WorldWideScience

Sample records for human gastrointestinal diseases

  1. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammations are a common element of many gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, and diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett's esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human gut and gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective of their fun......This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective...

  3. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sonja; Skrovanek; Katherine; DiGuilio; Robert; Bailey; William; Huntington; Ryan; Urbas; Barani; Mayilvaganan; Giancarlo; Mercogliano; James; M; Mullin

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases.

  4. Gastrointestinal polyposis in Cowden disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullnig, P.; Steiner, H.; Porsch, G.; Smolle, J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of Cowden disease (multiple hamartoma syndrome) with marked gastrointestinal polyposis is presented. The differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes is discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases.

  6. Radiological Atlas of Gastrointestinal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a reference to gastrointestinal disease and radiographic methods. It provides complete information for diagnosis and management and includes coverage of plain radiography, barium studies, water-soluble contrast studies, and more

  7. CT of acute gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computerized tomography in gastrointestinal tract diseases are presented, including advantages in surgical belly that are: anatomic clarity, wide survey and rapid performance. (C.G.C.)

  8. Significant Association of Streptococcus bovis with Malignant Gastrointestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Shanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus bovis is a Gram-positive bacterium causing serious human infections, including endocarditis and bacteremia, and is usually associated with underlying disease. The aims of the current study were to compare prevalence of the bacterium associated with malignant and nonmalignant gastrointestinal diseases and to determine the susceptibility of the isolated strains to different antimicrobial agents. The result showed that the prevalence of S. bovis in stool specimens from patients with malignant or with nonmalignant gastrointestinal diseases was statistically significant. This result may support the idea that there is correlation between S. bovis and the malignant gastrointestinal diseases.

  9. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  10. Gastrointestinal diseases in HIV/AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    an estimated 65 million people believed to be infected and an estimated. 14 000 new infections ... HIV is a staggering 10 - 20% of the population.1 Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases ... Oral fluconazole is a very successful treatment for ... candidiasis should be started on voriconazole.7 .... habits point to further investigation. An.

  11. Probiotics and Chronic Gastrointestinal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Francisco

    Human beings are associated in a symbiotic relationship with a huge population of microorganisms. During millennia, a considerable number of microbes have evolved and adapted to live and grow in the human intestine. The intestinal habitat of an individual contains billions of microorganisms including bacteria, protozoa, archaea, fungi, and viruses (Guarner and Malagelada, 2003; Ley et al., 2006), and the number of microbial cells within the gut lumen appears to be ten times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells of the human body. Some of these bacteria are potential pathogens and can be a source of infection and sepsis under some circumstances, for instance when the integrity of the bowel barrier is physically or functionally breached. However, growing evidence suggests that important health benefits to the human host derive from the constant interaction with its microbial guests. Recognition of these benefits in recent years is drawing particular attention to the functional implications of the gut microbial communities in host physiology.

  12. The Use of Probiotics in Gastrointestinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Madsen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are living microorganisms that can affect the host in a beneficial manner. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and activity of probiotic bacteria already established in the colon. Efficacy of probiotic compounds has been shown in a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. Lactobacillus GG alone, or the combination of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Streptococcus thermophilus, is effective in the treatment of Clostridium difficile, as well as in preventing the frequency and severity of infectious acute diarrhea in children. Prevention of antibiotic-induced diarrhea with the concomitant administration of either Lactobacillus GG or Saccharomyces boulardii has been demonstrated. The most successful studies involve the use of Lactobacillus GG at a dose of 1×1010 viable organisms per day and the yeast boulardii at a dose of 1 g/day. A probiotic preparation (VSL#3 - 6 g/day that uses a combination of three species of Bifidobacterium, four strains of Lactobacillus and one strain of Streptocccus has shown promise in maintaining remission in ulcerative colitis and pouchitis, as well as in preventing the postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease. The mechanism of action of probiotics may include receptor competition, effects on mucin secretion or probiotic immunomodulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Oral administration of probiotic compounds has been demonstrated to be well tolerated and safe. However, while probiotics have the potential to improve human health and to prevent and treat some diseases, major improvements are needed in labelling and quality assurance procedures for probiotic compounds. In addition, well planned and controlled clinical studies are necessary to delineate fully the potential for probiotic compounds.

  13. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, C.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and

  14. Gastrointestinal cancer after treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdwell, Sandra H.; Hancock, Steven L.; Varghese, Anna; Cox, Richard S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the risk of gastrointestinal cancer following Hodgkin's disease treatment according to age at treatment, type of treatment, and anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Cases were identified from the records of 2,441 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease between 1961 and 1994. Follow-up averaged 10.9 years, representing 26,590 person-years of observation. Relative risks (RR) for gastrointestinal cancer incidence and mortality were computed by comparison with expected annualized rates for a general population matched for age, sex, and race. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers developed in 25 patients. The incidence RR was 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-3.5] and mortality RR was 3.8 (CI, 2.4-4.7). Sites associated with significantly increased risks included the stomach [RR 7.3 (CI, 3.4-13.8)], small intestine [RR 11.6 (CI, 1.9-38.3)], and pancreas [RR 3.5 (CI, 1.1-8.5)]. Risk was significantly elevated after combined modality therapy, RR 3.9 (CI, 2.2-5.6). The risk after radiotherapy alone was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.4), not a statistically significant elevation. The RR for gastrointestinal cancer was greatest after treatment at young age and decreased with advancing age. It was significantly elevated within 10 years after treatment [RR 2.0 (CI, 1.1-3.5)] and increased further after 20 years [RR 6.1 (CI, 2.5-12.7)]. Risk assessed by attained age paralleled risk according to age at treatment. Fifteen cases of gastrointestinal cancers arose within the irradiation fields. Conclusion: Patients treated for Hodgkin's disease are at modestly increased risk for secondary gastrointestinal cancer, especially after combined modality therapy and treatment at a young age. Risk was highest more than 20 years after treatment, but was significantly elevated within 10 years. Gastrointestinal sites with increased risk included the stomach, pancreas, and small intestine

  15. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Gastrointestinal bleeding Matthew R Banks, Peter D Fairclough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Inflammatory bowel...

  16. Estrogen and its role in gastrointestinal health and disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Aisling M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: While the concept of a role of estrogen in gastrointestinal (in particular, colonic) malignancy has generated excitement in recent years, no review has examined the role of this potent and omnipresent steroid hormone in physiological states or its contribution to the development of benign pathological processes. Understanding these effects (and mechanisms therein) may provide a platform for a deeper understanding of more complex disease processes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database and the search terms were "estrogen," "estrogen AND gastrointestinal tract," "estrogen AND colon," "estrogen AND esophagus," "estrogen AND small intestine," "estrogen AND stomach," "estrogen AND gallbladder," and "estrogen AND motility." Bibliographies of extracted studies were further cross-referenced. In all, 136 full-text articles were selected for review. A logical organ-based approach was taken to enable extraction of data of clinical relevance and meaningful interpretation thereof. Insight is provided into the hypotheses, theories, controversies, and contradictions generated over the last five decades by extensive investigation of estrogen in human, animal, and cell models using techniques as diverse as autoradiographic studies of baboons to human population analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Effects from esophagus through to the colon and rectum are summarized in this first concise collection of data pertaining to estrogenic actions in gastrointestinal health and disease. Mechanisms of these actions are discussed where possible. Undoubtedly, this hormone exerts many actions yet to be elucidated, and its potential therapeutic applications remain, as yet, largely unexplored.

  17. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r 2 = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r 2 = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [Fourth Military Medical University, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli [Xidian University, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Wang, Min [Xi' an Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r{sup 2} = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r{sup 2} = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  19. Patient health communication mediating effects between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. ...

  20. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using 3 H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of 3 H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures

  1. Role of vitamins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Omar A; Chalhoub, Jean M; Sharara, Ala I

    2015-05-07

    A tremendous amount of data from research was published over the past decades concerning the roles of different vitamins in various gastrointestinal diseases. For instance, most vitamins showed an inverse relationship with the risk of colorectal carcinoma as well as other malignancies like gastric and esophageal cancer in observational trials, however interventional trials failed to prove a clear beneficial preventive role. On the other hand, more solid evidence was obtained from high quality studies for a role of certain vitamins in specific entities. Examples for this include the therapeutic role of vitamin E in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the additive role of vitamins B12 and D to the standard therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus, the role of vitamin C in reducing the risk of gallstones, the positive outcome with vitamin B12 in patients with aphthous stomatitis, and the beneficial effect of vitamin D and B1 in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Other potential uses are yet to be elaborated, like those on celiac disease, pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, cholestasis and other potential fields. Data from several ongoing interventional trials are expected to add to the current knowledge over the coming few years. Given that vitamin supplementation is psychologically accepted by patients as a natural compound with relative safety and low cost, their use should be encouraged in the fields where positive data are available.

  2. Bacterial Pollution in River Waters and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Rodríguez-Tapia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of Mexico’s most severe environmental problems is the high levels of pollution of many of its rivers. The present article focuses on the relationship between total coliform bacteria levels and the increase of human digestive tract diseases in the highly polluted Atoyac River in the central Mexican states of Puebla and Tlaxcala. Pollution has become a potential health hazard for people living in nearby river communities. Based on data collected from six of the most contaminated riverside municipalities, two environmental models were developed taking into consideration the health of the entire population, not simply that of its individual members. Such models estimate a health-disease function that confirm the link between Atoyac River pollution and the incidence of gastrointestinal diseases. The causal relation between pollution and gastrointestinal disease incentivizes the creation of epidemiological and public health programs aimed at reducing the environmental health impact of the pollution associated with the Atoyac River. The results presented here are the first of their kind of this river and will serve as basis for future research exploring other similarly contaminated riparian communities. As the causes of pollution are directly related to the economic development and population growth of the region, further research should be conducted for prevention of diseases, educational programs, water remediation and conservation programs that will have a positive impact on the quality of life of the population presently at risk.

  3. Bacterial Pollution in River Waters and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tapia, Lilia; Morales-Novelo, Jorge A

    2017-05-04

    Currently, one of Mexico's most severe environmental problems is the high levels of pollution of many of its rivers. The present article focuses on the relationship between total coliform bacteria levels and the increase of human digestive tract diseases in the highly polluted Atoyac River in the central Mexican states of Puebla and Tlaxcala. Pollution has become a potential health hazard for people living in nearby river communities. Based on data collected from six of the most contaminated riverside municipalities, two environmental models were developed taking into consideration the health of the entire population, not simply that of its individual members. Such models estimate a health-disease function that confirm the link between Atoyac River pollution and the incidence of gastrointestinal diseases. The causal relation between pollution and gastrointestinal disease incentivizes the creation of epidemiological and public health programs aimed at reducing the environmental health impact of the pollution associated with the Atoyac River. The results presented here are the first of their kind of this river and will serve as basis for future research exploring other similarly contaminated riparian communities. As the causes of pollution are directly related to the economic development and population growth of the region, further research should be conducted for prevention of diseases, educational programs, water remediation and conservation programs that will have a positive impact on the quality of life of the population presently at risk.

  4. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Dietlen, F; Cano-Contreras, A D; Sánchez-Maza, Y J; Espinosa-González, J M; Vázquez-Prieto, M Á; Valdés-de la O, E J; Díaz-Roesch, F; Carrasco-Arroniz, M Á; Cruz-Palacios, A; Grube-Pagola, P; Sumoza-Toledo, A; Vivanco-Cid, H; Mellado-Sánchez, G; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Silva-Cañetas, C S; Carrillo-Toledo, M G; Lagunes-Torres, R; Amieva-Balmori, M; Gómez-Castaño, P C; Reyes-Huerta, J U; Remes-Troche, J M

    2018-02-15

    Cancer is the result of the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It has recently been related to viral infections, one of which is human papillomavirus. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with digestive system cancers. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on patients with gastrointestinal cancer at 2public healthcare institutes in Veracruz. Two tumor samples were taken, one for histologic study and the other for DNA determination of human papillomavirus and its genotypes. Anthropometric variables, risk factors, sexual habits, tumor location, and histologic type of the cancer were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were determined using the SPSS version 24.0 program. Fifty-three patients were studied. They had gastrointestinal cancer located in: the colon (62.26%), stomach (18.87%), esophagus (7.55%), rectum (7.55%), and small bowel (3.77%). Human papillomavirus was identified in 11.32% of the patients, 66.7% of which corresponded to squamous cell carcinoma and 33.3% to adenocarcinoma. Only genotype 18 was identified. Mean patient age was 61.8±15.2 years, 56.60% of the patients were men, and 43.40% were women. A total of 15.8% of the patients had a family history of cancer and 31.6% had a personal history of the disease, 38.6% were tobacco smokers, and 61.4% consumed alcohol. Regarding sex, 5.3% of the patients said they were homosexual, 3.5% were bisexual, 29.8% engaged in oral sex, and 24.6% in anal sex. Our study showed that human papillomavirus infection was a risk factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancer, especially of squamous cell origin. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Traditional Persian topical medications for gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Dehghani Tafti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery across the skin is used for several millennia to ease gastrointestinal (GI ailments in Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM. TPM topical remedies are generally being applied on the stomach, lower abdomen, lower back and liver to alleviate GI illnesses such as dyspepsia, gastritis, GI ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal worms and infections. The aim of the present study is to survey the topical GI remedies and plant species used as ingredients for these remedies in TPM. In addition, pharmacological activities of the mentioned plants have been discussed. For this, we searched major TPM textbooks to find plants used to cure GI problems in topical use. Additionally, scientific databases were searched to obtain pharmacological data supporting the use of TPM plants in GI diseases. Rosa × damascena, Pistacia lentiscus, Malus domestica, Olea europaea and Artemisia absinthium are among the most frequently mentioned ingredients of TPM remedies. β-asarone, amygdalin, boswellic acids, guggulsterone, crocin, crocetin, isomasticadienolic acid, and cyclotides are the most important phytochemicals present in TPM plants with GI-protective activities. Pharmacological studies demonstrated GI activities for TPM plants supporting their extensive traditional use. These plants play pivotal role in alleviating GI disorders through exhibiting numerous activities including antispasmodic, anti-ulcer, anti-secretory, anti-colitis, anti-diarrheal, antibacterial and anthelmintic properties. Several mechanisms underlie these activities including the alleviation of oxidative stress, exhibiting cytoprotective activity, down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines, suppression of the cellular signaling pathways of inflammatory responses, improving re-epithelialization and angiogenesis, down-regulation of anti-angiogenic factors, blocking activity of acetylcholine, etc.

  6. Imaging of gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, Philip A

    2012-02-03

    Imaging of the abdomen for suspected gastrointestinal and hepatic disease during pregnancy is assuming greater importance. Like clinical evaluation, imaging of the abdomen and pelvis is challenging but is vitally important to prevent delayed diagnosis or unnecessary interventions. Also choice of imaging modality is influenced by factors which could impact on fetal safety such as the use of ionising radiation and magnetic resonance imaging. This article discusses important issues in imaging of gastrointestinal and hepatic disease in pregnancy and the puerperium.

  7. Impact of Oat-Based Products on Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staka Aiga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oat is rich in valuable nutrients. In comparison to other cereals, oat contains more total proteins, carbohydrate, fat, non-starch fibre, as well as unique antioxidants (one of them - avenanthramides, vitamins, and minerals. One of the most often studied components of oats is β-glucan - a type of soluble dietary fibre located throughout the starch endosperm, but with highest concentration in the bran. Many studies have shown the beneficial health effects of oat β-glucan as a soluble dietary fibre. Until now, most of the studies on this nutrient have been conducted in the cardiovascular and diabetology field. This article aimed to review the literature on studies that investigated the effects of oat-based products on human gastrointestinal tract - gastrointestinal microflora, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease as well as prevention/treatment of colorectal cancer. A literature search was conducted using PubMed database. More than 80 potential articles were identified, which were selected afterwards according to aims of our study. Studies done on human were preferred. A long-term dietary intake of oat-based products improves human intestinal microflora, could have benefits in irritable bowel syndrome, and probable effects were seen in patients with ulcerative colitis, but this remains to be proven. There are few studies regarding prevention/treatment of colorectal cancer and they do not show clear benefit nor provide recommendations.

  8. Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease in Sjogren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Yevgeniy; Salomon-Escoto, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SS) is a lymphocyte-mediated, infiltrative autoimmune disorder characterized by destruction of exocrine glands leading to secretory dysfunction. The typical manifestations include xerostomia and xerophthalmia; however, extensive gastrointestinal involvement is increasingly being recognized, emphasizing the variable and systemic nature of SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Diseases in Nigeria: Histopathologic Analysis of 74 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abudu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children are vulnerable to a vast number of diseases including gastrointestinal disorders, which may be associated with life threatening complications that sometimes result in mortality especially if left untreated. OBJECTIVE: To establish the age and sex distribution of children in the study population as well as the histopathological characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases that occurred in those children who were aged 14years and below in Sagamu, Southwestern Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Demographic data such as age, sex, and clinical summary of children in the study population were extracted from the medical records of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State from January 2003 to December 2009. Based on this information, a review of paraffin embedded blocks and slides as well as histopathological reports of gastrointestinal diseases that occurred in those children aged 14years and below was undertaken at the Morbid Anatomy Department of the hospital. RESULTS: Seventy–four cases of gastrointestinal diseases were seen in children aged 14years and below. The majority (39.2% of gastrointestinal diseases were accounted for by appendiceal lesions. Hirschsprung’s disease, intussusceptions, enterocolitis and jejunal atresia accounted for 29.7%, 10.8%, 6.8% and 4.1% of cases respectively. Adenocarcinoma of the intestine was the predominant gastrointestinal tumour, occurring in 5 out of 7 children. Two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were also seen. The ages of the children ranged from 2 to 14 years, with a mean age of 8.6years and a peak age incidence of gastrointestinal disease in the 10-14year age group. Male children were more commonly affected with the exception of appendiceal lesions, which occurred more in females (M:F ratio= 1.6:1.0. Acute suppurative appendicitis was the most prevalent lesion of the appendix, occurring in 13 out of 29 appendiceal lesions. Moderately differentiated to poorly

  10. Interventional therapy for gastrointestinal hemorrhage induced by Dieulafoy disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xiuqin; Yu Shiping; Zhang Jin; Zhang Caizhen; Yuan Wei; Meng Xiangwen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and assess the efficiency and clinical value of interventional therapy for gastrointestinal hemorrhage induced by Dieulafoy disease. Methods: Ten patients definitely diagnosed with Dieulafoy disease suffering from massive acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage received celiac arterial and left gastric arterial angiography, outcoming with 8 positively and 2 negative cases. Among them, 6 were embolized with gelfoam particles and the other two with aneurismal dilatation received gelfoam particles and spring steel coils; and one of the negtive cases was given hypophysin and without intervention to the other. Results: Among the 8 intra-arterial embolized cases, only 1 case rebleeded on the third day after gelfoam embolization, and then treated by surgical operation, and the rest 7 showed no rebleeding. One case with hypophysin treatment rehabilitated after one week. Conclusions: Interventional therapeutics is a safe and effective emergency management for gastrointestinal hemorrhage induced by Dieulafoy disease. (authors)

  11. Oligometastatic Disease in Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer - How to Proceed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Berlth, Felix; Plum, Patrick S; Betzler, Christopher; Stippel, Dirk L; Popp, Felix; Bruns, Christiane J

    2017-03-01

    In the present study we review and discuss the current evidence and suggest how to proceed in the management of oligometastatic disease in upper gastrointestinal cancer. An electronic search of the PubMed database for relevant articles was performed. Both the search for 'oligometastasis', 'oligometastases', 'oligometastatic', 'oligometastatic disease' as well as 'esophageal' and 'esophageal cancer' and the search for 'oligometastasis', 'oligometastases', 'oligometastatic', 'oligometastatic disease' as well as 'gastric', 'gastric cancer', 'stomach', and 'stomach cancer' yielded very few studies. Most data need to be extrapolated in general studies on oligometastatic diseases of different origins. No randomized controlled trial could be found. In the absence of data to formulate recommendations on how to proceed in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in upper gastrointestinal cancer, a more aggressive treatment of oligometastatic disease can be considered in patients whose tumors show a more favorable neoplastic behavior after the 'test of time'. The RENAISSANCE study will certainly deliver important data regarding this aspect.

  12. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, G J; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, C H

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Peptic ulcer disease Erik AJ Rauws, Guido NJ Tytgat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Emesis Gareth J Sanger, Paul LR Andrews...

  14. Gastrointestinal-active oligosaccharides from human milk and functional foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Keywords: human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), konjac glucomannan (KGM), breast milk, baby feces, gastrointestinal metabolization, blood-group specific conjugates, CE-LIF-MSn

    Oligosaccharides, as present in human milk or supplemented to food, are

  15. Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong-Seok Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients.

  16. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in gastrointestinal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin, also known as diferuloylmethane, is derived from the plant Curcuma longa and is the active ingredient of the spice turmeric. The therapeutic activities of curcumin for a wide variety of diseases such as diabetes, allergies, arthritis and other chronic and inflammatory diseases have been known for a long time. More recently, curcumin’s therapeutic potential for preventing and treating various cancers is being recognized. As curcumin’s therapeutic promise is being explored more system...

  17. Functional brain imaging of gastrointestinal sensation in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lukas Van Oudenhove; Steven J Coen; Qasim Aziz

    2007-01-01

    It has since long been known, from everyday experience as well as from animal and human studies, that psychological processes-both affective and cognitiveexert an influence on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function. More specifically, a link between psychological factors and visceral hypersensitivity has been suggested,mainly based on research in functional gastrointestinal disorder patients. However, until recently, the exact nature of this putative relationship remained unclear,mainly due to a lack of non-invasive methods to study the (neurobiological) mechanisms underlying this relationship in non-sleeping humans. As functional brain imaging, introduced in visceral sensory neuroscience some 10 years ago, does provide a method for in vivo study of brain-gut interactions, insight into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral sensation in general and the influence of psychological factors more particularly,has rapidly grown. In this article, an overview of brain imaging evidence on gastrointestinal sensation will be given, with special emphasis on the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between affective & cognitive processes and visceral sensation. First, the reciprocal neural pathways between the brain and the gut (braingut axis) will be briefly outlined, including brain imaging evidence in healthy volunteers. Second, functional brain imaging studies assessing the influence of psychological factors on brain processing of visceral sensation in healthy humans will be discussed in more detail.Finally, brain imaging work investigating differences in brain responses to visceral distension between healthy volunteers and functional gastrointestinal disorder patients will be highlighted.

  18. Human gastrointestinal tolerance to D-tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemann, B; Toubro, S; Astrup, A

    1999-04-01

    D-Tagatose is a stereoisomer of D-fructose which is poorly absorbed in the small intestine and may, therefore, have potential as a reduced calorie bulk sweetener. However, one of the major limitations is the use of malabsorbed sugars is that their consumption may be associated with gastric discomfort. This is due to the osmotic impact of the sugar molecules remaining in the gut lumen for a prolonged period. We have performed a series of studies in which gastrointestinal symptoms have been recorded after the consumption of 29 or 30 g of D-tagatose. Nausea and diarrhea were reported with an incidence of 15.1 and 31.5%, respectively, in 73 healthy young male subjects in a screening study. Increased flatulence after D-tagatose was frequently reported in all the studies and the flatulence did not decline during a 15-day period with intake of 30 g in one dose daily. In most cases, symptoms were reported as light or moderate. However, the results suggest that 30 g taken at one time may be above the dose which should be recommended for ordinary use. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Diversity of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the early days of microbiology, more than a century ago, representatives of over 400 different microbial species have been isolated and fully characterized from human gastrointestinal samples. However, during the past decade molecular ecological studies based on ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences

  20. Gastrointestinal Microbiota and Some Children Diseases: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabata Koester Weber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial colonization is defined immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of immune system leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K, stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favoring the health of the host. This paper is a review about modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention and adjuvant treatment of pediatric gastrointestinal diseases.

  1. New techniques in the tissue diagnosis of gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles H Knowles; Joanne E Martin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders of children and adults in which symptoms are presumed or proven to arise as a result of neuromuscular (including interstitial cell of Cajal) dysfunction. Common to most of these diseases are symptoms of impaired motor activity which manifest as slowed or obstructed transit with or without evidence of transient or persistent radiological visceral dilatation. A variety of histopathological techniques and allied investigations are being increasingly applied to tissue biopsies from such patients. This review outlines some of the more recent advances in this field, particularly in the most contentious area of small bowel disease manifesting as intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  2. Review of the role of probiotics in gastrointestinal diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián Domingo, Juan José

    Probiotics may act as biological agents that modify the intestinal microbiota and certain cytokine profiles, which can lead to an improvement in certain gastrointestinal diseases. To conduct a review of the evidence of the role of probiotics in certain gastrointestinal diseases in adults. Review conducted using appropriate descriptors, filters and limits in the PubMed database (MEDLINE). The MeSH terms used were Probiotics [in the title] AND Gastrointestinal Diseases, with the following limits or filters: Types of study: Systematic Reviews, Meta-Analysis, Guideline, Practice Guideline, Consensus Development Conference (and Consensus Development Conference NIH), Randomized Controlled Trial, Controlled Clinical Trial and Clinical Trial; age: adults (19 or older); language: English and Spanish; in humans, and with at least one abstract. Full texts of all the Systematic Reviews and meta-analyses directly related to the review's objective were obtained, as well as the Randomised Controlled Trials of the studies that were considered relevant and of sufficient quality for this review. Certain probiotics, different for each process, have proven to be effective and beneficial in cases of acute infectious diarrhoea, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea, pouchitis and Helicobacter pylori infection eradication. Although some probiotics have not demonstrated any benefit, there are certain gastrointestinal diseases in which the use of probiotics, true biological agents, can be recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  3. Myiasis gastrointestinal humana por Eristalis tenax Gastrointestinal human myiasis for Eristalis tenax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kun

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Son caracterizadas las myiasis registradas en Bariloche y establecidas las condiciones probables bajo las cuales se produjeron las infestaciones. Las larvas obtenidas a partir de heces de 2 pacientes fueron identificadas como Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphidae de acuerdo a las claves de Hartley (1961 y Organización Panamericana de la Salud (1962. Estos 2 casos de myiasis gastrointestinal humana constituyen los primeros registrados en Bariloche (Patagonia, Argentina y sus características responden a las registradas para esta especie de Díptera en otras partes del mundo. La falta de control específico en el sistema domiciliario de suministro de agua ha sido la causa más probable de la infestación. Este registro extiende la distribución de E. tenax y de las myiasis gastrointestinales humanas en América del Sur hasta los 41º 03' S.Foram caracterizadas as miasis registradas em Bariloche (Patagonia, Argentina e estabelecidas as prováveis condições sob as quais são produzidas as infestações. As larvas obtidas a partir das fezes de dois pacientes foram identificadas como Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphdae. Esses dois casos de miasis gastrointestinal humana foram os primeiros registrados em Bariloche, Argentina, e suas características respondem às registradas para esta espécie de Diptera em outras partes do mundo. A falta de controle específico no sistema domiciliário de abastecimento de água tem sido a causa mais provável de infestação. Este registro amplia a distribuição de E. tenax e das miasis gastrointestinais humanas em América do Sul até os 41º 03's.The myiasis observed in Bariloche are characterized and the probable conditions under which the infestations took place established. The larvae obtained from faeces of 2 patients were identified as Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphidae according to Hartley (1961 and Organización Panamericana de la Salud keys (1962. These 2 cases of human gastrointestinal myiasis were the

  4. Oligometastatic Disease in Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer – How to Proceed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Berlth, Felix; Plum, Patrick S.; Betzler, Christopher; Stippel, Dirk L.; Popp, Felix; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the present study we review and discuss the current evidence and suggest how to proceed in the management of oligometastatic disease in upper gastrointestinal cancer. Methods An electronic search of the PubMed database for relevant articles was performed. Results Both the search for ‘oligometastasis', ‘oligometastases', ‘oligometastatic’, ‘oligometastatic disease’ as well as ‘esophageal’ and ‘esophageal cancer’ and the search for ‘oligometastasis', ‘oligometastases', ‘oligometastatic’, ‘oligometastatic disease’ as well as ‘gastric’, ‘gastric cancer’, ‘stomach’, and ‘stomach cancer’ yielded very few studies. Most data need to be extrapolated in general studies on oligometastatic diseases of different origins. No randomized controlled trial could be found. Conclusion In the absence of data to formulate recommendations on how to proceed in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in upper gastrointestinal cancer, a more aggressive treatment of oligometastatic disease can be considered in patients whose tumors show a more favorable neoplastic behavior after the ‘test of time’. The RENAISSANCE study will certainly deliver important data regarding this aspect. PMID:28612014

  5. [Neurological and psychiatric aspects of some gastrointestinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2008-11-02

    The gastrointestinal tract is controlled by the independent enteric nervous system. It is also closely connected to the central nervous system, and bi-directional communication exists between them. The communication involves neural pathways as well as immune and endocrine mechanisms. The brain-gut axis plays a prominent role in the modulation of gut functions. Signals from different sources (e.g. sound, sight, smell, somatic and visceral sensations, pain) reach the brain. These inputs are modified by memory, cognition and affective mechanisms and integrated within the neural circuits of the central nervous system, spinal cord, autonomic and enteral nervous systems. These inputs can have physiologic effects, such as changes in motility, secretion, immune function, and blood flow to the gastrointestinal tract. One of the most important neurotransmitters is serotonin that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the most common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder: the irritable bowel syndrome. It is a biopsychosocial disease, resulting from the dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. Endogenous pain facilitation rather than inhibition, pathologic gradation of visceral perception and reduced threshold for pain are all evident in these patients. Abuse history is common in their anamnesis. Exaggerated conscientiousness, perfectionism, oversensitivity, feeling of deficiency in effectiveness, and higher demand for social parity, neuroticism and alexithymia have been detected among their constant personality features. Females are also characterized by gender role conflict and low assertiveness. Antidepressants and psychotherapy have important roles in their treatment. Also patients with inflammatory bowel disease are characterized by neuroticism and alexithymia and altered mother-child attachment is often described in their anamnesis. Autonomic neuropathy is a frequent and early neurological complication. Reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea mutually generate

  6. [COMMUNICATION AND HEALTH OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriček, G; Cerovečki, V; Adžić, Z Ožvačić

    2015-11-01

    Although survey results indicate clear connection between the physician-patient communication and health outcomes, mechanisms of their action are still insufficiently clear. The aim was to investigate the specificity of communication with patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases and the impact of good communication on measurable outcomes. We performed PubMed (Medline) search using the following key words: communication, health outcomes, and gastrointestinal diseases. Seven pathways through which communication can lead to better health include increased access to care, greater patient knowledge and shared understanding, higher quality medical decisions, enhanced therapeutic alliances, increased social support, patient agency and empowerment, and better management of emotions. Although these pathways were explored with respect to cancer care, they are certainly applicable to other health conditions as well, including the care of patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. Although proposing a number of pathways through which communication can lead to improved health, it should be emphasized that the relative importance of a particular pathway will depend on the outcome of interest, the health condition, where the patient is in the illness trajectory, and the patient’s life circumstances. Besides, research increasingly points to the importance of placebo effect, and it is recommended that health professionals encourage placebo effect by applying precisely targeted communication skills, as the unquestionable and successful part of many treatments. It is important that the clinician knows the possible positive and negative effects of communication on health outcomes, and in daily work consciously maximizes therapeutic effects of communication, reaching its proximal (understanding, satisfaction, clinician-patient agreement, trust, feeling known, rapport, motivation) and intermediate outcomes (access to care, quality medical decision, commitment to

  7. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S; Medland, Julia E; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-12-15

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S.; Medland, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. PMID:26451004

  9. Low serum myeloperoxidase in autistic children with gastrointestinal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Russo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthony J Russo1, Arthur Krigsman2, Bryan Jepson2, Andy Wakefield21Research Director, Health Research Institute/Pfeiffer Treatment Center, Warrenville, IL, USA; 2Thoughtful House Center for Children, Austin, TX, USAAim: To assess serum myeloperoxidase (MPO levels in autistic children with severe gastrointestinal (GI disease and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between serum MPO concentration and inflammatory GI disease, including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA, previously seen in a subgroup of autistic children.Subjects and methods: Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (most with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach, and 48 controls (12 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease, 20 age-matched children without autism or GI disease, and 16 nonautistic individuals with no family history of autism were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays designed to quantitate serum MPO levels. MPO serum concentration of autistic children with GI disease was compared to GI disease severity (including LNH and erythema and presence of ANCA.Results: We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had low serum levels of MPO. However, there was no significant relationship between these levels and severity of GI disease, including the presence of ANCA.Discussion: These results suggest a relationship between low MPO levels and GI disease seen in a subpopulation of autism spectrum disorders individuals. MPO concentration may therefore be a useful biomarker for GI disease in this group of autistic children.Keywords: autism spectrum disorders, autism, myeloperoxidase, GI disease, oxidative stress

  10. Determination of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens by detecting of the cpa and cpe genes in stool samples of human origin, associated to gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropeza Barrios, Gletty

    2014-01-01

    A molecular methodology is provided to the Centro Nacional de Referencia de Bacteriologia (CNRB) of the Instituto Costarricense de Investigacion y Ensenanza en Nutricion y Salud. An opportune diagnosis is realized of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in stool samples of sporadic cases and cases associated to foodborne disease outbreaks. DNA extraction of the white microorganism was performed through the methodology implemented in the CNRB. The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were adapted and standardized to establish the identification of C. perfringens to species level and detection of cpe gene coding for enterotoxin. The sensitivity of the method was determined in a selective culture medium for C. perfringens (Tryptose sulfite cycloserine Agar). A detection limit of about 2,3 x 10 4 CFU/ml was reached for the cpe gene and at least 2,8 x 10 2 CFU/ml for the cpa gene. Retrospective analysis of 61 samples of diarrheal stool suspicious by C. perfringens is performed to evaluate the efficacy of the technique. Three outbreaks caused by C. perfringens were identified and a 10% of positivity in the samples were obtained analyzed during the period between July 2012-March 2014 [es

  11. [Gastrointestinal diseases and abdominal pain in combat veterans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal'tsev, A I; Torgashov, M N; Popova, O S

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the role of consequences of combat stress in the development of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases. One hundred and sixty-one combat veterans aged 24 to 69 years were examined. All underwent a clinical and neurological examination using the McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), Beck depression inventory, Kotenev trauma stress questionnaire, and visual analogue scale to determine pain intensity. Anxiety, impairments in memory and sleep, and depression were identified. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to estimate quality of life in the patients. Gastric secretory function was investigated; esophagogastroduodenoscopy, X-ray and ultrasound studies, clinical and biochemical blood tests, coprological examinations, fecal tests for dysbiosis, if indicated, occult blood were made. Combat stress and its consequences as posttraumatic stress disorder have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GIT diseases and in the development of chronic abdominal pain. GIT diseases in combat veterans are in larger measure a sequel of impaired processes of adjustment to combat stress. Chronic abdominal pains were heterogeneous. On the one hand, chronic GIT disease serves as a source of pain syndrome; on the other hand, the central nervous system is of importance in the development of chronic abdominal pain. In addition to therapy for GIT and hepatobiliary diseases, the treatment of GIT diseases in this category of patients involves psychotherapy and neuroprotection, aimed at reducing the consequences of combat stress in combat veterans.

  12. Psychological disorders in gastrointestinal disease: epiphenomenon, cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Eric; Rezaie, Ali; Riddle, Mark; Pimentel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Psychological disorders have been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for decades in the absence of other objective etiology. However, such associations are also evident in other chronic diseases with more clearly defined pathogenesis such as ulcerative colitis. In this study, we examined the prevalence and severity of psychological disorders among IBS and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients relative to healthy controls. A review was conducted of English-language literature to identify case-control studies reporting the prevalence of depression or anxiety in IBS and UC populations relative to healthy controls. Our primary endpoint was the pooled prevalence or average score of depression or anxiety in an IBS or UC population relative to healthy control. Seven case-control studies evaluating IBS and three evaluating UC were included. All IBS and UC studies reported excess prevalence and severity of depression as well as anxiety, relative to healthy controls. The prevalence of depression in excess of healthy controls was 39% in UC case-control trials and 33% in IBS studies, and excess anxiety was present in UC (42%) and IBS (19%) case-control trials as well. Anxiety and depression scores were higher (representing more severe symptoms) in both UC and IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with both IBS and UC. The non-specific association between these psychological and gastrointestinal disorders could suggest that chronic gastrointestinal illness might affect psychosocial behavior.

  13. Gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal presentation in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Volta, Umberto; Manenti, Stefania; Caio, Giacomo; Giovenali, Paolo; Becheanu, Gabriel; Diculescu, Mircea; Pellegrino, Salvatore; Magazzù, Giuseppe; Casella, Giovanni; Di Bella, Camillo; Decarli, Nicola; Biancalani, Mauro; Bassotti, Gabrio; Hogg-Kollars, Sabine; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2013-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may have a variety of different presentations. This study has aimed to explore the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms in patients with CD according to data collected in Italy and Romania (Europe) and Iran (Middle East). This is a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in Iran, Romania and Italy with data collection during the period from May 2009 - May 2011. For each center we included only patients with CD that was confirmed by endoscopy, small bowel biopsies and positive serology. GI symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, nausea and vomiting, weight loss and flatulence, as well as additional signs and symptoms of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), osteoporosis, hypertransaminasemia, and other related abnormalities were collected. Overall, 323 women and 127 men, whose mean age at diagnosis was 34.2 ± 16.47 years were included in this study. Of these, 157 subjects (34.9%) reported at least one GI symptom. The majority of cases had the following primary presenting GI symptoms: diarrhea (13.6%), dyspepsia and constipation (4.0%). Other disease symptoms were reported by 168 (37.3%) patients. The most presenting non-GI symptoms in the majority of cases were anemia (20.7%) and osteopenia (6%). There were statistically significant differences between the majority of symptoms when we compared the reported clinical symptoms from different countries. This study indicated that upper abdominal disorders such as abdominal pain and dyspepsia were the most common primary complaints among European patients, whereas Iranian patients had complaints of diarrhea and bloating as the classic presentations of CD. For non-GI symptoms, anemia was the most frequent complaint for both Iranian and Italian patients; however it was significantly higher in Iranians.

  14. Roles and Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils in Immunity and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils have been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergy reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system. PMID:25049430

  15. Generation of Gastrointestinal Organoids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Jorge O; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, developmental biologists have discovered fundamental mechanisms by which organs form in developing embryos. With this information it is now possible to generate human "organoids" by the stepwise differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells using a process that recapitulates organ development. For the gastrointestinal tract, one of the first key steps is the formation of definitive endoderm and mesoderm, a process that relies on the TGFb molecule Nodal. Endoderm is then patterned along the anterior-posterior axis, with anterior endoderm forming the foregut and posterior endoderm forming the mid and hindgut. A-P patterning of the endoderm is accomplished by the combined activities of Wnt, BMP, and FGF. High Wnt and BMP promote a posterior fate, whereas repressing these pathways promotes an anterior endoderm fate. The stomach derives from the posterior foregut and retinoic acid signaling is required for promoting a posterior foregut fate. The small and large intestine derive from the mid and hindgut, respectively.These stages of gastrointestinal development can be precisely manipulated through the temporal activation and repression of the pathways mentioned above. For example, stimulation of the Nodal pathway with the mimetic Activin A, another TGF-β superfamily member, can trigger the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into definitive endoderm (D'Amour et al., Nat Biotechnol 23:1534-1541, 2005). Exposure of definitive endoderm to high levels of Wnt and FGF promotes the formation of posterior endoderm and mid/hindgut tissue that expresses CDX2. Mid-hindgut spheroids that are cultured in a three-dimensional matrix form human intestinal organoids (HIOs) that are small intestinal in nature Spence et al., Nature 2011. In contrast, activation of FGF and Wnt in the presence of the BMP inhibitor Noggin promotes the formation of anterior endoderm and foregut tissues that express SOX2. These SOX2-expressing foregut spheroids can be

  16. Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorder in Coeliac Disease: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis N. F. Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder is a rare disorder characterised by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. There are various gastrointestinal manifestations with eosinophilic ascites being the most unusual and rare presentation. Diagnosis requires high index of suspicion and exclusion of various disorders associated with peripheral eosinophilia. There are no previous case reports to suggest an association between eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder and coeliac disease in adults. We report a case of eosinophilic ascites and gastroenteritis in a 30-year-old woman with a known history of coeliac disease who responded dramatically to a course of steroids.

  17. Fecal pancreatic elastase-1 levels in older individuals without known gastrointestinal diseases or diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idziak Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural changes occur in the pancreas as a part of the natural aging process. With aging, also the incidence of maldigestive symptoms and malnutrition increases, raising the possibility that these might be caused at least in part by inadequate pancreatic enzyme secretion due to degenerative processes and damage of the gland. Fecal elastase-1 is a good marker of pancreatic exocrine secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the fecal elastase-1 levels among over 60 years old Finnish and Polish healthy individuals without any special diet, known gastrointestinal disease, surgery or diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 159 patients participated in this cross-sectional study. 106 older individuals (aged 60-92 years were recruited from outpatient clinics and elderly homes. They were divided to three age groups: 60-69 years old (n = 31; 70-79 years old (n = 38 and over 80 years old (n = 37. 53 young subjects (20-28 years old were investigated as controls. Inclusion criteria were age over 60 years, normal status and competence. Exclusion criteria were any special diet, diabetes mellitus, any known gastrointestinal disease or prior gastrointestinal surgery. Fecal elastase-1 concentration was measured from stool samples with an ELISA that uses two monoclonal antibodies against different epitopes of human elastase-1. Results Fecal elastase-1 concentrations correlated negatively with age (Pearson r = -0,3531, P P Conclusion In our study one fifth of healthy older individuals without any gastrointestinal disorder, surgery or diabetes mellitus suffer from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and might benefit from enzyme supplementation therapy.

  18. Delay in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Patients Without Gastrointestinal Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Marco A; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Sinacore, James; Winterfield, Laura; Venu, Mukund

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the delay in diagnosis of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease in those who present with gastrointestinal complaints vs nongastrointestinal complaints at our tertiary care center. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Celiac disease can have variable clinical presentations; it can be characterized by predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, or it may present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 687 adult patients who carried the diagnosis of celiac disease. Patients included had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were categorized based on presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms prior to their diagnosis. There were 101 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease that met inclusion criteria. Fifty-two patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and 49 had nongastrointestinal complaints. Results from Mann-Whitney statistical analysis showed a median delay in diagnosis of 2.3 months for the gastrointestinal symptoms group and 42 months for the nongastrointestinal group (P symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Of patients with nongastrointestinal symptoms, 69.4% had anemia, compared with 11.5% of the gastrointestinal symptom group (P symptom group, 68%, were noted to have abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. No sex differences were noted on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups (P = .997). Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surveillance of gastrointestinal disease in France using drug sales data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivette, Mathilde; Mueller, Judith E; Crépey, Pascal; Bar-Hen, Avner

    2014-09-01

    Drug sales data have increasingly been used for disease surveillance during recent years. Our objective was to assess the value of drug sales data as an operational early detection tool for gastroenteritis epidemics at national and regional level in France. For the period 2008-2013, we compared temporal trends of drug sales for the treatment of gastroenteritis with trends of cases reported by a Sentinel Network of general practitioners. We benchmarked detection models to select the one with the best sensitivity, false alert proportion and timeliness, and developed a prospective framework to assess the operational performance of the system. Drug sales data allowed the detection of seasonal gastrointestinal epidemics occurring in winter with a distinction between prescribed and non-prescribed drugs. Sales of non-prescribed drugs allowed epidemic detection on average 2.25 weeks earlier than Sentinel data. These results confirm the value of drug sales data for real-time monitoring of gastroenteritis epidemic activity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Natural products and microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Allen K; Papineni, Rao V L; Umar, Shahid

    2014-07-01

    The human intestinal tract harbors a complex ecosystem of commensal bacteria that play a fundamental role in the well-being of their host. There is a general consensus that diet rich in plant-based foods has many advantages in relation to the health and well-being of an individual. In adults, diets that have a high proportion of fruit and vegetables and a low consumption of meat are associated with a highly diverse microbiota and are defined by a greater abundance of Prevotella compared with Bacteroides, whereas the reverse is associated with a diet that contains a low proportion of plant-based foods. In a philosophical term, our consumption of processed foods, widespread use of antibiotics and disinfectants, and our modern lifestyle may have forever altered our ancient gut microbiome. We may never be able to identify or restore our microbiomes to their ancestral state, but dietary modulation to manipulate specific gut microbial species or groups of species may offer new therapeutic approaches to conditions that are prevalent in modern society, such as functional gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, and age-related nutritional deficiency. We believe that this will become an increasingly important area of health research. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Chemoprevention in Gastrointestinal Physiology and Disease. Natural products and microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Allen K.; Papineni, Rao V. L.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal tract harbors a complex ecosystem of commensal bacteria that play a fundamental role in the well-being of their host. There is a general consensus that diet rich in plant-based foods has many advantages in relation to the health and well-being of an individual. In adults, diets that have a high proportion of fruit and vegetables and a low consumption of meat are associated with a highly diverse microbiota and are defined by a greater abundance of Prevotella compared with Bacteroides, whereas the reverse is associated with a diet that contains a low proportion of plant-based foods. In a philosophical term, our consumption of processed foods, widespread use of antibiotics and disinfectants, and our modern lifestyle may have forever altered our ancient gut microbiome. We may never be able to identify or restore our microbiomes to their ancestral state, but dietary modulation to manipulate specific gut microbial species or groups of species may offer new therapeutic approaches to conditions that are prevalent in modern society, such as functional gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, and age-related nutritional deficiency. We believe that this will become an increasingly important area of health research. PMID:24789206

  2. Health-related quality of life in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of our study was to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and organic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases with an age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-matched healthy sample across GI diagnostic groups and with one ...

  3. Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Crohn Disease: Histopathologic and Endoscopic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Liege; Hernandez-Oquet, Rafael Enrique; Deshpande, Amar R; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-11-01

    Studies describing the prevalence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) Crohn disease (CD) and its histopathologic changes have been inconsistent as a result of different definitions used for upper GI involvement, diverse populations, and varying indications for endoscopy. We reviewed the literature describing endoscopic findings and histologic lesions in gastric and duodenal mucosa of patients with established CD. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for gastroduodenal biopsy findings in patients with CD from 1970 to 2014. We included all retrospective and prospective studies in adults. We calculated the prevalence of the most common endoscopic and histopathological findings among patients with overall CD and upper GI CD. Of the 385 articles identified, 20 eligible studies were included. A total of 2511 patients had CD and 815 had upper GI CD. In the CD group, the most common histopathological finding was nonspecific gastric inflammation in 32% of patients, followed by gastric granuloma in 7.9%. Focal gastritis was prevalent in 30.9% of patients. In the upper GI CD group, gastric inflammation was present in 84% of patients, followed by duodenal inflammation in 28.2% and gastric granuloma in 23.2%. The most common gastric endoscopic finding in patients with CD was erythema in 5.9%, followed by erosions in 3.7%. Duodenal endoscopic findings included ulcers and erythema in 5.3% and 3.0% of patients, respectively. We found a prevalence of 34% for CD involving the upper GI tract across these 20 studies. Routine upper endoscopy with biopsies of the upper GI tract in the diagnostic workup of patients with CD can correctly classify the distribution and extent of the disease.

  4. [Characterization, influence and manipulation of the gastrointestinal microbiota in health and disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mazcorro, José F; Garza-González, Elvira; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia G; Tamayo, José L

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of microorganisms that are indispensable for health. The gastrointestinal microbiota can be studied using culture and molecular methods. The applications of massive sequencing are constantly increasing, due to their high yield, increasingly accessible costs, and the availability of free software for data analysis. The present article provides a detailed review of a large number of studies on the gastrointestinal microbiota and its influence on human health; particular emphasis is placed on the evidence suggesting a relationship between the gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem and diverse physiological and immune/inflammatory processes. Discussion of the articles analyzed combines a medical approach and current concepts of microbial molecular ecology. The present revision aims to be useful to those interested in the gastrointestinal microbiota and its possible alteration to maintain, re-establish and enhance health in the human host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with End -Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfahani S.T

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to define the prevalence of the upper Gastrointestinal (GI lesions, dyspeptic symptoms, H.pylori infection, and the impact of duration of dialysis on upper GI symptoms and lesions of children with End-stage renal disease. We studied 69 children with ESRD who were under regular hemodialysis therapy in our department. The age of the patients were between 4-18 years (mean: 11.3. 57(82.6% of 69 patients had GI symptoms and 12(17.4% were symptom free, the prevalence of each symptom in 57 symptomatic children was as follows: anorexia 48(84.2%, nausea/vomiting 39 (68.4%, belching/heartburn 20(35%, abdominal distention 15(26.3%, and epigastric pain 8(14%. 65(92.4% of 69 patients with ESRD had pathologic lesions and the most common lesion was gastritis .There was no case of gastric angiodysplasia in our patients. 15(21.7% of 69 patients had H. pylori infection. The prevalence of H.pylori infection in non-uremic children with upper GI symptoms is about 27% in our pediatric gastroenterology department, so there was no significant difference in prevalence of H.pylori infection between uremic and non-uremic children in our study (p value = 0.4735. There was no significant relationship between duration of dialysis and dyspeptic symptoms or upper GI lesions (p values were 0.8775 and 0.7435, respectively. Conclusions: Upper GI disorders are very common in children with ESRD, even when they have no upper GI symptoms, the most common lesion is gastritis. The prevalence of H.pylori infection is not different between children with ESRD and non-uremic children with upper GI symptoms, and duration of hemodialysis therapy has no significant effect on prevalence of GI symptoms and lesions.

  6. Probiotic-based strategies for therapeutic and prophylactic use against multiple gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natallia V Varankovich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria offer a number of potential health benefits when administered in sufficient amounts that in part include reducing the number of harmful organisms in the intestine, producing antimicrobial substances and stimulating the body's immune response. However, precisely elucidating the probiotic effect of a specific bacterium has been challenging due to the complexity of the gut’s microbial ecosystem and a lack of definitive means for its characterization. This review provides an overview of widely-used and recently-described probiotics, their impact on the human’s gut microflora as a preventative treatment of disease, human/animal models being used to help show efficacy, and discusses the potential use of probiotics in gastrointestinal diseases associated with antibiotic administration.

  7. The human gastrointestinal microbiota - An unexplored frontier for pharmaceutical discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.; Bouwman, J.; Venema, K.; Montijn, R.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT) harbors microorganisms (the microbiota) of vast phylogentic, genomic, and metabolic diversity, and recent years have seen a rapid development in the techniques for studying these complex microbial ecosystems. It is increasingly apparent that the GIT

  8. Modulation of the Gastrointestinal Microbiome with Nondigestible Fermentable Carbohydrates To Improve Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deehan, Edward C; Duar, Rebbeca M; Armet, Anissa M; Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Jin, Mingliang; Walter, Jens

    2017-09-01

    There is a clear association between the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome and the development of chronic noncommunicable diseases, providing a rationale for the development of strategies that target the GI microbiota to improve human health. In this article, we discuss the potential of supplementing the human diet with nondigestible fermentable carbohydrates (NDFCs) to modulate the composition, structure, diversity, and metabolic potential of the GI microbiome in an attempt to prevent or treat human disease. The current concepts by which NDFCs can be administered to humans, including prebiotics, fermentable dietary fibers, and microbiota-accessible carbohydrates, as well as the mechanisms by which these carbohydrates exert their health benefits, are discussed. Epidemiological research presents compelling evidence for the health effects of NDFCs, with clinical studies providing further support for some of these benefits. However, rigorously designed human intervention studies with well-established clinical markers and microbial endpoints are still essential to establish (i) the clinical efficiency of specific NDFCs, (ii) the causal role of the GI microbiota in these effects, (iii) the underlying mechanisms involved, and (iv) the degree by which inter-individual differences between GI microbiomes influence these effects. Such studies would provide the mechanistic understanding needed for a systematic application of NDFCs to improve human health via GI microbiota modulation while also allowing the personalization of these dietary strategies.

  9. NOD2/CARD15 genotype and common gastrointestinal diseases in 43 600 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    heterozygotes. Cumulative incidences differed by genotype for appendicitis (log-rank P = 0.02), anal fissure, fistula and abscess (P = 0.003) and gastrointestinal cancer (P = 0.004), but not for any of the other endpoints. Compared with non-carriers, age and sex adjusted hazard ratios were 2.7 (95% CI 1...... appendicitis, 646 irritable bowel syndrome, 1301 infectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, 681 anal fissure, fistula and abscess, 826 gastrointestinal cancer and 161 developed cancer in liver and pancreas. Results. Some 89% were non-carriers, 11% heterozygotes, 0.15% homozygotes and 0.23% compound.......4-5.5) for appendicitis amongst compound heterozygotes, 3.2 (1.3-7.8) for anal fissure, fistula and abscess amongst compound heterozygotes, and 3.8 (1.6-9.2) for gastrointestinal cancer amongst homozygotes, whilst other genotypes did not have increased risk. The increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer amongst...

  10. NOD2/CARD15 genotype and common gastrointestinal diseases in 43 600 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    appendicitis, 646 irritable bowel syndrome, 1301 infectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, 681 anal fissure, fistula and abscess, 826 gastrointestinal cancer and 161 developed cancer in liver and pancreas. Results. Some 89% were non-carriers, 11% heterozygotes, 0.15% homozygotes and 0.23% compound...... heterozygotes. Cumulative incidences differed by genotype for appendicitis (log-rank P = 0.02), anal fissure, fistula and abscess (P = 0.003) and gastrointestinal cancer (P = 0.004), but not for any of the other endpoints. Compared with non-carriers, age and sex adjusted hazard ratios were 2.7 (95% CI 1.......4-5.5) for appendicitis amongst compound heterozygotes, 3.2 (1.3-7.8) for anal fissure, fistula and abscess amongst compound heterozygotes, and 3.8 (1.6-9.2) for gastrointestinal cancer amongst homozygotes, whilst other genotypes did not have increased risk. The increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer amongst...

  11. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  12. Pneumomediastinum: An unusual complication of acute gastrointestinal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, III, W W; Merten, D F; Kirks, D R

    1985-02-01

    Atraumatic of primary pneumomediastinum is an uncommon complication of severe retching and vomiting associated with acute gastrointestinal disorders. In two cases pneumomediastinum was the presenting radiographic abnormality; one patient presented with acute gastroenteritis, and the other present with duodenal obstruction due to hematoma. The pathogenesis of pneumomediastinum in these patients is presented.

  13. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  14. Transcription factors GATA-4 and GATA-6 in normal and neoplastic human gastrointestinal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäki Markku

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human gastrointestinal mucosa regenerates vigorously throughout life, but the factors controlling cell fate in mature mucosa are poorly understood. GATA transcription factors direct cell proliferation and differentiation in many organs, and are implicated in tumorigenesis. GATA-4 and GATA-6 are considered crucial for the formation of murine gastrointestinal mucosa, but their role in human gastrointestinal tract remains unexplored. We studied in detail the expression patterns of these two GATA factors and a GATA-6 down-stream target, Indian hedgehog (Ihh, in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa. Since these factors are considered important for proliferation and differentiation, we also explored the possible alterations in their expression in gastrointestinal neoplasias. The expression of the carcinogenesis-related protein Indian hedgehog was also investigated in comparison to GATA factors. Methods Samples of normal and neoplastic gastrointestinal tract from children and adults were subjected to RNA in situ hybridization with 33P labelled probes and immunohistochemistry, using an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase system. The pathological tissues examined included samples of chronic and atrophic gastritis as well as adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the colon and rectum. Results GATA-4 was abundant in the differentiated epithelial cells of the proximal parts of the gastrointestinal tract but was absent from the distal parts. In contrast, GATA-6 was expressed throughout the gastrointestinal epithelium, and in the distal gut its expression was most intense at the bottom of the crypts, i.e. cells with proliferative capacity. Both factors were also present in Barrett's esophagus and metaplasia of the stomach. GATA-6 expression was reduced in colon carcinoma. Ihh expression overlapped with that of GATA-6 especially in benign gastrointestinal neoplasias. Conclusion The results suggest differential but overlapping functions for GATA-4 and

  15. Obesity in Women: The Clinical Impact on Gastrointestinal and Reproductive Health and Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Blakely, Octavia; Uwakwe, Laura; Rashid, Farzana

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 36% of adult women in the United States are obese. Although obesity affects women similarly to men in terms of prevalence, there seem to be gender-specific differences in the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of obesity. Obesity is linked to comorbid diseases involving multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, like gastroesophageal reflux disease, fatty liver disease, and gallstones. This article focuses on obesity in women, specifically the impact of obesity on gastrointestinal diseases and reproductive health, as well as the treatment of obesity in women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of Lactose Malabsorption and Lactose Intolerance in Pediatric Patients with Selected Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Umławska, Wioleta; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lactase is an enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of lactose. Deficiency of the enzyme (hypolactasia) may be determined genetically or arise secondarily to disease of small intestine. Under this condition, lactose enters the colon where it is fermented by intestinal microflora and turns to gases and short-chain fatty acids, causing gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance (LI). To investigate the incidence of lactose malabsorption (LM), LI and the coexistence of these two conditions in children with upper gastrointestinal tract diseases (UGTD), malabsorption syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Hydrogen breath test (HBT) was conducted in 387 pediatric patients in years 2010-2013. Two hundred thirty two children with gastrointestinal tract diseases were selected and assigned to groups - UGTD, malabsorption syndrome, IBD or FGID. For each group the frequency of LM, frequency and severity of LI and the frequency of their co-occurrence were calculated. Lactose malabsorption was observed in 37.08% of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Positive HBT result was the most common in children with malabsorption syndrome (52.50%) and less common in UGTD (30.85%), especially in ulcer disease (23.53%). Symptoms after lactose ingestion affected 36.64% of the subjects, and were more specific to lactose malabsorbers than to lactose absorbers (72.10% vs. 15.75%). The higher frequency of LI was noted in children with FGID, especially in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (65.22%). The lowest incidence of symptoms was obtained in children with UGTD, especially in those with ulcer disease (27.44%). The incidence of LM with LI was noted in 27.16% of all patients and was the highest in IBS (47.83%) and the lowest in ulcer disease (15.78%). Lactose malabsorption is a common problem in children with gastrointestinal diseases, especially in children with bowel diseases. Lactose intolerance is related to LM, but does not

  17. Anticancer potential of Hericium erinaceus extracts against human gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Yu, Kai; Li, Fushuang; Xu, Kangping; Li, Jing; He, Shujin; Cao, Shousong; Tan, Guishan

    2014-04-28

    Hericium is a genus of mushrooms (fungus) in the Hericiaceae family. Hericium erinaceus (HE) has been used for the treatment of digestive diseases for over 2000 years in China. HE possesses many beneficial functions such as anticancer, antiulcer, antiinflammation and antimicrobial effects, immunomodulation and other activities. The aim of the studies was to evaluate the anticancer efficacy of two extracts (HTJ5 and HTJ5A) from the culture broth of HE against three gastrointestinal cancers such as liver, colorectal and gastric cancers in both of in vitro of cancer cell lines and in vivo of tumor xenografts and discover the active compounds. Two HE extracts (HTJ5 and HTJ5A) were used for the studies. For the study of chemical constituents, the HTJ5 and HTJ5A were separated using a combination of macroporous resin with silica gel, HW-40 and LH-20 chromatography then purified by semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. For the in vitro cytotoxicity studies, HepG2 and Huh-7 liver, HT-29 colon, and NCI-87 gastric cancer cell lines were used and MTT assay was performed to determine the in vitro cytotoxicity. For in vivo antitumor efficacy and toxicity studies, tumor xenograft models of SCID mice bearing liver cancer HepG2 and Huh-7, colon cancer HT-29 and gastric cancer NCI-87 subcutaneously were used and the mice were treated with the vehicle control, HTJ5 and HTJ5A orally (500 and 1000 mg/kg/day) and compared to 5-fluorouraci (5-FU) at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD, 25-30 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally daily for 5 days when the tumors reached about 180-200 mg (mm(3)). Tumor volumes and body weight were measured daily during the first 10 days and 2-3 times a week thereafter to assess the tumor growth inhibition, tumor doubling time, partial and complete tumor response and toxicity. Twenty-two compounds were obtained from the fractions of HTJ5/HTJ5A including seven cycli dipeptides, five

  18. Hepatic metabolism of toluene after gastrointestinal uptake in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Honoré Hansen, S

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of toluene and the influence of small doses of ethanol were measured in eight male volunteers after gastrointestinal uptake, the toluene concentration in alveolar air and the urinary excretion of hippuric acid and ortho-cresol being used as the measures of metabolism. During toluene...

  19. Gastrointestinal osmoreceptors and renal sodium excretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.J.; Jensen, T.U.; Bestle, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that natriuresis can be induced by stimulation of gastrointestinal osmoreceptors was tested in eight supine subjects on constant sodium intake (150 mmol NaCl/day). A sodium load equivalent to the amount contained in 10% of measured extracellular volume was administered by a nasogas......-angiotensin system....

  20. Emulating Host-Microbiome Ecosystem of Human Gastrointestinal Tract in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Seok; Park, Min Hee; Shin, Woojung; Zhao, Connie; Sheikh, Sameer; Oh, So Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-06-01

    The human gut microbiome performs prodigious physiological functions such as production of microbial metabolites, modulation of nutrient digestion and drug metabolism, control of immune system, and prevention of infection. Paradoxically, gut microbiome can also negatively orchestrate the host responses in diseases or chronic disorders, suggesting that the regulated and balanced host-gut microbiome crosstalk is a salient prerequisite in gastrointestinal physiology. To understand the pathophysiological role of host-microbiome crosstalk, it is critical to recreate in vivo relevant models of the host-gut microbiome ecosystem in human. However, controlling the multi-species microbial communities and their uncontrolled growth has remained a notable technical challenge. Furthermore, conventional two-dimensional (2D) or 3D culture systems do not recapitulate multicellular microarchitectures, mechanical dynamics, and tissue-specific functions. Here, we review recent advances and current pitfalls of in vitro and ex vivo models that display human GI functions. We also discuss how the disruptive technologies such as 3D organoids or a human organ-on-a-chip microphysiological system can contribute to better emulate host-gut microbiome crosstalks in health and disease. Finally, the medical and pharmaceutical significance of the gut microbiome-based personalized interventions is underlined as a future perspective.

  1. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik Birkebæk; Isager, Torben; Rich, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, 10th Edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism...... with atypical autism, a total of 22 (24.7%) were registered with at least one diagnosis of any disease of the gastrointestinal tract, against 47 of 258 (18.2%) in the comparison group (p = 0.22; odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.6). Without reaching statistical significance, the rate of diseases...... of the gastrointestinal tract was particularly high (odds ratio = 1.2) in those with intelligence quotient autism had about the same frequency of gastric, intestinal and hepatic diseases as had controls....

  2. Coeliac disease and gastrointestinal symptom screening in adult first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; Alvarez-Cuenllas, Begoña; Hernando, Mercedes; Iglesias-Blazquez, Cristina; Menéndez-Arias, Cristina; Vivas, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    The first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with coeliac disease are the main risk group for disease development. The study aims to evaluate the screening strategy in FDRs with negative coeliac serology based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping, followed by duodenal biopsy, and to analyze the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the influence of gluten intake. Adult FDRs with negative coeliac serology were invited to participate (n = 205), and a total of 139 completed the study protocol. HLA genotyping, transglutaminase antibody assessment, and duodenal biopsy were performed. Symptomatology was assessed using questionnaires during the various phases of dietary modification (baseline diet, gluten-free diet, and gluten overload). The study included 139 participants (mean age, 42 years; 53.2% women). HLA-DQ2/8 was positive in 78.4% of the participants (homozygous, 15.1%; heterozygous, 63.3%). Histopathological alterations were noted in 37.1% of participants who underwent duodenal biopsy (Marsh I, 32.7%; Marsh IIIa, 4.4%). At baseline, symptoms were observed in 45.7% of the participants, and the proportion decreased to 24.5% after the gluten-free diet (P < 0.001). Symptoms were not associated with the presence of histological alterations or genetic risk. However, younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.91), female sex (OR = 2.9), and the presence of autoimmune disorders (OR = 2.8) were independently associated with a significant symptom response to the gluten-free diet. Duodenal lymphocytosis and atrophy are frequently noted in FDRs, despite negative serological markers. In addition, gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly present and associated with gluten intake regardless of the histological pathology. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Association of nitrate, nitrite, and total organic carbon (TOC) in drinking water and gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademikia, Samaneh; Rafiee, Zahra; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Poursafa, Parinaz; Mansourian, Marjan; Modaberi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the amounts of nitrate, nitrite, and total organic carbon (TOC) in two drinking water sources and their relationship with some gastrointestinal diseases. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Iran. Two wells located in residential areas were selected for sampling and measuring the TOC, nitrate (NO3(-)), and nitrite (NO2(-)). This water is used for drinking as well as for industrial and agricultural consumption. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations of water samples were analyzed using DR 5000 spectrophotometer. The information of patients was collected from the records of the main referral hospital of the region for gastrointestinal diseases. In both areas under study, the mean water nitrate and nitrite concentrations were higher in July than in other months. The mean TOC concentrations in areas 1 and 2 were 2.29 ± 0.012 and 2.03 ± 0.309, respectively. Pollutant concentration and gastrointestinal disease did not show any significant relationship (P > 0.05). Although we did not document significant association of nitrite, nitrate, and TOC content of water with gastrointestinal diseases, it should be considered that such health hazards may develop over time, and the quality of water content should be controlled to prevent different diseases.

  4. Periodontal disease may be associated with oral and gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Zoann

    2010-12-01

    The association between periodontal disease and cancer:a review of the literature. Fitzpatrick SG, Katz J.J Dent 2010;38(2):83-95. Epub 2009 Nov 4. Zoann Nugent, Ph. D. To assess the published research to date on the relationship between periodontal disease and cancer. Information not available. Comprehensive literature review. Level 3: Other evidence. Grade C: Consensus, disease-oriented evidence, expert opinion.

  5. NOD2/CARD15 genotype and common gastrointestinal diseases in 43 600 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    associate with risk of nine common gastrointestinal diseases. Design and setting. We genotyped 43 596 white individuals from the Danish general population followed for 31 years, during which time 782 developed oesophagitis and reflux, 1395 ulcus ventriculi and duodeni, 1384 gastritis and dyspepsia, 1407...

  6. Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model: Implications for coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, C.; Havenaar, R.; Wouter Drijfhout, J.; Edens, L.; Dekking, L.; Koning, F.; Dekking, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coeliac disease is caused by an immune response to gluten. As gluten proteins are proline rich they are resistant to enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract, a property that probably contributes to the immunogenic nature of gluten. Aims: This study determined the efficiency of

  7. Early impairment of gut function and gut flora supporting a role for alteration of gastrointestinal mucosa in human immunodeficiency virus pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, Andrea; Tincati, Camilla; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Torti, Carlo; Quirino, Tiziana; Haarman, Monique; Ben Amor, Kaouther; van Schaik, Jacqueline; Vriesema, Aldwin; Knol, Jan; Marchetti, Giulia; Welling, Gjalt; Clerici, Mario

    Our results show that impairment of the gastrointestinal tracts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is present in the early phases of HIV disease. This impairment is associated with alterations in gut microbiota and intestinal inflammatory parameters. These findings support the

  8. Upper Gastrointestinal Disease in Nairobi and Nakuru Counties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Nairobi, Kenya), Ayuo et al (Eldoret, Kenya) have evaluated the UGI disease burden albeit with relatively smaller numbers(1–3,10). Only Missalek had 4000 patients. In addition, no study has been done around the Central Rift region in Kenya. We offer the first audited glimpse of these diseases and their pattern. Gastritis is ...

  9. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in pediatric gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Ranjan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS is a well-established diagnostic and therapeutic modality for adults. It is extremely helpful for a broad range of diagnostic indications including upper gastrointestinal (GI malignancies, submucosal lesions, pancreatic lesions (masses, cystic lesions, chronic pancreatitis, etiological workup of recurrent acute pancreatitis, common bile duct evaluation (calculi versus tumor, gallbladder lesions/microliths, and rectal malignancy; well-established therapeutic roles include fine-needle aspiration of lesions/lymph nodes, pancreatic fluid collection drainage, pancreatic duct drainage, biliary drainage, gallbladder drainage, pelvic abscess drainage, celiac plexus block, or neurolysis. Some recent studies have reported the use of EUS in the pediatric population. EUS is safe and easy to perform in the pediatric population also. However, there is paucity of data on use of EUS in pediatric population. In contrast with its regular therapeutic use in adults, EUS is not commonly performed in children for therapeutic reasons and most of the data are available on diagnostic use only. All of studies have shown that EUS is safe and a useful modality with a positive impact on management in majority of study population. EUS is very useful in pediatric population for the evaluation of upper GI tract submucosal lesions or rectal masses, pancreaticobiliary disorders, characterization of esophageal strictures, and for evaluation of enteric duplication cysts. The advent of miniprobe that can be passed through conventional endoscopes has increased the applicability of EUS in infants and children. Although there are limited data regarding use of EUS in pediatric population, it appears to be a very promising diagnostic and therapeutic tool.

  10. The functionality of the gastrointestinal microbiome in non-human animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Irene; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra

    2015-11-10

    Due to the significance of the microbiome on human health, much of the current data available regarding microbiome functionality is centered on human medicine. For agriculturally important taxa, the functionality of gastrointestinal bacteria has been studied with the primary goals of improving animal health and production performance. With respect to cattle, the digestive functions of bacteria in cattle are unarguably critical to digestion and positively impact production performance. Conversely, some research suggests that the gastrointestinal microbiome in chickens competes with the host for nutrients and produces toxins that can harm the host resulting in decreased growth efficiency. Concerning many other species including reptiles and cetaceans, some cataloging of fecal bacteria has been conducted, but the functionality within the host remains ambiguous. These taxa could provide interesting gastrointestinal insight into functionality and symbiosis considering the extreme feeding regimes (snakes), highly specialized diets (vampire bats), and living environments (polar bears), which warrants further exploration.

  11. Vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. Several treatments are used for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. One of them is vitamin K administration, but it is not known whether it benefits or harms people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin K for people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), and LILACS (1982 to 25 February 2015). We sought additional randomised trials from two registries of clinical trials: the World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials. We looked through the reference lists of the retrieved publications and review articles. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. We considered observational studies for assessment of harms only. \\We aimed to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using Standard Cochrane methodology and assess them according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised trials on vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases assessing benefits and harms of the intervention. We identified no quasi-randomised studies, historically controlled studies, or observational studies assessing harms. This updated review found no randomised clinical trials of vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. The benefits and harms of vitamin K need to be tested

  12. Biophysical, infrastructural and social heterogeneities explain spatial distribution of waterborne gastrointestinal disease burden in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Andrés; Estrada-Barón, Alejandra; Serrano-Candela, Fidel; Bojórquez, Luis A.; Eakin, Hallie; Escalante, Ana E.

    2018-06-01

    Due to unplanned growth, large extension and limited resources, most megacities in the developing world are vulnerable to hydrological hazards and infectious diseases caused by waterborne pathogens. Here we aim to elucidate the extent of the relation between the spatial heterogeneity of physical and socio-economic factors associated with hydrological hazards (flooding and scarcity) and the spatial distribution of gastrointestinal disease in Mexico City, a megacity with more than 8 million people. We applied spatial statistics and multivariate regression analyses to high resolution records of gastrointestinal diseases during two time frames (2007–2009 and 2010–2014). Results show a pattern of significant association between water flooding events and disease incidence in the city center (lowlands). We also found that in the periphery (highlands), higher incidence is generally associated with household infrastructure deficiency. Our findings suggest the need for integrated and spatially tailored interventions by public works and public health agencies, aimed to manage socio-hydrological vulnerability in Mexico City.

  13. Frequency of peptic ulcer disease in patients of dyspepsia an analysis of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, S.O.; Ambreen, S.; Ashraf, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of peptic ulcer disease in patients of dyspepsia on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A convenient non probability sampling was done and one hundred patients were selected from out patient department presenting within six months of dyspeptic symptoms. They were all subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy Of all patients 61% (n=61) were males and 39% (n=39) were females with age ranging between 20 - 45 years. Study revealed functional dyspepsia (76%), duodenal ulcer (11%), gastric ulcer (4%) and esophagitis including gastoesophageal reflux disease (9%). This showed an overall frequency of peptic ulcer disease to be 15% in the studied population.Conclusion: Peptic ulcer disease is a common structural cause of dyspepsia and was responsible for 15% of dyspepsia. (author)

  14. Gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium and curium in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.S.; Harrison, J.D.; Ham, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption of Np and Cm has been determined in five male adult volunteers. The Np and Cm, which were in citrate solution, were taken with food. An initial experiment with each individual determined the fraction of each element excreted in the urine following intravenous administration. Subsequently, the results for urinary excretion for the two routes of administration were used to calculate the fractional absorption (f1) of ingested Np and Cm. The mean f1 values were: Np (2.0 +/- 0.2) X 10 - 4 , range (1.2-2.9) X 10 - 4 , and Cm (1.7 +/- 0.3) X 10 - 4 , range (0.95-3.0) X 10 - 4 , the quoted uncertainties being the standard error of the means. Currently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends a value of 10 - 3 for both elements. Cumulative urinary excretion over 1 wk after intravenous injection accounted for about 20%-40% of administered Np and 7%-10% of Cm. At the conclusion of the experiment, the total committed effective dose equivalent for each volunteer was calculated to be in the range 130-250 microSv, based on the individual f1 values, and, in some cases, a knowledge of the rate of clearance of 239 Np through the gut as measured by whole-body counting

  15. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  16. Uranium gastrointestinal absorption: the F1 factor in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, M.L.; Zielinski, J.M.; Meyerhof, D.; Moodie, G.; Falcomer, R.; Tracy, B.

    2003-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken by the Department of Health, Canada, to determine the most appropriate value to use for uranium gastrointestinal absorption (f 1 ) in setting the guideline for drinking water. Fifty participants, free from medical problems, were recruited from two communities: a rural area where drinking water, supplied from drilled wells, contained elevated levels of uranium and an urban area where the water supplied by the municipal water system contained -1 . Uranium intake through food, drinking water and other beverages was monitored using the duplicate diet approach. Intake and excretion were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in samples collected concurrently from the same individuals over a 3 d period. The range of f 1 values was between 0.001 to 0.06, with a median of 0.009. These values were independent of gender, age, duration of exposure, daily total uranium intake and allocation of intake between food and water. Consistent with the recommendation of ICRP Publication 69, 78% were below 0.02. (author)

  17. Actions of prolonged ghrelin infusion on gastrointestinal transit and glucose homeostasis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkén, Y; Hellström, P M; Sanger, G J

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin is produced by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and stimulates gastric emptying in healthy volunteers and patients with gastroparesis in short-term studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of intravenous ghrelin on gastrointestinal motility and glucose homeostasis...... during a 6-h infusion in humans....

  18. Collagenous mucosal inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2005-07-01

    Collagenous mucosal inflammatory diseases involve the columnar-lined gastric and intestinal mucosa and have become recognized increasingly as a significant cause of symptomatic morbidity, particularly in middle-aged and elderly women, especially with watery diarrhea. Still, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this diarrhea remain poorly understood and require further elucidation. The prognosis and long-term outcome of these disorders has been documented only to a limited extent. Recent clinical and pathologic studies have indicated that collagenous mucosal inflammatory disease is a more extensive pathologic process that concomitantly may involve several sites in the gastric and intestinal mucosa. The dominant pathologic lesion is a distinct subepithelial hyaline-like deposit that has histochemical and ultrastructural features of collagen overlying a microscopically defined inflammatory process. An intimate relationship with other autoimmune connective tissue disorders is evident, particularly celiac disease. This is intriguing because these collagenous disorders have not been shown to be gluten dependent. Collagenous mucosal inflammatory disorders may represent a relatively unique but generalized inflammatory response to a multitude of causes, including celiac disease, along with a diverse group of pharmacologic agents. Some recent reports have documented treatment success but histopathologic reversal has been more difficult to substantiate owing to the focal, sometimes extensive nature, of this pathologic process.

  19. Patterns of upper gastrointestinal diseases based on endoscopy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of the patients had abnormal findings with gastritis being the most common (25.8%). It is concluded that gastritis is an important cause of morbidity in Kenya. Oesophagitis, mainly due to gastroesopahageal reflux disease, seems to be on the increase. Gastric cancer is not as rare as previously thought and peptic ...

  20. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiekierski, Jessica R; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2013-12-01

    The avoidance of wheat- and gluten-containing products is a worldwide phenomenon. While celiac disease is a well-established entity, the evidence base for gluten as a trigger of symptoms in patients without celiac disease (so-called 'non-celiac gluten sensitivity' or NCGS) is limited. The problems lie in the complexity of wheat and the ability of its carbohydrate as well as protein components to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms, the potentially false assumption that response to a gluten-free diet equates to an effect of gluten withdrawal, and diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease. Recent randomized controlled re-challenge trials have suggested that gluten may worsen gastrointestinal symptoms, but failed to confirm patients with self-perceived NCGS have specific gluten sensitivity. Furthermore, mechanisms by which gluten triggers symptoms have yet to be identified. This review discusses the most recent scientific evidence and our current understanding of NCGS.

  1. Fatal Cytomegalovirus Gastrointestinal Disease in an Infant with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ying Huang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although most cytomegalovirus (CMV infections are asymptomatic or cause only mild disease, the virus can cause serious disease and even mortality in immunocompromised children. In patients with WiskottAldrich syndrome (WAS, recurrent CMV infection is infrequently seen. A 3-month-old male infant was referred to Chang Gung Children's Hospital due to persistent thrombocytopenia and intermittent tachypnea. WAS complicated with CMV pneumonitis was diagnosed subsequently. He was discharged at the age of 7 months after a complete course of antiviral treatment. Unfortunately, refractory hemorrhagic gastritis developed later and recurred in spite of antiviral treatment and intravenous immunoglobulin. The patient died of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding at the age of 23 months. This observation indicates that a case of WAS complicated with CMV gastrointestinal disease may need more vigorous treatment.

  2. Systematic investigation of gastrointestinal diseases in China (SILC): validation of survey methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Yanfang; Ma, Xiuqiang; Fang, Jiqian; Yan, Hong; Kang, Xiaoping; Yin, Ping; Hao, Yuantao; Li, Qiang; Dent, John; Sung, Joseph; Zou, Duowu; Johansson, Saga; Halling, Katarina; Liu, Wenbin; He, Jia

    2009-11-19

    Symptom-based surveys suggest that the prevalence of gastrointestinal diseases is lower in China than in Western countries. The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for the epidemiological investigation of gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic findings in China. A randomized, stratified, multi-stage sampling methodology was used to select 18,000 adults aged 18-80 years from Shanghai, Beijing, Xi'an, Wuhan and Guangzhou. Participants from Shanghai were invited to provide blood samples and undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All participants completed Chinese versions of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and the modified Rome II questionnaire; 20% were also invited to complete the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The psychometric properties of the questionnaires were evaluated statistically. The study was completed by 16,091 individuals (response rate: 89.4%), with 3219 (89.4% of those invited) completing the SF-36 and ESS. All 3153 participants in Shanghai provided blood samples and 1030 (32.7%) underwent endoscopy. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.89, 0.89, 0.80 and 0.91, respectively, for the RDQ, modified Rome II questionnaire, ESS and SF-36, supporting internal consistency. Factor analysis supported construct validity of all questionnaire dimensions except SF-36 psychosocial dimensions. This population-based study has great potential to characterize the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic findings in China.

  3. EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASES OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT AND FOOD ALLERGY AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Shumilov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the structure of the inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract among children, one may single out a specific group of the chronic pathology of the digestive apparatus — eosinophilic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and gastroenterological manifestations of the food allergy. The food allergy is characterized by the pathologic immune reactivity among commonly genetically predisposed people. Depending on the peculiarities of the immune reactivity of a sick person and the nature of the allergen, the allergic reaction may evolve with primary involvement of the different mechanisms or th2 IgE-mediated, or Th1 non-igecmediated. Clinical picture of the food allergy is the manifestation of the immunoinflammatory process caused by the interaction of the food antigens with the structures of the lymphoid tissues associated with the mucous membranes of this or that target organ. The morphological basis of the clinical picture is mostly immune inflammation with primarily eosinophilic tissue infiltration. The eosinophilic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract include eosinophilic esophagitis, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, eosinophilic enteritis, eosinophilic colitis, eosinophilic proctitis and other states. During the food allergy each of the clinical forms of the gastrointestinal tract lesion has its own peculiarities with regards to the primary development mechanism, age of manifestation, character of the run and behaviour tactics.Key words: eosinophilic inflammation, esophagitis, gastroenteritis, colitis, food allergy.

  4. Elevated DMBT1 levels in neonatal gastrointestinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Helmke, Burkhard M

    2016-01-01

    Deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1) is involved in innate immunity and epithelial differentiation. Previous studies in adults indicated a strong intestinal expression of DMBT1 and an important role in inflammatory bowel diseases. Here, we analyzed the DMBT1 expression in the fetal gastroin......, and herniation. DMBT1 may play a role in epithelial differentiation and local innate immunity during neonatal inflammatory bowel processes....

  5. Antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. People with liver disease frequently have haemostatic abnormalities such as hyperfibrinolysis. Therefore, antifibrinolytic amino acids have been proposed to be used as supplementary interventions alongside any of the primary treatments for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), LILACS (1982 to February 2015), World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal (accessed 26 February 2015), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (accessed 26 February 2015). We scrutinised the reference lists of the retrieved publications. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies for assessment of harms. We planned to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using standard Cochrane methodologies and assessed according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised clinical trials assessing antifibrinolytic amino acids for treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We did not identify quasi-randomised, historically controlled, or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated Cochrane review identified no randomised clinical trials assessing the benefits and harms of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or

  6. Humanized mouse models: Application to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryoji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ito, Mamoru

    2018-05-01

    Humanized mice are superior to rodents for preclinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of drug candidates using human cells or tissues. During the past decade, humanized mouse technology has been greatly advanced by the establishment of novel platforms of genetically modified immunodeficient mice. Several human diseases can be recapitulated using humanized mice due to the improved engraftment and differentiation capacity of human cells or tissues. In this review, we discuss current advanced humanized mouse models that recapitulate human diseases including cancer, allergy, and graft-versus-host disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Campylobacter gastritis simulating Menetrier's disease by upper gastrointestinal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaloupka, J.C.; Gay, B.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Within this decade it has been determined that primary gastritis in both children and adults is frequently associated with infection of the gastric mucosa with Campylobacter pylori. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process in which the mucosa of the gastric antrum is typically most severely involved. Other regions of the stomach may be involved and associated peptic ulcers of the stomach and duodenal bulb are frequent. A case of C. pylori gastritis is reported in which involvement of the gastric fundus and body produced severe rugal hypertrophy that resembled Menetrier's disease. (orig.)

  9. Microbiological quality of urban-vended salad and its association with gastrointestinal diseases in Kumasi, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fung, Jessica; Keraita, Bernard; Konradsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    The influence of consumption of salads on exposure to gastrointestinal diseases was assessed in urban environments in Kumasi, Ghana. Data was collected using a cross-sectional survey involving 15 salad sellers and 213 consumers and microbiological laboratory analysis of 96 samples of ready......-to-eat salad. Findings showed higher contamination in street-vended salads than those in cafeterias with thermotelerant coliforms levels of 4.00-5.43 log units per 100 g salad, 32% of samples had Salmonella sp., and 17% had helminth eggs. Overall, there was an insignificant inverse relationship between salad...... consumption and gastrointestinal diseases among street salad consumers (RR = 0.81) and a strong positive relationship with cafeteria consumers (RR = 5.51). However, stratified analysis on relative risk showed a likelihood of strong influence from other risk factors embedded in socio-economic status...

  10. A longitudinal study of gastrointestinal diseases in individuals diagnosed with infantile autism as children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend-Erik; Rich, B; Isager, T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A number of studies have indicated a link between gastrointestinal (GI) diseases and autism spectrum disorders. Method The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and types of GI diseases in a clinical sample of 118 individuals diagnosed as children with infantile...... autism (IA) with GI diseases in 336 matched controls from the general population, based on data from the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register (DNHR). The average observation time was 30.3 years (SD 0.4) (range 27-30 years), and mean age at the end of the observation period was 42.7 years (SD 7...

  11. Recent Advances in Human Protozoan Parasites of Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    organism was found in 40% and 50%, respectively. The organism did not seem to be casually involved in the inflammatory periodontal * disease. Entamoeba...and lung, and in Ecuador, B. coli was found to be the cause of bloody-mucoid diarrhea and hepatic abscess . SUMMARY An attempt was made in this report

  12. Chili Peppers, Curcumins, and Prebiotics in Gastrointestinal Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence for the role of several natural products as either useful agents or adjuncts in the management of functional GI disorders (FGIDs). In this review, we examine the medical evidence for three such compounds: chili, a culinary spice; curcumin, another spice and active derivative of a root bark; and prebiotics, which are nondigestible food products. Chili may affect the pathogenesis of abdominal pain especially in functional dyspepsia and cause other symptoms. It may have a therapeutic role in FGIDs through desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor. Curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric rhizome, has been shown in several preclinical studies and uncontrolled clinical trials as having effects on gut inflammation, gut permeability and the brain-gut axis, especially in FGIDs. Prebiotics, the non-digestible food ingredients in dietary fiber, may serve as nutrients and selectively stimulate the growth and/or activity of certain colonic bacteria. The net effect of this change on colonic microbiota may lead to the production of acidic metabolites and other compounds that help to reduce the production of toxins and suppress the growth of harmful or disease-causing enteric pathogens. Although some clinical benefit in IBS has been shown, high dose intake of prebiotics may cause more bloating from bacterial fermentation.

  13. Characterization of materials eliciting foreign body reaction in stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C B B; Goldin, R D; Darzi, A; Hanna, G B

    2008-08-01

    Staples are made of titanium, which elicits minimal tissue reaction. The authors have encountered foreign body reaction associated with stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses, although the literature has no reports of this. The aim of this study was to identify the refractile foreign materials causing this reaction. Histological sections were taken from 14 gastrointestinal specimens from patients with a history of a stapled anastomosis within the specimen excised. These were reviewed by light and polarization microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were carried out on these sections, staples and stapler cartridges used for gastrointestinal surgery. Foreign bodies rich in fluorine were found in three patients, and those rich in carbon in 12. Other elements identified included oxygen, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminium and silicon. One specimen was found to contain titanium with no surrounding foreign body reaction. Stapler cartridges contained carbon, oxygen, fluorine, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminium, silicon and traces of titanium. Staples were composed of pure titanium with some fibrous material on the surface containing elements found in stapler cartridges. The presence of foreign body reaction was confirmed in stapled human gastrointestinal anastomoses. The source of refractile materials eliciting this reaction was the stapler cartridges. (c) 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, F

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2...

  15. Gastrointestinal symptoms in children with type 1 diabetes screened for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Priya; Porter, Lesley; Langton, Josephine; Rao, Veena; Davies, Paul; Cummins, Carole; Kirk, Jeremy; Barrett, Timothy; Protheroe, Susan

    2009-09-01

    The association between celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) is recognized. Most cases of CD in patients with DM are reported to be asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to (1) compare and audit our practice with the published standards for screening for CD in children with DM, (2) characterize the children with DM and biopsy-confirmed CD, in terms of growth and gastrointestinal symptoms, and compare them with children with DM and negative celiac serology, and (3) document the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) after 1 year of gastrointestinal symptoms, growth, and insulin requirement. We performed a retrospective case-note review of 22 children with DM, positive celiac serology +/- biopsy-confirmed CD, and 50 children with DM and negative celiac serology. Twenty-two children (3.9% of the total diabetic population) had positive celiac serology on screening, with 17 (3%) having biopsy-confirmed CD. Ninety-four percent of the children had standardized celiac serology testing. At diagnosis of CD, 13 of the 17 biopsy-positive children (76.4%) had > or =1 gastrointestinal symptom. The frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in negative celiac serology diabetic children was 6% (3 of 50) (P Symptoms resolved in all children after introduction of a GFD. A significant improvement in weight SD score (P = .008) and BMI SD score (P = .02) was noted in those compliant with a GFD after 1 year. Children with DM and CD have a higher frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms than their diabetic peers with negative celiac serology and are not truly asymptomatic. Institution of a GFD has a positive effect on nutritional status and symptom resolution in the short-term.

  16. The Frequency and Severity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease

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    Hye-Young Sung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although gastrointestinal dysfunctions occur in the majority of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, they are often unrecognized because many patients remain relatively asymptomatic in the early stage. We investigated the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD using newly developed gastrointestinal symptom questionnaires. Methods Early PD patients with a symptom duration not exceeding 3 years were included in this study. All PD patients were evaluated using a questionnaire, which consisted of three relevant domains: oropharyngoesophageal (10 items; gastric (3 items; and intestinal-anorectal (7 items. The frequency of symptoms was calculated as a proportion with an item score ≥ 2. Results Of the 54 patients enrolled, 48 patients (88.9% responded that bowel symptoms developed before the onset of Parkinsonian motor symptoms, and four patients reported that the onset of two types of symptoms (i.e., bowel and neurological occurred approximately simultaneously, with only months between them. The frequencies of gastrointestinal symptoms are as follows: speech disturbance (40.7%, drooling (24.1%, sense of getting stuck (31.5%, choking (27.8%, globus pharyngis (16.7%, repetitive deglutition (29.6%, pain during swallowing (5.6%, food regurgitation (3.7%, acid reflux (7.4%, nausea/vomiting (11.1%, early satiety (16.7%, postprandial fullness (14.8%, epigastric soreness (9.3%, abdominal pain (3.7%, constipation (46.3%, excessive strain during defecation (33.3%, fecal incontinence (7.4%, tenesmus (20.4%, loose stool or diarrhea (3.7%, and difficulty in relaxing anal sphincter (11.1%. Two patients were scored at zero. Conclusions Our findings confirm that gastrointestinal dysfunction occurs in early PD in relatively high frequency.

  17. in Human Liver Diseases

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    Minoru Fujimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways are strictly coordinated by several mechanisms to regulate adequate innate immune responses. Recent lines of evidence indicate that the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family proteins, originally identified as negative-feedback regulators in cytokine signaling, are involved in the regulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. SOCS1, a member of SOCS family, is strongly induced upon TLR stimulation. Cells lacking SOCS1 are hyperresponsive to TLR stimulation. Thus, SOCS1 is an important regulator for both cytokine and TLR-induced responses. As an immune organ, the liver contains various types of immune cells such as T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and Kupffer cells and is continuously challenged with gut-derived bacterial and dietary antigens. SOCS1 may be implicated in pathophysiology of the liver. The studies using SOCS1-deficient mice revealed that endogenous SOCS1 is critical for the prevention of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancers. Recent studies on humans suggest that SOCS1 is involved in the development of various liver disorders in humans. Thus, SOCS1 and other SOCS proteins are potential targets for the therapy of human liver diseases.

  18. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases: results from a multicenter survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Blink, Marjolein; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many pediatric patients use complementary and alternative medicine, especially when facing a chronic illness for which treatment options are limited. So far, research on the use of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with functional gastrointestinal disease has been

  19. Age and gender affect the composition of fungal population of the human gastrointestinal tract

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    Francesco Strati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C, to acidic and oxidative stress and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals’ life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics

  20. Granzyme A Is Required for Regulatory T-Cell Mediated Prevention of Gastrointestinal Graft-versus-Host Disease.

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    Sarvari Velaga

    Full Text Available In our previous work we could identify defects in human regulatory T cells (Tregs likely favoring the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT. Treg transcriptome analyses comparing GvHD and immune tolerant patients uncovered regulated gene transcripts highly relevant for Treg cell function. Moreover, granzyme A (GZMA also showed a significant lower expression at the protein level in Tregs of GvHD patients. GZMA induces cytolysis in a perforin-dependent, FAS-FASL independent manner and represents a cell-contact dependent mechanism for Tregs to control immune responses. We therefore analyzed the functional role of GZMA in a murine standard model for GvHD. For this purpose, adoptively transferred CD4+CD25+ Tregs from gzmA-/- mice were analyzed in comparison to their wild type counterparts for their capability to prevent murine GvHD. GzmA-/- Tregs home efficiently to secondary lymphoid organs and do not show phenotypic alterations with respect to activation and migration properties to inflammatory sites. Whereas gzmA-/- Tregs are highly suppressive in vitro, Tregs require GZMA to rescue hosts from murine GvHD, especially regarding gastrointestinal target organ damage. We herewith identify GZMA as critical effector molecule of human Treg function for gastrointestinal immune response in an experimental GvHD model.

  1. Impact of pasteurization of human milk on preterm newborn in vitro digestion: Gastrointestinal disintegration, lipolysis and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; Bellanger, Amandine; Henry, Gwénaële; Rousseau, Florence; Dirson, Emelyne; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie

    2016-11-15

    Human milk feeding is an important recommendation for preterm newborns considering their vulnerability and digestive immaturity. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30min) applied in milk banks modifies its biological quality and its microstructure. We investigated the impact of pasteurization of preterm human milk on its gastrointestinal kinetics of lipolysis, proteolysis and structural disintegration. An in vitro dynamic system was set up to simulate the gastrointestinal digestion of preterm newborns. A pool of preterm human milk was digested as raw or after Holder pasteurization. Pasteurization impacted the microstructure of undigested human milk, its gastrointestinal disintegration and tended to limit the intestinal lipolysis. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of some fatty acids was decreased by pasteurization, while the intestinal bioaccessibility of some amino acids was selectively modulated. The impact of pasteurization on the digestion of human milk may have nutritional relevance in vivo and potentially modulates preterm development and growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bevacizumab for Refractory Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Rendu-Osler-Weber Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Carlos; Santos, Sara; Loureiro, Rafaela; Borges, Verónica; Ramos, Gonçalo

    2018-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, is a rare autosomal dominant disorder which is often characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and visceral arteriovenous malformations. Patients with gastrointestinal involvement can present with a wide spectrum of severity, which may vary from uncomplicated iron deficiency anemia to continuous and refractory bleeding. We present the case of a 62-year-old female, who was admitted with anemia following several episodes of melena, and whose endoscopic examination revealed multiple angiodysplasias in the stomach and small bowel. Despite endoscopic and medical treatment attempts with hormonal agents and octreotide, she developed persistent hemorrhage and severe anemia, requiring frequent red blood cell transfusions. Immediately after initiating bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg, every 3 weeks), complete cessation of bleeding episodes was observed. Currently, after 1 year of follow-up, she maintained sustained remission without the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:29662934

  3. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Keita, E-mail: uchino13@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirano, Gen [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirahashi, Minako [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isobe, Taichi; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Baba, Eishi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Akashi, Koichi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2012-09-10

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 protein to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.

  4. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Keita; Hirano, Gen; Hirahashi, Minako; Isobe, Taichi; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Baba, Eishi; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Akashi, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 protein to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. ► Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. ► Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. ► Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. ► Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.

  5. Immunohistochemical characterization of gastrointestinal macrophages/phagocytes in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and non-IBD dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna; Junginger, Johannes; Lemensieck, Frederik; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal Mϕ play a pivotal role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis, but can also contribute to inflammation such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In contrast to human tissues, little is known about phenotypes of Mϕ in the canine gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, an immunohistochemical study was performed using Abs against Mϕ-associated molecules (Cluster of differentiation (CD)64, CD163, CD204, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1, L1 Ag, and MHC II) on stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon from non-IBD dogs. In addition, marker-expression in the stomach, duodenum and colon of the non-IBD dogs was compared to that in dogs with IBD. Results revealed predominance of resident Mϕ displaying an anti-inflammatory phenotype represented by expression of CD163 as well as CD204 in the gut of non-IBD dogs with high Mϕ numbers especially present in the small intestinal villus area. Compared to non-IBD tissue counterparts, stomach, duodenum, and colon from dogs with IBD showed reduced Mϕ numbers with the exception of slightly increased numbers of CD64+ Mϕ. Correlation analyses between marker-expression of Mϕ and the Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index as well as histological scores failed to reveal relevant relationships. The present study provides evidence of the canine steady state gastrointestinal tract being dominated by Mϕ with anti-inflammatory properties maintaining gut homeostasis. A significant reduction in these resident Mϕ may reflect disturbances in homeostatic capacity that could contribute to the development of canine IBD. In contrast to human IBD and murine disease models, infiltration of pro-inflammatory Mϕ does not significantly contribute to the inflammatory process of canine IBD, which may illustrate possible species-specific differences in IBD pathogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Is Osteopontin a Friend or Foe of Cell Apoptosis in Inflammatory Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Tomoya; Wagatsuma, Kohei; Hirayama, Daisuke; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-12-21

    Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in a variety of biological processes, including bone remodeling, innate immunity, acute and chronic inflammation, and cancer. The expression of OPN occurs in various tissues and cells, including intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and T lymphocytes. OPN plays an important role in the efficient development of T helper 1 immune responses and cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. The association of OPN with apoptosis has been investigated. In this review, we described the role of OPN in inflammatory gastrointestinal and liver diseases, focusing on the association of OPN with apoptosis. OPN changes its association with apoptosis depending on the type of disease and the phase of disease activity, acting as a promoter or a suppressor of inflammation and inflammatory carcinogenesis. It is essential that the roles of OPN in those diseases are elucidated, and treatments based on its mechanism are developed.

  7. Gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in screen-detected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Aku; Kurppa, Kalle; Ukkola, Anniina; Collin, Pekka; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2012-10-01

    Active serological screening has proved an effective means of increasing the diagnostic rate in celiac disease. The effects of a long-term gluten-free diet on possible gastrointestinal symptoms and psychological well-being in screen-detected patients have nevertheless remained obscure. Abdominal symptoms and quality of life were measured in a large cohort of treated screen-detected celiac adults. Comparisons were made with corresponding symptom-detected patients and with non-celiac controls. Dietary adherence was assessed both by structured interview and by serological testing. In both screen- and symptom-detected celiac groups, 88% of the patients were adherent. On a diet, both screen- and symptom-detected patients reported significantly more gastrointestinal symptoms than non-celiac controls. Those screen-detected patients who reported having no symptoms at the time of diagnosis, also remained asymptomatic during the diet. Despite persistent symptoms, psychological well-being in screen-detected patients was comparable with that in non-celiac controls, whereas the symptom-detected patients showed lower quality of life. Long-term treated screen-detected celiac patients, especially women, suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms on a gluten free diet similarly to symptom-detected patients. However, despite a similar frequency of persistent symptoms, the quality of life was unimpaired in the screen found, but remained low in the symptom-detected group. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efeito protetor da lactoferrina humana no trato gastrintestinal Efecto protector de la lactoferrina humana en el sistema gastrointestinal Protective effect of human lactoferrin in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valterlinda Alves de O. Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    gastrointestinal morbidities. DATA SOURCES: Nonsystematic literature review using the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs and Medline from 1990 to 2011. The key-words used were lactoferrin, human milk/breastfeeding, gastrointestinal, and immunity, in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Lactoferrin is the second predominant protein in the human milk, with higher concentrations in the colostrum (5.0 to 6.7mg/mL if compared to mature milk (0.2 to 2.6mg/mL. In contrast, cow's milk has lower levels, with 0.83mg/mL in the colostrum and 0.09mg/mL in the mature milk. Lactoferrin has several physiological functions to protect the gastrointestinal tract. The antimicrobial activity is related to the ability to sequester iron from biological fluids and/or to destruct the membrane of microorganisms. Lactoferrin also has the ability to stimulate cell proliferation. The anti-inflammatory action exercised by lactoferrin is associated with its ability to penetrate the core of the leukocyte and to block the Kappa B nuclear factor transcription. Given the importance of lactoferrin to prevent infectious diseases for breastfed children, the industry is using genetic engineering techniques to develop the expression of recombinant human lactoferrin in animals and plants, attempting to adjust the composition of infant formulas to that of human milk. CONCLUSIONS: Human lactoferrin is a peptide with great potential for preventing morbidity, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. Scientific evidence of the protective effects of human lactoferrin strengthens even more the recommendation for breastfeeding.

  9. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of ingestive behavior and gastrointestinal motility by ghrelin in diabetic animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Laviano, Alessandro; Chang, Full-Young; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2010-05-01

    Acyl ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, is the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is involved in stimulating growth hormone release, eliciting feeding behavior, inducing adiposity and stimulating gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin is unique for its post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 through ghrelin O-acyltransferase, and is the only peripheral signal to enhance food intake. Plasma ghrelin levels manifest "biphasic changes" in diabetes mellitus (DM). In the early stage of DM, the stomach significantly increases the secretion of ghrelin into the plasma, and elevated plasma ghrelin levels are correlated with diabetic hyperphagic feeding and accelerated gastrointestinal motility. In the late stage of DM, plasma ghrelin levels may be lower, which might be linked with anorexia/muscle wasting, delayed gastrointestinal transit, and even gastroparesis. Therefore, the unique ghrelin system may be the most important player compared to the other hindgut hormones participating in the "entero-insular axis". Further studies using either knockdown or knockout of ghrelin gene products and ghrelin O-acyltransferase may unravel the pathogenesis of DM, and show benefits in combating this disease and metabolic syndrome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of Ingestive Behavior and Gastrointestinal Motility by Ghrelin in Diabetic Animals and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yen Chen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Acyl ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, is the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is involved in stimulating growth hormone release, eliciting feeding behavior, inducing adiposity and stimulating gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin is unique for its post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 through ghrelin O-acyltransferase, and is the only peripheral signal to enhance food intake. Plasma ghrelin levels manifest “biphasic changes” in diabetes mellitus (DM. In the early stage of DM, the stomach significantly increases the secretion of ghrelin into the plasma, and elevated plasma ghrelin levels are correlated with diabetic hyperphagic feeding and accelerated gastrointestinal motility. In the late stage of DM, plasma ghrelin levels may be lower, which might be linked with anorexia/muscle wasting, delayed gastrointestinal transit, and even gastroparesis. Therefore, the unique ghrelin system may be the most important player compared to the other hindgut hormones participating in the “entero-insular axis”. Further studies using either knockdown or knockout of ghrelin gene products and ghrelin O-acyltransferase may unravel the pathogenesis of DM, and show benefits in combating this disease and metabolic syndrome.

  12. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  13. Survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract with Daily Consumption of a Low-Fat Probiotic Spread▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dommels, Yvonne E. M.; Kemperman, Robèr A.; Zebregs, Yvonne E. M. P.; Draaisma, René B.; Jol, Arne; Wolvers, Danielle A. W.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Albers, Ruud

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Therefore, probiotic strains should be able to survive passage through the human gastrointestinal tract. Human gastrointestinal tract survival of probiotics in a low-fat spread matrix has, however, never been tested. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human intervention study was to test the human gastrointestinal tract survival of Lactobacillus...

  14. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer in Iranian population: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani-Navai, Versa; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza; Yahyapour, Yousef; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Abediankenari, Saeid; Janbabaei, Ghasem; Toghani, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are the most common cancers and account for nearly half of all cancer-related deaths in Iran. There was a strong association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and urogenital cancers, in particular the cervix. However, there is no clear causal relationship in all types of cancers, including gastrointestinal cancers. Therefore, the present study as a systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the prevalence and relation of HPV in GI cancers. This systematic review and meta-analysis study assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus in GI cancers in Iran. Data were collected by searching electronic databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, SID and Iranmedex by English and Persian key words up to August 2016. Key words included: Human Papillomavirus, HPV, Cancer, Neoplasm, Carcinoma, Esophageal, colorectal, Gastrointestinal and Iran articles were entered in the EndNote software and duplicate papers were excluded. Data were extracted and analyzed by comprehensive meta-analysis software, Version 2 (CMA.V2) and random effects model. Finally, we included 17 studies in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of HPV in Iranian patients with GI cancers was 16.4% (CI95%: 10.4-24.9). Considering all HPV types, the odds ratio of GI cancers in positive patients was 3.03 (CI95%: 1.42-6.45) while in patients with HPV-16 was 3.62 (CI: 1.43-4.82). The results show a strong relationship between HPV infection especially high-risk HPV type 16 and GI cancers in Iranian population.

  15. Screening for celiac disease in a North American population: sequential serology and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Kent D; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Lahr, Brian D; Melton, L Joseph; Krause, Patricia K; Maggi, Kristine; Talley, Nicholas J; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease is celiac disease and the utility of screening in the general adult population of a geographically isolated area. Serum tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-IgA) were measured in volunteer health-care participants aged ≥ 18 years at the annual Casper, Wyoming, Blue Envelope Health Fair blood draw. Subjects with positive tTG-IgA tests had their endomysial IgA antibodies checked. Double positives were offered endoscopy with small bowel biopsy. All subjects completed a short gastrointestinal (GI) symptom questionnaire. A total of 3,850 residents of the Natrona County had serologic evaluation for celiac disease, 34 of whom tested positive for both tTG and endomysial antibody (EMA) IgA. Excluding three individuals with previous diagnosis of celiac disease, the overall prevalence of positive celiac serology in this community sample was 0.8%. All 31 subjects were offered a small bowel biopsy. Of the 18 biopsied subjects, 17 (94%) had at least partial villous atrophy. Symptoms that were reported by the fair attendees did not predict positivity. Screening for celiac disease was widely accepted in this preventative health-care setting. Undiagnosed celiac disease affects 1 in 126 individuals in this Wyoming community. Most were asymptomatic or had atypical presentations. Serologic testing can readily detect this disease in a general population.

  16. PCR Expression Analysis Of the Estrogeninducible Gene Bcei in Gastrointestinal and Other Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Wundrack

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed to test for tumor cell specific expression of the BCEI gene. This new marker gene, reported at first for human breast cancer, was found specifically active in various gastrointestinal carcinomas by previously applying immunohistochemistry and RNA (Northern blot analysis. Presently, by using reverse transcription -PCR analysis, a series of primary tumor tissues and established tumor cell lines were testcd for BCEI transcription. This approach was compared to immunostaining achieved by an antibody directed against the BCEI gene’s product. The result demonstrate the superior sensitivity of PCR by indicating the gene’ s expression in cases where immunohistochemical testing remained negative.

  17. Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease: characteristics of a unique series of 34 patients. Belgian IBD Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belaiche, J.; Louis, E.; D'Haens, G.; Cabooter, M.; Naegels, S.; de Vos, M.; Fontaine, F.; Schurmans, P.; Baert, F.; de Reuck, M.; Fiasse, R.; Holvoet, J.; Schmit, A.; van Outryve, M.

    1999-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to define epidemiological characteristics and therapeutic options of hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease. Thirty-four cases of

  18. Zoonotic gastrointestinal parasite burden of local dogs in Zaria, Northern Nigeria: Implications for human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher I. Ogbaje

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites of dogs are of the global problem particularly in the developing countries. Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide and have been reported to be hosts of many intestinal parasites of zoonotic importance globally. In Nigeria, gastrointestinal helminthes of dogs is currently endemic in 20 of the 36 states. Aim: In general, dogs are the closest animals to humans and for that reason we decided to carry out a survey study to check the incidence of these parasites in dogs and to ascertain the level of environmental contamination in the study area. Materials and Methods: Fecal samples were collected from dog patients presented to small animal clinic of Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, dog’s fecal droppings from the streets, and residential Quarters of the University and gastrointestinal tracts (GIT of dogs from dogs slaughtering house at Basawa Barrack, Zaria. Three methods were used in the analysis of the samples; simple flotation, sedimentation, and GIT processing methods within 48 h of collection. Results: Out of 224 samples analyzed 76(33.9% were positive of at least one of the parasites. Of the 101 samples from streets and residential quarters of ABU, Zaria, Isospora spp. 12(11.9% recorded the highest prevalence rate followed by Taenia spp. 6(5.9%, then Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, and Dipylidium caninum were 5.0%, 4.0%, and 1.0%, respectively. Isospora spp. (19.0% recorded the highest prevalence rate for the 100 samples collected from small animal clinic. Other parasites encountered were T. canis (8.0%, A. caninum (8.0% and Taenia spp. (5.0%. Parasites observed from the 23 gastrointestinal contents from “dog slaughtered houses” were T. canis (17.3%, Isospora spp.(13.1% and A. caninum (4.3. Conclusion: The study revealed that zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites of dogs are endemic in Zaria and the general public in the

  19. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  20. Human in vivo and in vitro studies on gastrointestinal absorption of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate; Morton, Jackie; Smith, Ian; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Harding, Anne-Helen; Evans, Gareth

    2015-03-04

    The study was designed to conduct human in vivo and in vitro studies on the gastrointestinal absorption of nanoparticles, using titanium dioxide as a model compound, and to compare nanoparticle behaviour with that of larger particles. A supplier's characterisation data may not fully describe a particle formulation. Most particles tested agreed with their supplied characterisation when assessed by particle number but significant proportions of 'nanoparticle formulations' were particles >100nm when assessed by particle weight. Oral doses are measured by weight and it is therefore important that the weight characterisation is taken into consideration. The human volunteer studies demonstrated that very little titanium dioxide is absorbed gastrointestinally after an oral challenge. There was no demonstrable difference in absorption for any of the three particle sizes tested. All tested formulations were shown to agglomerate in simulated gastric fluid, particularly in the smaller particle formulations. Further agglomeration was observed when dispersing formulations in polymeric or elemental foods. Virtually no translocation of titanium dioxide particles across the cell layer was demonstrated. This study found no evidence that nanoparticulate titanium dioxide is more likely to be absorbed in the gut than micron-sized particles. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reversibility of increased intestinal permeability to 51Cr-EDTA in patients with gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.T.; Jones, D.B.; Goodacre, R.L.; Collins, S.M.; Coates, G.; Hunt, R.H.; Bienenstock, J.

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in adults with inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases was investigated by measuring the 24-h urinary excretion of orally administered 51 Cr-EDTA. Eighty controls along with 100 patients with Crohn's disease, 46 patients with ulcerative colitis, 20 patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and 18 patients with other diseases were studied. In controls, the median 24-h excretion was 1.34%/24 h of the oral dose. Patients with Crohn's disease (median 2.96%/24 h), ulcerative colitis (median 2.12%/24 h), and untreated gluten-sensitive enteropathy (median 3.56%/24 h) had significantly elevated urinary excretion of the probe compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). Increased 24-h urinary excretion of 51 Cr-EDTA had a high association with intestinal inflammation (p less than 0.0001). Test specificity and sensitivity were 96% and 57%, respectively. A positive test has a 96% probability of correctly diagnosing the presence of intestinal inflammation, whereas a negative test has a 50% probability of predicting the absence of disease

  2. Comparison of five in vitro digestion models to in vivo experimental results: Lead bioaccessibility in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiele, T.R. van de; Oomen, A.G.; Wragg, J.; Cave, M.; Minekus, M.; Hack, A.; Cornelis, C.; Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Zwart, L.L. de; Klinck, B.; Wijnen, J. van; Verstraete, W.; Sips, A.J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-laboratory comparison study of in vitro models assessing bioaccessibility of soil-bound lead in the human gastrointestinal tract under simulated fasted and fed conditions. Oral bioavailability data from a previous human in vivo study on the same soil served as a reference

  3. Nuclear medicine methods used in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, I.

    2001-01-01

    Using physiologic tracer scintigraphy may give unique information on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function, supplementing the findings of rather invasive methods. Conventional barium-contrast x-ray studies of the GI tract, computed tomography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging afford high resolution images of the GI anatomy, but have a serious shortcoming - hardly lending themselves to quantification. As shown by the results functional scintigraphy is a sensitive, quantitative and noninvasive procedure. The potential of nuclear medicine methods to diagnose successfully diseases of the salivary glands, esophagus, stomach and visualization of GI bleeding and hepatobiliary system are comprehensively discussed. The advantages and drawbacks of radionuclide techniques are outlined, and compared with other methods of visualization. (author)

  4. New Insight for the Diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Malard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT is a curative therapy for different life-threatening malignant and nonmalignant hematologic disorders. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD remains a major source of morbidity and mortality following allo-SCT, which limits the use of this treatment in a broader spectrum of patients. Early diagnostic of GVHD is essential to initiate treatment as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of GVHD may be difficult to establish, because of the nonspecific nature of the associated symptoms and of the numerous differential diagnosis. This is particularly true regarding gastrointestinal (GI acute GVHD. In the recent years many progress has been made in medical imaging test and endoscopic techniques. The interest of these different techniques in the diagnosis of GI acute GVHD has been evaluated in several studies. With this background we review the contributions, limitations, and future prospect of these techniques in the diagnosis of GI acute GVHD.

  5. Ethnic variations in five lower gastrointestinal diseases: Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Raj S; Cezard, Genevieve; Bansal, Narinder; Ward, Hester J T; Bhala, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to augment the limited evidence mainly from local, clinical studies of ethnic differences in gastrointestinal disorders. Our question was: are there ethnic variations in hospitalisation/death for lower gastrointestinal disorders in Scotland? Setting Scotland. Population This retrospective-cohort linked 4.65 (of 4.9) million people in the 2001 census of Scotland (providing data on ethnicity, country of birth and indicators of socioeconomic deprivation) to 9 years of National Health Service hospitalisation and death records. Primary and secondary outcome measures and analysis For appendicitis, we studied all ages; for irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and diverticular disease, we included those ≥20 years. Using Poisson regression (robust variance) we calculated, by ethnic group and sex, first-hospitalisation/death age-adjusted rates per 100 000 person-years, and relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs multiplied by 100, so the White Scottish reference population had an RR=100. Results There were ethnic variations; for example, for irritable bowel syndrome, RRs (95% CIs) were comparatively high in Other White British women (128.4 (111.0 to 148.6)), and low in Pakistani women (75.1 (60.6 to 93.1)). For appendicitis, RRs were high in men in Other White British (145.2 (127.8 to 164.9)), and low in most non-White groups, for example, Pakistanis (73.8 (56.9 to 95.6)). For ulcerative colitis, RRs were high in Indian (169.8 (109.7 to 262.7)) and Pakistani (160.8 (104.2 to 248.2)) men. For Crohn's disease, the RR was high in Pakistani men (209.2 (149.6 to 292.6)). For diverticular disease, RRs were high in Irish men (176.0 (156.9 to 197.5)), and any Mixed background women (144.6 (107.4 to 194.8)), and low in most non-White groups, for example, Chinese men (47.1 (31.0 to 71.6) and women (46.0 (30.4 to 69.8)). Conclusions Appendicitis and diverticular disease were comparatively low in most non-White groups, while

  6. Improvement of Fabry Disease-Related Gastrointestinal Symptoms in a Significant Proportion of Female Patients Treated with Agalsidase Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Martins, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    of organ involvement. Although variable, gastrointestinal symptoms are among the most common and significant early clinical manifestations; they tend to persist into adulthood if left untreated. To further understand the effects of sustained enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase beta......Fabry disease, an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding α-galactosidase, GLA. In patients with Fabry disease, glycosphingolipids accumulate in various cell types, triggering a range of cellular and tissue responses that result in a wide spectrum...... on gastrointestinal symptoms in heterozygotes, a data analysis of female patients enrolled in the Fabry Registry was conducted. To be included, females of any age must have received agalsidase beta (average dose 1.0 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for at least 2.5 years. Measured outcomes were self-reported gastrointestinal...

  7. Neural control disturbances of the gastrointestinal tract and visceral pain in inflammatory bowel diseases 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ciesielczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the etiology of which is composed of factors such as the environment, genetic predisposition, gut dysbiosis and inadequate immune response. The pathologic findings in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are related to dysfunction of gastrointestinal secretion and motility and also disturbed visceral sensory function, with accompanying intestinal and parenteral complications. The systemic inflammatory response affects neurological control via the gut-brain axis, which modulates the cooperation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS, enteric nervous system (ENS and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. In chronic inflammation the intestinal neuropathy disrupts peristalsis and intestinal secretion as well as causing unpleasant symptoms of the patients. Pain receptors are stimulated by inflammatory mediators, and due to the intensified activation of the nociceptive system visceral hypersensitivity through central and peripheral sensitization is generated. Chronic visceral pain negatively influences the course of disease and the quality of the patient’s life. The growing knowledge about the neurological control dysfunction of the intestine and immune system dysregulation could provide proper directives for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  8. [Prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; González-Galilea, Ángel; Gisbert, Javier P; Cucala, Mercedes; Ponce, Julio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases. An epidemiological, multicenter, mixed design study (retrospective review of randomized clinical records and prospective visits) conducted between February 2010 and March 2011 in 22 Spanish gastroenterology departments. Severe anemia was defined as Hb iron deficiency as ferritin anemia at admission was 60% (95% CI 55 to 65), and anemia was severe (Hb iron deficiency was 54% of evaluable patients (95% CI 47 to 61). Gastrointestinal bleeding at admission was found in 39% of the patients, of whom 83% (121/146) were anemic. At discharge, the proportion of anemic patients was unchanged (from 60% at admission to 58% at discharge) (95% CI 53 to 63) and iron deficiency was found in 41% (95% CI 32 to 50): anemia was severe in 17% and mild/moderate in 41%. During follow-up, at 3-6 months after admission, 44% (95% CI 39 to 50) of evaluable patients continued to have iron deficiency and 28% (95% CI 23 to 32) were still anemic: 5% severe and 23% mild/moderate. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 44% (95% CI: 39-50). During admission, 50% of patients with anemia did not receive treatment. At discharge, 55% were untreated. The prevalence of anemia in patients hospitalized for gastroenterological diseases was very high. Anemia persisted in over a quarter of patients at the follow-up visit. Only half of hospitalized patients received treatment for anemia, even when the anemia was severe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastrointestinal motor inhibition by exogenous human, salmon, and eel calcitonin in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Asano, T; Haruta, K; Takeda, K

    1995-01-01

    Effects of synthetic eel (E-), salmon (S-), and human (H-) calcitonin (CT) on gastrointestinal motility were studied in conscious beagle dogs, which had been implanted with strain gauge force transducers. Intramuscular administration of E-, S-, or H-CT interrupted gastric migrating motor complexes, digestive pattern, and gastric emptying. The order of potency was E-CT = S-CT > H-CT. Motor inhibition induced by CT occurred independently of plasma immunoreactive motilin levels or hypocalcemia. In addition, E-CT and S-CT induced vomiting without a retrograde giant contraction (RGC) during the postprandial state. Apomorphine or CuSO4 initiated RGC prior to vomiting. RGC induced by apomorphine was inhibited by pretreatment with E-CT as well as hexamethonium, atropine, or surgical vagotomy. E-CT showed no inhibitory effect on nicotine stimulated contraction of isolated guinea-pig ileum. These results suggest that peripherally administered CT inhibits canine gastrointestinal motility at the central nervous system level by lowering vagal activity.

  10. Parental quality of life in the framework of paediatric chronic gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Rajna; Francisković, Tanja; Samarin, Radenka Munjas; Niksić, Milan

    2011-09-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CD), might have impact not only on the affected child but also on their parents since inside the family framework, a change in each member may have influence on the whole system. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that parents whose children have IBD or CD will have a lower quality of life (QoL) compared to parents of healthy children, as well as that lower QoL will be found among parents who perceive lower health related quality of life (HRQOL) of their child. 55 parents of children with IBD, 49 of CD and 53 parents of healthy children were included in the study. Children were aged 7-18 years. In order to measure parental QoL, a Croatian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was administered, with four domains: physical health, psychological health, social relationship and environment. The Total QoL was calculated as a sum of all domain items. The parent-proxy report of children's HRQOL, PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales was used. Main result shows that parents of children with IBD report a significantly lower psychological health, compared to parents of other children, and significantly lower physical health compared to parents of healthy children. Among parents of children with CD and parents of healthy children, better parental Total QoL was significantly correlated with better parental report of children's HRQOL, while for parents of children with IBD those associations were not found. Results of study show association between presence of the disease in offspring with poorer parental QoL, thus highlight the importance of supporting not only children with chronic disease but also involving their parents in psychosocial interventions, as well as supporting the patient's association groups which gather both children with chronic disease and their parents.

  11. Gastrointestinal diseases in HIV-positive patients: ultrasonography and computed tomography in a study of 85 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Yague, D.; Garcia, C.; Villalon, M.; Pascual, A.; Artigas, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Gastrointestinal diseases constitute the second most common group conditions affecting HIV-positive patients after respiratory diseases. Gastrointestinal involvement may even be the first sign of the disease, a facto which demonstrates the importance of its proper assessment. To demonstrate the utility of computed tomography and ultrasound in the study of gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary diseases in the HIV-positive patient. We review a series of 85 HIV-positive patients presenting gastrointestinal symptomatology who underwent ultrasonography and/or computed tomography. the definitive diagnosis was achieved in all the patients by microbiological or histopathological means. In our series 36.4% the patients had presented systemic TB, 23.52% CMV infection, 17.64% Cryptosporidium infection and 17.64% MAI infection. Much lower incidences were found for Mycobacterium xenopi. M. kansai and Leishmania infection. The presence of lymphoma was confirmed in 7.05% of the patients and Koposi's sarcoma in 0.95%. In these patients, the most common finding on imaging studies in lymph node involvement, followed by diffuse hepatosplenomegaly. Imaging techniques, especially ultrasonography and computed tomography, are useful in these patients: although they do not provide the diagnosis, they do contribute data of prognostic and therapeutic importance. (Author) 11 refs

  12. PREVALENCE OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASES AND EFFICACY OF ERADICATION THERAPY FOR H.PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Zhdanova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal tract pathology and estimations of clinical and pharmacoeconomic efficacy of different algorithms of therapy for H. pyloria assosiated diseases in children dwelling in Krasnodar region are presented in this article.Key words: h. Pylori, prevalence, treatment, eradication therapy, children.

  13. Quality of life and health care consultation in 13 to 18 year olds with abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Benninga, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases (AP-FGD) are commonly seen in the paediatric age group. It has significant impact on daily activities of affected children. Main objective of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with AP-FGD.

  14. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of digestive tract involvement in cystic fibrosis. Part 2: pancreatic and gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, T.; Prieto, C.; Miralles, M.; Pozo, G. del; Martinez, A.; Manzanares, J.

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common fatal, autosomal recessive disease among the white population. Although recurrent pulmonary infections and pulmonary insufficiency are the major causes of morbidity and mortality, gastrointestinal symptoms generally present earlier and may suggest the diagnosis in the newborn or even prior to birth. The changes are attributed to the secretion of an abnormally thick mucous into the intestinal lumen, leading to the hallmark of diseases of the digestive tract: obstruction. This can be detected at birth in the form of mecanium ileus, ileal atresia, mecanium peritonitis and mecomiun plug, or present later on in childhood and adolescence as distal bowel obstruction syndrome or fibrosing colonopathy. This thick mucous can also trigger intussusception or acute appendicitis. Pancreatic insufficiency or pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the direct cause of most of these disorders. Plain radiography is of the utmost utility in assessing the digestive tract in CF. When the disease is detected in a newborn, the recommended approach is to perform plain abdominal X-ray, followed by barium enema, always accompanied by ultrasound. In older children and adolescents, enema and ultrasound are usually sufficient, although computed tomography and magnetic resonance may sometimes be necessary. (Author) 52 refs

  16. Alterations and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract caused by old age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayerl, F.

    1981-01-01

    The dissertation reviews the publications on 'The gastrointestinal tract in old age' since 1941. As in the 1941 publication by Heinrich, particular interest is taken in diagnostic radiology. The lower age limit of the cases described was set at 55 to 60 years. Oesophageal changes ranged from functional disturbances (e.g. atonia, changes in peristalsis, or dilatation) to chronic inflammation, displacement caused by the surrounding organs, and tumours (mainly carcinoma). Formation of diverticula takes an intermediate position. Of the gastric and duodenal changes, hiatal hermia and chronic atrophic gastritis were the most frequent. Ulcers caused by old age differ from 'common' ulcers in some respects, and the symptoms may be confused with those of gastric carcinoma. Early gastric carcinoma is another disease whose incidence increases with age. Thoracic and spinal changes may cause impressions on the stomach. The effects of old age on the time of passage of contrast media, on gastric tone, and on the shape of the stomach remain unclear. Changes caused by old age in the small and large intestine range from formation of diverticula and vascular diseases (e.g. ischaemic colitis and obstruction of the mesenteric vessels) to the frequent carcinoma of the large intestine and rectum. According to this study it has to be supposed that the degenerative atrophic processes of aging and previous diseases occurring increasingly in old age, favour the provocation of ratrogenic injuries. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Current opinion on the management of iron deficiency anaemia in gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derovs, Aleksejs; Pokrotnieks, Juris; Derova, Jelena; Danilans, Anatolijs; Pukitis, Aldis; Dombure, Polina; Leiniece, Sandra; Zeltina Indra

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anaemia in the world. Despite frequently weak and masked clinical presentation of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), this disease is very serious with complications leading to early mortality. In the developed countries IDA is predominantly diagnosed as the complication of another disease or as the result of major bleeding events. Diagnosis of IDA should be based on laboratory findings i.e. haemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and ferritin. Latter is the most sensitive marker for iron deficiency. Anaemia of chronic disease should be taken into an account as a potential differential diagnosis or coexisting state. For women in fertility age with IDA, gynaecological disorders should be ruled out first. Males and postmenopausal women with IDA should undergo upper, lower and in certain cases capsule endoscopy and/or enteroscopy to find a plausible cause of IDA. The ultimate goal of therapy is to find out and treat the primary cause of IDA. Iron body stores should be restored using either oral or parenteral iron preparations. The use of parenteral iron preparations in patients with gastrointestinal pathologies is often clinically substantiated for the treatment of IDA. Red blood cell transfusion should be administered in emergency cases only.

  18. Osteopontin attenuates acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease by preventing apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kentaro; Minami, Naoki; Matsuura, Minoru; Iida, Tomoya; Toyonaga, Takahiko; Nagaishi, Kanna; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uede, Toshimitsu; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which often targets gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important physiological role in the efficient development of Th1 immune responses and cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. The role of OPN in acute GI-GVHD is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of OPN in donor T cells in the pathogenicity of acute GI-GVHD. Methods: OPN knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were used as donors, and (C57BL/6 × DBA/2) F1 (BDF1) mice were used as allograft recipients. Mice with acute GI-GVHD were divided into three groups: the control group (BDF1→BDF1), B6 group (B6→BDF1), and OPN-KO group (OPN-KO→BDF1). Bone marrow cells and spleen cells from donors were transplanted to lethally irradiated recipients. Clinical GVHD scores were assessed daily. Recipients were euthanized on day 7 after transplantation, and colons and small intestines were collected for various analyses. Results: The clinical GVHD score in the OPN-KO group was significantly increased compared with the B6 and control groups. We observed a difference in the severity of colonic GVHD between the OPN-KO group and B6 group, but not small intestinal-GVHD between these groups. Interferon-γ, Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-17A, and Interleukin-18 gene expression in the OPN-KO group was differed between the colon and small intestine. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of splenic and colonic CD8 T cells expressing Fas Ligand was increased in the OPN-KO group compared with the B6 group. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the importance of OPN in T cells in the onset of acute GI-GVHD involves regulating apoptosis of the intestinal cell via the Fas-Fas Ligand pathway. - Highlights: • A lack of osteopontin in donor cells exacerbated clinical gastrointestinal GVHD. • Donor cells lacking

  19. Influenza as a human disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Influenza as a human disease. Commonly perceived as a mild disease, affects every one, sometimes a couple of times in a year. Globally, seasonal influenza epidemics result in about three to five million yearly cases of severe illness and about 250,000 to 500,000 yearly ...

  20. Human communicable diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The rising incidence of malaria and tuberculosis in sub-Saharan Africa is causing great hardship, not only to the individuals affected but also to the economies of the countries where they are rife. Both diseases are becoming more resistant to the drugs that are currently available for treatment and drug resistant strains are posing a global threat. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is responding by sponsoring a programme to build technical competency in molecular and radioisotope-based techniques. (IAEA)

  1. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for 125 I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells

  2. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  3. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  4. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with upper gastrointestinal symptoms without heartburn and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish; Wernersson, Börje; Ohlsson, Lis; Dent, John

    2014-06-01

    Symptomatically 'silent' gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) may be underdiagnosed. To determine the prevalence of untreated GORD without heartburn and/or regurgitation in primary care. Patients were included if they had frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms and had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months (Diamond study: NCT00291746). GORD was diagnosed based on the presence of reflux oesophagitis, pathological oesophageal acid exposure, and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability. Patients completed the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and were interviewed by physicians using a prespecified symptom checklist. GORD was diagnosed in 197 of 336 patients investigated. Heartburn and/or regurgitation were reported in 84.3% of patients with GORD during the physician interviews and in 93.4% of patients with GORD when using the RDQ. Of patients with heartburn and/or regurgitation not identified at physician interview, 58.1% (18/31) reported them at a 'troublesome' frequency and severity on the RDQ. Nine patients with GORD did not report heartburn or regurgitation either at interview or on the RDQ. Structured patient-completed questionnaires may help to identify patients with GORD not identified during physician interview. In a small proportion of consulting patients, heartburn and regurgitation may not be present in those with GORD.

  5. Underlying—Disease Risk for Antispasmodic Premedication in Older Patients Undergoing Investigations of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Saito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Improve risk management of patients undergoing investigations of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, in regard to underlying diseases and choice of premedication. According to a nationwide survey in Japan, 74% of the deaths associated with premedication were patients aged 60 years or over. Methods Subjects were 418 patients undergoing investigations of the GI tract (367 endoscopy, 51 barium contrast radiography between October 2001 and January 2004. Age distribution peaked in the 65-69 years group, and 40% of subjects were aged 65 years and over. Using a questionnaire, each subject was interviewed prior to the investigation to determine contraindications for anticholinergic agents or glucagon preparations. To confirm the risk associated with antispasmodic agents in elderly subjects, the group was subdivided into those aged under 65 years and those aged 65 and over, and compared. Results Anticholinergic agents were contraindicated in more than 50% of subjects aged 65 years and over, and glucagon was contraindicated in 11% of subjects aged 65 years and over. The proportion of elderly subjects in whom antispasmodic agents, including anticholinergics and glucagon, were contraindicated was significantly greater than for subjects aged under 65 years. Conclusions Using a written questionnaire at the time of obtaining informed consent facilitates the identification of underlying diseases and selection of appropriate premedication.

  6. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory-Bryson, Emmalena; Bartlett, Elizabeth; Kiupel, Matti; Hayes, Schantel; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these malignant tumors. This study further

  7. Cohesin and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglan; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominant multisystem disorder caused by a disruption of cohesin function. The cohesin ring complex is composed of four protein subunits and more than 25 additional proteins involved in its regulation. The discovery that this complex also has a fundamental role in long-range regulation of transcription in Drosophila has shed light on the mechanism likely responsible for its role in development. In addition to the three cohesin proteins involved in CdLS, a second multisystem, recessively inherited, developmental disorder, Roberts-SC phocomelia, is caused by mutations in another regulator of the cohesin complex, ESCO2. Here we review the phenotypes of these disorders, collectively termed cohesinopathies, as well as the mechanism by which cohesin disruption likely causes these diseases. PMID:18767966

  8. Regulation of EGF and Prostaglandin Expression during Neonatal Gastrointestinal Injury in a Non-Human Primate Explant Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Neonatal Gastrointestinal Injury in a Non-Human Primate Explant Model presented at/published to Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, San Francisco CA...Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas’ 2Department of Biology, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas’ JDepartment of Pediatrics /Division of Neonatology

  9. Gastrointestinal parasites of canids, a latent risk to human health in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; M'rad, Selim; Trifa, Fatma; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2017-06-05

    Although data on the parasite environmental contamination are crucial to implement strategies for control and treatment, information about zoonotic helminths is very limited in Tunisia. Contamination of areas with canid faeces harboring infective parasite elements represents a relevant health-risk impact for humans. The aim of this study was to assess the environmental contamination with eggs and oocysts of gastrointestinal parasites of dogs and wild canids in Tunisia with special attention to those that can be transmitted to humans. One thousand two hundred and seventy faecal samples from stray dogs and 104 from wild canids (red foxes and golden jackals) were collected from different geographical regions throughout Tunisia. The helminth eggs and protozoan oocysts were concentrated by sucrose flotation and identified by microscopic examination. The most frequently observed parasites in dog samples were Toxocara spp. (27.2%), E. granulosus (25.8%), and Coccidia (13.1%). For wild canid faeces, the most commonly encountered parasites were Toxocara spp. (16.3%) followed by Capillaria spp. (9.6%). The parasite contamination of dog faeces varied significantly from one region to another in function of the climate. To our knowledge, the study highlights for the first time in Tunisia a serious environmental contamination by numerous parasitic stages infective to humans. Efforts should be made to increase the awareness of the contamination risk of such parasites in the environment and implement a targeted educational program.

  10. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Celiac Disease Patients on a Long-Term Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurikka, Pilvi; Salmi, Teea; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2016-07-14

    Experience suggests that many celiac patients suffer from persistent symptoms despite a long-term gluten-free diet (GFD). We investigated the prevalence and severity of these symptoms in patients with variable duration of GFD. Altogether, 856 patients were classified into untreated (n = 128), short-term GFD (1-2 years, n = 93) and long-term GFD (≥3 years, n = 635) groups. Analyses were made of clinical and histological data and dietary adherence. Symptoms were evaluated by the validated GSRS questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty healthy subjects comprised the control group. Further, the severity of symptoms was compared with that in peptic ulcer, reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Altogether, 93% of the short-term and 94% of the long-term treated patients had a strict GFD and recovered mucosa. Untreated patients had more diarrhea, indigestion and abdominal pain than those on GFD and controls. There were no differences in symptoms between the short- and long-term GFD groups, but both yielded poorer GSRS total score than controls (p = 0.03 and p = 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, patients treated 1-2 years had more diarrhea (p = 0.03) and those treated >10 years more reflux (p = 0.04) than controls. Long-term treated celiac patients showed relatively mild symptoms compared with other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on our results, good response to GFD sustained in long-term follow-up, but not all patients reach the level of healthy individuals.

  11. Non-invasive mapping of the gastrointestinal microbiota identifies children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B; Ward, Doyle V; Korzenik, Joshua R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Bousvaros, Athos; Alm, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota of children with IBD and other gastrointestinal disorders. We applied synthetic learning in microbial ecology (SLiME) analysis to 16S sequencing data obtained from i) published surveys of microbiota diversity in IBD and ii) fecal samples from 91 children and young adults who were treated in the gastroenterology program of Children's Hospital (Boston, USA). The developed method accurately distinguished control samples from those of patients with IBD; the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) value was 0.83 (corresponding to 80.3% sensitivity and 69.7% specificity at a set threshold). The accuracy was maintained among data sets collected by different sampling and sequencing methods. The method identified taxa associated with disease states and distinguished patients with Crohn's disease from those with ulcerative colitis with reasonable accuracy. The findings were validated using samples from an additional group of 68 patients; the validation test identified patients with IBD with an AUC value of 0.84 (e.g. 92% sensitivity, 58.5% specificity). Microbiome-based diagnostics can distinguish pediatric patients with IBD from patients with similar symptoms. Although this test can not replace endoscopy and histological examination as diagnostic tools, classification based on microbial diversity is an effective complementary technique for IBD detection in pediatric patients.

  12. Non-invasive mapping of the gastrointestinal microbiota identifies children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Papa

    Full Text Available Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota of children with IBD and other gastrointestinal disorders.We applied synthetic learning in microbial ecology (SLiME analysis to 16S sequencing data obtained from i published surveys of microbiota diversity in IBD and ii fecal samples from 91 children and young adults who were treated in the gastroenterology program of Children's Hospital (Boston, USA. The developed method accurately distinguished control samples from those of patients with IBD; the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC value was 0.83 (corresponding to 80.3% sensitivity and 69.7% specificity at a set threshold. The accuracy was maintained among data sets collected by different sampling and sequencing methods. The method identified taxa associated with disease states and distinguished patients with Crohn's disease from those with ulcerative colitis with reasonable accuracy. The findings were validated using samples from an additional group of 68 patients; the validation test identified patients with IBD with an AUC value of 0.84 (e.g. 92% sensitivity, 58.5% specificity.Microbiome-based diagnostics can distinguish pediatric patients with IBD from patients with similar symptoms. Although this test can not replace endoscopy and histological examination as diagnostic tools, classification based on microbial diversity is an effective complementary technique for IBD detection in pediatric patients.

  13. Gastrointestinal symptoms, inflammation and hypoalbuminemia in chronic kidney disease patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehan; Bansal, Nisha; Go, Alan S; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-12-11

    Few studies have focused on investigating hypoalbuminemia in patients during earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In particular, little is known about the role of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Our goal in this paper is to study how GI symptoms relate to serum albumin levels in CKD, especially in the context of and compared with inflammation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 3599 patients with chronic kidney disease enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. All subjects were asked to complete the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study patient symptom form. Our main predictor is GI symptom score. Serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured as well. Main outcome measures are serum albumin levels and prevalence of hypoalbuminemia. Of the participants assessed, mean serum albumin was 3.95 ± 0.46 g/dL; 12.7 % had hypoalbuminemia. Patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were likely to have more GI symptoms (apparent at an eGFR Patients with worse GI symptoms had lower dietary protein intake. GI symptoms, like inflammation, were risk factors for lower serum albumin levels. However, adding GI symptom score or CRP into the multivariable regression analysis, did not attenuate the association between lower eGFR and lower albumin or hypoalbuminemia. Increased prevalence of GI symptoms become apparent among CKD patients at relatively high eGFR levels (45 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), long before ESRD. Patients with more severe GI symptoms scores are more likely to have hypoalbuminemia. But our data do not support GI symptoms/decreased protein intake or inflammation as being the main determinants of serum albumin level in CKD patients.

  14. Radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in Hodgkin's disease: the role of exploratory laparotomy and fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallez-Marchal, D.; Fayolle, M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Rougier, P.; Cosset, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Out of 134 patients irradiated below the diaphragm to a dose of 40 Gy for Hodgkin's disease at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, 19 (14%) were subsequently found to present with radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract. Since five patients presented with two different injuries, 24 radiolesions were observed. Most of them (17 out of 24) were gastric or duodenal. Twelve (out of 24) were ulcers. Nine patients required surgery. A complete cure of the radiation injuries was obtained in 15 out of 19 patients. Sex, age, stage, histology or initial chemotherapy were not found to play a role in the occurrence of radiation damage. On the contrary, the role of a previous exploratory laparotomy appeared important; for the patients who underwent laparotomy and irradiation, the complication rate was 23%. For the patients treated by irradiation alone, the complication rate was 7% (p < 0.01). Fractionation was found to be another important parameter: for 52 patients treated using 3 weekly fractions of 3.3 Gy, the complication rate was 25% compared to 8% (p < 0.01) for 76 patients treated using 4 weekly fractions of 2.5 Gy. Combining these two factors, the authors found a 42% complication rate for the group of patients who underwent laparotomy and who were treated by means of 3 fractions of 3.3 Gy per week, whereas patients irradiated using 4 weekly fractions of 2.5 Gy, without any previous laparotomy, has only a 5% complication risk (p < 0.001). (Auth.)

  15. Effect of Gastrointestinal Malformations on the Outcomes of Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mery, Carlos M; De León, Luis E; Rodriguez, J Rubén; Nieto, R Michael; Zhang, Wei; Adachi, Iki; Heinle, Jeffrey S; Kane, Lauren C; McKenzie, E Dean; Fraser, Charles D

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of associated gastrointestinal malformations (GI) on the outcomes of patients undergoing congenital heart operations. Neonates and infants with thoracic (esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula) and abdominal (duodenal stenosis/atresia, imperforate anus, Hirschsprung disease) GI malformations undergoing congenital heart operations between 1995 and 2015 were included. Two control groups were created, one for each group. Patients were matched by diagnosis, procedure, history of prematurity, presence of genetic syndrome, and a propensity score including weight and year of operation. The cohort included 383 patients: 52 (14%) with thoracic GI malformations and 98 (25%) thoracic GI controls, 80 (21%) with abdominal GI malformations and 153 (40%) abdominal GI controls. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 16 days to 20 years). Patients with thoracic GI malformations had longer length of stay (p malformations and controls. Patients with thoracic GI malformations have worse perioperative outcomes than controls, but their long-term survival does not seem to be significantly different. Abdominal GI malformations do not have a significant effect on outcomes. The presence of GI malformations should likely not preclude patients from undergoing congenital heart operations, but careful family counseling is necessary, especially for thoracic GI malformations. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING IN THE YOUNG - GASTRIC GIST TUMOR OR PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Atolagbe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available GIST tumors is very unusual in the young and middle aged and a high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis in young patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate imaging such as a Computed tomographic scan (CT scan may identify this tumor which may easily be misdiagnosed as a bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease in the young. We present a case of a healthy 38 year old man with no alcohol use who presented with epigastric pain and melena and subsequent torrential bleeding uncontrolled during endoscopy necessitating an emergency exploratory laparotomy by the general surgery team. The bleeding intraluminal component of the tumor with gross splenic and pancreatic involvement was identified and surgical management consisted of a wedge resection of the greater curvature of the stomach incorporating the tumor and the spleen with successful dissection of the tumor off the tail of the pancreas. Histology was positive for C-KIT and DOG-1 markers. Postoperative course was uneventful and he is presently on Imatinib Mesylate.

  17. Epistaxis in end stage liver disease masquerading as severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Matthews, Jason D; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S

    2014-10-14

    To describe the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients with severe epistaxis thought to be severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). This observational single center study included all consecutive patients with ESLD and epistaxis identified from consecutive subjects hospitalized with suspected UGIH and prospectively enrolled in our databases of severe UGIH between 1998 and 2011. A total of 1249 patients were registered for severe UGIH in the data basis, 461 (36.9%) were cirrhotics. Epistaxis rather than UGIH was the bleeding source in 20 patients. All patients had severe coagulopathy. Epistaxis was initially controlled in all cases. Fifteen (75%) subjects required posterior nasal packing and 2 (10%) embolization in addition to correction of coagulopathy. Five (25%) patients died in the hospital, 12 (60%) received orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and 3 (15%) were discharged without OLT. The mortality rate was 63% in patients without OLT. Severe epistaxis in patients with ESLD is (1) a diagnosis of exclusion that requires upper endoscopy to exclude severe UGIH; and (2) associated with a high mortality rate in patients not receiving OLT.

  18. Perceived medication adherence barriers mediating effects between gastrointestinal symptoms and health-related quality of life in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varni, James W; Shulman, Robert J; Self, Mariella M; Saeed, Shehzad A; Zacur, George M; Patel, Ashish S; Nurko, Samuel; Neigut, Deborah A; Franciosi, James P; Saps, Miguel; Denham, Jolanda M; Dark, Chelsea Vaughan; Bendo, Cristiane B; Pohl, John F

    2018-01-01

    The primary objective was to investigate the mediating effects of patient-perceived medication adherence barriers in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The secondary objective explored patient health communication and gastrointestinal worry as additional mediators with medication adherence barriers in a serial multiple mediator model. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Medicines, Communication, Gastrointestinal Worry, and Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 172 adolescents with IBD. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea and perceived medication adherence barriers were tested for bivariate and multivariate linear associations with HRQOL. Mediational analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized mediating effects of perceived medication adherence barriers as an intervening variable between gastrointestinal symptoms and HRQOL. The predictive effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on HRQOL were mediated in part by perceived medication adherence barriers. Patient health communication was a significant additional mediator. In predictive analytics models utilizing multiple regression analyses, demographic variables, gastrointestinal symptoms (stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea), and perceived medication adherence barriers significantly accounted for 45, 38, and 29 percent of the variance in HRQOL (all Ps barriers explain in part the effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on HRQOL in adolescents with IBD. Patient health communication to healthcare providers and significant others further explain the mechanism in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms, perceived medication adherence barriers, and HRQOL.

  19. A wireless capsule system with ASIC for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Li; Gao, Jinyang; Liu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless capsule system for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The primary components of the system include a wireless capsule, a portable data recorder, and a workstation. Temperature, pH, and pressure sensors; an RF transceiver; a controlling and processing application specific integrated circuit (ASIC); and batteries were applied in a wireless capsule. Decreasing capsule size, improving sensor precision, and reducing power needs were the primary challenges; these were resolved by employing micro sensors, optimized architecture, and an ASIC design that include power management, clock management, a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an A/D converter (ADC), and a serial peripheral interface (SPI) communication unit. The ASIC has been fabricated in 0.18- μm CMOS technology with a die area of 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm. The wireless capsule integrating the ASIC controller measures Φ 11 mm × 26 mm. A data recorder and a workstation were developed, and 20 cases of human experiments were conducted in hospitals. Preprocessing in the workstation can significantly improve the quality of the data, and 76 original features were determined by mathematical statistics. Based on the 13 optimal features achieved in the evaluation of the features, the clustering algorithm can identify the patients who lack GI motility with a recognition rate reaching 83.3%.

  20. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases: results from a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieger, Arine M; Blink, Marjolein; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A

    2008-08-01

    Many pediatric patients use complementary and alternative medicine, especially when facing a chronic illness for which treatment options are limited. So far, research on the use of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with functional gastrointestinal disease has been scarce. This study was designed to assess complementary and alternative medicine use in children with different gastrointestinal diseases, including functional disorders, to determine which factors predicted complementary and alternative medicine use and to assess the willingness of parents to participate in future studies on complementary and alternative medicine efficacy and safety. The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use was assessed by using a questionnaire for 749 children visiting pediatric gastroenterology clinics of 9 hospitals in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of 35 questions on the child's gastrointestinal disease, medication use, health status, past and future complementary and alternative medicine use, reasons for its use, and the necessity of complementary and alternative medicine research. In this study population, the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine use was 37.6%. A total of 60.3% of this group had used complementary and alternative medicine specifically for their gastrointestinal disease. This specific complementary and alternative medicine use was higher in patients with functional disorders than organic disorders (25.3% vs 17.2%). Adverse effects of allopathic medication, school absenteeism, age effect of conventional treatment were predictors of specific complementary and alternative medicine use. Almost all (93%) of the parents considered it important that pediatricians initiate complementary and alternative medicine research, and 51% of parents were willing to participate in future complementary and alternative medicine trials. Almost 40% of parents of pediatric gastroenterology patients are turning to

  1. Medicinal plants--prophylactic and therapeutic options for gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases in calves and piglets? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrle, Hannah; Mevissen, Meike; Kaske, Martin; Nathues, Heiko; Gruetzner, Niels; Melzig, Matthias; Walkenhorst, Michael

    2016-06-06

    Gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases in calves and piglets lead to significant economic losses in livestock husbandry. A high morbidity has been reported for diarrhea (calves ≤ 35%; piglets ≤ 50%) and for respiratory diseases (calves ≤ 80%; piglets ≤ 40%). Despite a highly diverse etiology and pathophysiology of these diseases, treatment with antimicrobials is often the first-line therapy. Multi-antimicrobial resistance in pathogens results in international accordance to strengthen the research in novel treatment options. Medicinal plants bear a potential as alternative or additional treatment. Based on the versatile effects of their plant specific multi-component-compositions, medicinal plants can potentially act as 'multi-target drugs'. Regarding the plurality of medicinal plants, the aim of this systematic review was to identify potential medicinal plant species for prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases and for modulation of the immune system and inflammation in calves and piglets. Based on nine initial sources including standard textbooks and European ethnoveterinary studies, a total of 223 medicinal plant species related to the treatment of gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases was identified. A defined search strategy was established using the PRISMA statement to evaluate 30 medicinal plant species starting from 20'000 peer-reviewed articles published in the last 20 years (1994-2014). This strategy led to 418 references (257 in vitro, 84 in vivo and 77 clinical trials, thereof 48 clinical trials in veterinary medicine) to evaluate effects of medicinal plants and their efficacy in detail. The findings indicate that the most promising candidates for gastrointestinal diseases are Allium sativum L., Mentha x piperita L. and Salvia officinalis L.; for diseases of the respiratory tract Echinacea purpurea (L.) MOENCH, Thymus vulgaris L. and Althea officinalis L. were found most promising, and Echinacea purpurea (L

  2. The role of fermentable carbohydrates and beverages in the symptomatology of functional gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moding, Magnus; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2017-11-01

    The pathophysiology behind functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) has not been defined, but an intestinal accumulation of fermentable short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs) is thought to be involved. A restricted coffee intake is recommended. The aim was to investigate if symptoms of FGID were associated with intake of certain foods (including FODMAPs), as well as beverages (including coffee and tea). Data were used from participants, age range 45-75 years, who had answered the EpiHealth questionnaire about their background factors, health status and intake of food and beverages. After exclusion of organic bowel diseases, 16,840 participants remained. The impact of food and beverages on functional abdominal pain, functional bloating, functional constipation and functional diarrhea were examined by adjusted binary logistic regression. Wholemeal bread (Swedish cracker) (OR: 1.361; 95% CI: 1.001-1.851) and white bread (low fiber content) (OR: 1.527; 95% CI: 1.075-2.169) were associated with constipation, whereas soft wholemeal bread (high fiber content) was associated with diarrhea (OR: 1.601; 95% CI: 1.040-2.463). Cheese was associated with bloating (OR: 1.460; 95% CI: 1.004-2.123). A high tea intake was associated with abdominal pain (p for trend =.003), bloating (p for trend = .039) and diarrhea (p for trend <.001), whereas coffee intake was associated with a decreased risk of abdominal pain (p for trend = .002) and bloating (p for trend = .007). High soda intake associated with abdominal pain and bloating and juice with diarrhea. There are weak associations between intake of grain and dairy products and FGID symptoms. Tea is associated with increased risks, whereas coffee is associated with lower risks, of FGID symptoms.

  3. Autoimmune diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and the microbiome in schizophrenia: more than a gut feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Emily G; Yolken, Robert H; Eaton, William W

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmunity, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and schizophrenia have been associated with one another for a long time. This paper reviews these connections and provides a context by which multiple risk factors for schizophrenia may be related. Epidemiological studies strongly link schizophrenia with autoimmune disorders including enteropathic celiac disease. Exposure to wheat gluten and bovine milk casein also contribute to non-celiac food sensitivities in susceptible individuals. Co-morbid GI inflammation accompanies humoral immunity to food antigens, occurs early during the course of schizophrenia and appears to be independent from antipsychotic-generated motility effects. This inflammation impacts endothelial barrier permeability and can precipitate translocation of gut bacteria into systemic circulation. Infection by the neurotropic gut pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, will elicit an inflammatory GI environment. Such processes trigger innate immunity, including activation of complement C1q, which also functions at synapses in the brain. The emerging field of microbiome research lies at the center of these interactions with evidence that the abundance and diversity of resident gut microbiota contribute to digestion, inflammation, gut permeability and behavior. Dietary modifications of core bacterial compositions may explain inefficient gluten digestion and how immigrant status in certain situations is a risk factor for schizophrenia. Gut microbiome research in schizophrenia is in its infancy, but data in related fields suggest disease-associated altered phylogenetic compositions. In summary, this review surveys associative and experimental data linking autoimmunity, GI activity and schizophrenia, and proposes that understanding of disrupted biological pathways outside of the brain can lend valuable information regarding pathogeneses of complex, polygenic brain disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Helicobacter pylori population characteristic in patients with diseases of gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebrun, A B; Svarval', A V; Balabash, O A; Ferman, R S

    2013-01-01

    Study H. pylori strains circulating in St. Petersburg among patients with various gastrointestinal tract pathology as well as study of frequency of infection by H. pylori based on serological markers data among this group of patients. By using serological method 162 individuals with various chronic diseases of stomach and duodenum were examined. The presence in blood serum of IgG against H. pylori bacterial antigen and IgG against its toxin--CagA was studied. 129 patients were examined bacteriologically, biopsy samples of stomach mucous membrane were studied. PCR in real time format was used for study of H. pylori strains (49) and biopsy samples (36) of stomach mucous membrane. The analysis performed showed that on the territory of St. Petersburg H. pylori strains containing cagA gene predominate (81.63% of the isolated strains). Genotyping of strains by vacA showed that s1m1 genotype was more frequent (in 57.14% of cases). The fraction of CagA positive strains in patients in St. Petersburg is maximum for stomach cancer (90.8%), whereas for peptic ulcer disease and gastritis it is 64.7% and 72.2%, respectively. In patients with stomach and duodenum pathology the parameters of seropositivity for H. pylori were significantly higher than in individuals without clinical manifestations of H. pylori infection (86.72% against 65.09%; p < 0.05). The data obtained on increase of fraction of CagA positive strains among H. pylori circulating in St. Petersburg determine the importance of conducting eradication H. pylori.

  5. Gastrointestinal Diagnosis of Classical Whipple Disease: Clinical, Endoscopic, and Histopathologic Features in 191 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Ute; Moos, Verena; Offenmüller, Gabriel; Oelkers, Gerrit; Heise, Walther; Moter, Annette; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Classic Whipple disease (CWD) is a systemic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei. Different diagnostic tools have been developed over the last decades: periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining, T whipplei-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and T whipplei-specific immunohistochemistry (IHC). Despite all these advances, CWD is still difficult to diagnose because of a variety of clinical symptoms and possibly a long time span between first unspecific symptoms and the full-blown clinical picture of the disease. Herein, we report an observational cohort study summarizing epidemiologic data, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic parameters of 191 patients with CWD collected at our institution. Gastrointestinal manifestations are the most characteristic symptoms of CWD affecting 76% of the cohort. Although the small bowel was macroscopically conspicuous in only 27% of cases, 173 (91%) patients presented with characteristic histological changes in small bowel biopsies (in 2 patients, these changes were only seen within the ileum). However, 18 patients displayed normal small bowel histology without typical PAS staining. In 9 of these patients, alternative test were positive from their duodenal specimens (ie, T whipplei-specific PCR and/or IHC). Thus, in 182 patients (95%) a diagnostic hint toward CWD was obtained from small bowel biopsies. Only 9 patients (5%) were diagnosed solely based on positive T whipplei-specific PCR and/or IHC of extraintestinal fluids (eg, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid) or extraintestinal tissue (eg, lymph node, synovial tissue), respectively. Thus, despite efforts to diagnose CWD from alternative specimens, gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy and subsequent histological and molecular–biological examination is the most reliable diagnostic tool for CWD. PMID:25881849

  6. Burden of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Middle East and North Africa: Results of Global Burden of Diseases Study from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Delavari, Farnaz; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILDs) are major causes of death and disability in Middle East and North Africa (MENA). However, they have different patterns in countries with various geographical, cultural, and socio-economic status. We aimed to compare the burden of GILDs in Iran with its neighboring countries using the results of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study in 2010. METHODS Classic metrics of GBD have been used including: age-standardized rates (ASRs) of death, years of life lost due to premature death (YLL), years of life lost due to disability (YLD), and disability adjusted life years (DALY). All countries neighboring Iran have been selected. In addition, all other countries classified in the MENA region were included. Five major groups of gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases were studied including: infections of gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal and pancreatobilliary cancers, acute hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other digestive diseases. RESULTS The overall burden of GILDs is highest in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Egypt. Diarrheal diseases have been replaced by gastrointestinal cancers and cirrhosis in most countries in the region. However, in a number of countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Egypt, and Yemen, communicable GILDs are still among top causes of mortality and morbidity in addition to non-communicable GILDs and cancers. These countries are experiencing the double burden. In Iran, burden caused by cancers of stomach and esophagus are considerably higher than other countries. Diseases that are mainly diagnosed in outpatient settings have not been captured by GBD. CONCLUSION Improving the infrastructure of health care system including cancer registries and electronic recording of outpatient care is a necessity for better surveillance of GILDs in MENA. In contrast to expensive treatment, prevention of most GILDs is feasible and inexpensive. The health care systems in the region can be strengthened for

  7. The role of vitamin D in reducing gastrointestinal disease risk and assessment of individual dietary intake needs: Focus on genetic and genomic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Laing, Bobbi; Marlow, Gareth; Bishop, Karen

    2016-01-01

    With the endogenous formation of vitamin D being significantly curtailed because of public awareness of skin cancer dangers, attention is turning to dietary sources. Cumulative evidence has implicated vitamin D deficiency in increasing susceptibility to various gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also reason to suggest adjunct vitamin D therapy for such diseases. Although there is justification for increasing vitamin D intake overall, optimal intakes will vary among individuals. Genomic technologies have revealed several hundreds of genes associated with vitamin D actions. The nature of these genes emphasizes the potentially negative implications of modulating vitamin D intakes in the absence of complementary human genetic and genomic data, including information on the gut microbiome. However, we are not yet in a position to apply this information. Genomic data (transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) could provide evidence that vitamin D sufficiency has been achieved. We suggest that there is an increasingly strong case for considering the more widespread use of vitamin D fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to benefit gastrointestinal health. However, intake levels might beneficially be informed by personalized genetic and genomic information, for optimal disease prevention and maintenance of remission. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Impact of Cigarette Smoking on the Gastrointestinal Tract Inflammation: Opposing Effects in Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

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    Loni Berkowitz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for gastrointestinal disorders, such as peptic ulcer, Crohn’s disease (CD, and several cancers. The mechanisms proposed to explain the role of smoking in these disorders include mucosal damage, changes in gut irrigation, and impaired mucosal immune response. Paradoxically, cigarette smoking is a protective factor for the development and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC. UC and CD represent the two most important conditions of inflammatory bowel diseases, and share several clinical features. The opposite effects of smoking on these two conditions have been a topic of great interest in the last 30 years, and has not yet been clarified. In this review, we summarize the most important and well-understood effects of smoking in the gastrointestinal tract; and particularly, in intestinal inflammation, discussing available studies that have addressed the causes that would explain the opposite effects of smoking in CD and UC.

  9. Gluten causes gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without celiac disease: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiekierski, Jessica R; Newnham, Evan D; Irving, Peter M; Barrett, Jacqueline S; Haines, Melissa; Doecke, James D; Shepherd, Susan J; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2011-03-01

    Despite increased prescription of a gluten-free diet for gastrointestinal symptoms in individuals who do not have celiac disease, there is minimal evidence that suggests that gluten is a trigger. The aims of this study were to determine whether gluten ingestion can induce symptoms in non-celiac individuals and to examine the mechanism. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled rechallenge trial was undertaken in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in whom celiac disease was excluded and who were symptomatically controlled on a gluten-free diet. Participants received either gluten or placebo in the form of two bread slices plus one muffin per day with a gluten-free diet for up to 6 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated using a visual analog scale and markers of intestinal inflammation, injury, and immune activation were monitored. A total of 34 patients (aged 29-59 years, 4 men) completed the study as per protocol. Overall, 56% had human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8. Adherence to diet and supplements was very high. Of 19 patients (68%) in the gluten group, 13 reported that symptoms were not adequately controlled compared with 6 of 15 (40%) on placebo (P=0.0001; generalized estimating equation). On a visual analog scale, patients were significantly worse with gluten within 1 week for overall symptoms (P=0.047), pain (P=0.016), bloating (P=0.031), satisfaction with stool consistency (P=0.024), and tiredness (P=0.001). Anti-gliadin antibodies were not induced. There were no significant changes in fecal lactoferrin, levels of celiac antibodies, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, or intestinal permeability. There were no differences in any end point in individuals with or without DQ2/DQ8. "Non-celiac gluten intolerance" may exist, but no clues to the mechanism were elucidated.

  10. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Nathalie M L; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies.

  11. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  12. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisko, Daniel J.; Johnston, G. Patricia; Johnston, Carl G.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study. PMID:28212267

  13. A compositional look at the human gastrointestinal microbiome and immune activation parameters in HIV infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece A Mutlu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV progression is characterized by immune activation and microbial translocation. One factor that may be contributing to HIV progression could be a dysbiotic microbiome. We therefore hypothesized that the GI mucosal microbiome is altered in HIV patients and this alteration correlates with immune activation in HIV. 121 specimens were collected from 21 HIV positive and 22 control human subjects during colonoscopy. The composition of the lower gastrointestinal tract mucosal and luminal bacterial microbiome was characterized using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was correlated to clinical parameters as well as immune activation and circulating bacterial products in HIV patients on ART. The composition of the HIV microbiome was significantly different than that of controls; it was less diverse in the right colon and terminal ileum, and was characterized by loss of bacterial taxa that are typically considered commensals. In HIV samples, there was a gain of some pathogenic bacterial taxa. This is the first report characterizing the terminal ileal and colonic mucosal microbiome in HIV patients with next generation sequencing. Limitations include use of HIV-infected subjects on HAART therapy.

  14. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice.

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    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3 on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health.

  15. Specific expression of human intelectin-1 in malignant pleural mesothelioma and gastrointestinal goblet cells.

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    Kota Washimi

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a fatal tumor. It is often hard to discriminate MPM from metastatic tumors of other types because currently, there are no reliable immunopathological markers for MPM. MPM is differentially diagnosed by some immunohistochemical tests on pathology specimens. In the present study, we investigated the expression of intelectin-1, a new mesothelioma marker, in normal tissues in the whole body and in many cancers, including MPM, by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that in normal tissues, human intelectin-1 was mainly secreted from gastrointestinal goblet cells along with mucus into the intestinal lumen, and it was also expressed, to a lesser extent, in mesothelial cells and urinary epithelial cells. Eighty-eight percent of epithelioid-type MPMs expressed intelectin-1, whereas sarcomatoid-type MPMs, biphasic MPMs, and poorly differentiated MPMs were rarely positive for intelectin-1. Intelectin-1 was not expressed in other cancers, except in mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that intelectin-1 is a better marker for epithelioid-type MPM than other mesothelioma markers because of its specificity and the simplicity of pathological assessment. Pleural intelectin-1 could be a useful diagnostic marker for MPM with applications in histopathological identification of MPM.

  16. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Lisko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days. We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs, Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study.

  17. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Japanese apricot improves symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekita, Takao; Kato, Jun; Enomoto, Shotaro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Hanamitsu, Toshiko; Inoue, Izumi; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Muraki, Yosuke; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-07-14

    To investigate the effects of Japanese apricot (JA) consumption on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. Participants included individuals living in Minabe-cho, a well-known JA-growing region, who received specific medical check-ups by the local community health service in 2010. GERD-related symptoms were examined in 1303 Japanese individuals using a validated questionnaire, the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), which consists of 7 questions associated with acid reflux symptoms and 5 questions asking about gastrointestinal dysmotility symptoms. Each question was answered using a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe GERD-related symptoms. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their intake of dried and pickled JA: daily intake (≥ 1 JA daily) (392 subjects) and none or occasional intake (reflux score did not differ between subjects with and without daily intake of JA (1.08 ± 1.90 vs 1.24 ± 2.11, P = 0.177). Subanalysis indicated that improvement in dysmotility by JA intake was specifically observed in non-elderly (1.24 ± 1.68 vs 1.62 ± 2.22, P = 0.005) and H. pylori-negative subjects (0.99 ± 1.58 vs 1.57 ± 2.06, P < 0.001). GERD patients (total FSSG score ≥ 8) were less frequently observed among subjects with daily intake of JA as compared to those without daily intake of JA (6.1% vs 9.7%, P = 0.040). Daily JA intake may improve digestive dysmotility symptoms, resulting in relief of GERD symptoms. The effect is more obvious in non-elderly and H. pylori-negative subjects.

  19. Evidence Against Routine Testing of Patients With Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders for Celiac Disease: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, Rok Seon; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D; Kyle, Robert A; Camilleri, Michael J; Locke, G Richard; Talley, Nicholas J; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms in outpatient clinics. Guidelines recommend that all patients with IBS-like symptoms undergo serologic testing for celiac disease, but there is controversy over whether celiac disease is more prevalent in populations with IBS-like symptoms. We aimed to determine whether positive results from serologic tests for celiac disease are associated with IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in a large U.S. white population. Validated, self-report bowel disease questionnaires (BDQs) were sent to randomly selected cohorts of Olmsted County, Minnesota residents. In separate protocols, serum samples were collected from more than 47,000 Olmsted County residents without a prior diagnosis of celiac disease; we performed serologic tests for celiac disease on stored serum samples from residents who completed the BDQ. Logistic regression was used to test for the association between serologic markers of celiac disease (positive vs negative) and individual FGIDs. A total of 3202 subjects completed the BDQ and had serum available for testing. IBS was identified in 13.6% of these subjects (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.4%-14.8%), and any gastrointestinal symptom occurred in 55.2% (95% CI, 53.5%-56.9%). The prevalence of celiac disease on the basis of serologic markers was 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7%-1.4%). IBS was less prevalent in patients with celiac disease (3%) than patients without celiac disease (14%), although the difference was not statistically significant (odds ratio, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.03-1.5). Abdominal pain, constipation, weight loss, and dyspepsia were the most frequent symptom groups in subjects who were seropositive for celiac disease, but none of the gastrointestinal symptoms or disorders were significantly associated with celiac disease serology. Symptoms indicative of FGIDs and seropositive celiac disease are relatively common in a U.S. white community. Testing for celiac

  20. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  1. Upper-gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to peptic ulcer disease: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Samuel; Frolkis, Alexandra; Milne, Kaylee; Molodecky, Natalie; Yang, Hong; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Myers, Robert P; Ghosh, Subrata; Hilsden, Robert; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2014-12-14

    To evaluate the incidence, surgery, mortality, and readmission of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) secondary to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Administrative databases identified all hospitalizations for UGIB secondary to PUD in Alberta, Canada from 2004 to 2010 (n = 7079) using the International Classification of Diseases Codes (ICD-10). A subset of the data was validated using endoscopy reports. Positive predictive value and sensitivity with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Incidence of UGIB secondary to PUD was calculated. Logistic regression was used to evaluate surgery, in-hospital mortality, and 30-d readmission to hospital with recurrent UGIB secondary to PUD. Co-variants accounted for in our logistic regression model included: age, sex, area of residence (i.e., urban vs rural), number of Charlson comorbidities, presence of perforated PUD, undergoing upper endoscopy, year of admission, and interventional radiological attempt at controlling bleeding. A subgroup analysis (n = 6356) compared outcomes of patients with gastric ulcers to those with duodenal ulcers. Adjusted estimates are presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95%CI. The positive predictive value and sensitivity of ICD-10 coding for UGIB secondary to PUD were 85.2% (95%CI: 80.2%-90.2%) and 77.1% (95%CI: 69.1%-85.2%), respectively. The annual incidence between 2004 and 2010 ranged from 35.4 to 41.2 per 100000. Overall risk of surgery, in-hospital mortality, and 30-d readmission to hospital for UGIB secondary to PUD were 4.3%, 8.5%, and 4.7%, respectively. Interventional radiology to control bleeding was performed in 0.6% of patients and 76% of these patients avoided surgical intervention. Thirty-day readmission significantly increased from 3.1% in 2004 to 5.2% in 2010 (OR = 1.07; 95%CI: 1.01-1.14). Rural residents (OR rural vs urban: 2.35; 95%CI: 1.83-3.01) and older individuals (OR ≥ 65 vs ulcers had higher odds of dying (OR = 1.27; 95%CI: 1.05-1.53), requiring surgery (OR = 1.73; 95

  2. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-15

    Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as to perform outcome research using

  3. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  4. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  5. Use of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Guidelines Improves the Diagnostic Sensitivity of Gastrointestinal Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Diana M; Detweiler, Claire J; Shealy, Michael J; Sung, Anthony D; Wild, Daniel M; Poleski, Martin H; Balmadrid, Bryan L; Cirrincione, Constance T; Howell, David N; Sullivan, Keith M

    2018-04-26

    - Graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract is a common complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be difficult and is a truly clinicopathologic endeavor. - To assess the diagnostic sensitivity of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease using the 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH) histology consensus guidelines and to analyze histologic findings that support the guidelines. - Patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants were identified via a retrospective search of our electronic medical record from January 1, 2005, to January 1, 2011. Endoscopies with available histology were reviewed by 2 pathologists using the 2015 NIH guidelines. The clinical diagnosis was used as the gold standard. A nontransplant set of endoscopic biopsies was used as a control. - Of the 250 total endoscopies, 217 (87%) had a clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease. Use of the NIH consensus guidelines showed a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 65%. Thirty-seven of 58 (64%) cases with an initial false-negative histopathologic diagnosis were diagnosed as graft-versus-host disease on our review. - Use of the NIH histology consensus guidelines results in a high sensitivity and specificity, thereby decreasing false-negatives. Additionally, use of the NIH guidelines aids in creating uniformity and diagnostic clarity. Correlation with clinical and laboratory findings is critical in evaluating the differential diagnosis and to avoid false-positives. As expected, increased apoptosis with decreased inflammation was associated with a pathologic diagnosis of graft-versus-host disease and supports the NIH guidelines.

  6. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease. (paper)

  7. ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) reduces bacterial attachment to human gastrointestinal LS174T epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Andrew; Bebawy, Mary

    2012-08-15

    The aim of this project was to show elevated P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression decreasing bacterial association with LS174T human gastrointestinal cells, and that this effect could be reversed upon blocking functional P-gp efflux. Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactobacillus acidophilus and numerous strains of Escherichia coli, from commensal to enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic strains (O157:H7) were fluorescently labelled and incubated on LS174T cultures either with or without P-gp amplification using rifampicin. PSC-833 was used as a potent functional P-gp blocking agent. Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas displayed the greatest association with the LS174T cells. Surprisingly, lactobacilli retained more fluorescence than enteropathogenic-E. coli in this system. Irrespective of attachment differences between the bacterial species, the increase in P-gp protein expression decreased bacterial fluorescence by 25-30%. This included the GFP-labelled E. coli, and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (O157:H7). Blocking P-gp function through the co-administration of PSC-833 increased the amount of bacteria associated with P-gp expressing LS174T cells back to control levels. As most bacteria were affected to the same degree, irrespective of pathogenicity, it is unlikely that P-gp has a direct influence on adhesion of bacteria, and instead P-gp may be playing an indirect role by secreting a bank of endogenous factors or changing the local environment to one less suited to bacterial growth in general. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on daily life: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Xiaoping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease imposes a significant burden of illness in Western populations. However, data on the impact of reflux symptoms on daily life in Asian populations are scarce. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of GERD (defined on the basis of symptoms on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL in individuals from five regions in China, as part of the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC study. Methods In total, 18 000 residents were randomly selected from across five regions of China and asked to complete a general information questionnaire and a Chinese version of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ. A randomly selected subsample of one-fifth of subjects (20% from each region completed Chinese versions of the 36-item self-administered (SF-36 questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS questionnaire. Reflux symptoms were defined as the presence of heartburn and/or regurgitation. Symptom-defined GERD was diagnosed as mild heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥2 days per week, or moderate/severe heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥1 day a week, based on the Montreal Definition of GERD for population-based studies. Results The response rate was 89.4% for the total sample (16 091/18 000, and for the 20% subsample (3219/3600. Meaningful impairment was observed in all 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with symptom-defined GERD, in 7 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with troublesome reflux symptoms, and in 6 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with reflux symptoms below the threshold for symptom-defined GERD. Meaningful daytime sleepiness was also observed in each of these groups. The proportion of individuals reporting troublesome symptoms increased as reflux symptom frequency and severity approached the threshold for symptom-defined GERD, and this was associated with concomitant decreases in all HRQoL measures. Troublesome symptoms were reported by 68.2% (75

  9. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease : European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN).

  10. Disease burden due to gastrointestinal pathogens in a wastewater system in Kampala, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrimann, Samuel; Winkler, Mirko S.; Stalder, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    In wastewater systems in Kampala, Uganda, microbial contamination has increased over the past two decades. Those people who live or work along the Nakivubo channel and wetland and those who use the recreational areas along the shores of Lake Victoria are at an elevated risk of gastrointestinal in...

  11. Quality of colonoscopy and spectrum of lower gastrointestinal disease as determined by colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, K.U.; Qureshi, M.O.; Salih, M.

    2015-01-01

    To document the quality of colonoscopy practice and the pattern of colonic disease including polyp detection rate at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: This retrospective study recorded demographics of patients, indications and quality indices of 505 colonoscopies performed during the study period. Preparation was done with low residue diet and polyethylene glycol. Conscious sedation was generally used. Quality indices studied were compared with guideline standard. Results:Out of 505 colonoscopy patients, 305 were males and 200 were females. The indications for colonoscopic examination were lower gastrointestinal bleeding (26.5%, n=134), screening for colorectal cancer (14.1%, n=71), chronic diarrhea (12.9%, n=65), abdominal pain (10.9%, n=55), anemia (9.1%, n=46), constipation (7.3%, n=37), hematochezia and diarrhea (6.3%, n=32), altered bowel habits (5.1%, n=26), weight loss (3.6%, n=18), colonic thickening on CT scan (3.0%, n=15) and others (1.2%, n=6). Bowel preparation was adequate (in 92%, n=465) cases. Cecal intubation rate was 88.71% (n=448). Endoscopic diagnoses were hemorrhoids (36.2%, n=183), normal (22%, n=111), polyps (11.3%, n=57), ulcerative colitis (8.7%, n=44), cancer (4%, n=20), diverticulosis (3.4%, n=17), infective colitis (2.6%, n=13), intestinal TB (2.6%, n=13), non-specific colitis (2.2%, n=11), proctitis (1.8%, n=9) and others (5.3%, n=27). Conclusion: There is room for improvement in quality of colonoscopy, cecal intubation rate is slightly below the recommended standard and polyp detection rate is quite low however, it is not clear if the low rate of polyp detection is due to missed lesions or low population incidence. Time to reach caecum and withdrawal time should clearly be documented in the notes which can help to evaluate quality of the procedure in a better way

  12. Studies on the usefulness of negative contrast medium for CT-fatty emulsion-in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Tsuneo; Kameda, Kyoko; Tanaka, Koji; Nishimura, Shigeru; Higashide, Toshiaki [Osaka Police Hospital (Japan)

    1983-09-01

    Investigation was made on the usefulness of negative contrast medium for CT-fatty emulsion-, which is applicable to the whole area of the gastrointestinal tract, in diagnoses of diseases of the stomach, pancreas, colon and the organs adjacent to the three. After the administration of the drug, CT was performed and the thickness of the walls were measured for the normal upper gastrointestinal tract in 50 patients and for the normal colon in 25. The normal gastric walls did not exceed 5 mm and the walls of the colon measured about 2.1 mm. Gastric tumors were projected at 80.4%. Especially, the drug was useful for the early diagnosis of schirrus. The pancreas was more clearly projected in 88.4% of the patients. The reconstruction method using the present drug was useful for the investigation of the relationship between the two organs, the stomach and the duodenum, and the pancreas. When CT was performed on a patient laying this right side on the bed, invasion of pancreatic cancer and gastric antrum cancer into the circumferntial organs could be diagnosed. The drug was useful for the identification of tumors in the colon and intrapelvic lesions. The medium was also given to four patients with colitis ulcerosa and the obtained findings on the wall features were same as those obtained by barium enema. The present drug was little associated with side effects and is considered to be an excellent negative contrast medium for all the gastrointestinal tracts.

  13. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: mechanisms underlying gastrointestinal incorporation of the non-human sialic acid xeno-autoantigen N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Kalyan; Gregg, Christopher J; Chow, Renee; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    Although N-acetyl groups are common in nature, N-glycolyl groups are rare. Mammals express two major sialic acids, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Although humans cannot produce Neu5Gc, it is detected in the epithelial lining of hollow organs, endothelial lining of the vasculature, fetal tissues, and carcinomas. This unexpected expression is hypothesized to result via metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from mammalian foods. This accumulation has relevance for diseases associated with such nutrients, via interaction with Neu5Gc-specific antibodies. Little is known about how ingested sialic acids in general and Neu5Gc in particular are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the gastrointestinal and systemic fate of Neu5Gc-containing glycoproteins (Neu5Gc-glycoproteins) or free Neu5Gc in the Neu5Gc-free Cmah(-/-) mouse model. Ingested free Neu5Gc showed rapid absorption into the circulation and urinary excretion. In contrast, ingestion of Neu5Gc-glycoproteins led to Neu5Gc incorporation into the small intestinal wall, appearance in circulation at a steady-state level for several hours, and metabolic incorporation into multiple peripheral tissue glycoproteins and glycolipids, thus conclusively proving that Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated from food. Feeding Neu5Gc-glycoproteins but not free Neu5Gc mimics the human condition, causing tissue incorporation into human-like sites in Cmah(-/-) fetal and adult tissues, as well as developing tumors. Thus, glycoproteins containing glycosidically linked Neu5Gc are the likely dietary source for human tissue accumulation, and not the free monosaccharide. This human-like model can be used to elucidate specific mechanisms of Neu5Gc delivery from the gut to tissues, as well as general mechanisms of metabolism of ingested sialic acids.

  14. Time of day and eating behaviors are associated with the composition and function of the human gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Jennifer L; Musaad, Salma Ma; Holscher, Hannah D

    2017-11-01

    Background: Preclinical research has shown that the gastrointestinal microbiota exhibits circadian rhythms and that the timing of food consumption can affect the composition and function of gut microbes. However, there is a dearth of knowledge on these relations in humans. Objective: We aimed to determine whether human gastrointestinal microbes and bacterial metabolites were associated with time of day or behavioral factors, including eating frequency, percentage of energy consumed early in the day, and overnight-fast duration. Design: We analyzed 77 fecal samples collected from 28 healthy men and women. Fecal DNA was extracted and sequenced to determine the relative abundances of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was used to assess short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Eating frequency, percentage of energy consumed before 1400, and overnight-fast duration were determined from dietary records. Data were analyzed by linear mixed models or generalized linear mixed models, which controlled for fiber intake, sex, age, body mass index, and repeated sampling within each participant. Each OTU and metabolite were tested as the outcome in a separate model. Results: Acetate, propionate, and butyrate concentrations decreased throughout the day ( P = 0.006, 0.04, and 0.002, respectively). Thirty-five percent of bacterial OTUs were associated with time. In addition, relations were observed between gut microbes and eating behaviors, including eating frequency, early energy consumption, and overnight-fast duration. Conclusions: These results indicate that the human gastrointestinal microbiota composition and function vary throughout the day, which may be related to the circadian biology of the human body, the microbial community itself, or human eating behaviors. Behavioral factors, including timing of eating and overnight-fast duration, were also predictive of bacterial abundances. Longitudinal intervention studies are needed to

  15. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations for malignant disease 1 ESGE recommends placement of partially or fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia over laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, and esophageal bypass (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 For patients with longer life expectancy, ESGE recommends brachytherapy as a valid alternative or in addition to stenting in esophageal cancer patients with malignant dysphagia. Brachytherapy may provide a survival advantage and possibly a better quality of life compared to SEMS placement alone. (Strong recommendation, high quality evidence.) 3 ESGE recommends esophageal SEMS placement as the preferred treatment for sealing malignant tracheoesophageal or bronchoesophageal fistula (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend the use of concurrent external radiotherapy and esophageal stent treatment. SEMS placement is also not recommended as a bridge to surgery or prior to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. It is associated with a high incidence of adverse events and alternative satisfactory options such as placement of a feeding tube are available. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) Main recommendations for benign disease 1 ESGE recommends against the use of self-expandable stents (SEMSs) as first-line therapy for the management of benign esophageal strictures because of the potential for adverse events, the availability of alternative therapies, and costs (strong

  16. Gastrointestinal Traumatic Injuries: Gastrointestinal Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Maria A; Pugh, Marcia A; McGhee, Melanie

    2018-03-01

    The abdomen is a big place even in a small person. Gastrointestinal trauma can result in injury to the stomach, small bowel, colon, or rectum. Traumatic causes include blunt or penetrating trauma, such as gunshot wounds, stabbings, motor vehicle collisions, and crush injuries. Nontraumatic causes include appendicitis, Crohn disease, cancer, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, blockage of the bowel, and chemotherapy. The mechanism of injury will affect both the nature and severity of any resulting injuries. Treatment must address the critical and emergent nature of these injuries as well as issues that affect all trauma situations, which include management of hemodynamic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternative Argets Within the Endocannabinoid System for Future Treatment of Gastrointestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Schicho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many beneficial effects of herbal and synthetic cannabinoids on gut motility and inflammation have been demonstrated, suggesting a vast potential for these compounds in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. These effects are based on the so-called ‘endocannabinoid system’ (ECS, a cooperating network of molecules that regulate the metabolism of the body’s own and of exogenously administered cannabinoids. The ECS in the gastrointestinal tract quickly responds to homeostatic disturbances by de novo synthesis of its components to maintain homeostasis, thereby offering many potential targets for pharmacological intervention. Of major therapeutic interest are nonpsychoactive cannabinoids or compounds that do not directly target cannabinoid receptors but still possess cannabinoid-like properties. Drugs that inhibit endocannabinoid degradation and raise the level of endocannabinoids are becoming increasingly promising alternative therapeutic tools to manipulate the ECS.

  18. Radiation dose calculations for orally administered radio-pharmaceuticals in upper gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.K.; Malmud, L.S.; Knight, L.C.; Siegel, J.A.; Stern, H.; Zelac, R.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation burden estimates for upper gastrointestinal function studies employing the following orally administered radiopharmaceuticals are reported. Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (Tc-99m-SC) in water, Indium-111-DTPA in water, Tc-99m-DTPA in water, Indium-113m DTPA in water, Tc-99m Ovalbumin, Tc-99m sulfur colloid in a cooked egg, Tc-99m sulfur colloid in vivo labeled chicken liver, and Indium-111 colloid in vivo labeled chicken liver. Orally administered radiopharmaceuticals for upper gastrointestinal studies afford clinician and investigator valuable clinical and physiologic information not previously obtainable using other techniques. The radiation burden to the patient from single or sequential studies is acceptable in comparison to fluoroscopy which results in approximately 5000 millirem per minute of exposure. The variety of preparations listed above should make these types of studies available in any routinely equipped nuclear medicine radiopharmacy laboratory

  19. Effect of dark-colored maple syrup on cell proliferation of human gastrointestinal cancer cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Sato, Kanta; Kubota, Yuika; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener that is commonly consumed worldwide. While maple syrup mainly comprises sucrose, it also contains phytochemicals that present various biological effects. Maple syrup is made by boiling down sap, and its color and composition vary in accordance with the sap collection season. Typically, seasonal progression is associated with darker syrup color, and antioxidant activity is proportional to the increasingly dark color. The authors previously reported that maple syrup demonstrated inhibitory effects on colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion, which correlated with darker maple syrup color. In the present study, they examined the effects of two different grades of maple syrup on gastrointestinal cancer cell proliferation, to investigate whether the dark-color maple syrup was suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. Administration of dark-color maple syrup significantly inhibited gastrointestinal cancer cell growth as compared to non-treated cancer cells. Moreover, administration of dark-color maple syrup clearly inhibited protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation and did not impact mitogen-associated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data suggested that dark-color maple syrup may inhibit cell proliferation through suppression of AKT activation and, thus, may be suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. PMID:28685052

  20. Stability of milk fat globule membrane proteins toward human enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T T; Van de Wiele, T; Do, T N H; Debyser, G; Struijs, K; Devreese, B; Dewettinck, K; Van Camp, J

    2012-05-01

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction refers to the thin film of polar lipids and membrane proteins that surrounds fat globules in milk. It is its unique biochemical composition that renders MFGM with some beneficial biological activities, such as anti-adhesive effects toward pathogens. However, a prerequisite for the putative bioactivity of MFGM is its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. We, therefore, subjected MFGM material, isolated from raw milk, to an in vitro enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE, in combination with 2 staining methods, Coomassie Blue and periodic acid Schiff staining, was used to evaluate polypeptide patterns of the digest, whereas mass spectrometry was used to confirm the presence of specific MFGM proteins. Generally, it was observed that glycoproteins showed higher resistance to endogenous proteases compared with non-glycosylated proteins. Mucin 1 displayed the highest resistance to digestion and a considerable part of this protein was still detected at its original molecular weight after gastric and small intestine digestion. Cluster of differentiation 36 was also quite resistant to pepsin. A significant part of periodic acid Schiff 6/7 survived the gastric digestion, provided that the lipid moiety was not removed from the MFGM material. Overall, MFGM glycoproteins are generally more resistant to gastrointestinal digestion than serum milk proteins and the presence of lipids, besides glycosylation, may protect MFGM glycoproteins from gastrointestinal digestion. This gastrointestinal stability makes MFGM glycoproteins amenable to further studies in which their putative health-promoting effects can be explored. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of trefoil peptides and their stability in gastrointestinal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellev, Stine; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Nexø, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are considered promising for therapeutic use in gastrointestinal diseases, and there is a need to explore the fate of injected TFF and the stability of the peptides in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (i.v.) administ......Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are considered promising for therapeutic use in gastrointestinal diseases, and there is a need to explore the fate of injected TFF and the stability of the peptides in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (i.......v.) administered hTFF2 in mice and rats and of hTFF3 administered i.v., intramuscularly, intraperitoneally, and subcutaneously in mice, and estimated by ELISA the decay of the peptides added to rat and human gastrointestinal contents. We found that i.v. injected hTFF2 and hTFF3 were cleared from the circulation...

  2. Neuropilin-2 mediated β-catenin signaling and survival in human gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaija Samuel

    Full Text Available NRP-2 is a high-affinity kinase-deficient receptor for ligands belonging to the class 3 semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor families. NRP-2 has been detected on the surface of several types of human cancer cells, but its expression and function in gastrointestinal (GI cancer cells remains to be determined. We sought to determine the function of NRP-2 in mediating downstream signals regulating the growth and survival of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. In human gastric cancer specimens, NRP-2 expression was detected in tumor tissues but not in adjacent normal mucosa. In CNDT 2.5 cells, shRNA mediated knockdown NRP-2 expression led to decreased migration and invasion in vitro (p<0.01. Focused gene-array analysis demonstrated that loss of NRP-2 reduced the expression of a critical metastasis mediator gene, S100A4. Steady-state levels and function of β-catenin, a known regulator of S100A4, were also decreased in the shNRP-2 clones. Furthermore, knockdown of NRP-2 sensitized CNDT 2.5 cells in vitro to 5FU toxicity. This effect was associated with activation of caspases 3 and 7, cleavage of PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2. In vivo growth of CNDT 2.5 cells in the livers of nude mice was significantly decreased in the shNRP-2 group (p<0.05. Intraperitoneal administration of NRP-2 siRNA-DOPC decreased the tumor burden in mice (p = 0.01. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor cell-derived NRP-2 mediates critical survival signaling in gastrointestinal cancer cells.

  3. Characterization of equine vitamin D-binding protein, development of an assay, and assessment of plasma concentrations of the protein in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Tina H; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Dorthe T; Højrup, Peter; Grosche, Astrid; Freeman, David E; Andersen, Pia H; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To purify and characterize equine vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) from equine serum and to evaluate plasma concentrations of VDBP in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal injury or disease. ANIMALS 13 healthy laboratory animals (8 mice and 5 rabbits), 61 healthy horses, 12 horses with experimentally induced intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR), and 59 horses with acute gastrointestinal diseases. PROCEDURES VDBP was purified from serum of 2 healthy horses, and recombinant equine VDBP was obtained through a commercial service. Equine VDBP was characterized by mass spectrometry. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were raised against equine VDBP, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay for equine VDBP was established. Plasma samples from 61 healthy horses were used to establish working VDBP reference values for study purposes. Plasma VDBP concentrations were assessed at predetermined time points in horses with IR and in horses with naturally occurring gastrointestinal diseases. RESULTS The working reference range for plasma VDBP concentration in healthy horses was 531 to 1,382 mg/L. Plasma VDBP concentrations were significantly decreased after 1 hour of ischemia in horses with IR, compared with values prior to induction of ischemia, and were significantly lower in horses with naturally occurring gastrointestinal diseases with a colic duration of < 12 hours than in healthy horses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma VDBP concentrations were significantly decreased in horses with acute gastrointestinal injury or disease. Further studies and the development of a clinically relevant assay are needed to establish the reliability of VDBP as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses.

  4. Tight junctions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Norimasa; Murata, Masaki; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tobioka, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Chiba, Hideki

    2003-09-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical end of the lateral membrane surface. They have two functions, the barrier (or gate) function and the fence function. The barrier function of tight junctions regulates the passage of ions, water, and various macromolecules, even of cancer cells, through paracellular spaces. The barrier function is thus relevant to edema, jaundice, diarrhea, and blood-borne metastasis. On the other hand, the fence function maintains cell polarity. In other words, tight junctions work as a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell biology, in terms of loss of cell polarity. Of the proteins comprising tight junctions, integral membrane proteins occludin, claudins, and JAMs have been recently discovered. Of these molecules, claudins are exclusively responsible for the formation of tight-junction strands and are connected with the actin cytoskeleton mediated by ZO-1. Thus, both functions of tight junctions are dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton as well as ATP. Mutations in the claudin14 and the claudin16 genes result in hereditary deafness and hereditary hypomagnesemia, respectively. Some pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight-junction function, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases is summarized.

  5. Mood disorder associated with gastrointestinal and liver diseases: are there many challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Gadit, M.

    2010-01-01

    With the high prevalence of hepatitis and other gastrointestinal illness in the country, we come across the mental health consequences of such medical problems. The major issues are with depression and anxiety. It is quite understandable that physical illnesses bring in with them stress that is intrinsic by virtue of the serious nature of medical illness, the socio-economical repercussions and the uncertain prognosis in terms of the nature of illness. The major mental health problem that these patients are referred with is depression that can be of moderate to severe intensity. Depression in itself is a separate clinical entity that calls for treatment. (author)

  6. Radiation dose estimates for oral agents used in upper gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, J.A.; Wu, R.K.; Knight, L.C.; Zelac, R.E.; Stern, H.S.; Malmud, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry was calculated for a number of orally administered radiopharmaceuticals used for study of upper gastrointestinal function. These include: Tc-99m sulfur colloid in water, in a cooked egg, and in chicken liver labeled in vivo; In-111 DTPA; Tc-99m DTPA; In-113m DTPA; Tc-99m ovalbumin in cooked egg; and In-111 colloid in chicken liver labeled in vivo. Radiation burdens to the stomach, small intestine, upper and lower large intestine, ovaries, testes, and total body are calculated for each preparation

  7. Case report of unexpected gastrointestinal involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease: comparison of eliglustat tartrate treatment and enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Su Bum; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-05-15

    Gastrointestinal involvement in Gaucher disease is very rare, and appears to be unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Here, we describe identical twin, splenectomized, non-neuronopathic Gaucher patients on long-term ERT for 9 years, who complained of epigastric discomfort due to Gaucher cell infiltration of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Rare compound heterozygous mutations (p.Arg48Trp and p.Arg257Gln) of the GBA gene were found in both. Improvement in the gastroduodenal infiltration and reduced chitotriosidase levels were observed in one who switched to eliglustat tartrate for 1 year, whereas the other one who maintained ERT showed no improvement of chitotriosidase level and persistent duodenal lesions. This shows that eliglustat might be an effective treatment for Gaucher disease patients having lesions resistant to ERT.

  8. Distribution of obestatin and ghrelin in human tissues: immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and mammary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Magnusson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are two peptides derived from the same prohormone. It is well established that ghrelin is produced by endocrine cells in the gastric mucosa. However, the distribution of human obestatin immunoreactive cells is not thoroughly characterized. A polyclonal antibody...... that specifically recognizes human obestatin was produced. Using this antibody and a commercial antibody vs ghrelin, the distribution of obestatin and ghrelin immunoreactive cells was determined in a panel of human tissues using immunohistochemistry. The two peptides were detected in the mucosa...... of the gastrointestinal tract, from cardia to ileum, and in the pancreatic islets. Interestingly, epithelial cells in the ducts of mammary glands showed distinct immunoreactivity for both ghrelin and obestatin. By double immunofluorescence microscopy, it was shown that all detected cells were immunoreactive for both...

  9. Research on digestive and liver diseases: a priority for Europe - the societal importance of gastrointestinal diseases and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Quaglio, GianLuca; O'Morain, Colm; Rubig, Paul; Manns, Michael

    2013-08-01

    On 18 September 2012, in the European Parliament in Brussels, a public meeting was held between Science and Technology Options Assessments of the Parliament and the United European Gastroenterology to review the position of gastrointestinal and liver research in the context of the European Union. The meeting reflected the past situation, the ongoing close collaboration as well as facts and options on the upcoming European Union research programme Horizon 2020 that is in planning and will cover the years from 2014 to 2020.

  10. Impact and outcomes of nutritional support team intervention in patients with gastrointestinal disease in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Eun; Park, Soo Jung; Park, Yehyun; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho

    2017-12-01

    Nutritional support has become an important intervention for critically ill patients. Many studies have reported on the effects of nutritional support for the patients within the intensive care unit (ICU); however, no studies have specifically assessed patients with gastrointestinal diseases who may have difficulty absorbing enteral nutrition (EN) in the ICU.Sixty-two patients with gastrointestinal disease were admitted to the ICU between August 2014 and August 2016 at a single tertiary university hospital. We analyzed 2 different patient groups in a retrospective cohort study: those who received nutritional support team (NST) intervention and those who did not.Forty-four (71.0%) patients received nutritional support in ICU and 18 (29.0%) did not. Variables including male sex, high albumin or prealbumin level at the time of ICU admission, and short transition period into EN showed statistically significant association with lower mortality on the univariate analysis (all P < .05). Multivariate analysis revealed that longer length of hospital stay (P = .013; hazard ratio [HR], 0.972; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.951-0.994), shorter transition into EN (P = .014; HR, 1.040; 95% CI, 1.008-1.072), higher prealbumin level (P = .049; HR, 0.988; 95% CI, 0.976-1.000), and NST intervention (P = .022; HR, 0.356; 95% CI, 0.147-0.862) were independent prognostic factors for lower mortality.In conclusion, NST intervention related to early initiated EN, and high prealbumin levels are beneficial to decrease mortality in the acutely ill patients with GI disease.

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, L.R.; Shuler, S.E.; Alyea, K.; Husserl, F.E.; Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation, New Orleans, LO)

    1983-01-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. A commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation was examined and results compared with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 μg CEA/I plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. The heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay

  12. [Does the hospital cost of care differ for inflammatory bowel disease patients with or without gastrointestinal infections? A case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Köhler, F; Kräplin, T; Hartmann, M; Lerch, M M; Stallmach, A

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal Infections have been implicated as possible causes of exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or risk factors for severe flares in general. The introduction of the G-DRG reimbursement system has greatly increased the pressure to provide cost effective treatment in German hospitals. Few studies have compared the costs of treating IBD patients with or without gastrointestinal infections and none of them have specifically considered the German reimbursement situation. We performed a single center case-control retrospective chart review from 2002 to 2011 of inpatients with IBD (Department of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena) with an exacerbation of their disease. The presence of gastrointestinal infections (Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, adeno-, rota-, norovirus and Clostridium difficile) was assessed in all inpatients with Cohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD patients with gastrointestinal infections (n = 79) were matched for age to IBD patients who were negative for gastrointestinal pathogens (n = 158). Patient level costing (PLC) was used to express the total cost of hospital care for each patient; PLC comprised a weighted daily bed cost plus cost of all medical services provided (e. g., endoscopy, microbiology, pathology) calculated according to an activity-based costing approach. All costs were discounted to 2012 values. Gastrointestinal infections in IBD patients were not associated with an increase in mortality (0%); however, they were associated with 2.3-fold higher total hospital charges (6499.10 € vs. 2817.00 €; p = 0.001) and increased length of stay in hospital (14.5 vs. 9.4 days; p costs, especially in UC. Inpatient hospital costs differ significantly for IBD patients with and without gastrointestinal infections, especially in ulcerative colitis, when care was provided in a single university hospital. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Immunophenotyping in post-giardiasis functional gastrointestinal disease and chronic fatigue syndrome

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    Hanevik Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Giardia outbreak was associated with development of post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders (PI-FGID and chronic fatigue syndrome (PI-CFS. Markers of immune dysfunction have given conflicting results in CFS and FGID patient populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate a wide selection of markers of immune dysfunction in these two co-occurring post-infectious syndromes. Methods 48 patients, reporting chronic fatigue in a questionnaire study, were clinically evaluated five years after the outbreak and grouped according to Fukuda criteria for CFS (n=19 and idiopathic chronic fatigue (n=5 and Rome II criteria for FGIDs (n=54. 22 Giardia exposed non-fatigued individuals and 10 healthy unexposed individuals were recruited as controls. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results In peripheral blood we found significantly higher CD8 T-cell levels in PI-FGID, and significantly lower NK-cell levels in PI-CFS patients. Severity of abdominal and fatigue symptoms correlated negatively with NK-cell levels. A tendency towards lower T-cell CD26 expression in FGID was seen. Conclusion Patients with PI-CFS and/or PI-FGID 5 years after Giardia lamblia infection showed alterations in NK-cell and CD8-cell populations suggesting a possible immunological abnormality in these conditions. We found no significant changes in other markers examined in this well-defined group of PI-CFS and PI-FGID elicited by a gastrointestinal infection. Controlling for co-morbid conditions is important in evaluation of CFS-biomarkers.

  14. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stem cells - TREAT-ME-1 - a phase I, first in human, first in class trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Einem, Jobst C; Peter, Sylvia; Günther, Christine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Grütz, Gerald; Salat, Christoph; Stoetzer, Oliver; Nelson, Peter J; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P; Holch, Julian W; Angele, Martin; Bruns, Christiane; Niess, Hanno; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-10-06

    This phase I, first in human, first in class clinical study aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of treatment with genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV). MSC_apceth_101 are genetically modified autologous MSCs used as vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. The study design consisted of a dose-escalation 3 + 3 design. All patients ( n = 6) were treated with up to three applications of MSC_apceth_101, followed by GCV infusions given on three consecutive days starting 48 hours after injection of MSC_apceth_101. Three of six patients received a total dose of 1.5 × 10 6 cells/kg. Two patients received three doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg, while one patient received only two doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg due to a SADR. Six patients received MSC_apceth_101. No IMP-related serious adverse events occurred. Adverse-events related to IMP-injection were increased creatinine, cough, fever, and night sweat. TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and sE-Selectin, showed that repeated application is immunologically safe, but induces a switch of the functional properties of monocytes to an inflammatory phenotype. Treatment induced stable disease in 4/6 patients, and progressive disease in 2/6 patients. Treatment with MSC_apceth_101 in combination with GCV demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  15. First Insights into the Diverse Human Archaeome: Specific Detection of Archaea in the Gastrointestinal Tract, Lung, and Nose and on Skin

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    Kaisa Koskinen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human-associated archaea remain understudied in the field of microbiome research, although in particular methanogenic archaea were found to be regular commensals of the human gut, where they represent keystone species in metabolic processes. Knowledge on the abundance and diversity of human-associated archaea is extremely limited, and little is known about their function(s, their overall role in human health, or their association with parts of the human body other than the gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Currently, methodological issues impede the full assessment of the human archaeome, as bacteria-targeting protocols are unsuitable for characterization of the full spectrum of Archaea. The goal of this study was to establish conservative protocols based on specifically archaea-targeting, PCR-based methods to retrieve first insights into the archaeomes of the human gastrointestinal tract, lung, nose, and skin. Detection of Archaea was highly dependent on primer selection and the sequence processing pipeline used. Our results enabled us to retrieve a novel picture of the human archaeome, as we found for the first time Methanobacterium and Woesearchaeota (DPANN superphylum to be associated with the human gastrointestinal tract and the human lung, respectively. Similar to bacteria, human-associated archaeal communities were found to group biogeographically, forming (i the thaumarchaeal skin landscape, (ii the (methanoeuryarchaeal gastrointestinal tract, (iii a mixed skin-gastrointestinal tract landscape for the nose, and (iv a woesearchaeal lung landscape. On the basis of the protocols we used, we were able to detect unexpectedly high diversity of archaea associated with different body parts.

  16. Gastrointestinal helminth parasites of pet and stray dogs as a potential risk for human health in Bahir Dar town, north-western Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadiwos Abere

    Full Text Available Aim: A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2011 to April 2012 to determine the prevalence and species of gastrointestinal (GI helminth parasites in pet and stray dogs as a potential risk for human health in Bahir Dar town, northwestern Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A total of 384 and 46 faecal samples were collected from pet and stray dogs, respectively and xamined by using standard coprologic techniques. Results: The overall prevalence of GI helminth infection in pet and stray dogs was 75.26 and 84.78%, respectively. The detected parasites with their frequencies in pet dogs were Ancylostoma caninum (78.89%, Toxocara canis (39.79%, Dipylidium caninum (29.75%, Strongyloides stercoralis (29.06%, Taeniidae (23.87% and Trichuris vulpis (7.95%. Stray dogs were found more likely to be polyparasitized and presented higher prevalence of A. caninum, T. canis, S. stercoralis, Trichuris vulpis and Taeniidae (P < 0.05 than domiciled ones. Diphyllobothrium latum was detected only in 10.25% of stray dogs. Toxocara canis and A. caninum (P < 0.05 were detected more frequently in dogs with less than 6 months of age (P <0.05 than old age dogs. The sex or breed groups didn't significantly affect the prevalence of parasites. A significant variation was recorded (P < 0.05 between different feeding systems where higher prevalence was observed in uncontrolled feeding group (82.18% compared to controlled feeding (32.08%. Conclusion: Different gastrointestinal parasites in pet and stray dogs were identified in the study area that can potentially infect humans and cause serious public-health problems. Thus, concerted efforts should therefore be made to educate dog owners to embrace modern dog disease control programs and measures have to be taken on stray dogs. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 388-392

  17. Effects of wheat germ agglutinin on human gastrointestinal epithelium: Insights from an experimental model of immune/epithelial cell interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Tomelleri, Carlo; Zanetti, Chiara; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Fusi, Marina; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant protein that binds specifically to sugars expressed, among many others, by human gastrointestinal epithelial and immune cells. WGA is a toxic compound and an anti-nutritional factor, but recent works have shown that it may have potential as an anti-tumor drug and as a carrier for oral drugs. To quantitate the toxicity threshold for WGA on normal epithelial cells we previously investigated the effects of the lectin on differentiated Caco2 cells, and showed that in the micromolar range of concentrations WGA could alter the integrity of the epithelium layer and increase its permeability to both mannitol and dextran. WGA was shown to be uptaken by Caco2 cells and only ∼ 0.1% molecules were observed to cross the epithelium layer by transcytosis. Here we show that at nanomolar concentrations WGA is unexpectedly bioactive on immune cells. The supernatants of WGA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can alter the integrity of the epithelium layer when administered to the basolateral side of differentiated Caco2 cells and the effects can be partially inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against IL1, IL6 and IL8. At nanomolar concentrations WGA stimulates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus the biological activity of WGA should be reconsidered by taking into account the effects of WGA on the immune system at the gastrointestinal interface. These results shed new light onto the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of gastrointestinal disorders observed in vivo upon dietary intake of wheat-based foods.

  18. Perceived Stress in Patients with Common Gastrointestinal Disorders: Associations with Quality of Life, Symptoms and Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Joel S; Greeson, Jeffrey M; Roberts, Rhonda S; Kaufman, Adam B; Abrams, Donald I; Dolor, Rowena J; Wolever, Ruth Q

    Research supports relationships between stress and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and disorders. This pilot study assesses relationships between perceived stress, quality of life (QOL), and self-reported pain ratings as an indicator of symptom management in patients who self-reported gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the full sample (n = 402) perceived stress positively correlated with depression (r = 0.76, P stress also correlated with lower mental health-related QOL. Similar correlations were found for the participants with GERD (n = 188), IBS (n = 132), and IBD (n = 82). Finally, there were significant correlations in the GERD cohort between perceived stress, and average pain (r = 0.34, P stress, and average pain (r = 0.32, P stress broadly correlated with QOL characteristics in patients with GERD, IBS, and IBD, and their overall QOL was significantly lower than the general population. Perceived stress also appeared to be an indicator of symptom management (self-reported pain ratings) in GERD and IBD, but not IBS. While future research using objective measures of stress and symptom/disease management is needed to confirm these associations, as well as to evaluate the ability of stress reduction interventions to improve perceived stress, QOL and disease management in these GI disorders, integrative medicine treatment programs would be most beneficial to study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Sensitive and Rapid Method to Determine the Adhesion Capacity of Probiotics and Pathogenic Microorganisms to Human Gastrointestinal Mucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélinda Ringot-Destrez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus is the habitat for the microorganisms, bacteria and yeast that form the commensal flora. Mucins, the main macromolecules of mucus, and more specifically, the glycans that cover them, play essential roles in microbial gastrointestinal colonization. Probiotics and pathogens must also colonize mucus to have lasting positive or deleterious effects. The question of which mucin-harboured glycan motifs favour the adhesion of specific microorganisms remains very poorly studied. In the current study, a simple test based on the detection of fluorescent-labeled microorganisms raised against microgram amounts of mucins spotted on nitrocellulose was developed. The adhesion of various probiotic, commensal and pathogenic microorganisms was evaluated on a panel of human purified gastrointestinal mucins and compared with that of commercially available pig gastric mucins (PGM and of mucins secreted by the colonic cancer cell line HT29-MTX. The latter two proved to be very poor indicators of adhesion capacity on intestinal mucins. Our results show that the nature of the sialylated cores of O-glycans, determined by MALDI MS-MS analysis, potentially enables sialic acid residues to modulate the adhesion of microorganisms either positively or negatively. Other identified factors affecting the adhesion propensity were O-glycan core types and the presence of blood group motifs. This test should help to select probiotics with enhanced adhesion capabilities as well as deciphering the role of specific mucin glycotopes on microbial adhesion.

  20. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri in Human Health and Diseases

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    Qinghui Mu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri is a well-studied probiotic bacterium that can colonize a large number of mammals. In humans, L. reuteri is found in different body sites, including the gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract, skin, and breast milk. The abundance of L. reuteri varies among different individuals. Several beneficial effects of L. reuteri have been noted. First, L. reuteri can produce antimicrobial molecules, such as organic acids, ethanol, and reuterin. Due to its antimicrobial activity, L. reuteri is able to inhibit the colonization of pathogenic microbes and remodel the commensal microbiota composition in the host. Second, L. reuteri can benefit the host immune system. For instance, some L. reuteri strains can reduce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines while promoting regulatory T cell development and function. Third, bearing the ability to strengthen the intestinal barrier, the colonization of L. reuteri may decrease the microbial translocation from the gut lumen to the tissues. Microbial translocation across the intestinal epithelium has been hypothesized as an initiator of inflammation. Therefore, inflammatory diseases, including those located in the gut as well as in remote tissues, may be ameliorated by increasing the colonization of L. reuteri. Notably, the decrease in the abundance of L. reuteri in humans in the past decades is correlated with an increase in the incidences of inflammatory diseases over the same period of time. Direct supplementation or prebiotic modulation of L. reuteri may be an attractive preventive and/or therapeutic avenue against inflammatory diseases.

  1. Impact of an active patient education program on gastrointestinal symptoms in women with celiac disease following a gluten-free diet: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Lisa Ring; Friedrichsen, Maria; Göransson, Anne; Hallert, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Despite living with a gluten-free diet, Swedish women with celiac disease report a higher rate of gastrointestinal symptoms than women without the disease. This study was designed to assess the impact of active patient education on gastrointestinal symptoms in women with a gluten-free diet. A total of 106 Swedish women, aged 20 years or older, with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet for a minimum of 5 years took part in a randomized controlled trial. The intervention group (n = 54) underwent a 10-session educational program, "Celiac School," based on problem-based learning. Controls (n = 52) were sent information regarding celiac disease at home. The outcome measure was gastrointestinal symptoms at 10 weeks and 6 months after intervention, assessed with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. After 10 weeks of "Celiac School," the participating women reported significant improvements that remained 6 months later (p = .029). The controls did not improve significantly. A comparison of the development of scores, from baseline to 10 weeks, could not demonstrate a significant difference in the overall index between the 2 groups but showed a significant improvement concerning 1 of its components, namely the index reflecting Abdominal Pain (p = .007). Intervention methods should be refined to reach an even more pronounced effect.

  2. Studies of Se-75 labelled bile acid analogue absorption in different forms of gastrointestinal diseases using a whole body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, S.F.; Sattler, E.L.; Rinkenberger, C.; Bodenmueller, D.; Grebe, S.K.G.; Mueller, K.D.; Mueller, H.; Faengewisch, G.L.; Heckers, H.; Steckenmesser, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is possible to detect disturbances of bile acid absorption using a whole body counter after administration of Se-75 labelled bile acid analogues. We scrutinized the benefit of a modification of the test method. We investigated 77 patients with different forms of a gastrointestinal disease. After application of Se 75 homotaurocholic acid we measured patient-activity up to 7 days later including whole-body profile scans in the first 6 h. The fractional retention after 7 days was between 20 and 67%. In cases of impaired absorption it was below 12%. Patients with liver diseases and afer cholecystectomy (without bile acid resorption disturbance) showed normal values. Patients with Crohn's disease of the ileum or with intestinal ileas by-pass or with colestyramine treatment or with disturbance of vitamin B12-absorption or with cystic fibrosis showed a disturbance of bile acid absorption. The normal whole-body half-life was more than 2.8 days. The 24 and 72 h values were 62 and 31% in cases with normal absorption. Smaller values are signs of bile acid malabsorption. Impulse rates measured with the whole body counter are of an order of magnitude that allows to reduce the usually administered dose of 37 kBq to 9.25 kBq. This is an efficient method to detect disturbances of bile acid absorption. The usually adminstered activity of 37 kBq can be reduced to 9.25 kBq. (orig./MG) [de

  3. ROLE OF ENTEROSORPTION IN COMPREHENSIVE THERAPY FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES COMBINED DAMAGE TO WITH GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Belan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of acute respiratory infections remains high in childhood. It is impossible to identify etiology most accurately in each particular case. However, according to multiple studies, viruses, their associations with each other and bacteria prevail as causative agents. In addition, it is quite often that a respiratory infection, especially in minor children, is combined with a condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Apart from symptomatic and antiviral therapies in these cases, as the authors of this article demonstrated, it is advisable to use enterosorbents. This tactics results in a decreased level of intoxication, lower intensity and duration of diarrheal syndrome, i.e. more speedy recovery.Key words: acute respiratory infections, condition of gastro tract, intoxication, diarrheal syndrome, treatment, enterosorbents, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:88-90

  4. Functional gastrointestinal diseases and psychological maladjustment, personality traits and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Nishadi; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Perera, Madusanka S; Nishanthinie, Samudu; Warnakulasuriya, Tania; de Zoysa, Piyanjali Thamesha

    2018-02-27

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common worldwide problem and known to be associated with psychological problems. This study evaluated the association between abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs), psychological maladjustment and personality traits in adolescents. Adolescents aged 13-18 years were recruited from 5 randomly selected schools in Ampara district of Sri Lanka. AP-FGIDs were diagnosed using Rome III criteria. Translated and validated Rome III questionnaire (Child report form), personality questionnaire (PAQ) and PedsQL (Pediatric Quality of Life) inventory were used in data collection. Written consent was obtained from a parent and assent was obtained from every child recruited. The questionnaire was distributed in an examination setting to ensure confidentiality and privacy. Research assistants were present during data collection to assist on any necessary clarifications. A total of 1697 subjects were recruited [males 779 (45.9%), mean age 15.1 years, SD 1.6 years]. AP-FGIDs were present in 202 (11.9%). Those with AP-FGIDs had significantly higher mean scores for all personality traits (hostility and aggression, negative self-esteem, emotional unresponsiveness, emotional instability and negative world view), except dependency. Affected children had lower scores for all 4 domains of HRQoL (physical, emotional, social and school functioning), compared to controls (p PAQ scores within that of psychological maladjustment (p PAQ negatively correlated with scores obtained for HRQoL (r = - 0.52, p PAQ and lower HRQoL scores (p < 0.05). Adolescents with AP-FGIDs have more psychological maladjustment and abnormal personality traits than healthy controls. Affected adolescents with higher psychological maladjustments have lower HRQoL. Greater psychological maladjustment and lower HRQoL are associated with healthcare seeking behaviour in adolescents with AP-FGIDs.

  5. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  6. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt DG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available David G Levitt,1,* Michael D Levitt2,* 1Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, 2Research Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Serum albumin concentration (CP is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%, gastrointestinal (≈10%, and catabolic (≈84% clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy. The latter may occur

  7. [The course of inpatient rehabilitation in gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases under increasing integration of behavior and experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschmidt, S; Hänisch, S; Würthner, K

    1993-08-01

    Starting out from the thesis that behaviour and felt experience, i.e., the patient's "subjective world", have considerable influence on chronic diseases and their consequences in the gastrointestinal field, a "basic course documentation"-based comparison has been carried out of the courses of 4-week in-patient rehabilitation programmes designed to increasingly incorporate interventions directed at this area; the study population had consisted of two groups of patients (n = 688 each) without any significant differences concerning age and sex distribution admitted during the summer terms of 1990 (Group A) and 1991 (Group B), respectively. This documentation (in DBASE IV format) compiles (anonymized) patient data at an "objective" level on the one hand, i.e. basic data (such as diagnoses, age, sex), results obtained by the Edinburgh Rehabilitation Status Scale (ERSS), risk behaviour, and scope of interventions both in the organ-medical and physical therapy fields and in the area of "instruction, motivation, support, group work, and creativity" (designed to achieve integration of behaviour and felt experience); on the other hand, at "subjective level", it comprises the patient's own judgements relative to the treatment regimen and its environment, with subsequent correlational analysis of the data obtained (using the SPSSPC statistical package). As had been expected, correlations have on the one hand been stated at the "objective" level between an increased share of more "serious" conditions (ICD) in 1990 as compared to 1991 and higher ERSS scores (i.e., increased impact of disease consequences), greater organ-medical care intensity, and frequency of incapacity for work; on the other hand, at "subjective" level, strong linkages were found among the item ratings for general sense of improvement, specific and general therapy, as well as so-called "therapeutic environment". When the two levels are linked, the sense of improvement, as expected, is found to correlate

  8. Investigation of Genipin Cross-Linked Microcapsule for Oral Delivery of Live Bacterial Cells and Other Biotherapeutics: Preparation and In Vitro Analysis in Simulated Human Gastrointestinal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral therapy utilizing engineered microorganisms has shown promise in the treatment of many diseases. By microencapsulation, viable cells can overcome the harsh gastrointestinal (GI environment and secrete needed therapeutics into the gut. These engineered cells should be encased without escaping into the GI tract for safety concerns, thus robust microcapsule membrane is requisite. This paper examined the GI performance of a novel microcapsule membrane using a dynamic simulated human GI model. Results showed that the genipin cross-linked alginate-chitosan (GCAC microcapsules possessed strong resistance to structural disintegration in the simulated GI environment. Leakage of encapsulated high molecular weight dextran, a model material to be protected during the simulated GI transit, was negligible over 72 h of exposure, in contrast to considerable leakage of dextran from the non-cross-linked counterparts. These microcapsules did not alter the microflora and enzymatic activities in the simulated human colonic media. This study suggested the potential of the GCAC microcapsules for oral delivery of live microorganisms and other biotherapeutics.

  9. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  10. Comparison of the gastrointestinal absorption and bioavailability of fenofibrate and fenofibric acid in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Ansquer, Jean-Claude; Kelly, Maureen T; Sleep, Darryl J; Pradhan, Rajendra S

    2010-08-01

    This study compared the gastrointestinal (GI) absorption characteristics and absolute bioavailability of fenofibric acid and fenofibrate (which is converted to fenofibric acid in vivo) in healthy volunteers. Treatments were delivered to the proximal small bowel, distal small bowel, and colon using a site-specific delivery system (Enterion capsule) and to the stomach by oral administration of equimolar doses. Serial blood samples were collected for 120 hours postdose and assayed for plasma fenofibric acid concentrations. The absolute bioavailability of each treatment was determined relative to 50 mg of fenofibric acid administered intravenously. Plasma exposure to fenofibric acid following fenofibric acid administration was approximately 1.5 times higher than that following fenofibrate administration for delivery to the proximal and distal small bowel and following oral administration, and it was approximately 5 times higher following colon delivery. The absolute bioavailability in the stomach, proximal small bowel, distal small bowel, and colon was approximately 81%, 88%, 84%, and 78%, respectively, for fenofibric acid and 69%, 73%, 66%, and 22%, respectively, for fenofibrate (P < .0001 and P = .033 for fenofibric acid vs fenofibrate in the colon and distal small bowel, respectively). In conclusion, fenofibric acid is well absorbed throughout the GI tract and has greater bioavailability than fenofibrate in all GI regions.

  11. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  12. Human-associated fecal qPCR measurements and predicted risk of gastrointestinal illness in recreational waters contaminated with raw sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  13. Human-Associated Fecal Quantitative Polymerase Chain ReactionMeasurements and Simulated Risk of Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters Contaminated with Raw Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  14. Animal models for human genetic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharif Sons

    The study of human genetic diseases can be greatly aided by animal models because of their similarity .... and gene targeting in embryonic stem cells) has been a powerful tool in .... endonucleases that are designed to make a doublestrand.

  15. Roentgenosemiotics and diagnosis of human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Modern concepts concerning roentgenologic semiotics, diagnosis of almost all the human diseases as well as the features of roentgenologic examintion of organs and systems are described. Roentgenologic symptoms and syndroms are systematized and standardized by anatomy branches. 48 refs

  16. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and uranium in fed and fasted adult baboons and mice: application to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Moretti, E.S.; Ayres, L.

    1989-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) absorption values of plutonium and uranium were determined in fed and fasted adult baboons and mice. For both baboons and mice, the GI absorptions of plutonium and uranium were 10 to 20 times higher in 24 h fasted animals than in fed ones. For plutonium, GI absorption values in baboons were almost identical to those in mice for both fed and fasted conditions, and values for fed animals agreed with estimates for humans. For uranium, GI absorption values in fed and fasted baboons were 6 to 7 times higher than those in mice, and agreed well with those fed and fasted humans. For one baboon that was not given its morning meal, plutonium absorption 2 h after the start of the active phase was the same as that in the 24 h fasted animals. In contrast, for baboons that received a morning meal, plutonium absorption did not rise to the value of 24 h fasted baboons even 8 h after the meal. We conclude that GI absorption values for plutonium and uranium in adult baboons are good estimates of the values in humans and that the values for the fasted condition should be used to set standards for oral exposure of persons in the workplace. (author)

  17. Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlan Pauline D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and diversity of human methanogens are insufficiently characterised in the gastrointestinal tract of both health and disease. A PCR and clone library methodology targeting the mcrA gene was adopted to facilitate the two-fold aim of surveying the relative incidence of methanogens in health and disease groups and also to provide an overview of methanogen diversity in the human gastrointestinal tract. Results DNA faecal extracts (207 in total from a group of healthy controls and five gastrointestinal disease groups were investigated. Colorectal cancer, polypectomised, irritable bowel syndrome and the control group had largely equivalent numbers of individuals positive for methanogens (range 45–50%. Methanogen incidence in the inflammatory bowel disease groups was reduced, 24% for ulcerative colitis and 30% for Crohn's disease. Four unique mcrA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were identified and bioinformatic analyses revealed that the majority of all sequences (94% retrieved from libraries were 100% identical to Methanobrevibacter smithii mcrA gene. In addition, mcrA gene sequences most closely related to Methanobrevibacter oralis and members of the order Methanosarcinales were also recovered. Conclusion The mcrA gene serves as a useful biomarker for methanogen detection in the human gut and the varying trends of methanogen incidence in the human gut could serve as important indicators of intestinal function. Although Methanobrevibacter smithii is the dominant methanogen in both the distal colon of individuals in health and disease, the diversity of methanogens is greater than previously reported. In conclusion, the low incidence of methanogens in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the functionality of the methanogens and impact of methane production in addition to competitive interactions between methanogens and other microbial groups in the human gastrointestinal tract warrants further

  18. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute...

  19. Annotating the human genome with Disease Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, John D; Flatow, Jared; Holko, Michelle; Lin, Simon M; Kibbe, Warren A; Zhu, Lihua (Julie); Danila, Maria I; Feng, Gang; Chisholm, Rex L

    2009-01-01

    Background The human genome has been extensively annotated with Gene Ontology for biological functions, but minimally computationally annotated for diseases. Results We used the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap Transfer tool (MMTx) to discover gene-disease relationships from the GeneRIF database. We utilized a comprehensive subset of UMLS, which is disease-focused and structured as a directed acyclic graph (the Disease Ontology), to filter and interpret results from MMTx. The results were validated against the Homayouni gene collection using recall and precision measurements. We compared our results with the widely used Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) annotations. Conclusion The validation data set suggests a 91% recall rate and 97% precision rate of disease annotation using GeneRIF, in contrast with a 22% recall and 98% precision using OMIM. Our thesaurus-based approach allows for comparisons to be made between disease containing databases and allows for increased accuracy in disease identification through synonym matching. The much higher recall rate of our approach demonstrates that annotating human genome with Disease Ontology and GeneRIF for diseases dramatically increases the coverage of the disease annotation of human genome. PMID:19594883

  20. The volatile metabolome and microbiome in pulmonary and gastro-intestinal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, M.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Omics-technologies allow detailed characterization of biochemical molecular families enabling data-driven and hypothesis-generating research. In this thesis we explore potential merits and pitfalls of such an approach by studying the volatile metabolome and microbiome in disease diagnosis,

  1. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    TG), intrinsic factor (IF), parietal cells (PC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) were screened in the sera of 45 patients with AQP4-seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum diseases (NMO/NMO-SD), 17 patients with AQP4-seronegative NMO, 85 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis...

  2. Effect of bread gluten content on gastrointestinal function: a crossover MRI study on healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Marina; Gates, Fred K; Marciani, Luca; Shiwani, Henna; Major, Giles; Hoad, Caroline L; Chaddock, Gemma; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-14

    Gluten is a crucial functional component of bread, but the effect of increasing gluten content on gastrointestinal (GI) function remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the effect of increasing gluten content on GI function and symptoms in healthy participants using the unique capabilities of MRI. A total of twelve healthy participants completed this randomised, mechanistic, open-label, three-way crossover study. On days 1 and 2 they consumed either gluten-free bread (GFB), or normal gluten content bread (NGCB) or added gluten content bread (AGCB). The same bread was consumed on day 3, and MRI scans were performed every 60 min from fasting baseline up to 360 min after eating. The appearance of the gastric chime in the images was assessed using a visual heterogeneity score. Gastric volumes, the small bowel water content (SBWC), colonic volumes and colonic gas content and GI symptoms were measured. Fasting transverse colonic volume after the 2-d preload was significantly higher after GFB compared with NGCB and AGCB with a dose-dependent response (289 (SEM 96) v. 212 (SEM 74) v. 179 (SEM 87) ml, respectively; P=0·02). The intragastric chyme heterogeneity score was higher for the bread with increased gluten (AGCB 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 0·5) compared with GFB 3 (IQR 0·5); P=0·003). However, gastric half-emptying time was not different between breads nor were study day GI symptoms, postprandial SBWC, colonic volume and gas content. This MRI study showed novel mechanistic insights in the GI responses to different breads, which are poorly understood notwithstanding the importance of this staple food.

  3. Relationship between postprandial motor activity in the human small intestine and the gastrointestinal transit of food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, N.W.; Al-Janabi, M.N.; Edwards, C.A.; Barber, D.C.

    1984-04-01

    Profiles for gastric emptying and colonic filling were determined in 20 normal volunteers by means of a gamma camera and dedicated minicomputer after ingestion of a radiolabeled solid meal. These were compared with intraluminal pressure activity, recorded simultaneously from three sites (each separated by 50 cm) in the small intestine by infusion manometry. Recordings were continued for at least 8 h or until all the radioactivity appeared in the colon. Colonic filling was approximately linear, occurring at an average rate of 16% of the meal residues per hour. There were significant inverse correlations (p less than 0.01) between the pressure activity in the proximal jejunum during the first 3 h after ingestion and the times taken for 50% and 80% of the meal residues to enter the colon, and direct correlations between total small intestinal pressure activity and the half-time for gastric emptying. Phase III of the interdigestive migrating motor complex appeared between 3 and 9 h after ingestion (when between 15% and 80% of the meal remained in the small intestine), but did not necessarily migrate to the next recording site until much later. The time of appearance of phase III in the proximal jejunum was directly correlated with the half-time for gastric emptying (p less than 0.05) and with the intraluminal pressure activity recorded at that site during the first 3 h after food ingestion (p less than 0.01). The time at which 80% of the meal residues had entered the colon was significantly shorter in 6 subjects, in whom a postprandial activity front appeared to migrate throughout the small bowel, compared with 13 subjects, in whom this did not occur (5.0 +/- 0.5 h vs. 7.0 +/- 0.4 h, p less than 0.01). These studies have shown that gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal is related to both fed and fasted intraluminal pressure activity in the small intestine.

  4. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeliger, Harold I; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2015-03-01

    The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  5. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliger Harold I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  6. Human diseases associated with defective DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, E.C.; Ehmann, U.K.; Williams, J.I.

    1979-01-01

    The observations on xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells in culture were the first indications of defective DNA repair in association with human disease. Since then, a wealth of information on DNA repair in XP, and to a lesser extent in other diseases, has accumulated in the literature. Rather than clarifying the understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in normal cells and of defective DNA repair in human disease, the literature suggests an extraordinary complexity of both of the phenomena. In this review a number of discrete human diseases are considered separately. An attempt was made to systematically describe the pertinent clinical features and cellular and biochemical defects in these diseases, with an emphasis on defects in DNA metabolism, particularly DNA repair. Wherever possible observations have been correlated and unifying hypotheses presented concerning the nature of the basic defect(s) in these diseases. Discussions of the following diseases are presented: XP, ataxia telangiectasia; Fanconi's anemia; Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome; Bloom's syndrome, Cockayne's syndrome; Down's syndrome; retinoblastoma; chronic lymphocytic leukemia; and other miscellaneous human diseases with possble DNA repair defects

  7. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  8. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  9. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  10. Non-Invasive Mapping of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota Identifies Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P.; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B.; Ward, Doyle V.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bousvaros, Athos

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota o...

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of infant short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per Torp; Ney, Denise M; Sigalet, David L

    2014-01-01

    enterocolitis, atresia, gastroschisis, volvulus and aganglionosis. Patient outcomes have improved, but there is a need to develop new therapies for SBS and to understand intestinal adaptation after different diseases, resection types, nutritional interventions and growth factor therapies. Animal studies may......, newborn pigs and weanling rats represent a translational advantage for infant SBS due to their immature intestine. A balance among practical, economical, experimental and ethical constraints determines the choice of SBS model for each clinical or basic research question....

  12. Owner assessment of pruritus and gastrointestinal signs in apparently healthy dogs with no history of cutaneous or noncutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetina, Kacie M; Marks, Stanley L; Griffin, Craig E

    2015-08-01

    Determining the cause of pruritus relies on establishing the pattern of abnormal pruritus. The presence of gastrointestinal (GI) disease has also been helpful in determining the cause of pruritus. No study has systematically evaluated typical GI signs and pruritic behaviours in apparently healthy dogs. To evaluate owners' perceptions of pruritus and GI signs in apparently healthy dogs, and determine if age, breed, activity, diet or supplements affected these signs. Three hundred and fourteen apparently healthy dogs ≥ 12 months old with an unremarkable physical examination and no history of pruritus, otitis, skin/hair disease, metabolic or GI disease were enrolled. Thirty one veterinarians enrolled dogs after establishing their pruritus visual analog scale (PVAS) score and faecal consistency score (FCS); owners completed a comprehensive online survey regarding GI signs, possible pruritic behaviours, ear cleaning and sneezing. A PVAS score of ≤ 1.9 was recorded in 87.6% of dogs and the FCS was 2-3 in 94.9% of dogs. PVAS was positively correlated with paw licking/chewing, facial/muzzle rubbing, head shaking and sneezing. Scooting was positively correlated with sneezing. Over 96% of dogs had 1-3 bowel movements (BM) per day. Age was positively correlated with facial/muzzle rubbing, sneezing, coprophagia and borborygmi. The number of walks/day was positively correlated with paw licking/chewing, head shaking, sneezing, number of BM/day, coprophagia, belching, flatulence and borborygmi. A standard method of asking relevant questions was developed and the frequency of GI signs and many behaviours that may indicate pruritus in apparently healthy dogs was established. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. High-resolution imaging of the layers of the gastrointestinal wall of pig and human specimens using an endoluminal MR receiver coil. Correlation to histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Sebastian; Palmowski, M.; Macher-Goeppinger, S.; Mueller, M.; Volke, F.; Duex, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Grenacher, L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: High-resolution MR imaging of the layers of the gastrointestinal wall to provide a foundation for tumor staging based on morphological criteria. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 12 months, miscellaneous parts of the gastrointestinal tract of 15 human specimens and 30 porcine specimens were scanned using a 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner combined with an endoluminal receiver coil. The sequences used were T1-weighted opposed-phase, T2-weighted turbo spin echo with fat saturation and fast T2-weighted inversion recovery. The number of differentiable layers, their width and the signal intensity were documented. Then, the results were compared with histological specimens in order to link the imaged wall layers to the anatomical layers. Spearman's Rank Correlation was used to determine the soundness of the link between the images and their related histology. Results: For both human and animal specimens, the MRI scanning produced 3 to 5, maximum 6 (pig), differentiable layers. The mucosa, submucosa and muscularis could be differentiated with a hyperintense, hypointense and intermediary signal, respectively. The subserosal layer displayed a hypointense signal. Conclusion: High-resolution MRI is able to produce differentiable images of the anatomical layers of the gastrointestinal wall in both humans and pigs. Accordingly, it is possible to use MR imaging to diagnose the extent of local tumor infiltration of the gastrointestinal wall. (orig.)

  14. Plebotomine Vectors of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-30

    incriminated as vectors of Leishmania mexicana among rodents and/or humans from Mexico to the Amazon Basin. Specimens referable to L. olmeca olmeca...in the format similar to that given for the species group baityi included in this report. Additional phlebotomines from Tanzania, Brazil, Peru and...species group baityi included in this report. Additional phlebotomines from Tanzania, Brazil, Peru and Venezuela were slide-mounted and added to the

  15. Genomic uracil and human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Lars; Pena Diaz, Javier; Kavli, Bodil

    2006-01-01

    Uracil is present in small amounts in DNA due to spontaneous deamination of cytosine and incorporation of dUMP during replication. While deamination generates mutagenic U:G mismatches, incorporated dUMP results in U:A pairs that are not directly mutagenic, but may be cytotoxic. In most cells, mut...... retroviral infections. Ung(-/-) mice have a similar phenotype and develop B-cell lymphomas late in life. However, there is no evidence indicating that UNG deficiency causes lymphomas in humans....

  16. The spectrum of disease in lower gastrointestinal tract : endoscopic biopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil-Ullah; Husain, A.; Durrani, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the morphological spectrum of colonic disease and its clinical presentation in our patients from hospitals in and around Rawalpindi / Islamabad. Design: A retrospective data based study. Place and Duration of Study: Pathology Department of Army Medical College, Rawalpindi. Material and Methods: The colonic mucosal biopsies of 1268 patients received during the period of 1980-1995 were studied by routine histopathology methods. Results: A higher frequency of colonic disease in males with a male to female ratio of 2.6:1 and an age range of 1.25 months to 80 years was observed. The clinical presentations mostly seen were bleeding per rectum (32.71%), mass abdomen (23.86%), diarrhoeal episodes (18.62%), constipation (13.38%) and bloody diarrhea (3.02%). The major radiological diagnosis available in 71 cases was ulcerative colitis (32.39%), colonic growth (21.12%) and polyps (11.26%) on endoscopy the most frequently suspected lesious were polyps (34.70%) colonic growth (29.16%), ulcerative colitis (11.66%) and nonspecific findings (9.23%), while 11.23% cases showed unremarkable mucosa. The histopathology revealed mostly nonspecific colitis (25.23%), followed by polyps (24.13%), colonic cancer (17.11%), uncreative colitis (11.19%) and colonic aganglionosis (6.54%). A small number of cases of amoebic, eosinophilic and collagenous colitis and crohns disease was also seen. A number of biopsies (6.30% were unremarkable histologically. Conclusion: Anorectosigmoid was the most commonly involved site than rest of the colon with a ratio of 2.43:1 and therefore most lesions were within the reach of rectosigmoidoscope. (author)

  17. Peculiarities of gastrointestinal tract diseases course in the persons exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasyijeshvyilyi, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    The study involved 145 men aged 21 - 49 years, who were exposed to radiation in the dose of 9.3 ± 1.6 rem at different terms of their stay in 30-km zone during 49 ± 5.4 days. In the study group, chronic gastroduodenitis was diagnosed in 56 patients, chronic cholecystitis - in 47 patients, chronic pancreatitis - in 42 patients. In spite of the difference of nosologic forms, main clinical features of the disease were noted to be the changes of vegetative nervous system and psycho emotional changes

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  19. Utility of Endoscopic Examination in the Diagnosis of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Nomura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. We retrospectively investigated the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract and the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopy. Methods. Of 1231 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between January 2005 and December 2014, 186 of whom underwent colonoscopy and biopsy and had no cytomegalovirus infection. The endoscopic findings and histologic diagnosis from these 186 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Based on the histopathological findings, 171 patients were diagnosed with GVHD, accounting for 13.9% of all transplant recipients. Useful endoscopic findings for the diagnosis of GVHD were atrophy of the ileocecal valve and villous atrophy in the terminal ileum and tortoise shell-like mucosae, edema, and low vascular permeability in the colon. Even when no mucosal abnormality was observed, the incidence of GVHD was 78.9% in the terminal ileum and 75.0% in the colon. Furthermore, patients with mucosal exfoliation, although infrequent, were all diagnosed with grade 3/4 GVHD. Conclusions. It is important to perform endoscopy proactively for the early diagnosis of GVHD, and biopsy should be performed even when no abnormality is observed. In addition, because patients with mucosal exfoliation are extremely likely to have grade 3/4 GVHD, early treatment should be initiated.

  20. Late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in het H2 and H5 EORTC Hodgkin's disease trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Burgers, J.M.V.; Noordijk, E.Ml.; Van der Schueren, E.

    1988-01-01

    Out of 516 patients who entered in the two succesive EORTC trials H2 and H5 for supra-diaphragmatic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD), and who received an infra-diaphragmatic irradiation, 36 (7%) developed the late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Twenty-five patients presented with ulcers (stomach or duodenum), 2 with severe gastritis, 6 with small bowel obstruction or perforation and 3 patients had both un ulcer and bowel obstruction. A previous laparotomy played an important role. While the complication rate was 2.7% without any previous abdominal surgery, it was 11.5% after laparotomy (p < 0.001). Fractionation was also found to be of importance in the occurrence of complications: three different weekly schedules were used - 5 x 2 Gy, 4 x 2.5 Gy and 3 x 3.3 Gy; the GIT complication rates were 4, 9 and 22%, respectively (p < 0.001). These data provide new arguments: (1) against the systematic use of laparotomy and splenectomy in the management of HD; (2) against the use of large fraction sizes (superior to 2 Gy) when irradiating those patients

  1. A Household Level Analysis of Water Sanitation Associated with Gastrointestinal Disease in an Urban Slum Setting of South Okkalapa Township, Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zar Ni Hlaing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed the prevalence of water sanitation at the household level against gastrointestinal disease occurrence in the urban slum setting of South Okkalapa Township, Myanmar, using cross-sectional study design techniques. A total of 364 household respondents were interviewed face to face by well-trained research assistants using structured questionnaires. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the association between independent and dependent variables. Results showed that the source of household water (OR: 13.58, 95% CI: 6.90-26.74, and the types of drinking water (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 0.92-3.71, were significantly associated with gastrointestinal diseases (p-value<0.05. After adjustment for confounding factors, this study found that occupation (AOR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.25-5.54, employment status (AOR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.01-5.01, type of household toilet (AOR: 8.66, 95% CI: 4.03-18.60, sources of household water (AOR: 6.56, 95% CI: 2.86-15.08, and the method of vector control (AOR: 3.12, 95% CI: 1.37-7.30 were all significantly associated with gastrointestinal diseases (p-value<0.05. Health education and appropriate technology for household water, sanitary latrines, environmental sanitation and waste disposal, and the implementation of policies focusing on systematic water management are therefore urgently required to control the spread of waterborne diseases.

  2. Using Big Data to Discover Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Benjamin; Goossens, Nicolas; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies such as genome sequencing, gene expression profiling, proteomic and metabolomic analyses, electronic medical records, and patient-reported health information have produced large amounts of data, from various populations, cell types, and disorders (big data). However, these data must be integrated and analyzed if they are to produce models or concepts about physiologic function or mechanisms of pathogenesis. Many of these data are available to the public, allowing researchers anywhere to search for markers of specific biologic processes or therapeutic targets for specific diseases or patient types. We review recent advances in the fields of computational and systems biology, and highlight opportunities for researchers to use big data sets in the fields of gastroenterology and hepatology, to complement traditional means of diagnostic and therapeutic discovery. PMID:27773806

  3. Comparison of Nitrogen Bioaccessibility from Salmon and Whey Protein Hydrolysates using a Human Gastrointestinal Model (TIM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomi Framroze

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The TIM-1 system is a computer-controlled multi-compartmental dynamic model that closely simulates in vivo gastrointestinal tract digestion in humans. During digestion, the compounds released from meal matrix by gastric and intestinal secretions (enzymes are progressively absorbed through semipermeable membranes depending on their molecular weight. These absorbed (dialysed compounds are considered as bioaccessible, which means that they can be theoretically absorbed by the small intestine in the body. Methods: Salmon protein hydrolysate (SPH, whey protein hydrolysates extensively (WPHHigh or weakly (WPH-Low hydrolysed, non-hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI and mixtures of WPI:SPH (90:10, 80:20 were digested in TIM-1 using the conditions for a fast gastrointestinal transit that simulate the digestion of a liquid meal in human adults. During digestion (2 hours, samples were collected in intestinal compartments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum and in both jejunal and ileal dialysates to determine their nitrogen content. All the products were compared in terms of kinetics of nitrogen absorption through the semipermeable membranes (bioaccessible nitrogen and nitrogen distribution throughout the intestinal compartments at the end of the 2 hour digestion. Results: After a 2 h-digestion in TIM-1, SPH was the protein substrate from which the highest amount of nitrogen (67.0% becomes available for the small intestine absorption. WPH-High had the second highest amount (56.0% of bioaccessible nitrogen while this amount decreased to 38.5–42.2% for the other protein substrates. The high nitrogen bioaccessibility of SPH is consistent with its richness in low molecular weight peptides (50% < 1000 Da. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that SPH provides a higher proportion of bioaccessible nitrogen to a healthy adult compared to all forms of whey proteins, including extensively hydrolysed whey protein hydrolysate. The substitution of

  4. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; Heijden OG van der; Giessen JWB van der; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Published data on infection of human hosts with various protozoa, bacteria, and viruses causing gastro-enteritis are used to establish a quantitative relationship between ingested dose and the risk of infection. For all data sets analysed, this relationship is determined by fitting either an

  5. Higher Levels of Serum Zonulin May Rather Be Associated with Increased Risk of Obesity and Hyperlipidemia, Than with Gastrointestinal Symptoms or Disease Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Bodil Ohlsson; Marju Orho-Melander; Peter M. Nilsson

    2017-01-01

    Zonulin is considered a biomarker of increased intestinal permeability, and elevated levels have been found in celiac disease. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between serum zonulin levels and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and secondarily, between zonulin levels and anthropometric and metabolic factors. The offspring (n = 363) of the participants of the Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort (MDC-CV) were invited to an anthropometric and clinical examination...

  6. Systematic review with meta-analysis: online psychological interventions for mental and physical health outcomes in gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, I; Hewitt, C; Bell, K; Phillips, A; Mikocka-Walus, A

    2018-06-14

    Online psychotherapy has been successfully used as supportive treatment in many chronic illnesses. However, there is a lack of evidence on its role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. To examine whether online psychological interventions improve mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. We searched CINAHL Plus, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Management Information Consortium, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, a specialised register of the IBD/FBD Cochrane Group, MEDLINE (PubMed) WHO International Clinical Trial Registry, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of all papers included in the review. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess internal validity. Where possible, data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 11 publications (encompassing nine studies) meeting inclusion criteria. One study had a high risk of selection bias (allocation concealment), all studies had a high risk of performance and detection bias. Eight studies were included in the meta-analyses (6 on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] and two on inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). Online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was shown to significantly improve gastrointestinal symptom-specific anxiety (MD: -8.51, 95% CI -12.99 to -4.04, P = 0.0002) and lessen symptom-induced disability (MD: -2.78, 95% CI -5.43 to -0.12, P = 0.04) in IBS post intervention. There was no significant effect of online CBT on any other outcomes in IBS. No significant effect of online psychotherapy was demonstrated in IBD. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of online CBT to manage mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Mandella, Michael J.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5 frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212 μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  8. CD34 immunoreactivity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H

    2000-01-01

    , we observed that CD34-ir labeled Kit-negative fibroblast-like cells, closely adjacent to, but distinct from, the Kit-ir ICC. The existence of cells expressing both CD34-ir and Kit-ir remains controversial. CD34-ir and Kit-ir were studied by high-resolution confocal microscopy on cryostat sections...... of human and murine gut as well as murine whole-mounts, using specific antibodies raised to human and murine CD34, respectively. CD34-ir labeled numerous cells in all parts of the gut, in man and in mouse. CD34-ir was consistently observed in Kit-negative cells, distinct from the closely adjacent Kit......-ir ICC. Thin processes of both cell types intermingled extensively, often at the limit of resolution for light microscopy. CD34-ir was also observed in Kit-negative mesenchymal cells in the submucosa, in capillaries and in mesothelial cells. CD34-ir is not a marker for Kit-ir ICC in the human and murine...

  9. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  10. [Diseases transmitted through water for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Dentamaro, M

    2003-01-01

    The water for human consumption maintains a biological risk and can transmit diseases. The classical waterborne and the presently frequent diseases caused by protozoi Giardia and Cryptosporidium are considered and Arcobacter butzleri, a new waterborne pathogen, is described. Many measures have been adopted by institutions to ensure the quality of the drinking water. Managers and public health operators is working in order to verify the efficiency of more suitable indicators for its monitoring.

  11. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. However, it has been exceedingly difficult to model disease at the tissue level. Since recently, the gap between cell line studies and in vivo modeling has been narrowing thanks to progress in biomaterials and stem cell research. Development of reliable 3D...... culture systems has enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro models. Here we focus on some of the latest advances and future perspectives in 3D organoids for human disease modeling....

  12. Aspects of gastrointestinal immunology and nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castello-Branco Luiz RR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal surfaces have a fundamental participation in many aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection pathogenesis. In Brazilian HIV-1 infected subjects, loss of weight and appetite are among the most debilitating symptoms. In this review we describe a defined mucosal immunogen that has profound but transient effects on HIV viral load, and we suggest that gut associated lymphoid tissue under constant immunostimulation is likely to provide a major contribution to the total levels of HIV. We also show that hypermetabolism appears to play a role in the wasting process in Brazilian patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis.

  13. Mouse Chromosome Engineering for Modeling Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    van der Weyden, Louise; Bradley, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements occur frequently in humans and can be disease-associated or phenotypically neutral. Recent technological advances have led to the discovery of copy-number changes previously undetected by cytogenetic techniques. To understand the genetic consequences of such genomic changes, these mutations need to be modeled in experimentally tractable systems. The mouse is an excellent organism for this analysis because of its biological and genetic similarity to humans, and the e...

  14. Quality of life and health care consultation in 13 to 18 year olds with abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Benninga, Marc A

    2014-08-21

    Abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases (AP-FGD) are commonly seen in the paediatric age group. It has significant impact on daily activities of affected children. Main objective of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with AP-FGD. This was a cross sectional survey conducted in children aged 13-18 years, in four randomly selected schools in Western province of Sri Lanka. Data was collected using a previously validated, self-administered questionnaire. It had questions on symptoms, HRQoL and health care consultation. AP-FGD were diagnosed using Rome III criteria. A total of 1850 questionnaires were included in the analysis [males 1000 (54.1%), mean age 14.4 years and SD 1.3 years]. Of them, 305 (16.5%) had AP-FGD [irritable bowel syndrome = 91(4.9%), functional dyspepsia = 11 (0.6%), abdominal migraine = 37 (1.9%) and functional abdominal pain = 180 (9.7%)]. Lower HRQoL scores for physical (83.6 vs. 91.4 in controls), social (85.0 vs. 92.7), emotional (73.6 vs. 82.7) and school (75.0 vs. 82.5) functioning domains, and lower overall scores (79.6 vs. 88.0) were seen in children with AP-FGD (p abdominal pain (r = -0.24, p abdominal bloating and vomiting (p < 0.05). Children with AP-FGD have lower quality of life in all 4 domains. Those with severe symptoms have lower HRQoL. Approximately 28% of children with AP-FGD seek healthcare for their symptoms.

  15. Gastrointestinal safety of celecoxib versus naproxen in patients with cardiothrombotic diseases and arthritis after upper gastrointestinal bleeding (CONCERN): an industry-independent, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Francis K L; Ching, Jessica Y L; Tse, Yee Kit; Lam, Kelvin; Wong, Grace L H; Ng, Siew C; Lee, Vivian; Au, Kim W L; Cheong, Pui Kuan; Suen, Bing Y; Chan, Heyson; Kee, Ka Man; Lo, Angeline; Wong, Vincent W S; Wu, Justin C Y; Kyaw, Moe H

    2017-06-17

    Present guidelines are conflicting for patients at high risk of both cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events who continue to require non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We hypothesised that a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID plus proton-pump inhibitor is superior to a non-selective NSAID plus proton-pump inhibitor for prevention of recurrent ulcer bleeding in concomitant users of aspirin with previous ulcer bleeding. For this industry-independent, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised trial done in one academic hospital in Hong Kong, we screened patients with arthritis and cardiothrombotic diseases who were presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, were on NSAIDs, and require concomitant aspirin. After ulcer healing, an independent staff member randomly assigned (1:1) patients who were negative for Helicobacter pylori with a computer-generated list of random numbers to receive oral administrations of either celecoxib 100 mg twice per day plus esomeprazole 20 mg once per day or naproxen 500 mg twice per day plus esomeprazole 20 mg once per day for 18 months. All patients resumed aspirin 80 mg once per day. Both patients and investigators were masked to their treatments. The primary endpoint was recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding within 18 months. The primary endpoint and secondary safety endpoints were analysed in the modified intention-to-treat population. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153660. Between May 24, 2005, and Nov 28, 2012, we enrolled 514 patients, assigning 257 patients to each study group, all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat population. Recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 14 patients in the celecoxib group (nine gastric ulcers and five duodenal ulcers) and 31 patients in the naproxen group (25 gastric ulcers, three duodenal ulcers, one gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and two bleeding erosions). The cumulative incidence of recurrent bleeding in 18 months

  16. Study of the gastrointestinal parasitic fauna of captive non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Gazzonis, Alessia Libera; Epis, Sara; Manfredi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine helminths and protozoans in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) imported from registered breeding facilities in China and their relation to health risks for non-human primate handlers in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities. Fresh fecal samples were collected from a total of 443 M. fascicularis and analyzed by copromicroscopical analysis, immunoenzymatic, or molecular assays. As to helminths, whose eggs were shed in 2.03% of the samples, Trichuris and Oesophagostomum were the only two taxa found, with low prevalence and low eggs per gram (EPG) values. Protozoans were more frequently detected (87.40%), with Entamoeba coli (85.19%) and Endolimax nana (79.26%) as the most prevalent species shed. Other parasites found by fecal smear examination were uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoebas (78.52%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (42.96%), and Chilomastix mesnili (24.44%), while cysts of Balantidium coli (22.2%) were only observed by sedimentation. No coproantigens of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica complex were detected. Blastocystis sp. infection was noticed in 87.63% of macaques by PCR. These cynomolgus monkeys were infected with many subtypes (ST1, ST2, ST3, ST5, and ST7), where the predominant Blastocystis sp. subtypes were ST2 (77.5%), followed by ST1 (63.5%). Data collected confirmed the presence of potentially zoonotic parasites and a high parasite diversity, suggesting the need for appropriate and sensitive techniques to adequately control them and related health risks for handlers of non-human primates in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities.

  17. Immunotherapy of Human Papilloma Virus Induced Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy is the generic name for treatment modalities aiming to reinforce the immune system against diseases in which the immune system plays a role. The design of an optimal immunotherapeutic treatment against chronic viruses and associated diseases requires a detailed understanding of the interactions between the target virus and its host, in order to define the specific strategies that may have the best chance to deliver success at each stage of disease. Recently, a first series of successes was reported for the immunotherapy of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)-induced premalignant diseases but there is definitely room for improvement. Here I discuss a number of topics that in my opinion require more study as the answers to these questions allows us to better understand the underlying mechanisms of disease and as such to tailor treatment. PMID:23341861

  18. Reduced penetrance in human inherited disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... tant role in cellular senescence, tumorigenesis and in several diseases including type ... between epigenetic DNA modifications and human life span has also been shown .... penetrance mutation that is age dependent especially when compared with the ..... on healthy aging and longevity. Immunity Aging ...

  19. Primatology. Human diseases threaten great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, D

    2000-08-25

    Researchers are uncovering disturbing evidence that scientists and tourists are infecting wild primates with human pathogens. In response, ape specialists, including the American Society of Primatologists, are now calling for stricter health standards for researchers and tourists. They are also urging researchers to learn how to diagnose disease in their study animals.

  20. A modified inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire and the Vaizey Incontinence questionnaire are more sensitive measures of acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy than RTOG grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Usman; McGough, Camilla; Hackett, Claire; Blake, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Tait, Diana; Norman, Andrew R.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Simple scales with greater sensitivity than Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading to detect acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy, could be clinically useful. Methods and Materials: Do questionnaires used in benign gastrointestinal diseases detect toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy? The patient-completed Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBDQ) and Vaizey Incontinence questionnaires were compared prospectively at baseline and at Week 5 to physician-completed RTOG grading. Results: A total of 107 patients, median age 63 years, were recruited. After 5 weeks of treatment, patients with gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer were more symptomatic than urologic patients (p 0.012; p = 0.014). Overall, 94% had altered bowel habits, 80% loose stool, 74% frequency, 65% difficult gas, 60% pain, >48% distress, 44% tenesmus, >40% restrictions in daily activity, 39% urgency, 37% fecal incontinence, and 40% required antidiarrheal medication. The median RTOG score was 1 (range, 0-2), median IBDQ score 204.5 (range, 74-224), and median Vaizey score 5 (range, 0-20). Chemotherapy preceding radiotherapy increased fecal incontinence (p 0.002). RTOG scores stabilized after 3 weeks, IBDQ scores peaked at Week 4, and Vaizey scores worsened throughout treatment. IBDQ and Vaizey scores distinguished between groups with different RTOG scores. Conclusion: The IBDQ and Vaizey questionnaires are reliable and sensitive, offering greater insight into the severity and range of symptoms compared with RTOG grading

  1. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical trials and experimental studies strongly suggest a place for Saccharomyces boulardii as a biotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. S. boulardii mediates responses resembling the protective effects of the normal healthy gut flora. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases that have been confirmed by clinical trials. Caution should be taken in patients with risk factors for adverse events. This review discusses the evidence for efficacy and safety of S. boulardii as a probiotic for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders in humans. PMID:22423260

  2. Emerging arboviral human diseases in Southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Southern Europe is characterized by unique landscape and climate which attract tourists, but also arthropod vectors, some of them carrying pathogens. Among several arboviral diseases that emerged in the region during the last decade, West Nile fever accounted for high number of human cases and fatalities, while Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever expanded its geographic distribution, and is considered as a real threat for Europe. Viruses evolve rapidly and acquire mutations making themselves stronger and naive populations more vulnerable. In an effort to tackle efficiently the emerging arboviral diseases, preparedness and strategic surveillance are needed for the early detection of the pathogen and containment and mitigation of probable outbreaks. In this review, the main human arboviral diseases that emerged in Southern Europe are described. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Gastrointestinal and ectoparasites from urban stray dogs in Fortaleza (Brazil): high infection risk for humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, Sven; Heukelbach, Jörg; Pothmann, David; Rückert, Sonja

    2010-08-01

    Dogs are important definite or reservoir hosts for zoonotic parasites. However, only few studies on the prevalence of intestinal parasites in urban areas in Brazil are available. We performed a comprehensive study on parasites of stray dogs in a Brazilian metropolitan area. We included 46 stray dogs caught in the urban areas of Fortaleza (northeast Brazil). After euthanization, dogs were autopsied. Ectoparasites were collected, and the intestinal content of dogs were examined for the presence of parasites. Faecal samples were collected and analysed using merthiolate iodine formaldehyde concentration method. A total of nine different parasite species were found, including five endoparasite (one protozoan, one cestode and three nematode species) and four ectoparasite species (two flea, one louse and one tick species). In the intestinal content, 3,162 specimens of four helminth species were found: Ancylostoma caninum (prevalence, 95.7%), Dipylidium caninum (45.7%), Toxocara canis (8.7%) and Trichuris vulpis (4.3%). A total of 394 ectoparasite specimens were identified, including Rhipicephalus sanguineus (prevalence, 100.0%), Heterodoxus spiniger (67.4%), Ctenocephalides canis (39.1%) and Ctenocephalides felis (17.4%). In the faeces, intestinal parasites were detected in 38 stray dogs (82.6%), including oocysts of Giardia sp. (2.2%) and eggs of the nematode A. caninum (82.6%). Neither eggs nor larval stages of D. caninum, T. canis or T. vulpis were detected in dog faeces. Sensitivity of faecal examination for A. caninum was 86.4% (95% confidence interval, 72.0-94.3) but zero percentage for the other intestinal helminth species. Our data show that stray dogs in northeast Brazil carry a multitude of zoonotic ecto- and endoparasites, posing a considerable risk for humans. With the exception of A. caninum, sensitivity of faecal examination was negligible.

  4. Gastrointestinal System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jepson, Mark A.; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) acts as a barrier to uptake of potentially dangerous material while allowing absorption of processed food. The gut may be exposed to a diverse range of engineered nanomaterials due to their deliberate addition to food and consumer products

  5. Abnormal Gastroesophageal Flap Valve Is Associated With High Gastresophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire Score and the Severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Vietnamese Patients With Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Duc T; Nguyen, Trang T; Hiyama, Toru

    2018-04-30

    There have been no studies investigating the distribution of abnormal gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) among patients with dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and reflux esophagitis (RE) in the same set of patients. The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the association between GEFV and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERDQ) score, and (2) the distribution of abnormal GEFV in Vietnamese patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Three hundred and thirty-one patients recruited in this prospective cross-sectional study were classified into 3 groups: reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (GERDQ score ≥ 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury), and dyspepsia (GERDQ score < 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury). The GEFV was graded endoscopically according to the Hill classification. GEFV grades I and II were regarded as normal, while grades III and IV were regarded as abnormal GEFV. There were 215 (65.0%) patients with dyspepsia, 55 (16.6%) patients with NERD, and 61 (18.4%) patients with RE. Abnormal GEFV was an independent risk factor for GERD (OR, 2.93; CI 95%, 1.76-4.88) and RE (OR, 3.41; CI 95%, 1.78-6.53). The mean GERDQ score of patients with abnormal GEFV was significantly higher than that of patients with normal GEFV (5.7 ± 2.4 vs 4.9 ± 2.7, P = 0.011). The prevalence of abnormal GEFV gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia (27.4%), NERD (43.6%), grade A RE (56.8%), and grades B/C RE (80.0%) ( P < 0.001). Abnormal GEFV was significantly associated with high GERDQ score. Its prevalence gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia, NERD, and RE, respectively.

  6. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid T Noghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD, constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS, inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD, celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna and Râzi (Rhazes believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  7. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. World Health Organisation Classification of Lymphoid Tumours in Veterinary and Human Medicine: a Comparative Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Lymphomas in 61 Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfesberger, B; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, A; Greß, V; Hammer, S E; Gradner, G; Knödl, K; Tichy, A; Rütgen, B C; Beham-Schmid, C

    2018-02-01

    To diagnose and classify the various entities of lymphomas, the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification is applied in human as well as in veterinary medicine. We validated the concordance of these classification systems by having a veterinary and human pathologist evaluate gastrointestinal lymphoma tissue from 61 cats. In 59% of all cases, there was a match between their respective diagnoses of the lymphoma subtype. A complete consensus between the two evaluators was obtained for all samples with a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. A corresponding diagnosis was also made in the majority of samples with enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type II, although this subtype in cats has similarities to the 'indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the gastrointestinal tract', a provisional entity newly added to the revised human WHO classification in 2016. Very little consensus has been found with cases of EATL type I due to the fact that most did not meet all of the criteria of human EATL I. Hence, the human pathologist assigned them to the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas (not otherwise specified). Consequently, concrete guidelines and advanced immunophenotyping based on the model of human medicine are essential to differentiate these challenging entities in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  10. Calculation by the Monte Carlo method of the equivalent dose received by a human fetus from gamma sources localized in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segreto, V.S.A.

    1979-01-01

    New uterus positions are proposed and worked out in detail to evaluate the exposure of the human fetus to radiation originated in the gastrointestinal-tract during the pregnancy period. In our evaluation each organ in the gastrointestinal-tract namely stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, ascendent colon, descendent colon, sigmoid and rectum was individually considered. Changes in the position of each of these organs were studied as a function of the uterus growth. There were evaluated cases in which the uterus was in three, six and nine month pregnancy for photon energies of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 4 MeV. The average equivalent doses (H) of the uterus, in the uterine wall and in each one of the twelve compartiments which we considered as sub-divisions of the uterus were also determined and discussed. (Auhor) [pt

  11. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  12. The nuclear envelopathies and human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nuclear envelope (NE consists of two membrane layers that segregate the nuclear from the cytoplasmic contents. Recent progress in our understanding of nuclear-lamina associated diseases has revealed intriguing connections between the envelope components and nuclear processes. Here, we review the functions of the nuclear envelope in chromosome organization, gene expression, DNA repair and cell cycle progression, and correlate deficiencies in envelope function with human pathologies.

  13. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Is Less Frequent in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Than in Patients with Other Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fábián

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly used among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, but evidence about its real-life use is limited. We aimed to assess and compare CAM use in outpatients with IBD and other gastrointestinal diseases. Materials and Methods. The use of herbs and botanicals, lifestyle modifications and mind/body therapies, patient satisfaction, and continuous use of conventional medicine were assessed with an anonymous questionnaire at a tertiary IBD unit in Hungary. 396 IBD patients (207 with Crohn’s disease, 185 with ulcerative colitis, and 4 with indeterminate colitis and 164 patients with gastric acid-related diseases, premalignant and malignant colorectal diseases, lactose intolerance, celiac disease, dysbacteriosis, and so on were included. Results. IBD patients reported significantly lower usage of herbs than did controls (25% versus 42%, p<0.001. More than 90% of responding IBD patients continued conventional medication besides herbal remedies (83% in unaltered doses. IBD patients were more likely to implement lifestyle modifications (77% versus 63%, p=0.0011, but not body/mind therapies (20% versus 15%, p=0.1516. Younger age was a significant predictor of lifestyle modifications (p=0.0246. Conclusions. CAM use (especially that of herbal remedies in IBD is less frequent than that in other gastrointestinal diseases. It is more a complementary than an alternative to conventional medicine in IBD. There is no significant difference between CAM use in patients with Crohn’s disease and that in patients with ulcerative colitis, although the latter tend to choose herbs; the benefit of which is supported by scientific evidence. This study is registered at the Medical Research Council, Hungary. This trial is registered with 3769/2010/1018EKU.

  14. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive non-human primates of twenty-four zoological gardens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhao, Bo; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Captive primates are susceptible to gastrointestinal (GIT) parasitic infections, which are often zoonotic and can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Fecal samples were examined by the means of direct smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation, and fecal cultures. Of 26.51% (317/1196) of the captive primates were diagnosed gastrointestinal parasitic infections. Trichuris spp. were the most predominant in the primates, while Entamoeba spp. were the most prevalent in Old World monkeys (P primates and the safety of animal keepers and visitors. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Primatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in the human gastrointestinal tract with daily consumption of a low-fat probiotic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommels, Yvonne E M; Kemperman, Robèr A; Zebregs, Yvonne E M P; Draaisma, René B; Jol, Arne; Wolvers, Danielle A W; Vaughan, Elaine E; Albers, Ruud

    2009-10-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Therefore, probiotic strains should be able to survive passage through the human gastrointestinal tract. Human gastrointestinal tract survival of probiotics in a low-fat spread matrix has, however, never been tested. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human intervention study was to test the human gastrointestinal tract survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG after daily consumption of a low-fat probiotic spread by using traditional culturing, as well as molecular methods. Forty-two healthy human volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups provided with 20 g of placebo spread (n = 13), 20 g of spread with a target dose of 1 x 10(9) CFU of L. reuteri DSM 17938 (n = 13), or 20 g of spread with a target dose of 5 x 10(9) CFU of L. rhamnosus GG (n = 16) daily for 3 weeks. Fecal samples were obtained before and after the intervention period. A significant increase, compared to the baseline, in the recovery of viable probiotic lactobacilli in fecal samples was demonstrated after 3 weeks of daily consumption of the spread containing either L. reuteri DSM 17938 or L. rhamnosus GG by selective enumeration. In the placebo group, no increase was detected. The results of selective enumeration were supported by quantitative PCR, detecting a significant increase in DNA resulting from the probiotics after intervention. Overall, our results indicate for the first time that low-fat spread is a suitable carrier for these probiotic strains.

  17. The role of chemerin in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stojek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is not merely a storage depot of triacylglycerols but also a major endocrine organ. Its cells, including adipocytes, synthesize and secrete a range of biologically active molecules termed adipokines. Adipokines that display the properties of cytokines are often called adipocytokines. In recent years there has been increasing interest in a new adipokine called chemerin. Chemerin is a protein synthesized mostly by the adipose tissue and the liver as inactive pre-pro-chemerin. After the intracellular hydrolytic cutting off of the 20-amino-acid N-terminal polypeptide, it is secreted into the bloodstream as inactive pro-chemerin. Biologically active chemerin is then derived from pro-chemerin after cleavage of the C-terminal fragment by serum proteases involved in inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis. Proteolytic cleavage leads to formation of several chemerin-derived peptides, both biologically active (often with opposing functions and inactive.Within the last decade, there has been a growing number of publications regarding the role of chemerin in human disease. It seems to be implicated in the inflammatory response, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and alimentary tract disorders. The article presents the most recent information on the role of chemerin in human disease, and specifically alimentary tract disorders. The available evidence suggests that chemerin is an important link between adipose tissue mass, metabolic processes, the immune system and inflammation, and therefore plays a major role in human pathophysiology.

  18. Emerging Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Asia Pacific: Implications to Health Care in the Region (World Gastroenterology Organization: Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology Distinguished Global Lecture 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Khean-Lee

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are considered important emerging diseases in the Asia Pacific (AP) region. The incidence rate of CRC is the highest among gastrointestinal cancers in the region surpassing that of gastric cancer. However, population CRC screening is limited by availability of adequate health resources and financing. GERD is a highly prevalent disease in AP with the prevalence of GERD symptoms and reflux esophagitis reported to be increasing. The usage of proton pump inhibitors has also been reported to be high. The incidence and prevalence of IBD is not as high as in the west but is now an increasingly recognizable disease in the AP region. Being a complicated disease, IBD will pose a huge financial burden with the increasing use of expensive biological drugs. In tandem with the exponential increase in obesity and diabetes mellitus in AP, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will become the most important liver disease in the region in the coming years. These emerging diseases reflect the continued fast-paced socioeconomic development in the region with marked lifestyle changes and increasing affluence.

  19. Characterization of equine vitamin D–binding protein, development of an assay, and assessment of plasma concentrations of the protein in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina H.; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Dorthe T.

    2017-01-01

    horses with experimentally induced intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR), and 59 horses with acute gastrointestinal diseases. PROCEDURES VDBP was purified from serum of 2 healthy horses, and recombinant equine VDBP was obtained through a commercial service. Equine VDBP was characterized by mass...... spectrometry. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were raised against equine VDBP, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay for equine VDBP was established. Plasma samples from 61 healthy horses were used to establish working VDBP reference values for study purposes. Plasma VDBP concentrations were assessed...

  20. Associations among hair loss, oral sulfur-containing gases, and gastrointestinal and metabolic linked diseases in Japanese elderly men: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamasaki Tomoko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male pattern baldness (MPB, an observable trait, has been reported to be associated with various diseases, such as prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. Oral sulfur-containing gases have also been suggested to be useful as markers of systemic health condition. However, there are no known reports regarding the associations among MPB, and oral sulfur-containing gases, and systemic health conditions in males. Methods We studied 170 male subjects aged either 60 or 65 years old. The degree of MPB was assessed using the Norwood-Hamilton Baldness scale. Oral sulfur-containing gases were measured using a compact-designed device. All subjects completed physical and laboratory blood examinations, a face-to-face medical questionnaire, and an oral examination. Results There were significant differences between the levels of CH3SCH3 and baldness patterns, independent of age. When we analyzed whether the association was linked to systemic health condition, a strong significant association was observed between the level of CH3SCH3 and severe MPB in subjects with gastrointestinal diseases, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Conclusion These results suggest that MPB is associated with the level of CH3SCH3, a sulfur-containing gas that causes oral malodor, in elderly Japanese males. Further, the association was intensified by the existence of gastrointestinal tract and metabolic disorders.

  1. Sevelamer crystals in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract in a teenager with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joseph; Olson, Kristin; Butani, Lavjay

    2016-02-01

    Non-calcium-containing phosphate binders, such as sevelamer preparations, are being increasingly used in patients on dialysis due to their lower association with hypercalcemia and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While minor gastrointestinal side effects are quite common with the use of sevelamer, more serious gastrointestinal toxicities have only rarely been reported. We report a pediatric patient on maintenance dialysis receiving sevelamer hydrochloride who developed severe abdominal pain and a high-grade stricture of the sigmoid colon. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, resulting in a partial colectomy and colostomy. Histopathologic examination showed colonic mucosal injury and characteristic "fish-scale"-like sevelamer hydrochloride crystals within the mucosa. Whether the sevelamer crystals were causal, contributory or purely incidental remains to be clearly elucidated. However, our case raises sufficient concern to warrant additional investigation into whether there is a causal relationship between sevelamer use and intestinal mucosal injury.

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Lee, Roland R.; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  3. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Darewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes. Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50% of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  5. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-02-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Characteristics and predictors for gastrointestinal hemorrhage among adult patients with dengue virus infection: Emphasizing the impact of existing comorbid disease(s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chi Huang

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is a leading cause of death in dengue. This study aims to identify predictors for GI bleeding in adult dengue patients, emphasizing the impact of existing comorbid disease(s.Of 1300 adults with dengue virus infection, 175 (mean age, 56.5±13.7 years patients with GI bleeding and 1,125 (mean age, 49.2±15.6 years without GI bleeding (controls were retrospectively analyzed.Among 175 patients with GI bleeding, dengue hemorrhagic fever was found in 119 (68% patients; the median duration from onset dengue illness to GI bleeding was 5 days. Gastric ulcer, erythematous gastritis, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, and hemorrhagic gastritis were found in 52.3%, 33.3%, 28.6%, 28.6%, and 14.3% of 42 patients with GI bleeding who had undergone endoscopic examination, respectively. Overall, nine of the 175 patients with GI bleeding died, giving an in-hospital mortality rate of 5.1%. Multivariate analysis showed age ≥60 years (cases vs. controls: 48% vs. 28.3% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.663, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.128-2.453, end stage renal disease with additional comorbidities (cases vs. controls: 1.7% vs. 0.2% (OR: 9.405, 95% CI: 1.4-63.198, previous stroke with additional comorbidities (cases vs. controls: 7.4% vs. 0.6% (OR: 9.772, 95% CI: 3.302-28.918, gum bleeding (cases vs. controls: 27.4% vs. 11.5% (OR: 1.732, 95% CI: 1.1-2.727, petechiae (cases vs. controls: 56.6% vs. 29.1% (OR: 2.109, 95% CI: 1.411-3.153, and platelet count <50×109 cells/L (cases vs. controls: 53.1% vs. 25.8% (OR: 3.419, 95% CI: 2.103-5.558 were independent predictors of GI bleeding in patients with dengue virus infection.Our study is the first to disclose that end stage renal disease and previous stroke, with additional comorbidities, were strongly significant associated with the risk of GI bleeding in patients with dengue virus infection. Identification of these risk factors can be incorporated into the patient assessment and management protocol

  8. In Vivo Dissolution and Systemic Absorption of Immediate Release Ibuprofen in Human Gastrointestinal Tract under Fed and Fasted Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsknecht, Mark J; Baker, Jason R; Wen, Bo; Frances, Ann; Zhang, Huixia; Yu, Alex; Zhao, Ting; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Pai, Manjunath P; Bleske, Barry E; Zhang, Xinyuan; Lionberger, Robert; Lee, Allen; Amidon, Gordon L; Hasler, William L; Sun, Duxin

    2017-12-04

    In vivo drug dissolution in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is largely unmeasured. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the in vivo drug dissolution and systemic absorption of the BCS class IIa drug ibuprofen under fed and fasted conditions by direct sampling of stomach and small intestinal luminal content. Expanding current knowledge of drug dissolution in vivo will help to establish physiologically relevant in vitro models predictive of drug dissolution. A multilumen GI catheter was orally inserted into the GI tract of healthy human subjects. Subjects received a single oral dose of ibuprofen (800 mg tablet) with 250 mL of water under fasting and fed conditions. The GI catheter facilitated collection of GI fluid from the stomach, duodenum, and jejunum. Ibuprofen concentration in GI fluid supernatant and plasma was determined by LC-MS/MS. A total of 23 subjects completed the study, with 11 subjects returning for an additional study visit (a total of 34 completed study visits). The subjects were primarily white (61%) and male (65%) with an average age of 30 years. The subjects had a median [min, max] weight of 79 [52, 123] kg and body mass index of 25.7 [19.4, 37.7] kg/m 2 . Ibuprofen plasma levels were higher under fasted conditions and remained detectable for 28 h under both conditions. The AUC 0-24 and C max were lower in fed subjects vs fasted subjects, and T max was delayed in fed subjects vs fasted subjects. Ibuprofen was detected immediately after ingestion in the stomach under fasting and fed conditions until 7 h after dosing. Higher levels of ibuprofen were detected in the small intestine soon after dosing in fasted subjects compared to fed. In contrast to plasma drug concentration, overall gastric concentrations remained higher under fed conditions due to increased gastric pH vs fasting condition. The gastric pH increased to near neutrality after feedingbefore decreasing to acidic levels after 7 h. Induction of the fed state reduced systemic

  9. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  10. Characterization and Function of the Inflammatory Response to Infection by a Gastrointestinal Nematode Parasite: New Insights into Protective Th2 Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    gastrointestinal nematode parasites;T. trichuris, T. muris , T suis. WT wild type. 1 Dissertation Introduction Background and Significance...and hosts2. Infectious parasites are responsible for a wide range of human diseases, including Leishmanisis, Malaria, Schistosomaisis, Giardia ...the gut to define more clearly protective mechanisms against gastrointestinal nematodes. Using a mouse whipworm model of Trichuris 81 muris

  11. Graft versus host disease in the bone marrow, liver and thymus humanized mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Greenblatt

    Full Text Available Mice bearing a "humanized" immune system are valuable tools to experimentally manipulate human cells in vivo and facilitate disease models not normally possible in laboratory animals. Here we describe a form of GVHD that develops in NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human fetal bone marrow, liver and thymus (NS BLT mice. The skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and parotid glands are affected with progressive inflammation and sclerosis. Although all mice showed involvement of at least one organ site, the incidence of overt clinical disease was approximately 35% by 22 weeks after reconstitution. The use of hosts lacking the IL2 common gamma chain (NOD/SCID/γc(-/- delayed the onset of disease, but ultimately did not affect incidence. Genetic analysis revealed that particular donor HLA class I alleles influenced the risk for the development of GVHD. At a cellular level, GVHD is associated with the infiltration of human CD4+ T cells into the skin and a shift towards Th1 cytokine production. GVHD also induced a mixed M1/M2 polarization phenotype in a dermal murine CD11b+, MHC class II+ macrophage population. The presence of xenogenic GVHD in BLT mice both presents a major obstacle in the use of humanized mice and an opportunity to conduct preclinical studies on GVHD in a humanized model.

  12. Prevalence of Hookworm infection and Strongyloidiasis in Cats and Potential Risk Factor of Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedionoto, Blego; Anamnart, Witthaya

    2018-02-01

    Hookworm infection and Stronyloidiasis are public health problem in the worldwide which both of them could infective in human by penetrated on skin and they have potential risk from Gastrointestinal zoonotic helminths of pets, including cats. We investigated the prevalence soil transmitted helminths infection in human and cats used modified Formal-Ether Concentration and agar plate culture. Fecal samples of 23 cats and human from Naitung and Subua Villages (area study 1), and fecal samples of 15 cats and 17 humans from Thasala Beach villages (area study 2) were collected. Result of study in area study 1 showed prevalence of infection in human was not hookworm and strongyloidiasis but 10% humans have infected Ascaris and Tricuris, and in cats have infected by hookworm 75.2% and S. strercoralis 8.5%, toxocara 13%, spirometra 13% and overall prevalence 82.5%. In area study 2 showed in human has infected by Trichuris 100% and S. stercoralis 29.4% and in cats have infected by hookworm 100% and S. strercoralis 40%, toxocora 20%, and spirometra 20%. Helminth infection found in both humans in two areas study are S. strercoralis. Hookworms were the most common helminth in cats but did not connection with infection in human, while S. strercoralis was helminth infection in cats which has potential zoonotic disease to human.

  13. gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolandas Vaicekauskas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Accurate diagnosis of subepithelial lesions (SELs in the gastrointestinal tract depends on a variety of methods: endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and different types of biopsy. Making an error-free diagnosis is vital for the subsequent application of an appropriate treatment. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of deep biopsy via the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD technique for SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Material and methods: It was a case series study. Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was completed in 38 patients between November 2012 and October 2014. Thirty-eight SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract of varying size (very small ≤ 1 cm, small 1–2 cm and large ≥ 2 cm by means of the ESD technique after an incision with an electrosurgical knife of the overlying layers and revealing a small part of the lesion were biopsied under direct endoscopic view. Results: Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was diagnostic in 28 of 38 patients (73.3%; 95% CI: 59.7–89.7%. The diagnostic yield for SELs with a clear endophytic shape increased to 91.3%. An evident endophytic appearance of a subepithelial lesion, the mean number of biopsied samples (6.65 ±1.36 and the total size in length of all samples per case (19.88 ±8.07 mm were the main criteria influencing the positiveness of deep biopsy in the diagnostic group compared to the nondiagnostic one (p = 0.001; p = 0.025; p = 0.008. Conclusions : Deep biopsy via the ESD technique is an effective and safe method for the diagnosis of SELs especially with a clear endophytic appearance in a large number of biopsied samples.

  14. Enzyme activity of β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae on simulated conditions of human gastrointestinal system

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    Alessandra Bosso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An alternative to relieve the symptoms of lactose intolerance is the intake of the enzyme β-galactosidase in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The ability of β-galactosidase produced by Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae to hydrolyze lactose in simulated conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract was investigated. The experiment was carried out in the optimum temperature for each enzyme activity, 40 and 55°C, respectively, and at the normal human body temperature (37°C at concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 g/L (enzyme from A. oryzae or mL/L (enzyme from K. lactis. Both enzymes were completely inactivated under simulated gastric conditions (pH 2. When the enzymes were subjected to simulated small intestine conditions (pH 7.4, lactose hydrolysis has occurred, but at 37°C the percentage was lower than that under the optimal temperatures. At concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mL/L the enzyme from K. lactis hydrolyzed 76.63%, 88.91% and 94.80% of lactose at 40°C, and 55.99%, 80.91% and 81.53% at 37°C, respectively. In contrast, the enzyme from A. oryzae hydrolyzed 7.11%, 16.18% and 21.29% at 55°C, and 8.4%, 11.85% and 16.43% at 37°C. It was observed that under simulated intestinal conditions, the enzyme from K. lactis was more effective on lactose hydrolysis as compared to the enzyme from A. oryzae. Considering the findings of this study, it is extremely necessary to use an enteric coating on β-galactosidase capsules so that this enzyme is released only in the small intestine, which is its site of action, thus not suffering the action of the stomach pH.Keywords: Lactase. Hydrolysis. Lactose intolerance. Gastrointestinal tract. RESUMOAtividade de β-galactosidase de Kluyveromyces lactis e Aspergillus oryzae, em condições simuladas do sistema gastrintestinal humanoUma das alternativas para amenizar os sintomas da intolerância à lactose é a ingestão de β-galactosidase em formas farmacêuticas. Neste trabalho avaliou-se a

  15. Finding aroma clues in the human breath to diagnose diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dan Wilson

    2016-01-01

    History of human odor analysis in disease diagnosis The use of the sense of smell as an indicator of human disease probably originated with Hippocrates (circa 400 BC). Early medical practitioners recognized that the presence of human diseases changed the odors released from the body and breath. Physicians once relied heavily on their sense of smell to provide useful...

  16. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  17. Human prion diseases in the United States.

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    Robert C Holman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prion diseases are a family of rare, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals. The most common form of human prion disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, occurs worldwide. Variant CJD (vCJD, a recently emerged human prion disease, is a zoonotic foodborne disorder that occurs almost exclusively in countries with outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This study describes the occurrence and epidemiology of CJD and vCJD in the United States. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of CJD and vCJD deaths using death certificates of US residents for 1979-2006, and those identified through other surveillance mechanisms during 1996-2008. Since CJD is invariably fatal and illness duration is usually less than one year, the CJD incidence is estimated as the death rate. During 1979 through 2006, an estimated 6,917 deaths with CJD as a cause of death were reported in the United States, an annual average of approximately 247 deaths (range 172-304 deaths. The average annual age-adjusted incidence for CJD was 0.97 per 1,000,000 persons. Most (61.8% of the CJD deaths occurred among persons >or=65 years of age for an average annual incidence of 4.8 per 1,000,000 persons in this population. Most deaths were among whites (94.6%; the age-adjusted incidence for whites was 2.7 times higher than that for blacks (1.04 and 0.40, respectively. Three patients who died since 2004 were reported with vCJD; epidemiologic evidence indicated that their infection was acquired outside of the United States. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Surveillance continues to show an annual CJD incidence rate of about 1 case per 1,000,000 persons and marked differences in CJD rates by age and race in the United States. Ongoing surveillance remains important for monitoring the stability of the CJD incidence rates, and detecting occurrences of vCJD and possibly other novel prion diseases in the United States.

  18. Modern views on the pathogenesis of hard dental tissues and periodontium lesions and means of their treatment in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupey V.Y.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the mouth covity often reflect regularities of pathogenesis of a number of disease states, and primarily from the digestive tract. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to clarify pathogenesis of certain lesions of hard dental tissues and periodontal tissues in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and development of schemes for their treatment. The study observed 441 children aged from 7 to 15 years with dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis on the background of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, duodenal ulcer and malabsorption syndrome. All the children were divided into 2 groups - basic and comparison one. The study identified the most dan¬gerous and little-known way of pathogenesis, which passes through the general processes of reducing the production of various proteins (immune system and antiseptics, is a violation of the general and local resistance and, ultimately, mineral metabolism. Such disorders impair complete mineralization of tooth enamel, reduce optimal composition and properties of saliva stimulating glycolysis processes in oral cavity. Prevention of dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with chronic pathology of the gastrointestinal tract is based on the use of developed therapeutic and prophylactic complex, which includes mucosal gel Kvertulin, probiotic Latsidofil and drug Calcium D.

  19. Time trends in upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori infection in a multiracial Asian population--a 20-year experience over three time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, A H-R; Lim, Y-Y; Liew, W-C; Goh, K-L

    2016-04-01

    Marked epidemiological changes in upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori infection have taken place in the Asian Pacific region. In particular, differences with respect to race in the multiracial Asian population in Malaysia have been important and interesting. A time trend study of upper gastrointestinal disease and H. pylori infection in three time periods: 1989-1990, 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 spanning a period of 20 years was carried out. Consecutive first time gastroscopies carried out on patients attending the University of Malaya Medical Center were studied. Diagnoses and H. pylori infection status were carefully recorded. A steady decline in prevalence of duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric ulcer (GU) from 21.1% to 9.5% to 5.0% and from 11.9% to 9.4% to 9.9% while an increase in erosive oesophagitis (EO) from 2.0% to 8.4% to 9.5% (chi-square for trend; P Chinese and Indians but the difference over time was most marked in Malays. There was a steady decline in the proportion of patients with gastric and oesophageal cancers. Peptic ulcers have declined significantly over a 20-year period together with a decline in H. pylori infection. In contrast, a steady increase in erosive oesophagitis was observed. Gastric and oesophageal squamous cell cancers have declined to low levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, E.K.; Jones, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters and five case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: CT of the Stomach; CT and Other Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Evaluation of Crohn's Disease; Periotoneal Metastasis; CT and MRI Correlation of the Gastrointestinal Tract; CT of Acute Gastrointestinal Abnormlities; and CT of Colorectal Cancer

  1. Abdominal Pain-Associated Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder Prevalence in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease on Gluten-Free Diet: A Multinational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Sansotta, Naire; Bingham, Sean; Magazzu, Giuseppe; Grosso, Caterina; Romano, Simone; Pusatcioglu, Cenk; Guandalini, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that children with celiac disease (CD) on gluten-free diet are at increased risk of abdominal pain (AP) associated-functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). This was a multinational cross-sectional study performed from 2014 to 2015. Patients 4-18 years of age with CD on gluten-free diet for longer than 6 months were recruited from pediatric CD clinics in US and Italy. Control groups included siblings of children with CD (with normal tissue transglutaminase levels) and unrelated controls. Subjects or parents completed the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III. Children (n = 289) were recruited (55% US, 45% Italy): 96 children with CD, 96 sibling controls, and 97 unrelated controls. Chronic AP was present in 30 (30.9%) subjects with CD, 22 (22.7%) sibling controls, and 21 (21.6%) unrelated controls (P = .26 patients with CD vs siblings; P = .18 patients with CD vs unrelated; P = .96 siblings vs unrelated). AP-FGIDs were present in 8 (8.2%) subjects with CD, 8 (8.2%) sibling controls, and 2 (2.1%) unrelated controls (P = 1.00 subjects with CD vs sibling controls; P = .06 subjects with CD vs unrelated controls; P = .06 sibling controls vs unrelated controls). This multinational study evaluated the prevalence of chronic abdominal pain and AP-FGIDs in the pediatric population with CD. We found that subjects with CD and controls have a similar prevalence of chronic AP and AP-FGIDs. This suggests that not all types of gastrointestinal inflammation result in AP-FGIDs in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

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    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  3. Gastrointestinal symptoms and well-being of adults living on a gluten-free diet: a case for nursing in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Susanne; Kärner, Anita; Hallert, Claes

    2009-01-01

    Women with celiac disease (CD) living on a gluten-free diet (GFD) show a lower health-related quality of life and report a higher rate of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms than men with CD. Uncertainty exists as to whether GI symptoms may explain the poorer treatment outcome of women with CD. This study was designed to explore relationships of GI symptoms and psychological well-being in men and women with long-standing CD. Patients with CD (n = 108; 59% women), aged 45-64 years, treated with a GFD for at least 8 years were evaluated by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and the Psychological General Well-Being index. The results show that women with a high rate of GI symptoms have no lower level of psychological well-being than corresponding men with CD and that women with CD with reduced psychological well-being have no more GI symptoms than corresponding men. Our results fail to support the notion that the reduced subjective health in CD is explained by GI symptoms. They may be secondary to perceived difficulties in managing everyday life, suggesting that launching a nurse-led follow-up may be helpful, as has been proven to be useful in other lifelong disorders.

  4. The endemiology of helicobacter pylorus infection and gastro-intestinal disease in mine and related factory workers of Tongling city, Anhui

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiangyang; Jiang Zhonglin; Yang Shunqi; Mei Yanyan; Wen Qin; Cheng Yingzi; Wang Jianmiao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the endemiology of H. pylorus infection and related gastro-intestinal disease in mine and factory workers of Tong-Ling area. Methods: 14 C-urea breath test, serum IgG and cytotoxin-producing H. pylorus antibodies determinations were performed in 1076 randomly selected adults among the mine and related factory workers in Tong - Ling area. Gastroscopy was done in 156 subjects (cytotoxin-producing H. pylorus antibody CagA-HP positive 108 and Cag-HP negative 48). Results: Seven hundred and twenty-one subjects of the 1076 (67.0%) examined were positive with the 14 C-urea breath and serological tests, among which 350 (48.5% of the 721 ) were Cag-HP positive. Factors affecting positiveness of HP infection were in the order of: working environment, gastro-intestinal symptoms, past history, vocation, age, history of previous contact, sex and non- hygiene life-style. Conclusion: The HP infection rate in Tong-Ling area was slightly higher than nationwide but with a lower CagA - HP positive rate. HP infection was mostly related to the working environment and life-style. (authors)

  5. Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estmann, Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    to diagnosis and clinical course. METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part...

  6. Profiles of microbial fatty acids in the human metabolome are disease-specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna A Ktsoyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by a diverse and dense symbiotic microbiota, the composition of which is the result of host-microbe co-evolution and co-adaptation. This tight integration creates intense crosstalk and signalling between the host and microbiota at the cellular and metabolic levels. In many genetic or infectious diseases the balance between host and microbiota may be compromised resulting in erroneous communication. Consequently, the composition of the human metabolome, which includes the gut metabolome, may be different in health and disease states in terms of microbial products and metabolites entering systemic circulation. To test this hypothesis, we measured the level of hydroxy, branched, cyclopropyl and unsaturated fatty acids, aldehydes, and phenyl derivatives in blood of patients with a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, and in patients with peptic ulceration (PU resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection. Discriminant function analysis of a data matrix consisting of 94 cases as statistical units (37 FMF patients, 14 PU patients, and 43 healthy controls and the concentration of 35 microbial products in the blood as statistical variables revealed a high accuracy of the proposed model (all cases were correctly classified. This suggests that the profile of microbial products and metabolites in the human metabolome is specific for a given disease and may potentially serve as a biomarker for disease.

  7. Arsenic in cooked rice: Effect of chemical, enzymatic and microbial processes on bioaccessibility and speciation in the human gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Guoxin; Van de Wiele, Tom; Alava, Pradeep; Tack, Filip; Du Laing, Gijs

    2012-01-01

    Rice, used as staple food for half of the world population, can easily accumulate arsenic (As) into its grain, which often leads to As contamination. The health risk induced by presence of As in food depends on its release from the food matrix, i.e., its bioaccessibility. Using an in vitro gastrointestinal simulator, we incubated two types of cooked rice (total As: 0.389 and 0.314 mg/kg). Arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation changes were determined upon gastrointestinal digestion. Washing with deionized water and cooking did not result in changes of As speciation in the rice although the arsenic content dropped by 7.1–20.6%. Arsenic bioaccessibility of the cooked rice in the small intestine ranged between 38 and 57%. Bioaccessibility slightly increased during digestion in the simulated small intestine and decreased with time in the simulated colon. Significant speciation changes were noted in the simulated colon, with trivalent monomethylarsonate (MMA III ) becoming an important species. - Highlights: ► We studied arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation in rice during in vitro digestion. ► Bioaccessibility in cooked rice ranged between 38 and 57%. ► Bioaccessibility increased in the small intestine and dropped in the colon. ► Significant speciation changes were observed in the colon. ► Toxic trivalent monomethylarsonate (MMA III ) was produced in the colon. - Arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation changes were studied upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of As-polluted rice with specific attention to the role of colon micro-organisms.

  8. Role of Carbamylated Biomolecules in Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Asim; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2018-04-01

    Carbamylation (or carbamoylation) is a non-enzymatic modification of biomolecules mediated by cyanate, a dissociation product of urea. Proteins are more sensitive to carbamylation. Two major sites of carbamylation reaction are: N α -amino moiety of a protein N-terminus and the N ɛ -amino moiety of proteins' lysine residues. In kidney diseases, urea accumulates and the burden of carbamylation increases. This may lead to alteration in the structure and function of many important proteins relevant in maintenance of homeostasis. Carbamylated proteins namely, carbamylated-haemoglobin and carbamylated-low density lipoprotein (LDL) have been implicated in hypoxia and atherosclerosis, respectively. Furthermore, carbamylation of insulin, oxytocin, and erythropoietin have caused changes in the action of these hormones vis-à-vis the metabolic pathways they control. In this short review, authors have compiled the data on role of carbamylated proteins, enzymes, hormones, LDL, and so on, in human diseases. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(4):267-275, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Laboratory Diagnosis of Parasites from the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lynne S; Arrowood, Michael; Kokoskin, Evelyne; Paltridge, Graeme P; Pillai, Dylan R; Procop, Gary W; Ryan, Norbert; Shimizu, Robyn Y; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    This Practical Guidance for Clinical Microbiology document on the laboratory diagnosis of parasites from the gastrointestinal tract provides practical information for the recovery and identification of relevant human parasites. The document is based on a comprehensive literature review and expert consensus on relevant diagnostic methods. However, it does not include didactic information on human parasite life cycles, organism morphology, clinical disease, pathogenesis, treatment, or epidemiology and prevention. As greater emphasis is placed on neglected tropical diseases, it becomes highly probable that patients with gastrointestinal parasitic infections will become more widely recognized in areas where parasites are endemic and not endemic. Generally, these methods are nonautomated and require extensive bench experience for accurate performance and interpretation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Higher Levels of Serum Zonulin May Rather Be Associated with Increased Risk of Obesity and Hyperlipidemia, Than with Gastrointestinal Symptoms or Disease Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Bodil; Orho-Melander, Marju; Nilsson, Peter M

    2017-03-08

    Zonulin is considered a biomarker of increased intestinal permeability, and elevated levels have been found in celiac disease. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between serum zonulin levels and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and secondarily, between zonulin levels and anthropometric and metabolic factors. The offspring ( n = 363) of the participants of the Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort (MDC-CV) were invited to an anthropometric and clinical examination, where fasting plasma glucose levels were measured. Questionnaires about lifestyle factors and medical history were completed along with the Visual Analog Scale for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (VAS-IBS). Zonulin levels were measured in serum by ELISA. Neither GI symptoms nor GI diseases had any influence on zonulin levels. Higher zonulin levels were associated with higher waist circumference ( p = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure ( p = 0.003), and glucose levels ( p = 0.036). Higher zonulin levels were associated with increased risk of overweight ( p zonulin levels among individuals reporting GI symptoms or GI diseases, but higher zonulin levels are associated with higher waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, and increased risk of metabolic diseases.

  11. Higher Levels of Serum Zonulin May Rather Be Associated with Increased Risk of Obesity and Hyperlipidemia, Than with Gastrointestinal Symptoms or Disease Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Ohlsson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zonulin is considered a biomarker of increased intestinal permeability, and elevated levels have been found in celiac disease. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between serum zonulin levels and gastrointestinal (GI symptoms, and secondarily, between zonulin levels and anthropometric and metabolic factors. The offspring (n = 363 of the participants of the Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort (MDC-CV were invited to an anthropometric and clinical examination, where fasting plasma glucose levels were measured. Questionnaires about lifestyle factors and medical history were completed along with the Visual Analog Scale for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (VAS-IBS. Zonulin levels were measured in serum by ELISA. Neither GI symptoms nor GI diseases had any influence on zonulin levels. Higher zonulin levels were associated with higher waist circumference (p = 0.003, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.003, and glucose levels (p = 0.036. Higher zonulin levels were associated with increased risk of overweight (p < 0.001, obesity (p = 0.047, and hyperlipidemia (p = 0.048. We cannot detect altered zonulin levels among individuals reporting GI symptoms or GI diseases, but higher zonulin levels are associated with higher waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, and increased risk of metabolic diseases.

  12. MODERN ASPECTS OF THE COMBINED PATHOLOGY: BRONCHIAL ASTHMA AND DISEASES OF THE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT SEGMENTS AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Arshba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the combined pathology in childhood, namely a combination of bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease. The authors highlighted the key theories of the disease etiopathogenesis under alternating environmental conditions. They also highlighted the results of their own studies.Key words: bronchial asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease, children.

  13. Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Thad; Sequoia, Jacqueline

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics contain microorganisms, most of which are bacteria similar to the beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut. Probiotics have been widely studied in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. The most-studied species include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces. However, a lack of clear guidelines on when to use probiotics and the most effective probiotic for different gastrointestinal conditions may be confusing for family physicians and their patients. Probiotics have an important role in the maintenance of immunologic equilibrium in the gastrointestinal tract through the direct interaction with immune cells. Probiotic effectiveness can be species-, dose-, and disease-specific, and the duration of therapy depends on the clinical indication. There is high-quality evidence that probiotics are effective for acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile- associated diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Conversely, there is evidence that probiotics are not effective for acute pancreatitis and Crohn disease. Probiotics are safe for infants, children, adults, and older patients, but caution is advised in immunologically vulnerable populations.

  14. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufliarsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract. Better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs led to the clinical development of imatinib for treating patients with this disease. New immuno markers and mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance were discovered. Adjuvant imatinib in intermediate or high risk GIST has improved the recurrence-free survival. Sunitinib in patients with intolerance or progression on imatinib demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival versus placebo. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sorafenib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, have shown activity in patients with imatinib- and sunitinib-resistant GIST. (author)

  16. E3B1/ABI-1 Isoforms Are Down-Regulated in Cancers of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia A. Baba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of E3B1/ABI-1 protein and its role in cancer progression and prognosis are largely unknown in the majority of solid tumors. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of E3B1/ABI-1 protein in histologically confirmed cases of esophageal (squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, gastro-esophageal junction, colorectal cancers and corresponding normal tissues freshly resected from a cohort of 135 patients, by Western Blotting and Immunofluorescence Staining. The protein is present in its phosphorylated form in cells and tissues. Depending on the extent of phosphorylation it is either present in hyper-phosphorylated (M. Wt. 72 kDa form or in hypo-phosphorylated form (M. Wt. 68 kDa and 65 kDa. A thorough analysis revealed that expression of E3B1/ABI-1 protein is significantly decreased in esophageal, gastro-esophageal junction and colorectal carcinomas irrespective of age, gender, dietary and smoking habits of the patients. The decrease in expression of E3B1/ABI-1 was consistently observed for all the three isoforms. However, the decrease in the expression of isoforms varied with different forms of cancers. Down-regulation of E3B1/ABI-1 expression in human carcinomas may play a critical role in tumor progression and in determining disease prognosis.

  17. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  18. Analogs of human genetic skin disease in domesticated animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Finch, MD

    2017-09-01

    The genetic skin diseases we will review are pigmentary mosaicism, piebaldism, albinism, Griscelli syndrome, ectodermal dysplasias, Waardenburg syndrome, and mucinosis in both humans and domesticated animals.

  19. Human milk probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tract infections in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, José; Cañabate, Francisco; Sempere, Luis; Vela, Francisco; Sánchez, Ana R; Narbona, Eduardo; López-Huertas, Eduardo; Geerlings, Arjan; Valero, Antonio D; Olivares, Mónica; Lara-Villoslada, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a follow-on formula containing Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 (L. fermentum) on the incidence of infections in infants between the ages of 6 and 12 months. A randomized double-blinded controlled study including infants at the age of 6 months was conducted. Infants were assigned randomly to either follow-on formula supplemented with L. fermentum plus galactooligosaccharide (experimental group, EG), or the same formula supplemented with only galactooligosaccharide (control group, CG). The main outcome was the incidence of infections for the 6-month duration of the study. The EG showed a significant 46% reduction in the incidence rate (IR) of gastrointestinal infections (EG: 0.196 ± 0.51, CG: 0.363 ± 0.53, IR ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.307-0.950, P = 0.032), 27% reduction in the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (EG: 0.969 ± 0.96, CG: 1.330 ± 1.23, IR ratio 0.729, 95% CI 0.46-1.38, P = 0.026), and 30% reduction in the total number of infections (EG: 1.464 ± 1.15, CG: 2.077 ± 1.59, IR ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.46-1.38, P = 0.003), at the end of the study period compared with CG. Administration of a follow-on formula with L. fermentum CECT5716 may be useful for the prevention of community-acquired gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections.

  20. [Disturbances of gastrointestinal motility of the stomach in patients with chronic gastric erosions and biliary tract disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsitskyĭ, A S; Solovĭova, H A

    2012-12-01

    Article dwells on comparison data about motor function of the stomach in the three groups of patients: with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases, duodenal ulcer disease, chronic gastritis. It is shown, that patients with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases are characterized by slower evacuation function of the stomach, hypotonus of the stomach. Frequency of duodenal reflux in this group of patients is very high (85,9 %).

  1. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  2. Abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases in children and adolescents: prevalence, symptomatology, and association with emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Mettananda, Sachith; Liyanarachchi, Chathurangi; Nanayakkara, Navoda; Mendis, Niranjala; Perera, Nimnadi; Rajindrajith, Shaman

    2011-12-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD) are common among children, but little is known regarding their prevalence in developing countries. We assessed the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant FGD, in addition to the predisposing factors and symptomatology, in Sri Lankan children. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a randomly selected group of 10- to 16-year-olds in 8 randomly selected schools in 4 provinces in Sri Lanka. A validated, self-administered questionnaire was completed by children independently in an examination setting. FGD were diagnosed using Rome III criteria. A total of 2180 questionnaires were distributed and 2163 (99.2%) were included in the analysis (1189 [55%] boys, mean age 13.4 years, standard deviation 1.8 years). Of them, 270 (12.5%) had at least 1 abdominal pain-predominant FGD. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was seen in 107 (4.9%), functional dyspepsia in 54 (2.5%), functional abdominal pain in 96 (4.4%), and abdominal migraine (AM) in 21 (1.0%) (2 had AM and functional dyspepsia, 6 had AM and IBS). Extraintestinal symptoms were more common among affected children (P Abdominal pain-predominant FGD were higher in girls and those exposed to stressful events (P Abdominal pain-predominant FGD affects 12.5% of children ages 10 to 16 years and constitutes a significant health problem in Sri Lanka. IBS is the most common FGD subtype present. Abdominal pain-predominant FGD are higher in girls and those exposed to emotional stress. Prevalence of FGD decreased with age. Extraintestinal symptoms are more frequent in affected children.

  3. Estimating the global burden of thalassogenic diseases: human infectious diseases caused by wastewater pollution of the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Hillel

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary attempt at obtaining an order-of-magnitude estimate of the global burden of disease (GBD) of human infectious diseases associated with swimming/bathing in coastal waters polluted by wastewater, and eating raw or lightly steamed filter-feeding shellfish harvested from such waters. Such diseases will be termed thalassogenic--caused by the sea. Until recently these human health effects have been viewed primarily as local phenomena, not generally included in the world agenda of marine scientists dealing with global marine pollution problems. The massive global scale of the problem can be visualized when one considers that the wastewater and human body wastes of a significant portion of the world's population who reside along the coastline or in the vicinity of the sea are discharged daily, directly or indirectly, into the marine coastal waters, much of it with little or no treatment. Every cubic metre of raw domestic wastewater discharged into the sea can carry millions of infectious doses of pathogenic microorganisms. It is estimated that globally, foreign and local tourists together spend some 2 billion man-days annually at coastal recreational resorts and many are often exposed there to coastal waters polluted by wastewater. Annually some 800 million meals of potentially contaminated filter-feeding shellfish/bivalves and other sea foods, harvested in polluted waters are consumed, much of it raw or lightly steamed. A number of scientific studies have shown that swimmers swallow significant amounts of polluted seawater and can become ill with gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases from the pathogens they ingest. Based on risk assessments from the World Health Organization (WHO) and academic research sources the present study has made an estimate that globally, each year, there are in excess of 120 million cases of gastrointestinal disease and in excess of 50 million cases of more severe respiratory diseases caused by swimming and

  4. Elevated levels of faecal calprotectin in primary Sjögren's syndrome is common and associated with concomitant organic gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, Kristofer; Ohlsson, Bodil; Mandl, Thomas

    2016-01-12

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a systemic rheumatic disease in which gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common. Faecal calprotectin (FC) is a non-invasive biomarker that has been suggested to discriminate organic intestinal disease from functional disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of FC testing in patients with pSS. In total, 56 consecutive patients with pSS and 29 healthy control subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. FC was measured with a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. GI symptoms were evaluated with the Rome III questionnaire and the Visual Analogue Scale for Irritable Bowel Syndrome. In patients with pSS, disease activity was estimated using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI), and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated with the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Patient-Reported Index. Patients with pSS had higher levels of FC than healthy control subjects (median 54 μg/g, interquartile range [IQR 20-128]; vs. 20 μg/g [20-43]; p = 0.002). Concomitant organic GI disease was found in 14 patients with pSS and included inflammatory bowel disease (n = 3), colonic adenoma (n = 2) and GI lymphoma (n = 1). Patients with organic GI disease had higher FC levels than the other patients with pSS (median 274 μg/g [IQR 61-363] vs. median 34 μg/g [IQR 20-76]; p organic GI disease or elevated FC levels. FC correlated moderately with ESSDAI. Excluding patients with organic GI disease, we did not identify any significant association between ESSDAI and FC levels. GI symptoms are frequent in pSS. Contrary to patient-reported outcomes, elevated FC levels in pSS indicate possible organic GI disease that warrants further investigation.

  5. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

  6. A patient with cerebral Whipple disease with gastric involvement but no gastrointestinal symptoms: a consequence of local protective immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, Harald; Katchanov, Juri; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas; Moos, Verena

    2007-08-01

    Whipple disease is a granulomatous infectious disease caused by Tropheryma whipplei. The bacteria accumulate within macrophages, preferentially in the intestinal mucosa. Disease manifestation seems to be linked to immunological abnormalities of macrophages. We describe a patient with cerebral Whipple disease who presented with changes in mental status, confusion, inverse sleep-wake cycle, bilateral ptosis and vertical gaze palsy. Endoscopic biopsy sampling revealed Whipple disease in the gastric antrum but not in the duodenum. Whole blood stimulation displayed reactivity to T. whipplei that was at the lower end of healthy controls while reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes was not diminished. We propose that in cases of neurological symptoms suspicious of Whipple disease with normal duodenal and jenunal findings, biopsy sampling should be extended to the gastric mucosa. The robust reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes may have prevented our patient from developing small bowel disease, whereas the impaired reactivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes might yet explain the bacterial spreading to the central nervous system leading to the rare case of predominant neurological symptoms without relevant systemic involvement.

  7. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorobetea, D.; Svensson Frej, M.; Grencis, R.

    2018-01-01

    Numerous species of nematodes have evolved to inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans, with over a billion of the world's population infected with at least one species. These large multicellular pathogens present a considerable and complex challenge to the host immune system give...

  8. The role of combined 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring in the evaluation of children with gastrointestinal symptoms suggesting gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsak, I; Ivković, L; Trbojević, T; Pavić, I; Jadrešin, O; Mišak, Z; Kolaček, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (pH-MII) monitoring in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children who presented with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in comparison with the results of pH-metry alone and endoscopy. All children who underwent pH-MII monitoring due to GI symptoms, suggestive of GERD, from October 2013 to October 2015 in Children's Hospital Zagreb, were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups according to age - group 1: children Gastro-esophageal reflux disease was determined in 44 of 133 patients (33.1%) by pH-MII and only in 21 of 133 patients (15.8%) by pH-metry alone. Endoscopy was performed in 77 (57.9%) children and esophagitis was found in 32/77 (41.6%). The finding of esophagitis significantly correlated with the number of total reflux episodes (coef. 0.42, p reflux episodes detected by pH-MII; but, no correlation was found to reflux episodes detected by pH-metry alone (coef. 0.21, p = 0.07). Compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII performed significantly better in the detection of GERD in all age groups. On the basis of our data, pH-MII had a strong correlation with endoscopically confirmed esophagitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Encapsulation of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920 with alginate-human-like collagen and evaluation of survival in simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ran; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Fan, Dai-Di; Mi, Yu; Yang, Chan-Yuan; Jia, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Alginate (ALg)-human-like collagen (HLC) microspheres were prepared by the technology of electrostatic droplet generation in order to develop a biocompatible vehicle for probiotic bacteria. Microparticles were spherical with mean particle size of 400μm. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of ALg-HLC microspheres could reach 92-99.2%. Water-soluble and fibrous human-like collagen is combined with sodium alginate through intermolecular hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force which were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thus the matrix of ALg-HLC was very stable. Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920, as a kind of probiotic bacteria, was encapsulated with alginate-human-like collagen to survive and function in simulated gastrointestinal juice. Microparticles were very easy to degradation in simulated intestinal juices. After incubation in simulated gastric (pH 2.0, 2h), the encapsulated B. longum BIOMA 5920 numbers were 4.81 ± 0.38 log cfu/g. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Different distribution of Helicobacter pylori EPIYA- cagA motifs and dupA genes in the upper gastrointestinal diseases and correlation with clinical outcomes in iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bazargani, Abdollah; Khashei, Reza; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Moini, Maryam; Rokni Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the EPIYA-cagA Phosphorylation sites and dupA gene in H. pylori isolates among patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases. Pathogenicity of the cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is associated with EPIYA motifs and higher number of EPIYA-C segments is a risk factor of gastric cancer, while duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) is determined as a protective factor against gastric cancer. A total of 280 non-repeated gastric biopsies obtained from patients undergoing endoscopy from January 2013 till July 2013. Samples were cultured on selective horse blood agar and incubated in microaerophilic atmosphere. The isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori by Gram staining and positive oxidase, catalase, and urease tests. Various motif types of cagA and the prevalence of dupA were determined by PCR method. Out of 280 specimens, 128 (54.7%) isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori. Of 120 H. pylori isolates, 35.9% were dupA positive and 56.26% were cagA positive, while cagA with ABC and ABCC motifs were 55.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Fifty six percent of the isolates with the ABCC motif have had dupA genes. We also found a significant association between strains with genotypes of dupA-ABC and duodenal ulcer disease (p = 0.007). The results of this study showed that the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori in Shiraz was as high as in western countries and higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were seen in gastric cancer patients. We may also use dupA as a prognostic and pathogenic marker for duodenal ulcer disease and cagA with the segment C for gastric cancer and gastric ulcer disease in this region.

  11. Entomologic index for human risk of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T N; Nicholson, M C; Donnelly, E F; Matyas, B T

    1996-12-01

    An entomologic index based on density estimates of Lyme disease spirochete-infected nymphal deer ticks (lxodes scapularis) was developed to assess human risk of Lyme disease. The authors used a standardized protocol to determine tick density and infection in numerous forested sites in six Rhode Island towns. An entomologic risk index calculated for each town was compared with the number of human Lyme disease cases reported to the Rhode Island State Health Department for the same year. A strong positive relation between entomologic risk index and the Lyme disease case rate for each town suggested that the entomologic index was predictive of Lyme disease risk.

  12. Nutrition, epigenetic mechanisms, and human disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maulik, Nilanjana; Maulik, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    .... The text discusses the basics of nutrigenomics and epigenetic regulation, types of nutrition influencing genetic imprinting, and the role of nutrition in modulating an individual's predisposition to disease...

  13. Intragastric formation and modulation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model under human physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Havenaar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic N-alkylnitrosamines can occur exogenously via food consumption or endogenously by formation of these compounds through nitrosation of amine precursors. Information on the intragastric formation of NDMA from complex mixtures of precursors and inhibitors in humans is not

  14. Multinational corporations and infectious disease: Embracing human rights management techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Singer, Burton H; Weiss, Mitchell G; Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Wielga, Mark; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Global health institutions have called for governments, international organisations and health practitioners to employ a human rights-based approach to infectious diseases. The motivation for a human rights approach is clear: poverty and inequality create conditions for infectious diseases to thrive, and the diseases, in turn, interact with social-ecological systems to promulgate poverty, inequity and indignity. Governments and intergovernmental organisations should be concerned with the control and elimination of these diseases, as widespread infections delay economic growth and contribute to higher healthcare costs and slower processes for realising universal human rights. These social determinants and economic outcomes associated with infectious diseases should interest multinational companies, partly because they have bearing on corporate productivity and, increasingly, because new global norms impose on companies a responsibility to respect human rights, including the right to health. We reviewed historical and recent developments at the interface of infectious diseases, human rights and multinational corporations. Our investigation was supplemented with field-level insights at corporate capital projects that were developed in areas of high endemicity of infectious diseases, which embraced rights-based disease control strategies. Experience and literature provide a longstanding business case and an emerging social responsibility case for corporations to apply a human rights approach to health programmes at global operations. Indeed, in an increasingly globalised and interconnected world, multinational corporations have an interest, and an important role to play, in advancing rights-based control strategies for infectious diseases. There are new opportunities for governments and international health agencies to enlist corporate business actors in disease control and elimination strategies. Guidance offered by the United Nations in 2011 that is widely embraced

  15. Production of human metabolites by gastrointestinal bacteria as a potential source of post-mortem alteration of antemortem drug/metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Stephanie M; Powers, Robert H; Bell, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bacterial species are capable of transforming complex chemical substances. Several of these species, native to the human gastrointestinal tract, are active in postmortem decomposition. They have potential to cause biotransformations affecting compound-to-metabolite ratios within the human body, especially after death. Investigation of postmortem effects could supply valuable information, especially concerning compound identification and confirmation. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens on diazepam and flunitrazepam in Reinforced Clostridial Medium, and to compare bacterial biotransformation products to those of human metabolism. A decrease in diazepam concentration between pre- and post-incubation was observed for samples inoculated with Escherichia coli (14.7-20.2%) as well as Bacteroides fragilis (13.9-25.7%); however there was no corresponding increase in concentration for the monitored human metabolites. Flunitrazepam demonstrated a greater concentration loss when incubated with individual bacterial species as well as mixed culture (79.2-100.0%). Samples incubated with Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and mixed culture resulted in nearly complete conversion of flunitrazepam. Increased 7-aminoflunitrazepam concentrations accounted for the majority of the conversion; however discrepancies in the mass balance of the reaction suggested the possibility of a minor metabolite that was not monitored in the current analysis. These experiments served as a pilot study and proof of concept that can be adapted and applied to a realm of possibilities. Ultimately, this methodology would be ideal to study compounds that are too toxic or lethal for animal and human metabolic investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  17. The genus Malassezia and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Sabouraud's Pityrosporum is now recognized as Malassezia. With taxonomic revision of the genus, newer species have been included. The role of this member of the normal human skin flora in different cutaneous and systemic disorders is becoming clearer. The immunological responses it induces in the human body are conflicting and their relevance to clinical features is yet to be explored.

  18. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  19. QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF MAIN GROUPS OF SUBSTANCES IN GRANULES ON THE BASIS OF MEDICINAL VEGETABLE RAW MATERIAL FOR TREATING GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridonov S.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last time a significant increasing of gastrointestinal tract diseases has been observed. The poor quality and irrational feeding, environmental pollution, psychological and other factors is the causes of this. Very often the gastrointestinal tract has a multifactorial pathological effects, also affecting the hepatosphere organs and urogenital system. Also a great importance have accompanying disorders of the central nervous system. Thus we must to require a comprehensive approach to the creation of drugs for use in gastroenterology, the assortment range of which should be expanded. Advantageous position in this case takes a phytotherapy using drugs based on medicinal plant raw material, which acting on the main areas of the pathological process. For this purpose the scientists from the National University of Pharmacy (Kharkov, Ukraine was created a complex herbal drug in the form of granules under the code name "Poligerbagastrin", includes the following types of medicinal plant raw material powders: helichrysum arenarium flowers, corn stigmas, horsetail grass, knotweed grass, horse chestnut seeds, licorice roots and wheat bran. Materials and methods To determine the quantity of biologically active substances the method of spectrophotometry in the visible and UV spectral region was used. This method is well studied and available, equipped with high-precision hardware. He also described in the Ukrainian normative documents and contained in the world's leading pharmacopoeias. For determination was used the unifieds methods, which shown in pharmacopoeia monographs and other reference literature. Determination was carried out with a spectrophotometer HP 8543 UV-VIZ of «Hewlett Packard» company, USA. Results and discussion For the quantitative determination of flavonoids was used a methodology, which based on the complexation reaction of isolated by acid hydrolysis and extraction with ethylacetate hydrolysis products with aluminum chloride in

  20. New techniques in gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Antonio Luengas Tello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery has been making great progress since the seventies in the management paradigms of conditions such as gastrointestinal bleeding, polyp resection and diagnostic and therapeutic management of the biliary tract. The current challenge is the development of techniques that allow endoscopic treatment of emerging diseases such as cancer, morbid obesity, gastro-esophageal reflux and achalasia. This article reports on new techniques and expectations for the future in the endoscopic management of these diseases.

  1. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  2. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Vania López Rodríguez; Emilio Carpio Muñoz; Vicente Fardales Macías; Iralys Benítez Guzmán

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determi...

  3. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  4. Ethical Discourse about the Modification of Food for Therapeutic Purposes: How Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases View the Good, the Bad, and the Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Krista L.; Geller, Gail; Marshall, Patricia; Tilburt, Jon; Mercer, MaryBeth; Brinich, Margaret A.; Highland, Janelle; Farrell, Ruth M.; Sharp, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers have the potential to utilize genetic modification (GM) technologies to create a hybrid of “food” and “medicine” that may challenge traditional understandings of what is “natural”. Moral and ethical concerns are likely to arise in any discussion of these therapeutic foods and will affect the integration of products into clinical care and daily life. This study examined how patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases view probiotics as future bioengineered therapeutic foods. Methods A multi-site qualitative study consisting of focus groups with chronic GI diseases was conducted at Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic, and Johns Hopkins University Results We conducted twenty-two focus groups with 136 patients with major GI diseases between March and August 2009. GI patients associated the term “natural” with concepts of diminished risk and morally “good”; conversely, patients associated the term “unnatural” with things that are “risky,” “foreign”, and morally “bad”. Readily available unmodified probiotics were more commonly described as “natural” while genetically modified probiotics were more commonly labeled as “unnatural” and “risky”. However, patients acknowledged that not all natural products are safe, nor are unnatural products always harmful. Conclusions If GI patient perspectives are indicative of public perceptions of therapeutic foods, our findings suggest that the potential benefits and risks of clinical and public health initiatives employing therapeutic foods will be understood in moralistic terms. Bioethicists and others should be sensitive to the implicit normative appeals that are often embedded in the language of what is “natural” and “unnatural”. PMID:22773953

  5. Gastrointestinal Eosinofilic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Maria, Roberto; Bohorquez, Maria Amalia; Gonzalez, Irene; Torregroza, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal eosinofilic disorders are little frequent diseases, of etiopatogenia little clear, that are characterized by the presence of an infiltrated eosinofilo that can affect the different layers of the wall of the alimentary canal in absence of known causes of eosinofilia. The clinical manifestations are variable and the symptoms are conditioned by the degree of eosinofilia of the wall, the number of layers affected and the segment of the gastrointestinal tract implied. The presentations symptoms vary from diarrhea, vomits, abdominal pain and loss of weigh until the acute intestinal obstruction. They are characterized to present peripherical eosinofilia, although it is not a forced criterion. Its definite diagnosis is anatomopatologic. The steroid use is considered as the angular stone of the treatment. We present two cases, with different clinical presentation forms, with initial answer to steroids and later relapse after the suspension of these, remaining without symptoms actually with dependency of low doses of steroids. Next we will do the revision of the available literature emphasizing the pathophysiologic data, the clinical evaluation and the therapeutic aspects

  6. Disease emergence and resurgence—the wildlife-human connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton; Hurley, James W.; Nol, Pauline; Wesenberg, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) was organized as a global disease watchdog group to coordinate disease outbreak information and health crisis response. The World Health Organization (WHO) is the headquarters for this network. Understandably, the primary focus for WHO is human health. However, diseases such as the H5N1 avian influenza epizootic in Asian bird populations demonstrate the need for integrating knowledge about disease emergence in animals and in humans.Aside from human disease concerns, H5N1 avian influenza has major economic consequences for the poultry industry worldwide. Many other emerging diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), monkeypox, Ebola fever, and West Nile fever, also have an important wildlife component. Despite these wildlife associations, the true integration of the wildlife component in approaches towards disease emergence remains elusive. This separation between wildlife and other species’ interests is counterproductive because the emergence of zoonotic viruses and other pathogens maintained by wildlife reservoir hosts is poorly understood.This book is about the wildlife component of emerging diseases. It is intended to enhance the reader’s awareness of the role of wildlife in disease emergence. By doing so, perhaps a more holistic approach to disease prevention and control will emerge for the benefit of human, domestic animal, and free-ranging wildlife populations alike. The perspectives offered are influenced by more than four decades of my experiences as a wildlife disease practitioner. Although wildlife are victims to many of the same disease agents affecting humans and domestic animals, many aspects of disease in free-ranging wildlife require different approaches than those commonly applied to address disease in humans or domestic animals. Nevertheless, the broader community of disease investigators and health care professionals has largely pursued a separatist approach for

  7. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curi, N H A; Paschoal, A M O; Massara, R L; Santos, H A; Guimarães, M P; Passamani, M; Chiarello, A G

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation), 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans) were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47%) followed by Toxocara (18%) and Trichuris (8%). Other less prevalent (dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  8. Hydrolysed fumonisin B1 and N-(deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-fumonisin B1: stability and catabolic fate under simulated human gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirlini, Martina; Hahn, Irene; Varga, Elisabeth; Dall'Asta, Margherita; Falavigna, Claudia; Calani, Luca; Berthiller, Franz; Del Rio, Daniele; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2015-02-01

    Food processing may induce thermal degradation of fumonisins in corn via Maillard-type reactions, or alkaline hydrolysis via loss of the two tricarballylic acid moieties. In the former case, N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-fumonisin B(1) (NDF) can be formed, while the latter derivative is called hydrolysed fumonisin B(1) (HFB(1)). The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the gastrointestinal stability of HFB(1) and NDF in humans. Due to the lack of standard, NDF was chemically synthesised and cleaned up in high purity to be used for further experiments. While NDF is already partially cleaved (about 41%) during simulated digestion, it remained rather stable towards human colon microflora. In contrast to this, HFB(1) is partially metabolised by the colon microflora to unknown compounds after 24 h of fermentation, as seen by a loss of about 22%. Concluding, the cleavage of NDF during digestion as well as the likely metabolisation of HFB(1) emphasise the need for animal trials to ascertain their toxicity in vivo.

  9. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  10. Disease Human - MDC_CardiovascularMortality2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Polygon feature class based on Zip Code boundaries showing the rate of deaths due to major cardiovascular diseases per 1000 residents of Miami-Dade County in 2006.

  11. Disease Human - MDC_CLRDMortality2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Polygon feature class based on Zip Code boundaries showing the rate of deaths per 100,000 residents due to Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease (CLRD) in Miami-Dade...

  12. Use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry for evaluation of microcirculation in the small and large intestines of horses without gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christof; Kästner, Sabine B R; Hopster, Klaus; Rohn, Karl; Rötting, Anna K

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the use of a micro-lightguide tissue spectrophotometer for measurement of tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the small and large intestines of horses under anesthesia. 13 adult horses without gastrointestinal disease. Horses were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency. Ventral midline laparotomy was performed. Intestinal segments were exteriorized to obtain measurements. Spectrophotometric measurements of tissue oxygenation and regional blood flow of the jejunum and pelvic flexure were obtained under various conditions that were considered to have a potential effect on measurement accuracy. In addition, arterial oxygen saturation at the measuring sites was determined by use of pulse oximetry. 12,791 single measurements of oxygen saturation, relative amount of hemoglobin, and blood flow were obtained. Errors occurred in 381 of 12,791 (2.98%) measurements. Most measurement errors occurred when surgical lights were directed at the measuring site; covering the probe with the surgeon's hand did not eliminate this error source. No measurement errors were observed when the probe was positioned on the intestinal wall with room light, at the mesenteric side, or between the mesenteric and antimesenteric side. Values for blood flow had higher variability, and this was most likely caused by motion artifacts of the intestines. The micro-lightguide spectrophotometry system was easy to use on the small and large intestines of horses and provided rapid evaluation of the microcirculation. Results indicated that measurements should be performed with room light only and intestinal motion should be minimized.

  13. Minimal differences in prevalence and spectrum of organic disease at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between selected secondary care patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux or dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Andrew J; Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Moayyedi, Paul; Ford, Alexander C

    2017-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspepsia are felt to be separate upper gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. We aimed to measure the degree of overlap between them, and assess whether endoscopic findings differed. Demographic, symptom, upper GI endoscopy and histology data were collected from consecutive adults in secondary care. Patients were categorised according to whether they reported gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, dyspepsia alone or both, and patient demographics and endoscopic findings were compared. Of 1167 patients, 97 (8.3%) had gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, 571 (48.9%) dyspepsia alone, and 499 (42.8%) overlap. Patients with overlap symptoms were more likely to smoke, compared with those with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, or dyspepsia alone (p = .009), but there were no other differences. Patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone or overlap had a higher prevalence of erosive oesophagitis (18.6% and 15.4% respectively, p Gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspepsia symptoms commonly overlap. There were minimal differences in demographics or spectrum of underlying organic disease between various symptom groups, suggesting that restrictive classifications according to predominant symptom may not be clinically useful.

  14. Online market research panel members as controls in case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks: early experiences and lessons learnt from the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, P; McCormick, J; Kanagarajah, S; Adak, G K; Cleary, P; Elson, R; Gobin, M; Hawker, J; Inns, T; Sinclair, C; Trienekens, S C M; Vivancos, R; McCarthy, N D

    2018-03-01

    Established methods of recruiting population controls for case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks can be time consuming, resulting in delays in identifying the source or vehicle of infection. After an initial evaluation of using online market research panel members as controls in a case-control study to investigate a Salmonella outbreak in 2013, this method was applied in four further studies in the UK between 2014 and 2016. We used data from all five studies and interviews with members of each outbreak control team and market research panel provider to review operational issues, evaluate risk of bias in this approach and consider methods to reduce confounding and bias. The investigators of each outbreak reported likely time and cost savings from using market research controls. There were systematic differences between case and control groups in some studies but no evidence that conclusions on the likely source or vehicle of infection were incorrect. Potential selection biases introduced by using this sampling frame and the low response rate are unclear. Methods that might reduce confounding and some bias should be balanced with concerns for overmatching. Further evaluation of this approach using comparisons with traditional methods and population-based exposure survey data is recommended.

  15. GASTROINTESTINAL FOOD ALLERGY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Makarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the prevalence  of food allergies. Pathological conditions associated  with a food intolerance are becoming an increasingly urgent problem of pediatrics. According to different researchers, allergic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract occurs in 25–50% of patients with such common pathology as an allergy to cow's milk proteins. The severity of diseases  associated  with food allergies and their prognosis  depend largely on early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Difficulties and errors  in the diagnosis  of gastrointestinal  food allergies  are associated  with both subjective  and objective  reasons,  primarily due to the fact that gastrointestinal  reactions to food are often delayed and non-IgE-mediated. The article describes clinical forms of gastrointestinal food allergy according to the existing classification. Diagnostic algorithms and modern approaches  to differential diagnosis of disease based on evidence-based  medicine and corresponding to international consensus papers are given.

  16. Traditional and Modern Uses of Natural Honey in Human Diseases: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Eteraf-Oskouei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Honey is a by-product of flower nectar and the upper aero-digestive tract of the honey bee, which is concentrated through a dehydration process inside the bee hive. Honey has a very complex chemical composition that varies depending on the botanical source. It has been used both as food and medicine since ancient times. Human use of honey is traced to some 8000 years ago as depicted by Stone Age paintings. In addition to important role of natural honey in the traditional medicine, during the past few decades, it was subjected to laboratory and clinical investigations by several research groups and it has found a place in modern medicine. Honey has been reported to have an inhibitory effect on around 60 species of bacteria, some species of fungi and viruses. Antioxidant capacity of honey is important in many disease conditions and is due to a wide range of compounds including phenolics, peptides, organic acids, enzymes, and Maillard reaction products. Honey has also been used in some gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, inflammatory and neoplastic states. This review covers the composition, physico-chemical properties and the most important uses of natural honey in human diseases.

  17. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  18. The use of double-balloon enteroscopy in retrieving mucosal biopsies from the entire human gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Nicolai Alexander; Vilmann, Peter; Hassan, Hazem

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this explorative study was to evaluate double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) as a new tool for collecting mucosal biopsies from well-defined parts of the entire small and large bowel in patients with type 2 diabetes and in matched healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve su...... possibility to access hitherto unexplored human anatomy and physiology....

  19. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  20. A Mysterious Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding Disguising Itself as Diverticulosis and Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Review of Diagnostic Modalities for Aortoenteric Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplove Senadhi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An 81-year-old male with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and peptic ulcer disease (PUD presented with 2 episodes of maroon stools for 3 days and was found to be orthostatic. His PUD was thought to have accounted for a previous upper gastrointestinal (GI bleed. A colonoscopy revealed 3 polyps and a few diverticuli throughout the colon that were considered to be the source of the bleeding. Two months later, the patient had massive lower GI bleeding and developed hypovolemic shock with a positive bleeding scan in the splenic flexure; however, angiography was negative. A repeat colonoscopy revealed transverse/descending colon diverticular disease and the patient was scheduled for a left hemicolectomy for presumed diverticular bleeding. Intraoperatively, an aortoenteric (AE fistula secondary to an aorto-bi-iliac bypass graft placed during an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair 14 years prior was discovered and was found to be the source of the bleeding. The patient had an AE fistula repair and did well postoperatively without further bleeding. AE fistulas can present with either upper GI or lower GI bleeding, and are universally deadly if left untreated. AE fistulas often present with a herald bleed before life-threatening bleeding. A careful history should always be elicited in patients with risk factors of AAAs such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia and a history of smoking. Strong clinical suspicion in the setting of a scrupulous patient history is the most important factor that allows for the diagnosis of an AE fistula. There are numerous diagnostic modalities for AE fistula, but there is not one specific test that universally diagnoses AE fistulas. Nuclear medicine scans and angiography should not be completely relied on for the diagnosis of AE fistulas or other lower GI bleeds for that manner. Although the conventional paradigm for evaluating lower GI bleeds incorporates nuclear medicine scans and angiography, there is

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of an enteral nutrition protocol for children with common gastrointestinal diseases in China: good start but still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Chen, Pei-Yu; Gong, Si-Tang; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lan-Lan; Liu, Li-Ying; Liang, Cui-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Hui; Li, Hui-Wen; Fang, Tie-Fu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-11-01

    A standard nutrition screening and enteral nutrition (EN) protocol was implemented in January 2012 in a tertiary children's center in China. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a standard EN protocol in hospitalized patients. A retrospective chart review was performed in the gastroenterology inpatient unit. We included all inpatient children requiring EN from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013, with common gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Children from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013, served as the standard EN treatment group, and those from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011, were the control EN group. Pertinent patient information was collected. We also analyzed the length of hospital stay, cost of care, and in-hospital infection rates. The standard EN treatment group received more nasojejunal tube feedings. There was a tendency for the standard EN treatment group to receive more elemental and hydrolyzed protein formulas. Implementation of a standard EN protocol significantly reduced the time to initiate EN (32.38 ± 24.50 hours vs 18.76 ± 13.53 hours; P = .011) and the time to reach a targeted calorie goal (7.42 ± 3.98 days vs 5.06 ± 3.55 days; P = .023); length of hospital stay was shortened by 3.2 days after implementation of the standard EN protocol but did not reach statistical significance. However, the shortened length of hospital stay contributed to a significant reduction in the total cost of hospital care (13,164.12 ± 6722.95 Chinese yuan [CNY] vs 9814.96 ± 4592.91 CNY; P common GI diseases. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Emerging role of mitophagy in human diseases and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jee-Hyun; Yun, Jeanho

    2017-06-01

    Mitophagy is a process of selective removal of damaged or unnecessary mitochondria using autophagic machinery. Mitophagy plays an essential role in maintaining mitochondrial quality control and homeostasis. Mitochondrial dysfunctions and defective mitophagy in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases indicate a close link between human disease and mitophagy. Furthermore, recent studies showing the involvement of mitophagy in differentiation and development, suggest that mitophagy may play a more active role in controlling cellular functions. A better understanding of mitophagy will provide insights about human disease and offer novel chance for treatment. This review mainly focuses on the recent implications for mitophagy in human diseases and normal physiology. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(6): 299-307].

  3. The commensal microbiota and the development of human disease - an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Humans have co-evolved with microorganisms, and both exist in a symbiotic or mutualistic relationship. We are colonised by a diverse, resident microbiota, which develop into structurally and functionally organised biofilms. The resident microorganisms gain a secure, warm, nutritious habitat from the host and, in return, contribute to the development of many important host functions. The resident microbiota of each habitat is natural and provides important benefits for the host including immunological priming, down-regulation of excessive pro-inflammatory responses, regulation of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems, and prevention of colonisation by exogenous microbes. The biological properties of each habitat determine which microorganisms can colonise and grow, and dictate which will be major or minor components of the resident microbiota of a site. This results in different surfaces having distinct but characteristic microbiotas. This relationship between the resident microbiota and the host is dynamic and, on occasions, this symbiotic relationship breaks down due to, for example, changes in lifestyle, immune status or following broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. This 'dysbiosis' can result in previously minor components of the microbiota out-competing the normally dominant and beneficial bacteria, thereby increasing the risk of disease. Such perturbations have been associated with a number of clinical disorders such as obesity, allergy, and a variety of inflammatory diseases, including periodontal diseases. A better understanding of the delicate balance between the host and its resident microbiota could lead to novel approaches to the promotion of health and the prevention of dysbiosis.

  4. The commensal microbiota and the development of human disease – an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Marsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans have co-evolved with microorganisms, and both exist in a symbiotic or mutualistic relationship. We are colonised by a diverse, resident microbiota, which develop into structurally and functionally organised biofilms. The resident microorganisms gain a secure, warm, nutritious habitat from the host and, in return, contribute to the development of many important host functions. The resident microbiota of each habitat is natural and provides important benefits for the host including immunological priming, down-regulation of excessive pro-inflammatory responses, regulation of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems, and prevention of colonisation by exogenous microbes. The biological properties of each habitat determine which microorganisms can colonise and grow, and dictate which will be major or minor components of the resident microbiota of a site. This results in different surfaces having distinct but characteristic microbiotas. This relationship between the resident microbiota and the host is dynamic and, on occasions, this symbiotic relationship breaks down due to, for example, changes in lifestyle, immune status or following broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. This ‘dysbiosis’ can result in previously minor components of the microbiota out-competing the normally dominant and beneficial bacteria, thereby increasing the risk of disease. Such perturbations have been associated with a number of clinical disorders such as obesity, allergy, and a variety of inflammatory diseases, including periodontal diseases. A better understanding of the delicate balance between the host and its resident microbiota could lead to novel approaches to the promotion of health and the prevention of dysbiosis.

  5. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...... chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends...

  6. Vitamins in the prevention of human diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Wolfgang, Prof; Obeid, Rima

    2011-01-01

    ... in ancient Egypt. One-sided nutrition, smoking, alcohol, genetic factors, and even geographical origin interfere with our dietary intake of the vitamins. Insufficient vitamin intake can impact our health and contribute significantly to the development of diseases. This book offers expert reviews and judgements on the role of vitamins in health and ...

  7. Exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Disease. What Precautions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic is more pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa. The ever-increasing prevalence of HIV infection and the continued improvement in clinical management has increased the likelihood of these patients being managed by healthcare workers. The aim of the review ...

  8. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  9. Glutathione dysregulation and the etiology and progression of human diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballatori, N.; Krance, S.M.; Notenboom, S.; Shi, S.; Tieu, K.; Hammond, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and as a result, disturbances in GSH homeostasis are implicated in the etiology and/or progression of a number of human diseases, including cancer, diseases

  10. Mosquitoes as vectors of human disease in South Africa | Jupp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While malaria is the most important mosquito-borne disease in South Africa, there are also several mosquito-borne viruses that also cause human disease. The most significant are chikungunya, West Nile, Sindbis and Rift Valley fever viruses. In this review these are compared with malaria, mainly in regard to their ecology ...

  11. A murine model of human myeloma bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, I.R.; Dallas, S.; Radl, J.; Mundy, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Myeloma causes a devastating and unique form of osteolytic bone disease. Although osteoclast activation is responsible for bone destruction, the precise mechanisms by which myeloma cells increase osteoclast activity have not been defined. An animal model of human myeloma bone disease mould help in

  12. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for

  13. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  14. Interaction or relationship between Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kai-Yu; Hu, Fu-Lian

    2006-06-28

    According to a meta-analysis, H pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) independently and significantly increase the risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and ulcer bleeding. Their coincidence is frequent, demonstration of a possible relationship and consequent attitude is of important implications. But unfortunately, no consensus has been approved in the past years and their interactions are still controversial. H pylori and NSAID are known to share a number of pathogenic mechanisms, but there is no evidence for the significant synergic action between these two risk factors. Their relationship is independent, additive, synergistic or antagonistic without considering the influence of other factors because studies on this subject are different in almost all aspects of their methodology, including the definition of a NSAID user as well as the types, doses, duration and their indications for NSAID use, as well as their end-points, definition of dyspepsia and regimes used for eradication of H pylori. These might contribute to the conflicting results and opinions. H pylori infection in humans does not act synergistically with NSAID on ulcer healing, and there is no need to eradicate it. This notion is supported by the finding that the eradication of H pylori does not affect NSAID-induced gastropathy treated with omeprazole and that H pylori infection induces a strong cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression resulting in excessive biosynthesis of gastroprotective prostaglandin which in turn counteracts NSAID-induced gastropathy and heals the existing ulcer. Other investigators claimed that H pylori infection acts synergistically with NSAID on ulcer development, and H pylori should be eradicated, particularly at the start of long-term NSAID therapy. Eradication of H pylori prior to NSAID treatment does not appear to accelerate ulcer healing or to prevent recurrent ulcers in NSAID users. However, some recommendations can be drawn from the results of clinical trails.

  15. Positions of human dwellings affect few tropical diseases near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Some factors that possibly affect tropical disease distribution was investigated in about 500 randomize human dwellings. The studied factors include wild animals, domestic animals, wild plants, cultivated plants, nature of soil, nature of water, positions of human dwellings, nature of building material and position of animal ...

  16. Animal models for human genetic diseases | Sharif | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of human genetic diseases can be greatly aided by animal models because of their similarity to humans in terms of genetics. In addition to understand diverse aspects of basic biology, model organisms are extensively used in applied research in agriculture, industry, and also in medicine, where they are used to ...

  17. Gastrointestinal Simulation Model TWIN-SHIME Shows Differences between Human Urolithin-Metabotypes in Gut Microbiota Composition, Pomegranate Polyphenol Metabolism, and Transport along the Intestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villalba, Rocío; Vissenaekens, Hanne; Pitart, Judit; Romo-Vaquero, María; Espín, Juan C; Grootaert, Charlotte; Selma, María V; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy; Possemiers, Sam; Van Camp, John; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A

    2017-07-12

    A TWIN-SHIME system was used to compare the metabolism of pomegranate polyphenols by the gut microbiota from two individuals with different urolithin metabotypes. Gut microbiota, ellagitannin metabolism, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), transport of metabolites, and phase II metabolism using Caco-2 cells were explored. The simulation reproduced the in vivo metabolic profiles for each metabotype. The study shows for the first time that microbial composition, metabolism of ellagitannins, and SCFA differ between metabotypes and along the large intestine. The assay also showed that pomegranate phenolics preserved intestinal cell integrity. Pomegranate polyphenols enhanced urolithin and propionate production, as well as Akkermansia and Gordonibacter prevalence with the highest effect in the descending colon. The system provides an insight into the mechanisms of pomegranate polyphenol gut microbiota metabolism and absorption through intestinal cells. The results obtained by the combined SHIME/Caco-2 cell system are consistent with previous human and animal studies and show that although urolithin metabolites are present along the gastrointestinal tract due to enterohepatic circulation, they are predominantly produced in the distal colon region.

  18. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Human gait Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimonti eDutta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available IIn this paper multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis is used to study the human gait time series for normal and diseased sets. It is observed that long range correlation is primarily responsible for the origin of multifractality. The study reveals that the degree of multifractality is more for normal set compared to diseased set. However the method fails to distinguish between the two diseased sets.

  19. Localized gastrointestinal amyloidosis presenting with protein-losing enteropathy and massive hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Corrêa

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis of the gastrointestinal tract is usually a systemic disease. Localized gastrointestinal amyloidosis without evidence of extraintestinal involvement or an associated plasma cell dyscrasia is uncommon and does not usually cause death. We report a case of a patient with localized gastrointestinal amyloidosis who presented with protein-losing enteropathy and a fatal upper gastrointestinal bleed.

  20. Development and application of an in vitro methodology to determine the transit tolerance of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the upper human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, W P; Kelly, P M; Morelli, L; Collins, J K

    1998-05-01

    An in vitro methodology which mimics in vivo human upper gastrointestinal transit was developed. The transit tolerance of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was determined by exposing washed cell suspensions at 37 degrees C to a simulated gastric juice (pH 2.0), containing pepsin (0.3% w/v) and sodium chloride (0.5% w/v), and a simulated small intestinal juice (pH 8.0), containing pancreatin USP (1 g l-1) and sodium chloride (5 g l-1), and monitoring changes in total viable count periodically. The methodology was also employed to determine the effect of adding milk proteins (1 g l-1), hog gastric mucin (1 g l-1) and soyabean trypsinchymotrypsin inhibitor [SBTCI] (1 g l-1) on transit tolerance. The majority (14 of 15) of isolates lost > 90% viability during simulated gastric transit. Only one isolate, Lactobacillus fermentum KLD, was considered intrinsically resistant. The addition of milk proteins, singly and in combination, generally improved gastric transit tolerance. In this regard, two isolates, Lact. casei 212.3 and Bifidobacterium infantis 25962, exhibited 100% gastric transit tolerance in the presence of milk proteins. In general, the addition of hog gastric mucin did not influence simulated gastric transit tolerance of lactobacilli but tended to increase that of bifidobacteria. However, it increased that of Lact. casei 242 and Lact. salivarius 43338 but diminished that of B. bifidum 2715 and B. animalis Bo. Selected bile salts-resistant isolates were intrinsically tolerant to simulated small intestinal transit. Only Lact. casei F19 and B. adolescentis 15703T showed significant reduction in viability after 240 min. In general, the addition of milk proteins and SBTCI did not affect simulated small intestinal transit tolerance. However, they significantly improved the intrinsic resistance of Lact. casei F19 but diminished that of B. breve 15700T. It is concluded that, whereas the majority of bile salts-resistant lactobacilli and

  1. DEGAS: de novo discovery of dysregulated pathways in human diseases.

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    Igor Ulitsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular studies of the human disease transcriptome typically involve a search for genes whose expression is significantly dysregulated in sick individuals compared to healthy controls. Recent studies have found that only a small number of the genes in human disease-related pathways show consistent dysregulation in sick individuals. However, those studies found that some pathway genes are affected in most sick individuals, but genes can differ among individuals. While a pathway is usually defined as a set of genes known to share a specific function, pathway boundaries are frequently difficult to assign, and methods that rely on such definition cannot discover novel pathways. Protein interaction networks can potentially be used to overcome these problems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present DEGAS (DysrEgulated Gene set Analysis via Subnetworks, a method for identifying connected gene subnetworks significantly enriched for genes that are dysregulated in specimens of a disease. We applied DEGAS to seven human diseases and obtained statistically significant results that appear to home in on compact pathways enriched with hallmarks of the diseases. In Parkinson's disease, we provide novel evidence for involvement of mRNA splicing, cell proliferation, and the 14-3-3 complex in the disease progression. DEGAS is available as part of the MATISSE software package (http://acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/matisse. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The subnetworks identified by DEGAS can provide a signature of the disease potentially useful for diagnosis, pinpoint possible pathways affected by the disease, and suggest targets for drug intervention.

  2. Human gastrointestinal tract resistance of Lactobacillus strains isolated from infant faecesResistência ao trato gastrointestinal humano de linhagens de Lactobacillus isoladas de fezes de crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Garcia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The probiotic bacteria survival during the gastrointestinal transit is primordial, and implies in the ability of microorganisms to survive at the stomach acidity and bile, so they can exert their beneficial effects on the host. The aim of this study was to evaluate, “in vitro”, Lactobacillus strains originated from one year old children fecal material in the selection of probiotic microorganisms. Two commercial strains, L. casei (Lc 01TM and L. acidophilus (La-05 TM were used as controls. The first screening resulted in 75 colonies and they were isolated from six samples faeces. Isolates were Gram positive, mostly rod shaped (cocobacilli, long and thin rods and rarely cocci. They were submitted to catalase test and evaluated for the presence of spores, resulting in 30 pre-selected strains. Among those strains, eight strains: L4, L5, L12, L19, L20, L22, L23, L24 were the most resistant to Oxgall (bile salts concentration (0.3 w/v. These eight strains were also resistant to acid conditions (pH 3.0 and all strains were able to grow in the presence of 0.3 w/v of phenol. The results of treatments were compared to the Neuman Keuls Student test at 5% of probability, with regression analyses made at different times for tolerance to intestinal conditions. The results demonstrated that all these strains were able to survive under gastrointestinal stress condition, indicating potential use as probiotics. The high survival rate of probiotic strains, in conditions that simulate the gastrointestinal transit, is strain dependent and thus, a proper selection of strains in the development of dairy probiotic products is vital.

  3. [Bartonellosis. II. Other Bartonella responsible for human diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piémont, Y; Heller, R

    1999-01-01

    In addition to Bartonella henselae, five other Bartonella species were involved in human pathology. As for B. henselae, ectoparasites seem to be responsible for the transmission of most or all these bacterial species. B. bacilliformis is responsible for Carrion's disease that occurs in some valleys of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. This disease is transmitted by biting of infected sandflies. The bacterial reservoir is constituted by humans only. That disease occurs either as an acute form with severe infectious hemolytic anemia (or Oroya fever), or as benign cutaneous tumors, also called verruga peruana. Healthy blood carriers of the bacterium exist. Trench fever was described during the First World War. This non-lethal disease is constituted of recurrent febrile attacks associated particularly with osseous pains. The causative agent of the disease is B. quintana, transmitted by the body louse. Humans seem to be the reservoir of that bacterium. In some patients, B. quintana can be responsible for endocarditis, bacillary angiomatosis and chronic or recurrent bacteremia. Other human infections due to Bartonella sp. have been described: B. vinsonii, isolated from blood of small rodents, and B. elizabethae, the reservoir of which is currently unknown, can be responsible for endocardites. B. clarridgeiae (isolated from blood of 5% of pet cats and 17% of stray cats) may be responsible for human cat scratch disease. All these bartonelloses are diagnosed by non-standard blood culture or by in vitro DNA amplification or by serological testing. Their treatment requires tetracyclines or chloramphenicol or macrolides.

  4. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  5. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. A. Curi

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation, 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47% followed by Toxocara (18% and Trichuris (8%. Other less prevalent (<2% parasites found were Capillaria, Ascaridia, Spirocerca, Taeniidae, Acantocephala, Ascaris, Dipylidium caninum, Toxascaris, and the protozoans Cystoisospora and Eimeria. Mixed infections were found in 36% of samples, mostly by Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Previous deworming had no association with infections, meaning that this preventive measure is being incorrectly performed by owners. Regarding risk factors, dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  6. Low Buffer Capacity and Alternating Motility along the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Implications for in Vivo Dissolution and Absorption of Ionizable Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Bart; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Bermejo, Marival; Paixao, Paulo; Koenigsknecht, Mark J; Baker, Jason R; Hasler, William L; Lionberger, Robert; Fan, Jianghong; Dickens, Joseph; Shedden, Kerby; Wen, Bo; Wysocki, Jeffrey; Loebenberg, Raimar; Lee, Allen; Frances, Ann; Amidon, Greg; Yu, Alex; Benninghoff, Gail; Salehi, Niloufar; Talattof, Arjang; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-12-04

    In this study, we determined the pH and buffer capacity of human gastrointestinal (GI) fluids (aspirated from the stomach, duodenum, proximal jejunum, and mid/distal jejunum) as a function of time, from 37 healthy subjects after oral administration of an 800 mg immediate-release tablet of ibuprofen (reference listed drug; RLD) under typical prescribed bioequivalence (BE) study protocol conditions in both fasted and fed states (simulated by ingestion of a liquid meal). Simultaneously, motility was continuously monitored using water-perfused manometry. The time to appearance of phase III contractions (i.e., housekeeper wave) was monitored following administration of the ibuprofen tablet. Our results clearly demonstrated the dynamic change in pH as a function of time and, most significantly, the extremely low buffer capacity along the GI tract. The buffer capacity on average was 2.26 μmol/mL/ΔpH in fasted state (range: 0.26 and 6.32 μmol/mL/ΔpH) and 2.66 μmol/mL/ΔpH in fed state (range: 0.78 and 5.98 μmol/mL/ΔpH) throughout the entire upper GI tract (stomach, duodenum, and proximal and mid/distal jejunum). The implication of this very low buffer capacity of the human GI tract is profound for the oral delivery of both acidic and basic active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). An in vivo predictive dissolution method would require not only a bicarbonate buffer but also, more significantly, a low buffer capacity of dissolution media to reflect in vivo dissolution conditions.

  7. Wildlife disease prevalence in human-modified landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Grant; Rhodes, Jonathan; Bradley, Adrian; Baxter, Greg; Seabrook, Leonie; Lunney, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McAlpine, Clive

    2013-05-01

    Human-induced landscape change associated with habitat loss and fragmentation places wildlife populations at risk. One issue in these landscapes is a change in the prevalence of disease which may result in increased mortality and reduced fecundity. Our understanding of the influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on the prevalence of wildlife diseases is still in its infancy. What is evident is that changes in disease prevalence as a result of human-induced landscape modification are highly variable. The importance of infectious diseases for the conservation of wildlife will increase as the amount and quality of suitable habitat decreases due to human land-use pressures. We review the experimental and observational literature of the influence of human-induced landscape change on wildlife disease prevalence, and discuss disease transmission types and host responses as mechanisms that are likely to determine the extent of change in disease prevalence. It is likely that transmission dynamics will be the key process in determining a pathogen's impact on a host population, while the host response may ultimately determine the extent of disease prevalence. Finally, we conceptualize mechanisms and identify future research directions to increase our understanding of the relationship between human-modified landscapes and wildlife disease prevalence. This review highlights that there are rarely consistent relationships between wildlife diseases and human-modified landscapes. In addition, variation is evident between transmission types and landscape types, with the greatest positive influence on disease prevalence being in urban landscapes and directly transmitted disease systems. While we have a limited understanding of the potential influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on wildlife disease, there are a number of important areas to address in future research, particularly to account for the variability in increased and decreased disease prevalence. Previous studies

  8. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT. In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists. The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively). A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy.

  9. Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Doubled after Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding: A Nationwide Nested Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung Wu

    Full Text Available Prior studies of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB and acute myocardial infarction (AMI are small, and long-term effects of UGIB on AMI have not been delineated. We investigated whether UGIB in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease (CAD increased their risk of subsequent AMI. This was a population-based, nested case-control study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. After propensity-score matching for age, gender, comorbidities, CAD date, and follow-up duration, we identified 1,677 new-onset CAD patients with AMI (AMI[+] between 2001 and 2006 as the case group and 10,062 new-onset CAD patients without (AMI[-] as the control group. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between UGIB and AMI. Compared with UGIB[-] patients, UGIB[+] patients had twice the risk for subsequent AMI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72-2.50. In the subgroup analysis for gender and age, UGIB[+] women (AOR = 2.70; 95% CI, 2.03-3.57 and patients < 65 years old (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.56-3.18 had higher odds of an AMI. UGIB[+] AMI[+] patients used nonsignificantly less aspirin than did UGIB[-] AMI[+] patients (27.69% vs. 35.61%, respectively. UGIB increased the risk of subsequent AMI in CAD patients, especially in women and patients < 65. This suggests that physicians need to use earlier and more aggressive intervention to detect UGIB and prevent AMI in CAD patients.

  10. Rotavirus vaccine impact and socioeconomic deprivation: an interrupted time-series analysis of gastrointestinal disease outcomes across primary and secondary care in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Daniel; Vivancos, Roberto; Read, Jonathan M; Iturriza-Gόmara, Miren; French, Neil; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2018-01-29

    Rotavirus causes severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. The UK introduced the monovalent rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) in July 2013. Vaccination is free of charge to parents, with two doses delivered at 8 and 12 weeks of age. We evaluated vaccine impact across a health system in relation to socioeconomic deprivation. We used interrupted time-series analyses to assess changes in monthly health-care attendances in Merseyside, UK, for all ages, from July 2013 to June 2016, compared to predicted counterfactual attendances without vaccination spanning 3-11 years pre-vaccine. Outcome measures included laboratory-confirmed rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) hospitalisations, acute gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalisations, emergency department (ED) attendances for gastrointestinal conditions and consultations for infectious gastroenteritis at community walk-in centres (WIC) and general practices (GP). All analyses were stratified by age. Hospitalisations were additionally stratified by vaccine uptake and small-area-level socioeconomic deprivation. The uptake of the first and second doses of rotavirus vaccine was 91.4% (29,108/31,836) and 86.7% (27,594/31,836), respectively. Among children aged impact was greatest during the rotavirus season and for vaccine-eligible age groups. In adults aged 65+ years, AGE hospitalisations fell by 25% (95% CI 19-30%; p socioeconomically deprived communities (adjusted incident rate ratio 1.57; 95% CI 1.51-1.64; p impact was greatest among the most deprived populations, despite lower vaccine uptake. Prioritising vaccine uptake in socioeconomically deprived communities should give the greatest health benefit in terms of population disease burden.

  11. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  12. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  13. Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Boykova, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: GIST are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with varying tumor grade and frequency of 1: 100 000 per year. Mazur and Clark introduced the term for the first time in 1983. GIST constitute approximately 2% of the tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The average age is 60 years. The most common locations are the stomach (60%), small intestine (30%), esophagus (1%), and rectum (5%). Learning objective: to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of the disease according to the current ESMO guidelines and to present the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalitiesnbased on review of literature and on own observations. GIST originate from interstitial cells (of Cajal) in the GIT wall, belonging to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for motility. 90% of GIST show overexpression of the KIT receptor, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor. those that do not express c-KIT mutations, activate mutations in PDGFRA gene. Tumor’s macromorphology determines the imaging features on different modalities. Most of these tumors are exophytic, subepithelial, reach large size and enhance inhomogeneous due to necrosis. They usually do not cause obstruction. Ultrasound as the initiation method shows low sensitivity and specificity in GIST detection, CT with intravenous contrast is the gold standard. MRI contributes with assessing the vascularisation, cellularity and pH. FDG-PET/CT registers the metabolism of intratumoral acidosis. CT is the method of choice in the early diagnosis and determination of resectability of GIST. MRI is an additional method. PET FDG-CT is useful for the monitoring of patients treated with Imatinib

  14. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  15. Transferability of a tetracycline resistance gene from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri to bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervärn, Maria; Lindmark, Hans; Olsson, Johan; Roos, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus reuteri as a donor of antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut was investigated by studying the transferability of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(W) to faecal enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In a double-blind clinical study, seven subjects consumed L. reuteri ATCC 55730 harbouring a plasmid-encoded tet(W) gene (tet(W)-reuteri) and an equal number of subjects consumed L. reuteri DSM 17938 derived from the ATCC 55730 strain by the removal of two plasmids, one of which contained the tet(W) gene. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after ingestion of 5 x 10(8) CFU of L. reuteri per day for 14 days. Both L. reuteri strains were detectable at similar levels in faeces after 14 days of intake but neither was detected after a two-week wash-out period. After enrichment and isolation of tetracycline resistant enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli from each faecal sample, DNA was extracted and analysed for presence of tet(W)-reuteri using a real-time PCR allelic discrimination method developed in this study. No tet(W)-reuteri signal was produced from any of the DNA samples and thus gene transfer to enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during intestinal passage of the probiotic strain was non-detectable under the conditions tested, although transfer at low frequencies or to the remaining faecal bacterial population cannot be excluded.

  16. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal

  17. Preventive and Therapeutic Role of Functional Ingredients of Barley Grass for Chronic Diseases in Human Beings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawen Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley grass powder is the best functional food that provides nutrition and eliminates toxins from cells in human beings; however, its functional ingredients have played an important role as health benefit. In order to better cognize the preventive and therapeutic role of barley grass for chronic diseases, we carried out the systematic strategies for functional ingredients of barley grass, based on the comprehensive databases, especially the PubMed, Baidu, ISI Web of Science, and CNKI, between 2008 and 2017. Barley grass is rich in functional ingredients, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, flavonoids, saponarin, lutonarin, superoxide dismutase (SOD, K, Ca, Se, tryptophan, chlorophyll, vitamins (A, B1, C, and E, dietary fiber, polysaccharide, alkaloid, metallothioneins, and polyphenols. Barley grass promotes sleep; has antidiabetic effect; regulates blood pressure; enhances immunity; protects liver; has anti-acne/detoxifying and antidepressant effects; improves gastrointestinal function; has anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypolipidemic, and antigout effects; reduces hyperuricemia; prevents hypoxia, cardiovascular diseases, fatigue, and constipation; alleviates atopic dermatitis; is a calcium supplement; improves cognition; and so on. These results support that barley grass may be one of the best functional foods for preventive chronic diseases and the best raw material of modern diet structure in promoting the development of large health industry and further reveal that GABA, flavonoids, SOD, K-Ca, vitamins, and tryptophan mechanism of barley grass have preventive and therapeutic role for chronic diseases. This paper can be used as a scientific evidence for developing functional foods and novel drugs for barley grass for preventive chronic diseases.

  18. Gastrointestinal complications associated with the treatment of patients with congenital cardiac disease : consensus definitions from the Multi-Societal Database Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghanayem, Nancy S.; Dearani, Joseph A.; Welke, Karl E.; Beland, Marie J.; Shen, Irving; Ebels, Tjark

    2008-01-01

    A complication is an event or occurrence that is associated with a disease or a healthcare intervention, is a departure from the desired course of events, and may cause, or be associated with, suboptimal outcome. A complication does not necessarily represent a breech in the standard of care that

  19. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells by gastric acid and bile during in vitro gastrointestinal transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceuppens Siele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus can cause diarrhoeal food poisoning by production of enterotoxins in the small intestine. The prerequisite for diarrhoeal disease is thus survival during gastrointestinal passage. Methods Vegetative cells of 3 different B. cereus strains were cultivated in a real composite food matrix, lasagne verde, and their survival during subsequent simulation of gastrointestinal passage was assessed using in vitro experiments simulating transit through the human upper gastrointestinal tract (from mouth to small intestine. Results No survival of vegetative cells was observed, despite the high inoculum levels of 7.0 to 8.0 log CFU/g and the presence of various potentially protective food components. Significant fractions (approx. 10% of the consumed inoculum of B. cereus vegetative cells survived gastric passage, but they were subsequently inactivated by bile exposure in weakly acidic intestinal medium (pH 5.0. In contrast, the low numbers of spores present (up to 4.0 log spores/g showed excellent survival and remained viable spores throughout the gastrointestinal passage simulation. Conclusion Vegetative cells are inactivated by gastric acid and bile during gastrointestinal passage, while spores are resistant and survive. Therefore, the physiological form (vegetative cells or spores of the B. cereus consumed determines the subsequent gastrointestinal survival and thus the infective dose, which is expected to be much lower for spores than vegetative cells. No significant differences in gastrointestinal survival ability was found among the different strains. However, considerable strain variability was observed in sporulation tendency during growth in laboratory medium and food, which has important implications for the gastrointestinal survival potential of the different B. cereus strains.

  20. [The standardized mortality numbers of patients with gastrointestinal tumors and cardiovascular diseases in four wine regions and in one not-wine region of Hungary between 2000-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, János; Sipka, Sándor; Kocsis, Judit; Horváth, Zsolt

    2017-06-01

    Eating habits act on mortalities from gastrointestinal tumors and cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the role of wine drinking on these mortalities in Hungary. The standardized mortality data of people from 206,159 subjects died of gastrointestinal tumors and cardiovascular diseases between 2000-2010 were compared in four wine regions: Tokaj (white), Eger (red), Balaton (white), Szekszárd/Villány (red) and in Hódmezővásárhely (not-wine region). The significantly smallest number of tumors (664) occurred in Tokaj, but the cardiovascular mortality here was the highest (5955). On the other hand, the fewest cardiovascular mortality occurred in Szekszárd/Villány (3907), but showing here (831) and in Eger (934) the highest values of tumor death. The protective effect of red wine on cardiovascular mortality was verified. Surprisingly, the low value of gastrointestinal mortality in "Tokaj" - besides the higher level of selenium in tap water - shows some hidden features of these white wines. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(25): 992-998.

  1. Human genomic disease variants: a neutral evolutionary explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Joel T; Kim, Yuseob; Liu, Li; Markov, Glenn J; Gerold, Kristyn; Chen, Rong; Butte, Atul J; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-08-01

    Many perspectives on the role of evolution in human health include nonempirical assumptions concerning the adaptive evolutionary origins of human diseases. Evolutionary analyses of the increasing wealth of clinical and population genomic data have begun to challenge these presumptions. In order to systematically evaluate such claims, the time has come to build a common framework for an empirical and intellectual unification of evolution and modern medicine. We review the emerging evidence and provide a supporting conceptual framework that establishes the classical neutral theory of molecular evolution (NTME) as the basis for evaluating disease- associated genomic variations in health and medicine. For over a decade, the NTME has already explained the origins and distribution of variants implicated in diseases and has illuminated the power of evolutionary thinking in genomic medicine. We suggest that a majority of disease variants in modern populations will have neutral evolutionary origins (previously neutral), with a relatively smaller fraction exhibiting adaptive evolutionary origins (previously adaptive). This pattern is expected to hold true for common as well as rare disease variants. Ultimately, a neutral evolutionary perspective will provide medicine with an informative and actionable framework that enables objective clinical assessment beyond convenient tendencies to invoke past adaptive events in human history as a root cause of human disease.

  2. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Ugur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes.

  3. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  4. Polycystins, calcium signaling, and human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, Patrick; Padilla, Francoise; Osorio, Nancy; Coste, Bertrand; Raoux, Matthieu; Crest, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major, inherited nephropathy affecting over 1:1000 of the worldwide population. It is a systemic condition with frequent hepatic and cardiovascular manifestations in addition to the progressive development of fluid-filled cysts from the tubules and collecting ducts of affected kidneys. The pathogenesis of cyst formation is currently thought to involve increased proliferation of epithelial cells, mild dedifferentiation, and fluid accumulation. In the past decade, study of ADPKD led to the discovery of a unique family of highly complex proteins, the polycystins. Loss-of-function mutations in either of two polycystin proteins, polycystin-1 or polycystin-2, give rise to ADPKD. These proteins are thought to function together as part of a multiprotein complex that may initiate Ca 2+ signals, directing attention to the regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ as a possible misstep that participates in cyst formation. Here we review what is known about the Ca 2+ signaling functions of polycystin proteins and focus on findings that have significantly advanced our physiological insight. Special attention is paid to the recently discovered role of these proteins in the mechanotransduction of the renal primary cilium and the model it suggests

  5. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  6. Ecology and pathogenicity of gastrointestinal Streptococcus bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Paul; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is an indigenous resident in the gastrointestinal tracts of both humans and animals. S. bovis is one of the major causes of bacterial endocarditis and has been implicated in the incidence of human colon cancer, possibly due to chronic inflammatory response at the site of intestinal colonization. Certain feeding regimens in ruminants can lead to overgrowth of S. bovis in the rumen, resulting in the over-production of lactate and capsular polysaccharide causing acute ruminal acidosis and bloat, respectively. There are multiple strategies in controlling acute lactic acidosis and bloat. The incidence of the two diseases may be controlled by strict dietary management. Gradual introduction of grain-based diets and the feeding of coarsely chopped roughage decrease the incidence of the two disease entities. Ionophores, which have been used to enhance feed conversion and growth rate in cattle, have been shown to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria in the rumen. Other methods of controlling lactic acid bacteria in the ruminal environment (dietary supplementation of long-chain fatty acids, induction of passive and active immune responses to the bacteria, and the use of lytic bacteriophages) have also been investigated. It is anticipated that through continued in-depth ecological analysis of S. bovis the characteristics responsible for human and animal pathogenesis would be sufficiently identified to a point where more effective control strategies for the control of this bacteria can be developed.

  7. Frequent detection of human adenovirus from the lower gastrointestinal tract in men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel E Curlin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The association between baseline seropositivity to human adenovirus (HAdV type 5 and increased HIV acquisition in the Step HIV Vaccine Study has raised questions concerning frequency of acquired and/or persistent Adenovirus infections among adults at high risk of HIV-1 infection.To evaluate the frequency and pattern of HAdV shedding from the lower GI tract, we retrospectively tested rectal swabs for HAdVs in a cohort of 20 HSV-2 positive HIV-positive Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM undergoing rectal swabbing three times/week for 18 consecutive weeks, in a prospective study of HSV-2 suppression in HIV infection. Viral DNA was extracted and amplified using a sensitive multiplex PCR assay that detects all currently recognized HAdV types. Molecular typing of viruses was performed on selected samples by hexon gene sequencing. Baseline neutralizing antibody titers to HAdVs -5, -26, -35 and -48 were also assessed.15/20 individuals had HAdV detected during follow up. The median frequency of HAdV detection was 30% of samples (range 2.0% to 64.7%. HAdV shedding typically occurred on consecutive days in clustered episodes lasting a median of 4 days (range 1 to 9 days separated by periods without shedding, suggesting frequent new infections or reactivation of latent infections over time. 8 of the 15 shedders had more than one type detected in follow-up. 20 HAdV types from species B, C, and D were identified, including HAdV-5, -26 and -48, HAdV types under development as potential vaccine candidates. 14/20 subjects were seropositive for HAdV-5; 15/20 for HAdV-26; 3/20 for HAdV-35; and 2/20 for HAdV-48. HAdV shedding did not correlate with CD4 count, plasma HIV-1 viral load, or titers to HAdV-5 or HAdV-35. The sole individual with HAdV-5 shedding was HAdV-5 seropositive.HAdV shedding was highly prevalent and diverse, including types presently under consideration as HIV vaccine vectors. Subclinical HAdV infection of the GI tract is common among MSM in

  8. Anal Carcinoma: Impact of TN Category of Disease on Survival, Disease Relapse, and Colostomy Failure in US Gastrointestinal Intergroup RTOG 98-11 Phase 3 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Pedersen, John E.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Benson, Al B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Mayer, Robert J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The long-term update of US GI Intergroup RTOG 98-11 anal cancer trial found that concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with fluorouracil (5-FU) plus mitomycin had a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with induction plus concurrent 5-FU plus cisplatin. The intent of the current analysis was to determine the impact of tumor node (TN) category of disease on survival (DFS and OS), colostomy failure (CF), and relapse (local-regional failure [LRF] and distant metastases [DM]) in this patient group. Methods and Materials DFS and OS were estimated univariately by using the Kaplan-Meier method, and 6 TN categories were compared by the log–rank test (T2N0, T3N0, T4N0, T2N1-3, T3N1-3, and T4N1-3). Time to relapse and colostomy were estimated by the cumulative incidence method, and TN categories were compared using Gray’s test. Results Of 682 patients, 620 were analyzable for outcomes by TN category. All endpoints showed statistically significant differences among the TN categories of disease (OS, P<.0001; DFS, P<.0001; LRF, P<.0001; DM, P=.0011; CF, P=.01). Patients with the poorest OS, DFS, and LRF outcomes were those with T3-4N-positive (+) disease. CF was lowest for T2N0 and T2N+ (11%, 11%, respectively) and worst for the T4N0, T3N+, and T4N+ categories (26%, 27%, 24%, respectively). Conclusions TN category of disease has a statistically significant impact on OS, DFS, LRF, DM, and CF in patients treated with CCRT and provides excellent prognostic information for outcomes in patients with anal carcinoma. Significant challenges remain for patients with T4N0 and T3-4N+ categories of disease with regard to survival, relapse, and CF and lesser challenges for T2-3N0/T2N+ categories. PMID:24035327

  9. Anal Carcinoma: Impact of TN Category of Disease on Survival, Disease Relapse, and Colostomy Failure in US Gastrointestinal Intergroup RTOG 98-11 Phase 3 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, Leonard L., E-mail: gunderson.leonard@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pedersen, John E. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Benson, Al B. [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Mayer, Robert J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Rich, Tyvin A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The long-term update of US GI Intergroup RTOG 98-11 anal cancer trial found that concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with fluorouracil (5-FU) plus mitomycin had a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with induction plus concurrent 5-FU plus cisplatin. The intent of the current analysis was to determine the impact of tumor node (TN) category of disease on survival (DFS and OS), colostomy failure (CF), and relapse (local-regional failure [LRF] and distant metastases [DM]) in this patient group. Methods and Materials: DFS and OS were estimated univariately by using the Kaplan-Meier method, and 6 TN categories were compared by the log–rank test (T2N0, T3N0, T4N0, T2N1-3, T3N1-3, and T4N1-3). Time to relapse and colostomy were estimated by the cumulative incidence method, and TN categories were compared using Gray's test. Results: Of 682 patients, 620 were analyzable for outcomes by TN category. All endpoints showed statistically significant differences among the TN categories of disease (OS, P<.0001; DFS, P<.0001; LRF, P<.0001; DM, P=.0011; CF, P=.01). Patients with the poorest OS, DFS, and LRF outcomes were those with T3-4N-positive (+) disease. CF was lowest for T2N0 and T2N+ (11%, 11%, respectively) and worst for the T4N0, T3N+, and T4N+ categories (26%, 27%, 24%, respectively). Conclusions: TN category of disease has a statistically significant impact on OS, DFS, LRF, DM, and CF in patients treated with CCRT and provides excellent prognostic information for outcomes in patients with anal carcinoma. Significant challenges remain for patients with T4N0 and T3-4N+ categories of disease with regard to survival, relapse, and CF and lesser challenges for T2-3N0/T2N+ categories.

  10. Anal Carcinoma: Impact of TN Category of Disease on Survival, Disease Relapse, and Colostomy Failure in US Gastrointestinal Intergroup RTOG 98-11 Phase 3 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Pedersen, John E.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Benson, Al B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Mayer, Robert J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The long-term update of US GI Intergroup RTOG 98-11 anal cancer trial found that concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with fluorouracil (5-FU) plus mitomycin had a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with induction plus concurrent 5-FU plus cisplatin. The intent of the current analysis was to determine the impact of tumor node (TN) category of disease on survival (DFS and OS), colostomy failure (CF), and relapse (local-regional failure [LRF] and distant metastases [DM]) in this patient group. Methods and Materials: DFS and OS were estimated univariately by using the Kaplan-Meier method, and 6 TN categories were compared by the log–rank test (T2N0, T3N0, T4N0, T2N1-3, T3N1-3, and T4N1-3). Time to relapse and colostomy were estimated by the cumulative incidence method, and TN categories were compared using Gray's test. Results: Of 682 patients, 620 were analyzable for outcomes by TN category. All endpoints showed statistically significant differences among the TN categories of disease (OS, P<.0001; DFS, P<.0001; LRF, P<.0001; DM, P=.0011; CF, P=.01). Patients with the poorest OS, DFS, and LRF outcomes were those with T3-4N-positive (+) disease. CF was lowest for T2N0 and T2N+ (11%, 11%, respectively) and worst for the T4N0, T3N+, and T4N+ categories (26%, 27%, 24%, respectively). Conclusions: TN category of disease has a statistically significant impact on OS, DFS, LRF, DM, and CF in patients treated with CCRT and provides excellent prognostic information for outcomes in patients with anal carcinoma. Significant challenges remain for patients with T4N0 and T3-4N+ categories of disease with regard to survival, relapse, and CF and lesser challenges for T2-3N0/T2N+ categories

  11. Infectious prion diseases in humans: cannibalism, iatrogenicity and zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In contrast with other neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, human prion diseases include infectious forms (also called transmitted forms) such as kuru, iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The transmissible agent is thought to be solely composed of the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein that accumulated in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Compared to its normal counterpart, PrP(Sc) is β-sheet enriched and aggregated and its propagation is based on an autocatalytic conversion process. Increasing evidence supports the view that conformational variations of PrP(Sc) encoded the biological properties of the various prion strains that have been isolated by transmission studies in experimental models. Infectious forms of human prion diseases played a pivotal role in the emergence of the prion concept and in the characterization of the very unconventional properties of prions. They provide a unique model to understand how prion strains are selected and propagate in humans. Here, we review and discuss how genetic factors interplay with strain properties and route of transmission to influence disease susceptibility, incubation period and phenotypic expression in the light of the kuru epidemics due to ritual endocannibalism, the various series iatrogenic diseases secondary to extractive growth hormone treatment or dura mater graft and the epidemics of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to dietary exposure to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Human parechovirus infections in Dutch children and the association between serotype and disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benschop, K. S. M.; Schinkel, J.; Minnaar, R. P.; Pajkrt, D.; Spanjerberg, L.; Kraakman, H. C.; Berkhout, B.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Beld, M. G. H. M.; Wolthers, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are members of the family Picornaviridae and are classified into 3 known serotypes: HPeV1, HPeV2, and the recently identified HPeV3. HPeV1 and HPeV2 infections are most commonly associated with mild respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms and occasionally

  13. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  14. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  15. Genetic engineering in nonhuman primates for human disease modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenya; Sasaki, Erika

    2018-02-01

    Nonhuman primate (NHP) experimental models have contributed greatly to human health research by assessing the safety and efficacy of newly developed drugs, due to their physiological and anatomical similarities to humans. To generate NHP disease models, drug-inducible methods, and surgical treatment methods have been employed. Recent developments in genetic and developmental engineering in NHPs offer new options for producing genetically modified disease models. Moreover, in recent years, genome-editing technology has emerged to further promote this trend and the generation of disease model NHPs has entered a new era. In this review, we summarize the generation of conventional disease model NHPs and discuss new solutions to the problem of mosaicism in genome-editing technology.

  16. Natural selection and infectious disease in human populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    The ancient biological 'arms race' between microbial pathogens and humans has shaped genetic variation in modern populations, and this has important implications for the growing field of medical genomics. As humans migrated throughout the world, populations encountered distinct pathogens, and natural selection increased the prevalence of alleles that are advantageous in the new ecosystems in both host and pathogens. This ancient history now influences human infectious disease susceptibility and microbiome homeostasis, and contributes to common diseases that show geographical disparities, such as autoimmune and metabolic disorders. Using new high-throughput technologies, analytical methods and expanding public data resources, the investigation of natural selection is leading to new insights into the function and dysfunction of human biology. PMID:24776769

  17. Human genetics of infectious diseases: a unified theory

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the dominant paradigm in the human genetics of infectious diseases postulates that rare monogenic immunodeficiencies confer vulnerability to multiple infectious diseases (one gene, multiple infections), whereas common infections are associated with the polygenic inheritance of multiple susceptibility genes (one infection, multiple genes). Recent studies, since 1996 in particular, have challenged this view. A newly recognised group of primary immunodeficiencies predispos...

  18. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  19. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interconnectivity of human cellular metabolism and disease prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Sun

    2010-12-01

    Fluctuations of metabolic reaction fluxes may cause abnormal concentrations of toxic or essential metabolites, possibly leading to metabolic diseases. The mutual binding of enzymatic proteins and ones involving common metabolites enforces distinct coupled reactions, by which local perturbations may spread through the cellular network. Such network effects at the molecular interaction level in human cellular metabolism can reappear in the patterns of disease occurrence. Here we construct the enzyme-reaction network and the metabolite-reaction network, capturing the flux coupling of metabolic reactions caused by the interacting enzymes and the shared metabolites, respectively. Diseases potentially caused by the failure of individual metabolic reactions can be identified by using the known disease-gene association, which allows us to derive the probability of an inactivated reaction causing diseases from the disease records at the population level. We find that the greater the number of proteins that catalyze a reaction, the higher the mean prevalence of its associated diseases. Moreover, the number of connected reactions and the mean size of the avalanches in the networks constructed are also shown to be positively correlated with the disease prevalence. These findings illuminate the impact of the cellular network topology on disease development, suggesting that the global organization of the molecular interaction network should be understood to assist in disease diagnosis, treatment, and drug discovery.

  1. Traditional uses of medicinal plants in gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokaya, Maan B; Uprety, Yadav; Poudel, Ram C; Timsina, Binu; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Asselin, Hugo; Tiwari, Achyut; Shrestha, Shyam S; Sigdel, Shalik R

    2014-12-02

    Gastrointestinal disorders cause morbidity and can lead to mortality, especially in the developing world where sanitation is deficient. A large part of the human population relies on medicinal plants for treating various diseases, including gastrointestinal disorders. The present review summarizes the traditional uses of medicinal plants of Nepal used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, and evaluates their bio-efficacy based on a review of the available phytochemical and pharmacological literature. We searched different electronic databases and libraries for the literature on medicinal plants used in Nepal to treat gastrointestinal disorders. For each species, we also searched the literature for information on conservation status, as well as for phytochemical and pharmacological studies in support of the ethnobotanical information. We used principal component analysis to explore the relation among disorders and plant families, plant life forms, plant parts and preparation modes. We also performed permutation tests to determine if botanical families were used more often than expected considering their availability in the Nepali flora. We documented a total of 947 species belonging to 158 families and 586 genera used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal. Diarrhea was the disorder treated by the highest number of species (348), followed by stomachache (340) and dysentery (307). Among the reported species, five were endemic to Nepal, whereas 16 orchid species were protected under CITES Appendices II and III. The randomization test showed that species belonging to 14 families were used less often than expected, whereas plants belonging to 25 families were used more often than expected. The PCA scatter plot showed distinct groups of gastrointestinal disorders treated with similar plant life forms, plant parts, and/or preparation modes. We found 763 phytochemical studies on 324 species and 654 pharmacological studies on 269 species. We showed the diversity and

  2. Human prion diseases: surgical lessons learned from iatrogenic prion transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Khan, Fahd; Miller, Benjamin R; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Puoti, Gianfranco; Cohen, Mark L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Cali, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    The human prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, have captivated our imaginations since their discovery in the Fore linguistic group in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s. The mysterious and poorly understood "infectious protein" has become somewhat of a household name in many regions across the globe. From bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly identified as mad cow disease, to endocannibalism, media outlets have capitalized on these devastatingly fatal neurological conditions. Interestingly, since their discovery, there have been more than 492 incidents of iatrogenic transmission of prion diseases, largely resulting from prion-contaminated growth hormone and dura mater grafts. Although fewer than 9 cases of probable iatrogenic neurosurgical cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have been reported worldwide, the likelihood of some missed cases and the potential for prion transmission by neurosurgery create considerable concern. Laboratory studies indicate that standard decontamination and sterilization procedures may be insufficient to completely remove infectivity from prion-contaminated instruments. In this unfortunate event, the instruments may transmit the prion disease to others. Much caution therefore should be taken in the absence of strong evidence against the presence of a prion disease in a neurosurgical patient. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have devised risk assessment and decontamination protocols for the prevention of iatrogenic transmission of the prion diseases, incidents of possible exposure to prions have unfortunately occurred in the United States. In this article, the authors outline the historical discoveries that led from kuru to the identification and isolation of the pathological prion proteins in addition to providing a brief description of human prion diseases and iatrogenic forms of CJD, a brief history of prion disease nosocomial transmission

  3. Bowen's Disease Associated With Two Human Papilloma Virus Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Hojat; Gharaei Nejad, Kaveh; Azimi, Seyyede Zeinab; Rafiei, Rana; Mesbah, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Bowen's disease (BD) is an epidermal in-situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Most Human Papilloma Viruses (HPV)-positive lesions in Bowen's disease are localized to the genital region or distal extremities (periungual sites) in which HPV type-16 is frequently detected. Patient was a 64-year-old construction worker for whom we detected 2 erythematous psoriasiform reticular scaly plaques on peri-umbilical and medial knee. Biopsy established the diagnosis of Bowen's disease and polymerase chain reaction assay showed HPV-6, -18 co-infection. Patient was referred for surgical excision.

  4. Tumor del estroma gastrointestinal Tumor of the gastrointestinal stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Felipe Montero León

    2012-03-01

    , as well ass in latter studies by immunohistochemistry of lesion. We conclude with a diagnosis of tumor of gastrointestinal stroma and the results of performed surgical and drugs interventions. It is recommended to assess the significance of a close relationship among general surgeons and gynecologists in face of unexpected diseases due to its difficult preoperative diagnosis leading to a appropriate surgical treatment due to its complexity it is necessary the competence of both surgical specialties.

  5. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of

  6. Effects of antibiotics on human microbiota and subsequent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Kristie M; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, B Brett

    2014-01-01

    Although antibiotics have significantly improved human health and life expectancy, their disruption of the existing microbiota has been linked to significant side effects such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, and increased susceptibility to subsequent disease. By using antibiotics to break colonization resistance against Clostridium, Salmonella, and Citrobacter species, researchers are now exploring mechanisms for microbiota-mediated modulation against pathogenic infection, revealing potential roles for different phyla and family members as well as microbiota-liberated sugars, hormones, and short-chain fatty acids in regulating pathogenicity. Furthermore, connections are now being made between microbiota dysbiosis and a variety of different diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, atopy, and obesity. Future advances in the rapidly developing field of microbial bioinformatics will enable researchers to further characterize the mechanisms of microbiota modulation of disease and potentially identify novel therapeutics against disease.

  7. Human heart disease : lessons from human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, E.; Mummery, C.L.; Bellin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Technical advances in generating and phenotyping cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) are now driving their wider acceptance as in vitro models to understand human heart disease and discover therapeutic targets that may lead to new compounds for clinical use. Current

  8. Interconnectivity of human cellular metabolism and disease prevalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deok-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations of metabolic reaction fluxes may cause abnormal concentrations of toxic or essential metabolites, possibly leading to metabolic diseases. The mutual binding of enzymatic proteins and ones involving common metabolites enforces distinct coupled reactions, by which local perturbations may spread through the cellular network. Such network effects at the molecular interaction level in human cellular metabolism can reappear in the patterns of disease occurrence. Here we construct the enzyme-reaction network and the metabolite-reaction network, capturing the flux coupling of metabolic reactions caused by the interacting enzymes and the shared metabolites, respectively. Diseases potentially caused by the failure of individual metabolic reactions can be identified by using the known disease–gene association, which allows us to derive the probability of an inactivated reaction causing diseases from the disease records at the population level. We find that the greater the number of proteins that catalyze a reaction, the higher the mean prevalence of its associated diseases. Moreover, the number of connected reactions and the mean size of the avalanches in the networks constructed are also shown to be positively correlated with the disease prevalence. These findings illuminate the impact of the cellular network topology on disease development, suggesting that the global organization of the molecular interaction network should be understood to assist in disease diagnosis, treatment, and drug discovery

  9. The gastrointestinal-brain axis in humans as an evolutionary advance of the root-leaf axis in plants: A hypothesis linking quantum effects of light on serotonin and auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, Lucio; Gashi, Bekim; Scuotto, Alessandro; Cappello, Glenda; Cocchi, Massimo; Gabrielli, Fabio; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2018-01-01

    Living organisms tend to find viable strategies under ambient conditions that optimize their search for, and utilization of, life-sustaining resources. For plants, a leading role in this process is performed by auxin, a plant hormone that drives morphological development, dynamics, and movement to optimize the absorption of light (through branches and leaves) and chemical "food" (through roots). Similarly to auxin in plants, serotonin seems to play an important role in higher animals, especially humans. Here, it is proposed that morphological and functional similarities between (i) plant leaves and the animal/human brain and (ii) plant roots and the animal/human gastro-intestinal tract have general features in common. Plants interact with light and use it for biological energy, whereas, neurons in the central nervous system seem to interact with bio-photons and use them for proper brain function. Further, as auxin drives roots "arborescence" within the soil, similarly serotonin seems to facilitate enteric nervous system connectivity within the human gastro-intestinal tract. This auxin/serotonin parallel suggests the root-branches axis in plants may be an evolutionary precursor to the gastro-intestinal-brain axis in humans. Finally, we hypothesize that light might be an important factor, both in gastro-intestinal dynamics and brain function. Such a comparison may indicate a key role for the interaction of light and serotonin in neuronal physiology (possibly in both the central nervous system and the enteric nervous system), and according to recent work, mind and consciousness.

  10. Lipid metabolism in peroxisomes in relation to human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxisomes were long believed to play only a minor role in cellular metabolism but it is now clear that they catalyze a number of important functions. The importance of peroxisomes in humans is stressed by the existence of a group of genetic diseases in man in which one or more peroxisomal

  11. Gene therapy in nonhuman primate models of human autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    t'Hart, B. A.; Vervoordeldonk, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Tak, P. P.

    2003-01-01

    Before autoimmune diseases in humans can be treated with gene therapy, the safety and efficacy of the used vectors must be tested in valid experimental models. Monkeys, such as the rhesus macaque or the common marmoset, provide such models. This publication reviews the state of the art in monkey

  12. [Leprosy, a pillar of human genetics of infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschignard, J; Scurr, E; Alcaïs, A

    2013-06-01

    Despite a natural reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae limited to humans and free availability of an effective antibiotic treatment, more than 200,000 people develop leprosy each year. This disease remains a major cause of disability and social stigma worldwide. The cause of this constant incidence is currently unknown and indicates that important aspects of the complex relationship between the pathogen and its human host remain to be discovered. An important contribution of host genetics to susceptibility to leprosy has long been suggested to account for the considerable variability between individuals sustainably exposed to M. leprae. Given the inability to cultivate M. leprae in vitro and in the absence of relevant animal model, genetic epidemiology is the main strategy used to identify the genes and, consequently, the immunological pathways involved in protective immunity to M. leprae. Recent genome-wide studies have identified new pathophysiological pathways which importance is only beginning to be understood. In addition, the prism of human genetics placed leprosy at the crossroads of other common diseases such as Crohn's disease, asthma or myocardial infarction. Therefore, novel lights on the pathogenesis of many common diseases could eventually emerge from the detailed understanding of a disease of the shadows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A population-based survey of the epidemiology of symptom-defined gastroesophageal reflux disease: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has yet to be investigated using the symptomatic threshold criteria recommended by the Montreal Definition. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD across five regions of China, and to investigate variables associated with GERD. Methods A representative sample of 18 000 adults (aged 18-80 years were selected equally from rural and urban areas in each region (n = 1800. According to the Montreal Definition, GERD is present when mild symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥2 days a week, or moderate-to-severe symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥1 day a week. Results In total, 16 091 participants completed the survey (response rate: 89.4% and 16 078 responses were suitable for analysis. Applying the Montreal criteria, the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD was 3.1% and varied significantly (p Conclusions This population-based survey found that the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD in China was 3.1%, which is lower than that found in Western countries.

  14. Gastrointestinal nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblik, P.D.; Hornof, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    General localization of gastrointestinal bleeding through the use of labeled red blood cells may be performed in children, or (99m)Tc-pertechnetate may be used if a Meckel's diverticulum is suspected. As in adults, cholecystitis and biliary leak may be assessed in children via (99m)Tc-IDA derivatives. Gastroesophageal reflux can be evaluated by oral consumption of the child's usual diet labeled with (99m)Tc sulfur colloid. For the scintigraphic determination of pulmonary aspiration, a relatively high concentration of tracer within a drop of liquid is placed beneath the child's tongue followed by dynamic imaging of the respiratory tract. Colonic transit scintigraphy can aid in the identification and therapeutic decision-making in patients with functional fecal retention, the most common cause of chronic constipation in children. (18)F-DOPA positron emission tomography is useful for classifying pancreatic involvement in infantile hyperinsulinism as focal or diffuse, thereby differentiating between patients who should receive curative focal pancreatic resection versus those who should receive medical management. Assessment of protein-losing enteropathy can be conducted scintigraphically and, compared with fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin collection, the scintigraphic method can detect esophageal and gastric protein loss. Also, scintigraphic quantification of protein loss can be performed without the requirement for fecal collection. Intestinal inflammation in children with inflammatory bowel disease can be evaluated using (99m)Tc white blood cells. The scintigraphic method is safe, accurate, well-tolerated by children and complementary to endoscopy in most patients

  15. Single-Domain Antibodies As Therapeutics against Human Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In full-size formats, monoclonal antibodies have been highly successful as therapeutics against cancer and immune diseases. However, their large size leads to inaccessibility of some epitopes and relatively high production costs. As an alternative, single-domain antibodies (sdAbs offer special advantages compared to full-size antibodies, including smaller size, larger number of accessible epitopes, relatively low production costs and improved robustness. Currently, sdAbs are being developed against a number of viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1, influenza viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, and enteric viruses. Although sdAbs are very potent inhibitors of viral infections, no sdAbs have been approved for clinical use against virial infection or any other diseases. In this review, we discuss the current state of research on sdAbs against viruses and their potential as therapeutics against human viral diseases.

  16. Leveraging human-centered design in chronic disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Pacione, Chris; Shultz, Rebecca K; Klügl, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Bridging the knowing-doing gap in the prevention of chronic disease requires deep appreciation and understanding of the complexities inherent in behavioral change. Strategies that have relied exclusively on the implementation of evidence-based data have not yielded the desired progress. The tools of human-centered design, used in conjunction with evidence-based data, hold much promise in providing an optimal approach for advancing disease prevention efforts. Directing the focus toward wide-scale education and application of human-centered design techniques among healthcare professionals will rapidly multiply their effective ability to bring the kind of substantial results in disease prevention that have eluded the healthcare industry for decades. This, in turn, would increase the likelihood of prevention by design. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human genetics of infectious diseases: a unified theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the dominant paradigm in the human genetics of infectious diseases postulates that rare monogenic immunodeficiencies confer vulnerability to multiple infectious diseases (one gene, multiple infections), whereas common infections are associated with the polygenic inheritance of multiple susceptibility genes (one infection, multiple genes). Recent studies, since 1996 in particular, have challenged this view. A newly recognised group of primary immunodeficiencies predisposing the individual to a principal or single type of infection is emerging. In parallel, several common infections have been shown to reflect the inheritance of one major susceptibility gene, at least in some populations. This novel causal relationship (one gene, one infection) blurs the distinction between patient-based Mendelian genetics and population-based complex genetics, and provides a unified conceptual frame for exploring the molecular genetic basis of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:17255931

  18. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Human endogenous retroviruses and chosen disease parameters in morphea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Szramka-Pawlak, Beata; Żaba, Ryszard; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Silny, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Morphea (localized scleroderma) is a relatively rare disease characterized by excessive skin fibrosis. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) are largely distributed within the human genome with hundreds of thousands of elements. The HERV have been widely studied in autoimmune disorders, yet hardly ever assessed in diseases with a good prognosis such as morphea. Aim In this study we focus on the possible relations between the expression of chosen HERV and factors influencing the pathomechanism of the disease, such as age, sex, titres of anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as duration, activity, and severity of the disease (LoSSI index). Material and methods Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting six HERV sequences of interest were performed on samples derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and skin biopsies. Results In PBMC we found a statistically significant negative correlation between HERV-W env expression and LoSSI index (p = 0.01). Additionally, HERV-W env was downregulated in patients with the active form of morphea. In all other cases we found no correlation whatsoever nor statistically significant differences below the p = 0.05 threshold. Conclusions Morphea seems to be an autoimmune disease where the impact of HERV is not so apparent. It seems that probing many patients for the expression of just a few sequences is not as effective as previously expected. For initial studies of HERV in other diseases we recommend high throughput techniques such as HERV-dedicated DNA microarrays or massive parallel sequencing. PMID:28261031

  20. Human endogenous retroviruses and chosen disease parameters in morphea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał J. Kowalczyk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morphea (localized scleroderma is a relatively rare disease characterized by excessive skin fibrosis. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV are largely distributed within the human genome with hundreds of thousands of elements. The HERV have been widely studied in autoimmune disorders, yet hardly ever assessed in diseases with a good prognosis such as morphea. Aim: In this study we focus on the possible relations between the expression of chosen HERV and factors influencing the pathomechanism of the disease, such as age, sex, titres of anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as duration, activity, and severity of the disease (LoSSI index. Material and methods: Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting six HERV sequences of interest were performed on samples derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and skin biopsies. Results: In PBMC we found a statistically significant negative correlation between HERV-W env expression and LoSSI index (p = 0.01. Additionally, HERV-W env was downregulated in patients with the active form of morphea. In all other cases we found no correlation whatsoever nor statistically significant differences below the p = 0.05 threshold. Conclusions : Morphea seems to be an autoimmune disease where the impact of HERV is not so apparent. It seems that probing many patients for the expression of just a few sequences is not as effective as previously expected. For initial studies of HERV in other diseases we recommend high throughput techniques such as HERV-dedicated DNA microarrays or massive parallel sequencing.

  1. A framework for annotating human genome in disease context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Huisong; Cheng, Wenqing; Fu, Dong; Xia, Tian; Kibbe, Warren A; Lin, Simon M

    2012-01-01

    Identification of gene-disease association is crucial to understanding disease mechanism. A rapid increase in biomedical literatures, led by advances of genome-scale technologies, poses challenge for manually-curated-based annotation databases to characterize gene-disease associations effectively and timely. We propose an automatic method-The Disease Ontology Annotation Framework (DOAF) to provide a comprehensive annotation of the human genome using the computable Disease Ontology (DO), the NCBO Annotator service and NCBI Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF). DOAF can keep the resulting knowledgebase current by periodically executing automatic pipeline to re-annotate the human genome using the latest DO and GeneRIF releases at any frequency such as daily or monthly. Further, DOAF provides a computable and programmable environment which enables large-scale and integrative analysis by working with external analytic software or online service platforms. A user-friendly web interface (doa.nubic.northwestern.edu) is implemented to allow users to efficiently query, download, and view disease annotations and the underlying evidences.

  2. Differential overexpression of SERPINA3 in human prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, S; Moda, F; Zattoni, M; Bistaffa, E; De Cecco, E; Rossi, M; Giaccone, G; Tagliavini, F; Haïk, S; Deslys, J P; Zanusso, G; Ironside, J W; Ferrer, I; Kovacs, G G; Legname, G

    2017-11-15

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders with sporadic, genetic or acquired etiologies. The molecular alterations leading to the onset and the spreading of these diseases are still unknown. In a previous work we identified a five-gene signature able to distinguish intracranially BSE-infected macaques from healthy ones, with SERPINA3 showing the most prominent dysregulation. We analyzed 128 suitable frontal cortex samples, from prion-affected patients (variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) n = 20, iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) n = 11, sporadic CJD (sCJD) n = 23, familial CJD (gCJD) n = 17, fatal familial insomnia (FFI) n = 9, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS)) n = 4), patients with Alzheimer disease (AD, n = 14) and age-matched controls (n = 30). Real Time-quantitative PCR was performed for SERPINA3 transcript, and ACTB, RPL19, GAPDH and B2M were used as reference genes. We report SERPINA3 to be strongly up-regulated in the brain of all human prion diseases, with only a mild up-regulation in AD. We show that this striking up-regulation, both at the mRNA and at the protein level, is present in all types of human prion diseases analyzed, although to a different extent for each specific disorder. Our data suggest that SERPINA3 may be involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of prion diseases, representing a valid tool for distinguishing different forms of these disorders in humans.

  3. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  4. Diagnostic strategies in children with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Geeske Atje

    2016-01-01

    Chronic or recurrent gastrointestinal symptoms are common presentations among children in primary care. Because symptoms of functional gastrointestinal disorders may be indistinguishable from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is a diagnostic challenge for clinicians to differentiate between them

  5. Dientamoeba fragilis colonization is not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in children at primary care level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A.; Kranenberg, Justin J.; Blanker, Marco H.; Ott, Alewijn; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Dientamoeba fragilis is commonly identified in children in primary care and is suspected to cause gastrointestinal disease. Objective. To determine the association between D. fragilis colonization and gastrointestinal symptoms in children. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study

  6. Appendiceal hemorrhage – An uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Chiang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a common disease among elderly patients. The common sources of lower gastrointestinal bleeding include vascular disease, Crohn’s disease, neoplasms, inflammatory bowel disease, hemorrhoids, and ischemic colitis. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding arising from the appendix is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of appendiceal hemorrhage in a young male. Diagnosis was made by multidetector computerized tomography during survey for hematochezia. The patient recovered well after appendectomy. The histological finding revealed focal erosion of appendix mucosa with bleeding.

  7. Human anthrax as a re-emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Mehmet; Demiraslan, Hayati

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is primarily a disease of herbivores and the etiological agent is B. anthracis which is a gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming, and rod shaped bacterium. Bacillus anthracis spores are highly resistant to heat, pressure, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, chemical agents and disinfectants. For these reasons, B. anthracis spores are an attractive choice as biological agents for the use of bioweapon and/or bioterrorism. Soil is the main reservoir for the infectious agent. The disease most commonly affects wild and domestic mammals. Human are secondarily infected by contact with infected animals and contaminated animal products or directly expose to B. anthracis spores. Anthrax occurs worldwide. This infection is still endemic or hyperendemic in both animals and humans in some part of areas of the world; particularly in Middle East, West Africa, Central Asia, some part of India, South America. However, some countries are claiming free of anthrax, and anthrax has become a re-emerging disease in western countries with the intentional outbreak. Currently, anthrax is classified according to its setting as (1) naturally occurring anthrax, (2) bioterrorism-related anthrax. Vast majority of human anthrax are occurring as naturally occurring anthrax in the world. It is also a threaten disease for western countries. The aim of this paper is to review the relevant patents, short historical perspective, microbiological and epidemiological features, clinical presentations and treatment.

  8. Mobile technologies for disease surveillance in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwabukusi, Mpoki; Karimuribo, Esron D; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Beda, Eric

    2014-04-23

    A paper-based disease reporting system has been associated with a number of challenges. These include difficulties to submit hard copies of the disease surveillance forms because of poor road infrastructure, weather conditions or challenging terrain, particularly in the developing countries. The system demands re-entry of the data at data processing and analysis points, thus making it prone to introduction of errors during this process. All these challenges contribute to delayed acquisition, processing and response to disease events occurring in remote hard to reach areas. Our study piloted the use of mobile phones in order to transmit near to real-time data from remote districts in Tanzania (Ngorongoro and Ngara), Burundi (Muyinga) and Zambia (Kazungula and Sesheke). Two technologies namely, digital and short messaging services were used to capture and transmit disease event data in the animal and human health sectors in the study areas based on a server-client model. Smart phones running the Android operating system (minimum required version: Android 1.6), and which supported open source application, Epicollect, as well as the Open Data Kit application, were used in the study. These phones allowed collection of geo-tagged data, with the opportunity of including static and moving images related to disease events. The project supported routine disease surveillance systems in the ministries responsible for animal and human health in Burundi, Tanzania and Zambia, as well as data collection for researchers at the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania. During the project implementation period between 2011 and 2013, a total number of 1651 diseases event-related forms were submitted, which allowed reporters to include GPS coordinates and photographs related to the events captured. It was concluded that the new technology-based surveillance system is useful in providing near to real-time data, with potential for enhancing timely response in rural remote areas of

  9. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea

    2015-01-01

    metabolism and immune response. We applied multivariate analysis in order to find the minimum set of proteins that better allows discrimination of healthy and caries-affected dental plaque samples, detecting seven bacterial and five human protein functions that allow determining the health sta