WorldWideScience

Sample records for human epileptic disorders

  1. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of\\ud consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research\\ud literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context\\ud of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consci...

  2. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  3. Consciousness in non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Markus; Kurthen, M

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the 'level' and `content' of consciousness but also between 'phenomenal consciousness' (consciousness of states it somehow "feels to be like") and 'access consciousness' (having certain 'higher' cognitive processes at one's disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience - and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness - is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of "consciousness" is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures.

  4. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  5. Reflex epileptic mechanisms in humans: Lessons about natural ictogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The definition of reflex epileptic seizures is that specific seizure types can be triggered by certain sensory or cognitive stimuli. Simple triggers are sensory (most often visual, more rarely tactile or proprioceptive; simple audiogenic triggers in humans are practically nonexistent) and act within seconds, whereas complex triggers like praxis, reading and talking, and music are mostly cognitive and work within minutes. The constant relation between a qualitatively, often even quantitatively, well-defined stimulus and a specific epileptic response provides unique possibilities to investigate seizure generation in natural human epilepsies. For several reflex epileptic mechanisms (REMs), this has been done. Reflex epileptic mechanisms have been reported less often in focal lesional epilepsies than in idiopathic "generalized" epilepsies (IGEs) which are primarily genetically determined. The key syndrome of IGE is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), where more than half of the patients present reflex epileptic traits (photosensitivity, eye closure sensitivity, praxis induction, and language-induced orofacial reflex myocloni). Findings with multimodal investigations of cerebral function concur to indicate that ictogenic mechanisms in IGEs largely (ab)use preexisting functional anatomic networks (CNS subsystems) normally serving highly complex physiological functions (e.g., deliberate complex actions and linguistic communication) which supports the concept of system epilepsy. Whereas REMs in IGEs, thus, are primarily function-related, in focal epilepsies, they are primarily localization-related. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular and genetic insights into an infantile epileptic encephalopathy – CDKL5 disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ailing; Han, Song

    2017-01-01

    Background The discovery that mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene are associated with infantile epileptic encephalopathy has stimulated world-wide research effort to understand the molecular and genetic basis of CDKL5 disorder. Given the large number of literature published thus far, this review aims to summarize current genetic studies, draw a consensus on proposed molecular functions, and point to gaps of knowledge in CDKL5 research. Methods A systematic review process was conducted using the PubMed search engine focusing on CDKL5 studies in the recent ten years. We analyzed these publications and summarized the findings into four sections: genetic studies, CDKL5 expression patterns, molecular functions, and animal models. We also discussed challenges and future directions in each section. Results On the clinical side, CDKL5 disorder is characterized by early onset epileptic seizures, intellectual disability, and stereotypical behaviors. On the research side, a series of molecular and genetic studies in human patients, cell cultures and animal models have established the causality of CDKL5 to the infantile epileptic encephalopathy, and pointed to a key role for CDKL5 in regulating neuronal function in the brain. Mouse models of CDKL5 disorder have also been developed, and notably, manifest behavioral phenotypes, mimicking numerous clinical symptoms of CDKL5 disorder and advancing CDKL5 research to the preclinical stage. Conclusions Given what we have learned thus far, future identification of robust, quantitative, and sensitive outcome measures would be the key in animal model studies, particularly in heterozygous females. In the meantime, molecular and cellular studies of CDKL5 should focus on mechanism-based investigation and aim to uncover druggable targets that offer the potential to rescue or ameliorate CDKL5 disorder-related phenotypes. PMID:28580010

  7. Molecular and genetic insights into an infantile epileptic encephalopathy - CDKL5 disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ailing; Han, Song; Zhou, Zhaolan Joe

    2017-02-01

    The discovery that mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ( CDKL5 ) gene are associated with infantile epileptic encephalopathy has stimulated world-wide research effort to understand the molecular and genetic basis of CDKL5 disorder. Given the large number of literature published thus far, this review aims to summarize current genetic studies, draw a consensus on proposed molecular functions, and point to gaps of knowledge in CDKL5 research. A systematic review process was conducted using the PubMed search engine focusing on CDKL5 studies in the recent ten years. We analyzed these publications and summarized the findings into four sections: genetic studies, CDKL5 expression patterns, molecular functions, and animal models. We also discussed challenges and future directions in each section. On the clinical side, CDKL5 disorder is characterized by early onset epileptic seizures, intellectual disability, and stereotypical behaviors. On the research side, a series of molecular and genetic studies in human patients, cell cultures and animal models have established the causality of CDKL5 to the infantile epileptic encephalopathy, and pointed to a key role for CDKL5 in regulating neuronal function in the brain. Mouse models of CDKL5 disorder have also been developed, and notably, manifest behavioral phenotypes, mimicking numerous clinical symptoms of CDKL5 disorder and advancing CDKL5 research to the preclinical stage. Given what we have learned thus far, future identification of robust, quantitative, and sensitive outcome measures would be the key in animal model studies, particularly in heterozygous females. In the meantime, molecular and cellular studies of CDKL5 should focus on mechanism-based investigation and aim to uncover druggable targets that offer the potential to rescue or ameliorate CDKL5 disorder-related phenotypes.

  8. Molecular and genetic insights into an infantile epileptic encephalopathy-CDKL5 disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ailing Zhou; Song Han; Zhaolan Joe Zhou

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The discovery that mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene are associated with infantile epileptic encephalopathy has stimulated world-wide research effort to understand the molecular and genetic basis of CDKL5 disorder.Given the large number of literature published thus far,this review aims to summarize current genetic studies,draw a consensus on proposed molecular functions,and point to gaps of knowledge in CDKL5 research.METHODS:A systematic review process was conducted using the PubMed search engine focusing on CDKL5 studies in the recent ten years.We analyzed these publications and summarized the findings into four sections:genetic studies,CDKL5 expression pattems,molecular functions,and animal models.We also discussed challenges and future directions in each section.RESULTS:On the clinical side,CDKL5 disorder is characterized by early onset epileptic seizures,intellectual disability,and stereotypical behaviors.On the research side,a series of molecular and genetic studies in human patients,cell cultures and animal models have established the causality of CDKL5 to the infantile epileptic encephalopathy,and pointed to a key role for CDKL5 in regulating neuronal function in the brain.Mouse models of CDKL5 disorder have also been developed,and notably,manifest behavioral phenotypes,mimicking numerous clinical symptoms of CDKL5 disorder and advancing CDKL5 research to the preclinical stage.CONCLUSIONS:Given what we have leamed thus far,future identification of robust,quantitative,and sensitive outcome measures would be the key in animal model studies,particularly in heterozygous females.In the meantime,molecular and cellular studies of CDKL5 should focus on mechanism-based investigation and aim to uncover druggable targets that offer the potential to rescue or ameliorate CDKL5 disorder-related phenotypes.

  9. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  10. Significance of MDR1 and multiple drug resistance in refractory human epileptic brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Gabriele

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multiple drug resistance protein (MDR1/P-glycoprotein is overexpressed in glia and blood-brain barrier (BBB endothelium in drug refractory human epileptic tissue. Since various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs can act as substrates for MDR1, the enhanced expression/function of this protein may increase their active extrusion from the brain, resulting in decreased responsiveness to AEDs. Methods Human drug resistant epileptic brain tissues were collected after surgical resection. Astrocyte cell cultures were established from these tissues, and commercially available normal human astrocytes were used as controls. Uptake of fluorescent doxorubicin and radioactive-labeled Phenytoin was measured in the two cell populations, and the effect of MDR1 blockers was evaluated. Frozen human epileptic brain tissue slices were double immunostained to locate MDR1 in neurons and glia. Other slices were exposed to toxic concentrations of Phenytoin to study cell viability in the presence or absence of a specific MDR1 blocker. Results MDR1 was overexpressed in blood vessels, astrocytes and neurons in human epileptic drug-resistant brain. In addition, MDR1-mediated cellular drug extrusion was increased in human 'epileptic' astrocytes compared to 'normal' ones. Concomitantly, cell viability in the presence of cytotoxic compounds was increased. Conclusions Overexpression of MDR1 in different cell types in drug-resistant epileptic human brain leads to functional alterations, not all of which are linked to drug pharmacokinetics. In particular, the modulation of glioneuronal MDR1 function in epileptic brain in the presence of toxic concentrations of xenobiotics may constitute a novel cytoprotective mechanism.

  11. Impact of cognitive stimulation on ripples within human epileptic and non-epileptic hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Cimbálník, J.; Roman, R.; Shaw, D. J.; Stead, M.; Daniel, P.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, JULY 25 (2015), 47:1-9 ISSN 1471-2202 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * hippocampal ripples * epilepsy * human cognition Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.304, year: 2015

  12. Depression and anxiety disorder among epileptic people at Amanuel Specialized Mental Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegegne, Minale Tareke; Mossie, Tilahun Belete; Awoke, Andargie Abate; Assaye, Ashagre Molla; Gebrie, Belete Temitm; Eshetu, Desalegn Asmare

    2015-09-02

    Although depression and anxiety disorders are very common in people with epilepsy; there are no studies that assessed the magnitude and associated factors among epileptic people in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study determined prevalence and associated factors of depression and anxiety disorders in people with epilepsy. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May, 2013, among 423 people with epilepsy from the outpatient department of Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess predictors of depression and anxiety. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among epileptic people were 33.5 and 32.8%, respectively. Monthly income, frequency of seizure and side effects of anti convulsants were found to be significantly associated with both depression and anxiety. Being divorced/widowed was associated with anxiety while using poly-therapy of anti convulsants, perceived stigma, and inability to read or write were associated with depression. The prevalence of co-morbid anxiety and depression was found to be high among people with epilepsy. Early identification of co-morbid depression and anxiety in people with epilepsy and managing epilepsy to become seizure free should be of great concern for health care providers.

  13. Affective disorders and functional (non-epileptic) seizures in persons with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A; Macfarlane, Matthew D; Looi, Jeffrey Cl

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to describe the prevalence, assessment and management of affective disorders as well as functional (non-epileptic) seizures in people with epilepsy. This paper comprises a selective review of the literature of the common affective manifestations of epilepsy. Affective disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbidity seen in people with epilepsy and assessment and management parallels that of the general population. Additionally, people with epilepsy may experience higher rates of mood instability, irritability and euphoria, classified together as a group, interictal dysphoric disorder and resembling an unstable bipolar Type II disorder. Functional seizures present unique challenges in terms of identification of the disorder and a lack of specific management. Given their high prevalence, it is important to be able to recognise affective disorders in people with epilepsy. Management principles parallel those in the general population with specific caution exercised regarding the potential interactions between antidepressant medications and antiepileptic drugs. Functional seizures are more complex and require a coordinated approach involving neurologists, psychiatrists, general practitioners, nursing and allied health. There is very limited evidence to guide psychological and behavioural interventions for neurotic disorders in epilepsy and much more research is needed. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  14. Dissociative experiences and quality of life in patients with non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James W; Ali, Fizzah; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2012-11-01

    Dissociative experiences are commonly reported by patients with non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD). This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence and characteristics of dissociative experiences in patients with NEAD and assessed their association with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Fifty-three patients diagnosed with NEAD were consecutively recruited (70.0% female, mean age=42 years, 22.0% with comorbid epilepsy) from a specialist neuropsychiatric clinic. Our sample reported high levels of dissociative experiences, with 36.7% of patients scoring ≥30 on the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Significant negative correlations were found between total DES scores and HRQoL, as measured by the QOLIE-31 questionnaire (r=-0.64, pdissociative experiences in this patient population, highlighting the importance of routinely screening patients for dissociative symptoms and their impact on patients' lives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Are psychogenic non-epileptic seizures just another symptom of conversion disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Richard A A; Duncan, Roderick; Goldstein, Laura H; Jankovic, Joseph; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2017-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified with other functional neurological symptoms as 'Conversion Disorder', but there are reasons to wonder whether this symptomatology constitutes a distinct entity. We reviewed the literature comparing PNES with other functional neurological symptoms. We find eight studies that directly examined this question. Though all but one found significant differences-notably in presenting age, trauma history, and dissociation-they were divided on whether these differences represented an important distinction. We argue that the aetiological and mechanistic distinctions they support, particularly when bolstered by additional data, give reason to sustain a separation between these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Differential Effect of Neuropeptides on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission in Human Epileptic Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Madsen, Marita G.

    2015-01-01

    therapy is an evolving innovative approach that may prove useful for clinical applications. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), gene therapy treatments based on viral vectors encoding NPY or galanin have been shown to effectively suppress seizures. However, how this translates to human TLE...... remains unknown. A unique possibility to validate these animal studies is provided by a surgical therapeutic approach, whereby resected epileptic tissue from temporal lobes of pharmacoresistant patients are available for neurophysiological studies in vitro. To test whether NPY and galanin have...

  17. Healthcare-seeking behavior of patients with epileptic seizure disorders attending a tertiary care hospital, Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhik Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Neurological diseases are very important causes of prolonged morbidity and disability, leading to profound financial loss. Epilepsy is one of the most important neurological disorders Healthcare seeking by epilepsy patients is quite diverse and unique. Aims and Objectives: The study was conducted among the epilepsy patients, to assess their healthcare-seeking behavior and its determinants. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and fifteen epilepsy patients, selected by systematic random sampling, in the neuromedicine outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital were interviewed with a predesigned, pretested, semi-structured proforma. Results and Conclusion: More than 90% sought healthcare just after the onset of a seizure. The majority opted for allopathic medicine and the causes for not seeking initial care from allopaths were ignorance, faith in another system, constraint of money, and so on. A significant association existed between rural residence and low social status of the patients with initial care seeking from someone other than allopaths. No association was found among sex, type of seizure, educational status of the patients, and care seeking. The mean treatment gap was 2.98 ± 10.49 months and the chief motivators were mostly the family members. Patients for anti epileptic drugs preferred neurologists in urban areas and general practitioners in rural areas. District care model of epilepsy was proposed in the recommendation.

  18. The stigma of mental illness: anticipation and attitudes among patients with epileptic, dissociative or somatoform pain disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, M; Spitzl, S Piralic; Prause, W; Zimprich, F; Lehner-Baumgartner, Eva; Baumgartner, C; Aigner, M

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the attitudes of 101 consecutive in- and out-patients with epileptic, dissociative or somatoform pain disorders (mean age: 43 [+/-11] years; 58% female) from either the Department of Psychiatry or Neurology toward anticipated mental illness stigma. The patients were administered a modified 12-item version of Links Stigma Questionnaire. Nearly 60% of all 101 patients believe that "most people" would not allow a mental patient "to take care of their children", "most young women" would be "reluctant to date a man" who has been treated for a mental illness and "most employers would pass over" the application of a psychiatric patient in favour of another applicant. Fifty five percent of the respondents assume that "most people think less of a person who has been in a mental hospital" and over a half of all patients interviewed assert that the general population thinks that psychiatric patients are "less intelligent, less trustworthy and that their opinion is taken less seriously by others". Gender, age and education had no influence on the overall results. There is a high stigmatisation concerning psychiatry even in patients with epilepsy and somatoform/dissociative symptoms with psychiatric comorbidity. Fear of being stigmatized is more pronounced among somatoform pain patients as compared to patients suffering from epileptic or dissocative disorders, with particular reference to close personal relationships.

  19. The impact of self-efficacy, alexithymia and multiple traumas on posttraumatic stress disorder and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizures: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Allen, Rachel D; Dennis, Ian

    2013-12-30

    This study investigated the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure, whether alexithymia mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and psychiatric outcomes, and whether the mediational effect was moderated by the severity of PTSD from other traumas. Seventy-one (M=31, F=40) people with a diagnosis of epilepsy recruited from support groups in the United Kingdom completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. They were compared with 71 people (M=29, F=42) without epilepsy. For people with epilepsy, 51% and 22% met the diagnostic criteria for post-epileptic seizure PTSD and for PTSD following one other traumatic life event respectively. For the control group, 24% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD following other traumatic life events. The epilepsy group reported significantly more anxiety and depression than the control. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis showed that self-efficacy was significantly correlated with alexithymia, post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Alexithymia was also significantly correlated with post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediation analyses confirmed that alexithymia mediated the path between self-efficacy and post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Moderated mediation also confirmed that self-efficacy and PTSD from one other trauma moderated the effect of alexithymia on outcomes. To conclude, people can develop posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure. These psychiatric outcomes are closely linked with their belief in personal competence to deal with stressful situations and regulate their own functioning, to process rather than defend against distressing emotions, and with the degree of PTSD from other traumas. © 2013 Elsevier

  20. The role of stress as a trigger for epileptic seizures: a narrative review of evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Ponnusamy, Athi; Reuber, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure triggers in patients with epilepsy; however, most previous publications on stress and epilepsy have focused on the role of stress in the initial development of epilepsy. This narrative review explores the causal role of stress in triggering seizures in patients with existing epilepsy. Findings from human studies of psychological stress, as well as of physiologic stress responses in humans and animals, and evidence from nonpharmacologic interventions for epilepsy are considered. The evidence from human studies for stress as a trigger of epileptic seizures is inconclusive. Although retrospective self-report studies show that stress is the most common patient-perceived seizure precipitant, prospective studies have yielded mixed results and studies of life events suggest that stressful experiences only trigger seizures in certain individuals. There is limited evidence suggesting that autonomic arousal can precede seizures. Interventions designed to improve coping with stress reduce seizures in some individuals. Studies of physiologic stress using animal epilepsy models provide more convincing evidence. Exposure to exogenous and endogenous stress mediators has been found to increase epileptic activity in the brain and trigger overt seizures, especially after repeated exposure. In conclusion, stress is likely to exacerbate the susceptibility to epileptic seizures in a subgroup of individuals with epilepsy and may play a role in triggering "spontaneous" seizures. However, there is currently no strong evidence for a close link between stress and seizures in the majority of people with epilepsy, although animal research suggests that such links are likely. Further research is needed into the relationship between stress and seizures and into interventions designed to reduce perceived stress and improve quality of life with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Interictal functional connectivity of human epileptic networks assessed by intracerebral EEG and BOLD signal fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Bettus

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal. This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional

  2. Degenerate time-dependent network dynamics anticipate seizures in human epileptic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauste Campo, Adrià; Principe, Alessandro; Ley, Miguel; Rocamora, Rodrigo; Deco, Gustavo

    2018-04-01

    Epileptic seizures are known to follow specific changes in brain dynamics. While some algorithms can nowadays robustly detect these changes, a clear understanding of the mechanism by which these alterations occur and generate seizures is still lacking. Here, we provide crossvalidated evidence that such changes are initiated by an alteration of physiological network state dynamics. Specifically, our analysis of long intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings from a group of 10 patients identifies a critical phase of a few hours in which time-dependent network states become less variable ("degenerate"), and this phase is followed by a global functional connectivity reduction before seizure onset. This critical phase is characterized by an abnormal occurrence of highly correlated network instances and is shown to be particularly associated with the activity of the resected regions in patients with validated postsurgical outcome. Our approach characterizes preseizure network dynamics as a cascade of 2 sequential events providing new insights into seizure prediction and control.

  3. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, P S; Palmer, V S; Jilek-Aall, L

    2013-06-01

    Repetitive involuntary head nodding was first reported in the 1960s in the Wapogoro tribe of Tanzania. We describe the natural history of head nodding in the Wapogoro tribe, with special reference to the earliest reported dates of onset. We analyzed clinical data from 150 historical patients seen between 1960 and 1971. Head nodding with or without grand mal convulsions was present in 33/150 (∼20%) cases, was mostly familial and equally distributed by gender. Age at onset of head nodding ranged from 2-22 years (mean: ∼10 years) in the period 1934-1962. Head nodding preceded onset of grand mal convulsions by up to 12 months, and motor and psychomotor deficits indicative of brain damage developed with time. Fourteen of the 33 cases died at 13-39 years of age (mean: ∼20 years) while nineteen aged 16-28 years (mean: ∼16 years) were still alive. Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome. Reported to have existed in this population for at least 80 years, Nodding Syndrome is a progressive seizure disorder that leads to generalized convulsions (kifafa), brain damage and death.

  4. Two different mechanisms associated with ripple-like oscillations (100-250 Hz) in the human epileptic subiculum in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Rojas, C; Huberfeld, G; Baulac, M; Clemenceau, S; Charpier, S; Miles, R; Menendez de la Prida, L; Le Van Quyen, M

    2015-01-01

    Transient high-frequency oscillations (150-600 Hz) in local field potential generated by human hippocampal and parahippocampal areas have been related to both physiological and pathological processes. The cellular basis and effects of normal and abnormal forms of high-frequency oscillations (HFO) has been controversial. Here, we searched for HFOs in slices of the subiculum prepared from human hippocampal tissue resected for treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. HFOs occurred spontaneously in extracellular field potentials during interictal discharges (IID) and also during pharmacologically induced preictal discharges (PID) preceding ictal-like events. While most of these events might be considered pathological since they invaded the fast ripple band (>250 Hz), others were spectrally similar to physiological ripples (150-250 Hz). Do similar cellular mechanisms underly IID-ripples and PID-ripples? Are ripple-like oscillations a valid proxy of epileptogenesis in human TLE? With combined intra- or juxta-cellular and extracellular recordings, we showed that, despite overlapping spectral components, ripple-like IID and PID oscillations were associated with different cellular and synaptic mechanisms. IID-ripples were associated with rhythmic GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials with moderate neuronal firing. In contrast, PID-ripples were associated with depolarizing synaptic inputs frequently reaching the threshold for bursting in most cells. Thus ripple-like oscillations (100-250 Hz) in the human epileptic hippocampus are associated with different mechanisms for synchrony reflecting distinct dynamic changes in inhibition and excitation during interictal and pre-ictal states. PMID:25448920

  5. [Basic disorders in human communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza-López, Y; Gutiérrez-Silva, J; Andrade-Illañez, E N; Fierro-Evans, M A; Hernández-López, X

    1989-01-01

    This paper specifies the areas and disorders that concern human communication medicine. The frequency of the diverse disorders is analyzed in relation to age and sex, and the distribution in group ages of several disabling diseases is also discussed.

  6. Comparison of two next-generation sequencing kits for diagnosis of epileptic disorders with a user-friendly tool for displaying gene coverage, DeCovA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra Dimassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, molecular genetics has been playing an increasing role in the diagnostic process of monogenic epilepsies. Knowing the genetic basis of one patient's epilepsy provides accurate genetic counseling and may guide therapeutic options. Genetic diagnosis of epilepsy syndromes has long been based on Sanger sequencing and search for large rearrangements using MLPA or DNA arrays (array-CGH or SNP-array. Recently, next-generation sequencing (NGS was demonstrated to be a powerful approach to overcome the wide clinical and genetic heterogeneity of epileptic disorders. Coverage is critical for assessing the quality and accuracy of results from NGS. However, it is often a difficult parameter to display in practice. The aim of the study was to compare two library-building methods (Haloplex, Agilent and SeqCap EZ, Roche for a targeted panel of 41 genes causing monogenic epileptic disorders. We included 24 patients, 20 of whom had known disease-causing mutations. For each patient both libraries were built in parallel and sequenced on an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM. To compare coverage and depth, we developed a simple homemade tool, named DeCovA (Depth and Coverage Analysis. DeCovA displays the sequencing depth of each base and the coverage of target genes for each genomic position. The fraction of each gene covered at different thresholds could be easily estimated. None of the two methods used, namely NextGene and Ion Reporter, were able to identify all the known mutations/CNVs displayed by the 20 patients. Variant detection rate was globally similar for the two techniques and DeCovA showed that failure to detect a mutation was mainly related to insufficient coverage.

  7. Danish epileptics given Thorotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, J.H.; Anderson, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Cancer incidence among 8004 patients hospitalized for epilepsy between 1933 and 1962 was compared to that of the general population. Among 140 epileptics given Thorotrast during cerebral angiography, a significant excess of cancer was observed. Thorotrast exposure was linked to significant excesses of liver cancer, leukaemia and lung cancer. An excess of brain cancer occurred shortly after hospital admission, suggesting brain tumours were the cause of the seizure disorder and are not due to Thorotrast. Haemangiosarcomas of the liver appeared uniquely related to Thorotrast, as did the rare subtypes of leukaemia observed. Cholangiocarcinomas also occurred in excess. The preponderance of anaplastic lung cancer is provocative and suggests the possibility that thoron exposure from the decay of Thorotrast might be involved. The cumulative risk of developing cancer at 40 years, excluding the brain cancer risk, was 60±6%. (author)

  8. Human GRIN2B variants in neurodevelopmental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of whole exome/genome sequencing technologies has given rise to an unprecedented volume of data linking patient genomic variability to brain disorder phenotypes. A surprising number of variants have been found in the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR gene family, with the GRIN2B gene encoding the GluN2B subunit being implicated in many cases of neurodevelopmental disorders, which are psychiatric conditions originating in childhood and include language, motor, and learning disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, developmental delay, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. The GRIN2B gene plays a crucial role in normal neuronal development and is important for learning and memory. Mutations in human GRIN2B were distributed throughout the entire gene in a number of patients with various neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. Studies that provide functional analysis of variants are still lacking, however current analysis of de novo variants that segregate with disease cases such as intellectual disability, developmental delay, ASD or epileptic encephalopathies reveal altered NMDAR function. Here, we summarize the current reports of disease-associated variants in GRIN2B from patients with multiple neurodevelopmental disorders, and discuss implications, highlighting the importance of functional analysis and precision medicine therapies.

  9. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  10. Accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) and transient epileptic amnesia (TEA): two cases of epilepsy-related memory disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Steven; Illman, Nathan A; Moulin, Chris J A; Baddeley, Alan D

    2012-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has long been associated with memory impairment. Recently, two specific forms of memory complaint in this population have been identified: accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) and transient epileptic amnesia (TEA). This paper presents neuropsychological data (standard neuropsychological tests and experimental measures) on two patients who presented in the epilepsy clinic with seemingly similar subjective reports of profound memory difficulties. This paper illustrates the differences between TEA and ALF. Our focus was on measuring long-term forgetting utilizing a novel visual and verbal test protocol, with responses elicited via verbal prompts over the telephone at intervals up to 30 days. Whereas patient SK had neuropsychological test evidence of problems with learning plus ALF at short and long intervals without clinical evidence of TEA, patient EB had clinically convincing TEA without neuropsychological test evidence of ALF. In particular, SK showed accelerated forgetting while EB did not. This detailed case work develops our understanding of ALF measurement and demonstrates that ALF and TEA can be dissociated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparisons of childhood trauma, alexithymia, and defensive styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures vs. epilepsy: Implications for the etiology of conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Marcia J; Dwivedi, Alok K; Privitera, Michael D; Isaacs, Kelly; Hughes, Cynthia; Bowman, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    It has been theorized that conversion disorder is the result of emotion that cannot be experienced consciously as feeling states or put into words (i.e., alexithymia), but there is little confirming empirical evidence. We sought to characterize subjects with conversion disorder compared to subjects with a distinct medical illness, using the model of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) vs. epilepsy (ES), on measures of childhood traumatic experience, alexithymia and maturity of psychological defensive strategies. All subjects admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center were offered self-report questionnaires (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and Response Evaluation Measure-71) at the outset of evaluation. Diagnosis of each subject was confirmed by video-EEG and we compared subjects with PNES to those with ES on these measures. 82 subjects had ES AND 96 had PNES. Those with PNES were significantly more likely to have experienced childhood trauma in all domains (p=.005 to p=.05), and were significantly more likely to have alexithymia (p=.0267). There was a significant difference in the capacity to identify feelings, and a trend towards significance in capacity to describe feelings. There were no differences in defensive styles between the two groups. PNES diagnosis was associated with female sex, higher alexithymia scores and higher rates of childhood trauma, but not with differences in defensive styles compared to ES. These findings add empirical evidence for theories regarding the cause of conversion disorder and may aid in the design of prospective treatment trials in patients with conversion disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Conversation analysis can help to distinguish between epilepsy and non-epileptic seizure disorders: a case comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Factual items in patients' histories are of limited discriminating value in the differential diagnosis of epilepsy and non-epileptic seizures (NES). A number of studies using a transcript-based sociolinguistic research method inspired by Conversation Analysis (CA) suggest that it is helpful to focus on how patients talk. Previous reports communicated these findings by using particularly clear examples of diagnostically relevant interactional, linguistic and topical features from different patients. They did not discuss the sequential display of different features although this is crucially important from a conversation analytic point of view. This case comparison aims to show clinicians how the discriminating features are displayed by individual patients over the course of a clinical encounter. CA-inspired brief sequential analysis of two first 30-min doctor-patient encounters by a linguist blinded to all medical information. A gold standard diagnosis was made by the recording of a typical seizure with video-EEG. The patient with epilepsy volunteered detailed first person accounts of seizures. The NES patient exhibited resistance to focusing on individual seizure episodes and only provided a detailed seizure description after repeated prompting towards the end of the interview. Although both patients also displayed some linguistic features favouring the alternative diagnosis, the linguist's final diagnostic hypothesis matched the diagnosis made by video-EEG in both cases. This study illustrates the importance of the time point at which patients share information with the doctor. It supports the notion that close attention to how patients communicate can help in the differential diagnosis of seizures.

  13. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  14. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, M; Kozik, A; West, B J; Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous, pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  15. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, pPTSD symptoms (M=-17.1875, SD=13.01; t (15)=-5.281, pPTSD reduced the number of PNES and improved mood and post traumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrent epileptic Wernicke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahaya, Kinshuk; Dhand, Upinder K; Goyal, Munish K; Soni, Chetan R; Sahota, Pradeep K

    2010-04-15

    We report a patient with recurrent epileptic Wernicke aphasia who prior to this presentation, had been misdiagnosed as transient ischemic attacks for several years. This case report emphasizes the consideration of epileptic nature of aphasia when a clear alternate etiology is unavailable, even when EEG fails to show a clear ictal pattern. We also present a brief discussion of previously reported ictal aphasias. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accelerometry based detection of epileptic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsen, T.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Epileptic seizures are the manifestation of abnormal hypersynchronous discharges of cortical neurons that impair brain function. Most of the people affected can be treated successfully with drug therapy or neurosurgical procedures. But there

  18. Genetics Home Reference: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1 (EIEE1) is a seizure disorder characterized by a type of seizure known as ... 2 links) Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  19. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  20. SIGNIFICANCE OF TARGETED EXOME SEQUENCING AND METHODS OF DATA ANALYSIS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF GENETIC DISORDERS LEADING TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Victorovna Kozhanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological disorder, and there is a genetic basis in almost 50% of people with epilepsy. The diagnosis of genetic epilepsies makes to estimate reasons of seizures in the patient. Last decade has shown tremendous growth in gene sequencing technologies, which have made genetic tests available. The aim is to show significance of targeted exome sequencing and methods of data analysis in the diagnosis of hereditary syndromes leading to the development of epileptic encephalopathy. We examined 27 patients with с early EE (resistant to antiepileptic drugs, psychomotor and speech development delay in the psycho-neurological department. Targeted exome sequencing was performed for patients without a previously identified molecular diagnosis using 454 Sequencing GS Junior sequencer (Roche and IlluminaNextSeq 500 platform. As a result of the analysis, specific epilepsy genetic variants were diagnosed in 27 patients. The greatest number of cases was due to mutations in the SCN1A gene (7/27. The structure of mutations for other genes (mutations with a minor allele frequency of less than 0,5% are presented: ALDH7A1 (n=1, CACNA1C (n=1, CDKL5 (n=1, CNTNAP2 (n=2, DLGAP2 (n=2, DOCK7 (n=2, GRIN2B (n=2, HCN1 (n=1, NRXN1 (n=3, PCDH19 (n=1, RNASEH2B (n=2, SLC2A1 (n=1, UBE3A (n=1. The use of the exome sequencing in the genetic practice allows to significantly improve the effectiveness of medical genetic counseling, as it made possible to diagnose certain variants of genetically heterogeneous groups of diseases with similar of clinical manifestations.

  1. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  3. [Unusual dreams in epileptics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, A I

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses bizarre dreams characteristic of epileptics and never occurring in normal subjects which have an important practical implication especially for early detection of epilepsy and the prevention of severe forms of the disease. This group of dreams includes vivid nightmares with vital fear, dreams not infrequently transforming into pro-dream states; persistently repeated stereotyped dreams and dreams with invariably the same unpleasant sensations representing an isolated aura of subsequent epileptic attacks. Diagnostically important may also be dreams with the symptoms of derealization and depersonalization, vague dream images and the deja vu phenomenon.

  4. Epileptic peri-ictal psychosis, a reversible cause of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Mingot, C; Gil Villar, M P; Calvo Medel, D; Corbalán Sevilla, T; Martínez Martínez, L; Iñiguez Martínez, C; Santos Lasaosa, S; Mauri Llerda, J A

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic psychoses are categorised as peri-ictal and interictal according to their relationship with the occurrence of seizures. There is a close temporal relationship between peri-ictal psychosis and seizures, and psychosis may present before (preictal), during (ictal) or after seizures (postictal). Epileptic psychoses usually have acute initial and final phases, with a short symptom duration and complete remission with a risk of recurrence. There is no temporal relationship between interictal or chronic psychosis and epileptic seizures. Another type of epileptic psychosis is related to the response to epilepsy treatment: epileptic psychosis caused by the phenomenon of forced normalisation (alternative psychosis), which includes epileptic psychosis secondary to epilepsy surgery. Although combination treatment with antiepileptic and neuroleptic drugs is now widely used to manage this condition, there are no standard treatment guidelines for epileptic psychosis. We present 5 cases of peri-ictal epileptic psychosis in which we observed an excellent response to treatment with levetiracetam. Good control was achieved over both seizures and psychotic episodes. Levetiracetam was used in association with neuroleptic drugs with no adverse effects, and our patients did not require high doses of the latter. Categorising psychotic states associated with epilepsy according to their temporal relationship with seizures is clinically and prognostically useful because it provides important information regarding disease treatment and progression. The treatment of peri-ictal or acute mental disorders is based on epileptic seizure control, while the treatment of interictal or chronic disorders has more in common with managing disorders which are purely psychiatric in origin. In addition to improving the patient's quality of life and reducing disability, achieving strict control over seizures may also prevent the development of interictal psychosis. For this reason, we believe that

  5. Idiopathic epileptic syndromes and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommet, Caroline; Sauerwein, Hannelore C; De Toffol, Bertrand; Lassonde, Maryse

    2006-01-01

    Epilepsy is frequently associated with cognitive impairments which result from various interacting factors. The present paper deals with the contribution of neuropsychology to the characterization of the type of epilepsy and the possible mechanisms underlying idiopathic epileptic syndromes. The non-lesional, so-called idiopathic epilepsies, constitute an interesting model for assessing the relationship between epileptiform EEG discharges and cognition. Among the idiopathic generalized epilepsies, disorders of social integration and personality have been frequently reported in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Since similar disturbances are observed in frontal-lobe-lesioned patients, impairments in other frontal lobe functions (e.g. executive functions) might be expected in JME. This gives rise to speculation about the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in JME. With regard to partial idiopathic epilepsies, benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS) may provide a useful model for the study of the relationship between epileptiform EEG discharges in the peri-sylvian region and language functions. Furthermore, the description of mild cognitive dysfunctions in BCECTS, and their persistence into adulthood, can provide information about compensatory mechanisms and may allow for the generation of remedial strategies. Thus, 'lesional' neuropsychology has given way to 'dynamic' neuropsychology based on specific postulates. By using the cognitive profile to specify the mechanism underlying the behavioral disturbances observed in different types of epilepsy, neuropsychology may eventually contribute to a revision of the present classification of epileptic syndromes. In addition, the neuropsychological data may help predict the extent and limits of functional recovery and cerebral plasticity.

  6. Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance In Epileptic Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, A.T.; Mohammed, A.A.; El-Maghraby, D.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which are characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is usually controlled, but cannot be cured with medications, although surgery may be considered in difficult cases. Over 30% of people with epilepsy don't have seizure control even with the best available medications. In epileptic children, oxidant-antioxidant balance is disturbed. Glutathione homeostasis may be altered as a consequence of reactive metabolites and/or reactive oxygen species produced during treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Per-oxidation of membrane lipid caused by an increase in generation of free radical or decrease in the activities of antioxidant defense systems have been suggested to be critically involved in seizure control. The effect of antiepileptic monotherapy as valproic acid (VPA) or carbamazepine (CBZ) or both on level of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as an index of antioxidant and the plasma of malondialdehyde (MDA) as an index of oxidative stress were studied in this study. Forty children (18 males and 22 females) with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, diagnosed in the Pediatric Neurology Unit, Children Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, were selected to represent group (1) with mean age of 5.13 ± 4.36 years. Thirty healthy children (14 males and 16 females) matched in age, sex and social life status served as normal control group (2). The results revealed that there was high significant increase in the plasma level of MDA in patients with idiopathic epilepsy as compared to the control while the serum level of GST was significantly decreased in epileptic children as compared to the control group. Non-significant difference in plasma level of MDA and serum level of GST among the epileptic subgroups was observed. In uncontrolled epileptic patients (seizures more than 4/month), the plasma level of MDA displayed higher significant increase than in controlled epileptic patients. On the other hand, serum GST

  7. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  8. Cognitive Dysfunctions in Epileptic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Ayta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some children with epilepsy display a low level of intelligence, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders and anxiety. Besides specific learning disabilities like reading, writing, arithmetics, learning problems may involve other major areas of intellectual functions such as speech and language, attention, memory, fine motor coordination. Even in the presence of common pathology that leads to epilepsy and mental dysfunctions, seizures cause additional cognitive problems. Age at seizure onset, type of seizures and epileptic syndromes are some variables that determine the effect of epilepsy on cognition. As recurrent seizures may have some negative impact on the developing brain, the use of antiepileptic drugs should be considered not only to aim reducing seizures but also to prevent possible seizure-induced cortical dysfunctions. Epilepsy is a disorder requiring a complicated psychological adjustment for the patients and indeed is a disease that affects the whole family. Thus, the management of epilepsy must include educational, psychotherapeutic and behavioral interventions as well as drug treatment.

  9. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was the clinical validation of an automated algorithm based on surface electromyography (EMG) for differentiation between convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Forty-four consecutive episodes with convulsive events were automatically analyzed with the a......%) and 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  10. Classifying Normal and Abnormal Status Based on Video Recordings of Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on video recordings of the movement of the patients with epilepsy, this paper proposed a human action recognition scheme to detect distinct motion patterns and to distinguish the normal status from the abnormal status of epileptic patients. The scheme first extracts local features and holistic features, which are complementary to each other. Afterwards, a support vector machine is applied to classification. Based on the experimental results, this scheme obtains a satisfactory classification result and provides a fundamental analysis towards the human-robot interaction with socially assistive robots in caring the patients with epilepsy (or other patients with brain disorders in order to protect them from injury.

  11. Impaired action potential initiation in GABAergic interneurons causes hyperexcitable networks in an epileptic mouse model carrying a human Na(V)1.1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz; Mantegazza, Massimo; Lerche, Holger

    2014-11-05

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na(+) channels in interneurons and persistent Na(+) currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca(2+) imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414874-16$15.00/0.

  12. Computed tomography of epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Mana; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes seen on cranial computed tomography (CT) of epileptic children, especially in the area of the temporal horn. The subjects were 242 epileptic children excluding those with encephalitis, brain tumor, neurocutaneous syndromes, degenerative disease, hydrocephalus etc. The control subjects were 195 children without any neurological disease and symptoms. CT scan were taken with a TCT-60A whole body scanner, and 14 check points were evaluated excluding the temporal horn. 195 epileptic children (N-group) and all control children were normal at 14 check points. Next, the areas of the temporal horns and adjoining hemispheres of the epileptic children (N-group) and control children were examined with Muto-Tablet-Desitizer. The temporal horn ratio ((area of temporal horn/area of ipsilateral hemisphere) x 100) was greater in younger children of the control group, and it was higher in epileptic than in control children. Enlargement of the temporal horn was seen in 1 % of the controls and in 35 % of the 125 epileptic children with normal measurements at 14 points on CT scans (p < 0.01). The frequency of enlargement of temporal horns was not variable among different epileptic types. In the epileptic children with normal CT scans except for enlargement of temporal horns behavioral disturbances were 6 boys and 5 had enlarged temporal horns (bilateral 1 case, left side 1 case, right side 3 cases). (author)

  13. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  14. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Riesch, Erik

    2015-01-01

    disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype....... They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing...

  15. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  16. Childhood masturbation simulating epileptic seizures: A report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Childhood masturbation is re- garded as one of the paroxysmal, non-epileptic disorders in children, which incorporate several potential diagno- ses. Therefore, if not recognized, it could pose diagnos- tic difficulties, unnecessary investigative spending and considerable parental anxiety.3. There is paucity of ...

  17. Epileptic seizure detection in EEG signal with GModPCA and support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abeg Kumar; Banka, Haider

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders caused by recurrent seizures. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) record neural activity and can detect epilepsy. Visual inspection of an EEG signal for epileptic seizure detection is a time-consuming process and may lead to human error; therefore, recently, a number of automated seizure detection frameworks were proposed to replace these traditional methods. Feature extraction and classification are two important steps in these procedures. Feature extraction focuses on finding the informative features that could be used for classification and correct decision-making. Therefore, proposing effective feature extraction techniques for seizure detection is of great significance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a dimensionality reduction technique used in different fields of pattern recognition including EEG signal classification. Global modular PCA (GModPCA) is a variation of PCA. In this paper, an effective framework with GModPCA and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is presented for epileptic seizure detection in EEG signals. The feature extraction is performed with GModPCA, whereas SVM trained with radial basis function kernel performed the classification between seizure and nonseizure EEG signals. Seven different experimental cases were conducted on the benchmark epilepsy EEG dataset. The system performance was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. In addition, we prove analytically that GModPCA has less time and space complexities as compared to PCA. The experimental results show that EEG signals have strong inter-sub-pattern correlations. GModPCA and SVM have been able to achieve 100% accuracy for the classification between normal and epileptic signals. Along with this, seven different experimental cases were tested. The classification results of the proposed approach were better than were compared the results of some of the existing methods proposed in literature. It is also found that the time and space

  18. Grey matter volume in healthy and epileptic beagles using voxel-based morphometry – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Frank

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common chronic neurological disorders in dogs is idiopathic epilepsy (IE diagnosed as epilepsy without structural changes in the brain. In the current study the hypothesis should be proven that subtle grey matter changes occur in epileptic dogs. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR images of one dog breed (Beagles were used to obtain an approximately uniform brain shape. Local differences in grey matter volume (GMV were compared between 5 healthy Beagles and 10 Beagles with spontaneously recurrent seizures (5 dogs with IE and 5 dogs with structural epilepsy (SE, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. T1W images of all dogs were prepared using Amira 6.3.0 for brain extraction, FSL 4.1.8 for registration and SPM12 for realignment. After creation of tissue probability maps of cerebrospinal fluid, grey and white matter from control images to segment all extracted brains, GM templates for each group were constructed to normalize brain images for parametric statistical analysis, which was achieved using SPM12. Results Epileptic Beagles (IE and SE Beagles displayed statistically significant reduced GMV in olfactory bulb, cingulate gyrus, hippocampus and cortex, especially in temporal and occipital lobes. Beagles with IE showed statistically significant decreased GMV in olfactory bulb, cortex of parietal and temporal lobe, hippocampus and cingulate gyrus, Beagles with SE mild statistically significant GMV reduction in temporal lobe (p < 0.05; family- wise error correction. Conclusion These results suggest that, as reported in epileptic humans, focal reduction in GMV also occurs in epileptic dogs. Furthermore, the current study shows that VBM analysis represents an excellent method to detect GMV differences of the brain between a healthy dog group and dogs with epileptic syndrome, when MR images of one breed are used.

  19. Genetic epileptic encephalopathies: is all written into the DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Jonghe, Peter; Zara, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is a condition in which epileptic activity, clinical or subclinical, is thought to be responsible for any disturbance of cognition, behavior, or motor control. However, experimental evidence supporting this clinical observation are still poor and the causal relationship between pharmacoresistant seizures and cognitive outcome is controversial. In the past two decades, genetic studies shed new light onto complex mechanisms underlying different severe epileptic conditions associated with intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities, thereby providing important clues on the relationship between seizures and cognitive outcome. Dravet syndrome is a childhood disorder associated with loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A and is characterized by frequent seizures and severe cognitive impairment, thus well illustrating the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. However, it is difficult to determine the causative role of the underlying sodium channel dysfunction and that of the consequent seizures in influencing cognitive outcome in these children. It is also difficult to demonstrate whether a recognizable profile of cognitive impairment or a definite behavioral phenotype exists. Data from the laboratory and the clinics may provide greater insight into the degree to which epileptic activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in individual syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  1. Multimodality localization of epileptic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Pozo, M. A.; Santos, Andres; Reig, Santiago; Gispert, Juan D.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a multimodality approach for the localization of epileptic foci using PET, MRI and EEG combined without the need of external markers. Mutual Information algorithm is used for MRI-PET registration. Dipole coordinates (provided by BESA software) are projected onto the MRI using a specifically developed algorithm. The four anatomical references used for electrode positioning (nasion, inion and two preauricular points) are located on the MRI using a triplanar viewer combined with a surface-rendering tool. Geometric transformation using deformation of the ideal sphere used for dipole calculations is then applied to match the patient's brain size and shape. Eight treatment-refractory epileptic patients have been studied. The combination of the anatomical information from the MRI, hipoperfusion areas in PET and dipole position and orientation helped the physician in the diagnosis of epileptic focus location. Neurosurgery was not indicated for patients where PET and dipole results were inconsistent; in two cases it was clinically indicated despite the mismatch, showing a negative follow up. The multimodality approach presented does not require external markers for dipole projection onto the MRI, this being the main difference with previous methods. The proposed method may play an important role in the indication of surgery for treatment- refractory epileptic patients.

  2. Glutamate synapses in human cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Lenora; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Sharma, Kamal; Huganir, Richard L

    2015-07-08

    Accumulating data, including those from large genetic association studies, indicate that alterations in glutamatergic synapse structure and function represent a common underlying pathology in many symptomatically distinct cognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss evidence from human genetic studies and data from animal models supporting a role for aberrant glutamatergic synapse function in the etiology of intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia (SCZ), neurodevelopmental disorders that comprise a significant proportion of human cognitive disease and exact a substantial financial and social burden. The varied manifestations of impaired perceptual processing, executive function, social interaction, communication, and/or intellectual ability in ID, ASD, and SCZ appear to emerge from altered neural microstructure, function, and/or wiring rather than gross changes in neuron number or morphology. Here, we review evidence that these disorders may share a common underlying neuropathy: altered excitatory synapse function. We focus on the most promising candidate genes affecting glutamatergic synapse function, highlighting the likely disease-relevant functional consequences of each. We first present a brief overview of glutamatergic synapses and then explore the genetic and phenotypic evidence for altered glutamate signaling in ID, ASD, and SCZ.

  3. Epileptic seizures and headache/migraine: a review of types of association and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pruna, Dario; Ledda, Mariagiuseppina

    2013-11-01

    There are different possible temporal associations between epileptic seizures and headache attacks which have given rise to unclear or controversial terminologies. The classification of the International League Against Epilepsy does not refer to this type of disorder, while the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) defines three kinds of association: (1) migraine-triggered seizure ("migralepsy"), (2) hemicrania epileptica, and (3) post-ictal headache. We performed an extensive review of the literature, not including "post-ictal" and "inter-ictal" headaches. On the basis of well-documented reports, the following clinical entities may be identified: (A) "epileptic headache (EH)" or "ictal epileptic headache (IEH)": in this condition headache (with or without migrainous features) is an epileptic manifestation per se, with onset, and cessation if isolated, coinciding with the scalp or deep EEG pattern of an epileptic seizure. EH maybe followed by other epileptic manifestations (motor/sensory/autonomic); this condition should be differentiated from "pure" or "isolated" EH, in which headache/migraine is the sole epileptic manifestation (requiring differential diagnosis from other headache forms). "Hemicrania epileptica" (if confirmed) is a very rare variant of EH, characterized by ipsilateral location of headache and ictal EEG paroxysms. (B) "Pre-ictal migraine" and "pre-ictal headache": when a headache attack is followed during, or shortly after, by a typical epileptic seizure. The migraine attack may be with or without aura, and its seizure-triggering role ("migraine-triggered seizure") is still a subject of debate. A differentiation from occipital epilepsy is mandatory. The term "migralepsy" has not been used uniformly, and may therefore led to misinterpretation. On the basis of this review we suggest definitions and a terminology which may become the basis of a forthcoming classification of headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Copyright

  4. Epileptic seizure, as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children, does not require antiepileptic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Meng-Jia; Li, Jiu-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hypoparathyroidism exhibit metabolic disorders (hypocalcemia) and brain structural abnormalities (brain calcifications). Currently, studies have determined whether antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is required for epileptic seizures in children with hypoparathyroidism. Method This study aims to evaluate the data of two medical centers in Beijing based on the diagnosis of epileptic seizures as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children. Result A total of 42 pa...

  5. Clinical Microbiological Aspects of Epileptic Seizures in the Tropical Countries with Specific Focus on Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijeoma Kanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder; however, in Nigeria and other tropical regions, the causes of epileptic seizures differ greatly in etiology. This paper is an attempt to highlight some possible microbiological aspects of epileptic seizures. A literature review was carried out to identify the extent to which microbial infections were involved in the elicitation of epileptic seizures. Data were collected from several clinics in the community and hospitals in Nigeria and correlated with the evidence from the literature review. It was found that different microbial agents including viral, bacterial, protozoa, and fungal agents were involved in several aspects of epileptic seizures. Malaria was found to cause more than 88% of childhood epileptic seizures and 12% of adult seizures. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in more than 40% of adult patients. Partial seizures were uncommon. Cases of epileptic seizures associated with bacteria (e.g., brucellosis, viral, fungal, and protozoa infections were frequently reported. Malaria, tapeworm, and cysticercosis were some of the common infectious causes of epilepsy; however, in some cases, the cause remained unknown. From these findings, it was evident that microbiological aspects of epilepsies are possible research areas that might be developed. It is believed that the unraveling of the various microbiological factors in epileptic seizures would have important implications for understanding the underlying neurobiology, evaluating treatment strategies, and perhaps planning health-care resources for the affected. It will also help to improve the prognostic factors in initial seizure symptomatic etiology and presence of any structural cerebral abnormalities.

  6. Inferences from a community study about non-epileptic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the epidemiological importance of the different types of non-epileptic events (NEE in a low-income urban community. METHOD: The patients suspected of having epilepsy, who were detected in the first phase (screening one of this prevalence study, were interviewed by a neurologist in a non-structured neurological interview. These NEE were classified as physiological and psychogenic, subdivided by various types. The psychogenic NEE were classified according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We compared the cases suspected of having epilepsy (n=176 with those not suspected (n=806 and discovered that those cases suspected of having epilepsy had a greater median age (<0.01 and female predominance (p<0.01. Among the cases suspected of having epilepsy there were different diagnosis: epileptic events without identifiable cause (n=20 or with identifiable causes (e.g., febrile convulsions and eclampsia. The most prevalent diagnosis for those suspected of having epilepsy was syncope (n=63; 35.8%. In terms of physiological events, the most frequent were: epileptic seizures, paroxysmal toxic phenomena (including alcoholism and brain trauma, besides syncope; in terms of psychogenic events the most frequent were: dissociative and anxiety disorders. Regarding gender differences, paroxysmal toxic problems were significantly more prevalent in men (p= 0.02, and dissociative disorders (p=0.01 in women. CONCLUSION: This survey confirms the epidemiological importance of syncope in a populational sample with NEE. However, among the psychogenic disorders of this NEE sample, the most frequent were dissociative and anxiety phenomena. This finding contrasts with the literature based on samples from tertiary epileptic centers with video-EEG resources, which found somatoform disorders to be more prevalent than dissociative and anxiety phenomena.

  7. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  8. Video electroencephalography monitoring differentiates between epileptic and non-epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Mette Borch; Erdal, Jesper; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is often misdiagnosed and approximately one in every four patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy does not have epilepsy, but instead non-epileptic seizures. Video electroencephalography monitoring (VEM) is the gold standard for differentiation between epileptic and non...

  9. An acardiac acephalic monster following in-utero anti-epileptic drug exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlay, B; Bayramoglu, S; Kutlar, A I; Yesildaglar, N

    1996-04-01

    Acardia, the absence of the heart, is one of the rarest medical anomalies. The exact mechanism which causes this anomaly is still unknown. The authors report the acardiac acephalic fetus of an epileptic mother who was on primidone therapy. The mother who received no antenatal care stopped taking primidone (her sole medication) in the third month of pregnancy with the fear of delivering a malformed baby and had three convulsions until delivery. This is the first reported case of acardia associated with anti-epileptic medication. The cause of the anomaly in this patient may be an unknown genetic defect, the maternal epileptic disorder, the convulsions, the anti-epileptic medication, or a combination of these factors.

  10. Causes of mortality in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Graciane; de Souza Santos, Francisco; Borelli, Wyllians Vendramini; Pisani, Leonardo; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2018-06-12

    Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy syndrome (EIEE), also known as Ohtahara syndrome, is an age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy syndrome defined by clinical features and electroencephalographic findings. Epileptic disorders with refractory seizures beginning in the neonatal period and/or early infancy have a potential risk of premature mortality, including sudden death. We aimed to identify the causes of death in EIEE and conducted a literature survey of fatal outcomes. We performed a literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science for data from inception until September 2017. The terms "death sudden," "unexplained death," "SUDEP," "lethal," and "fatal" and the medical subject heading terms "epileptic encephalopathy," "mortality," "death," "sudden infant death syndrome," and "human" were used in the search strategy. The EIEE case report studies reporting mortality were included. The search yielded 1360 articles. After screening for titles and abstracts and removing duplicate entries, full texts of 15 articles were reviewed. After reading full texts, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria (9 articles in English and 2 in Japanese, dated from 1976 to 2015). The review comprised 38 unique cases of EIEE, 17 of which had death as an outcome. In all cases, the suppression-burst pattern on electroencephalographies (EEGs) was common. Most cases (55%) involved male infants. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age at onset of seizure was 19.6 ± 33 days. The mean (SD) age at death was 12.9 ± 14.1 months. Most infants (58.8%) survived less than one year. The cause of death was described only in eight (47%) patients; the cause was pneumonia/respiratory illness or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). The results show EIEE as a severe disease associated with a premature mortality, evidenced by a very young age at death. Increasing interest in the detection of new molecular bases of EIEE is leading us to a better understanding of this severe

  11. Cerebellar atrophy in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneva, N.

    1991-01-01

    52 patients with epileptic seizures of different form, frequency and duration who had received long term treatment with anticonvulsive drugs were examined on Siretom 2000, a brain scanner of II generation. 6 standard incisions were made in all patients in the area of cerebellum, side ventricules and high convexity. Additional scanning with an incision width of 5 mm was made when pathological changes were detected. There were found 3 cases of cerebellar atrophy, 3 - cerebral atrophy, 1 - combined atrophy and 4 - with other changes. It was difficult to establish any relation between the rerebellar atrophy and the type of anticonvulsant used because treatment had usually been complex. 1 fig., 1 tab., 4 refs

  12. Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma M. R Assis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes.Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The most common etiology was ischemic stroke (37%, followed by neoplasias (13%, hemorrhagic stroke (12%, dementias (11.4% and metabolic disturbances (5.5%. In a univariate analysis, disease duration (p = 0.04, status epilepticus (p < 0.001 and metabolic etiology (p = 0.005 were associated with mortality. However after adjustment by logistic regression, only status epilepticus remained an independent predictor of death (odds ratio = 13; 95%CI = 2.3 to 72; p = 0.004.Conclusion In this study status epilepticus was an independent risk factor for death during hospitalization.

  13. Free Software for Disorders of Human Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ricardo Rodríguez Dueñas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: New technologies are increasingly used by the health sector for its implementation in therapeutic interventions. However, in the case of speech therapists, there are many unknown free software-based tools which could support their daily work. This paper summarizes fourteen free software-based tools that can support interventions in early stimulation, assessment and control of voice and speech, several resources for augmentative and alternative communication and tools that facilitate access to the computer. Materials and methods: The information presented here is the result of a general review of software-based tools designed to treat human communication disorders. Criteria for inclusion and exclusion were established to select tools and these were installed and tested. Results: 22 tools were found and 14 were selected and classified in these categories: Early stimulation and capture attention, acoustic signal processing of voice, speech processing, Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Other; the latter includes tools for access to the computer without the need for advanced computer skills. Discussion: The set of tools discussed in this paper provides free computer-based tools to therapists in order to help their interventions, additionally, promotes the improvement of computer skills so necessary in today’s society of professionals.

  14. Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronically epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are pathologic hallmarks of both experimental and human epilepsy, and could be implicated in the neuronal hyperexcitability. Aspirin represents one of the non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with fewer side effects in long-term application. This study was carried out to assess the anti-epileptic effects of aspirin when administered during the chronic stage of temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE] in mice. The alteration of hippocampal neurogenesis was also examined for raising a possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of anti-inflammatory treatment in the TLE. Two months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the chronically epileptic mice were treated with aspirin (20 mg, 60 mg or 80 mg/kg) once a day for 10 weeks. Spontaneous recurrent seizures were monitored by video camera for 2 weeks. To evaluate the profile of hippocampal neurogenesis, the newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker BrdU. The newborn neurons that extended axons to CA3 area were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing. Administration of aspirin with a dosage of 60 mg or 80 mg/kg initiated at 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Aspirin treatment also increased the number of newborn neurons with anatomic integration through improving the survival of the newly generated cells. Aspirin treatment during the chronic stage of TLE could attenuate the spontaneous recurrent seizures in mice. Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition of COX-PGE2 pathway might partly contribute to this anti-epileptic effect. Highlights • Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures of chronically epileptic mice • Aspirin increases neurogenesis of chronically epileptic hippocampus by improving the survival of newly generated cells • Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition

  15. Syndrome of Electrical Status Epilepticus During Sleep: Epileptic Encephalopathy Related to Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Qiao; Zhang, Wei-Na; Hu, Lin-Yan; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an age-related and self-limited disorder. The present study analyzed the etiology, demographics, and pathogenesis of patients with electrical status epilepticus during sleep to provide information on the diagnosis and therapy of this syndrome. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in patients admitted in Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were classified into the genetic, structural-metabolic, and unknown groups according to the etiology. Demographics and clinical characteristics of all the patients were then analyzed and compared among groups. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in 75 patients mainly included benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, polymicrogyria, and migration disorders. Age at onset of epilepsy did not show a specific pattern, but age at onset of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep was concentrated at age 6-9 years. The mean age at onset of epilepsy in the genetic group was significantly older than that in the structural-metabolic group (P status epilepticus during sleep did not significantly differ between the two groups. Electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy related to brain development and presents an age-dependent occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The offspring of epileptic mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, S K; Misra, S; Jaiswal, S

    1996-01-01

    The offspring of an epileptic mother is an issue-currently getting attention because of its several implications. A complex interaction between epilepsy during pregnancy and its adverse impact on foetus, labor, neonate, congenital malformation, psychosocial and medico-social concern and treatment challenges of such cases is increasingly being realised. Some of the significant observations has been reviewed extensively in this article. Maternal epilepsy is likely to adversely affect the off-spring at its various stages of development amounting to increased morbidity and mortality. Increased seizure frequency during pregnancy with resultant increased risk is well documented but its mechanism is poorly understood. Low apgar score, increased still birth rates (1.3 to 14%) in offspring of epileptic mother (OEM) is reported. So also, the neonatal and perinatal deaths are twice more common in OEMS than normal control. Small for dates, and prematurity in OEM is reported to be 7 to 10% and 4-11% respectively. Adverse impact on labor and delivery like preclampsia, abruptio placentae, polyhydramnios, assisted delivery, cesarean section and IUGR poses particular challenges to the obstetrician. Pediatrician's alertness is needed to anticipate and deal with the bleeding manifestation due to deficiency of Vit-K dependent clotting factors and various anticonvulsant drug (AED) withdrawal symptoms. Significant risk of developing congenital malformation is the result of epilepsy perse and the AED used during pregnancy. AED exposure leads to other distinct clinical syndromes, the orofacial clefts and cardiac anomalies being the commonest manifestation. Epilepsy in mother but not in father has significant adverse impact. Management strategies in the context of available observation has been discussed.

  17. CT findings in epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Nobuo; Kimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Jun; Haneda, Satoshi; Takebe, Yukinao

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 43 children with generalized seizures (grand mal seizures) (GM group) and in 50 children with partial seizures (P group), classified according to clinical seizure type, were studied. 1) CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 19% (8/43) in GM group and in 40% (20/50) in P group, including localized CT abnormalities in 9.3% (4/43) and in 34% (17/50) respectively. CT abnormalities were found more frequently in cases with abnormal past histories and/or mental defects (MD) than in those without them. 2) In P group, localized CT abnormalities and generalized brain atrophy were observed in 13 and 7 cases respectively. In 40 cases with focal epileptic discharges (FED) in EEG, localized CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 23% (9/40). The sites of localized CT abnormalities corresponded in 73% (11/15) to the sites of focal suppression in EEG (i.e., slowing, low amplitude and lazy pattern) regardless of FED. 3) The bicaudate cerebro-ventricular index (B-CVI) in 19 cases in the normal control group over 2 years of age was 10.0 +- 1.2 (mean +- SD). Ventricular narrowing (VN), with B-CVI less than 8.2 (mean - 1.5 SD), was observed in 5, 17 and 27% in control, GM and P groups respectively, indicating more frequently in epileptic children than in normal controls. Seizures were well controlled in 85% (11/13) in VN group and in 70% (26/36) in normal ventricular group. Brain atrophy in CT findings to inspection was ascertained in all cases by measuring B-CVI. (author)

  18. The effect of childhood conduct disorder on human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbink, Dinand; Vujić, Sunčica; Koning, Pierre; Martin, Nicholas G

    2012-08-01

    This paper estimates the longer-term effects of childhood conduct disorder on human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behavior later in life using data of Australian twins. We measure conduct disorder with a rich set of indicators based on diagnostic criteria from psychiatry. Using ordinary least squares and twin fixed effects estimation approaches, we find that early-age (pre-18) conduct disorder problems significantly affect both human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behavior over the life course. In addition, we find that conduct disorder is more deleterious if these behaviors occur earlier in life. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Vulnerability to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is linked to low neuropeptide Y levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Miani, Alessandro; Vercoe, Moana

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. Female patients with PNES often present with a history of prolonged stressors, especially sexual abuse. In the current study, we studied the relationship between neuropeptide Y (NPY...

  20. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bridgers, Joshua; Cossette, Patrick; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Jiang, Yu; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Steven; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ren, Zhong; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott; Wang, Quanli; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna A.; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne G.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Fiol, Miguel E.; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients

  1. A Preliminary Classification of Human Functional Sexual Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Lawrence; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary classification is presented for functional human sexual disorders. This system is based on objective behavior and reports of distress. Five categories of sexual disorders are proposed, including the behavioral, psychological and informational components of sexual functioning in the individual and the couple. (Author)

  2. Differentiating epileptic from non-epileptic high frequency intracerebral EEG signals with measures of wavelet entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Anne H; Frauscher, Birgit; Amiri, Mina; Otte, Willem M; Gotman, Jean

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in the background activity in the ripple band (80-200Hz) between epileptic and non-epileptic channels, and to assess whether this difference is sufficient for their reliable separation. We calculated mean and standard deviation of wavelet entropy in 303 non-epileptic and 334 epileptic channels from 50 patients with intracerebral depth electrodes and used these measures as predictors in a multivariable logistic regression model. We assessed sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) based on a probability threshold corresponding to 90% specificity. The probability of a channel being epileptic increased with higher mean (p=0.004) and particularly with higher standard deviation (pentropy is likely to be epileptic; with a threshold corresponding to 90% specificity our model can reliably select a subset of epileptic channels. Most studies have concentrated on brief ripple events. We showed that background activity in the ripple band also has some ability to discriminate epileptic channels. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients...... with IS or LGS. The contribution of autosomal recessive genetic variation, however, is less well understood. We implemented a rare variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to search for autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy genes in a cohort of 320 outbred patient-parent trios that were generally...... not find evidence of a role for individual autosomal recessive genes, our current sample is insufficiently powered to assess the overall role of autosomal recessive genotypes in an outbred epileptic encephalopathy population....

  4. An epileptic seizures detection algorithm based on the empirical mode decomposition of EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Lorena; Laciar, Eric; Correa, Agustina Garces; Torres, Abel; Graffigna, Juan P

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. The seizure detection is an important component in the diagnosis of epilepsy. In this study, the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method was proposed on the development of an automatic epileptic seizure detection algorithm. The algorithm first computes the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) of EEG records, then calculates the energy of each IMF and performs the detection based on an energy threshold and a minimum duration decision. The algorithm was tested in 9 invasive EEG records provided and validated by the Epilepsy Center of the University Hospital of Freiburg. In 90 segments analyzed (39 with epileptic seizures) the sensitivity and specificity obtained with the method were of 56.41% and 75.86% respectively. It could be concluded that EMD is a promissory method for epileptic seizure detection in EEG records.

  5. Assessing quantitative EEG spectrograms to identify non-epileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajay; Boro, Alexis; Yozawitz, Elissa

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms in order to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic events. Seventeen patients with paroxysmal non-epileptic events, captured during EEG monitoring, were retrospectively assessed using QEEG spectrograms. These patients were compared to a control group of 13 consecutive patients (ages 25-60 years) with epileptic seizures of similar semiology. Assessment of raw EEG was employed as the gold standard against which epileptic and non-epileptic events were validated. QEEG spectrograms, available using Persyst 12 EEG system integration software, were each assessed with respect to their usefulness to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. The given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure if, at the time of the clinically identified event, it showed a visually significant change from baseline. Eighty-two clinically identified paroxysmal events were analysed (46 non-epileptic and 36 epileptic). The "seizure detector trend analysis" spectrogram correctly classified 33/46 (71%) non-epileptic events (no seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) vs. 29/36 (81%) epileptic seizures (seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) (p=0.013). Similarly, "rhythmicity spectrogram", FFT spectrogram, "asymmetry relative spectrogram", and integrated-amplitude EEG spectrogram detected 28/46 (61%), 30/46 (65%), 22/46 (48%) and 27/46 (59%) non-epileptic events vs. 27/36 (75%), 25/36 (69%), 25/36 (69%) and 27/36 (75%) epileptic events, respectively. High sensitivities and specificities for QEEG seizure detection analyses suggest that QEEG may have a role at the bedside to facilitate early differentiation between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events in order to avoid unnecessary administration of antiepileptic drugs and possible iatrogenic consequences.

  6. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Charles L; Samson, David R; Krystal, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep-i.e. 'why' sleep evolved-remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Compared to other primates, sleep in great apes has undergone substantial evolutionary change, with all great apes building a sleeping platform or 'nest'. Further evolutionary change characterizes human sleep, with humans having the shortest sleep duration, yet the highest proportion of rapid eye movement sleep among primates. These changes likely reflect that our ancestors experienced fitness benefits from being active for a greater portion of the 24-h cycle than other primates, potentially related to advantages arising from learning, socializing and defending against predators and hostile conspecifics. Perspectives from evolutionary medicine have implications for understanding sleep disorders; we consider these perspectives in the context of insomnia, narcolepsy, seasonal affective disorder, circadian rhythm disorders and sleep apnea. We also identify how human sleep today differs from sleep through most of human evolution, and the implications of these changes for global health and health disparities. More generally, our review highlights the importance of phylogenetic comparisons in understanding human health, including well-known links between sleep, cognitive performance and health in humans. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  7. The functional organization of human epileptic hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Duque, J. J.; Brinkmann, B.; Gompel, J.V.; Stead, M.; St Louis, E.K.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Worrell, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 6 (2016), s. 3140-3145 ISSN 0022-3077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : intracranial EEG * epilepsy * seizure onset zone * behavioral state * connectivity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.396, year: 2016

  8. ABC optimized RBF network for classification of EEG signal for epileptic seizure identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Satapathy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain signals usually generate certain electrical signals that can be recorded and analyzed for detection in several brain disorder diseases. These small signals are expressly called as Electroencephalogram (EEG signals. This research work analyzes the epileptic disorder in human brain through EEG signal analysis by integrating the best attributes of Artificial Bee Colony (ABC and radial basis function networks (RBFNNs. We have used Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT technique for extraction of potential features from the signal. In our study, for classification of these signals, in this paper, the RBFNNs have been trained by a modified version of ABC algorithm. In the modified ABC, the onlooker bees are selected based on binary tournament unlike roulette wheel selection of ABC. Additionally, kernels such as Gaussian, Multi-quadric, and Inverse-multi-quadric are used for measuring the effectiveness of the method in numerous mixtures of healthy segments, seizure-free segments, and seizure segments. Our experimental outcomes confirm that RBFNN with inverse-multi-quadric kernel trained with modified ABC is significantly better than RBFNNs with other kernels trained by ABC and modified ABC.

  9. [Epilepsy and epileptic syndromes during the first year of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durá-Travé, T; Yoldi-Petri, M E; Hualde-Olascoaga, J; Etayo-Etayo, V

    To analyse the epidemiological characteristics and the relative distribution of the different types of epilepsy and epileptic syndromes during the first year of life. An analysis was performed of the patient records of all patients with epilepsy diagnosed during their first year of life who were submitted to a developmental check-up in the year 2007. The sample consisted of 60 patients (27 boys and 33 girls). Epidemiological and clinical data were collected, together with the findings from complementary examinations. The diagnostic criteria applied were those of the International League Against Epilepsy. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 6.3 months. The mean follow-up time was 7.6 years. The aetiology was symptomatic in 40 cases (66.7%), cryptogenic in 16 (26.7%) and idiopathic in four cases (6.7%). Neuroimaging tests detected abnormalities in 34 patients (56.7%). West's syndrome (30%), symptomatic focal epilepsies (23.3%) and epilepsies linked to specific syndromes (16.7%) were the epileptic syndromes with the highest prevalence. Learning disabilities were observed in 82.5% of the children. Most epilepsies that present during the first year of life are symptomatic and/or cryptogenic, and are accompanied by psychoneurological impairment and/or resistance to therapy, which condition cognitive disorders that are eligible for specialised psycho-pedagogical intervention.

  10. DREADDs suppress seizure-like activity in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epileptic brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, N.; Andersson, M.; Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard

    2016-01-01

    and closely resemble features of human epileptic tissue. Studies suggest that chemically induced epileptiform activity in rat OHSCs is pharmacoresistant to most of AEDs. However, high-frequency electric stimulus train-induced bursting (STIB) in OHSCs is responsive to carbamazepine and phenytoin. We...

  11. Glial adenosine kinase--a neuropathological marker of the epileptic brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Sandau, Ursula S.; Iyer, Anand; Boison, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Experimental research over the past decade has supported the critical role of astrocytes activated by different types of injury and the pathophysiological processes that underlie the development of epilepsy. In both experimental and human epileptic tissues astrocytes undergo complex changes in their

  12. Localisation of epileptic foci using novel imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Lemieux, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines recent reports on the use of advanced techniques to map the regions and networks involved during focal epileptic seizure generation in humans. Recent findings A number of imaging techniques are capable of providing new localizing information on the ictal processes and epileptogenic zone. Evaluating the clinical utility of these findings has been mainly performed through post-hoc comparison with the findings of invasive EEG and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography, using postsurgical seizure reduction as the main outcome measure. Added value has been demonstrated in MRI-negative cases. Improved understanding of the human ictiogenic processes and the focus vs. network hypothesis is likely to result from the application of multimodal techniques that combine electrophysiological, semiological, and whole-brain coverage of brain activity changes. Summary On the basis of recent research in the field of neuroimaging, several novel imaging modalities have been improved and developed to provide information about the localization of epileptic foci. PMID:23823464

  13. DisFace: A Database of Human Facial Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramjit Kaur

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Face is an integral part of human body by which an individual communicates in the society. Its importance can be highlighted by the fact that a person deprived of face cannot sustain in the living world. In the past few decades, human face has gained attention of several researchers, whether it is related to facial anthropometry, facial disorder, face transplantation or face reconstruction. Several researches have also shown the correlation between neuropsychiatry disorders and human face and also that how face recognition abilities are correlated with these disorders. Currently, several databases exist which contain the facial images of several individuals captured from different sources. The advantage of these databases is that the images in these databases can be used for testing and training purpose. However, in current date no such database exists which would provide not only facial images of individuals; but also the literature concerning the human face, list of several genes controlling human face, list of facial disorders and various tools which work on facial images. Thus, the current research aims at developing a database of human facial disorders using bioinformatics approach. The database will contain information about facial diseases, medications, symptoms, findings, etc. The information will be extracted from several other databases like OMIM, PubChem, Radiopedia, Medline Plus, FDA, etc. and links to them will also be provided. Initially, the diseases specific for human face have been obtained from already created published corpora of literature using text mining approach. Becas tool was used to obtain the specific task.  A dataset will be created and stored in the form of database. It will be a database containing cross-referenced index of human facial diseases, medications, symptoms, signs, etc. Thus, a database on human face with complete existing information about human facial disorders will be developed. The novelty of the

  14. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  15. Evolutionary Conservation in Genes Underlying Human Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Michelle Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago and thirty one non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in primates supports the hypothesis that schizophrenia and autism are a cost of higher brain function. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  16. Comparative evaluation of oral hygiene status and gingival enlargement among epileptic and healthy children as related to various antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Hasmukhbhai Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a gathering of neurological disorders characterized by epileptic seizures. Epileptic children, who are on active treatment with antiepileptic drugs, have a well-recognized side effect of gingival enlargement. Therefore, all efforts should be made, particularly for the population who are diagnosed or affected by the systemic disease. This study was conducted with an aim to determine oral hygiene status and gingival enlargement among epileptic and healthy children as related to various antiepileptic drugs. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the department of pedodontics and attached general hospital. A sample size of 120 participants with 60 healthy and 60 epileptic children between age 2 and 14 years were included. Oral health status of participants was examined using oral hygiene simplified index and plaque index. Gingival enlargement was assessed using Miranda–Brunet index. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA test, independent t-test, and Pearson's Chi-square test were used. Results: From the total participants included in the study, 49% of participants had good oral hygiene from healthy group, and 28% participants had poor oral hygiene from the epileptic group. Sodium valproate was the most common drug used and was associated with increased gingival enlargement. Conclusion: Conclusion can be drawn that epileptic children under medication had poor oral hygiene and an increased risk for gingival enlargement as compared to their healthy counterparts. It must be stressed that the epileptic patients should be given dental care without conditions and provided with best possible care to restore esthetics and functions.

  17. Biomarkers of epileptic seizures and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Lorber

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review biological markers, their importance and usefulness in the diagnosis of epileptic seizure or epilepsy. Assessed are also their prognostic value, their use in the evaluation of antiepileptic therapy effect and some other useful properties. The article reviews prolactin, neuron specific enolase, S–100 protein, creatin kinase, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase, nesfatin–1, ghrelin, obestatin and chromogranin A. The authors stress the need for further research studies in this area.

  18. Epileptic seizures precipited by eating: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Carlos Aleixo Sepulveda

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available The case of one 23 year-old girl who had epileptic manifestations is reported. At first, generalized tonic seizures; afterwards, epileptic seizures precipited by eating. The electroencephalograms showed left temporal lobe disfunctions. Different types of drugs were used with no sucess. The best results were obtained by association of sodium valproate, clonazepan and phenobarbital. Comments are made about clinic and etiopathogenesis, believing the authors in the hipothesis of nervous structures chronic hiperactivity. To Walker8 the hiperactivity was reached by hormones production under neural control of specific cerebral centers. The continuous bombardment of epileptic discharges to hypothalamic centers is the probably responsible by epileptic seizures precipited by eating.

  19. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyatsi, D P

    2005-08-01

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several episodes of nocturnal generalised tonic clonic epileptic seizures. An electroencephalogram showed features consistent with complex partial seizures. He was commenced on anti-epileptic treatment with phenytoin sodium, and by the third day of treatment, the patient had achieved stool control.

  20. Behavioral Problems in Iranian Epileptic Children; A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aludari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy is among the most common neurological disorders in childhood, prevalence of which is increasing. Unpredictable and chronic nature of the disease affects physical, social and mental functions of the children and their family. This study was aimed to compare behavioral problems in epileptic children group versus healthy control group. Materials and Methods This study is a case-control one conducted from January 2013 to June 2016 in Tehran, Iran. The epileptic children in age of 7-10 years old that were diagnosed by neurologist referred to the researcher for further process. Their parents were provided with Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL to be completed. For matching by age and gender, the healthy group was sampled after the epilepsy group. Multivariate Analysis of Variance was used for statistical analysis. Results In this study 94 children with epilepsy and 83 healthy children in age of 7-10 years old were studied. The results indicated that there were significantly higher behavioral problems in the children with epilepsy than in control group in nine categories of seclusiveness, physical complaints, anxiety and depression, social problems, thought problems, attention problems, delinquent behaviors, aggressive behaviors, and other problems. Comparison of two generalized and partial epilepsy groups indicated that there was a significant difference only in attention problems (p = 0.024. Conclusion The present study indicates that the children with epilepsy have more behavioral problems as compared to control group. Therefore, educational and psychological interventions are necessary for supporting desirable psychosocial growth and development of such children.

  1. If the Airway Opens with Finger During Epileptics Attack: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyran Kilinc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bites generally have been came across after the situation as fighting, aggression, murder, sports competitions and child abuse. Hands and wrists are the most common areas that human bites have seen. Our case was seen first time when 65 aged woman treating for diabetes mellitus in our endocrinology service consultated us with a neglected open wound that occurred after she put on her hands second finger%u2019s proximal phalanx to her relative%u2019s mouth to keep open duration of epileptic attack before 45 days. In this case we try to explain that the wrong intervention in epileptic attack and delaying treatment of infections of human bites can be resulted with limb missing.

  2. [Analysis of gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Pan, G; Li, W H; Zhang, L M; Wu, B B; Wang, H J; Zhang, P; Zhou, S Z

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To summarize the gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason. Method: In this prospective study, data of patients with early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason were collected from neurological department of Children's Hospital of Fudan University between March 2016 and December 2016. Patients with known disorders such as infection, metabolic, structural, immunological problems and known genetic mutations were excluded. Patients with genetic disease that can be diagnosed by clinical manifestations and phenotypic characteristics were also excluded. Genetic research methods included nervous system panel containing 1 427 epilepsy genes, whole exome sequencing (WES), analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and karyotype analysis of chromosome. The basic information, phenotypes, genetic results and the antiepileptic treatment of patients were analyzed. Result: Nine of the 17 cases with early onset epileptic spasm were boys and eight were girls. Patients' age at first seizure onset ranged from 1 day after birth to 8 months (median age of 3 months). The first hospital visit age ranged from 1 month to 2 years (median age of 4.5 months). The time of following-up ranged from 8 months to 3 years and 10 months. All the 17 patients had early onset epileptic spasm. Video electroencephalogram was used to monitor the spasm seizure. Five patients had Ohtahara syndrome, 10 had West syndrome, two had unclear classification. In 17 cases, 10 of them had detected pathogenic genes. Nine cases had point mutations, involving SCN2A, ARX, UNC80, KCNQ2, and GABRB3. Except one case of mutations in GABRB3 gene have been reported, all the other cases had new mutations. One patient had deletion mutation in CDKL5 gene. One CNV case had 6q 22.31 5.5MB repeats. Ten cases out of 17 were using 2-3 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and the drugs had no effect. Seven cases used adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prednisone besides AEDs (a total course for 8 weeks

  3. Epileptic MEG Spike Detection Using Statistical Features and Genetic Programming with KNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turky N. Alotaiby

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Monitoring the brain activities and identifying the seizure source which starts with spike detection are important steps for epilepsy treatment. Magnetoencephalography (MEG is an emerging epileptic diagnostic tool with high-density sensors; this makes manual analysis a challenging task due to the vast amount of MEG data. This paper explores the use of eight statistical features and genetic programing (GP with the K-nearest neighbor (KNN for interictal spike detection. The proposed method is comprised of three stages: preprocessing, genetic programming-based feature generation, and classification. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been evaluated using real MEG data obtained from 28 epileptic patients. It has achieved a 91.75% average sensitivity and 92.99% average specificity.

  4. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzonca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A; Nürnberg, Peter; van Gassen, Koen L I; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical syndromes with various degrees of severity arise from a single gene, a single mutation, or from different mutations showing similar functional defects. Accordingly, several genes coding for GABAA receptor subunits have been linked to a spectrum of benign to severe epileptic disorders and it was shown that a loss of function presents the major correlated pathomechanism. Here, we identified six variants in GABRA3 encoding the α3-subunit of the GABAA receptor. This gene is located on chromosome Xq28 and has not been previously associated with human disease. Five missense variants and one microduplication were detected in four families and two sporadic cases presenting with a range of epileptic seizure types, a varying degree of intellectual disability and developmental delay, sometimes with dysmorphic features or nystagmus. The variants co-segregated mostly but not completely with the phenotype in the families, indicating in some cases incomplete penetrance, involvement of other genes, or presence of phenocopies. Overall, males were more severely affected and there were three asymptomatic female mutation carriers compared to only one male without a clinical phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation studies could not explain the phenotypic variability in females. Three detected missense variants are localized in the extracellular GABA-binding NH2-terminus, one in the M2-M3 linker and one in the M4 transmembrane segment of the α3-subunit. Functional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a variable but significant reduction of GABA-evoked anion currents for all mutants compared to wild-type receptors. The degree of current reduction correlated partially with the phenotype

  5. Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to expose the variables or predictors that mediate in anxiety disorders among epileptics in Nigeria. Such variables or predictors are age, level of social support and perceived level of stigmatization were examined with reference to their roles in causing anxiety disorder among epileptics in Nigeria.

  6. [Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in an alcoholic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, R; Otto, F G

    2000-09-01

    We introduce a case of a 66 year-old male with chronic alcoholism who suffered from confusion, Wernicke-aphasia and epileptic seizures. Several EEG revealed periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. The patient's case resembles the symptoms of a subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures which can occur in alcoholics.

  7. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    Long term exposure to organic solvents is usually not considered as a possible cause of chronic epileptic seizures. A case that shows a remarkable coincidence between exposure to organic solvents and occurrence of epileptic seizures is reported. The man was a 58 year old sign writer with lifelong...

  8. Clinical Presentation of Epilepsy among Adult Sudanese Epileptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the pattern of clinical presentation of epilepsy among adult Sudanese epileptic patients. Methods: 120 patients with epilepsy were included in a prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted at Sheik Mohamed Kheir Friday Epileptic Clinic .Duration: May 2003 Oct 2006. Results: ...

  9. Clinical outcomes and immune benefits of anti-epileptic drug therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krentz Hartmut B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are frequently prescribed to persons with HIV/AIDS receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART although the extent of AED use and their interactions with cART are uncertain. Herein, AED usage, associated toxicities and immune consequences were investigated. Methods HIV replication was analysed in proliferating human T cells during AED exposure. Patients receiving AEDs in a geographically-based HIV care program were assessed using clinical and laboratory variables in addition to assessing AED indication, type, and cumulative exposures. Results Valproate suppressed proliferation in vitro of both HIV-infected and uninfected T cells (p 0.05 but AED exposures did not affect HIV production in vitro. Among 1345 HIV/AIDS persons in active care between 2001 and 2007, 169 individuals were exposed to AEDs for the following indications: peripheral neuropathy/neuropathic pain (60%, seizure/epilepsy (24%, mood disorder (13% and movement disorder (2%. The most frequently prescribed AEDs were calcium channel blockers (gabapentin/pregabalin, followed by sodium channel blockers (phenytoin, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. In a nested cohort of 55 AED-treated patients receiving cART and aviremic, chronic exposure to sodium and calcium channel blocking AEDs was associated with increased CD4+ T cell levels (p 0.05 with no change in CD8+ T cell levels over 12 months from the beginning of AED therapy. Conclusions AEDs were prescribed for multiple indications without major adverse effects in this population but immune status in patients receiving sodium or calcium channel blocking drugs was improved.

  10. Electrical stimulation of the epileptic focus in absence epileptic WAG/RIJ rats: assessment of local and network excitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttjohann, A.K.; Zhang, S.W.; Peijper, R.A.G. de; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The study aims to investigate whether there is a higher excitability in the deep cortical layers of the pen-oral region of the somatosensory cortex as compared to other cortical regions in absence epileptic WAG/Rij rats and whether this is unique for this type of epileptic rats, as would

  11. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  12. STATISTICAL INSIGHT INTO THE BINDING REGIONS IN DISORDERED HUMAN PROTEOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Pal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human proteome contains a significant number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. They show unusual structural features that enable them to participate in diverse cellular functions and play significant roles in cell signaling and reorganization processes. In addition, the actions of IDPs, their functional cooperativity, conformational alterations and folding often accompany binding to a target macromolecule. Applying bioinformatics approaches and with the aid of statistical methodologies, we investigated the statistical parameters of binding regions (BRs found in disordered human proteome. In this report, we detailed the bioinformatics analysis of binding regions found in the IDPs. Statistical models for the occurrence of BRs, their length distribution and percent occupancy in the parent proteins are shown. The frequency of BRs followed a Poisson distribution pattern with increasing expectancy with the degree of disorderedness. The length of the individual BRs also followed Poisson distribution with a mean of 6 residues, whereas, percentage of residues in BR showed a normal distribution pattern. We also explored the physicochemical properties such as the grand average of hydropathy (GRAVY and the theoretical isoelectric points (pIs. The theoretical pIs of the BRs followed a bimodal distribution as in the parent proteins. However, the mean acidic/basic pIs were significantly lower/higher than that of the proteins, respectively. We further showed that the amino acid composition of BRs was enriched in hydrophobic residues such as Ala, Val, Ile, Leu and Phe compared to the average sequence content of the proteins. Sequences in a BR showed conformational adaptability mostly towards flexible coil structure and followed by helix, however, the ordered secondary structural conformation was significantly lower in BRs than the proteins. Combining and comparing these statistical information of BRs with other methods may be useful for high

  13. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The evaluation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D, calcium, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase levels in epileptic children under antiepileptic medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyhani doost Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Epilepsy is a common disease in the pediatric neurology. There are frequent anti-epileptic drugs which are used in management of epilepsy. Anti-epileptic drugs may have some complications on bone and vitamin-D metabolism. In this study we aimed to evaluate vitamin-D metabolism in epileptic children."n"nMethods: The study was a prospective and cross sectional one. A total 89 epileptic children who were taking anti-epileptic drugs for longer than six months with no underlying disorder in Imam Khomeini and Bahrami Hospitals in Tehran, Iran were enrolled in our study"n"nResults: Forty nine boys and 40 girls were enrolled in this study; mean age of the patients was 7.8±2.1 years. Mean duration of anti-epileptic drug therapy was 2.3 years (SD=0.4, 70 of patients were under monotherapy and 19 were under polytherapy. None of the patients had signs of rickets. Serum calcium and phosphor levels were within normal ranges. Serum alkaline phosphates levels were increased more than two times in 43%. 42% had vitamin-D deficiency (25-OH Vit D<10 ng/ml and another 33% had vitamin-D insufficiency (10<25-oh Vit D<20 ng/ml. 29 patients (32% were taking prophylactic supplemental Vit D (200-400 IU/day. There was significant difference between patients taking supplemental vitamin-D as prophylaxis and patients who did not (p=0.04. There was no significant difference in vitamin-D levels between patients according to age, gender or different drugs."n"nConclusion: Periodic

  15. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  16. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Nicolet Biomedical Inc. (NBI) is collaborating with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to convert ORNL's patented technology for forewarning of epileptic seizures to a clinical prototype. This technical report describes the highlights of the first year's effort. The software requirements for the clinical device were specified from which the hardware specifications were obtained. ORNL's research-class FORTRAN was converted to run under a graphical user interface (GUI) that was custom-built for this application by NBI. The resulting software package was cloned to desktop computers that are being tested in five different clinical sites. Two hundred electroencephalogram (EEG) datasets from those clinical sites were provided to ORNL for detailed analysis and improvement of the forewarning methodology. Effort under this CRADA is continuing into the second year as planned

  17. Epileptic consciousness: concept and meaning of aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Silva, Sergio; Alvarez-Silva, Iria; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Javier; Perez-Echeverria, M J; Campayo-Martinez, Antonio; Rodriguez-Fernandez, F L

    2006-05-01

    This research is based on previous publications that have analyzed certain neuropsychological phenomena that always have the same characteristic clinical features: a vivid experience of sudden onset and automatic development, accompanied by an intense sensation of strangeness. When these automatisms are accompanied by only mental symptoms, the designation paroxysmal psychic automatisms (PPAs) is proposed, and they should be interpreted as partial seizures (PSs) with a psychic content whenever they clearly exhibit the four features of suddenness, passivity, intensity, and strangeness. This interpretation is based on the existence of a wealth of scientific literature indicating an overlap between PPAs and PSs; moreover, bibliographic reviews indicate that the clinical signs just defined as characterizing PPAs are precisely those defining the epileptic consciousness.

  18. Reports on Polysomnograph Combined with Long-term Video Electroencephalogram for Monitoring Nocturnal Sleep-breath Events in 82 Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of epileptic discharges in sleep of epileptic patients on sleepbreath events. Methods: Polysomnograph (PSG and long-term video electroencephalogram (LTVEEG were used to monitor 82 adult epileptic patients. The condition of paroxysmal events in nocturnal sleep was analyzed, and the epileptiform discharge and effects of antiepileptic drugs were explored. Results: In epileptic group, latency to persistent sleep (LPS and REM sleep latency increased, the proportion of light sleep increased while that of deep sleep decreased, sleep efficiency reduced, nocturnal arousal times increased and apnea hyponea indexes (AHI improved, which demonstrated significant differences by comparison to control group. Periodic leg movements (PLM had no conspicuous differences compared with control group. There were no specific effects of epileptiform discharge and antiepileptic drugs on AHI and PLM indexes. Conclusion: Epileptic patients have sleep structure disorders and sleep-disordered breathing, and arousal, respiratory and leg movement events influence mutually. Synchronous detection of PSG combined with LTVEEG is in favor of comprehensively analyzing the relationship between sleep structures and epilepsy-breath events.

  19. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  20. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs.

  1. Efficacy of fish liver oil and propolis as neuroprotective agents in pilocarpine epileptic rats treated with valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannaa, Fathia; El-Shamy, Karima A; El-Shaikh, Kamal A; El-Kassaby, Mahitab

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the action of fish liver oil and propolis in pilocarpine epileptic rats treated with the anticonvulsant drug valproate. Seven groups of rats were treated daily for six months: control; fish liver oil (0.4ml/kg b.w); propolis (50mg/kg b.w); pilocarpine-treated rats (epileptic control); epileptic rats treated with valproate (400mg/kg b.w); groups 6 and 7, epileptic rats treated with valproate plus fish liver oil or propolis. Pilocarpine administration caused a significant increase in hippocampal dopamine and serotonin levels accompanied with a significant decrease in their levels in serum. Lipid peroxidation level and LDH activity in hippocampus were significantly increased after pilocarpine treatment whereas Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and total antioxidant capacity were significantly decreased compared to the controls. Animals treated with the combined treatments showed a significant improvement in tested parameters towards the normal values of the control. Fish liver oil and propolis when given in combination with valproate, neuroprotected against the neurophysiological disorders induced by pilocarpine epilepsy in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge about epilepsy among teachers and epileptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Valls Tosetti

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available 223 epileptics patients and their families and 136 teachers from public and private schools were submitted to similar questionnaires related to inheritance, transmission, cure, complilcation rates, care during seizures, need for information on the disease, habits, comparison with other diseases and to the educational and social performances of epileptics. Cure and complication nates accounted for the main differences between those populations. Epileptics could recognize a bigger number of complications but still expected to be cured from the disease. The majority of teachers and patients have never been informed about epilepsy and this finding was related to the big number of equivocal answers obtained from them. Put together, the data showed that social and educational performance of epileptic patients could be disturbed by medical and social parameters. Some, of them could be improved by an educational program towards these aspects of epilepsy.

  3. ‘Transient epileptic amnesia’ : een caus en loteratuuroverzicht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thissen, S.; Vlooswijk, Marielle; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Majoie, Marian

    ‘Transient epileptic amnesia’ (TEA) wordt gezien als een weinig voorkomende vorm van temporaalkwabepilepsie, gekarakteriseerd door aanvallen van specifieke amnesie door epileptische activiteit (ictaalof postictaal). TEA treft voornamelijk mannen bovende 40 jaar. Aanvallen duren korter dan 60 minuten

  4. Effect Of Cognitive Stimulation On Hippocampal Ripples In Epileptic Patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Cimbálník, J.; Roman, R.; Stead, M.; Daniel, P.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, S3 (2013), s. 268-268 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /30./. 23.06.2013-27.06.2013, Montreal] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Cognitive Stimulation * Epileptic Patients Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Human pluripotent stem cells in modeling human disorders: the case of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershkov, Dan; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2017-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) generated from affected blastocysts or from patient-derived somatic cells are an emerging platform for disease modeling and drug discovery. Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, was one of the first disorders modeled in both embryonic stem cells and induced PCSs and can serve as an exemplary case for the utilization of human PSCs in the study of human diseases. Over the past decade, FXS-PSCs have been used to address the fundamental questions regarding the pathophysiology of FXS. In this review we summarize the methodologies for generation of FXS-PSCs, discuss their advantages and disadvantages compared with existing modeling systems and describe their utilization in the study of FXS pathogenesis and in the development of targeted treatment.

  6. Non-human Primate Models for Brain Disorders - Towards Genetic Manipulations via Innovative Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zilong; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Modeling brain disorders has always been one of the key tasks in neurobiological studies. A wide range of organisms including worms, fruit flies, zebrafish, and rodents have been used for modeling brain disorders. However, whether complicated neurological and psychiatric symptoms can be faithfully mimicked in animals is still debatable. In this review, we discuss key findings using non-human primates to address the neural mechanisms underlying stress and anxiety behaviors, as well as technical advances for establishing genetically-engineered non-human primate models of autism spectrum disorders and other disorders. Considering the close evolutionary connections and similarity of brain structures between non-human primates and humans, together with the rapid progress in genome-editing technology, non-human primates will be indispensable for pathophysiological studies and exploring potential therapeutic methods for treating brain disorders.

  7. The Parameters Related to Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Epileptic Patients Under Valproate Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün CENGIZ

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the parameters related to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS in epileptic patients under valproate (VPA treatment. Design: Cross-sectional clinical study. Setting: Ondokuz Mayis University Teaching Hospital. Patients: 16 patients using VPA for epileptic disorders. Intervensions: Reproductive history, measurement of height and weight, hormone analyses, pelvic ultrasonography. Main outcome measures: Menstrual regularity, body mass index (BMI, early follicular phase serum total testosterone level and LH/FSH ratio, fasting insulin level, polycystic ovaries (PCO’s at ultrasonography. RESULTS: Thirteen patients used VPA for generalized tonic-clonic seizures (81.2% and 3 patients for focal seizures (18.8%. Mean duration of treatment was 4.9±2.9 (2-13 years. 37.5% of the patients had irregular menses in the pattern of oligomenorrhea. Mean BMI was 22.4±3.0 (17.4-27.3 kg/m2 in the group. Only 2 patients had an LH/FSH ratio of ≥ 2 (12.5%, and hyperandrogenemia was detected at a ratio of 37.5%. Insulin levels of all the patients were within the normal range. PCO’s were observed at ultrasonography at a ratio of 62.5%. Seven out of our 16 patients were diagnosed as PCOS (43.8%. Correlation analyses didn’t reveal any significant relation between the BMI, LH/FSH ratios, total testosteron and insulin levels of the patients (p>0,05. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship of epilepsy – VPA treatment – and PCOS is a controversial issue. PCOS is diagnosed at quite a high ratio in our patient group, which mostly consisted of the ones with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Besides the epileptic disorder itself, this high ratio appears to be related to the VPA treatment as well

  8. Knowledge and attitude of epilepsy among secondary schools students (epileptic and non-epileptic) in Assiut city Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Mahran, Dalia G

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to assess knowledge and attitude with respect to epilepsy among secondary school students (epileptic and none) in Assiut city, Egypt. A cross sectional study was applied among secondary school students in Assiut city, Egypt. A 13-item questionnaire was self administered by 2226 students who selected randomly. All students either epileptic or non-epileptic had been heard about epilepsy. Only 7.1% of epileptic students and 8.5% of non-epileptic students thought that the epilepsy is a brain disease. Out of 2198 non-epileptic students, 28.4% thought that person with epilepsy (PWE) should not marry and 92% of them refused to marry from PWE. The correct knowledge of epilepsy was significantly positive correlated with positive attitude towards PWE. However, students still feel persons with epilepsy are stigmatized and are different from others. Secondary school students in Egypt have a vague knowledge about the etiology of epilepsy. Misconceptions about and negative attitudes towards epilepsy are unexpectedly high among those students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Large animals as potential models of human mental and behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danek, Michał; Danek, Janusz; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2017-12-30

    Many animal models in different species have been developed for mental and behavioral disorders. This review presents large animals (dog, ovine, swine, horse) as potential models of this disorders. The article was based on the researches that were published in the peer-reviewed journals. Aliterature research was carried out using the PubMed database. The above issues were discussed in the several problem groups in accordance with the WHO International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10thRevision (ICD-10), in particular regarding: organic, including symptomatic, disorders; mental disorders (Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease, pernicious anemia and hepatic encephalopathy, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease); behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (alcoholic intoxication, abuse of morphine); schizophrenia and other schizotypal disorders (puerperal psychosis); mood (affective) disorders (depressive episode); neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder); behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors (anxiety disorders, anorexia nervosa, narcolepsy); mental retardation (Cohen syndrome, Down syndrome, Hunter syndrome); behavioral and emotional disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). This data indicates many large animal disorders which can be models to examine the above human mental and behavioral disorders.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  11. Epileptic seizures due to multiple cerebral cavernomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cavernous angiomas are angiographically occult vascular malformations that are present in 0.4−0.9 % of people, and represent around 5% of all cerebrovascular malformations. They can be single or multiple, and sporadic or familial. The presence of multiple lesions is more frequent in familial cavernomatosis. Ten to 30 % are associated with familial clustering. Case report. We presented the case of a 43-year-old man, admitted to the Emergency Department due to unprovoked seizure during the wide awake and everyday activities. Neurological examination was with no focal signs. A 32-channel standard digital EEG was without any significant changes of normal baseline activity. After sleep deprivation EEG showed multifocal, bilateral and asymmetric polyspikes and sharpwaves activity. Hyperventilation induced generalized epileptiform discharges. MRI scan demonstrated multiple small cavernous angiomas. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated a delayed memory impairment. Neurosurgery treatment was not recommended, and the therapy with valproate 1 250 mg/day had an excellent efficacy with no singnificant adverse effects. Conclusion. This patient considered as a rare case with multiple cavernomatosis highlights the importance of neuroradiological examination in adult patients with the first epileptic seizure but with no focal neurological signs. .

  12. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  13. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  14. How large must an epileptic focus be to cause an electrographic status epilepticus--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Based on experimental data from animal studies different theories regarding the size of an epileptic focus have been postulated which range from single pacemaker cells to extended neuronal networks. We report a case which gives further information about the size of a human epileptic focus which can trigger manifest epileptic seizures. We report a 22-year-old man with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. This patient suffered from brief complex partial seizures and frequent epigastric auras. To differentiate a mesiotemporal from a temporolateral seizure origin the patient was implanted with a 10 contact depth electrode from a posterior approach into the right hippocampus, and additional temporobasal/temporolateral subdural strip electrodes. Depth recordings revealed an electrographic status with continuous rhythmic sharp wave activity (1 Hz), the field of which was confined to a diameter of less than 1 cm in the anterior hippocampus, whereas temporobasal subdural strip electrodes did not display this activity. Periodically, spread of this activity occurred to the amygdala, to the posterior part of the hippocampus, and less often to the temporobasal cortex. Most seizure patterns remained subclinical, few of them became symptomatic as partial seizures. This case demonstrates that a hippocampal epileptic focus causing electrographic focal status epilepticus may be limited to a volume of less than 1 cm in diameter. This observation is discussed with regard to implantation strategies and to possible superselective resective or modulatory approaches in the treatment of such limited epileptogenic areas.

  15. Curcumin for neuropsychiatric disorders: a review of in vitro, animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2017-03-01

    Turmeric has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat a range of ailments. Its primary active constituent curcumin, can influence an array of biological activities. Many of these, such as its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective, and monoaminergic effects are dysregulated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. In this systematic review, in vitro, animal, and human studies investigating the potential of curcumin as a treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders, and autism are reviewed, and directions for future research are proposed. It is concluded that curcumin is a promising, natural agent for many of these conditions, however, further research utilising robust, clinical designs are essential. The problem associated with the poor oral bioavailability of standard curcumin also requires consideration. Currently the greatest support for the efficacy of curcumin is for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  16. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-Epileptic Drugs and their Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein I. Johannessen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum concentration achieved and maintained following the administration of a fixed drug dosage is a direct consequence of the interactions of a wide variety of interrelated processes, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, and the physiological status of the patient. These interrelationships are reviewed with specific reference to the major anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbitone, phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine, as well as a new first-line antiepileptic, oxcarbazepine. Both older drugs, such as phenobarbitone and phenytoin, and newer drugs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ and sodium valproate, have been studied extensively over the past years giving valuable information for drug treatment. An important feature of oxcarbazepine (OXC , which was developed through minimal changes in the structure of CBZ in order to improve on the tolerability of CBZ without sacrificing efficacy, is that its metabolites do not include the 11-epoxide which has been implicated in the side-effects of CBZ. In man, OXC is metabolized to a monohydroxy derivative which has independent anti-epileptic properties. OXC seems to lack several disadavantageous pharmacokinetic properties common to other major anti-epileptic drugs. OXC does not influence its own metabolism after repeated administration, in contrast to the auto-induction displayed by CBZ. The metabolism of OXC is not influenced by anti-epileptic co-medication and does not influence the kinetics of other anti-epileptic drugs – or if it does, then to a lesser extent than CBZ.

  18. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  19. Erratum : De Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies (American Journal of Human Genetics 95(4) (360–370)(S0002929714003838)(10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.08.013))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Dimova, Petia; Djémié, Tania; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna A.; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Robbiano, Angela; Roelens, Filip; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne G.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amrom, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Sadleir, Lynette G.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.; Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    (The American Journal of Human Genetics 95, 360–370; October 2, 2014) In the list of consortium members for the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, member Dina Amrom's name was misspelled as Amron. The authors regret the error.

  20. DMPD: Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031249 Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Le Bour...w Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. PubmedID 18031249 Title Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and hum...an inflammatory disorders. Authors Le Bourhis L, Benko S

  1. Agmatine for combined treatment of epilepsy, depression and cognitive impairment in chronic epileptic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanveer; Bagga, Neetu; Kaur, Anureet; Kaur, Navjot; Gawande, Dinesh Yugraj; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is fourth most common neurological disorders associated with depression and cognitive deficits. As per present scenario, none of the antiseizure drugs have been reported successful to have ameliorative effect on epilepsy associated depression and cognitive deficits. Thus, the study was envisioned to assess an ameliorative potential of agmatine on epilepsy and its efficacy and safety for management of associated depression and cognitive deficits. The animals were made epileptic employing pentylenetetrazole (35mg/kg i.p. every 48±2h) kindling model of epilepsy and subsequently were treated with vehicle, valproic acid (300mg/kg/day i.p.) and agmatine (2.5, 5, and 10mg/kg)/day/i.p. for 15days. Except naïve, all the groups were challenged with same pentylenetetrazole dose as employed during kindling on days 5, 10, and 15 to evaluate seizure severity. Two hours after seizure severity test, tail suspension test and passive shock avoidance paradigm was employed to evaluate depression and cognitive behavior respectively. Results suggested that epileptic animals were significantly associated with depression and cognitive impairment. Chronic valproate treatment significantly reduced seizure severity, but was found unable to mitigate depression and cognitive deficits. However, agmatine treatment dose dependently ameliorated seizure severity as well as associated depression and cognitive deficits. On 15th day, animals were euthanized and pertinent neurochemical estimations were carried out in cortical and hippocampal areas of the mice brain. Thus, study concluded that agmatine ameliorated seizure severity, depression and cognitive impairment in epileptic animals, possibly via restoring glutamate-GABA neurotransmission and serotonin synthesis with decreased nitrosative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Face scanning in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD: human versus dog face scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro eMuszkat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study used eye-tracking to explore attention allocation to human and dog faces in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and typical development (TD. Significant differences were found among the three groups. TD participants looked longer at the eyes than ASD and ADHD ones, irrespective of the faces presented. In spite of this difference, groups were similar in that they looked more to the eyes than to the mouth areas of interest. The ADHD group gazed longer at the mouth region than the other groups. Furthermore, groups were also similar in that they looked more to the dog than to the human faces. The eye tracking technology proved to be useful for behavioral investigation in different neurodevelopmental disorders.

  3. Mapping pathological phenotypes in a mouse model of CDKL5 disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Amendola

    Full Text Available Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5 cause early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, a neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to Rett Syndrome. Here we describe the physiological, molecular, and behavioral phenotyping of a Cdkl5 conditional knockout mouse model of CDKL5 disorder. Behavioral analysis of constitutive Cdkl5 knockout mice revealed key features of the human disorder, including limb clasping, hypoactivity, and abnormal eye tracking. Anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the knockout uncovered potential pathological substrates of the disorder, including reduced dendritic arborization of cortical neurons, abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG responses to convulsant treatment, decreased visual evoked responses (VEPs, and alterations in the Akt/rpS6 signaling pathway. Selective knockout of Cdkl5 in excitatory and inhibitory forebrain neurons allowed us to map the behavioral features of the disorder to separable cell-types. These findings identify physiological and molecular deficits in specific forebrain neuron populations as possible pathological substrates in CDKL5 disorder.

  4. Mapping pathological phenotypes in a mouse model of CDKL5 disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Elena; Zhan, Yang; Mattucci, Camilla; Castroflorio, Enrico; Calcagno, Eleonora; Fuchs, Claudia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Silingardi, Davide; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Farley, Dominika; Ciani, Elisabetta; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Giustetto, Maurizio; Gross, Cornelius T

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) cause early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, a neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to Rett Syndrome. Here we describe the physiological, molecular, and behavioral phenotyping of a Cdkl5 conditional knockout mouse model of CDKL5 disorder. Behavioral analysis of constitutive Cdkl5 knockout mice revealed key features of the human disorder, including limb clasping, hypoactivity, and abnormal eye tracking. Anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the knockout uncovered potential pathological substrates of the disorder, including reduced dendritic arborization of cortical neurons, abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) responses to convulsant treatment, decreased visual evoked responses (VEPs), and alterations in the Akt/rpS6 signaling pathway. Selective knockout of Cdkl5 in excitatory and inhibitory forebrain neurons allowed us to map the behavioral features of the disorder to separable cell-types. These findings identify physiological and molecular deficits in specific forebrain neuron populations as possible pathological substrates in CDKL5 disorder.

  5. Attention in schizophrenia and in epileptic psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C.J Kairalla

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive behavior of human beings is usually supported by rapid monitoring of outstanding events in the environment. Some investigators have suggested that a primary attention deficit might trigger symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, researchers have long discussed the relationship between schizophrenia and the schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy (SLPE. On the basis of these considerations, the objective of the present study was to investigate attention performance of patients with both disorders. Patient age was 18 to 60 years, and all patients had received formal schooling for at least four years. Patients were excluded if they had any systemic disease with neurologic or psychiatric comorbidity, or a history of brain surgery. The computer-assisted TAVIS-2R test was applied to all patients and to a control group to evaluate and discriminate between selective, alternating and sustained attention. The TAVIS-2R test is divided into three parts: one for selective attention (5 min, the second for alternating attention (5 min, and the third for the evaluation of vigilance or sustained attention (10 min. The same computer software was used for statistical analysis of reaction time, omission errors, and commission errors. The sample consisted of 36 patients with schizophrenia, 28 with interictal SLPE, and 47 healthy controls. The results of the selective attention tests for both patient groups were significantly lower than that for controls. The patients with schizophrenia and SLPE performed differently in the alternating and sustained attention tests: patients with SLPE had alternating attention deficits, whereas patients with schizophrenia showed deficits in sustained attention. These quantitative results confirmed the qualitative clinical observations for both patient groups, that is, that patients with schizophrenia had difficulties in focusing attention, whereas those with epilepsy showed perseveration in attention focus.

  6. Is there anything distinctive about epileptic deja vu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Zeman, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Déjà vu can occur as an aura of temporal lobe epilepsy and in some psychiatric conditions but is also common in the general population. It is unclear whether any clinical features distinguish pathological and physiological forms of déjà vu. 50 epileptic patients with ictal déjà vu, 50 non-epileptic patients attending general neurology clinics and 50 medical students at Edinburgh University were recruited. Data were collected on demographic factors, the experience of déjà vu using a questionnaire based on Sno's Inventory for Déjà Vu Experiences Assessment, symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as well as seizure characteristics, anti-epileptic medications, handedness, EEG and neuroimaging findings for epileptic patients. 73.5% of neurology patients, 88% of students and (by definition) all epilepsy patients had experienced déjà vu. The experience of déjà vu itself was similar in the three groups. Epileptic déjà vu occurred more frequently and lasted somewhat longer than physiological déjà vu. Epilepsy patients were more likely to report prior fatigue and concentrated activity, associated derealisation, olfactory and gustatory hallucinations, physical symptoms such as headaches, abdominal sensations and fear. After controlling for study group, anxiety and depression scores were not associated with déjà vu frequency. Déjà vu is common and qualitatively similar whether it occurs as an epileptic aura or normal phenomenon. However ictal déjà vu occurs more frequently and is accompanied by several distinctive features. It is distinguished primarily by 'the company it keeps'.

  7. Effects of anticonvulsants and inactivity on bone disease in epileptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Lilian E.; Bewsher, P. D.; Chesters, Marion; Gilbert, J.; Catto, G.; Law, Elizabeth; McKay, E.; Ross, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    No significant biochemical or radiological features of vitamin D deficiency were found in groups of juvenile and adult epileptics and control groups of non-epileptic patients in hospitals for the mentally retarded. There was evidence of hepatic enzyme induction in patients on anticonvulsants, in that urinary D-glucaric acid concentration and excretion were raised. No effect was found of prolonged anticonvulsant therapy on bone densitometry, but in children immobility was closely associated with decreased bone density. The evidence suggests that disuse osteoporosis is the major bone disease in these mentally retarded children. PMID:1161672

  8. Pharmacological response of systemically derived focal epileptic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remler, M.P.; Sigvardt, K.; Marcussen, W.H.

    1986-11-01

    Focal epileptic lesions were made in rats by systemic focal epileptogenesis. In this method, a focal lesion of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is produced by focal alpha irradiation followed by repeated systemic injection of a convulsant drug that cannot cross the normal BBB, resulting in a chronic epileptic focus. Changes in the spike frequency of these foci in response to various drugs was recorded. The controls, saline and chlorpromazine, produced no change. Phenytoin, phenobarbital, chlordiazepoxide, and valproic acid produced the expected decrease in spike frequency. Pentobarbital and diazepam produced a paradoxical increase in spike frequency.

  9. Sleep deprivation and spike-wave discharges in epileptic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation were studied on the occurrence of spike-wave discharges in the electroencephalogram of rats of the epileptic WAG/Rij strain, a model for absence epilepsy. This was done before, during and after a period of 12 hours of near total sleep deprivation. A substantial increase in the number of spike-wave discharges was found during the first 4 hours of the deprivation period, whereas in the following deprivation hours epileptic activity returned to baseline values. I...

  10. De novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès; Striano, Pasquale; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Nabbout, Rima; Cancès, Claude; Ville, Dorothée; Brilstra, Eva H; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Raffo, Emmanuel; Bouteiller, Delphine; Marie, Yannick; Trouillard, Oriane; Robbiano, Angela; Keren, Boris; Agher, Dahbia; Roze, Emmanuel; Lesage, Suzanne; Nicolas, Aude; Brice, Alexis; Baulac, Michel; Vogt, Cornelia; El Hajj, Nady; Schneider, Eberhard; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Gormley, Padhraig; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Baulac, Stéphanie; Zara, Federico; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Haaf, Thomas; LeGuern, Eric; Depienne, Christel

    2014-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations in human epilepsy is lacking. We carried out exome sequencing for parent-offspring trios with fever-sensitive, intractable epileptic encephalopathy, leading to the discovery of two de novo missense HCN1 mutations. Screening of follow-up cohorts comprising 157 cases in total identified 4 additional amino acid substitutions. Patch-clamp recordings of Ih currents in cells expressing wild-type or mutant human HCN1 channels showed that the mutations had striking but divergent effects on homomeric channels. Individuals with mutations had clinical features resembling those of Dravet syndrome with progression toward atypical absences, intellectual disability and autistic traits. These findings provide clear evidence that de novo HCN1 point mutations cause a recognizable early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in humans.

  11. Perpetration of gross human rights violations in South Africa: association with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Williams, Stacey L; Jackson, Pamela B; Seedat, Soraya; Myer, Landon; Herman, Allen; Williams, David R

    2009-05-01

    A nationally representative study of psychiatric disorders in South Africa provided an opportunity to study the association between perpetration of human rights violations (HRVs) during apartheid and psychiatric disorder. Prior work has suggested an association between perpetration and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but this remains controversial. Subjects reported on their perpetration of human rights violations, purposeful injury, accidental injury and domestic violence. Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition) disorders were assessed with Version 3.0 of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Socio-demographic characteristics of these groups were calculated. Odds ratios for the association between the major categories of psychiatric disorders and perpetration were assessed. HRV perpetrators were more likely to be male, black and more educated, while perpetrators of domestic violence (DV) were more likely to be female, older, married, less educated and with lower income. HRV perpetration was associated with lifetime and 12-month anxiety and substance use disorders, particularly PTSD. Purposeful and DV perpetration were associated with lifetime and 12-month history of all categories of disorders, whereas accidental perpetration was associated most strongly with mood disorders. Socio-demographic profiles of perpetrators of HRV and DV in South Africa differ. While the causal relationship between perpetration and psychiatric disorders deserves further study, it is possible that some HRV and DV perpetrators were themselves once victims. The association between accidental perpetration and mood disorder also deserves further attention.

  12. Comparing ESC and iPSC?Based Models for Human Genetic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Halevy, Tomer; Urbach, Achia

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, human disorders were studied using animal models or somatic cells taken from patients. Such studies enabled the analysis of the molecular mechanisms of numerous disorders, and led to the discovery of new treatments. Yet, these systems are limited or even irrelevant in modeling multiple genetic diseases. The isolation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from diseased blastocysts, the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients’ somatic cells, and the ne...

  13. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normalVGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Regression of nodules on cranial computerized tomography (CCT) scans in 4 focal epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; Yoon, Sei Chul; Park, Seog Hee; Huh, Choon Woong

    1983-01-01

    Epilepsy can be defined as a paroxysmal, excessive, neuronal discharge within the brain originating from either cortical or sugcortical regions. The incidence of epilepsy is increasing possibly due to the survival of persons who should have died of brain injuries or other cerebral abnormalities acquired in early life. The use of antibiotics and improvement in the medical care have saved many children who might have died of meningitis, brain abscess, encephalitis, severe head injuries, etc. CCT scan is new radiologic procedure for defining cranial and intracranial structures and also an useful procedure for evaluation and follow-up (FU) of patient with focal seizure disorder. Recently we experienced nodules which were isodense or hypodense on initial non contrasted CT (NECT) and scans became hyperdense of the enhancement in 4 cases of focal epileptic seizure. Nearly complete disappearance or regression of the epileptic foci occurred on the FU CT scans in 2 cases. Operation was performed in 2 cases. The tissue specimen obtained from the CT nodule revealed cerebral edema in one case and localized gliosis and congestion in the other. All the patients showed marked clinical improvement when the CT nodule improved. Review of literature failed to disclose any previous report on such observation

  15. Contrasting Features of Urea Cycle Disorders in Human Patients and Knockout Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Deignan, Joshua L.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Grody, Wayne W.

    2007-01-01

    The urea cycle exists for the removal of excess nitrogen from the body. Six separate enzymes comprise the urea cycle, and a deficiency in any one of them causes a urea cycle disorder (UCD) in humans. Arginase is the only urea cycle enzyme with an alternate isoform, though no known human disorder currently exists due to a deficiency in the second isoform. While all of the UCDs usually present with hyperammonemia in the first few days to months of life, most disorders are distinguished by a cha...

  16. Convergent integration of animal model and human studies of bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Niculescu, Helen; Patel, Sagar D; Niculescu, Alexander B

    2010-10-01

    Animal models and human studies of bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders are becoming increasingly integrated, prompted by recent successes. Particularly for genomics, the convergence and integration of data across species, experimental modalities and technical platforms is providing a fit-to-disease way of extracting reproducible and biologically important signal, in sharp contrast to the fit-to-cohort effect, disappointing findings to date, and limited reproducibility of human genetic analyses alone. Such work in psychiatry can provide an example of how to address other genetically complex disorders, and in turn will benefit by incorporating concepts from other areas, such as cancer biology and diabetes. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Different expressions of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel types in the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus of the absence epileptic WAG/Rij rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovenkamp-Janssen, M.C. van de; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Kuijpers-Kwant, F.J.; Kozicz, L.T.; Veening, J.G.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; McEnery, M.W.; Roubos, E.W.

    2004-01-01

    In the WAG/Rij rat, a model for human absence epilepsy, spike-wave discharges (SWD) and absence epileptic behavior develop after the age of 3 months. The rostral part of the reticular thalamic nucleus (rRTN) is involved in SWD. Ca(2+) channels play a central role in the initiation and maintenance of

  18. Monitoring of regional cerebral blood flow by single photon emission tomography of I123-N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine in epileptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magistretti, P.L.; Uren, R.F.; Parker, J.A.; Royal, H.D.; Front, D.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    In some patients with epileptic disorders it is difficult to accurately localize the seizure focus especially in the case of deep lesions. In an attempt to provide better localization of such foci we have used single photon emission tomography (SPECT) of a new radiopharmaceutical I 123 -N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) in the ictal and interictal phases. Eight patients were studied. The location of the seizure focus was determined by intraoperative corticography operative findings and pathology in 5 patients and by neuropsychological testing and long-term EEG monitoring in the other three. The SPECT scan accurately localized the seizure focus in all patients. This modality also allowed the functional state of the seizure focus to be assessed. In five of the thirteen studies there was increased RCBF at the seizure focus. On four of these occasions the patients reported symptoms typical of their seizures. In the asymptomatic patient the focally increased RCBF corresponded with a very active superficial epileptic focus on EEG. These preliminary results suggest that SPECT scans of RCBF, will have considerable utility in the management of epileptics. This is particularly the case as the necessary instrumentation is already available in many hospitals, thus minimizing the cost of widespread application

  19. Uric acid and allopurinol aggravate absence epileptic activity in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kovács, Zsolt

    2018-05-01

    Uric acid has a role in several physiological and pathophysiological processes. For example, uric acid may facilitate seizure generalization while reducing uric acid level may evoke anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects. Allopurinol blocks the activity of xanthine oxidase, by which allopurinol inhibits catabolism of hypoxanthine to xanthine and uric acid and, as a consequence, decreases the level of uric acid. Although the modulation of serum uric acid level is a widely used strategy in the treatment of certain diseases, our knowledge regarding the effects of uric acid on epileptic activity is far from complete. Thus, the main aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of uric acid on absence epileptic seizures (spike-wave discharges: SWDs) in a model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rat. We investigated the influence of intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected uric acid (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg), allopurinol (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg), a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) inhibitor indomethacin (10 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) alone and the combined application of allopurinol (50 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) or inosine (500 mg/kg) as well as indomethacin (10 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) on absence epileptic activity. We demonstrated that both uric acid and allopurinol alone significantly increased the number of SWDs whereas indomethacin abolished the uric acid-evoked increase in SWD number. Our results suggest that uric acid and allopurinol have proepileptic effects in WAG/Rij rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recognition of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a curable neurophobia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2013-02-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) remains challenging. The majority of \\'PNES status\\' cases are likely to be seen in the emergency department or similar non-specialised units, where patients are initially assessed and managed by physicians of varying expertise in neurology.

  1. GRIN1 Mutations in Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Yokohama City University and other medical centers in Israel and Japan reported mutations on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors subunit GRIN1 (GluN1 identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

  2. Epilepsy, anti-epileptic medication use and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jeanette; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Whether the powerful medications used to treat epilepsy increase the risk of cancer has been debated for decades, but until now no study could disentangle the contributions of anti-epileptic medications and epilepsy itself to cancer risk. Using a cohort comprising all Danish residents ≥ 16 years ...

  3. Sleep deprivation and spike-wave discharges in epileptic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation were studied on the occurrence of spike-wave discharges in the electroencephalogram of rats of the epileptic WAG/Rij strain, a model for absence epilepsy. This was done before, during and after a period of 12 hours of near total sleep deprivation. A substantial

  4. Behavioral problems of siblings of epileptic children in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Epileptic patients who consecutively referred to the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, from October 1999 to September 2000 were recruited. Demographic data were obtained, with a questionnaire administered to the parents. Information on the behavior ...

  5. Exfoliative Dermatitis Due To Carbamazepine In An Epileptic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sadhan Kr

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A young epileptic girl of 17 years who was being treated with carbamazepine suddenly developed exanthematous skin eruption all over the body resulting in exfoliative dermatitis within 2 days of onset. The drug was withdrawn and the patient responded well with symptomatic treatment.

  6. The determinants of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This assesses generalisation of seizures, falls, injuries, urinary incontinence, warning interval before loss of consciousness, automatisms and time of recovery on a graded scale. Results: The most frequent indices of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics is the generalisation of seizures in 85.7% of subjects, incontinence of ...

  7. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Roman, R.; Světlák, M.; Kukleta, M.; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 23 (2014), el151:1-4 ISSN 0025-7974 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : EEG * epileptic Seizure Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 5.723, year: 2014

  8. Epileptic aura and perception of self-control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Allan; Kjaer, Troels W; Sabers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The health locus of control is the subjective perception of control over one's health. It has been studied for years as one of several factors that determine patient health-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate how the epileptic aura is associated with the health...

  9. Tremor cells in the human thalamus: differences among neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodkey, Jason A; Tasker, Ronald R; Hamani, Clement; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Lozano, Andres M

    2004-07-01

    Thalamic neurons firing at frequencies synchronous with tremor are thought to play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of tremor. The authors studied the incidence and locations of neurons with tremor-related activity (TRA) in the thalamus of patients with varied pathological conditions-including Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), multiple sclerosis (MS), and cerebellar disorders--to determine whether known differences in the effectiveness of thalamic stereotactic procedures for these tremors could be correlated to differences in the incidence or locations of TRA cells. Seventy-five operations were performed in 61 patients during which 686 TRA cells were recorded from 440 microelectrode trajectories in the thalamus. The locations of the TRA cells in relation to electrophysiologically defined thalamic nuclei and the commissural coordinates were compared among patient groups. The authors found that TRA cells are present in patients with each of these disorders and that these cells populate several nuclei in the ventral lateral tier of the thalamus. There were no large differences in the locations of TRA cells among the different diagnostic classes, although there was a difference in the incidence of TRA cells in patients with PD, who had greater than 3.8 times more cells per thalamic trajectory than patients with ET and approximately five times more cells than patients with MS or cerebellar disorders. There was an increased incidence of TRA in the thalamus of patients with PD. The location of thalamic TRA cells in patients with basal ganglia and other tremor disorders was similar.

  10. Human Sexual Desire Disorder: Do We Have a Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Warren L.; Henry, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), loss of sexual desire for sexual activity, is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions of men and women in the United States. This article presents an overview of this specific sexual dysfunction including incidence, possible causes, treatment options, and the role of the health educator in addressing…

  11. EEG-confirmed epileptic activity in a cat with VGKC-complex/LGI1 antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakozdy, Akos; Glantschnigg, Ursula; Leschnik, Michael; Hechinger, Harald; Moloney, Teresa; Lang, Bethan; Halasz, Peter; Vincent, Angela

    2014-03-01

    A 5-year-old, female client-owned cat presented with acute onset of focal epileptic seizures with orofacial twitching and behavioural changes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral temporal lobe hyperintensities and the EEG was consistent with ictal epileptic seizure activity. After antiepileptic and additional corticosteroid treatment, the cat recovered and by 10 months of follow-up was seizure-free without any problem. Retrospectively, antibodies to LGI1, a component of the voltage-gated potassium channel-complex, were identified. Feline focal seizures with orofacial involvement have been increasingly recognised in client-owned cats, and autoimmune limbic encephalitis was recently suggested as a possible aetiology. This is the first report of EEG, MRI and long-term follow-up of this condition in cats which is similar to human limbic encephalitis.

  12. METALS IN THE METABOLISM OF HIPPOCAMPUS AND ROLE OF ZINC IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kuchkovsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological mechanisms of convulsions status during epilepsy or episindrom significantly different from the mechanisms, which were describe for other disorders associated with glutamatergic system, such as schizophrenia (a decrease of glutamate in neurons and increased dopaminergic load, drug addiction and alcoholism (the formation of endogenous opioids and dopamine, strengthening the role of GABA-ergic system. With glutamatergic transmission are сconnect not only convulsive state, but also the realization of higher integrative functions. Therefore, the development of epilepsy, particularly  which caused glutamate, implemented by activating Zn-ergic hippocampal neurons, associate with complex changes in human mental functions. Based on a scientific literature about  of the role of chelating zinc in the mechanisms of glutamatergic transmission, we can  suggest it participation in the mechanisms of formation of epilepsy  convulsions. In experience on animals, was show that in the animal organism of stressing correlative changes observe zinc content and secretory material in the hippocampus, Paneth cells  and B cells of pancreas. The nature of the changes depend on the stressor. When this change of zinc content in the hippocampus and hypothalamus (as the main regulator of stress reaction were multidirectional that this can be explained by the release of metal together with secretory material in the hypothalamus into the bloodstream. Research epileptic activity  of hippocampus by administering to the animal chelate 8 BSQ allowed to establish the dependence between convulsant action  and first  stress condition of the animal. Evocation of stress by 8-BSQ and physical activity, immobilization and alcohol abuse found that the convulsive effect of this reagent during intravitreal research increased in the case of prior exposure by specified kinds of stressors. In this pre-convulsive effect on exertion increased by 266% and the zinc content

  13. Emotion Recognition in Animated Compared to Human Stimuli in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Johnson, Hilary; Grawmeyer, Beate; Chapman, Emma; Benton, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is equivocal evidence as to whether there is a deficit in recognising emotional expressions in Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study compared emotion recognition in ASD in three types of emotion expression media (still image, dynamic image, auditory) across human stimuli (e.g. photo of a human face) and animated stimuli (e.g. cartoon…

  14. Puberty as a critical risk period for eating disorders: a review of human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, Kelly L

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Puberty is one of the most frequently discussed risk periods for the development of eating disorders. Prevailing theories propose environmentally mediated sources of risk arising from the psychosocial effects (e.g., increased body dissatisfaction, decreased self-esteem) of pubertal development in girls. However, recent research highlights the potential role of ovarian hormones in phenotypic and genetic risk for eating disorders during puberty. The goal of this paper is to review data from human and animal studies in support of puberty as a critical risk period for eating disorders and evaluate the evidence for hormonal contributions. Data are consistent in suggesting that both pubertal status and pubertal timing significantly impact risk for most eating disorders in girls, such that advanced pubertal development and early pubertal timing are associated with increased rates of eating disorders and their symptoms in both cross-sectional and longitudinal research. Findings in boys have been much less consistent and suggest a smaller role for puberty in risk for eating disorders in boys. Twin and animal studies indicate that at least part of the female-specific risk is due to genetic factors associated with estrogen activation at puberty. In conclusion, data thus far support a role for puberty in risk for eating disorders and highlight the need for additional human and animal studies of hormonal and genetic risk for eating disorders during puberty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Puberty as a Critical Risk Period for Eating Disorders: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, Kelly L.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is one of the most frequently discussed risk periods for the development of eating disorders. Prevailing theories propose environmentally mediated sources of risk arising from the psychosocial effects (e.g., increased body dissatisfaction, decreased self-esteem) of pubertal development in girls. However, recent research highlights the potential role of ovarian hormones in phenotypic and genetic risk for eating disorders during puberty. The goal of this paper is to review data from human and animal studies in support of puberty as a critical risk period for eating disorders and evaluate the evidence for hormonal contributions. Data are consistent in suggesting that both pubertal status and pubertal timing significantly impact risk for most eating disorders in girls, such that advanced pubertal development and early pubertal timing are associated with increased rates of eating disorders and their symptoms in both cross-sectional and longitudinal research. Findings in boys have been much less consistent and suggest a smaller role for puberty in risk for eating disorders in boys. Twin and animal studies indicate that at least part of the female-specific risk is due to genetic factors associated with estrogen activation at puberty. In conclusion, data thus far support a role for puberty in risk for eating disorders and highlight the need for additional human and animal studies of hormonal and genetic risk for eating disorders during puberty. PMID:23998681

  16. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, Andrew; Nunn, CL; Samson, DR; Krystal, AD

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep-i.e. 'why' sleep evolved-remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalia

  17. Charles Bonnet Syndrome in a Patient With Right Medial Occipital Lobe Infarction: Epileptic or Deafferentation Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumral, Emre; Uluakay, Arzu; Dönmez, İlknur

    2015-07-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by complex and recurrent visual hallucinations in patients with visual pathway pathologic defects. To describe a patient who experienced complex visual hallucinations following infarction in the right occipital lobe and epileptic seizure who was diagnosed as having CBS. A 65-year-old man presented acute ischemic stroke caused by artery to artery embolism involving the right occipital lobe. Following ischemic stroke, complex visual hallucinations in the left visual field not associated with loss of consciousness or delusion developed in the patient. Hallucinations persisted for >1 month and during hallucination, no electrographic seizures were recorded through 24 hours of videoelectroencephalographic monitoring. CBS may develop in a patient with occipital lobe infarction following an embolic event. CBS associated with medial occipital lobe infarction and epilepsy may coexist and reflects the abnormal functioning of an integrated neuronal network.

  18. Decrement of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in dentate granule cells in epileptic hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokawa, M

    1996-05-01

    1. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were studied in hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGCs) in the pilocarpine model and human temporal lobe epilepsy, with the use of the whole cell patch-clamp recording technique in slice preparations. 2. In the pilocarpine model, hippocampal slices were prepared from rats that were allowed to experience spontaneous seizures for 2 mo. Human hippocampal specimens were obtained from epileptic patients who underwent surgical treatment for medically intractable seizures. 3. IPSCs were generated by single perforant path stimulation and recorded at a membrane potential (Vm) of 0 mV near the reversal potential of glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents in the voltage-clamp recording. IPSCs were pharmacologically identified as gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) IPSCs by 10 microM bicuculline methiodide. 4. During low-frequency stimulation, IPSCs were not different in amplitude among non-seizure-experienced rat hippocampi, human nonsclerotic hippocampi, seizure-experienced rat hippocampi, and human sclerotic hippocampi. In the last two groups of DGCs, current-clamp recordings indicated the presence of prolonged excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. 5. High-frequency stimulation, administered at Vm = -30 mV to activate NMDA currents, reduced GABAA IPSC amplitude specifically in seizure-experienced rat hippocampi (t = 2.5, P < 0.03) and human sclerotic hippocampi (t = 7.7, P < 0.01). This reduction was blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) (50 microM). The time for GABAA IPSCs to recover to their original amplitude was also shortened by the application of APV. 6. I conclude that, when intensively activated, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory transmission may interact with GABAergic synaptic inhibition in DGCs in seizure-experienced hippocampus to transiently reduce GABA(A) receptor-channel function. Such interactions may contribute to

  19. Mice doubly-deficient in lysosomal hexosaminidase A and neuraminidase 4 show epileptic crises and rapid neuronal loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Seyrantepe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tay-Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the HexA gene coding for the α-subunit of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase A, which converts G(M2 to G(M3 ganglioside. Hexa(-/- mice, depleted of β-hexosaminidase A, remain asymptomatic to 1 year of age, because they catabolise G(M2 ganglioside via a lysosomal sialidase into glycolipid G(A2, which is further processed by β-hexosaminidase B to lactosyl-ceramide, thereby bypassing the β-hexosaminidase A defect. Since this bypass is not effective in humans, infantile Tay-Sachs disease is fatal in the first years of life. Previously, we identified a novel ganglioside metabolizing sialidase, Neu4, abundantly expressed in mouse brain neurons. Now we demonstrate that mice with targeted disruption of both Neu4 and Hexa genes (Neu4(-/-;Hexa(-/- show epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance correlating with polyspike discharges on the cortical electrodes of the electroencephalogram. Single knockout Hexa(-/- or Neu4(-/- siblings do not show such symptoms. Further, double-knockout but not single-knockout mice have multiple degenerating neurons in the cortex and hippocampus and multiple layers of cortical neurons accumulating G(M2 ganglioside. Together, our data suggest that the Neu4 block exacerbates the disease in Hexa(-/- mice, indicating that Neu4 is a modifier gene in the mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, reducing the disease severity through the metabolic bypass. However, while disease severity in the double mutant is increased, it is not profound suggesting that Neu4 is not the only sialidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in Hexa(-/- mice.

  20. Ketogenic diet efficacy in the treatment of intractable epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Husam R; Gustafson, Megan; Myers, Tara; Thompson, Lindsey; Williams, Michelle; Abdelmoity, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in controlling epileptic spasms after failing traditional antiepileptic medication therapy. This is a prospective, case-based study of all infants with epileptic spasms who were referred for treatment with the ketogenic diet at our hospital between 2009 and 2012. All subjects continued to have epileptic spasms with evidence of hypsarrhythmia or severe epileptic encephalopathy on electroencephalography despite appropriate medication treatments. The diet efficacy was assessed through clinic visits, phone communications, and electroencephalography. Quality of life improvement was charted based on the caregiver's perspective. Twenty infants (15 males) were included in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 4.5 months. Age at ketogenic diet initiation was 0.3 to 2.9 years (mean 1.20, standard deviation 0.78). Fifteen patients had epileptic spasms of unknown etiology; three had perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, one had lissencephaly, and one had STXBP1 mutation. Fifteen infants failed to respond to adrenocorticotropin hormone and/or vigabatrin before going on the ketogenic diet. Three months after starting the diet, >50% seizure reduction was achieved in 70% of patients (95% CI 48-86). These results were maintained at 6- and 12-month intervals. All eight of the patients followed for 24 months had >50% seizure reduction (95% CI 63-100). At least 90% seizure reduction was reported in 20% of patients at 3 months (95% CI 7-42), 22% (95% CI 8-46) at 6 months, and 35% (95% CI 17-59) at 12 months. The majority of patients (63%) achieved improvement of their spasms within 1 month after starting the diet. Sixty percent of patients had electroencephalographic improvement. All caregivers reported improvement of the quality of life at the 3-month visit (95% confidence interval 81-100). This ratio was 94% at 6 months (95% CI 72-99) and 82% at 12 months (95% CI 58-95). The ketogenic diet is a safe and potentially

  1. Avaliação pelo P300 de crianças com e sem epilepsia e rendimento escolar Assessment through P300 of epileptic and non-epileptic children and school performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUCELEI F. VISIOLI-MELO

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Dificuldade de aprendizagem é situação comum em crianças com epilepsia. Distúrbios da inteligência têm sido associados com epilepsia. O potencial cognitivo (P300 é um adjunto clínico para mensurar neurofisiologicamente o processo cognitivo. Foram estudadas 99 crianças com 10 anos a 11 anos e 11 meses. Do Grupo I, sem epilepsia, faziam parte 64 crianças, das quais 32 com bom rendimento e outras 32 com mau rendimento escolar. Do Grupo II, com epilepsia, faziam parte 35 crianças, sendo 21 com bom rendimento escolar e 15 com mau rendimento escolar. Não foi encontrada diferença significativa na latência do P300 entre os dois grupos. Quando foram estratificados segundo o desempenho escolar, as crianças do Grupo I, com bom rendimento escolar, apresentaram latência do P300 de 336 ms e as com mau rendimento escolar, latência de 382 ms; as crianças do Grupo II, com bom rendimento escolar, apresentaram latência do P300 de 363 ms e as com mau rendimento escolar, latência de 400 ms, com diferença significativa. Essa diferença estava localizada entre as crianças não epilépticas com bom desempenho escolar e as com mau desempenho escolar, epilépticas ou não.Learning disability is common in epileptic children. Epilepsy has been associated with disorders of intelligence. Cognitive potential (P300 is considered to be a clinical aid in the neurophysiological measurement of the cognitive process. Ninety-nine children between the ages of 10 years and 11 years and 11 months formed our sample, with good and poor school performance. Group I, non-epileptic, had 64 children of whom 32 had good and 32 poor school performance. Group II, epileptic, had 35 children, of whom 21 had good and 15 poor school performance. No significant difference in P300 latency was found between Groups I and II. When groups were stratified based on school performance, Group I children with good school performance had P300 latency of 336 ms, while the ones with poor

  2. Dose-Dependent Effect of Curcumin on Learning and Memory Deficit in Kainate-Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kiasalari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Epileptic seizures accompany disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills. With regard to antiepileptic potential of curcumin and its beneficial effect on memory, the effect of its administration on learning and memory in kainate-epileptic rats was investigated.   Methods: Forty male rats were divided into sham, positive control ( valproate-treated epileptic, epileptic, and two curcumin-treated epileptic groups. Rat model of epilepsy was induced by unilateral intrahippocampal administration of 4 μg of kainate per rat. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg daily for 1 week before surgery. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial (IL and step-through latencies (STL were determined using passive avoidance test and alternation behavior percentage was obtained according to Y maze test.   Results: Regarding IL, there was no significant difference between the groups. In contrast, STL significantly decreased in curcumin-50-treated epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 263.1 to 184.5 s. However, this parameter significantly increased in curcumin-100-treated epileptic group as compared to epileptic group (p<0.01 (a change from 263.1 to 220.3 s. In addition, STL was also significantly higher in valproic acid-treated epileptic group versus epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 145.7 to 210.3 s. Alternation percentage was also significantly higher in curcumin-50- and curcumin-100-treated epileptic groups relative to epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 60.5 to 77.6 and 80.3%.   Conclusion: Curcumin could dose-dependently enhance the consolidation and recall in epileptic animals and could improve spatial memory in such animals.

  3. Development of a neurostimulator for studies of epileptic crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niro, J [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Manso, J [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ballina, F [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Periolo, S [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); D' Atellis, C [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponce, S [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional / Secretaria de Proyectos Especiales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Barroso, M [Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires / Facultad de Medicina, Centro de Epilepsia UBA - CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Anessi, C [Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires / Facultad de Medicina, Centro de Epilepsia UBA - CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kochen, S [Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires / Facultad de Medicina, Centro de Epilepsia UBA - CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work describes the development and use of a multi-channel, programmable physiological stimulator. The device is intended for the detection of epileptic events and crisis prediction using encephalograms. The animals were followed by the kindling model. The system program accepts several inputs of stimulation parameters such as, pulse width, separation between pulses, pulse intensity and total number of pulses. The stimulator generates constant-current, bipolar pulses with a maximum amplitude of 5 mA and a resolution of 50{mu}A. As regards voltage, the maximum amplitude is 150 V. The stimulator was constructed with a microcontroller (PIC18F4550), the latter version being controlled by a personal computer. Experiments of achieving the epileptic events were carried out on rats.

  4. Development of a neurostimulator for studies of epileptic crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niro, J; Manso, J; Ballina, F; Periolo, S; D'Atellis, C; Ponce, S; Barroso, M; Anessi, C; Kochen, S

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the development and use of a multi-channel, programmable physiological stimulator. The device is intended for the detection of epileptic events and crisis prediction using encephalograms. The animals were followed by the kindling model. The system program accepts several inputs of stimulation parameters such as, pulse width, separation between pulses, pulse intensity and total number of pulses. The stimulator generates constant-current, bipolar pulses with a maximum amplitude of 5 mA and a resolution of 50μA. As regards voltage, the maximum amplitude is 150 V. The stimulator was constructed with a microcontroller (PIC18F4550), the latter version being controlled by a personal computer. Experiments of achieving the epileptic events were carried out on rats

  5. Multidisciplinary approach to hospitalized epileptic children and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cristina Pontes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Epilepsy is the most frequent diagnosis in the ward;due to the high degree of complexity of its investigation andtreatment, the objective of this work was to proceed to an analysisof the interventions of the team with hospitalized epileptic childrenand their families. Methods: The data were obtained from theclinical handbooks and individual registers of the specialties.Results: There were 235 elective admissions, 88 regarding theEpilepsy. The services for specialties were distributed among those88 epileptic children: physiotherapy (34%, psychology (41% andoccupational therapy (88.6%. Conclusion: Given the severity ofthe social and biological sequelae associated with the diagnosisof epilepsy and the need for a family intervention, themultidisciplinary work focused on the child, in stimulationinterventions and promotion of his/her development, with a viewto minimize the sequelae; and providing the family with orientationand support, in order to give them more elaborate strategies forcoping with the disease and improve conditions for supplying postdischargeinfant treatment.

  6. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  7. Are animal models useful for studying human disc disorders / degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alini, M.; Eisenstein, S.M.; Ito, K.; Little, C.; Kettler, A.A.; Masuda, K.; Melrose, J.; Ralphs, J.; Stokes, I.; Wilke, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is an often investigated pathophysiological condition because of its implication in causing low back pain. As human material for such studies is difficult to obtain because of ethical and government regulatory restriction, animal tissue, organs and in vivo

  8. Differential DNA methylation patterns define status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Das, Sudipto; Sano, Takanori; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Bryan, Kenneth; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) produce pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus that are associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression. Epileptic tolerance is an endogenous program of cell protection that can be activated in the brain by previous exposure to a non-harmful seizure episode before status epilepticus. A major transcriptional feature of tolerance is gene downregulation. Here, through methylation analysis of 34,143 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and promoter regions in the mouse genome, we report the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus after status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance in adult mice. A total of 321 genes showed altered DNA methylation after status epilepticus alone or status epilepticus that followed seizure preconditioning, with >90% of the promoters of these genes undergoing hypomethylation. These profiles included genes not previously associated with epilepsy, such as the polycomb gene Phc2. Differential methylation events generally occurred throughout the genome without bias for a particular chromosomal region, with the exception of a small region of chromosome 4, which was significantly overrepresented with genes hypomethylated after status epilepticus. Surprisingly, only few genes displayed differential hypermethylation in epileptic tolerance. Nevertheless, gene ontology analysis emphasized the majority of differential methylation events between the groups occurred in genes associated with nuclear functions, such as DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. The present study reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes after status epilepticus and in epileptic tolerance, which may contribute to regulating the gene expression environment of the seizure-damaged hippocampus.

  9. The clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic autonomic auras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Revditovna Kremenchugskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to refine the pattern of clinical manifestations of epileptic autonomic auras (EAA and to reveal clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging ratios. Patients and methods. Eighteen patients (8, 41% men and 10, 59% women aged 9 to 27years (mean 18±5years were examined. The examination encompassed analysis of history data, clinical and neurological studies, long-term video-assisted electroencephalographic monitoring, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Results. In most patients (n = 12, 67%, the symptoms of EAA corresponded to the criteria for abdominal one. In the other patients, the clinical manifestations resembled autonomic paroxysms as attacks of panic. Interictal pathological changes on an electroencephalogram (EEG were present in the frontal, temporal, and frontotemporal regions in 4 (22%, 6 (33%, and 7 (39% patients, respectively, as well as in both the left and right hemispheres without significant differences. Pathological EEG changes were not found in one case. MRI detected that 13 (72% patients had structural changes that were potentially eliptogenic. Conclusion. The clinical symptoms of EAA give information on the site of a primary pathological focus. It is necessary to differentiate EAA from non-epileptic paroxysmal states. The autonomic phenomena of epileptic genesis help study the functional organizations of the autonomic nervous system.

  10. Epileptic Seizures Versus Syncope: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Charalambous

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalised epileptic seizures and syncope are two syndromes with similar clinical manifestation and their differentiation can be quite challenging. The aim of this review is to use an evidence-based approach in differentiating these two syndromes through the comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical signs. Both syndromes affect regions of the forebrain and consciousness level, although, different mechanisms are involved. Syncope is a paroxysmal event secondary to a short-term decrease in cerebral perfusion, oxygenation or essential nutrients delivery. Generalised epileptic seizure activity is defined as the clinical manifestation of transient paroxysmal disturbances in brain function secondary to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. Clinical criteria, including precipitating events, clinical signs preceding, during and following the episodes and event duration, can be used to differentiate the two syndromes. Although these criteria might be useful for the practitioner, definite conclusions should be precluded due to the lack of original research articles and weak evidence on this specific field.Application: The review might be a useful tool for the general practitioner and clinical scientist as it will aid towards the differentiation of two syndromes, i.e. generalised epileptic seizures and syncope, with similar clinical presentation.

  11. Contrasting features of urea cycle disorders in human patients and knockout mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Joshua L; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W

    2008-01-01

    The urea cycle exists for the removal of excess nitrogen from the body. Six separate enzymes comprise the urea cycle, and a deficiency in any one of them causes a urea cycle disorder (UCD) in humans. Arginase is the only urea cycle enzyme with an alternate isoform, though no known human disorder currently exists due to a deficiency in the second isoform. While all of the UCDs usually present with hyperammonemia in the first few days to months of life, most disorders are distinguished by a characteristic profile of plasma amino acid alterations that can be utilized for diagnosis. While enzyme assay is possible, an analysis of the underlying mutation is preferable for an accurate diagnosis. Mouse models for each of the urea cycle disorders exist (with the exception of NAGS deficiency), and for almost all of them, their clinical and biochemical phenotypes rather closely resemble the phenotypes seen in human patients. Consequently, all of the current mouse models are highly useful for future research into novel pharmacological and dietary treatments and gene therapy protocols for the management of urea cycle disorders.

  12. Data on overlapping brain disorders and emerging drug targets in human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Podder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intercommunication of Dopamine Receptors (DRs with their associate protein partners is crucial to maintain regular brain function in human. Majority of the brain disorders arise due to malfunctioning of such communication process. Hence, contributions of genetic factors, as well as phenotypic indications for various neurological and psychiatric disorders are often attributed as sharing in nature. In our earlier research article entitled “Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN: a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network” (Podder et al., 2014 [1], we had depicted a holistic interaction map of human Dopamine Receptors. Given emphasis on the topological parameters, we had characterized the functionality along with the vulnerable properties of the network. In support of this, we hereby provide an additional data highlighting the genetic overlapping of various brain disorders in the network. The data indicates the sharing nature of disease genes for various neurological and psychiatric disorders in dopamine receptors connecting protein-protein interactions network. The data also indicates toward an alternative approach to prioritize proteins for overlapping brain disorders as valuable drug targets in the network.

  13. Human Mendelian pain disorders: a key to discovery and validation of novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Y P; Pimstone, S N; Namdari, R; Price, N; Cohen, C; Sherrington, R P; Hayden, M R

    2012-10-01

    We have utilized a novel application of human genetics, illuminating the important role that rare genetic disorders can play in the development of novel drugs that may be of relevance for the treatment of both rare and common diseases. By studying a very rare Mendelian disorder of absent pain perception, congenital indifference to pain, we have defined Nav1.7 (endocded by SCN9A) as a critical and novel target for analgesic development. Strong human validation has emerged with SCN9A gain-of-function mutations causing inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, both Mendelian disorder of spontaneous or easily evoked pain. Furthermore, variations in the Nav1.7 channel also modulate pain perception in healthy subjects as well as in painful conditions such as osteoarthritis and Parkinson disease. On the basis of this, we have developed a novel compound (XEN402) that exhibits potent, voltage-dependent block of Nav1.7. In a small pilot study, we showed that XEN402 blocks Nav1.7 mediated pain associated with IEM thereby demonstrating the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept. Our approach underscores the critical role that human genetics can play by illuminating novel and critical pathways pertinent for drug discovery. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Socially Impaired Robots: Human Social Disorders and Robots' Socio-Emotional Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Jonathan; Williams, Mary-Anne; Johnston, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Social robots need intelligence in order to safely coexist and interact with humans. Robots without functional abilities in understanding others and unable to empathise might be a societal risk and they may lead to a society of socially impaired robots. In this work we provide a survey of three relevant human social disorders, namely autism, psychopathy and schizophrenia, as a means to gain a better understanding of social robots' future capability requirements. We provide evidence supporting...

  15. Rethinking dependent personality disorder: comparing different human relatedness in cultural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YuJu; Nettles, Margaret E; Chen, Shun-Wen

    2009-11-01

    We argue that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders dependent personality disorder is a culturally related concept reflecting deeply rooted values, beliefs, and assumptions of American individualistic convictions about self and interpersonal relationship. This article integrates social psychology concepts into the exploration of psychopathology. Beginning with the construct of individualism and collectivism, we demonstrate the limitations of this commonly used framework. The indigenous Chinese concept of Confucianism and Chinese Relationalism is introduced to highlight that a well-differentiated self is not a universal premise of human beings, healthy existence. In East Asian Confucianism the manifestation of dependence and submission may be considered individuals' proper behavior and required for their social obligation, rather than a direct display of individuals' personality. Thus, the complexity of dependent personality disorder is beyond the neo-Kraepelinian approach assumed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders system.

  16. Impressions of Humanness for Android Robot May Represent an Endophenotype for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazaki, Hirokazu; Warren, Zachary; Swanson, Amy; Yoshikawa, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Minabe, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2018-01-01

    Identification of meaningful endophenotypes may be critical to unraveling the etiology and pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We investigated whether impressions of "humanness" for android robot might represent a candidate characteristic of an ASD endophenotype. We used a female type of android robot with an appearance…

  17. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify...... CHD2 and SYNGAP1 mutations are new causes of epileptic encephalopathies, accounting for 1.2% and 1% of cases, respectively. We also expand the phenotypic spectra explained by SCN1A, SCN2A and SCN8A mutations. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of cases with epileptic encephalopathies...

  18. Sleep Disorders, Epilepsy, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the clinical data linking autism with sleep and epilepsy and to discuss the impact of treating sleep disorders in children with autism either with or without coexisting epileptic seizures. Studies are presented to support the view that sleep is abnormal in individuals with autistic spectrum…

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow in status epileptics measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiseki, Hajime; Terashi, Akiro; Hamamoto, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tokuzo.

    1995-01-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99m Tc-hexamethylpropylene amineoxime (HM-PAO) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in status epileptics (SE) caused by a cerebral vascular accident. In addition, we have discussed the neurophysiology of SE based on the SPECT findings. A total of sixteen patients (5 males and 11 females, average age; 78.2 years old) with SE who were suffering from prolonged consciousness disturbance were investigated. When SPECT was performed in the ictal state, there was a remarkable increase in radio isotope (RI) uptake at the focus which correlated well with EEG findings. However, in other cortical regions, basal ganglia and thalamus, there was a relatively demonstrated decrease in RI uptake compared with that of the focus. Additionally in the interictal state, we found a decrease in RI uptake in the epileptic foci and normal recovery of the RI uptake level in other cerebral regions. We speculate that these characteristic patterns of cerebral blood flow distribution shown by SPECT scans in the ictal state reflect the state of consciousness disturbance due to SE. In general, in the elderly, it is difficult to make a differential diagnosis between prolonged consciousness disturbance due to nonconvulsive SE and other diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, dehydration, metabolic disorder, etc. Nevertheless, nonconvulsive SE causes diffuse cell loss and irreversible brain damage. Therefore the elderly who have suffered from prolonged consciousness disturbance due to SE need an exact diagnosis and immediate medical treatment. When we diagnose a nonconvulsive SE, the characteristic findings of SPECT scans in the ictal state are very clear and useful. In conclusion, SPECT is a very simple and non-invasive method that demonstrates abnormalities of brain function exactly. Therefore, we should perform not only EEC but also SPECT scans when making a diagnosis of SE. (author)

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in status epileptics measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiseki, Hajime; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Hamamoto, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tokuzo

    1995-12-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropylene amineoxime (HM-PAO) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in status epileptics (SE) caused by a cerebral vascular accident. In addition, we have discussed the neurophysiology of SE based on the SPECT findings. A total of sixteen patients (5 males and 11 females, average age; 78.2 years old) with SE who were suffering from prolonged consciousness disturbance were investigated. When SPECT was performed in the ictal state, there was a remarkable increase in radio isotope (RI) uptake at the focus which correlated well with EEG findings. However, in other cortical regions, basal ganglia and thalamus, there was a relatively demonstrated decrease in RI uptake compared with that of the focus. Additionally in the interictal state, we found a decrease in RI uptake in the epileptic foci and normal recovery of the RI uptake level in other cerebral regions. We speculate that these characteristic patterns of cerebral blood flow distribution shown by SPECT scans in the ictal state reflect the state of consciousness disturbance due to SE. In general, in the elderly, it is difficult to make a differential diagnosis between prolonged consciousness disturbance due to nonconvulsive SE and other diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, dehydration, metabolic disorder, etc. Nevertheless, nonconvulsive SE causes diffuse cell loss and irreversible brain damage. Therefore the elderly who have suffered from prolonged consciousness disturbance due to SE need an exact diagnosis and immediate medical treatment. When we diagnose a nonconvulsive SE, the characteristic findings of SPECT scans in the ictal state are very clear and useful. In conclusion, SPECT is a very simple and non-invasive method that demonstrates abnormalities of brain function exactly. Therefore, we should perform not only EEC but also SPECT scans when making a diagnosis of SE. (author).

  1. Risk factors for mental disorders in women survivors of human trafficking: a historical cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found high levels of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder among women survivors of human trafficking. No previous research has described risk factors for diagnosed mental disorders in this population. Methods A historical cohort study of women survivors of trafficked women aged 18 and over who returned to Moldova and registered for assistance with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM). Women were approached by IOM social workers and, if they gave informed consented to participate in the study, interviewed by the research team. At 2–12 months post-return to Moldova, a psychiatrist assessed DSM-IV mental disorders blind to information about women’s pre-trafficking and post-trafficking experiences using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). A backwards stepwise selection procedure was used to create a multivariable regression model of risk factors for DSM-IV mental disorder measured at an average of 6 months post-return. Results 120/176 (68%) eligible women participated. At an average of 6 months post-return, 54% met criteria for any DSM-IV mental disorder: 35.8% of women had PTSD (alone or co-morbid), 12.5% had depression without PTSD and 5.8% had another anxiety disorder. Multivariable regression analysis found that childhood sexual abuse (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 4.68, 95% CI 1.04-20.92), increased number of post-trafficking unmet needs (AOR 1.80; 95% CI 1.28-2.52) and post-trafficking social support (AOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.52-0.79) were independent risk factors for mental disorder, and that duration of trafficking showed a borderline association with mental disorder (AOR 1.12, 95% CI 0.98-1.29). Conclusions Assessment for mental disorders should be part of re-integration follow-up care for women survivors of human trafficking. Mental disorders at that time, most commonly PTSD and depression, are likely to be influenced by a range of predisposing, precipitating and

  2. Risk factors for mental disorders in women survivors of human trafficking: a historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Melanie; Ostrovschi, Nicolae V; Prince, Martin; Gorceag, Viorel I; Trigub, Carolina; Oram, Siân

    2013-08-03

    Previous studies have found high levels of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder among women survivors of human trafficking. No previous research has described risk factors for diagnosed mental disorders in this population. A historical cohort study of women survivors of trafficked women aged 18 and over who returned to Moldova and registered for assistance with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM). Women were approached by IOM social workers and, if they gave informed consented to participate in the study, interviewed by the research team. At 2-12 months post-return to Moldova, a psychiatrist assessed DSM-IV mental disorders blind to information about women's pre-trafficking and post-trafficking experiences using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). A backwards stepwise selection procedure was used to create a multivariable regression model of risk factors for DSM-IV mental disorder measured at an average of 6 months post-return. 120/176 (68%) eligible women participated. At an average of 6 months post-return, 54% met criteria for any DSM-IV mental disorder: 35.8% of women had PTSD (alone or co-morbid), 12.5% had depression without PTSD and 5.8% had another anxiety disorder. Multivariable regression analysis found that childhood sexual abuse (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 4.68, 95% CI 1.04-20.92), increased number of post-trafficking unmet needs (AOR 1.80; 95% CI 1.28-2.52) and post-trafficking social support (AOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.52-0.79) were independent risk factors for mental disorder, and that duration of trafficking showed a borderline association with mental disorder (AOR 1.12, 95% CI 0.98-1.29). Assessment for mental disorders should be part of re-integration follow-up care for women survivors of human trafficking. Mental disorders at that time, most commonly PTSD and depression, are likely to be influenced by a range of predisposing, precipitating and maintaining factors. Care plans for survivors of

  3. Epileptic Seizure, Postictal Hemiparesis, and Hyperleukocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olivieri MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS is a rare event in infancy. Besides vasculopathy, thrombophilia, or cardiac disorders, cancer and chemotherapy are known predisposing factors for AIS. Leukemia can be associated with different abnormal coagulation parameters, but severe bleeding or thrombosis occurs rarely. Clinical Course: We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who was presented to our emergency ward after a prolonged seizure with right sided postictal hemiparesis. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a large infarction and edema due to thrombosis of the left carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery. Laboratory workup showed 196 g/L leukocytes with 75% myeloid blast cells. Immediate exchange transfusion, hydration, and chemotherapy with cytarabine were started. During the hospital course intracranial pressure increased and the patient developed a unilateral dilated pupil unresponsive to light. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a new infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Refractory increased intracranial pressure and brain stem herniation developed, and the child died 3 days after admission to hospital. Conclusion: Seizures with postictal hemiparesis due to cerebral infarction can be a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Leukocytosis and cancer-induced coagulopathy are main reasons for thrombosis and/or hemorrhage. High leukocyte counts need immediate interventions with hydration, careful chemotherapy, and perhaps exchange transfusion or leukapharesis. In the presence of thrombosis, anticoagulation must be discussed despite the risk of bleeding due to hyperfibrinolysis and low platelet counts. Mortality may be reduced by awareness of this rare presentation of leukemia and prompt institution of leucoreductive treatment.

  4. Prevalence of Autism among Epileptic Children Referring to Imam Reza Clinic and Comparing to Control Group (non Epileptic Children During2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS mohammadijahromi

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: According to this study, the prevalence of autism among epileptic children is higher than non epileptic ones. As the age of the onset of seizure is lower the prevalence of autism will be higher. Also, the prevalence of autism among epileptic children will be higher as abnormal findings of imaging and known etiologies of seizureincrease. Loss of significant correlations among prevalence of autism and some variables of seizure can be due to few numbers of autistic cases, which were diagnosed in this study comparing with previous studies.

  5. From Pavlov to PTSD: The extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and in anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B.; Dahlgren, M. Kathryn; Davis, F. Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders. PMID:24321650

  6. From Pavlov to PTSD: the extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B; Dahlgren, M Kathryn; Davis, F Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A new mouse model for mania shares genetic correlates with human bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Saul

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BPD is a debilitating heritable psychiatric disorder. Contemporary rodent models for the manic pole of BPD have primarily utilized either single locus transgenics or treatment with psychostimulants. Our lab recently characterized a mouse strain termed Madison (MSN that naturally displays a manic phenotype, exhibiting elevated locomotor activity, increased sexual behavior, and higher forced swimming relative to control strains. Lithium chloride and olanzapine treatments attenuate this phenotype. In this study, we replicated our locomotor activity experiment, showing that MSN mice display generationally-stable mania relative to their outbred ancestral strain, hsd:ICR (ICR. We then performed a gene expression microarray experiment to compare hippocampus of MSN and ICR mice. We found dysregulation of multiple transcripts whose human orthologs are associated with BPD and other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and ADHD, including: Epor, Smarca4, Cmklr1, Cat, Tac1, Npsr1, Fhit, and P2rx7. RT-qPCR confirmed dysregulation for all of seven transcripts tested. Using a novel genome enrichment algorithm, we found enrichment in genome regions homologous to human loci implicated in BPD in replicated linkage studies including homologs of human cytobands 1p36, 3p14, 3q29, 6p21-22, 12q24, 16q24, and 17q25. Using a functional network analysis, we found dysregulation of a gene system related to chromatin packaging, a result convergent with recent human findings on BPD. Our findings suggest that MSN mice represent a polygenic model for the manic pole of BPD showing much of the genetic systems complexity of the corresponding human disorder. Further, the high degree of convergence between our findings and the human literature on BPD brings up novel questions about evolution by analogy in mammalian genomes.

  8. [Histopathological changes in human placentas related to hypertensive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Luciano Guimarães; Madi, José Mauro; Godoy, Alessandra Eifler Guerra; Coelho, Celso Piccoli; Rombaldi, Renato Luís; Artico, Graziela Rech

    2009-01-01

    to determine the prevalence of histopathological changes, in human placentas, related to hypertensive syndromes. a transversal study that compares histopathological changes identified in 43 placentae from hypertensive pregnant women (HypPr), with the ones from 33 placentae from normotensive pregnant women (NorPr). The weight, volume and macroscopic and microscopic occurrence of infarctions, clots, hematomas, atherosis (partial obliteration, thickness of layers and presence of blood vessels hyalinization) and Tenney-Parker changes (absent, discreet and prominent), as well as the locating of infarctions and clots (central, peripheral or the association of both) have been analyzed. The chi2 and t Student tests have been used for the statistical analysis, as well as medians, standard deviations and ratios. It has been considered as significant, p<0.05. the macroscopic study of HypPr placentae have presented lower weight (461.1 versus 572.1 g) and volume (437.4 versus 542.0 cm(3)), higher infarction (51.2 versus 45.5%; p<0.05: OR=1.15) and clots (51.2 versus 15.1%; p<0.05; OR=5.4) ratios, as compared to the NorPr's. In the HypPr and NorPr, microscopic clots have occurred in 83.7 versus 45.5% (p<0.05; OR=4.3), respectively. Atherosis and Tenney-Parker changes have been statistically associated to the hypertensive syndromes (p<0.05). the obtained data allow us to associate lower placentary weight and volume, higher ratio of macro and microscopic infarction, clots, atherosis and Tenney-Parker changes to placentae of gestations occurring with hypertensive syndromes.

  9. Role of Vitamin D in human Diseases and Disorders – An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanshee Gohil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin and generated in human skin by ultraviolet (UV light. Today, vitamin D is considered to be a steroidal hormone and plays a central role in bone mineralization and calcium homeostasis. The active form of the vitamin D is 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (DHCC] which mediatesproliferation, differentiation and various functions at the cellular level through Vitamin D receptors (VDR.Therefore, compromised vitamin D status is likely to be involved in progression or pathogenesis of various disorders. This assumption is consistent with findings from epidemiological studies that a compromised vitamin D status in humans increases the risk of autoimmune diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus. However, diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disorders and bone disorders are yet not focused. Thus the role of vitamin D in pathogenesis of various diseases is complex and controversial. This review briefly summarizes the role of vitamin D in development and progression of different human disorders.

  10. Association of endogenous retroviruses and long terminal repeats with human disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoko eKatoh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the human genome sequences became available in 2001, our knowledge about the human transposable elements which comprise ~40% of the total nucleotides has been expanding. Non- LTR (long terminal repeat retrotransposons are actively transposing in the present-day human genome, and have been found to cause ~100 identified clinical cases of varied disorders. In contrast, almost all of the human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs originating from ancient infectious retroviruses lost their infectivity and transposing activity at various times before the human-chimpanzee speciation (~6 million years ago, and no known HERV is presently infectious. Insertion of HERVs and mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLRs into the chromosomal DNA influenced a number of host genes in various modes during human evolution. Apart from the aspect of genome evolution, HERVs and solitary LTRs being suppressed in normal biological processes can potentially act as extra transcriptional apparatuses of cellular genes by re-activation in individuals. There has been a reasonable prediction that aberrant LTR activation could trigger malignant disorders and autoimmune responses if epigenetic changes including DNA hypomethylation occur in somatic cells. Evidence supporting this hypothesis has begun to emerge only recently: a MaLR family LTR activation in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a HERV-E antigen expression in an anti-renal cell carcinoma immune response. This mini review addresses the impacts of the remnant-form LTR retrotransposons on human pathogenesis.

  11. Axon guidance pathways served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huimeng; Yan, Zhangming; Sun, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Jianhong; Ma, Caihong; Xu, Qunyuan; Wang, Rui; Jarvis, Erich D; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-11-01

    Human and several nonhuman species share the rare ability of modifying acoustic and/or syntactic features of sounds produced, i.e. vocal learning, which is the important neurobiological and behavioral substrate of human speech/language. This convergent trait was suggested to be associated with significant genomic convergence and best manifested at the ROBO-SLIT axon guidance pathway. Here we verified the significance of such genomic convergence and assessed its functional relevance to human speech/language using human genetic variation data. In normal human populations, we found the affected amino acid sites were well fixed and accompanied with significantly more associated protein-coding SNPs in the same genes than the rest genes. Diseased individuals with speech/language disorders have significant more low frequency protein coding SNPs but they preferentially occurred outside the affected genes. Such patients' SNPs were enriched in several functional categories including two axon guidance pathways (mediated by netrin and semaphorin) that interact with ROBO-SLITs. Four of the six patients have homozygous missense SNPs on PRAME gene family, one youngest gene family in human lineage, which possibly acts upon retinoic acid receptor signaling, similarly as FOXP2, to modulate axon guidance. Taken together, we suggest the axon guidance pathways (e.g. ROBO-SLIT, PRAME gene family) served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Infantile masturbation and paroxysmal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Mohammadreza Salehi; Ghofrani, Mohammad; Juibary, Ali Ghabeli

    2008-02-01

    A recurrent paroxysmal presentation in children leads to different diagnoses and among them are neurologic and cardiac etiologies. Infantile masturbation is not a well known entity and cannot be differentiated easily from other disorders. Aim of this study is to elucidate and differentiate this condition from epileptic seizures. We report 3 cases of 10 to 30 mth old girls of infantile masturbation that their symptoms initiated at 2, 3 and 8 mth of age. These present with contraction and extension of lower extremities, scissoring of legs, perspiration, changing face color. In 2 cases body rocking and legs rubbing initiated then there after. Masturbation is one of the paroxysmal non-epileptic conditions of early infancy and is in differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures.

  13. Does D-cycloserine enhance exposure therapy for anxiety disorders in humans? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The treatment of anxiety is on the edge of a new era of combinations of pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions. A new wave of translational research has focused on the use of pharmacological agents as psychotherapy adjuvants using neurobiological insights into the mechanism of the action of certain psychological treatments such as exposure therapy. Recently, d-cycloserine (DCS an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis has been applied to enhance exposure-based treatment for anxiety and has proved to be a promising, but as yet unproven intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of DCS in the enhancement of exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. A systematic review/meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic searches were conducted in the databases ISI-Web of Science, Pubmed and PsycINFO. We included only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with humans, focusing on the role of DCS in enhancing the action of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We identified 328 references, 13 studies were included in our final sample: 4 on obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2 on panic disorder, 2 on social anxiety disorder, 2 on posttraumatic stress disorder, one on acrophobia, and 2 on snake phobia. The results of the present meta-analysis show that DCS enhances exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders (Cohen d =  -0.34; CI: -0.54 to -0.14, facilitating the specific process of extinction of fear. DCS seems to be effective when administered at a time close to the exposure therapy, at low doses and a limited number of times. DCS emerges as a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with refractory anxiety disorders that are unresponsive to the conventional treatments available. When administered correctly, DCS is a promising strategy for augmentation of CBT and could reduce health care costs, drop-out rates and bring faster relief to patients.

  14. FOCAL EPILEPTIC MYOCLONUS IN KOZHEVNIKOV–RASMUSSEN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Kvaskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical, electroencephalographic (EEG and neuroimaging features, as well as the results of treatment of patients with focal epileptic myoclonus (FEM with the Kozhevnikov–Rasmussen syndrome (KRS. FEM in KRS-patients was identified in 11 cases, accounting for 0.9 % of all the cases of epilepsy with the onset of seizures up to 18 years (n = 1261. The age at onset of KRS ranged from 3 to 21 years (average – 9.2 ± 5.7 years. In the active period of the disease of all patients in the clinical picture the active FEM appeared and increasing frequency of the secondary generalized seizures (SGS. In addition SGS and FEM, the clinical picture of the disease in most patients (91 % the focal motor (clonic and the somatosensory focal seizures were observed. As the disease progressed, the FEM became more pronounced in frequency and intensity, seized more muscle groups, localizing mainly in the muscles of the trunk and limbs. The typical EEG pattern of FEM patients with KRS was regional epileptiform activity that occurs in the structure of the continued regional slowing localizing maximum of the fronto-central-temporal region. During the magnetic resonance tomography of the brain in dynamics all the patients observed the increase in total cortical hemiatrophy. In all the cases, the appointment of antiepileptic therapy resulted in a slowing of the FEM, however, a complete remission was reached at none of the patients. Two patients were made surgical treatment of epilepsy. In one case remission of epileptic seizures was observed after right-side hemispherotomy. Our study showed that FEM is very resistant type of epileptic seizures. This fact calls for the identification of the FEM at the early stages of the disease with the purpose to improve the prognosis, as well as for an earlier surgical treatment.

  15. Transfer function between EEG and BOLD signals of epileptic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLeite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have seen growing application in the evaluation of epilepsy, namely in the characterization of brain networks related to epileptic activity. In EEG-correlated fMRI studies, epileptic events are usually described as boxcar signals based on the timing information retrieved from the EEG, and subsequently convolved with a heamodynamic response function to model the associated BOLD changes. Although more flexible approaches may allow a higher degree of complexity for the haemodynamics, the issue of how to model these dynamics based on the EEG remains an open question. In this work, a new methodology for the integration of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in epilepsy is proposed, which incorporates a transfer function from the EEG to the BOLD signal. Independent component analysis (ICA of the EEG is performed, and a number of metrics expressing different models of the EEG-BOLD transfer function are extracted from the resulting time courses. These metrics are then used to predict the fMRI data and to identify brain areas associated with the EEG epileptic activity. The methodology was tested on both ictal and interictal EEG-fMRI recordings from one patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma. When compared to the conventional analysis approach, plausible, consistent and more significant activations were obtained. Importantly, frequency-weighted EEG metrics yielded superior results than those weighted solely on the EEG power, which comes in agreement with previous literature. Reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity should be addressed in an extended group of patients in order to further validate the proposed methodology and generalize the presented proof of concept.

  16. [A modified approach to the diagnosis and therapy of epileptic seizures in the third stage of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavranović, Muhamed; Delilović, Jasminka; Kurtović, Azra; Alibegović, Sakib; Rajić, Zeljka; Ajanović, Zakira

    2003-01-01

    Incidence of seizures in the elderly is nowadays greater than the one characteristic for children up to 10 years of age. Epileptic seizures are the third most common serious neurological disorder in this age group, after stroke and dementia. Optimal care for those patients, regarding to the seizures, demands some modification in diagnostic and treatment approach. Aim of this report was to point out problems in diagnostics, treatment and most common mistakes in practice. Fifty one patients were assessed, aged 65-83 years, (30 female and 21 male), with diagnosis of epilepsy and established antiepileptic treatment. All patients were re-examined, and following procedures were utilised: auto and heteroanamnesis (especially data provided by eyewitnesses), clinical examination, biochemical status, complete cardiological examination, EEG registration, serum concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, CT and MRI scan. Out of 51 patients 11 were misdiagnosed (syncope, provoked seizures, TIA). The most common form of seizures were partial seizures with or without secondary generalization (31 cases). Etiologic factors: stroke (25 cases), arteriosclerosis (7 cases), tumours (3 cases), trauma (2 cases), unknown (3 cases) cardiovascular diseases (29 casec) diabetes mellitus (20 cases), respiratory disturbance (12 cases) renal disturbances (8 cases). Only 30 patients had monotherapy from the beginning, with either carbamazepine or valproate. Rest were treated from the beginning with 2 antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital + carbamazepine or pheytoin + phenobarbital). Adverse effects were recorded in 21 patients. I. It is crucial to distingiush unprovoked and provoked seizures during diagnostic procedures, as well as epileptic and non-epileptic attacks; 2. Principle of monotherapy is conditio sine qua non, and in treatment attention should be paid to co-morbidity, multitherapy, drug interactions, intoxication, diminished detoxication and elimination of drugs, as well as increased

  17. Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in alcoholism (SESA): case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, F G; Kozian, R

    2001-10-01

    The case of a 66-year-old patient is reported in view of the rarity of his condition: a case of subacute encephalopathy with seizures in alcoholics (SESA syndrome), described first in 1981 by Niedermeyer, et al. Wernicke-type aphasia, epileptic seizures (generalized tonic-clonic) and PLEDs EEG pattern dominated the neurological picture, in addition to hepatomegaly and rhabdomyolysis. This condition differs from all other known CNS complications in chronic alcoholism and is withdrawal-independent. It is prognostically favorable as far as the syndrome as such is concerned.

  18. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Using Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thomas Lynggaard; Olsen, Ulrich L.; Conradsen, Isa

    2010-01-01

    . The combination of Matching Pursuit and SVM for automatic seizure detection has never been tested before, making this a pilot study. Data from red different patients with 6 to 49 seizures are used to test our model. Three patients are recorded with scalp electroencephalography (sEEG) and three with intracranial...... electroencephalography (iEEG). A sensitivity of 78-100% and a detection latency of 5-18s has been achieved, while holding the false detection at 0.16-5.31/h. Our results show the potential of Matching Pursuit as a feature xtractor for detection of epileptic seizures....

  19. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...... phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...

  20. Overlap of food addiction and substance use disorders definitions: analysis of animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone-Blanchet, Antoine; Fecteau, Shirley

    2014-10-01

    Food has both homeostatic and hedonic components, which makes it a potent natural reward. Food related reward could therefore promote an escalation of intake and trigger symptoms associated to withdrawal, suggesting a behavioral parallel with substance abuse. Animal and human theoretical models of food reward and addiction have emerged, raising further interrogations on the validity of a bond between Substance Use Disorders, as clinically categorized in the DSM 5, and food reward. These models propose that highly palatable food items, rich in sugar and/or fat, are overly stimulating to the brain's reward pathways. Moreover, studies have also investigated the possibility of causal link between food reward and the contemporary obesity epidemic, with obesity being potentiated and maintained due to this overwhelming food reward. Although natural rewards are a hot topic in the definition and categorization of Substance Use Disorders, proofs of concept and definite evidence are still inconclusive. This review focuses on available results from experimental studies in animal and human models exploring the concept of food addiction, in an effort to determine if it depicts a specific phenotype and if there is truly a neurobiological similarity between food addiction and Substance Use Disorders. It describes results from sugar, fat and sweet-fat bingeing in rodent models, and behavioral and neurobiological assessments in different human populations. Although pieces of behavioral and neurobiological evidence supporting a food addiction phenotype in animals and humans are interesting, it seems premature to conclude on its validity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological restoration of central nervous system architecture and function: part 3-stem cell- and cell-based applications and realities in the biological management of central nervous system disorders: traumatic, vascular, and epilepsy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Azadeh; Liu, Charles Y; Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2009-11-01

    STEM CELL THERAPY has emerged as a promising novel therapeutic endeavor for traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and epilepsy in experimental studies. A few preliminary clinical trials have further supported its safety and early efficacy after transplantation into humans. Although not yet clinically available for central nervous system disorders, stem cell technology is expected to evolve into one of the most powerful tools in the biological management of complex central nervous system disorders, many of which currently have limited treatment modalities. The identification of stem cells, discovery of neurogenesis, and application of stem cells to treat central nervous system disorders represent a dramatic evolution and expansion of the neurosurgeon's capabilities into the neurorestoration and neuroregeneration realms. In Part 3 of a 5-part series on stem cells, we discuss the theory, experimental evidence, and clinical data pertaining to the use of stem cells for the treatment of traumatic, vascular, and epileptic disorders.

  2. Psycho-Social Aspects of Educating Epileptic Children: Roles for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Brenda B.

    1985-01-01

    Epileptic children may have physical and emotional needs which can interfere with learning and socialization. Current prevalence estimates, definitions, and classifications of epilepsy are surveyed. Factors affecting the epileptic child's school performance and specific learning problems are addressed. Specific roles are presented for school…

  3. Oral hygiene practices and status of epileptics and controls in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial plaque is the primary aetiologic agent in inflammatory periodontal disease. This study therefore aims to investigate the oral health practices and status of epileptics and controls. This will form the basis of a more detailed study on the periodontal status and treatment needs of epileptic patients. Materials and Method: ...

  4. Clinical spectrum of psychogenic non epileptic seizures in children; an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Priyanka; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Sapra, Savita; Sagar, Rajesh; Mohammad, Akbar; Pandey, R M; Tripathi, Manjari

    2018-07-01

    The current study was designed to analyze the clinical spectrum of Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in children. Children aged 6-16years with clinically suspected PNES, confirmed by short-term VEEG (STVEEG{video electroencephalogram}) and induction were classified as per Seneviratne classification. Stressors, associated co morbidities, Verbal IQ (Intelligence Quotient) and behavioral abnormalities were assessed using HTP(House tree person) test, DSM IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) TR criteria, MISIC (Malin intelligence scale for Indian children) and CBCL (Child behaviour checklist). Eighty children with PNES {45 boys; mean age: 10.5 (±1.6) years} were enrolled. Median delay in diagnosis was 5 months {IQR(interquartile range)- 0.5 to 48 months}) and 45% patients were already on AEDs (antiepileptic drugs). Commonest semiology was dialeptic (42.5%), followed by mixed (28.8%), motor (15%) and nonepileptic aura (13.8%). Family stressors were the commonest followed by school related issues. The most common psychiatric comorbidity was adjustment disorder. Somatic complaints were observed in 50% children. Dialeptic PNES is commonest in children. In resource constrained settings, STVEEG along with induction is a reliable method to diagnose PNES. A comprehensive assessment protocol (including assessment of stressors) is needed for holistic management of pediatric PNES. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Two Novel Variants Affecting CDKL5 Transcript Associated with Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupauerová, Jana; Štěrbová, Katalin; Vlčková, Markéta; Sebroňová, Věra; Maříková, Tat'ána; Krůtová, Marcela; David, Staněk; Kršek, Pavel; Žaliová, Markéta; Seeman, Pavel; Laššuthová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    Variants in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported as being etiologically associated with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy type 2 (EIEE2). We report on two patients, a boy and a girl, with EIEE2 that present with early onset epilepsy, hypotonia, severe intellectual disability, and poor eye contact. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) of a custom-designed gene panel for epilepsy and epileptic encephalopathy containing 112 epilepsy-related genes was performed. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the novel variants. For confirmation of the functional consequence of an intronic CDKL5 variant in patient 2, an RNA study was done. DNA sequencing revealed de novo variants in CDKL5, a c.2578C>T (p. Gln860*) present in a hemizygous state in a 3-year-old boy, and a potential splice site variant c.463+5G>A in heterozygous state in a 5-year-old girl. Multiple in silico splicing algorithms predicted a highly reduced splice site score for c.463+5G>A. A subsequent mRNA study confirmed an aberrant shorter transcript lacking exon 7. Our data confirmed that variants in the CDKL5 are associated with EIEE2. There is credible evidence that the novel identified variants are pathogenic and, therefore, are likely the cause of the disease in the presented patients. In one of the patients a stop codon variant is predicted to produce a truncated protein, and in the other patient an intronic variant results in aberrant splicing.

  6. A New Rat Model of Epileptic Spasms Based on Methylazoxymethanol-Induced Malformations of Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Malformations of cortical development (MCDs can cause medically intractable epilepsies and cognitive disabilities in children. We developed a new model of MCD-associated epileptic spasms by treating rats prenatally with methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM to induce cortical malformations and postnatally with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA to induce spasms. To produce cortical malformations to infant rats, two dosages of MAM (15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally were injected to pregnant rats at gestational day 15. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats and the controls, spasms were triggered by single (6 mg/kg on postnatal day 12 (P12 or 10 mg/kg on P13 or 15 mg/kg on P15 or multiple doses (P12, P13, and P15 of NMDA. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats with single NMDA-provoked spasms at P15, we obtain the intracranial electroencephalography and examine the pretreatment response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or vigabatrin. Rat pups prenatally exposed to MAM exhibited a significantly greater number of spasms in response to single and multiple postnatal NMDA doses than vehicle-exposed controls. Vigabatrin treatment prior to a single NMDA dose on P15 significantly suppressed spasms in MAM group rats (p < 0.05, while ACTH did not. The MAM group also showed significantly higher fast oscillation (25–100 Hz power during NMDA-induced spasms than controls (p = 0.047. This new model of MCD-based epileptic spasms with corresponding features of human spasms will be valuable for future research of the developmental epilepsy.

  7. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubadah Sabbagh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES. A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  8. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Ubadah; Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  9. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Nishimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB. Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS. Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans.

  10. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans.

  11. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans. PMID:24872936

  12. Transferrin receptors on human reticulocytes: variation in site number in hematologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumak, K.H.; Rachkewich, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Assays of binding of 125iodine-labeled ( 125 I) human transferrin were used to study transferrin receptor sites on reticulocytes from 15 normal subjects and from 66 patients with various hematologic disorders. In normal subjects, few or no transferrin receptors were detected whereas the average number of receptors per reticulocyte varied greatly from patient to patient, ranging from 0 to 67,700 in samples, from 35 patients, on which Scatchard analysis of binding of [ 125 I]-transferrin was done. Marked heterogeneity in the number of reticulocyte transferrin receptors in different hematologic disorders was also found in assays with [ 125 I]-OKT9 (monoclonal antibody to the human transferrin receptor). The number of receptors was not correlated with either the reticulocyte count or the hemoglobin

  13. Current Applications of Chromatographic Methods in the Study of Human Body Fluids for Diagnosing Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik, Jagoda; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, analysis of various human body fluids is one of the most essential and promising approaches to enable the discovery of biomarkers or pathophysiological mechanisms for disorders and diseases. Analysis of these fluids is challenging due to their complex composition and unique characteristics. Development of new analytical methods in this field has made it possible to analyze body fluids with higher selectivity, sensitivity, and precision. The composition and concentration of analytes in body fluids are most often determined by chromatography-based techniques. There is no doubt that proper use of knowledge that comes from a better understanding of the role of body fluids requires the cooperation of scientists of diverse specializations, including analytical chemists, biologists, and physicians. This article summarizes current knowledge about the application of different chromatographic methods in analyses of a wide range of compounds in human body fluids in order to diagnose certain diseases and disorders.

  14. Transplantation of Human Chorion-Derived Cholinergic Progenitor Cells: a Novel Treatment for Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Maleki-Jamshid, Ali; Sanooghi, Davood; Milan, Peiman Brouki; Rahmani, Arash; Sefat, Farshid; Shahpasand, Koorosh; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Belali, Rafie; Faghihi, Faezeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Perry, George; Mozafari, Masoud

    2018-03-16

    A neurological disorder is any disorder or abnormality in the nervous system. Among different neurological disorders, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is recognized as the sixth leading cause of death globally. Considerable research has been conducted to find pioneer treatments for this devastating disorder among which cell therapy has attracted remarkable attentions over the last decade. Up to now, targeted differentiation into specific desirable cell types has remained a major obstacle to clinical application of cell therapy. Also, potential risks including uncontrolled growth of stem cells could be disastrous. In our novel protocol, we used basal forebrain cholinergic progenitor cells (BFCN) derived from human chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hC-MSCs) which made it possible to obtain high-quality population of cholinergic neurons and in vivo in much shorter time period than previous established methods. Remarkably, the transplanted progenitors fully differentiated to cholinergic neurons which in turn integrated in higher cortical networks of host brains, resulting in significant improvement in cognitive assessments. This method may have profound implications in cell therapies for any other neurodegenerative disorders. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Loss-of-function of neuroplasticity-related genes confers risk for human neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Milo R; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Li, Li; Chen, Rong; Morishita, Hirofumi; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-01-01

    High and increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders place enormous personal and economic burdens on society. Given the growing realization that the roots of neurodevelopmental disorders often lie in early childhood, there is an urgent need to identify childhood risk factors. Neurodevelopment is marked by periods of heightened experience-dependent neuroplasticity wherein neural circuitry is optimized by the environment. If these critical periods are disrupted, development of normal brain function can be permanently altered, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we aim to systematically identify human variants in neuroplasticity-related genes that confer risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Historically, this knowledge has been limited by a lack of techniques to identify genes related to neurodevelopmental plasticity in a high-throughput manner and a lack of methods to systematically identify mutations in these genes that confer risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Using an integrative genomics approach, we determined loss-of-function (LOF) variants in putative plasticity genes, identified from transcriptional profiles of brain from mice with elevated plasticity, that were associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. From five shared differentially expressed genes found in two mouse models of juvenile-like elevated plasticity (juvenile wild-type or adult Lynx1-/- relative to adult wild-type) that were also genotyped in the Mount Sinai BioMe Biobank we identified multiple associations between LOF genes and increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders across 10,510 patients linked to the Mount Sinai Electronic Medical Records (EMR), including epilepsy and schizophrenia. This work demonstrates a novel approach to identify neurodevelopmental risk genes and points toward a promising avenue to discover new drug targets to address the unmet therapeutic needs of neurodevelopmental disease.

  16. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and psychoanalytical treatment: results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraldo de Oliveira Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the occurrence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is estimated to be between 2 to 33 cases in every 100,000 inhabitants. The number of patients with PNES reaches 19% of those treated as epileptics. Patients with PNES are treated as if they had intractable epilepsy, with unsatisfactory results even after medication treatment is used to its maximum. The aim of this study is to present the effects of individual psychoanalytical treatment in patients with PNES, assessing its impact in the evolution of the clinical picture and its association with sex, time of disease, social, psychological and professional harm, as well as going through with treatment. Methods: The case base was composed of 37 patients with PNES. The diagnosis was reached with video-EEG monitoring. Psychoanalytical treatment was carried out through 12 months of weekly sessions timed for around 50-minutes each, in a total of 48 individual sessions. Results: This study found a high rate of success in the treatment of PNES patients. 29.7% (n=11 of patients had cessation or cure of symptoms and 51.4% (n=19 had a decrease in the number of episodes. There is an association between cessation or decrease in the number of episodes and sex (p<0.01, religion (p<0.01 and concluding treatment (p<0.01. Conclusion: Individual psychoanalytical treatment applied to patients with PNES is considered effective and can be an essential form of assistance for the reduction or cessation of episodes.

  17. Network dynamics in the healthy and epileptic developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Rosch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG allows recording of cortical activity at high temporal resolution. EEG recordings can be summarized along different dimensions using network-level quantitative measures, such as channel-to-channel correlation, or band power distributions across channels. These reveal network patterns that unfold over a range of different timescales and can be tracked dynamically. Here we describe the dynamics of network state transitions in EEG recordings of spontaneous brain activity in normally developing infants and infants with severe early infantile epileptic encephalopathies (n = 8, age: 1–8 months. We describe differences in measures of EEG dynamics derived from band power, and correlation-based summaries of network-wide brain activity. We further show that EEGs from different patient groups and controls may be distinguishable on a small set of the novel quantitative measures introduced here, which describe dynamic network state switching. Quantitative measures related to the sharpness of switching from one correlation pattern to another show the largest differences between groups. These findings reveal that the early epileptic encephalopathies are associated with characteristic dynamic features at the network level. Quantitative network-based analyses like the one presented here may in the future inform the clinical use of quantitative EEG for diagnosis.

  18. Hyperspherical Manifold for EEG Signals of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling of EEG signals of epileptic seizures presents a challenge as seizure data is erratic, often with no visible trend. Limitations in existing models indicate a need for a generalized model that can be used to analyze seizures without the need for apriori information, whilst minimizing the loss of signal data due to smoothing. This paper utilizes measure theory to design a discrete probability measure that reformats EEG data without altering its geometric structure. An analysis of EEG data from three patients experiencing epileptic seizures is made using the developed measure, resulting in successful identification of increased potential difference in portions of the brain that correspond to physical symptoms demonstrated by the patients. A mapping then is devised to transport the measure data onto the surface of a high-dimensional manifold, enabling the analysis of seizures using directional statistics and manifold theory. The subset of seizure signals on the manifold is shown to be a topological space, verifying Ahmad's approach to use topological modelling.

  19. Examination on Impact of Air Ions toward Human Social Disorder Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesha-Tri-Chandrasa

    2000-01-01

    Air ions are something that people can not see and feel. However, they exist surrounding human life. Imbalance inhalation of air ions can affect central nervous system, and physically it will affect human activities and create social disorder behavior. Some investigations have proved the relation above and devices for anticipating ionization have been innovated and available on the market. Furthermore, it has been found that individual resistance against ionization is different between genders. Therefore it is important to study character and to anticipate effects of ions and ionization, in order to build more comfortable environment. (author)

  20. Entrainment of the circadian clock in humans: mechanism and implications for sleep disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metcalfe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans exhibit behaviour and physiology controlled by a circadian clock. The circadian period is genetically determined and administered by a series of interlocked autoregulatory feedback loops largely in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The phase of the clock is, however, synchronised by a number of external environmental cues such as light. A failure or change in any one of the requisite clock components may result in the onset of a long-term sleep disorder. This review discusses the mechanism regulating circadian physiology in humans and explores how disturbances of this mechanism may result in sleep pathologies.

  1. X-ray diffraction evidence for myelin disorder in brain from humans with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, L S; Thompson, J E; Moscarello, M A

    1984-09-05

    Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the lipid phase transition temperature of myelin from brain tissue of humans with Alzheimer's disease was about 12 degrees C lower than that of normal age-matched controls, indicating differences in the physical organization of the myelin lipid bilayer. Elevated levels of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene were found in brain tissue from humans with Alzheimer's disease, indicating an increased amount of lipid peroxidation over the controls. An increase in myelin disorder and in lipid peroxidation can both be correlated with aging in human brain, but the changes in myelin from humans with Alzheimer's disease are more pronounced than in normal aging. These changes might represent severe or accelerated aging.

  2. Animal models of human anxiety disorders: reappraisal from a developmental psychopathology vantage point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampis, Valentina; Maziade, Michel; Battaglia, Marco

    2011-05-01

    We are witnessing a tremendous expansion of strategies and techniques that derive from basic and preclinical science to study the fine genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic regulation of behavior in the laboratory animal. In this endeavor, animal models of psychiatric illness are becoming the almost exclusive domain of basic researchers, with lesser involvement of clinician researchers in their conceptual design, and transfer into practice of new paradigms. From the side of human behavioral research, the growing interest in gene-environment interplay and the fostering of valid endophenotypes are among the few substantial innovations in the effort of linking common mental disorders to cutting-edge clinical research questions. We argue that it is time for cross-fertilization between these camps. In this article, we a) observe that the "translational divide" can-and should-be crossed by having investigators from both the basic and the clinical sides cowork on simpler, valid "endophenotypes" of neurodevelopmental relevance; b) emphasize the importance of unambiguous physiological readouts, more than behavioral equivalents of human symptoms/syndromes, for animal research; c) indicate and discuss how this could be fostered and implemented in a developmental framework of reference for some common anxiety disorders and ultimately lead to better animal models of human mental disorders.

  3. Human Urine-Derived Renal Progenitors for Personalized Modeling of Genetic Kidney Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Elena; Ronconi, Elisa; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Peired, Anna; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Becherucci, Francesca; Conti, Sara; Sansavini, Giulia; Sisti, Alessandro; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Lombardi, Duccio; Provenzano, Aldesia; Manonelles, Anna; Cruzado, Josep M; Giglio, Sabrina; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Lasagni, Laura; Romagnani, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The critical role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of kidney disorders is gradually becoming clear, and the need for disease models that recapitulate human kidney disorders in a personalized manner is paramount. In this study, we describe a method to select and amplify renal progenitor cultures from the urine of patients with kidney disorders. Urine-derived human renal progenitors exhibited phenotype and functional properties identical to those purified from kidney tissue, including the capacity to differentiate into tubular cells and podocytes, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis of podocyte-specific proteins, and scanning electron microscopy. Lineage tracing studies performed with conditional transgenic mice, in which podocytes are irreversibly tagged upon tamoxifen treatment (NPHS2.iCreER;mT/mG), that were subjected to doxorubicin nephropathy demonstrated that renal progenitors are the only urinary cell population that can be amplified in long-term culture. To validate the use of these cells for personalized modeling of kidney disorders, renal progenitors were obtained from (1) the urine of children with nephrotic syndrome and carrying potentially pathogenic mutations in genes encoding for podocyte proteins and (2) the urine of children without genetic alterations, as validated by next-generation sequencing. Renal progenitors obtained from patients carrying pathogenic mutations generated podocytes that exhibited an abnormal cytoskeleton structure and functional abnormalities compared with those obtained from patients with proteinuria but without genetic mutations. The results of this study demonstrate that urine-derived patient-specific renal progenitor cultures may be an innovative research tool for modeling of genetic kidney disorders. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Hidden pattern discovery on epileptic EEG with 1-D local binary patterns and epileptic seizures detection by grey relational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yılmaz

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to detect epilepsy seizures by using Electroencephalography (EEG), which is one of the most common methods for the diagnosis of epilepsy, based on 1-Dimension Local Binary Pattern (1D-LBP) and grey relational analysis (GRA) methods. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and validate a novel approach, which is a computer-based quantitative EEG analyzing method and based on grey systems, aimed to help decision-maker. In this study, 1D-LBP, which utilizes all data points, was employed for extracting features in raw EEG signals, Fisher score (FS) was employed to select the representative features, which can also be determined as hidden patterns. Additionally, GRA is performed to classify EEG signals through these Fisher scored features. The experimental results of the proposed approach, which was employed in a public dataset for validation, showed that it has a high accuracy in identifying epileptic EEG signals. For various combinations of epileptic EEG, such as A-E, B-E, C-E, D-E, and A-D clusters, 100, 96, 100, 99.00 and 100% were achieved, respectively. Also, this work presents an attempt to develop a new general-purpose hidden pattern determination scheme, which can be utilized for different categories of time-varying signals.

  5. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ashbrook

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium’s bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis.We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1 and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum.

  6. The serotonergic anatomy of the developing human medulla oblongata: implications for pediatric disorders of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Hannah C; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Haynes, Robin L; Rognum, Ingvar J; Paterson, David S

    2011-07-01

    The caudal serotonergic (5-HT) system is a critical component of a medullary "homeostatic network" that regulates protective responses to metabolic stressors such as hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hyperthermia. We define anatomically the caudal 5-HT system in the human medulla as 5-HT neuronal cell bodies located in the raphé (raphé obscurus, raphé magnus, and raphé pallidus), extra-raphé (gigantocellularis, paragigantocellularis lateralis, intermediate reticular zone, lateral reticular nucleus, and nucleus subtrigeminalis), and ventral surface (arcuate nucleus). These 5-HT neurons are adjacent to all of the respiratory- and autonomic-related nuclei in the medulla where they are positioned to modulate directly the responses of these effector nuclei. In the following review, we highlight the topography and development of the caudal 5-HT system in the human fetus and infant, and its inter-relationships with nicotinic, GABAergic, and cytokine receptors. We also summarize pediatric disorders in early life which we term "developmental serotonopathies" of the caudal (as well as rostral) 5-HT domain and which are associated with homeostatic imbalances. The delineation of the development and organization of the human caudal 5-HT system provides the critical foundation for the neuropathologic elucidation of its disorders directly in the human brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The ecological executive function of epileptic children with ADHD%癫痫共患ADHD儿童的生态学执行功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 周农; 刘天龙; 顾安丽; 陈晓霞

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of ecological executive function and influencing factors of epilep-tic children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD) . Methods By utilizing the cross-sectional survey study, 79 cases of epileptic children were evaluated according to the clinical diagnostic scale of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-IV, USA);all of the epileptic children and 52 cases of normal chil-dren with the matched age, gender and levels of education were completed with the questionnaire evaluation of Be-havior Rating Index of Executive Function ( BRIEF, Parents Version) . Results ①30 cases of ADHD were found in 79 cases of children with epilepsy, and the coincidence rate was 37. 97%. There were no statistically significant differences between epileptic children with ADHD and epileptic children without ADHD in gender, age, onset age, education level , course of diseases , control or not , family history and history of traumatic brain injuries . But there were statistically significant differences in epileptic seizure type and drug treatment or not ( P<0. 05 ) . ②The two scores of behavior management index and metacognition were higher in epileptic children with ADHD than the epi-leptic children without ADHD and the normal group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0. 05).③ The clinical characteristics of seizure type, course of disease, epileptic seizure control or not and drug treatment or not in epileptic children with ADHD were significantly correlated with BRIEF(P<0. 05). Conclusion The eco-logical executive function is comprehensively damaged in the epileptic children with ADHD, and the damage is more serious than the epileptic children without ADHD. The ecological executive function of epileptic children with ADHD is significantly influenced by epilepsy seizure type, epilepsy control or not and drug treatment or not.%目的 探讨癫痫共患注意缺陷多动障碍( ADHD)儿童

  8. Effect of an Empowerment Program on Self-Efficacy of Epileptic Child's Mothers in Psychological Adaptation, Gaining Support and Receiving Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gholami

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent childhood neurological disorders. As the primary caregivers, the mothers of epileptic children undergo different psychological pressures. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of empowerment on the self-efficacy of the mothers of the epileptic children, concerning psychological adaptation, gaining support, and receiving information. Materials & Methods: In the controlled two-group random clinical trial with pretest and posttest steps, 100 mothers of epileptic children hospitalized in the Neurology Ward of Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad were studied in 2014. The subjects, selected via convenience sampling method, were randomly divided into two groups including experimental (n=50 and control (n=50 groups. Data was collected using the caregiver’s self-efficacy questionnaire. Only experimental group received the empowerment program, and no intervention was conducted in control group. The mothers’ self-efficacy was measured before and after the intervention in both groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS 11.5 software using independent T, paired T, Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, and covariance tests. Findings: The mean scores of self-efficacy, including psychological adjustment, gain a support, and receiving information, were not significantly different between the groups before the intervention (p>0.05. Nevertheless, the groups were significantly different after the intervention (p<0.001. In addition, the mean score after the intervention in experimental group was significantly higher than the score in the same group before the intervention (p<0.001. Conclusion: The empowerment program enhances the self-efficacy of the mothers of the epileptic children in psychological adjustment, gain a support, and receiving information.

  9. Proposal for best practice in the use of video-EEG when psychogenic non-epileptic seizures are a possible diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Whitehead

    Full Text Available The gold-standard for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is capturing an attack with typical semiology and lack of epileptic ictal discharges on video-EEG. Despite the importance of this diagnostic test, lack of standardisation has resulted in a wide variety of protocols and reporting practices. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of research findings on the diagnostic video-EEG procedure, in both the adult and paediatric literature. We discuss how uncertainties about the ethical use of suggestion can be resolved, and consider what constitutes best clinical practice. We stress the importance of ictal observation and assessment and consider how diagnostically useful information is best obtained. We also discuss the optimal format of video-EEG reports; and of highlighting features with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of miscommunication. We suggest that over-interpretation of the interictal EEG, and the failure to recognise differences between typical epileptic and nonepileptic seizure manifestations are the greatest pitfalls in neurophysiological assessment of patients with PNES. Meanwhile, under-recognition of semiological pointers towards frontal lobe seizures and of the absence of epileptiform ictal EEG patterns during some epileptic seizure types (especially some seizures not associated with loss of awareness, may lead to erroneous PNES diagnoses. We propose that a standardised approach to the video-EEG examination and the subsequent written report will facilitate a clear communication of its import, improving diagnostic certainty and thereby promoting appropriate patient management. Keywords: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, Nonepileptic attack disorder, Suggestion, EEG

  10. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Endocrine and metabolic disorders associated with human immune deficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, C N; Uchenna, D I; Young, E E

    2009-01-01

    Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. Data were obtained from MEDLINE, Google search and otherjournals on 'HIV, Endocrinopathies/Metabolic Disorders' from 1985 till 2007. Studies related to HIV associated endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in the last two decades were reviewed. Information on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the target organ endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in HIV/AIDS were extracted from relevant literature. Endocrine and metabolic disturbances occur in the course of HIV infection. Pathogenesis includes direct infection of endocrine glands by HIV or opportunistic organisms, infiltration by neoplasms and side effects of drugs. Adrenal insufficiency is the commonest HIV endocrinopathy with cytomegalovirus adrenalitis occurring in 40-88% of cases. Thyroid dysfunction may occur as euthyroid sick syndrome or sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Hypogonadotrophic dysfunction accounts for 75% of HIV-associated hypogonadism, with prolonged amenorrhoea being three times more likely in the women. Pancreatic dysfunction may result in hypoglycaemia or diabetes mellitus (DM). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially protease inhibitors has been noted to result in insulin resistance and lipodystrophy. Virtually every endocrine organ is involved in the course of HIV infection. Detailed endocrinological and metabolic evaluation and appropriate treatment is necessary in the optimal management of patients with HIV infection in our environment.

  12. [Consensus statement on the clinical management of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzamczer Palter, Daniel; Muñoz-Moreno, José A; Alcolea Rodríguez, Daniel; Alonso Villaverde, Carlos; Antela López, Antonio; Blanch Andreu, Jordi; Casado Osorio, José Luis; Galindo Puerto, M José; Garolera i Freixa, Maite; Locutura Rupérez, Jaime; Lleó Bisa, Albert; Prats París, Anna; Pérez-Valero, Ignacio; Portilla Sogorb, Joaquín; Rovira Cañellas, Alex; Téllez Molina, M Jesús; Tiraboschi, Juan Manuel; Vergara Moragues, Esperanza; Arribas López, José Ramón; Goenaga Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; de León-Naranjo, Fernando Lozano; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban; Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Muñoz-Moreno, José A; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To develop a consensus document containing clinical recommendations for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). We assembled a panel of experts appointed by GeSIDA and the Secretariat of the National AIDS Plan (PNS), including internal medicine physicians with expertise in the field of HIV, neuropsychologists, neurologists and neuroradiologists. Scientific information was reviewed to October 2012 in publications and conference papers. In support of the recommendations using two levels of evidence: the strength of the recommendation in the opinion of the experts (A, B, C) and the level of empirical evidence (I, II, III), two levels based on the criteria of the Infectious Disease Society of America, already used in previous documents GeSIDA/SPNS. Multiple recommendations for the clinical management of these disorders are provided, including two graphics algorithms, considering both the diagnostic and possible therapeutic strategies. Neurocognitive disorders associated with HIV infection is currently highly prevalent, are associated with a decreased quality of life and daily activities, and given the possibility of occurrence of an increase in the coming years, there is a need to adequately manage these disorders, from a diagnostic as well as therapeutic point of view, and always from a multidisciplinary perspective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing ESC and iPSC—Based Models for Human Genetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, human disorders were studied using animal models or somatic cells taken from patients. Such studies enabled the analysis of the molecular mechanisms of numerous disorders, and led to the discovery of new treatments. Yet, these systems are limited or even irrelevant in modeling multiple genetic diseases. The isolation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs from diseased blastocysts, the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients’ somatic cells, and the new technologies for genome editing of pluripotent stem cells have opened a new window of opportunities in the field of disease modeling, and enabled studying diseases that couldn’t be modeled in the past. Importantly, despite the high similarity between ESCs and iPSCs, there are several fundamental differences between these cells, which have important implications regarding disease modeling. In this review we compare ESC-based models to iPSC-based models, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each system. We further suggest a roadmap for how to choose the optimal strategy to model each specific disorder.

  14. Comparing ESC and iPSC-Based Models for Human Genetic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Tomer; Urbach, Achia

    2014-10-24

    Traditionally, human disorders were studied using animal models or somatic cells taken from patients. Such studies enabled the analysis of the molecular mechanisms of numerous disorders, and led to the discovery of new treatments. Yet, these systems are limited or even irrelevant in modeling multiple genetic diseases. The isolation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from diseased blastocysts, the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients' somatic cells, and the new technologies for genome editing of pluripotent stem cells have opened a new window of opportunities in the field of disease modeling, and enabled studying diseases that couldn't be modeled in the past. Importantly, despite the high similarity between ESCs and iPSCs, there are several fundamental differences between these cells, which have important implications regarding disease modeling. In this review we compare ESC-based models to iPSC-based models, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each system. We further suggest a roadmap for how to choose the optimal strategy to model each specific disorder.

  15. [Association between autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Song-Li; Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Xin; Gao, Ting-Ting; Peng, Xin-Xian

    2017-05-01

    To examine the association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy in children. A total of 190 children with ASD were enrolled. A self-designed questionnaire, Childhood Autism Rating Scale, and Autism Behavior Checklist were used to determine the association between ASD and epilepsy. Among the 190 children with ASD, 20 (10.5%) had epileptic seizures and 12 (6.3%) were diagnosed with epilepsy. The rates of abnormal physical development and hearing disorders before the age of one year were significantly higher in ASD children with epileptic seizures than in those without epileptic seizures (Pchildren diagnosed with epilepsy and those receiving epilepsy treatment had a significantly increased rate of abnormal physical development before the age of one year (Pchildren with epileptic seizures had poorer sensory responses and behavioral competencies than those without epileptic seizures (PEpilepsy treatment have a positive effect on behavioral competencies in ASD children (Pepilepsy in children. The possibility of the comorbidity between ASD and epilepsy may be assessed according to the status of growth and development before the age of one year, sensory responses and behavioral competencies, and the presence or absence of epileptic seizures.

  16. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  17. Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioli, Marta; Vigevano, Federico; Buttinelli, Carla; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A

    2005-11-01

    We determined whether epileptic clinical manifestations evoked by playing video games (VG) differ from those evoked by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) or striped patterns (P). We exposed nine children who had TV- and VG-evoked seizures in daily life to 12 VG after standardized photic stimulation and pattern stimulation. Their EEGs were recorded continuously, analyzed, and then correlated with a video of their behavior. Similar types of clinical signs were seen during VG, P, and IPS, but the signs we observed were more subtle during the VG. Eight patients showed a clear lateralization. A new observation was the lowering of the eyelids to a state of half-closed. Our study suggests that the type of visual stimulus provoking a photoparoxysmal response or seizure is not particularly relevant. The children belonged to different epilepsy groups, and our findings add to the discussion on the boundaries of the epilepsy types.

  18. Pharmacokinetic aspects of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Frølund, Sidsel; Holm, René

    2014-01-01

    are discussed in detail. Special focus is on the contribution of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) for intestinal vigabatrin absorption. Furthermore, the review gives an overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters of vigabatrin across different species and drug-food and drug-drug interactions......Drug transporters in various tissues, such as intestine, kidney, liver and brain, are recognized as important mediators of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drug substances. This review gives a current status on the transporter(s) mediating the absorption, distribution......, metabolism and excretion properties of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin. For orally administered drugs, like vigabatrin, the absorption from the intestine is a prerequisite for the bioavailability. Therefore, transporter(s) involved in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin in vitro and in vivo...

  19. Collective excitability in a mesoscopic neuronal model of epileptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedynak, Maciej; Pons, Antonio J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    At the mesoscopic scale, the brain can be understood as a collection of interacting neuronal oscillators, but the extent to which its sustained activity is due to coupling among brain areas is still unclear. Here we address this issue in a simplified situation by examining the effect of coupling between two cortical columns described via Jansen-Rit neural mass models. Our results show that coupling between the two neuronal populations gives rise to stochastic initiations of sustained collective activity, which can be interpreted as epileptic events. For large enough coupling strengths, termination of these events results mainly from the emergence of synchronization between the columns, and thus it is controlled by coupling instead of noise. Stochastic triggering and noise-independent durations are characteristic of excitable dynamics, and thus we interpret our results in terms of collective excitability.

  20. Mental development of tuberous sclerosis with regard to epileptic seizures and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katafuchi, Yukihiko; Ishihara, Osamu; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Shiotsuki, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro; Imuta, Fusae

    1985-01-01

    The relation of mental development to epileptic seizures and CT findings was examined in 17 patients with tuberous sclerosis. Epileptic seizures occurred in 16 of the 17 patients. The earlier it occurred, the higher the incidence of mental retardation was. There was no constant correlation between mental development and the type of epileptic seizures or the attainment of inhibition of seizures. In two patients in whom calcification spreading to the cerebral cortex and subcortical region was detected on CT, in addition to calcified tubercles around the cerebral ventricle, an intelligence quotient was significantly lower than in the other patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. Reis Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  2. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  3. GAD2 Alternative Transcripts in the Human Prefrontal Cortex, and in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey N Davis

    Full Text Available Genetic variation and early adverse environmental events work together to increase risk for schizophrenia. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain, plays a major role in normal brain development, and has been strongly implicated in the pathobiology of schizophrenia. GABA synthesis is controlled by two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD genes, GAD1 and GAD2, both of which produce a number of alternative transcripts. Genetic variants in the GAD1 gene are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, and reduced expression of its major transcript in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. No consistent changes in GAD2 expression have been found in brains from patients with schizophrenia. In this work, with the use of RNA sequencing and PCR technologies, we confirmed and tracked the expression of an alternative truncated transcript of GAD2 (ENST00000428517 in human control DLPFC homogenates across lifespan besides the well-known full length transcript of GAD2. In addition, using quantitative RT-PCR, expression of GAD2 full length and truncated transcripts were measured in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The expression of GAD2 full length transcript is decreased in the DLPFC of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, while GAD2 truncated transcript is increased in bipolar disorder patients but decreased in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, the patients with schizophrenia with completed suicide or positive nicotine exposure showed significantly higher expression of GAD2 full length transcript. Alternative transcripts of GAD2 may be important in the growth and development of GABA-synthesizing neurons as well as abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders.

  4. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murin, Yonathan; Kim, Jeremy; Parvizi, Josef; Goldsmith, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ). In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous) neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19).

  5. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonathan Murin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ. In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19.

  6. The role of driver nodes in managing epileptic seizures: Application of Kuramoto model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ali; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Bakouie, Fatemeh

    2017-04-21

    Synchronization is an important global phenomenon which could be found in a wide range of complex systems such as brain or electronic devices. However, in some circumstances the synchronized states are not desirable for the system and should be suppressed. For example, excessively synchronized activities in the brain network could be the root of neuronal disorders like epileptic seizures. According to the controllability theory of the complex networks, a minimum set of driver nodes has the ability to control the entire system. In this study, we examine the role of driver nodes in suppressing the excessive synchronization in a generalized Kuramoto model, which consists of two types of oscillators: contrarian and regular ones. We used two different structural topologies: Barabási-Albert scale-free (BASF) network and Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) neuronal network. Our results show that contrarian driver nodes have the sufficient ability to break the synchronized level of the systems. In this case, the system coherency level is not fully suppressed that is avoiding dysfunctions of normal brain functions which require the neuronal synchronized activities. Moreover, in this case, the oscillators grouped in two distinct synchronized clusters that could be an indication of chaotic behavior of the system known as resting-state activity of the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N.; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A. G.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed “ATCCT interruptions,” experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confers a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling. PMID:24318420

  8. An Automatic Prediction of Epileptic Seizures Using Cloud Computing and Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Sanjay; Sood, Sandeep K; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures. An automatic prediction of seizure can protect the patients from accidents and save their life. In this article, we proposed a mobile-based framework that automatically predict seizures using the information contained in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The wireless sensor technology is used to capture the EEG signals of patients. The cloud-based services are used to collect and analyze the EEG data from the patient's mobile phone. The features from the EEG signal are extracted using the fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT). The Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) is applied to FWHT coefficients in order to select the features set relevant to normal, preictal and ictal states of seizure. We subsequently exploit the selected features as input to a k-means classifier to detect epileptic seizure states in a reasonable time. The performance of the proposed model is tested on Amazon EC2 cloud and compared in terms of execution time and accuracy. The findings show that with selected HOS based features, we were able to achieve a classification accuracy of 94.6 %.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in human skeletal muscle biopsies of lipid storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debashree, Bandopadhyay; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Natarajan, Archana; Christopher, Rita; Nalini, Atchayaram; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2018-02-09

    Mitochondria regulate the balance between lipid metabolism and storage in the skeletal muscle. Altered lipid transport, metabolism and storage influence the bioenergetics, redox status and insulin signalling, contributing to cardiac and neurological diseases. Lipid storage disorders (LSDs) are neurological disorders which entail intramuscular lipid accumulation and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics in the skeletal muscle causing progressive myopathy with muscle weakness. However, the mitochondrial changes including molecular events associated with impaired lipid storage have not been completely understood in the human skeletal muscle. We carried out morphological and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial function in muscle biopsies of human subjects with LSDs (n = 7), compared to controls (n = 10). Routine histology, enzyme histochemistry and ultrastructural analysis indicated altered muscle cell morphology and mitochondrial structure. Protein profiling of the muscle mitochondria from LSD samples (n = 5) (vs. control, n = 5) by high-throughput mass spectrometric analysis revealed that impaired metabolic processes could contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and ensuing myopathy in LSDs. We propose that impaired fatty acid and respiratory metabolism along with increased membrane permeability, elevated lipolysis and altered cristae entail mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs. Some of these mechanisms were unique to LSD apart from others that were common to dystrophic and inflammatory muscle pathologies. Many differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins in LSD are linked with other human diseases, indicating that mitochondrial protection via targeted drugs could be a treatment modality in LSD and related metabolic diseases. © 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  11. Metabolic Alkalosis, Acute Renal Failure and Epileptic Seizures as Unusual Manifestations of an Upside-Down Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stephani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Upside-down stomach represents a critical and rare manifestation of hiatal hernias. Here we report on a 60-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with epileptic seizures and dehydration. Laboratory tests revealed severe metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.56 with low potassium (2.7 mmol/l, hypochloremia (<60 mmol/l, increased hematocrit (53% and high levels of serum creatinine (651 µmol/l. Based on a history of recurrent vomiting, gastroscopy and computed tomography were performed. Both diagnostics showed an upside-down stomach with signs of incarceration. Upon infusion of sodium chloride 0.9%, acid-base state, electrolyte balance and renal function became improved. Subsequently, the patient was referred to the department of surgery for hiatoplasty with fundoplication. This case report highlights severe metabolic and neurological disorders as unusual and life-threatening complications of an upside-down stomach.

  12. Performance evaluation for epileptic electroencephalogram (EEG) detection by using Neyman-Pearson criteria and a support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-mei; Zhang, Chong-ming; Zou, Jun-zhong; Zhang, Jian

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of several neurological disorders is based on the detection of typical pathological patterns in electroencephalograms (EEGs). This is a time-consuming task requiring significant training and experience. A lot of effort has been devoted to developing automatic detection techniques which might help not only in accelerating this process but also in avoiding the disagreement among readers of the same record. In this work, Neyman-Pearson criteria and a support vector machine (SVM) are applied for detecting an epileptic EEG. Decision making is performed in two stages: feature extraction by computing the wavelet coefficients and the approximate entropy (ApEn) and detection by using Neyman-Pearson criteria and an SVM. Then the detection performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that the wavelet coefficients and the ApEn are features that represent the EEG signals well. By comparison with Neyman-Pearson criteria, an SVM applied on these features achieved higher detection accuracies.

  13. Crystal structure of human CRMP-4: correction of intensities for lattice-translocation disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponnusamy, Rajesh [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, EAN, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Lebedev, Andrey A. [Research Complex at Harwell, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Pahlow, Steffen [University of Hamburg, Ohnhorststrasse 18, 22609 Hamburg (Germany); Lohkamp, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.lohkamp@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 6, 4tr, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, EAN, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Crystals of human CRMP-4 showed severe lattice-translocation disorder. Intensities were demodulated using the so-called lattice-alignment method and a new more general method with simplified parameterization, and the structure is presented. Collapsin response mediator proteins (CRMPs) are cytosolic phosphoproteins that are mainly involved in neuronal cell development. In humans, the CRMP family comprises five members. Here, crystal structures of human CRMP-4 in a truncated and a full-length version are presented. The latter was determined from two types of crystals, which were either twinned or partially disordered. The crystal disorder was coupled with translational NCS in ordered domains and manifested itself with a rather sophisticated modulation of intensities. The data were demodulated using either the two-lattice treatment of lattice-translocation effects or a novel method in which demodulation was achieved by independent scaling of several groups of intensities. This iterative protocol does not rely on any particular parameterization of the modulation coefficients, but uses the current refined structure as a reference. The best results in terms of R factors and map correlation coefficients were obtained using this new method. The determined structures of CRMP-4 are similar to those of other CRMPs. Structural comparison allowed the confirmation of known residues, as well as the identification of new residues, that are important for the homo- and hetero-oligomerization of these proteins, which are critical to nerve-cell development. The structures provide further insight into the effects of medically relevant mutations of the DPYSL-3 gene encoding CRMP-4 and the putative enzymatic activities of CRMPs.

  14. Crystal structure of human CRMP-4: correction of intensities for lattice-translocation disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Lebedev, Andrey A.; Pahlow, Steffen; Lohkamp, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Crystals of human CRMP-4 showed severe lattice-translocation disorder. Intensities were demodulated using the so-called lattice-alignment method and a new more general method with simplified parameterization, and the structure is presented. Collapsin response mediator proteins (CRMPs) are cytosolic phosphoproteins that are mainly involved in neuronal cell development. In humans, the CRMP family comprises five members. Here, crystal structures of human CRMP-4 in a truncated and a full-length version are presented. The latter was determined from two types of crystals, which were either twinned or partially disordered. The crystal disorder was coupled with translational NCS in ordered domains and manifested itself with a rather sophisticated modulation of intensities. The data were demodulated using either the two-lattice treatment of lattice-translocation effects or a novel method in which demodulation was achieved by independent scaling of several groups of intensities. This iterative protocol does not rely on any particular parameterization of the modulation coefficients, but uses the current refined structure as a reference. The best results in terms of R factors and map correlation coefficients were obtained using this new method. The determined structures of CRMP-4 are similar to those of other CRMPs. Structural comparison allowed the confirmation of known residues, as well as the identification of new residues, that are important for the homo- and hetero-oligomerization of these proteins, which are critical to nerve-cell development. The structures provide further insight into the effects of medically relevant mutations of the DPYSL-3 gene encoding CRMP-4 and the putative enzymatic activities of CRMPs

  15. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary ...

  16. Determination of Four Anti-epileptic Drugs in Plasma Using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Mass Detection Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassib, Sonia T; Hashem, Hanaa M A; Mahrouse, Marianne A; Mostafa, Eman A

    2018-04-10

    Status epilepticus (SE) is considered the second most frequent neurologic emergency. Its therapeutic management is performed using sequential anti-epileptic drug regimens. Diazepam (DIA), midazolam (MID), phenytoin (PHT) and phenobarbital (PB) are four drugs of different classes used sequentially in the management of SE. A sensitive, selective, accurate and precise method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of the four anti-epileptic drugs in human plasma. Their separation and quantification were achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with mass detection using carbamazepine as internal standard (IS). For the first three drugs and IS, UPLC-MS/MS with electrospray ionization working in multiple reaction monitoring mode was used at the following transitions: m/z 285→193 for DIA, m/z 326→291 for MID, m/z 253→182 for PHT and m/z 237→194, 237→192 for IS. For the fourth drug (PB), molecular ion peak of PB [M+H] + at m/z 233 was used for its quantitation. The method was linear over concentration ranges of 5-500 ng/ml for DIA and MID and 0.25-20 μg/ml for PHT and PB, respectively. Bio-analytical validation of the developed method was carried out according to European Medicines Agency guidelines. The developed method can be applied for routine drug analysis, therapeutic drug monitoring and bioequivalence studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Long Memory Processes Are Revealed in the Dynamics of the Epileptic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark James Cook

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of epileptic seizures is often considered unpredictable, and the interval between events without correlation. A number of studies have examined the possibility that seizure activity, both in terms of event magnitude and inter-event intervals, respect a power-law relationship. Such relationships are found in a variety of natural and man-made systems, such as earthquakes or Internet traffic, and describe the relationship between the magnitude of an event and the number of events. We postulated that human inter-seizure intervals would follow a power law relationship, and furthermore that evidence for the existence of a long memory process could be established in this relationship. We studied 8 patients who had long-term ambulatory EEG data recorded as part of the assessment of a novel seizure prediction device, in which data was sufficiently stationary in 6. We demonstrated that a power law relationship could be established in these patients, β=1.5. In 5/6 subjects we found evidence of long memory process, spanning time scales from 30 minutes to 40 days, using a wavelet based analysis technique. The Hurst exponent values ranged from 0.5 to 0.76. We conclude there is evidence of long memory processes in adult human epilepsy, with a heterogeneous range of time scales demonstrated between individuals. This finding may provide evidence of phase-transitions underlying the dynamics of epilepsy.

  18. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Depienne

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome (DS is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  19. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p...... = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have...... analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  20. Fertility rate oF epileptic women at Kenyatta national Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-07-07

    Jul 7, 2008 ... multifaceted, and both epilepsy and antiepileptic drug (aeDs) use may alter fertility and pregnancy ... Conclusion: Fertility rate in epileptic women is decreased by two thirds ..... The effect of this bias on our primary aim was.

  1. Effect of epileptic seizures on the cerebrospinal fluid--A systematic retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Jobs, Catherine; Brettschneider, Johannes; Hoppner, Anselm C; Kerling, Frank; Fauser, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    Analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are obligatory when epileptic seizures manifest for the first time in order to exclude life-threatening causes or treatable diseases such as acute infections or autoimmune encephalitis. However, there are only few systematic investigations on the effect of seizures themselves on CSF parameters and the significance of these parameters in differential diagnosis. CSF samples of 309 patients with epileptic and 10 with psychogenic seizures were retrospectively analyzed. CSF samples were collected between 1999 and 2008. Cell counts, the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels were determined. Findings were correlated with seizure types, seizure etiology (symptomatic, cryptogenic, occasional seizure), and seizure duration. Pathological findings were only observed in patients with epileptic but not with psychogenic seizures. The lactate concentration was elevated in 14%, the albumin quotient in 34%, and the Tau protein level in 36% of CSF samples. Cell counts were only slightly elevated in 6% of patients. Different seizure types influenced all parameters except for the cell count: In status epilepticus highest, in simple partial seizures lowest values were seen. Symptomatic partial and generalized epileptic seizures had significantly higher Tau-protein levels than cryptogenic partial seizures. In patients with repetitive and occasional epileptic seizures, higher Tau-protein levels were seen than in those with psychogenic seizures. Duration of epileptic seizures was positively correlated with the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels. High variability of investigated CSF parameters within each subgroup rendered a clear separation between epileptic and psychogenic seizures impossible. Elevated cell counts are infrequently observed in patients with epileptic seizures and should therefore not uncritically be interpreted as a postictal phenomenon. However, blood-CSF barrier disruption, increased glucose metabolism

  2. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Duan, Lixia; Wang, Qian; Luan, Guoming

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC) to inhibitory neuronal population (IN) which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX). Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD) in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic seizures and

  3. The lateralizing and localizing value of peri-ictal cough in epileptic seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Bektaş; Erşen, Gülsün; Delil, Şakir; Özkara, Çiğdem; Yeni, S. Naz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Coughing may be observed as an epiphenomenon during or after epileptic seizures. Aim. In this paper we discuss the lateralization and localization value of cough as an epileptic peri/post ictal semiological phenomenon. Material and Methods. Seven patients presenting cough as a part of their symptomatology are presented. We will discuss cough in the context of these seven patients. Results. Six out of these seven patients were multidrug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patient...

  4. Recurrent occurrences of CDKL5 mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Kimura, Nobusuke; Mogami, Yukiko; Usui, Daisuke; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) is recognized as one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We identified CDKL5 mutations in five Japanese patients (one male and four female) with epileptic encephalopathy. Although all mutations were of de novo origin, they were located in the same positions as previously reported pathogenic mutations. These recurrent occurrences of de novo mutations in the same loci may indicate hot spots of nucleotide alteration.

  5. Application of magnetic source imaging in localizing the epileptic foci in patients with grey matter heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jilin; Wu Jie; Jia Xiuchuan; Li Sumin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in localizing the epileptic foci of patients with histologically proved grey matter heterotopia (GMH) and seizure. Methods: MSI examinations were performed on 8 patients with GMH and seizure. The location of the epileptic foci defined by MSI was compared with the results of the ECoG. After imaging examinations, all patients received operation with 13-48 months follow up to observe the effectiveness of the operation. Results: Among the 8 patients, 1 had hippocampal sclerosis, 2 had focal cortical dysplasia of type Ⅰ B and 1 had focal cortical dysplasia of type Ⅱ B. MRI showed normal findings in 2 cases, subcortical heterotopia in 4 cases, and nodular heterotopia in 2 cases with one having schizencephaly. The epileptic foci defined by MSI were at right temporal lobe in 2 cases, left frontal lobe in 2 cases, biparietal lobe in 1 case, left parietal lobe in 1 case, left temporal lobe in 1 case, and left frontal-parietal lobe in 1 case. The epileptic foci defined by MSI were completely overlaid with area of GMH in 4 cases, closely behind the area of GMH in case, and partly overlaid with area of CMH in 1 cases with size larger than that of the latter. One patient showed two epileptic foci with one located within the area of GMH and the other one 2 centimeters anterior to the area of GMH. One case's epileptic focus located 2 centimeters posteolateral to the area of GMH. The locations of the epileptic foci defined by MSI showed no difference with those defined by ECoG in all patients. According to Engel classification of treatment effect of epilepsy, 6 patients achieved Engle class Ⅰ ( seizure free after operation), and 2 patients Engel class Ⅳ (no changes in the frequency of occurrence of seizures before and after operation). Conclusion: MSI can noninvasively and precisely localize the epileptic foci before operation in patients with GMH and seizure. (authors)

  6. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denggui Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC to inhibitory neuronal population (IN which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX. Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic

  7. Basal ganglia, movement disorders and deep brain stimulation: advances made through non-human primate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Thomas; Bergman, Hagai; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2018-03-01

    Studies in non-human primates (NHPs) have led to major advances in our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia and of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of hypokinetic movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and hyperkinetic disorders such as chorea and dystonia. Since the brains of NHPs are anatomically very close to those of humans, disease states and the effects of medical and surgical approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), can be more faithfully modeled in NHPs than in other species. According to the current model of the basal ganglia circuitry, which was strongly influenced by studies in NHPs, the basal ganglia are viewed as components of segregated networks that emanate from specific cortical areas, traverse the basal ganglia, and ventral thalamus, and return to the frontal cortex. Based on the presumed functional domains of the different cortical areas involved, these networks are designated as 'motor', 'oculomotor', 'associative' and 'limbic' circuits. The functions of these networks are strongly modulated by the release of dopamine in the striatum. Striatal dopamine release alters the activity of striatal projection neurons which, in turn, influences the (inhibitory) basal ganglia output. In parkinsonism, the loss of striatal dopamine results in the emergence of oscillatory burst patterns of firing of basal ganglia output neurons, increased synchrony of the discharge of neighboring basal ganglia neurons, and an overall increase in basal ganglia output. The relevance of these findings is supported by the demonstration, in NHP models of parkinsonism, of the antiparkinsonian effects of inactivation of the motor circuit at the level of the subthalamic nucleus, one of the major components of the basal ganglia. This finding also contributed strongly to the revival of the use of surgical interventions to treat patients with Parkinson's disease. While ablative procedures were first used for this purpose, they have now been largely

  8. The pathological consequences of impaired genome integrity in humans; disorders of the DNA replication machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and efficient replication of the human genome occurs in the context of an array of constitutional barriers, including regional topological constraints imposed by chromatin architecture and processes such as transcription, catenation of the helical polymer and spontaneously generated DNA lesions, including base modifications and strand breaks. DNA replication is fundamentally important for tissue development and homeostasis; differentiation programmes are intimately linked with stem cell division. Unsurprisingly, impairments of the DNA replication machinery can have catastrophic consequences for genome stability and cell division. Functional impacts on DNA replication and genome stability have long been known to play roles in malignant transformation through a variety of complex mechanisms, and significant further insights have been gained from studying model organisms in this context. Congenital hypomorphic defects in components of the DNA replication machinery have been and continue to be identified in humans. These disorders present with a wide range of clinical features. Indeed, in some instances, different mutations in the same gene underlie different clinical presentations. Understanding the origin and molecular basis of these features opens a window onto the range of developmental impacts of suboptimal DNA replication and genome instability in humans. Here, I will briefly overview the basic steps involved in DNA replication and the key concepts that have emerged from this area of research, before switching emphasis to the pathological consequences of defects within the DNA replication network; the human disorders. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work

  10. The human right to communicate and our need to listen: Learning from people with a history of childhood communication disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Jane; Baker, Elise; Crowe, Kathryn

    2018-02-01

    In 2013, the Australian Government Senate formed a committee for inquiry and report into the prevalence of speech, language, and communication disorders and speech pathology services in Australia. Submissions were sought from individuals and organisations. In this paper, submissions made by individuals with a history of childhood communication disorder were examined to explore their life experiences and the impact on their lives when the right to communicate could not be enacted. There were 305 submissions to the Australian Government Senate Committee Inquiry, of which 288 were publically accessible. In this study, the submissions (n = 17) from children or adults with a history of communication disorder (including speech, language and stuttering), who provided personal accounts of their experiences, were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological approach. Four themes emerged relating to: personal identity, life with communication disorder, the importance of help, and how life would be different without a communication disorder. This paper gives voice to children and adults with communication disorder. In listening to these voices, the impact of communication disorder on the right to communicate and on other human rights can be heard, and the need for a response is clear. However, the challenge is to determine how the voices of these individuals, and others like them, can be enabled to exert real influence on practice and policy so communication disorder will no longer be a barrier to attainment of their human rights.

  11. Biomedical and Clinical Promises of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Jongkamonwiwat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are characterized by the chronic and progressive loss of neuronal structures and functions. There is a variability of the onsets and causes of clinical manifestations. Cell therapy has brought a new concept to overcome brain diseases, but the advancement of this therapy is limited by the demands of specialized neurons. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been promised as a renewable resource for generating human neurons for both laboratory and clinical purposes. By the modulations of appropriate signalling pathways, desired neuron subtypes can be obtained, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide genetically matched neurons for treating patients. These hPSC-derived neurons can also be used for disease modeling and drug screening. Since the most urgent problem today in transplantation is the lack of suitable donor organs and tissues, the derivation of neural progenitor cells from hPSCs has opened a new avenue for regenerative medicine. In this review, we summarize the recent reports that show how to generate neural derivatives from hPSCs, and discuss the current evidence of using these cells in animal studies. We also highlight the possibilities and concerns of translating these hPSC-derived neurons for biomedical and clinical uses in order to fight against neurological disorders.

  12. Transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells modulates hippocampal expression of growth factors in chronically epileptic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanirati, Gabriele; Azevedo, Pamella Nunes; Marinowic, Daniel Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Felipe; de Oliveira Dias, Ana Christina; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Greggio, Samuel; Simão, Fabrício; DaCosta, Jaderson Costa

    2015-05-01

    In previous studies, transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) in epileptic animals has been found to be neuroprotective. However, the mechanism by which the BMMCs act remains unclear. We hypothesize that BMMCs may provide neuroprotection to the epileptic brain through trophic support. To test our hypothesis, we studied the temporal expression of neurotrophins after BMMC transplantation in the epileptic rat hippocampus. Chronically epileptic rats were intravenously transplanted with 1 × 10(7) BMMCs isolated from GFP transgenic mice. Expression levels of BDNF, GDNF, NGF, VEGF, and TGF-β1, and their receptors, were evaluated by ELISA and/or qRT-PCR analysis. Our data revealed increased protein expression of BDNF, GDNF, NGF, and VEGF and reduced levels of TGF-β1 in the hippocampus of transplanted epileptic animals. Additionally, an increase in the mRNA expression of BDNF, GDNF, and VEGF, a reduction in TGF-β1, and a decrease in mRNA levels of the TrkA and TGFR-β1 receptors were also observed. The gain provided by transplanted BMMCs in the epileptic brain may be related to the ability of these cells in modulating the network of neurotrophins and angiogenic signals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  14. SVM-Based System for Prediction of Epileptic Seizures from iEEG Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Vladimir; Lee, Jieun; Veber, Brandon; Patterson, Edward E.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a data-analytic modeling approach for prediction of epileptic seizures from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recording of brain activity. Even though it is widely accepted that statistical characteristics of iEEG signal change prior to seizures, robust seizure prediction remains a challenging problem due to subject-specific nature of data-analytic modeling. Methods Our work emphasizes understanding of clinical considerations important for iEEG-based seizure prediction, and proper translation of these clinical considerations into data-analytic modeling assumptions. Several design choices during pre-processing and post-processing are considered and investigated for their effect on seizure prediction accuracy. Results Our empirical results show that the proposed SVM-based seizure prediction system can achieve robust prediction of preictal and interictal iEEG segments from dogs with epilepsy. The sensitivity is about 90–100%, and the false-positive rate is about 0–0.3 times per day. The results also suggest good prediction is subject-specific (dog or human), in agreement with earlier studies. Conclusion Good prediction performance is possible only if the training data contain sufficiently many seizure episodes, i.e., at least 5–7 seizures. Significance The proposed system uses subject-specific modeling and unbalanced training data. This system also utilizes three different time scales during training and testing stages. PMID:27362758

  15. Serum Leptin Levels in Epileptic Patients Treated with Topiramate and Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Fatma Uludağ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Leptin is considered to be a signal factor that regulates body weight and energy expenditure, and there is a strong correlation between serum leptin concentrations, body mass index, and body fat mass in humans. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in valproic acid (VPA and topiramate (TPM related weight changes in epileptic patients. METHODS: Body mass index is calculated and serum leptin and insulin levels are measured in 56 patients with epilepsy (40 patients taking VPA and 16 patients taking VPA and TPM and in 40 healty control subjects. RESULTS: Obesity was seen in 21 patients (52.5% in VPA treated group, in 15 patients (37.5% in the control group and in only one male (6.3% in VPA and TPM treated group. Body mass index was lower in the group treated with VPA and TPM (p<0.001. Serum leptin concentrations were correlated with the body mass index (r=0.49, p<0.001 and were significantly higher in obese subjects (p<0.001 and in women (p<0.001. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in patients treated with VPA and TPM (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: High levels of serum leptin in patients taking VPA and significantly low levels of serum leptin in patients taking VPA and TPM in our study are in agreement with the hypotheses that weight changes induced with VPA and TPM are related with the alterations in serum leptin levels

  16. Serum Leptin Levels in Epileptic Patients Treated with Topiramate and Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Fatma Uludağ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Leptin is considered to be a signal factor that regulates body weight and energy expenditure, and there is a strong correlation between serum leptin concentrations, body mass index, and body fat mass in humans. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in valproic acid (VPA and topiramate (TPM related weight changes in epileptic patients. METHODS: Body mass index is calculated and serum leptin and insulin levels are measured in 56 patients with epilepsy (40 patients taking VPA and 16 patients taking VPA and TPM and in 40 healty control subjects. RESULTS: Obesity was seen in 21 patients (52.5% in VPA treated group, in 15 patients (37.5% in the control group and in only one male (6.3% in VPA and TPM treated group. Body mass index was lower in the group treated with VPA and TPM (p<0.001. Serum leptin concentrations were correlated with the body mass index (r=0.49, p<0.001 and were significantly higher in obese subjects (p<0.001 and in women (p<0.001. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in patients treated with VPA and TPM (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: High levels of serum leptin in patients taking VPA and significantly low levels of serum leptin in patients taking VPA and TPM in our study are in agreement with the hypotheses that weight changes induced with VPA and TPM are related with the alterations in serum leptin levels.

  17. Fuzzy topological digital space and digital fuzzy spline of electroencephalography during epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mazlina Muzafar; Wahab, Abdul Fatah

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy disease occurs because of there is a temporary electrical disturbance in a group of brain cells (nurons). The recording of electrical signals come from the human brain which can be collected from the scalp of the head is called Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG then considered in digital format and in fuzzy form makes it a fuzzy digital space data form. The purpose of research is to identify the area (curve and surface) in fuzzy digital space affected by inside epilepsy seizure in epileptic patient's brain. The main focus for this research is to generalize fuzzy topological digital space, definition and basic operation also the properties by using digital fuzzy set and the operations. By using fuzzy digital space, the theory of digital fuzzy spline can be introduced to replace grid data that has been use previously to get better result. As a result, the flat of EEG can be fuzzy topological digital space and this type of data can be use to interpolate the digital fuzzy spline.

  18. Magnetic resonance volumetry of the hippocampus in familial spontaneous epileptic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Shunta; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Ogawa, Fukie; Fujiwara, Aki; Matsuki, Naoaki; Fujita, Michio

    2014-12-01

    A strain of familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) with typical limbic seizures was identified in 2010. The electroencephalographic features suggested that an epileptogenic zone is present in the mesial temporal structures (i.e., amygdala and/or hippocampus). In this study, visual evaluations and quantitative analyses were performed by using 3D MR hippocampal volumetry in comparing FSECs with age-matched controls. Visual hippocampal asymmetries were seen in 8 of 14 (57.1%) FSECs. The FSEC group showed a significantly higher asymmetric ratio (4.15%) than the control group (0.99%). The smaller side of hippocampal volume (HV) (0.206 cm(3)) in FSECs was significantly smaller than the mean HV in controls (0.227 cm(3)). However, the means of left and right HVs and total HVs in FSECs showed no differences because the laterality of hippocampal atrophy was different in each individual. Therefore, since FSECs represent a true model of spontaneous epilepsy, hippocampal volumetry should be evaluated in each individual as well as in human patients. The significant asymmetry of HV suggests the potential for hippocampal atrophy in FSECs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular metabolites in the cortex and hippocampus of epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Idil; Kasoff, Willard S; Cassaday, Michael P; Jacob, Ralph; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Sherwin, Robert S; Krystal, John H; Spencer, Dennis D; Abi-Saab, Walid M

    2005-02-01

    Interictal brain energy metabolism and glutamate-glutamine cycling are impaired in epilepsy and may contribute to seizure generation. We used the zero-flow microdialysis method to measure the extracellular levels of glutamate, glutamine, and the major energy substrates glucose and lactate in the epileptogenic and the nonepileptogenic cortex and hippocampus of 38 awake epileptic patients during the interictal period. Depth electrodes attached to microdialysis probes were used to identify the epileptogenic and the nonepileptogenic sites. The epileptogenic hippocampus had surprisingly high basal glutamate levels, low glutamine/glutamate ratio, high lactate levels, and indication for poor glucose utilization. The epileptogenic cortex had only marginally increased glutamate levels. We propose that interictal energetic deficiency in the epileptogenic hippocampus could contribute to impaired glutamate reuptake and glutamate-glutamine cycling, resulting in persistently increased extracellular glutamate, glial and neuronal toxicity, increased lactate production together with poor lactate and glucose utilization, and ultimately worsening energy metabolism. Our data suggest that a different neurometabolic process underlies the neocortical epilepsies.

  20. Oxcabazepine (®Trileptal in Anti-Epileptic Polytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peder Klosterskov Jensen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-epileptic activity of oxcarbazepine (OXC was compared with that of carbamazepine (CBZ and the primary active metabolite of OXC, a monohydroxy derivative (MHD. Altogether 255 patients receiving either OXC or MHD (192 and 63 patients respectively were included in the analysis of efficacy. Out of these 255 patients a total of 40 were children. The duration of treatment varied between 8 and 24weeks. The daily dose of OXC or MHD varied between 600 and 5400 mg (in children 600–2400 mg. Out of five studies two were double-blind controlled studies (including a total of 105 patients whereas the remaining three were open studies. The results of these studies indicate that, in adults with epilepsy, there is no statistically significant difference in overall seizure frequency between CBZ and OXC. In one double-blind study the number of generalized tonic-clonic seizures was significantly less frequent during treatment with OXC than with CBZ. No statistically significant difference with regard to side-effects was observed between OXC and CBZ. The results in children with epilepsy show a statistically significant difference in seizure frequency in favour of OXC, in comparison with CBZ. Overall, the polytherapy studies in adults and children support the effectiveness and safety of oxcarbazepine.

  1. Anti Epileptic Activity of Morinda citrifolia Linn Fruit Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muralidharan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit extract of Morinda citrifolia (Noni, a medicinal plant used in many neuro protective ayurvedic preparations was evaluated for its protective effect against seizures induced by Maximal Electro Shock (MES method in rats. A daily dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg of the extract was administered to the animals for 15 days, after which seizures were induced by maximum electro shock method and the duration of various phases of epileptic attacks were recorded and compared with the control animals. A significant (P<0.01 and P<0.001 reduction in the time taken for righting reflex (recovery was noted in the experimental animals. The levels of biogenic amines such as dopamine, serotonin and nor-adrenaline in the forebrain region were also estimated and a significant level of restoration was opserved in the extract treated animals. Significant results were opserved in the estimated parameters thereby justifying the use of this medicinal plant in the treatment of epilepsy.

  2. Parental anxiety and quality of life of epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Ji, Cheng-Ye; Qin, Jiong; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence of parental anxiety associated with epileptic children, and to explore whether and how this specific condition affects children's quality of life (QOL), and what are the significant determinants for parental anxiety. Three hundred and forty parents whose children were affected with known epilepsy were enrolled in the study. Questionnaires for quality of life in childhood epilepsy (QOLCE), and hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) of parents were used to collect demographic data of both children and their parents, as well as clinical manifestations of epilepsy and family status. Parental anxiety (of any severity) was observed in 191 subjects at interview, giving a prevalence rate of 56.2%. Of the 191 subjects, 18.5% reported mild anxiety, 24.4% moderate anxiety, and 13.2% severe anxiety. Factors associated with parental anxiety included frequency of seizure in children, average monthly income per person and parents' knowledge about epilepsy (P < 0.05). Parental anxiety significantly (P = 0.000) correlated with quality of life of children with epilepsy. Parents of children with epilepsy are at high risk of having anxiety. Factors associated with parental anxiety originate both from children and from parents. Parental anxiety is significantly related with children's QOL. It is important for experts concerned to recognize such a relationship to improve the QOL of children and their parents.

  3. [Epileptic encephalopathy associated with forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuya; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Here we report a case of a 10-year-old female with unclassified epileptic encephalopathy who showed forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam (LEV). She initially presented with intractable tonic and myoclonic seizures that were observed about 10 times a day along with frequent multifocal sharp and slow wave complexes on electroencephalography (EEG). We were forced to decrease the topiramate dose because of the appearance of nystagmus, and her myoclonic seizures became worse. We added LEV (250 mg/day) and her tonic and myoclonic seizures disappeared one day after initiation of LEV administration. However, she showed hyporesponsiveness and akinesia. The disappearance of paroxysmal discharges on EEG confirmed the diagnosis of forced normalization. Despite continuous administration of LEV, tonic and myoclonic seizures relapsed within a month but her psychotic symptoms resolved simultaneously. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of forced normalization after LEV administration. It should be noted that LEV may cause forced normalization although it can be started at an adequate dosage.

  4. Modeling of intracerebral interictal epileptic discharges: Evidence for network interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Stephan; Ossenblok, Pauly; Colon, Albert; Wagner, Louis; Schijns, Olaf; Boon, Paul; Florack, Luc; Fuster, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    The interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) occurring in stereotactic EEG (SEEG) recordings are in general abundant compared to ictal discharges, but difficult to interpret due to complex underlying network interactions. A framework is developed to model these network interactions. To identify the synchronized neuronal activity underlying the IEDs, the variation in correlation over time of the SEEG signals is related to the occurrence of IEDs using the general linear model. The interdependency is assessed of the brain areas that reflect highly synchronized neural activity by applying independent component analysis, followed by cluster analysis of the spatial distributions of the independent components. The spatiotemporal interactions of the spike clusters reveal the leading or lagging of brain areas. The analysis framework was evaluated for five successfully operated patients, showing that the spike cluster that was related to the MRI-visible brain lesions coincided with the seizure onset zone. The additional value of the framework was demonstrated for two more patients, who were MRI-negative and for whom surgery was not successful. A network approach is promising in case of complex epilepsies. Analysis of IEDs is considered a valuable addition to routine review of SEEG recordings, with the potential to increase the success rate of epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PHD fingers in human diseases: Disorders arising from misinterpreting epigenetic marks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsey A. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Allis, C. David [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: alliscd@rockefeller.edu; Wang, Gang G. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: gwang@rockefeller.edu

    2008-12-01

    Histone covalent modifications regulate many, if not all, DNA-templated processes, including gene expression and DNA damage response. The biological consequences of histone modifications are mediated partially by evolutionarily conserved 'reader/effector' modules that bind to histone marks in a modification- and context-specific fashion and subsequently enact chromatin changes or recruit other proteins to do so. Recently, the Plant Homeodomain (PHD) finger has emerged as a class of specialized 'reader' modules that, in some instances, recognize the methylation status of histone lysine residues, such as histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4). While mutations in catalytic enzymes that mediate the addition or removal of histone modifications (i.e., 'writers' and 'erasers') are already known to be involved in various human diseases, mutations in the modification-specific 'reader' proteins are only beginning to be recognized as contributing to human diseases. For instance, point mutations, deletions or chromosomal translocations that target PHD fingers encoded by many genes (such as recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2), Inhibitor of Growth (ING), nuclear receptor-binding SET domain-containing 1 (NSD1) and Alpha Thalassaemia and Mental Retardation Syndrome, X-linked (ATRX)) have been associated with a wide range of human pathologies including immunological disorders, cancers, and neurological diseases. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of PHD fingers as well as the diseases for which direct mutation or dysregulation of the PHD finger has been reported. We propose that misinterpretation of the epigenetic marks may serve as a general mechanism for human diseases of this category. Determining the regulatory roles of histone covalent modifications in the context of human disease will allow for a more thorough understanding of normal and pathological development, and may provide innovative therapeutic strategies

  6. PHD fingers in human diseases: Disorders arising from misinterpreting epigenetic marks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Lindsey A.; Allis, C. David; Wang, Gang G.

    2008-01-01

    Histone covalent modifications regulate many, if not all, DNA-templated processes, including gene expression and DNA damage response. The biological consequences of histone modifications are mediated partially by evolutionarily conserved 'reader/effector' modules that bind to histone marks in a modification- and context-specific fashion and subsequently enact chromatin changes or recruit other proteins to do so. Recently, the Plant Homeodomain (PHD) finger has emerged as a class of specialized 'reader' modules that, in some instances, recognize the methylation status of histone lysine residues, such as histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4). While mutations in catalytic enzymes that mediate the addition or removal of histone modifications (i.e., 'writers' and 'erasers') are already known to be involved in various human diseases, mutations in the modification-specific 'reader' proteins are only beginning to be recognized as contributing to human diseases. For instance, point mutations, deletions or chromosomal translocations that target PHD fingers encoded by many genes (such as recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2), Inhibitor of Growth (ING), nuclear receptor-binding SET domain-containing 1 (NSD1) and Alpha Thalassaemia and Mental Retardation Syndrome, X-linked (ATRX)) have been associated with a wide range of human pathologies including immunological disorders, cancers, and neurological diseases. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of PHD fingers as well as the diseases for which direct mutation or dysregulation of the PHD finger has been reported. We propose that misinterpretation of the epigenetic marks may serve as a general mechanism for human diseases of this category. Determining the regulatory roles of histone covalent modifications in the context of human disease will allow for a more thorough understanding of normal and pathological development, and may provide innovative therapeutic strategies wherein 'chromatin readers' stand as potential drug

  7. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), a knowledgebase of human genes and genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamosh, Ada; Scott, Alan F; Amberger, Joanna S; Bocchini, Carol A; McKusick, Victor A

    2005-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive, authoritative and timely knowledgebase of human genes and genetic disorders compiled to support human genetics research and education and the practice of clinical genetics. Started by Dr Victor A. McKusick as the definitive reference Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/) is now distributed electronically by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, where it is integrated with the Entrez suite of databases. Derived from the biomedical literature, OMIM is written and edited at Johns Hopkins University with input from scientists and physicians around the world. Each OMIM entry has a full-text summary of a genetically determined phenotype and/or gene and has numerous links to other genetic databases such as DNA and protein sequence, PubMed references, general and locus-specific mutation databases, HUGO nomenclature, MapViewer, GeneTests, patient support groups and many others. OMIM is an easy and straightforward portal to the burgeoning information in human genetics.

  8. Patients with epilepsy and patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: video-EEG, clinical and neuropsychological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine; Piazzini, Ada; Chiesa, Valentina; Barbieri, Valentina; Vignoli, Aglaia; Gardella, Elena; Tisi, Giuseppe; Scarone, Silvio; Canevini, Maria Paola; Gambini, Orsola

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is 4.9/100,000/year and it is estimated that about 20-30% of patients referred to tertiary care epilepsy centers for refractory seizures have both epilepsy and PNES. The purpose of our study is to evaluate psychiatric disorders and neuropsychological functions among patients with PNES, patients with epilepsy associated with PNES and patients with epilepsy. We evaluated 66 consecutive in-patients with video-EEG recordings: 21 patients with epilepsy, 22 patients with PNES and 10 patients with epilepsy associated with PNES; 13 patients were excluded (8 because of mental retardation and 5 because they did not present seizures or PNES during the recording period). All patients with PNES had a psychiatric diagnosis (100%) vs. 52% of patients with epilepsy. Cluster B personality disorders were more common in patients with PNES. We observed fewer mood and anxiety disorders in patients with PNES compared with those with epilepsy. We did not find statistically significant differences in neuropsychological profiles among the 3 patient groups. This study can help to contribute to a better understanding of the impact of PNES manifestations, in addition to the occurrence of seizures, in order to provide patients with more appropriate clinical, psychological and social care. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory findings in neurosyphilis patients with epileptic seizures alone as the initial presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Man-Li; Liu, Li-Li; Zeng, Yan-Li; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Liu, Gui-Li; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Dong, Jie; Wu, Jing-Yi; Su, Yuan-Hui; Lin, Li-Rong; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed to characterize the clinical presentation, the characteristic combination of serologic and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities, and the neuroimaging findings of neurosyphilis (NS) patients who had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting symptom. In a 6.75-year period, 169 inpatients with NS were identified at Zhongshan Hospital (from June 2005 to February 2012). We demonstrated that 13 (7.7%) of the 169 NS patients had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting feature. Epileptic seizures occurred in NS patients with syphilitic meningitis (2 cases), meningovascular NS (5 cases), and general paresis (6 cases). The types of epileptic seizures included simple partial, complex partial with secondary generalization (including status epilepticus), and generalized seizures (no focal onset reported). Nine of NS patients with only epileptic seizures as primary symptom were misdiagnosed, and the original misdiagnosis was 69.23% (9/13). Ten (10/13, 76.9%) patients had an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, and 7 (7/13 53.8%) patients had abnormal electroencephalogram recordings. In addition, the sera rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) from all 13 patients were positive. The overall positive rates of the CSF-RPR and CSF-TPPA were 61.5% and 69.2%, respectively. Three patients demonstrated CSF pleocytosis, and 9 patients exhibited elevated CSF protein levels. Therefore, NS with only epileptic seizures at the initial presentation exhibits a lack of specificity. It is recommended that every patient with clinically evident symptoms of epileptic seizures should have a blood test performed for syphilis. When the serology results are positive, all of the patients should undergo a CSF examination to diagnose NS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Order-disorder transitions govern kinetic cooperativity and allostery of monomeric human glucokinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioara Larion

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GCK catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glucose catabolism in the pancreas, where it functions as the body's principal glucose sensor. GCK dysfunction leads to several potentially fatal diseases including maturity-onset diabetes of the young type II (MODY-II and persistent hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemia of infancy (PHHI. GCK maintains glucose homeostasis by displaying a sigmoidal kinetic response to increasing blood glucose levels. This positive cooperativity is unique because the enzyme functions exclusively as a monomer and possesses only a single glucose binding site. Despite nearly a half century of research, the mechanistic basis for GCK's homotropic allostery remains unresolved. Here we explain GCK cooperativity in terms of large-scale, glucose-mediated disorder-order transitions using 17 isotopically labeled isoleucine methyl groups and three tryptophan side chains as sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR probes. We find that the small domain of unliganded GCK is intrinsically disordered and samples a broad conformational ensemble. We also demonstrate that small-molecule diabetes therapeutic agents and hyperinsulinemia-associated GCK mutations share a strikingly similar activation mechanism, characterized by a population shift toward a more narrow, well-ordered ensemble resembling the glucose-bound conformation. Our results support a model in which GCK generates its cooperative kinetic response at low glucose concentrations by using a millisecond disorder-order cycle of the small domain as a "time-delay loop," which is bypassed at high glucose concentrations, providing a unique mechanism to allosterically regulate the activity of human GCK under physiological conditions.

  11. Detecting epileptic seizure with different feature extracting strategies using robust machine learning classification techniques by applying advance parameter optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Lal

    2018-06-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder produced due to abnormal excitability of neurons in the brain. The research reveals that brain activity is monitored through electroencephalogram (EEG) of patients suffered from seizure to detect the epileptic seizure. The performance of EEG detection based epilepsy require feature extracting strategies. In this research, we have extracted varying features extracting strategies based on time and frequency domain characteristics, nonlinear, wavelet based entropy and few statistical features. A deeper study was undertaken using novel machine learning classifiers by considering multiple factors. The support vector machine kernels are evaluated based on multiclass kernel and box constraint level. Likewise, for K-nearest neighbors (KNN), we computed the different distance metrics, Neighbor weights and Neighbors. Similarly, the decision trees we tuned the paramours based on maximum splits and split criteria and ensemble classifiers are evaluated based on different ensemble methods and learning rate. For training/testing tenfold Cross validation was employed and performance was evaluated in form of TPR, NPR, PPV, accuracy and AUC. In this research, a deeper analysis approach was performed using diverse features extracting strategies using robust machine learning classifiers with more advanced optimal options. Support Vector Machine linear kernel and KNN with City block distance metric give the overall highest accuracy of 99.5% which was higher than using the default parameters for these classifiers. Moreover, highest separation (AUC = 0.9991, 0.9990) were obtained at different kernel scales using SVM. Additionally, the K-nearest neighbors with inverse squared distance weight give higher performance at different Neighbors. Moreover, to distinguish the postictal heart rate oscillations from epileptic ictal subjects, and highest performance of 100% was obtained using different machine learning classifiers.

  12. The Role of Serotonin Transporter in Human Lung Development and in Neonatal Lung Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. C. Castro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Failure of the vascular pulmonary remodeling at birth often manifests as pulmonary hypertension (PHT and is associated with a variety of neonatal lung disorders including a uniformly fatal developmental disorder known as alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV. Serum serotonin regulation has been linked to pulmonary vascular function and disease, and serotonin transporter (SERT is thought to be one of the key regulators in these processes. We sought to find evidence of a role that SERT plays in the neonatal respiratory adaptation process and in the pathomechanism of ACD/MPV. Methods. We used histology and immunohistochemistry to determine the timetable of SERT protein expression in normal human fetal and postnatal lungs and in cases of newborn and childhood PHT of varied etiology. In addition, we tested for a SERT gene promoter defect in ACD/MPV patients. Results. We found that SERT protein expression begins at 30 weeks of gestation, increases to term, and stays high postnatally. ACD/MPV patients had diminished SERT expression without SERT promoter alteration. Conclusion. We concluded that SERT/serotonin pathway is crucial in the process of pulmonary vascular remodeling/adaptation at birth and plays a key role in the pathobiology of ACD/MPV.

  13. Human movement stochastic variability leads to diagnostic biomarkers In Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Torres, Elizabeth B.; Jose, Jorge V.

    2015-03-01

    ASD is a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders. The high heterogeneity of the symptoms associated with the disorder impedes efficient diagnoses based on human observations. Recent advances with high-resolution MEM wearable sensors enable accurate movement measurements that may escape the naked eye. It calls for objective metrics to extract physiological relevant information from the rapidly accumulating data. In this talk we'll discuss the statistical analysis of movement data continuously collected with high-resolution sensors at 240Hz. We calculated statistical properties of speed fluctuations within the millisecond time range that closely correlate with the subjects' cognitive abilities. We computed the periodicity and synchronicity of the speed fluctuations' from their power spectrum and ensemble averaged two-point cross-correlation function. We built a two-parameter phase space from the temporal statistical analyses of the nearest neighbor fluctuations that provided a quantitative biomarker for ASD and adult normal subjects and further classified ASD severity. We also found age related developmental statistical signatures and potential ASD parental links in our movement dynamical studies. Our results may have direct clinical applications.

  14. Pathophysiological Significance of Dermatan Sulfate Proteoglycans Revealed by Human Genetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The indispensable roles of dermatan sulfate-proteoglycans (DS-PGs have been demonstrated in various biological events including construction of the extracellular matrix and cell signaling through interactions with collagen and transforming growth factor-β, respectively. Defects in the core proteins of DS-PGs such as decorin and biglycan cause congenital stromal dystrophy of the cornea, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, and Meester-Loeys syndrome. Furthermore, mutations in human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases, epimerases, and sulfotransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of DS chains cause connective tissue disorders including Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity characterized by skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and tissue fragility, and by severe skeletal disorders such as kyphoscoliosis, short trunk, dislocation, and joint laxity. Glycobiological approaches revealed that mutations in DS-biosynthetic enzymes cause reductions in enzymatic activities and in the amount of synthesized DS and also disrupt the formation of collagen bundles. This review focused on the growing number of glycobiological studies on recently reported genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of DS and DS-PGs.

  15. The control of human mesenchymal cell differentiation using nanoscale symmetry and disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Tare, Rahul; Andar, Abhay; Riehle, Mathis O.; Herzyk, Pawel; Wilkinson, Chris D. W.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2007-12-01

    A key tenet of bone tissue engineering is the development of scaffold materials that can stimulate stem cell differentiation in the absence of chemical treatment to become osteoblasts without compromising material properties. At present, conventional implant materials fail owing to encapsulation by soft tissue, rather than direct bone bonding. Here, we demonstrate the use of nanoscale disorder to stimulate human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to produce bone mineral in vitro, in the absence of osteogenic supplements. This approach has similar efficiency to that of cells cultured with osteogenic media. In addition, the current studies show that topographically treated MSCs have a distinct differentiation profile compared with those treated with osteogenic media, which has implications for cell therapies.

  16. The human figure drawing as related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets-Dubrovsky, Sharon; Kaveh, Michelle; Deutsh-Castel, Tsofia; Cohen, Ayala; Tirosh, Emanuel

    2010-06-01

    To assess the reliability and validity of the human figure drawing test among children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or learning disability, boys (n = 136) between the ages of 8 and 10 years, with either or both ADHD and learning disability, were included. Two drawings were used: person and house, tree and person. The drawings were analyzed using the Koppitz emotional and developmental scales. Conners teacher and parent rating scales and the Matching Familiar Figure Test were administered. High intertest reliability for the emotional scale and a significant negative correlation between the 2 scales were found. The reported anxiety and learning were significantly correlated with the cognitive score. A combination of cognitive and emotional items resulted in 67% correct classification of ADHD and learning disability. This test can be used as part of the assessment of ADHD/learning disability.

  17. Evaluation of selected recurrence measures in discriminating pre-ictal and inter-ictal periods from epileptic EEG data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngamga, Eulalie Joelle [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegraphenberg A 31, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Bialonski, Stephan [Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Marwan, Norbert, E-mail: marwan@pik-potsdam.de [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegraphenberg A 31, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Kurths, Jürgen [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegraphenberg A 31, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute for Complex Systems and Mathematical Biology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Geier, Christian [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14–16, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Lehnertz, Klaus [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14–16, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brühler Straße 7, 53175 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the suitability of selected measures of complexity based on recurrence quantification analysis and recurrence networks for an identification of pre-seizure states in multi-day, multi-channel, invasive electroencephalographic recordings from five epilepsy patients. We employ several statistical techniques to avoid spurious findings due to various influencing factors and due to multiple comparisons and observe precursory structures in three patients. Our findings indicate a high congruence among measures in identifying seizure precursors and emphasize the current notion of seizure generation in large-scale epileptic networks. A final judgment of the suitability for field studies, however, requires evaluation on a larger database. - Highlights: • Recurrence-based analysis of brain dynamics in human epilepsy. • Comparison of recurrence quantification and recurrence network measures. • Statistically significant precursory structures in three out of five patients. • High congruence among measures in characterizing brain dynamics.

  18. Evaluation of selected recurrence measures in discriminating pre-ictal and inter-ictal periods from epileptic EEG data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngamga, Eulalie Joelle; Bialonski, Stephan; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Geier, Christian; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of selected measures of complexity based on recurrence quantification analysis and recurrence networks for an identification of pre-seizure states in multi-day, multi-channel, invasive electroencephalographic recordings from five epilepsy patients. We employ several statistical techniques to avoid spurious findings due to various influencing factors and due to multiple comparisons and observe precursory structures in three patients. Our findings indicate a high congruence among measures in identifying seizure precursors and emphasize the current notion of seizure generation in large-scale epileptic networks. A final judgment of the suitability for field studies, however, requires evaluation on a larger database. - Highlights: • Recurrence-based analysis of brain dynamics in human epilepsy. • Comparison of recurrence quantification and recurrence network measures. • Statistically significant precursory structures in three out of five patients. • High congruence among measures in characterizing brain dynamics.

  19. Knowledge and attitude of Iranian community pharmacists about the pharmaceutical care for epileptic females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzghabaee, A.M.; Zolfaghari, B.; Ebrahimabadi, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of a cohort of Iranian community pharmacists about the pharmaceutical care indexes and drug therapy in female epileptic patients. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Iran (2011) and one hundred and twenty two community pharmacists were randomly selected using clustering method for sampling. A self-administered questionnaire which was originally made by a clinical pharmacy focus group was used. This questionnaire had 10 true/false questions for knowledge assessing (Spearman-Brown coefficient, 0.65) and 19 attitude statements (with Likert scale) about the intention of pharmacists for providing pharmaceutical care for epileptic females (Croanbach's alpha, 0.802). Face and content validity for both parts of the questionnaire were performed before the study. Results: There was a significant inverse relationship between pharmacists' knowledge on pharmaceutical care for epileptic females and the time elapsed from their graduation date. Considering the minimum passing score of 5, 85% of pharmacists did not have enough knowledge. The range of pharmacists' attitude scores was 35 to 64 and its mean was 46.09. Regarding the minimum passing score of 45, 63.3% of pharmacists had positive attitude to AEDs in epileptic females. Conclusion: It seems that the pharmaceutical care for epileptic females is a missing part of Pharmacy education. It is highly recommended to pay special attention to this topic in continuing education programs for Iranian pharmacists. (author)

  20. High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation in early onset epileptic encephalopathy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiron, Oded; Gale, Rena; Namestnic, Julia; Bennet-Back, Odeya; David, Jonathan; Gebodh, Nigel; Adair, Devin; Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Bikson, Marom

    2018-01-01

    Early onset epileptic encephalopathy is characterized by high daily seizure-frequency, multifocal epileptic discharges, severe psychomotor retardation, and death at infancy. Currently, there are no effective treatments to alleviate seizure frequency and high-voltage epileptic discharges in these catastrophic epilepsy cases. The current study examined the safety and feasibility of High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) in reducing epileptiform activity in a 30-month-old child suffering from early onset epileptic encephalopathy. HD-tDCS was administered over 10 intervention days spanning two weeks including pre- and post-intervention video-EEG monitoring. There were no serious adverse events or side effects related to the HD-tDCS intervention. Frequency of clinical seizures was not significantly reduced. However, interictal sharp wave amplitudes were significantly lower during the post-intervention period versus baseline. Vital signs and blood biochemistry remained stable throughout the entire study. These exploratory findings support the safety and feasibility of 4 × 1 HD-tDCS in early onset epileptic encephalopathy and provide the first evidence of HD-tDCS effects on paroxysmal EEG features in electroclinical cases under the age of 36 months. Extending HD-tDCS treatment may enhance electrographic findings and clinical effects.

  1. Does rapid and physiological astrocyte–neuron signalling amplify epileptic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hippocampus is a key brain region in the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Long‐term changes of its architecture and function on the network and cellular level are well documented in epilepsy. Astrocytes can control many aspects of neuronal function and their long‐term alterations over weeks, months and years play an important role in epilepsy. However, a pathophysiological transformation of astrocytes does not seem to be required for astrocytes to contribute to epileptic activity. Some of the properties of physiological astrocyte–neuron communication could allow these cells to exacerbate or synchronize neuronal firing on shorter time scales of milliseconds to minutes. Therefore, these astrocyte–neuron interactions are increasingly recognized as potential contributors to epileptic activity. Fast and reciprocal communication between astrocytes and neurons is enabled by a diverse set of mechanisms that could both amplify and counteract epileptic activity. They may thus promote or cause development of epileptic activity or inhibit it. Mechanisms of astrocyte–neuron interactions that can quickly increase network excitability involve, for example, astrocyte Ca2+ and Na+ signalling, K+ buffering, gap junction coupling and metabolism. However, rapid changes of astrocyte neurotransmitter uptake and morphology may also underlie or support development of network hyperexcitability. The temporal characteristics of these interactions, their ability to synchronize neuronal activity and their net effect on network activity will determine their contribution to the emergence or maintenance of epileptic activity. PMID:27106234

  2. Does rapid and physiological astrocyte-neuron signalling amplify epileptic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberger, Christian

    2017-03-15

    The hippocampus is a key brain region in the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Long-term changes of its architecture and function on the network and cellular level are well documented in epilepsy. Astrocytes can control many aspects of neuronal function and their long-term alterations over weeks, months and years play an important role in epilepsy. However, a pathophysiological transformation of astrocytes does not seem to be required for astrocytes to contribute to epileptic activity. Some of the properties of physiological astrocyte-neuron communication could allow these cells to exacerbate or synchronize neuronal firing on shorter time scales of milliseconds to minutes. Therefore, these astrocyte-neuron interactions are increasingly recognized as potential contributors to epileptic activity. Fast and reciprocal communication between astrocytes and neurons is enabled by a diverse set of mechanisms that could both amplify and counteract epileptic activity. They may thus promote or cause development of epileptic activity or inhibit it. Mechanisms of astrocyte-neuron interactions that can quickly increase network excitability involve, for example, astrocyte Ca 2+ and Na + signalling, K + buffering, gap junction coupling and metabolism. However, rapid changes of astrocyte neurotransmitter uptake and morphology may also underlie or support development of network hyperexcitability. The temporal characteristics of these interactions, their ability to synchronize neuronal activity and their net effect on network activity will determine their contribution to the emergence or maintenance of epileptic activity. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  3. Behavioral state classification in epileptic brain using intracranial electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremen, Vaclav; Duque, Juliano J.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Berry, Brent M.; Kucewicz, Michal T.; Khadjevand, Fatemeh; Van Gompel, Jamie; Stead, Matt; St. Louis, Erik K.; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Automated behavioral state classification can benefit next generation implantable epilepsy devices. In this study we explored the feasibility of automated awake (AW) and slow wave sleep (SWS) classification using wide bandwidth intracranial EEG (iEEG) in patients undergoing evaluation for epilepsy surgery. Approach. Data from seven patients (age 34+/- 12 , 4 women) who underwent intracranial depth electrode implantation for iEEG monitoring were included. Spectral power features (0.1-600 Hz) spanning several frequency bands from a single electrode were used to train and test a support vector machine classifier. Main results. Classification accuracy of 97.8  ±  0.3% (normal tissue) and 89.4  ±  0.8% (epileptic tissue) across seven subjects using multiple spectral power features from a single electrode was achieved. Spectral power features from electrodes placed in normal temporal neocortex were found to be more useful (accuracy 90.8  ±  0.8%) for sleep-wake state classification than electrodes located in normal hippocampus (87.1  ±  1.6%). Spectral power in high frequency band features (Ripple (80-250 Hz), Fast Ripple (250-600 Hz)) showed comparable performance for AW and SWS classification as the best performing Berger bands (Alpha, Beta, low Gamma) with accuracy  ⩾90% using a single electrode contact and single spectral feature. Significance. Automated classification of wake and SWS should prove useful for future implantable epilepsy devices with limited computational power, memory, and number of electrodes. Applications include quantifying patient sleep patterns and behavioral state dependent detection, prediction, and electrical stimulation therapies.

  4. Attention Deficit Disorder--A New Age Yuppie Disorder or an Age Old Human Characteristic Essential for Our Survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, Anna A.

    This brief paper suggests that Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) may result from a specific "novelty seeking" gene which has been associated over the history of man's evolution with a biological advantage in situations where energy, risk taking, and creativity are essentials. It reviews research on the genetics of ADD which suggest that novelty…

  5. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Sonal; Samuel, Sherin; Sierra, Olga R.; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situ...

  6. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    This progress report represents a summary of our performance during the two year period following initial start-up of these research activities at Michigan. Productivity has been excellent; already over 47 papers and abstracts have been published or accepted for publication from this still young program. They represent significant contributions to extending the technology of positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders. Our focus is to develop more cost effective and efficient means for producing new functionally specific tracers and simpler, less expensive, means for acquiring and interpreting quantitative data. These improved processes are required for the future growth of PET as a sophisticated research tool and for the transfer of this technology to clinical use. Our approach concentrates on two separate yet related areas, radiosynthesis and data analysis. In subproject 1, Drs. Jewett and Mulholland have introduced innovative methods for improving 11C and 18F synthetic processes. In Subproject 2, Dr. Hutchins has laid the foundations for an objective analysis of the limitations and opportunities for quantifying regional PET data. In Subproject 3, Dr. Koeppe has extended rapid techniques for parameter estimation in kinetic modeling of new ligands. Finally, in Subproject 4, Dr. Frey has applied kinetic analysis to ligand tracing of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in animal and human brain. These DOE supported studies have direct impact on clinical research here and elsewhere which is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment of degenerative neurological diseases, mental illness and brain tumors. 47 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Disordering of human telomeric G-quadruplex with novel antiproliferative anthrathiophenedione.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kaluzhny

    Full Text Available Linear heteroareneanthracenediones have been shown to interfere with DNA functions, thereby causing death of human tumor cells and their drug resistant counterparts. Here we report the interaction of our novel antiproliferative agent 4,11-bis[(2-{[acetimido]amino}ethylamino]anthra[2,3-b]thiophene-5,10-dione with telomeric DNA structures studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism and UV absorption spectroscopy. New compound demonstrated a high affinity (K(ass∼10⁶ M⁻¹ for human telomeric antiparallel quadruplex d(TTAGGG₄ and duplex d(TTAGGG₄∶d(CCCTAA₄. Importantly, a ∼100-fold higher affinity was determined for the ligand binding to an unordered oligonucleotide d(TTAGGG TTAGAG TTAGGG TTAGGG unable to form quadruplex structures. Moreover, in the presence of Na+ the compound caused dramatic conformational perturbation of the telomeric G-quadruplex, namely, almost complete disordering of G-quartets. Disorganization of a portion of G-quartets in the presence of K+ was also detected. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to illustrate how the binding of one molecule of the ligand might disrupt the G-quartet adjacent to the diagonal loop of telomeric G-quadruplex. Our results provide evidence for a non-trivial mode of alteration of G-quadruplex structure by tentative antiproliferative drugs.

  9. The difficult relationship between occlusal interferences and temporomandibular disorder - insights from animal and human experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q; Li, X; Xu, X

    2013-04-01

    The aetiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is multifactorial, and numerous studies have addressed that occlusion may be of great importance. However, whether occlusion plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of TMD remains controversial. Study designs utilising animal models have been used to study the effects of artificial occlusal alterations. Experimental traumatic occlusion affects blood flow in the temporomandibular joint and results in changes in the condylar cartilage, and artificial occlusal interference induces masticatory muscle nociceptive responses that are associated with peripheral sensitisation and lead to central sensitisation, which maintains masticatory muscle hyperalgesia. The possibility that occlusal interference results in TMD has been investigated in humans using a double-blind randomised design. Subjects without a history of TMD show fairly good adaptation to interferences. In contrast, subjects with a history of TMD develop a significant increase in clinical signs and self-report stronger symptoms (occlusal discomfort and chewing difficulties) in response to interferences. Meanwhile, psychological factors appear meaningful for symptomatic responses to artificial interferences in subjects with a history of TMD. Thus, individual differences in vulnerability to occlusal interferences do exist. Although there are advantages and disadvantages to using human and animal occlusal interference models, these approaches are indispensable for discovering the role of occlusion in TMD pathogenesis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A new web-based data mining tool for the identification of candidate genes for human genetic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, van M.A.; Cuelenaere, K.; Kemmeren, P.P.C.W.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    To identify the gene underlying a human genetic disorder can be difficult and time-consuming. Typically, positional data delimit a chromosomal region that contains between 20 and 200 genes. The choice then lies between sequencing large numbers of genes, or setting priorities by combining positional

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in relation to EEG epileptic foci in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Kyoko; Okuno, Takehiko; Ito, Masatoshi; Asato, Reinin; Konishi, Junji; Mikawa, Haruki

    1990-01-01

    In 20 patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS), who were sequentially treated for epilepsy at our clinic, the high signal lesions in the cerebral cortex and subcortex detected on T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with the interictal EEG findings. In four cases who showed a unilateral distribution of the MRI lesions, there was a good correlation between the laterality of the affected lobes and the localization of the EEG epileptic foci. Thirteen cases with more than four affected lobes in both hemispheres also showed bilateral epileptic foci on EEG. The MRI lesions in the occipital lobes showed the best correlation with the EEG epileptic foci, while the worst correlation was seen in the frontal lobes. In addition, the cases with four or more affected lobes without laterality on MRI are more likely to show bilateral synchronization on EEG. The prognosis of epilepsy in these cases was found to be rather poor. (author)

  13. [Sleep disorders in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy.

  14. CDKL5 gene-related epileptic encephalopathy: electroclinical findings in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Federico; Mei, Davide; Pisano, Tiziana; Savasta, Salvatore; Franzoni, Emilio; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo

    2011-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene abnormalities cause an early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. We performed video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) monitoring early in the course of CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathy in order to examine the early electroclinical characteristics of the condition. We used video-EEG to monitor six infants (five females, one male) with CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathy (five mutations; one deletion), at ages 45 days to 12 months and followed them up to the ages of 14 months to 5 years (mean age 23 mo). We focused our analysis on the first year of life. The results were evaluated against those of a comparison group of nine infants (aged below 1y) with epileptic encephalography who had tested negative for CDKL5 mutations and deletions. One infant exhibited normal background activity, three exhibited moderate slowing, and two exhibited a suppression burst pattern. Two participants had epileptic spasms and four had a stereotyped complex seizure pattern, which we defined as a 'prolonged' generalized tonic-clonic event consisting of a tonic-tonic/vibratory contraction, followed by a clonic phase with series of spasms, gradually translating into repetitive distal myoclonic jerks. Seizure duration ranged from 2 to 4 minutes. The EEG correlate of each clinical phase included an initial electrodecremental event (tonic vibratory phase), irregular series of sharp waves and spike slow waves (clonic phase with series of spasms), and bilateral rhythmic sharp waves (time locked with myoclonus). Infants with CDKL5-related early epileptic encephalopathy can present in the first year of life with an unusual electroclinical pattern of 'prolonged' generalized tonic-clonic seizures. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2011.

  15. A novel scheme for the validation of an automated classification method for epileptic spikes by comparison with multiple observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Niraj K; Pedreira, Carlos; Centeno, Maria; Chaudhary, Umair J; Wehner, Tim; França, Lucas G S; Yadee, Tinonkorn; Murta, Teresa; Leite, Marco; Vos, Sjoerd B; Ourselin, Sebastien; Diehl, Beate; Lemieux, Louis

    2017-07-01

    To validate the application of an automated neuronal spike classification algorithm, Wave_clus (WC), on interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) obtained from human intracranial EEG (icEEG) data. Five 10-min segments of icEEG recorded in 5 patients were used. WC and three expert EEG reviewers independently classified one hundred IED events into IED classes or non-IEDs. First, we determined whether WC-human agreement variability falls within inter-reviewer agreement variability by calculating the variation of information for each classifier pair and quantifying the overlap between all WC-reviewer and all reviewer-reviewer pairs. Second, we compared WC and EEG reviewers' spike identification and individual spike class labels visually and quantitatively. The overlap between all WC-human pairs and all human pairs was >80% for 3/5 patients and >58% for the other 2 patients demonstrating WC falling within inter-human variation. The average sensitivity of spike marking for WC was 91% and >87% for all three EEG reviewers. Finally, there was a strong visual and quantitative similarity between WC and EEG reviewers. WC performance is indistinguishable to that of EEG reviewers' suggesting it could be a valid clinical tool for the assessment of IEDs. WC can be used to provide quantitative analysis of epileptic spikes. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adult epileptic patients’ perception of social support during rational antiepileptic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of stigmatization of a patient with epilepsy is frequently essential in restricting the capacities of his social performance. Society is often unready to recognize an epileptic patient as its equal member. The authors consider the main sources of social support (SS to patients with epilepsy: the patient’s family takes first place; friends and other important persons also play a major role. The perception of SS has been found to be related to the number of used antiepileptic drugs and the hemispheric lateralization of a leading epileptic focus.

  17. Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte: did he have seizures? Psychogenic or epileptic or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2003-12-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte was a general in the French army at 24 years of age, later conquering most of Europe. He was one of the greatest military geniuses the world has ever known, but also an extremely intelligent individual. Did he have seizures? The evidence shows that he had both psychogenic and epileptic attacks. The psychogenic attacks were likely related to the tremendous stress in his life, and the epileptic seizures were the result of chronic uremia from a severe urethral stricture caused by gonorrhea that was transmitted from his wife, Empress Josephine.

  18. Cardiac troponin I (CTnI level among children with epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Anwer Attia Khattab

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac troponin I is a perfect tool for early detection of cases with myocardial dysfunction in epileptic patients – cardiac troponin I is significantly increased in children with epilepsy especially the complicated epilepsy. Cardiac injury in epileptic children is more common in patients with early onset epilepsy, positive prenatal problem, idiopathic epilepsy, abnormal imaging and EEG – elevated TnI levels may be of value in assessing the severity and eventual outcome and mortality risk of the disease in children with epilepsy.

  19. Epileptic Negative Myoclonus as the First and Only Symptom in a Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Epilepsy With Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only ictal symptom of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Methods: Electrophysiological evaluations included polygraphic recordings with simultaneous video electroencephalogram monitoring and tests performed with patient’s upper limb outstretched in standing posture. Epileptic negative myoclonus manifestations, electrophysiological features, and responses to antiepileptic drugs were analyzed. Results: The authors report 2 patients with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, who had epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only seizure type. Video electroencephalogram monitoring results showed that their negative myoclonus seizures were emanating from the contralateral central and the parietal regions. Epileptic negative myoclonus was controlled by administration of valproate and levetiracetam. Conclusion: Epileptic negative myoclonus can be the first and only seizure type of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, and long-term follow-up monitoring should be the care for the recurrence and/or presence of other types of seizures.

  20. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma AK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anand K Sarma,1 Nabil Khandker,1 Lisa Kurczewski,2 Gretchen M Brophy2 1Department of Neurology, 2Departments of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science and Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who

  1. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 micro Ci/microgram and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and y intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3 Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (32.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM [90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml] returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA

  2. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 μCi/μg and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and ''y'' intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3. Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (31.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM [90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml] returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA

  3. Temporal, Diagnostic, and Tissue-Specific Regulation of NRG3 Isoform Expression in Human Brain Development and Affective Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Clare; Wang, Yanhong; Hyde, Thomas M.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Law, Amanda J.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Genes implicated in schizophrenia are enriched in networks differentially regulated during human CNS development. Neuregulin 3 (NRG3), a brain-enriched neurotrophin, undergoes alternative splicing and is implicated in several neurological disorders with developmental origins. Isoform-specific increases in NRG3 are observed in schizophrenia and associated with rs10748842, a NRG3 risk polymorphism, suggesting NRG3 transcriptional dysregulation as a molecular mechanism of risk. The authors quantitatively mapped the temporal trajectories of NRG3 isoforms (classes I–IV) in the neocortex throughout the human lifespan, examined whether tissue-specific regulation of NRG3 occurs in humans, and determined if abnormalities in NRG3 transcriptomics occur in mood disorders and are genetically determined. Method NRG3 isoform classes I–IV were quantified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in human postmortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex from 286 nonpsychiatric control individuals, from gestational week 14 to 85 years old, and individuals diagnosed with either bipolar disorder (N=34) or major depressive disorder (N=69). Tissue-specific mapping was investigated in several human tissues. rs10748842 was genotyped in individuals with mood disorders, and association with NRG3 isoform expression examined. Results NRG3 classes displayed individually specific expression trajectories across human neocortical development and aging; classes I, II, and IV were significantly associated with developmental stage. NRG3 class I was increased in bipolar and major depressive disorder, consistent with observations in schizophrenia. NRG3 class II was increased in bipolar disorder, and class III was increased in major depression. The rs10748842 risk genotype predicted elevated class II and III expression, consistent with previous reports in the brain, with tissue-specific analyses suggesting that classes II and III are brain-specific isoforms of NRG3. Conclusions

  4. Identification of de novo copy number variants associated with human disorders of sexual development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounia Tannour-Louet

    Full Text Available Disorders of sexual development (DSD, ranging in severity from genital abnormalities to complete sex reversal, are among the most common human birth defects with incidence rates reaching almost 3%. Although causative alterations in key genes controlling gonad development have been identified, the majority of DSD cases remain unexplained. To improve the diagnosis, we screened 116 children born with idiopathic DSD using a clinically validated array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform. 8951 controls without urogenital defects were used to compare with our cohort of affected patients. Clinically relevant imbalances were found in 21.5% of the analyzed patients. Most anomalies (74.2% evaded detection by the routinely ordered karyotype and were scattered across the genome in gene-enriched subtelomeric loci. Among these defects, confirmed de novo duplication and deletion events were noted on 1p36.33, 9p24.3 and 19q12-q13.11 for ambiguous genitalia, 10p14 and Xq28 for cryptorchidism and 12p13 and 16p11.2 for hypospadias. These variants were significantly associated with genitourinary defects (P = 6.08×10(-12. The causality of defects observed in 5p15.3, 9p24.3, 22q12.1 and Xq28 was supported by the presence of overlapping chromosomal rearrangements in several unrelated patients. In addition to known gonad determining genes including SRY and DMRT1, novel candidate genes such as FGFR2, KANK1, ADCY2 and ZEB2 were encompassed. The identification of risk germline rearrangements for urogenital birth defects may impact diagnosis and genetic counseling and contribute to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of human sexual development.

  5. Religious convictions in patients with epilepsy-associated affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaler, Arne E; Kondziella, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy often have different mood symptoms and behavioral trait characteristics compared to the non-epileptic population. In the present prospective study, we aimed to assess differences in behavioral trait characteristics between acutely admitted, psychiatric in-patients with epil...... characteristics at admission or in clinical history should alert the psychiatrist and lead to closer examination for a possible convulsive disorder....

  6. Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnig, Cindy; Alsaleh, Ghada; Jung, Nicolas; Dembélé, Doulaye; Paul, Nicodème; Poirot, Anh; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Georgel, Philippe; de Blay, Fréderic; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach-in a limited number of patients and controls-to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology.

  7. Brain monoamine oxidase B and A in human parkinsonian dopamine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Rathitharan, Gausiha; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Guttman, Mark; Hornykiewicz, Oleh; Kish, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    enzyme in the parkinsonian substantia nigra; instead, increased nigral levels of a MAOA fragment and 'turnover' of the enzyme were observed in the conditions. Our findings provide support that MAOB might serve as a biochemical imaging marker, albeit not entirely specific, for astrocyte activation in human brain. The observation that MAOB protein concentration is generally increased in degenerating brain areas in multiple system atrophy (especially putamen) and in progressive supranuclear palsy, but not in the nigra in Parkinson's disease, also distinguishes astrocyte behaviour in Parkinson's disease from that in the two 'Parkinson-plus' conditions. The question remains whether suppression of either MAOB in astrocytes or MAOA in dopamine neurons might influence progression of the parkinsonian disorders. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis for epileptic patient in seizure and seizure free status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Dutta, Srimonti; Chakraborty, Sayantan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze EEG of patients during seizure and in seizure free interval. • Data from different sections of the brain and seizure activity was analyzed. • Assessment of cross-correlation in seizure and seizure free interval using MF-DXA technique. - Abstract: This paper reports a study of EEG data of epileptic patients in terms of multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA). The EEG clinical data were obtained from the EEG Database available with the Clinic of Epileptology of the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany. The data sets (C, D, and E) were taken from five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The data sets consist of intracranial EEG recordings during seizure-free intervals (interictal periods) from within the epileptogenic zone (D) and from the hippocampal formation of the opposite hemisphere of the epileptic patients’ brain, respectively (C). The data set (E) was recorded during seizure activity (ictal periods). MF-DXA is a very rigorous and robust tool for assessment of cross-correlation among two nonlinear time series. The study reveals the degree of cross-correlation is more among seizure and seizure free interval in epileptogenic zone. These data are very significant for diagnosis, onset and prognosis of epileptic patients

  9. A Penalized Semialgebraic Deflation ICA Algorithm for the Efficient Extraction of Interictal Epileptic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Hanna; Albera, Laurent; Comon, Pierre; Kachenoura, Amar; Merlet, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    As a noninvasive technique, electroencephalography (EEG) is commonly used to monitor the brain signals of patients with epilepsy such as the interictal epileptic spikes. However, the recorded data are often corrupted by artifacts originating, for example, from muscle activities, which may have much higher amplitudes than the interictal epileptic signals of interest. To remove these artifacts, a number of independent component analysis (ICA) techniques were successfully applied. In this paper, we propose a new deflation ICA algorithm, called penalized semialgebraic unitary deflation (P-SAUD) algorithm, that improves upon classical ICA methods by leading to a considerably reduced computational complexity at equivalent performance. This is achieved by employing a penalized semialgebraic extraction scheme, which permits us to identify the epileptic components of interest (interictal spikes) first and obviates the need of extracting subsequent components. The proposed method is evaluated on physiologically plausible simulated EEG data and actual measurements of three patients. The results are compared to those of several popular ICA algorithms as well as second-order blind source separation methods, demonstrating that P-SAUD extracts the epileptic spikes with the same accuracy as the best ICA methods, but reduces the computational complexity by a factor of 10 for 32-channel recordings. This superior computational efficiency is of particular interest considering the increasing use of high-resolution EEG recordings, whose analysis requires algorithms with low computational cost.

  10. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurat...

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Depressed Affect among Epileptics: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gay R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated a program where cognitive-behavioral methods were utilized in a structured learning format with clinically depressed epileptics (N=13). Results indicated that cognitive behavioral interventions result in significant decreases in depression and increases in related areas of psychosocial functioning that are maintained over time. (LLL)

  12. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  13. False Negatives, Canter's Background Interference Procedure, the Trail Making Test, and Epileptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinzey, Ronald K.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Results of correlation studies of 141 adult epileptics' scores on the Background Interference Procedure (BIP) indicated that the BIP often does not agree with abnormal neurological diagnoses but often does agree with psychiatric diagnoses of Organic Brain Syndrome (OBS). Suggests that future BIP validity studies include a behavioral measure of OBS…

  14. CDKL5 alterations lead to early epileptic encephalopathy in both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jao-Shwann; Shimojima, Keiko; Takayama, Rumiko; Natsume, Jun; Shichiji, Minobu; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Imai, Kaoru; Okanishi, Tohru; Mizuno, Seiji; Okumura, Akihisa; Sugawara, Midori; Ito, Tomoshiro; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Imai, Katsumi; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    Genetic mutations of the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been reported in patients with epileptic encephalopathy, which is characterized by intractable seizures and severe-to-profound developmental delay. We investigated the clinical relevance of CDKL5 alterations in both genders. A total of 125 patients with epileptic encephalopathy were examined for genomic copy number aberrations, and 119 patients with no such aberrations were further examined for CDKL5 mutations. Five patients with Rett syndrome, who did not show methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) mutations, were also examined for CDKL5 mutations. One male and three female patients showed submicroscopic deletions including CDKL5, and two male and six female patients showed CDKL5 nucleotide alterations. Development of early onset seizure was a characteristic clinical feature for the patients with CDKL5 alterations in both genders despite polymorphous seizure types, including myoclonic seizures, tonic seizures, and spasms. Severe developmental delays and mild frontal lobe atrophies revealed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were observed in almost all patients, and there was no gender difference in phenotypic features. We observed that 5% of the male patients and 14% of the female patients with epileptic encephalopathy had CDKL5 alterations. These findings indicate that alterations in CDKL5 are associated with early epileptic encephalopathy in both female and male patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Limits of 2D-TCA in detecting BOLD responses to epileptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatamian, Yasha Borna; Fahoum, Firas; Gotman, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional temporal clustering analysis (2D-TCA) is a relatively new functional MRI (fMRI) based technique that breaks blood oxygen level dependent activity into separate components based on timing and has shown potential for localizing epileptic activity independently of electroencephalography (EEG). 2D-TCA has only been applied to detect epileptic activity in a few studies and its limits in detecting activity of various forms (i.e. activation size, amplitude, and frequency) have not been investigated. This study evaluated 2D-TCA's ability to detect various forms of both simulated epileptic activity and EEG-fMRI activity detected in patients. When applied to simulated data, 2D-TCA consistently detected activity in 6min runs containing 5 spikes/run, 10 spikes/run, and one 5s long event with hemodynamic response function amplitudes of at least 1.5%, 1.25%, and 1% above baseline respectively. When applied to patient data, while detection of interictal spikes was inconsistent, 2D-TCA consistently produced results similar to those obtained by EEG-fMRI when at least 2 prolonged interictal events (a few seconds each) occurred during the run. However, even for such cases it was determined that 2D-TCA can only be used to validate localization by other means or to create hypotheses as to where activity may occur, as it also detects changes not caused by epileptic activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels in serum of epileptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanism of this association with epileptogenesis has not been clearly understood, although there is emerging evidence to support the unfavorable effects of some anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on the plasma homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations. The aim of this study was to uncover the relationship between the levels of ...

  17. Cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats are differently influenced by NMDA receptor antagonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlamberová, Romana; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 516, č. 1 (2005), s. 10-17 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic seizure * cerebral cortex * NMDA receptor antagonist Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.477, year: 2005

  18. Changes of cortical epileptic afterdischarges under the influence of convulsant drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koryntová, Hana; Kubová, Hana; Tutka, P.; Mareš, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2002), s. 49-54 ISSN 0361-9230 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1643 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic afterdischarges * cerebral cortex * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.283, year: 2002

  19. Pharmacological analysis of postictal refractoriness after cortical epileptic seizures in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 12-13 ISSN 1734-1140. [Day of neuropsychopharmacology /16./. 06.09.2007-08.09.2007, Wroclaw] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : postictal refractoriness * epileptic afterdischarges * rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  20. Mozart K.545 Mimics Mozart K.448 in Reducing Epileptiform Discharges in Epileptic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroencephalogram examinations before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545, one week apart, respectively. The frequencies of epileptiform discharges were compared. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of epileptiform discharges during and right after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 (reduced by 35.7±32.7% during Mozart K.448 and 30.3±44.4% after Mozart K.448; and 34.0±39.5% during Mozart K.545 and 31.8±39.2% after Mozart K.545. Spectrogrammatic analysis of the two pieces of music demonstrated that both share similar spectrogrammatic characteristics. Listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 decreased the epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. This suggests that Mozart K.448 is not the only piece of music to have beneficial effects on children with epilepsy. Other music with lower harmonics may also decrease epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

  1. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Zwarts, M.J.; Renier, W.O.; Bloem, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed

  2. Modeling epileptic brain states using EEG spectral analysis and topographic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2012-09-30

    Changes in the spatio-temporal behavior of the brain electrical activity are believed to be associated to epileptic brain states. We propose a novel methodology to identify the different states of the epileptic brain, based on the topographic mapping of the time varying relative power of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency sub-bands, estimated from EEG. Using normalized-cuts segmentation algorithm, points of interest are identified in the topographic mappings and their trajectories over time are used for finding out relations with epileptogenic propagations in the brain. These trajectories are used to train a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which models the different epileptic brain states and the transition among them. Applied to 10 patients suffering from focal seizures, with a total of 30 seizures over 497.3h of data, the methodology shows good results (an average point-by-point accuracy of 89.31%) for the identification of the four brain states--interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal. The results suggest that the spatio-temporal dynamics captured by the proposed methodology are related to the epileptic brain states and transitions involved in focal seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Brilstra, Eva H; van Kempen, Marjan J A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. METHODS: To increase the number of validated EE...

  4. The Anticonvulsant Effects of Ketogenic Diet on Epileptic Seizures and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Jingwei; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Wei; Li, Bingjin

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a syndrome of brain dysfunction induced by the aberrant excitability of certain neurons. Despite advances in surgical technique and anti-epileptic drug in recent years, recurrent epileptic seizures remain intractable and lead to a serious morbidity in the world. The ketogenic diet refers to a high-fat, low-carbohydrate and adequate-protein diet. Currently, its beneficial effects on epileptic seizure reduction have been well established. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the anti-epileptic effects of ketogenic diet are still poorly understood. In this article, the possible roles of ketogenic diet on epilepsy were discussed. Data was obtained from the websites including Web of Science, Medline, Pubmed, Scopus, based on these keywords: "Ketogenic diet" and "epilepsy". As shown in both clinical and basic studies, the therapeutic effects of ketogenic diet might involve neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter function, neuronal membrane potential and neuron protection against ROS. In this review, we systematically reviewed the effects and possible mechanisms of ketogenic diet on epilepsy, which may optimize the therapeutic strategies against epilepsy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Mozart k.545 mimics mozart k.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroencephalogram examinations before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545, one week apart, respectively. The frequencies of epileptiform discharges were compared. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of epileptiform discharges during and right after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 (reduced by 35.7 ± 32.7% during Mozart K.448 and 30.3 ± 44.4% after Mozart K.448; and 34.0 ± 39.5% during Mozart K.545 and 31.8 ± 39.2% after Mozart K.545). Spectrogrammatic analysis of the two pieces of music demonstrated that both share similar spectrogrammatic characteristics. Listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 decreased the epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. This suggests that Mozart K.448 is not the only piece of music to have beneficial effects on children with epilepsy. Other music with lower harmonics may also decrease epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

  6. Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using a New Similarity Index for Chaotic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknazar, Hamid; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    Epileptic seizures are generated by abnormal activity of neurons. The prediction of epileptic seizures is an important issue in the field of neurology, since it may improve the quality of life of patients suffering from drug resistant epilepsy. In this study a new similarity index based on symbolic dynamic techniques which can be used for extracting behavior of chaotic time series is presented. Using Freiburg EEG dataset, it is found that the method is able to detect the behavioral changes of the neural activity prior to epileptic seizures, so it can be used for prediction of epileptic seizure. A sensitivity of 63.75% with 0.33 false positive rate (FPR) in all 21 patients and sensitivity of 96.66% with 0.33 FPR in eight patients were achieved using the proposed method. Moreover, the method was evaluated by applying on Logistic and Tent map with different parameters to demonstrate its robustness and ability in determining similarity between two time series with the same chaotic characterization.

  7. The Persistence of Erroneous Familiarity in an Epileptic Male: Challenging Perceptual Theories of Deja Vu Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the…

  8. Restriction of the spread of epileptic discharges in cats by means of Bragg peak, intracranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, C.T.; Montoya, V.J.; Lyman, J.T.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male cats with a single epileptic focus receive neon ion Bragg peak radiation at the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Bragg peak radiation is deposited in a thin disc of brain tissue beneath an epileptogenic focus produced with alumina cream. Paroxysmal electroencephalograms (EEGs) from the occipital cortex of cats confirm the biolectric changes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Distant spread of seizure activity occurs when the cells in the cortical focus fire a series of relatively simultaneous spikes at high frequency with sufficient intensity to develop self-sustained discharges in remote brain areas. The development of a 'mirror focus' in the EEG records in the contralateral cortex gives a measure of the distances paroxysmal discharges spread. Interhemispheric responses (IHR) that travel from the alumina-treated cortex via the corpus callosum to the contralateral cortex are a second measure of pathways over which paroxysmal discharges spread. In cat studies Bragg peak radiation is positioned beneath the epileptic cortical focus. Various heavy ion doses are employed to test whether an absorbed dose per cat is sufficient to block the transmission of epileptic activity as a function of the post-irradiation time. The relationship between neon ion dose and the post-irradiation time for the loss of IHR is a measure of the physiological dissociation of the epileptic brain tissue from the remainder of the brain. The loss of the 'mirror focus' in EEG records agrees with the IHR findings. (author)

  9. Compare Of the West Syndrome with Other Syndromes in the Epileptic Encephalopathy - Kosovo Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeka, Naim; Gërguri, Abdurrahim; Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Vuciterna, Armend

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: West Syndrome (WS) represents as a specific epileptic encephalopathy characterised with a unique type of attacks, called infantile spasms, severe forms of abnormalities in electroencephalographic (EEG) records as a hypsarythmias and delays in the psychomotoric development. The characteristics of the disease, mostly affecting male gender, are infantile spasms and typical findings in EEG as a hypsarythmia. Infantile spasms are a consequence of many factors in the undeveloped brain. AIM: We aimed: (1) to see the incidence of the illness and the spreading out because of gender in rapport with other syndromes in the epileptic encephalopathies group; (2) to show principles of the treatment for the illness; and (3) to present the effects of the disease in the psycho-motoric development of affected children. METHODS: The study was designed as a cross-sectional study of the patients with epileptic encephalopathies, treated in Paediatric Clinic in Prishtina, from 1st of January 2013 until the 31st of December 2015. RESULTS: From the cohort group of 97 children diagnosed with epileptic encephalopathies, in 14 of them clinical and EEG signs of WS were noted. The earliest age of disease manifestation was 74 days (± 63.8 days). On the group of children with WS, 13 of them with Natrium Valpropat were treated, with the doses of 301.9 mg (± 64.1). From the cohort group, in 89 children (91.8%) psychomotoric retardation was documented, within the higher reoccurrence in the undifferentiated epileptic encephalopathies (96%) and the WS (78.6%). CONCLUSION: WS is a frequent disease of the encephalopathies with the epileptogenic framework. The resistance in anticonvulsive therapy is huge, and psychomotoric retardation follows a big percentage of children with this syndrome. PMID:29362620

  10. Weather as a risk factor for epileptic seizures: A case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakers, Florian; Walther, Mario; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Rasche, Marius; Kockler, Michael; Witte, Otto W; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwab, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Most epileptic seizures occur unexpectedly and independently of known risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of patients' perception that weather is a risk factor for epileptic seizures. Using a hospital-based, bidirectional case-crossover study, 604 adult patients admitted to a large university hospital in Central Germany for an unprovoked epileptic seizure between 2003 and 2010 were recruited. The effect of atmospheric pressure, relative air humidity, and ambient temperature on the onset of epileptic seizures under temperate climate conditions was estimated. We found a close-to-linear negative correlation between atmospheric pressure and seizure risk. For every 10.7 hPa lower atmospheric pressure, seizure risk increased in the entire study population by 14% (odds ratio [OR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.28). In patients with less severe epilepsy treated with one antiepileptic medication, seizure risk increased by 36% (1.36, 1.09-1.67). A high relative air humidity of >80% increased seizure risk in the entire study population by up to 48% (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.96) 3 days after exposure in a J-shaped association. High ambient temperatures of >20°C decreased seizure risk by 46% in the overall study population (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90) and in subgroups, with the greatest effects observed in male patients (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.74). Low atmospheric pressure and high relative air humidity are associated with an increased risk for epileptic seizures, whereas high ambient temperatures seem to decrease seizure risk. Weather-dependent seizure risk may be accentuated in patients with less severe epilepsy. Our results require further replication across different climate regions and cohorts before reliable clinical recommendations can be made. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  12. Using bivariate signal analysis to characterize the epileptic focus: the benefit of surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, R G; Chicharro, D; Lehnertz, K; Mormann, F

    2011-04-01

    The disease epilepsy is related to hypersynchronous activity of networks of neurons. While acute epileptic seizures are the most extreme manifestation of this hypersynchronous activity, an elevated level of interdependence of neuronal dynamics is thought to persist also during the seizure-free interval. In multichannel recordings from brain areas involved in the epileptic process, this interdependence can be reflected in an increased linear cross correlation but also in signal properties of higher order. Bivariate time series analysis comprises a variety of approaches, each with different degrees of sensitivity and specificity for interdependencies reflected in lower- or higher-order properties of pairs of simultaneously recorded signals. Here we investigate which approach is best suited to detect putatively elevated interdependence levels in signals recorded from brain areas involved in the epileptic process. For this purpose, we use the linear cross correlation that is sensitive to lower-order signatures of interdependence, a nonlinear interdependence measure that integrates both lower- and higher-order properties, and a surrogate-corrected nonlinear interdependence measure that aims to specifically characterize higher-order properties. We analyze intracranial electroencephalographic recordings of the seizure-free interval from 29 patients with an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe. Our results show that all three approaches detect higher levels of interdependence for signals recorded from the brain hemisphere containing the epileptic focus as compared to signals recorded from the opposite hemisphere. For the linear cross correlation, however, these differences are not significant. For the nonlinear interdependence measure, results are significant but only of moderate accuracy with regard to the discriminative power for the focal and nonfocal hemispheres. The highest significance and accuracy is obtained for the surrogate-corrected nonlinear

  13. Limited efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of highly refractory epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaun A; Shin, Ji Hyun; Shih, Evan J; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika; Kezele, Michele E; Sankar, Raman; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet is effective in the treatment of epileptic spasms, even in refractory cases. However, there has been very limited demonstration of prompt and complete (video-EEG confirmed) response. We set out to describe our center's experience with the ketogenic diet in the treatment of children with highly refractory epileptic spasms, with rigorous seizure outcome assessment. Children treated with the ketogenic diet for epileptic spasms between April, 2010 and June, 2014 were retrospectively identified. Seizure burden was tabulated at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12-months of ketogenic diet exposure. Adverse events were similarly ascertained. We identified a cohort of 22 consecutive patients who received ketogenic diet therapy, with median age of onset of epileptic spasms of 5.2 (IQR 2.0-9.0) months, with diet initiation beginning a median of 26.4 (12.5-38.7) months after onset, and following a median of 7 (IQR 5-7) treatment failures. Only 2 patients exhibited a complete response during ketogenic diet exposure, and response was more reasonably attributed to alternative therapies in both cases. A modest early reduction in seizure frequency was not sustained beyond 1 month of diet exposure. The diet was well tolerated, and continued in 6 patients with subjective and/or partial response. In contrast to prior studies reporting substantial efficacy of the ketogenic diet, our findings suggest limited efficacy, albeit in a highly refractory cohort. Prospective studies in both refractory and new-onset populations, with both video-EEG confirmation of response and rigorous cognitive outcome assessment, would be of great value to more clearly define the utility of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Psychogenic paroxysmal disorders in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulas, F; Morant, A

    Paroxystic psychic disorders which imitate organic disorders of the nervous system may have peripheral effects, present as changes in level of consciousness or appear as paroxystic behaviour changes. The types of crises of psychological origin are: tantrums, panic attacks, crises of psychopathic rage, onanism or masturbation, epileptic pseudocrises or pseudoconvulsions and Munchausen's syndrome. In general psychic crises are not frequent in infancy: tantrums are commoner in small children and the other conditions usually occur after puberty or during adolescence. The anamnesis is the most important factor in the correct diagnosis of psychogenic paroxystic disorders. Complementary studies are done in doubtful cases, to rule out different pathological processes which might be causing the paroxystic disorder. Amongst these investigations, we emphasize the importance of the video-EEG for differential diagnosis of paroxystic disorders in children.

  15. Human olfactory bulb neural stem cells mitigate movement disorders in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hany E S; Lashen, Samah; Farag, Amany; Althani, Asmaa; Afifi, Nahla; A, Abd-Elmaksoud; Rezk, Shaymaa; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patrizia; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different neuronal and glial elements. The production of DA neurons from NSCs could potentially alleviate behavioral deficits in Parkinsonian patients; timely intervention with NSCs might provide a therapeutic strategy for PD. We have isolated and generated highly enriched cultures of neural stem/progenitor cells from the human olfactory bulb (OB). If NSCs can be obtained from OB, it would alleviate ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic tissue, and provide an easily accessible cell source that would preclude the need for invasive brain surgery. Following isolation and culture, olfactory bulb neural stem cells (OBNSCs) were genetically engineered to express hNGF and GFP. The hNFG-GFP-OBNSCs were transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamin (6-OHDA) Parkinsonian rats. The grafted cells survived in the lesion environment for more than eight weeks after implantation with no tumor formation. The grafted cells differentiated in vivo into oligodendrocyte-like (25 ± 2.88%), neuron-like (52.63 ± 4.16%), and astrocyte -like (22.36 ± 1.56%) lineages, which we differentiated based on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria. Transplanted rats exhibited a significant partial correction in stepping and placing in non-pharmacological behavioral tests, pole and rotarod tests. Taken together, our data encourage further investigations of the possible use of OBNSCs as a promising cell-based therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Motor-auditory-visual integration: The role of the human mirror neuron system in communication and communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M; Pineda, Jaime A; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an integration of motor-auditory-visual information processing related to aspects of language learning including action understanding and recognition. Such integration may also form the basis for language-related constructs such as theory of mind. In this article, we review the MNS system as it relates to the cognitive development of language in typically developing children and in children at-risk for communication disorders, such as children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or hearing impairment. Studying MNS development in these children may help illuminate an important role of the MNS in children with communication disorders. Studies with deaf children are especially important because they offer potential insights into how the MNS is reorganized when one modality, such as audition, is deprived during early cognitive development, and this may have long-term consequences on language maturation and theory of mind abilities. Readers will be able to (1) understand the concept of mirror neurons, (2) identify cortical areas associated with the MNS in animal and human studies, (3) discuss the use of mu suppression in the EEG for measuring the MNS in humans, and (4) discuss MNS dysfunction in children with (ASD).

  17. Anatomy and Cell Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorder : Lessons from Human Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijer, Kristel T E; Huguet, Guillaume; Tastet, Julie; Bourgeron, Thomas; Burbach, J P H

    2017-01-01

    Until recently autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was regarded as a neurodevelopmental condition with unknown causes and pathogenesis. In the footsteps of the revolution of genome technologies and genetics, and with its high degree of heritability, ASD became the first neuropsychiatric disorder for

  18. Role of the endocannabinoid system in human brain functions relevant for psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossong, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Impaired cognitive function is a fundamental characteristic of many psychiatric and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia or Alzheimer’s disease. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of cannabinoid receptors and accompanying ligands, has been implicated in these disorders. In

  19. Positron emission tomography in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonigal A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aileen McGonigal,1–3 Marie Arthuis,3 Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi,4,5 Fabrice Bartolomei,1–3 Eric Guedj6–8 1Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, INSERM UMR 1106, Marseille, France; 2Aix Marseille University, Faculty of Medicine, Marseille, France; 3Clinical Neurophysiology Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Functional Investigation of the Nervous System, Sleep Clinic, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France; 5USR CNRS 3413, University of Bordeaux, France; 6Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 7Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille, France; 8Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, UMR7289, INT, Marseille, FranceWe have read with interest the recent review entitled “Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging” by Maryam Ejareh dar and Richard AA Kanaan,1 published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. Our paper on resting state brain metabolism measured by positron emission tomography (PET was included and discussed.2 We were most surprised to see that the authors of the review seem to have misunderstood the findings of our study, which concerned patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The authors state that the 16 patients included in our study “were later found to have PNES with comorbid epilepsy”. This is incorrect, since our study included only patients with PNES in whom comorbid epilepsy was excluded. This crucial point is indeed detailed in the Methods section of our article and clearly stated in the abstract: “in all patients, the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed to be PNES with no coexisting epilepsy.” It is thus on the basis of incorrect understanding of our results that Drs Ejareh dar and Kanaan discuss the possible significance of hypometabolism in the anterior cingulate region described in our paper, and erroneously suggest that interpretation of PET findings is

  20. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy: A Retrospective Autopsy Study of 112 Epileptic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen Melez, İpek; Arslan, Murat Nihat; Melez, Deniz Oğuzhan; Şanli, Ahmet Necati; Koç, Sermet

    2017-09-01

    Sudden unexpected deaths comprise the most important and worthy investigation case profiles in both neurology and forensic medicine. Epilepsy, which is one of the neuropathological causes of sudden unexpected deaths, is an important disorder having mysterious aspects. The aim of this study is to make common the points of view between neurology and forensic medicine experts and to discuss the features of the findings together with the related clinical hypotheses, leading to the differential diagnosis of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) by presenting autopsy findings and available medical data of patients who had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy. In Istanbul, the cases of 20334 autopsied patients who were referred to The Ministry of Justice Council of Forensic Medicine between 2007 and 2011 were identified from the complete forensic autopsy data of the city and were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy were included. Both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed through the parameters of demographical data, physical properties, incident features, macroscopic-microscopic autopsy findings, and cause of death initially for all cases and then separately for SUDEP cases. Among the 20334 patients, 112 were determined to have a prior diagnosis of epilepsy. A possible macroscopic and/or microscopic epileptic focus was present in 23 (20.5%) of these 112 cases. The cause of death was determined to be SUDEP in 40 (35.7%) cases, while it could not be determined in 28 (25%) cases. Among patients whose death cause was considered as SUDEP, the male-to-female ratio was 1.1:1, while the mean age was 31.5±13.9 years in males and 29.6±12.9 years in females. The presence of hypertrophy and myocardial scar tissue findings in the microscopic examination were significantly more frequent among patients determined to have died from cardiovascular diseases compared to patients in the SUDEP group (p=0.001 for each finding

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow in epileptic foci using [I-123] IMP-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tohru

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-six epileptic patients, whose ages ranged from 6 months to 16 years (a mean age, 8 years and 2 months), were examined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [I-123] N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP). Of these patients, 44 had partial seizures (PS) and 12 had generalized seizures (GS). SPECT revealed abnormality of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 24 PS patients (54.5%), being correlated with EEG abnormality. Among the 24 patients, 22 had a decreased rCBF and 2 others had an increased rCBF. According to the PS type, rCBF abnormality in the foci was less frequently observed for benign age-related partial epilepsy (2/9) than for the other types of partial epilepsy (22/35). Among 35 patients with the other types of partial epilepsy, SPECT showed foci in the frontal (12), central (3), parietal (4), temporal (6), and occipital (6) regions, and diffuse spike-wave or the lack of paroaxysmals (4). The EEG foci was of the left hemisphere in 12 patients, and of the right hemisphere in 18 patients. Higher incidence of rCBF abnormality was associated with the temporal, partietal, and frontal foci than with the occipital foci. There was no correlation between the incidence of rCBF abnormlaity and the frequency of seizure activities on EEG. Complex partial seizures had a tendency to be associated with rCBF abnormality. In comparing IMP uptake in evaluable 17 patients with a decreased rCBF, a mean %CBF in foci compared to that in the contralateral area was 91.9%. All of the 12 GS patients showed no focal reduction of rCBF around the cortex. Patients with tonic-clonic seizure and myoclonic seizure had almost normal IMP images. The IMP images of organic lesions were a marked reduction of rCBF. IMP-SPECT may also be suitable for evaluating the underlying organic and secondary involving disorders with epilepsy. (N.K.)

  2. Epileptic encephalopathy and amelogenesis imperfecta: Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schossig, A.; Wolf, N.I.; Kapferer, I.; Kohlschutter, A.; Zschocke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with epilepsy, psychomotor regression, and a severe enamel defect with yellow or brownish discoloration of the teeth. The first affected family was described in 1974, and 25 patients in 11 families have been reported until now. Inheritance is

  3. Epileptic Electroencephalography Profile Associates with Attention Defects in Children with Fragile X Syndrome: review and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cowley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and a variant of autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The FXS population is quite heterogeneous with respect to comorbidities, which implies the need for a personalized medicine approach, relying on biomarkers or endophenotypes to guide treatment. There is evidence that quantitative electroencephalography (EEG endophenotype-guided treatments can support increased clinical benefit by considering the patient’s neurophysiological profile. We describe a case series of 11 children diagnosed with FXS, aged one to 14 years, mean 4.6 years. Case data are based on longitudinal clinically-observed reports by attending physicians for comorbid symptoms including awake and asleep EEG profiles. We tabulate the comorbid EEG symptoms in this case series, and relate them to the literature on EEG endophenotypes and associated treatment options. The two most common endophenotypes in the data were diffuse slow oscillations and epileptiform EEG, which have been associated with attention and epilepsy respectively. This observation agrees with reported prevalence of comorbid behavioral symptoms for FXS. In this sample of FXS children, attention problems were found in 37% (4 of 11, and epileptic seizures in 45% (5 of 11. Attention problems were found to associate with the epilepsy endophenotype. From the synthesis of this case series and literature review, we argue that the evidence-based personalized treatment approach, exemplified by neurofeedback, could benefit FXS children by focusing on observable, specific characteristics of comorbid disease symptoms.

  4. What we know and would like to know about CDKL5 and its involvement in epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rusconi, Laura; La Montanara, Paolo; Ciceri, Dalila; Bergo, Anna; Bedogni, Francesco; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the X-linked serine/threonine kinase cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) has been associated with early-onset epileptic encephalopathies characterized by the manifestation of intractable epilepsy within the first weeks of life, severe developmental delay, profound hypotonia, and often the presence of some Rett-syndrome-like features. The association of CDKL5 with neurodevelopmental disorders and its high expression levels in the maturing brain underscore the importance of this kinase for proper brain development. However, our present knowledge of CDKL5 functions is still rather limited. The picture that emerges from the molecular and cellular studies suggests that CDKL5 functions are important for regulating both neuronal morphology through cytoplasmic signaling pathways and activity-dependent gene expression in the nuclear compartment. This paper surveys the current state of CDKL5 research with emphasis on the clinical symptoms associated with mutations in CDKL5, the different mechanisms regulating its functions, and the connected molecular pathways. Finally, based on the available data we speculate that CDKL5 might play a role in neuronal plasticity and we adduce and discuss some possible arguments supporting this hypothesis.

  5. What We Know and Would Like to Know about CDKL5 and Its Involvement in Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Kilstrup-Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the X-linked serine/threonine kinase cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5 has been associated with early-onset epileptic encephalopathies characterized by the manifestation of intractable epilepsy within the first weeks of life, severe developmental delay, profound hypotonia, and often the presence of some Rett-syndrome-like features. The association of CDKL5 with neurodevelopmental disorders and its high expression levels in the maturing brain underscore the importance of this kinase for proper brain development. However, our present knowledge of CDKL5 functions is still rather limited. The picture that emerges from the molecular and cellular studies suggests that CDKL5 functions are important for regulating both neuronal morphology through cytoplasmic signaling pathways and activity-dependent gene expression in the nuclear compartment. This paper surveys the current state of CDKL5 research with emphasis on the clinical symptoms associated with mutations in CDKL5, the different mechanisms regulating its functions, and the connected molecular pathways. Finally, based on the available data we speculate that CDKL5 might play a role in neuronal plasticity and we adduce and discuss some possible arguments supporting this hypothesis.

  6. [Clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society on prophylaxis and treatment of acute symptomatic epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Cerdá, J M; Gascón-Jiménez, F J; Ramos-Lizana, J; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Serrano-Castro, P J

    Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have traditionally been used empirically to prevent the presentation of epileptic seizures in patients with acute brain disorders during the early or late phase. However, AED are not free of serious drawbacks, which means that their use should be based on solid scientific foundations. Our aim is to produce a set of practice guidelines based on explicit evidence about when prophylactic treatment with AED is indicated and the length of time it should be continued in acute symptomatic seizures (ASS). A selective search for quality scientific information on the subject was conducted on PubMed-Medline, Tripdatabase and the Biblioteca Cochrane Plus. The authors discussed and analysed the references that were selected and any recommendations that could be drawn from them were collected. A total of 14 primary documents and eight practice guidelines, protocols or experts' recommendations were identified. Our recommendations were explicitly included at the end of the document. The Andalusian Epilepsy Society makes the following recommendations: a) AED must only be used for the primary prevention of ASS in severe traumatic brain injury and as secondary prevention of new ASS due to other causes of acute brain damage; b) duration of treatment of ASS must not exceed the time needed to resolve the cause that gave rise to them; and c) benzodiazepines are the preferred drugs for use in the treatment of ASS due to alcohol withdrawal and magnesium sulphate for the ASS of eclampsia.

  7. Neonatal epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in the PNPO gene encoding pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Philippa B; Surtees, Robert A H; Champion, Michael P; Beesley, Clare E; Dalton, Neil; Scambler, Peter J; Heales, Simon J R; Briddon, Anthony; Scheimberg, Irene; Hoffmann, Georg F; Zschocke, Johannes; Clayton, Peter T

    2005-04-15

    In the mouse, neurotransmitter metabolism can be regulated by modulation of the synthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and failure to maintain pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) levels results in epilepsy. This study of five patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy suggests that the same is true in man. Cerebrospinal fluid and urine analyses indicated reduced activity of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and other PLP-dependent enzymes. Seizures ceased with the administration of PLP, having been resistant to treatment with pyridoxine, suggesting a defect of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO). Sequencing of the PNPO gene identified homozygous missense, splice site and stop codon mutations. Expression studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that the splice site (IVS3-1g>a) and stop codon (X262Q) mutations were null activity mutations and that the missense mutation (R229W) markedly reduced pyridox(am)ine phosphate oxidase activity. Maintenance of optimal PLP levels in the brain may be important in many neurological disorders in which neurotransmitter metabolism is disturbed (either as a primary or as a secondary phenomenon).

  8. The Socio-Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of the Adult Epileptic Patients Applying to the Neurology Clinic of Erciyes University and the Relation of These Phenomena to Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesile Şenol

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The epidemiological characteristics of epilepsy vary from society to society. Epilepsy, whose prevalence is between 0.5-1.0%, is usually seen in early and late ages, at the both of ends of life, and more often in males, and in people who have low income and education. Besides ıts neuropsychologic effects, epilepsy is a disease which has psychological, socilogical aspects such as social isolation, low self-esteem and depression. Depression is seen more often in people with epilepsy than people who don’t have this disease. The percentage of depression for the whole life-time for people with epilepsy is 10-30%. Age at onset of epilepsy, seizure type, frequency, time and the type of treatment (mono-poly therapy affect the incidence and degree of depression. OBJECTIVES: To define the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of epilepsy cases, to determine the percentage of depressive disorders in epilepsy cases, to probe the characteristics of epileptic seizure and its relation to depression. METHODS: The study was conducted through a face-to-face survey of 102 adult epileptic patients who applied to the Erciyes University Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic between October 2004 and 2005. In order to gather the data, which was prepared by the researcher “A survey form for the epileptic individuals” and “The Turkish Version of Beck Depression Inventory”, whose accuracy and validity was checked by Hisli, was used. RESULTS: The average age for the cases is 34.3±12.6, the average age at seizure onset is 21.4±14.6 and in 66% of them the seizure started when they were under 25. Majority of the cases were male and lower than the minimum wage. Among the patients, 45.6% had generalized (tonic-clonic seizures, and 36% had been ≥1/month seizures and 32% seizure-free during the previous year. CONCLUSION: The average of depressive disorder was 29.4%. 15.7% of the cases were with major depression. Age at onset epilepsy, seizure type and

  9. iPS cells to model CDKL5-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenduni, Mariangela; De Filippis, Roberta; Cheung, Aaron Y L; Disciglio, Vittoria; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Ariani, Francesca; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Hayek, Youssef; Renieri, Alessandra; Ellis, James; Meloni, Ilaria

    2011-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurologic disorder representing one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females. To date mutations in three genes have been associated with this condition. Classic RTT is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, whereas variants can be due to mutations in either MECP2 or FOXG1 or CDKL5. Mutations in CDKL5 have been identified both in females with the early onset seizure variant of RTT and in males with X-linked epileptic encephalopathy. CDKL5 is a kinase protein highly expressed in neurons, but its exact function inside the cell is unknown. To address this issue we established a human cellular model for CDKL5-related disease using the recently developed technology of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated in vitro into many different cell types, including neurons. These features make them the ideal tool to study disease mechanisms directly on the primarily affected neuronal cells. We derived iPSCs from fibroblasts of one female with p.Q347X and one male with p.T288I mutation, affected by early onset seizure variant and X-linked epileptic encephalopathy, respectively. We demonstrated that female CDKL5-mutated iPSCs maintain X-chromosome inactivation and clones express either the mutant CDKL5 allele or the wild-type allele that serve as an ideal experimental control. Array CGH indicates normal isogenic molecular karyotypes without detection of de novo CNVs in the CDKL5-mutated iPSCs. Furthermore, the iPS cells can be differentiated into neurons and are thus suitable to model disease pathogenesis in vitro.

  10. Age-Dependent Effects of Methylphenidate on the Human Dopaminergic System in Young vs Adult Patients With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clincal Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrantee, A.; Tamminga, H.G.H.; Bouziane, C.; Bottelier, M.A.; Bron, E.E.; Mutsaerts, H.-J.M.M.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Groote, I.R.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Lindauer, R.J.L.; Klein, S.; Niessen, W.J.; Opmeer, B.C.; Boer, F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Andersen, S.L.; Geurts, H.M.; Reneman, L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Although numerous children receive methylphenidate hydrochloride for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about age-dependent and possibly lasting effects of methylphenidate on the human dopaminergic system. Objectives: To determine whether

  11. Age-dependent effects of methylphenidate on the human dopaminergic system in young vs adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrantee, A. (Anouk); Tamminga, H.G.H. (Hyke G. H.); C. Bouziane (Cheima); Bottelier, M.A. (Marco A.); E.E. Bron (Esther); H.J.M.M. Mutsaerts (Henri J. M.); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); Groote, I.R. (Inge R.); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); Lindauer, R.J.L. (Ramon J. L.); S. Klein (Stefan); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); B.C. Opmeer (Brent); Boer, F. (Frits); P.J. Lucassen; Andersen, S.L. (Susan L.); H.M. Geurts (Hilde ); L. Reneman (Liesbeth)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIMPORTANCE Although numerous children receivemethylphenidate hydrochloride for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about age-dependent and possibly lasting effects of methylphenidate on the human dopaminergic system. OBJECTIVES To determine

  12. Age-Dependent Effects of Methylphenidate on the Human Dopaminergic System in Young vs Adult Patients With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tamminga, Hyke G. H.; Bouziane, Cheima; Bottelier, Marco A.; Bron, Esther E.; Mutsaerts, Henk-Jan M. M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Groote, Inge R.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Lindauer, Ramon J. L.; Klein, Stefan; Niessen, Wiro J.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Boer, Frits; Lucassen, Paul J.; Andersen, Susan L.; Geurts, Hilde M.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous children receive methylphenidate hydrochloride for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about age-dependent and possibly lasting effects of methylphenidate on the human dopaminergic system. To determine whether the effects of

  13. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between

  14. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  15. Discovery of previously unidentified genomic disorders from the duplication architecture of the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, Andrew J.; Hansen, Sierra; Selzer, Rebecca R.; Cheng, Ze; Regan, Regina; Hurst, Jane A.; Stewart, Helen; Price, Sue M.; Blair, Edward; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Fitzpatrick, Carrie A.; Segraves, Rick; Richmond, Todd A.; Guiver, Cheryl; Albertson, Donna G.; Pinkel, Daniel; Eis, Peggy S.; Schwartz, Stuart; Knight, Samantha J. L.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic disorders are characterized by the presence of flanking segmental duplications that predispose these regions to recurrent rearrangement. Based on the duplication architecture of the genome, we investigated 130 regions that we hypothesized as candidates for previously undescribed genomic

  16. [Review of 1,172 clinical cases with human communication disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Díaz, M R; de Pustilnik, N F; Tortolero, Y

    1976-01-01

    The study comprised 1,172 clinical cases that were classified according to sex, age and speech disorders. A review is made on the most common alterations that they present, the selective treatment in each type and their rehabilitation.

  17. Monitoring hyperproliferative disorders in human skin: flow cytometry of changing cytokeratin expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M.E.J.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring dynamics of different cell populations in solid tissues using flow cytometry has several limitations. The interaction and changes in epidermal subpopulations in hyperproliferative skin disorders such as psoriasis, a very common chronic inflammatory skin disease, may, however,

  18. Puberty as a Critical Risk Period for Eating Disorders: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Klump, Kelly L.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is one of the most frequently discussed risk periods for the development of eating disorders. Prevailing theories propose environmentally mediated sources of risk arising from the psychosocial effects (e.g., increased body dissatisfaction, decreased self-esteem) of pubertal development in girls. However, recent research highlights the potential role of ovarian hormones in phenotypic and genetic risk for eating disorders during puberty. The goal of this paper is to review data from hum...

  19. Self-esteem and psychiatric features of Turkish adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a comparative study with epilepsy and healthy control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gokçe N; Tasdemir, Haydar A; Akbas, Seher; Yüce, Murat; Karabekiroglu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and epilepsy are known to have psychosocial problems. The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial difficulties, history of stressful life events/abuse, psychiatric diagnosis, and self-esteem of adolescents with PNES to the ones with epilepsy and healthy controls at a tertiary care center in Turkey. Thirty-four adolescents with PNES diagnosed by video-EEG were compared with 23 adolescents that have epilepsy and 35 healthy volunteers. Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of participants were examined by semi-structured interviews using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Self-esteem of adolescents was evaluated by Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). No differences in sociodemographic features were observed between the groups. The PNES group showed significantly higher rates of parental conflicts, difficulties in relationship with siblings/peers, school under-achievement, and history of stressful events/abuse. The rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders were 64.7% in PNES and 47.8% in epilepsy group. The most common disorders in both groups were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was significantly increased in the PNES group. Additionally, adolescents with PNES displayed significantly lower levels of self-esteem than the other groups. It could be concluded that both disorders involved a high risk for developing psychiatric disorders; additionally, adolescents with PNES have higher rates of stressors and lower levels of self-esteem. Findings from this investigation point to the importance of psychiatric interventions in pediatric PNES and also epilepsy.

  20. [Epilepsy from a metaphysical perspective: an interpretation of the biblical story of the epileptic boy and Raphael's Transfiguration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, D

    1994-01-01

    Raphael's last painting reveals, in the upper half of the picture, Christ's transfiguration on Mount Tabor and, in the lower half, the young boy's epileptic seizure at the foot of the mountain in the presence of the other disciples. Raphael depicts both events, which are told in succession in the Gospels, as if they took place at the same time. By synchronizing both scenes, Raphael demonstrated a significant correspondence between Christ and the epileptic boy which reveals the epileptic seizure as a symbolic representation of a transcendental event. This metaphysical aspect of epilepsy depicted by Raphael can also be found in the corresponding biblical passages. In the Gospels, the metamorphosis caused by the epileptic seizure is used as a simile for Christ's transfiguration through suffering, death and resurrection.

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in stress-related disorders: data convergence from animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Sayamwong E; May, Victor

    2015-08-01

    The maladaptive expression and function of several stress-associated hormones have been implicated in pathological stress and anxiety-related disorders. Among these, recent evidence has suggested that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has critical roles in central neurocircuits mediating stress-related emotional behaviors. We describe the PACAPergic systems, the data implicating PACAP in stress biology, and how altered PACAP expression and signaling may result in psychopathologies. We include our work implicating PACAP signaling within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in mediating the consequences of stressor exposure and relatedly, describe more recent studies suggesting that PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala may impact the emotional aspects of chronic pain states. In aggregate, these results are consistent with data suggesting that PACAP dysregulation is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in humans. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Atypical presentation in Rasmussen encephalitis: delayed late-onset periodic epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Taíssa P F; Hamad, Ana P A; Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Scattolin, Monica; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Lancellotti, Carmem L P; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2011-09-01

    A five-and-a-half-year-old girl started experiencing progressive left hemiparesis at age two and a half years. At age five years and four months she started presenting clusters of asymmetric periodic epileptic spasms with no hypsarrhythmia. The ictal EEG showed periodic, constant and stereotyped complexes. Serial brain imaging revealed progressive atrophy of the right hemisphere with increased T2 signal on MRI. She underwent a right hemispherotomy, and histological examination showed signs of inflammation and features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). She has been seizure-free for 16 months. This case is unique in the following aspects: the presence of typical Rasmussen encephalitis features of progressive unilateral brain involvement without seizures, a delay of almost three years prior to seizure onset; an atypical seizure type presentation with periodic epileptic spasms and the presence of FCD associated with inflammatory changes. [Published with video sequences].

  3. Effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    GIACCONE, M.; BARTOLI, A.; GATTI, G.; MARCHISELLI, R.; PISANI, F.; LATELLA, M.A.; PERUCCA, E.

    1996-01-01

    1To assess the effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics, plasma ethosuximide concentrations after a single oral dose (500 mg) of the drug were compared in 12 healthy control subjects and 10 epileptic patients receiving chronic therapy with phenobarbitone, phenytoin and/or carbamazepine. 2Compared with controls, epileptic patients showed markedly shorter ethosuximide half-lives (29.0±7.8 vs 53.7±14.3 h, means±s.d., Panticonvulsants, the effect probably being mediated by stimulation of cytochrome CYP3A activity. 4The enhancement of ethosuximide clearance in patients comedicated with enzyme inducing anticonvulsants is likely to be clinically relevant. Higher ethosuximide dosages will be required to achieve therapeutic drug concentrations in these patients. PMID:8799524

  4. A method for detecting nonlinear determinism in normal and epileptic brain EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, Amir H; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Aghakhani, Yahya

    2007-01-01

    A robust method of detecting determinism for short time series is proposed and applied to both healthy and epileptic EEG signals. The method provides a robust measure of determinism through characterizing the trajectories of the signal components which are obtained through singular value decomposition. Robustness of the method is shown by calculating proposed index of determinism at different levels of white and colored noise added to a simulated chaotic signal. The method is shown to be able to detect determinism at considerably high levels of additive noise. The method is then applied to both intracranial and scalp EEG recordings collected in different data sets for healthy and epileptic brain signals. The results show that for all of the studied EEG data sets there is enough evidence of determinism. The determinism is more significant for intracranial EEG recordings particularly during seizure activity.

  5. Plasticity of Hippocampal Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance: Missing the Synaptic Control in the Epileptic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bonansco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is the capacity generated by experience to modify the neural function and, thereby, adapt our behaviour. Long-term plasticity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission occurs in a concerted manner, finely adjusting the excitatory-inhibitory (E/I balance. Imbalances of E/I function are related to several neurological diseases including epilepsy. Several evidences have demonstrated that astrocytes are able to control the synaptic plasticity, with astrocytes being active partners in synaptic physiology and E/I balance. Here, we revise molecular evidences showing the epileptic stage as an abnormal form of long-term brain plasticity and propose the possible participation of astrocytes to the abnormal increase of glutamatergic and decrease of GABAergic neurotransmission in epileptic networks.

  6. The epileptic seizure and the mystery of death in Christian painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael W

    2010-02-01

    The epileptic seizure is in many cultures associated with death. Indo-European tradition perceives death not necessarily as the end but as a step, as a point the life cycle is passing through. The epileptic seizure may be seen as a transient form of death, which offers some symmetry with the biblical story of the death and resurrection of Christ. This article, originating from a case report, shows how some Christian painting alludes to renaissance after a seizure and to the parallelism between the patient with epilepsy and the destiny of Christ. Special attention is paid to Raphael's, in this respect particularly complex work, The Transfiguration. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of hubs in the structure of a neuronal network during an epileptic seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner Cardoso; Cerdeira, Hilda A.; Machado, Birajara Soares

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose changes in the structure of a neuronal network with the intention to provoke strong synchronization to simulate episodes of epileptic seizure. Starting with a network of Izhikevich neurons we slowly increase the number of connections in selected nodes in a controlled way, to produce (or not) hubs. We study how these structures alter the synchronization on the spike firings interval, on individual neurons as well as on mean values, as a function of the concentration of connections for random and non-random (hubs) distribution. We also analyze how the post-ictal signal varies for the different distributions. We conclude that a network with hubs is more appropriate to represent an epileptic state.

  8. Topiramate-induced paresthesia is more frequently reported by migraine than epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Shafiei, Kaveh; Azizpour, Iman

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate is an approved and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. Paresthesia is the most commonly reported side effect. The primary objective of this study was to compare the frequency of topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine headache to epileptic patients. Patients with migraine without aura and epilepsy were enrolled in this observational study. All cases were interviewed by telephone about their history of paresthesia. Confounding factors were controlled through logistic regression. The odds ratio of developing topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine compared to epilepsy patients was 3.4. Three factors were independent contributors to developing topiramate-induced paresthesia: female sex (odds ratio 2.1), topiramate dosage (odds ratio 0.3) and duration of therapy. Our findings indicate an independent association between migraine and development of paresthesia. Migraineurs were more likely than epileptic patients to report paresthesia as topiramate adverse effects. Female sex, treatment duration and topiramate dosage contribute significantly to subsequent development of paresthesia.

  9. Preoperative localization of epileptic foci with SPECT brain perfusion imaging, electrocorticography, surgery and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Shaowei; Xu Wengui; Chen Hongyan; Weng Yongmei; Yang Pinghua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The value of preoperative localization of epileptic foci with SPECT brain perfusion imaging was investigated. Methods: The study population consisted of 23 patients with intractable partial seizures which was difficult to control with anticonvulsant for long period. In order to preoperatively locate the epileptic foci, double SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed during interictal and ictal stage. The foci were confirmed with electrocorticography (EcoG), surgery and pathology. Results: The author checked with EcoG the foci shown by SPECT, 23 patients had all typical spike discharge. The regions of radioactivity increase in ictal matched with the abnormal electrical activity areas that EcoG showed. The spike wave originated in the corresponding cerebrum cortex instead of hyperplastic and adherent arachnoid or tumor itself. Conclusions: SPECT brain perfusion imaging contributes to distinguishing location, size, perfusion and functioning of epileptogenic foci, and has some directive function on to making out a treatment programme at preoperation

  10. From an animal model to human patients: An example of a translational study on obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, David

    2017-05-01

    The application of similar analyses enables a direct projection from translational research in animals to human studies. Following is an example of how the methodology of a specific animal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was applied to study human patients. Specifically, the quinpirole rat model for OCD was based on analyzing the trajectories of travel among different locales, and scoring the set of acts performed at each locale. Applying this analytic approach in human patients unveiled various aspects of OCD, such as the repetition and addition of acts, incompleteness, and the link between behavior and specific locations. It is also illustrated how the same analytical approach could be applicable to studying other mental disorders. Finally, it is suggested that the development of OCD could be explained by the four-phase sequence of Repetition, Addition, Condensation, and Elimination, as outlined in the study of ontogeny and phylogeny and applied to normal development of behavior. In OCD, this sequence is curtailed, resulting in the abundant repetition and addition of acts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Does status epilepticus induced at early postnatal period change excitability after cortical epileptic afterdischarges?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2016), E183-E186 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * cortical stimulation * epileptic afterdischarges * ontogeny * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  12. Age-dependent suppression of hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist MTEP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecília; Kubová, Hana; Otáhal, Jakub; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Mareš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 5 (2014), s. 927-930 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0846; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : epileptic afterdischarge * hippocampus * rat * ontogeny * metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.928, year: 2014

  13. Biphasic effect of chronic postnatal caffeine treatment on cortical epileptic afterdischarges during ontogeny in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1082, č. 1 (2006), s. 43-49 ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0464 Grant - others:CZ-BG(CZ) Research project 2002-2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : caffeine * epileptic afterdischarges * sensorimotor cortex Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.341, year: 2006

  14. Effects of caffeine on cortical epileptic afterdischarges in adult rats are modulated by postnatal treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 4 (2013), s. 493-500 ISSN 0300-9009 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR9184; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : caffeine * perinatal administration * cortical epileptic afterdischarges * adult rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2013

  15. Compare Of the West Syndrome with Other Syndromes in the Epileptic Encephalopathy - Kosovo Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zeka, Naim; Gërguri, Abdurrahim; Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Vuciterna, Armend

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: West Syndrome (WS) represents as a specific epileptic encephalopathy characterised with a unique type of attacks, called infantile spasms, severe forms of abnormalities in electroencephalographic (EEG) records as a hypsarythmias and delays in the psychomotoric development. The characteristics of the disease, mostly affecting male gender, are infantile spasms and typical findings in EEG as a hypsarythmia. Infantile spasms are a consequence of many factors in the undeveloped brain. ...

  16. Large-scale structural alteration of brain in epileptic children with SCN1A mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jeong; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Min-Jee; Shim, Woo-Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Yoo, Il Han; Lee, Jiwon; Lim, Byung Chan; Kim, Ki Joong; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in SCN1A gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the voltage gated sodium channel are associated with several epilepsy syndromes including genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI). However, in most patients with SCN1A mutation, brain imaging has reported normal or non-specific findings including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in brain morphometry in epileptic chil...

  17. Motor correlates of models of secondary bilateral synchrony and multiple epileptic foci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Prokš, J.; Otáhal, Jakub; Mareš, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2007), s. 627-635 ISSN 1059-1311 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/03/0770; GA ČR GA304/05/2582 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic foci * secondary bilateral synchrony * neocortex Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2007

  18. A combined analysis of genome-wide expression profiling of bipolar disorder in human prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinglu; Qu, Susu; Wang, Weixiao; Guo, Liyuan; Zhang, Kunlin; Chang, Suhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Numbers of gene expression profiling studies of bipolar disorder have been published. Besides different array chips and tissues, variety of the data processes in different cohorts aggravated the inconsistency of results of these genome-wide gene expression profiling studies. By searching the gene expression databases, we obtained six data sets for prefrontal cortex (PFC) of bipolar disorder with raw data and combinable platforms. We used standardized pre-processing and quality control procedures to analyze each data set separately and then combined them into a large gene expression matrix with 101 bipolar disorder subjects and 106 controls. A standard linear mixed-effects model was used to calculate the differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Multiple levels of sensitivity analyses and cross validation with genetic data were conducted. Functional and network analyses were carried out on basis of the DEGs. In the result, we identified 198 unique differentially expressed genes in the PFC of bipolar disorder and control. Among them, 115 DEGs were robust to at least three leave-one-out tests or different pre-processing methods; 51 DEGs were validated with genetic association signals. Pathway enrichment analysis showed these DEGs were related with regulation of neurological system, cell death and apoptosis, and several basic binding processes. Protein-protein interaction network further identified one key hub gene. We have contributed the most comprehensive integrated analysis of bipolar disorder expression profiling studies in PFC to date. The DEGs, especially those with multiple validations, may denote a common signature of bipolar disorder and contribute to the pathogenesis of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Canine disorder mirrors human disease: exonic deletion in HES7 causes autosomal recessive spondylocostal dysostosis in miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cali E Willet

    Full Text Available Spondylocostal dysostosis is a congenital disorder of the axial skeleton documented in human families from diverse racial backgrounds. The condition is characterised by truncal shortening, extensive hemivertebrae and rib anomalies including malalignment, fusion and reduction in number. Mutations in the Notch signalling pathway genes DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6 have been associated with this defect. In this study, spondylocostal dysostosis in an outbred family of miniature schnauzer dogs is described. Computed tomography demonstrated that the condition mirrors the skeletal defects observed in human cases, but unlike most human cases, the affected dogs were stillborn or died shortly after birth. Through gene mapping and whole genome sequencing, we identified a single-base deletion in the coding region of HES7. The frameshift mutation causes loss of functional domains essential for the oscillatory transcriptional autorepression of HES7 during somitogenesis. A restriction fragment length polymorphism test was applied within the immediate family and supported a highly penetrant autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The mutation was not observed in wider testing of 117 randomly sampled adult miniature schnauzer and six adult standard schnauzer dogs; providing a significance of association of Praw = 4.759e-36 (genome-wide significant. Despite this apparently low frequency in the Australian population, the allele may be globally distributed based on its presence in two unrelated sires from geographically distant locations. While isolated hemivertebrae have been observed in a small number of other dog breeds, this is the first clinical and genetic diagnosis of spontaneously occurring spondylocostal dysostosis in a non-human mammal and offers an excellent model in which to study this devastating human disorder. The genetic test can be utilized by dog breeders to select away from the disease and avoid unnecessary neonatal losses.

  20. Canine disorder mirrors human disease: exonic deletion in HES7 causes autosomal recessive spondylocostal dysostosis in miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Cali E; Makara, Mariano; Reppas, George; Tsoukalas, George; Malik, Richard; Haase, Bianca; Wade, Claire M

    2015-01-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis is a congenital disorder of the axial skeleton documented in human families from diverse racial backgrounds. The condition is characterised by truncal shortening, extensive hemivertebrae and rib anomalies including malalignment, fusion and reduction in number. Mutations in the Notch signalling pathway genes DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6 have been associated with this defect. In this study, spondylocostal dysostosis in an outbred family of miniature schnauzer dogs is described. Computed tomography demonstrated that the condition mirrors the skeletal defects observed in human cases, but unlike most human cases, the affected dogs were stillborn or died shortly after birth. Through gene mapping and whole genome sequencing, we identified a single-base deletion in the coding region of HES7. The frameshift mutation causes loss of functional domains essential for the oscillatory transcriptional autorepression of HES7 during somitogenesis. A restriction fragment length polymorphism test was applied within the immediate family and supported a highly penetrant autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The mutation was not observed in wider testing of 117 randomly sampled adult miniature schnauzer and six adult standard schnauzer dogs; providing a significance of association of Praw = 4.759e-36 (genome-wide significant). Despite this apparently low frequency in the Australian population, the allele may be globally distributed based on its presence in two unrelated sires from geographically distant locations. While isolated hemivertebrae have been observed in a small number of other dog breeds, this is the first clinical and genetic diagnosis of spontaneously occurring spondylocostal dysostosis in a non-human mammal and offers an excellent model in which to study this devastating human disorder. The genetic test can be utilized by dog breeders to select away from the disease and avoid unnecessary neonatal losses.

  1. Ictal but not interictal epileptic discharges activate astrocyte endfeet and elicit cerebral arteriole responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eGomez-Gonzalo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Activation of astrocytes by neuronal signals plays a central role in the control of neuronal activity-dependent blood flow changes in the normal brain. The cellular pathways that mediate neurovascular coupling in the epileptic brain remain, however, poorly defined. In a cortical slice model of epilepsy, we found that the ictal, seizure-like discharge, and only to a minor extent the interictal discharge, evokes both a Ca2+ increase in astrocyte endfeet and a vasomotor response. We also observed that rapid ictal discharge-induced arteriole responses were regularly preceded by Ca2+ elevations in endfeet and were abolished by pharmacological inhibition of Ca2+ signals in these astrocyte processes. Under these latter conditions, arterioles exhibited after the ictal discharge only slowly developing vasodilations. The poor efficacy of interictal discharges, compared with ictal discharges, to activate endfeet was confirmed also in the intact in vitro isolated guinea pig brain. Although the possibility of a direct contribution of neurons, in particular in the late response of cerebral blood vessels to epileptic discharges, should be taken into account, our study supports the view that astrocytes are central for neurovascular coupling also in the epileptic brain. The massive endfeet Ca2+ elevations evoked by ictal discharges and the poor response to interictal events represent new information potentially relevant to interpret data from diagnostic brain imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance, utilized in the clinic to localize neural activity and to optimize neurosurgery of untreatable epilepsies.

  2. Evaluation of SPECT with N-isopropyl[I-123]-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Toshikazu; Itoh, Kazuo; Sumi, Tetsuo; Furudate, Masayori; Irie, Goro

    1988-01-01

    Brain SPECT scintigrams with N-Isopropyl[I-123]-p-Iodoamphetamine (IMP) were reviewed and compared with the EEG findings in 21 epileptic patients (22 SPECT images) with normal CT. Thirteen of 22 SPECT images showed abnormal low uptake and 7 of them corresponded to the EEG focus. In order to obtain the quantitative analysis, the count ratio of the focus side to the opposite I-123 content in fixed ROI was measured for each case, but no statistically significant correlation for the frequency or the duration of epilepsy was found. EEG is not considered to be favorite standard for localizing epileptic foci, especially in deep cerebral region, and that may be one of the main reason for the incomplete correlation. In the qualitative study, however, the cases with frequent epileptic attack were more likely to show abnormal findings. I-123 IMP SPECT can now be considered as having a significant clinical role for the diagnosis and management of patients with epilepsy. (author)

  3. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity.

  4. Brain Graph Topology Changes Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harvey S.; Chiang, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neuroimaging studies of functional connectivity using graph theory have furthered our understanding of the network structure in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Brain network effects of anti-epileptic drugs could influence such studies, but have not been systematically studied. Resting-state functional MRI was analyzed in 25 patients with TLE using graph theory analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on anti-epileptic medication use: those taking carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine (CBZ/OXC) (n=9) and those not taking CBZ/OXC (n=16) as a part of their medication regimen. The following graph topology metrics were analyzed: global efficiency, betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient, and small-world index. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association of CBZ/OXC with graph topology. The two groups did not differ from each other based on epilepsy characteristics. Use of CBZ/OXC was associated with a lower BC. Longer epilepsy duration was also associated with a lower BC. These findings can inform graph theory-based studies in patients with TLE. The changes observed are discussed in relation to the anti-epileptic mechanism of action and adverse effects of CBZ/OXC. PMID:25492633

  5. Serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during long-term therapy with anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Anwar; Mohammed, Lamia

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during the long-term treatment of anticonvulsant drugs and correlate this with healthy subjects. A hospital-based group matched case-control study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt between November 2013 and October 2014. Ninety patients aged 7.1 ± 3.6 years were diagnosed with epilepsy by a neurologist. The control group was selected from healthy individuals and matched to the case group. Serum zinc and copper were measured by the calorimetric method using a colorimetric method kit. The mean zinc level was 60.1 ± 22.6 ug/dl in the cases, and 102.1 ± 18 ug/dl in the controls (p<0.001). The mean copper level was 180.1 ± 32.4 ug/dl in cases compared with 114.5 ± 18.5 ug/dl in controls (p<0.001). Serum zinc levels in epileptic children under drug treatment are lower compared with healthy children. Also, serum copper levels in these patients are significantly higher than in healthy people. No significant difference in the levels of serum copper and zinc was observed in using one drug or multiple drugs in the treatment of epileptic patients.

  6. Classifying epileptic EEG signals with delay permutation entropy and Multi-Scale K-means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guohun; Li, Yan; Wen, Peng Paul; Wang, Shuaifang

    2015-01-01

    Most epileptic EEG classification algorithms are supervised and require large training datasets, that hinder their use in real time applications. This chapter proposes an unsupervised Multi-Scale K-means (MSK-means) MSK-means algorithm to distinguish epileptic EEG signals and identify epileptic zones. The random initialization of the K-means algorithm can lead to wrong clusters. Based on the characteristics of EEGs, the MSK-means MSK-means algorithm initializes the coarse-scale centroid of a cluster with a suitable scale factor. In this chapter, the MSK-means algorithm is proved theoretically superior to the K-means algorithm on efficiency. In addition, three classifiers: the K-means, MSK-means MSK-means and support vector machine (SVM), are used to identify seizure and localize epileptogenic zone using delay permutation entropy features. The experimental results demonstrate that identifying seizure with the MSK-means algorithm and delay permutation entropy achieves 4. 7 % higher accuracy than that of K-means, and 0. 7 % higher accuracy than that of the SVM.

  7. Efficacy of sodium channel blockers in SCN2A early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Striano, Pasquale; Gennaro, Elena; Bassi, Laura; Olivotto, Sara; Tadini, Laura; Mosca, Fabio; Barbieri, Sergio; Zara, Federico; Fumagalli, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Recent clinical evidence supports a targeted therapeutic approach for genetic epileptic encephalopathies based on the molecular dysfunction. A 2-day-old male infant presented with epileptic encephalopathy characterized by burst-suppression EEG background and tonic-clonic migrating partial seizures. The condition was refractory to phenobarbital, pyridoxine, pyridoxal phosphate and levetiracetam, but a dramatic response to an intravenous loading dose of phenytoin was documented by video-EEG monitoring. Over weeks phenytoin was successfully switched to carbamazepine to prevent seizure relapses associated with difficulty in maintaining proper blood levels of phenytoin. Genetic analysis identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation (c.[4633A>G]p.[Met1545Val]) in SCN2A. At two years and three months of age the patient is still seizure-free on carbamazepine, although a developmental delay is evident. Sodium channel blockers represent the first-line treatment for confirmed or suspected SCN2A-related epileptic encephalopathies. In severe cases with compatible electro-clinical features we propose a treatment algorithm based on a test trial with high dose intravenous phenytoin followed in case of a positive response by carbamazepine, more suitable for long-term maintenance treatment. Because of their rarity, collaborative studies are needed to delineate shared therapeutic protocols for EIEE based on the electro-clinical features and the presumed underlying genetic substrate. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity. PMID:26063964

  9. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism during seizure in spontaneously epileptic El mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Chisa; Ochi, Hironobu; Yamagami, Sakae; Kawabe, Joji; Kobashi, Toshiko; Okamura, Terue; Yamada, Ryusaku

    1995-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were examined in spontaneously epileptic El mice using autoradiography with 125 I-IMP and 14 C-DG in the interictal phase and during seizure. El (+) mice that developed generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and El (-) mice that received no stimulation and had no history of epileptic seizures were examined. The seizure non-susceptible, maternal strain ddY mice were used as control. Uptake ratios for IMP and DG in mouse brain were calculated using the autoradiographic density. In the interictal phase, the pattern of local cerebral blood flow of El (+) mice was similar to that of ddY and El (-) mice, and glucose metabolism in the hippocampus was higher in El (+) mice than in El (-) and ddY mice, but flow and metabolism were nearly matched. During seizure, no significant changed blood flow and increased glucose metabolism in the hippocampus, the epileptic focus, and no markedly changed blood flow and depressed glucose metabolism in other brain regions were observed and considered to be flow-metabolism uncoupling. These observations have never been reported in clinical or experimental studies of epilepsy. Seizures did not cause large regional differences in cerebral blood flow. Therefore, only glucose metabolism is useful for detection of the focus of secondary generalized seizures in El mice, and appeared possibly to be related to the pathophysiology of secondary generalized epilepsy in El mice. (author)

  10. Neo-Timm staining in the thalamus of chronically epileptic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamani C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus is an important modulator of seizures and is severely affected in cholinergic models of epilepsy. In the present study, chronically epileptic rats had their brains processed for neo-Timm and acetylcholinesterase two months after the induction of status epilepticus with pilocarpine. Both controls and pilocarpine-treated animals presented neo-Timm staining in the anterodorsal nucleus, laterodorsal nucleus, reticular nucleus, most intralaminar nuclei, nucleus reuniens, and rhomboid nucleus of the thalamus, as well as in the zona incerta. The intensity of neo-Timm staining was similar in control and pilocarpine-treated rats, except for the nucleus reuniens and the rhomboid nucleus, which had a lower intensity of staining in the epileptic group. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, zinc seems to modulate glutamate release and to decrease seizure activity. In this context, a reduction of neo-Timm-stained terminals in the midline thalamus could ultimately result in an increased excitatory activity, not only within its related nuclei, but also in anatomical structures that receive their efferent connections. This might contribute to the pathological substrate observed in chronic pilocarpine-treated epileptic animals.

  11. Active reward processing during human sleep: insights from sleep-related eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampros ePerogamvros

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present two carefully documented cases of patients with sleep-related eating disorder (SRED, a parasomnia which is characterized by involuntary compulsive eating during the night and whose pathophysiology is not known. Using video-polysomnography and psychometric examination, we found that both patients present elevated novelty seeking and increased reward sensitivity on reward-related questionnaires. In light of new evidence on the mesolimbic dopaminergic implication in compulsive eating disorders, our findings suggest a role of an active reward system during sleep in the manifestation of SRED.

  12. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in girls and the risk of autoimmune disorders: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV Vaccine Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Erin Y.; Smith, Leah M.; Ellis, Anne K.; Whitaker, Heather; Law, Barbara; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Farrington, Paddy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite demonstrated effectiveness in real-world settings, concerns persist regarding the safety of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. We sought to assess the risk of autoimmune disorders following HPV4 vaccination among grade 8 girls eligible for Ontario’s school-based HPV vaccination program. METHODS: We undertook a population-based retrospective cohort study using Ontario’s administrative health and vaccination databases from 2007 to 2013. The self-controlled case series method was used to compare the rate of a composite end point of autoimmune disorders diagnosed during days 7–60 post-vaccination (“exposed” follow-up) to that at any other time (“unexposed”). The analysis was repeated to assess the effect of a history of immune-mediated diseases and time since vaccination. We also conducted an exploratory analysis of individual autoimmune disorders. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional Poisson regression, adjusted for age, seasonality, concomitant vaccinations and infections. RESULTS: The study cohort consisted of 290 939 girls aged 12–17 years who were eligible for vaccination between 2007 and 2013. There was no significant risk for developing an autoimmune disorder following HPV4 vaccination (n = 681; rate ratio 1.12, 95% CI 0.85–1.47), and the association was unchanged by a history of immune-mediated disorders and time since vaccination. Exploratory analyses of individual autoimmune disorders found no significant risks, including for Bell palsy (n = 65; rate ratio 1.73, 95% CI 0.77–3.89), optic neuritis (n = 67; rate ratio 1.57, 95% CI 0.74–3.33) and Graves disease (n = 47; rate ratio 1.55, 95% CI 0.92–2.63). INTERPRETATION: We did not observe an increased risk of autoimmune disorders following HPV4 vaccination among teenaged girls. These findings should reassure parents and health care providers. PMID:29807937

  13. Heterozygous CDKL5 Knockout Female Mice Are a Valuable Animal Model for CDKL5 Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Claudia; Gennaccaro, Laura; Trazzi, Stefania; Bastianini, Stefano; Bettini, Simone; Martire, Viviana Lo; Ren, Elisa; Medici, Giorgio; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Rimondini, Roberto; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2018-01-01

    CDKL5 disorder is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked CDKL5 (cyclin-dependent kinase-like five) gene. CDKL5 disorder primarily affects girls and is characterized by early-onset epileptic seizures, gross motor impairment, intellectual disability, and autistic features. Although all CDKL5 female patients are heterozygous, the most valid disease-related model, the heterozygous female Cdkl5 knockout (Cdkl5 +/−) mouse, has been little characterized. The lack of...

  14. Revertant mosaicism in a human skin fragility disorder results from slipped mispairing and mitotic recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; He, Yinghong; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Onder, Meltem; Happle, Rudolf; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Has, Cristina

    Spontaneous gene repair, also called revertant mosaicism, has been documented in several genetic disorders involving organs that undergo self-regeneration, including the skin. Genetic reversion may occur through different mechanisms, and in a single individual, the mutation can be repaired in

  15. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrast, R.; Saher, G.; Nave, K.A.; Verheijen, M.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid

  16. A human phenome-interactome network of protein complexes implicated in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart; Størling, Zenia, Marian

    2007-01-01

    the known disease-causing protein as the top candidate, and in 870 intervals with no identified disease-causing gene, provides novel candidates implicated in disorders such as retinitis pigmentosa, epithelial ovarian cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, type...

  17. Endogenous sulfur dioxide regulates hippocampal neuron apoptosis in developing epileptic rats and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Manman; Han, Ying; Li, Qinrui; Zhang, Jing

    2018-02-05

    Epilepsy is among the most common neurological diseases in children. Recurrent seizures can result in hippocampal damage and seriously impair learning and memory functions in children. However, the mechanisms underlying epilepsy-related brain injury are unclear. Neuronal apoptosis is among the most common neuropathological manifestations of brain injury. Endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) has been shown to be involved in seizures and related neuron apoptosis. However, the role of endogenous SO 2 in epilepsy remains unclear. This study assessed whether endogenous SO 2 is involved in epilepsy and its underlying mechanisms. Using a rat epilepsy model induced by an intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA), we found that hippocampal neuron apoptosis was induced in epileptic rats, and the SO 2 content and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) activity in the plasma were increased compared to those in the control group. However, the inhibition of SO 2 production by l-aspartate-β-hydroxamate (HDX) can subvert this response 72h after an epileptic seizure. No difference in apoptosis was observed 7 d after the epileptic seizure in the KA and KA+HDX groups. The protein expression levels of AAT2, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), pancreatic eIF2 kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and phospho-PERK (p-PERK) were remarkably elevated in the hippocampi of the epileptic rats, while the HDX treatment was capable of reversing this process 7 d after the epileptic seizure. These results indicate that the inhibition of endogenous SO 2 production can alleviate neuronal apoptosis and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway during the initial stages after epileptic seizure, but inhibiting SO 2 production only delayed the occurrence of apoptosis and did not prevent neuronal apoptosis in the epileptic rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  19. Severe neonatal epileptic encephalopathy and KCNQ2 mutation: neuropathological substrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eDalen Meurs-Van Der Schoor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Neonatal convulsions are clinical manifestations in a heterogeneous group of disorders with different etiology and outcome. They are attributed to several genetic causes. Methods:We describe a patient with intractable neonatal seizures who died from respiratory compromise during a status epilepticus. Results:This case report provides EEG, MRI, genetic analysis and neuropathological data. Genetic analysis revealed a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ2 gene, which encodes a subunit of a voltage-gated potassium channel. KCNQ2 gene mutation is associated with intractable neonatal seizures. EEG, MRI data as well as mutation analysis have been described in other KCNQ2 cases. Postmortem neuropathologic investigation revealed mild malformation of cortical development with increased heterotopic neurons in the deep white matter compared to an age-matched control subject. The new finding of this study is the combination of a KCNQ2 mutation and the cortical abnormalities. Conclusions:KCNQ2 mutations should be considered in neonates with refractory epilepsy of unknown cause. The mild cortical malformation is an important new finding, though it remains unknown whether these cortical abnormalities are due to the KCNQ2 mutation or are secondary to the refractory seizures.

  20. Paradoxical Seizure Response to Phenytoin in an Epileptic Heroin Addict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Verma, Beni R; Dewberry, Robert G; Pula, Thaddeus

    2015-06-01

    Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window and seizures can occur at both ends of the spectrum. A 41-year-old man with a history of a seizure disorder and heroin addiction presented with dizziness following 2 generalized tonic-clonic seizures that occurred earlier that day. The patient had received a loading dose of phenytoin for seizures associated with a subtherapeutic level 5 days previously. Initial evaluation revealed an elevated phenytoin level of 32.6 mcg/mL and an opiate-positive toxicology screen. Levetiracetam was started on the day of presentation and phenytoin was held until the level returned to the therapeutic range. The patient's dizziness resolved and he had no additional seizures. Evaluation for reversible causes of seizure activity along with anticonvulsant administration is generally the standard of care for breakthrough seizures. Phenytoin blood levels, if supratherapeutic, may be at least partially responsible for breakthrough seizure activity; in this circumstance, holding phenytoin and temporarily adding another anticonvulsant may be indicated.

  1. Treatment of middle ear ventilation disorders: sheep as animal model for stenting the human Eustachian tube--a cadaver study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas Miller

    Full Text Available Eustachian tube disorders can lead to chronic otitis media with consecutive conductive hearing loss. To improve treatment and to develop new types of implants such as stents, an adequate experimental animal model is required. As the middle ear of sheep is known to be comparable to the human middle ear, the dimensions of the Eustachian tube in two strains of sheep were investigated. The Eustachian tube and middle ear of half heads of heathland and blackface sheep were filled with silicone rubber, blended with barium sulfate to induce X-ray visibility. Images were taken by digital volume tomography. The tubes were segmented, and a three-dimensional model of every Eustachian tube was generated. The lengths, diameters and shapes were determined. Additionally, the feasibility of endoscopic stent implantation and fixation was tested in cadaver experiments. The length of the tube between ostium pharyngeum and the isthmus and the diameters were comparable to published values for the human tube. The tube was easily accessible through the nose, and then stents could be implanted and fixed at the isthmus. The sheep appears to be a promising model for testing new stent treatments for middle ear ventilation disorders.

  2. Comparative studies of placentation and immunology in non-human primates suggest a scenario for the evolution of deep trophoblast invasion and an explanation for human pregnancy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Anthony M

    2011-04-01

    Deep trophoblast invasion in the placental bed has been considered the hallmark of human pregnancy. It occurs by two routes, interstitial and endovascular, and results in transformation of the walls of the spiral arteries as they traverse the decidua and the inner third of the myometrium. Disturbances in this process are associated with reproductive disorders such preeclampsia. In contrast, trophoblast invasion in Old World monkeys occurs only by the endovascular route and seldom reaches the myometrium. Recently, it was shown that this pattern is maintained in gibbons, but that the human arrangement also occurs in chimpanzee and gorilla. There is an interesting parallel with results from placental immunology regarding the evolution of the major histocompatability complex class I antigen HLA-C and its cognate receptors. HLA-C is not present in Old World monkeys or gibbons. It emerged in the orangutan and became polymorphic in the lineage leading to gorilla, bonobo, chimpanzee, and human. Interaction between HLA-C1 and HLA-C2 on the surface of trophoblast and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) expressed by uterine natural killer cells are important regulators of trophoblast invasion. Evolution of this system in great apes may have been one prerequisite for deep trophoblast invasion but seems to have come at a price. The evidence now suggests that certain combinations of maternal genotype for KIRs and fetal genotype for HLA-C imply an increased risk of preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and recurrent abortion. The fetal genotype is in part derived from the father providing an explanation for the paternal contribution to reproductive disorders.

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder associated with natural and human-made disasters in the World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, E. J.; Atwoli, L.; Kawakami, N.; Navarro-Mateu, F.; Piotrowski, P.; King, A. J.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.; Alonso, J.; Bunting, B.; Demyttenaere, K.; Florescu, S.; de Girolamo, G.; Gluzman, S.; Haro, J. M.; de Jonge, P.; Karam, E. G.; Lee, S.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Mneimneh, Z.; Pennell, B.-E.; Posada-Villa, J.; Salmerón, D.; Takeshima, T.; Kessler, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following natural and human-made disasters has been undertaken for more than three decades. Although PTSD prevalence estimates vary widely, most are in the 20–40% range in disaster-focused studies but considerably lower (3–5%) in the few general population epidemiological surveys that evaluated disaster-related PTSD as part of a broader clinical assessment. The World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys provide an opportunity to examine disaster-related PTSD in representative general population surveys across a much wider range of sites than in previous studies. Method Although disaster-related PTSD was evaluated in 18 WMH surveys, only six in high-income countries had enough respondents for a risk factor analysis. Predictors considered were socio-demographics, disaster characteristics, and pre-disaster vulnerability factors (childhood family adversities, prior traumatic experiences, and prior mental disorders). Results Disaster-related PTSD prevalence was 0.0–3.8% among adult (ages 18+) WMH respondents and was significantly related to high education, serious injury or death of someone close, forced displacement from home, and pre-existing vulnerabilities (prior childhood family adversities, other traumas, and mental disorders). Of PTSD cases 44.5% were among the 5% of respondents classified by the model as having highest PTSD risk. Conclusion Disaster-related PTSD is uncommon in high-income WMH countries. Risk factors are consistent with prior research: severity of exposure, history of prior stress exposure, and pre-existing mental disorders. The high concentration of PTSD among respondents with high predicted risk in our model supports the focus of screening assessments that identify disaster survivors most in need of preventive interventions. PMID:27573281

  4. Post-traumatic stress disorder associated with natural and human-made disasters in the World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, E J; Atwoli, L; Kawakami, N; Navarro-Mateu, F; Piotrowski, P; King, A J; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Alonso, J; Bunting, B; Demyttenaere, K; Florescu, S; de Girolamo, G; Gluzman, S; Haro, J M; de Jonge, P; Karam, E G; Lee, S; Kovess-Masfety, V; Medina-Mora, M E; Mneimneh, Z; Pennell, B-E; Posada-Villa, J; Salmerón, D; Takeshima, T; Kessler, R C

    2017-01-01

    Research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following natural and human-made disasters has been undertaken for more than three decades. Although PTSD prevalence estimates vary widely, most are in the 20-40% range in disaster-focused studies but considerably lower (3-5%) in the few general population epidemiological surveys that evaluated disaster-related PTSD as part of a broader clinical assessment. The World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys provide an opportunity to examine disaster-related PTSD in representative general population surveys across a much wider range of sites than in previous studies. Although disaster-related PTSD was evaluated in 18 WMH surveys, only six in high-income countries had enough respondents for a risk factor analysis. Predictors considered were socio-demographics, disaster characteristics, and pre-disaster vulnerability factors (childhood family adversities, prior traumatic experiences, and prior mental disorders). Disaster-related PTSD prevalence was 0.0-3.8% among adult (ages 18+) WMH respondents and was significantly related to high education, serious injury or death of someone close, forced displacement from home, and pre-existing vulnerabilities (prior childhood family adversities, other traumas, and mental disorders). Of PTSD cases 44.5% were among the 5% of respondents classified by the model as having highest PTSD risk. Disaster-related PTSD is uncommon in high-income WMH countries. Risk factors are consistent with prior research: severity of exposure, history of prior stress exposure, and pre-existing mental disorders. The high concentration of PTSD among respondents with high predicted risk in our model supports the focus of screening assessments that identify disaster survivors most in need of preventive interventions.

  5. Heme orientational disorder in human adult hemoglobin reconstituted with a ring fluorinated heme and its functional consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Satoshi; Hirai, Yueki; Kawano, Shin; Imai, Kiyohiro; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A ring fluorinated heme, 13,17-bis(2-carboxylatoethyl)-3,8-diethyl-2-fluoro-7,12, 18-trimethyl-porphyrin-atoiron(III), has been incorporated into human adult hemoglobin (Hb A). The heme orientational disorder in the individual subunits of the protein has been readily characterized using 19 F NMR and the O 2 binding properties of the protein have been evaluated through the oxygen equilibrium analysis. The equilibrated orientations of hemes in α- and β- subunits of the reconstituted protein were found to be almost completely opposite to each other, and hence were largely different from those of the native and the previously reported reconstituted proteins [T. Jue, G.N. La Mar, Heme orientational heterogeneity in deuterohemin-reconstituted horse and human hemoglobin characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 119 (1984) 640-645]. Despite the large difference in the degree of the heme orientational disorder in the subunits of the proteins, the O 2 affinity and the cooperativity of the protein reconstituted with 2-MF were similar to those of the proteins reconstituted with a series of hemes chemically modified at the heme 3- and 8-positions [K. Kawabe, K. Imaizumi, Z. Yoshida, K. Imai, I. Tyuma, Studies on reconstituted myoglobins and hemoglobins II. Role of the heme side chains in the oxygenation of hemoglobin, J. Biochem. 92 (1982) 1713-1722], whose O 2 affinity and cooperativity were higher and lower, respectively, relative to those of native protein. These results indicated that the heme orientational disorder could exert little effect, if any, on the O 2 affinity properties of Hb A. This finding provides new insights into structure-function relationship of Hb A

  6. Simplifying the human serum proteome for discriminating patients with bipolar disorder of other psychiatry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Jemmyson Romário; Galazzi, Rodrigo Moretto; de Lima, Tatiani Brenelli; Banzato, Cláudio Eduardo Muller; de Almeida Lima E Silva, Luiz Fernando; de Rosalmeida Dantas, Clarissa; Gozzo, Fábio Cézar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2017-12-01

    An exploratory analysis using proteomic strategies in blood serum of patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and with other psychiatric conditions such as Schizophrenia (SCZ), can provide a better understanding of this disorder, as well as their discrimination based on their proteomic profile. The proteomic profile of blood serum samples obtained from patients with BD using lithium or other drugs (N=14), healthy controls, including non-family (HCNF; N=3) and family (HCF; N=9), patients with schizophrenia (SCZ; N=23), and patients using lithium for other psychiatric conditions (OD; N=4) were compared. Four methods for simplifying the serum samples proteome were evaluated for both removing the most abundant proteins and for enriching those of lower-abundance: protein depletion with acetonitrile (ACN), dithiothreitol (DTT), sequential depletion using DTT and ACN, and protein equalization using commercial ProteoMiner® kit (PM). For proteomic evaluation, 2-D DIGE and nanoLC-MS/MS analysis were employed. PM method was the best strategy for removing proteins of high abundance. Through 2-D DIGE gel image comparison, 37 protein spots were found differentially abundant (p<0.05, Student's t-test), which exhibited ≥2.0-fold change of the average value of normalized spot intensities in the serum of SCZ, BD and OD patients compared to subject controls (HCF and HCNF). From these spots detected, 13 different proteins were identified: ApoA1, ApoE, ApoC3, ApoA4, Samp, SerpinA1, TTR, IgK, Alb, VTN, TR, C4A and C4B. Proteomic analysis allowed the discrimination of patients with BD from patients with other mental disorders, such as SCZ. The findings in this exploratory study may also contribute for better understanding the pathophysiology of these disorders and finding potential serum biomarkers for these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrast, Roman; Saher, Gesine; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Verheijen, Mark H G

    2011-03-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid synthesis of myelinating glial cells because of blood barriers shielding the nervous system from circulating lipids. Recent insights from analysis of inherited lipid disorders, especially those with prevailing lipid depletion and from mouse models with glia-specific disruption of lipid metabolism, shed new light on this issue. The particular lipid composition of myelin, the transport of lipid-associated myelin proteins, and the necessity for timely assembly of the myelin sheath all contribute to the observed vulnerability of myelin to perturbed lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the uptake of external lipids may also play a role in the formation of myelin membranes. In addition to an improved understanding of basic myelin biology, these data provide a foundation for future therapeutic interventions aiming at preserving glial cell integrity in metabolic disorders.

  8. [Consensus statement on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risks in patients with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk (CVR) guidelines for HIV-infected patients. This document has been approved by an expert panel of GEAM, SPNS and GESIDA after reviewing the results of efficacy and safety of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendation strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on the GRADE system. A healthy lifestyle is recommended, no smoking and at least 30min of aerobic exercise daily. In diabetic patients the same treatment as non-HIV infected patients is recommended. HIV patients with dyslipidemia should be considered as high CVR, thus its therapeutic objective is an LDL less than 100mg/dL. The antihypertensive of ACE inhibitors and ARAII families are better tolerated and have a lower risk of interactions. In HIV-patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome and elevated transaminases with no defined etiology, the recommended is to rule out a hepatic steatosis Recommendations for action in hormone alterations are also updated. These new guidelines update previous recommendations regarding all those metabolic disorders involved in CVR. Hormone changes and their management and the impact of metabolic disorders on the liver are also included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  10. The Use of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) for the Treatment of Pediatric Aggression and Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Munshi, Kaizad R.; Oken, Tanya; Guild, Danielle J.; Trivedi, Harsh K.; Wang, Betty C.; Ducharme, Peter; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Aggressive symptomatology presents across multiple psychiatric, developmental, neurological and behavioral disorders, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying pathology. Anti-Epileptic Drugs (AEDs) have become an appealing alternative in the treatment of aggression, mood lability and impulsivity in adult and pediatric populations, although few controlled trials have explored their efficacy in treating pediatric populations. This review of the literature synthesizes the avail...

  11. Epoxide hydrolase affects estrogen production in the human ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, N; Fujiwara, H; Maeda, M; Fujii, S; Ueda, M

    2000-09-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of ovarian cell differentiation, we raised a new monoclonal antibody, HCL-3, which reacted with human luteal cells. It also reacted with human and porcine hepatocytes. The immunoaffinity-purified HCL-3 antigen from human corpora lutea (CL) was shown to be a 46-kDa protein. The N-terminal 22 amino acids of the 46-kDa protein from porcine liver exhibited high homology (82%) to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH). The purified HCL-3 antigen from human CL or porcine liver showed EH enzyme activity, confirming that HCL-3 antigen is identical to mEH, which is reported to detoxify the toxic substrates in the liver. In human follicles, mEH was immunohistochemically detected on granulosa and theca interna cells. In the menstrual and pregnant CL, mEH was also expressed on large and small luteal cells. A competitive inhibitor of EH, 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane, inhibited the conversion of estradiol from testosterone by granulosa cells cultured in vitro, indicating the involvement of mEH in ovarian estrogen production. Because anticonvulsant sodium valproate and its analogues were reported to inhibit EH enzyme activity, these findings provide a new insight into the etiology of endocrine disorders that are frequently observed among epileptic patients taking anticonvulsant drugs.

  12. Seizure characteristics and the use of anti-epileptic drugs in children and young people with brain tumours and epileptic seizures: Analysis of regional paediatric cancer service population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Chiara; Liu, Jo-Fen; Walker, David A; Whitehouse, William P

    2018-03-21

    Epileptic seizures complicate the management of childhood brain tumours. There are no published standards for clinical practice concerning risk factors, treatment selection or strategies to withdraw treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED). we undertook a case note review of 120 patients with newly diagnosed brain tumours, referred to a regional paediatric cancer service. data was available on 117/120 (98%) children seizures. A cortical tumour location was associated with the highest risk of seizures (OR: 7.1; CI 95% 2.9-17.3). At a median follow up of 24 months (IQR 25°-75° : 15-48), 22/35 (63%) with seizures, had a single seizure episode, 15/35 (43%) were seizure free (SF) on AEDs, 13/35 (37%) were SF off AEDs, and 7/35 (20%) experienced continuing epileptic seizures. Overall 34/35 (97%) were treated with AEDs after a seizure, of whom 12/35 (35%) withdrew from AED medication, and although 4/35 (12%) had seizure relapse, all were after further acute events. The median duration of AED before withdrawal was 11 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-14 months), and the median follow up after withdrawal was 15 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-34 months). Seizures affect about 1/3rd of children and young people presenting with and being treated for brain tumours particularly when the tumour is in the cerebral cortex. The low risk of recurrent seizures after AED treatment justifies consideration of early withdrawal of AED after seizure control. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Won

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD. FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation (fmr gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm.

  15. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jinyoung; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Park, Sookyoung; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-06-20

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation ( fmr ) gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm.

  16. Comparative studies of placentation and immunology in non-human primates suggest a scenario for the evolution of deep trophoblast invasion and an explanation for human pregnancy disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael

    2011-01-01

    in the orangutan and became polymorphic in the lineage leading to gorilla, bonobo, chimpanzee, and human. Interaction between HLA-C1 and HLA-C2 on the surface of trophoblast and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) expressed by uterine natural killer cells are important regulators of trophoblast invasion....... Evolution of this system in great apes may have been one prerequisite for deep trophoblast invasion but seems to have come at a price. The evidence now suggests that certain combinations of maternal genotype for KIRs and fetal genotype for HLA-C imply an increased risk of preeclampsia, fetal growth...... restriction, and recurrent abortion. The fetal genotype is in part derived from the father providing an explanation for the paternal contribution to reproductive disorders....

  17. Discovery of previously unidentified genomic disorders from the duplication architecture of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Andrew J; Hansen, Sierra; Selzer, Rebecca R; Cheng, Ze; Regan, Regina; Hurst, Jane A; Stewart, Helen; Price, Sue M; Blair, Edward; Hennekam, Raoul C; Fitzpatrick, Carrie A; Segraves, Rick; Richmond, Todd A; Guiver, Cheryl; Albertson, Donna G; Pinkel, Daniel; Eis, Peggy S; Schwartz, Stuart; Knight, Samantha J L; Eichler, Evan E

    2006-09-01

    Genomic disorders are characterized by the presence of flanking segmental duplications that predispose these regions to recurrent rearrangement. Based on the duplication architecture of the genome, we investigated 130 regions that we hypothesized as candidates for previously undescribed genomic disorders. We tested 290 individuals with mental retardation by BAC array comparative genomic hybridization and identified 16 pathogenic rearrangements, including de novo microdeletions of 17q21.31 found in four individuals. Using oligonucleotide arrays, we refined the breakpoints of this microdeletion, defining a 478-kb critical region containing six genes that were deleted in all four individuals. We mapped the breakpoints of this deletion and of four other pathogenic rearrangements in 1q21.1, 15q13, 15q24 and 17q12 to flanking segmental duplications, suggesting that these are also sites of recurrent rearrangement. In common with the 17q21.31 deletion, these breakpoint regions are sites of copy number polymorphism in controls, indicating that these may be inherently unstable genomic regions.

  18. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal eGoswami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e. that require the hippocampus or not the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze. Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma, PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  19. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sonal; Samuel, Sherin; Sierra, Olga R; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e., that require the hippocampus or not) the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM). Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  20. Clinical Spectrum, Etiology, and Outcome of Neurological Disorders in the Rural Hospital of Mosango, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukendi, Deby; Lilo Kalo, Jean-Roger; Mpanya, Alain; Minikulu, Luigi; Kayembe, Tharcisse; Lutumba, Pascal; Barbé, Barbara; Gillet, Philippe; Jacobs, Jan; Van Loen, Harry; Yansouni, Cédric P; Chappuis, François; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Verdonck, Kristien; Boelaert, Marleen; Winkler, Andrea S; Bottieau, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    There is little published information on the epidemiology of neurological disorders in rural Central Africa, although the burden is considered to be substantial. This study aimed to investigate the pattern, etiology, and outcome of neurological disorders in children > 5 years and adults admitted to the rural hospital of Mosango, province of Kwilu, Democratic Republic of Congo, with a focus on severe and treatable infections of the central nervous system (CNS). From September 2012 to January 2015, 351 consecutive patients hospitalized for recent and/or ongoing neurological disorder were prospectively evaluated by a neurologist, subjected to a set of reference diagnostic tests in blood or cerebrospinal fluid, and followed-up for 3-6 months after discharge. No neuroimaging was available. Severe headache (199, 56.7%), gait/walking disorders (97, 27.6%), epileptic seizure (87, 24.8%), and focal neurological deficit (86, 24.5%) were the predominant presentations, often in combination. Infections of the CNS were documented in 63 (17.9%) patients and mainly included bacterial meningitis and unspecified meningoencephalitis (33, 9.4%), second-stage human African trypanosomiasis (10, 2.8%), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neurological disorders (10, 2.8%). Other focal/systemic infections with neurological manifestations were diagnosed in an additional 60 (17.1%) cases. The leading noncommunicable conditions were epilepsy (61, 17.3%), psychiatric disorders (56, 16.0%), and cerebrovascular accident (23, 6.6%). Overall fatality rate was 8.2% (29/351), but up to 23.8% for CNS infections. Sequelae were observed in 76 (21.6%) patients. Clinical presentations and etiologies of neurological disorders were very diverse in this rural Central African setting and caused considerable mortality and morbidity.

  1. Brain spect in the pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Buchpiguel

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients consists of neurological examination, intensive electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring and anatomical studies (CT and MRI. Functional methods such as PET and SPECT imaging are now used more frequently. We have studied pre-operatively 15 adult epileptic patients (8 female, 7 male using a rotational scintillation camera interfaced to a dedicated computer. The tomographic images were obtained 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 99mTc_HMPAO. All had MRI scanning and intensive EEG monitoring which generally included seizure recording. Five patients had progressive lesions (3 meningiomas, 2 astrocytomas. In 10 patients, neuroradiological studies did not show the presence of progressive lesions (2 normal scans and 8 cases with inactive lesions. Two patients with meningioma showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site while the third patient had a marked hyperperfusion which might correlate with the clinical diagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. In the astrocytoma patients SPECT scans showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site. Data obtained from the 10 patients without progressive CNS lesions showed: (a in 4, SPECT findings correlated well with the anatomical findings; (b in 5 instances, SPECT was able to disclose additional functional deficits; (c in one case, there was no SPECT correlate of a discrete anatomical lesion. In 5 of these cases with no progressive lesions (n=10 SPECT findings were useful as a complementary tool in determining the clinical or surgical management of these patients. Despite the small number and hete-rogenicity of the present sample, SPECT seems to be an useful tool as part of the clinical workup of epileptic patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  2. MEG source localization of spatially extended generators of epileptic activity: comparing entropic and hierarchical bayesian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Lina, Jean Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG) or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG) signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i) brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii) brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP) method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM) and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm(2) to 30 cm(2), whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered.

  3. MEG source localization of spatially extended generators of epileptic activity: comparing entropic and hierarchical bayesian approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheda Arman Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm(2 to 30 cm(2, whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered.

  4. Preictal dynamics of EEG complexity in intracranially recorded epileptic seizure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208-217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis.The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8-6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures.

  5. Automated Detection of Epileptic Biomarkers in Resting-State Interictal MEG Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel C. Soriano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain differences between brain networks of healthy and epilectic subjects have been reported even during the interictal activity, in which no epileptic seizures occur. Here, magnetoencephalography (MEG data recorded in the resting state is used to discriminate between healthy subjects and patients with either idiopathic generalized epilepsy or frontal focal epilepsy. Signal features extracted from interictal periods without any epileptiform activity are used to train a machine learning algorithm to draw a diagnosis. This is potentially relevant to patients without frequent or easily detectable spikes. To analyze the data, we use an up-to-date machine learning algorithm and explore the benefits of including different features obtained from the MEG data as inputs to the algorithm. We find that the relative power spectral density of the MEG time-series is sufficient to distinguish between healthy and epileptic subjects with a high prediction accuracy. We also find that a combination of features such as the phase-locked value and the relative power spectral density allow to discriminate generalized and focal epilepsy, when these features are calculated over a filtered version of the signals in certain frequency bands. Machine learning algorithms are currently being applied to the analysis and classification of brain signals. It is, however, less evident to identify the proper features of these signals that are prone to be used in such machine learning algorithms. Here, we evaluate the influence of the input feature selection on a clinical scenario to distinguish between healthy and epileptic subjects. Our results indicate that such distinction is possible with a high accuracy (86%, allowing the discrimination between idiopathic generalized and frontal focal epilepsy types.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in epileptic adult patients: experience in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solosrungruang, Anusorn; Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Chinwarun, Yotin

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to classify the imaging structural abnormalities of epileptic adult patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) of the brain at Ramathibodi Hospital and to correlate with the clinical data and EEG. MR imaging of 91 adult epileptic patients (age ranging from 15-85 years old with an average of 36.90 years old) were retrospectively reviewed and classified into eight groups according to etiologies. Then clinical data and EEG correlations were analyzed using the Kappa analysis. All of the MR imaging of the brain were performed at Ramathibodi Hospital from January 2001 to December 2002. Secondary generalized tonic clonic seizure was the most common clinical presenting seizure type. Extra temporal lobe epilepsy was the most common clinical diagnosis. Of the thirty-three patients who underwent EEG before performing MR imaging, 17 had normal EEG From MR imaging, temporal lobe lesion was the main affected location and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was the most common cause of the epilepsy in patients. For age group classification, young adult (15-34 years old) and adult (35-64 years old) age groups, MTS was the most common etiology of epilepsy with cortical dysplasia being the second most common cause for the first group and vascular disease for the latter group. For the older age group (> 64 years old), vascular disease and idiopathic cause were equally common etiologies. MRI, EEG findings, and clinical data were all concordant with statistical significance. MRI is the non-invasive modality of choice for evaluation of the epileptic patients. The result is concordant with the clinical and EEG findings. It can detect and localize the structural abnormality accurately and is useful in the treatment planning.

  7. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  8. [Sleep disorders and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryo; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that patients with epilepsy often have insomnia and/or daytime sleepiness; the symptomatologic features differ in seizure types. Not only the administration of anti-epileptics, but also inappropriate sleep hygiene cause daytime sleepiness. In subjective assessment of sleepiness, we need to pay attention if it can correctly assess or not. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with epilepsy is approximately 10-30%. Sleep apnea deteriorates the seizure control because of worsen sleep condition by sleep apnea, especially in elderly patients. Some researchers report that continuous positive airway pressure was effective for seizure control. Patients with epilepsy occasionally have REM sleep behavior disorder as comorbidity. Examination using polysomnography is required for differential diagnosis.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of epileptic seizure in substance-abusing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Surendra K; Singh, Shubh M; Bhardwaj, Rahul; Kumar, Suresh; Basu, Debasish; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2009-08-01

    Life-time prevalence of epileptic seizures was assessed in 626 consecutive patients treated for substance abuse. Seizures were reported in 8.63% (9.2% in alcohol abusers, 12.5% in opioid abusers). A total of 64.8% of the seizures were associated with substance use. These occurred during withdrawal in the alcohol cohort and during intoxication with dextropropoxyphene and withdrawal from heroin or poppy husk in the opioid cohort. Results indicate that seizures may be more common in older patients with longer duration of dependence among those abusing alcohol.

  10. Does status epilepticus modify the effect of ifenprodil on cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbasova, Kenul; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2018), s. 126-132 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15032 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * immature rats * ifenprodil * cortical stimulation * epileptic afterdischarges Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2016

  11. Transient epileptic amnesia differentiated from psychogenic "fugue": neuropsychological, EEG, and PET findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, M D; Panayiotopoulos, C P; Lewis, P

    1994-08-01

    A patient had repeated episodes of transient loss of memory, which had been attributed to psychogenic causes. Preservation of his sense of personal identity and the presence of repetitive questioning indicated an organic basis, however, and the multiplicity of the attacks and their brief duration suggested an epileptic aetiology. Although three standard EEGs, CT and MRI were all normal, two sleep EEGs confirmed bilateral foci in the temporal lobes. The attacks responded to an anticonvulsant. A fluoro-deoxyglucose PET scan, performed a few months after the most recent attack, was normal. The patient also had impaired anterograde memory that persisted six months after recovery from the acute attacks.

  12. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F; Maggadottir, S Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T; Nair, Rajan P; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Orange, Jordan S; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-04-20

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B-cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0 × 10(-9)) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P=4.8 × 10(-16)). Clec16a knockdown (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared with controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition.

  13. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology...

  14. Androgen imprinting of the brain in animal models and humans with intersex disorders: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovszky, Zoltan; Hutson, John M

    2002-11-01

    Psychosexual development, gender assignment and surgical treatment in patients with intersex are controversial issues in the medical literature. Some groups are of the opinion that gender identity and sexual orientation are determined prenatally secondary to the fetal hormonal environment causing irreversible development of the nervous system. We reviewed the evidence in animal and human studies to determine the possible role of early postnatal androgen production in gender development. An extensive literature review was performed of data from animal experiments and human studies. RESULTS Many animal studies show that adding or removing hormonal stimulus in early postnatal life can profoundly alter gender behavior of the adult animal. Human case studies show that late intervention is unable to reverse gender orientation from male to female. Most studies have not permitted testing of whether early gender assignment and treatment as female with suppression/ablation of postnatal androgen production leads to improved concordance of the gender identity and sex of rearing. Animal studies support a role for postnatal androgens in brain/behavior development with human studies neither completely supportive nor antagonistic. Therefore, gender assignment in infants with intersex should be made with the possibility in mind that postnatal testicular hormones at ages 1 to 6 months may affect gender identity. A case-control study is required to test the hypothesis that postnatal androgen exposure may convert ambisexual brain functions to committed male behavior patterns.

  15. Fatty acid omega-oxidation as a rescue pathway for fatty acid oxidation disorders in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Komen, Jasper; Kemp, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can be degraded via different mechanisms including alpha-, beta- and omega-oxidation. In humans, a range of different genetic diseases has been identified in which either mitochondrial FA beta-oxidation, peroxisomal FA beta-oxidation or FA alpha-oxidation is impaired. Treatment

  16. Role of human papillomavirus in oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are epitheliotropic viruses with an affinity for keratinocytes and are principally found in the anogenital tract, urethra, skin, larynx, tracheobronchial and oral mucosa. On the basis of high, but variable frequency of HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), malignant potential of HPV infection has been hypothesized but not definitely confirmed. The aim of this review was to highlight the genomic structure and possible mechanism of infection and carcinogenesis by HPV in the oral mucosa and to review the frequency of HPV prevalence in OSCC and oral potentially malignant disorders. A computer database search was performed through the use of PubMed from 1994 to 2014. Search keywords used were: HPV and oral cancer, HPV and oral leukoplakia, HPV and oral lichen planus, HPV and OSCC, HPV and verrucous carcinoma, HPV and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, HPV and oral papilloma. PMID:26097339

  17. Elevated VGKC-Complex Antibodies in a Boy with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy in School-Age Children (FIRES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Marjorie A.; Hanrahan, Donncha; Anderson, Claire E.; O'Kane, Kathryn; Anderson, Jennifer; Casey, Maureen; de Sousa, Carlos; Cross, J. Helen; Wright, Sukvhir; Dale, Russell C.; Vincent, Angela; Kurian, Manju A.

    2011-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a clinically recognized epileptic encephalopathy of unknown aetiology. Presentation in previously healthy children is characterized by febrile status epilepticus. A pharmacoresistant epilepsy ensues, occurring in parallel with dramatic cognitive decline and…

  18. Sexual differentiation of the human brain: relation to gender identity, sexual orientation and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-04-01

    During the intrauterine period a testosterone surge masculinizes the fetal brain, whereas the absence of such a surge results in a feminine brain. As sexual differentiation of the brain takes place at a much later stage in development than sexual differentiation of the genitals, these two processes can be influenced independently of each other. Sex differences in cognition, gender identity (an individual's perception of their own sexual identity), sexual orientation (heterosexuality, homosexuality or bisexuality), and the risks of developing neuropsychiatric disorders are programmed into our brain during early development. There is no evidence that one's postnatal social environment plays a crucial role in gender identity or sexual orientation. We discuss the relationships between structural and functional sex differences of various brain areas and the way they change along with any changes in the supply of sex hormones on the one hand and sex differences in behavior in health and disease on the other. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in fatty acid oxidation disorders: insights from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajner, Moacir; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez

    2015-11-20

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) plays a pivotal role in maintaining body energy homoeostasis mainly during catabolic states. Oxidation of fatty acids requires approximately 25 proteins. Inherited defects of FAO have been identified in the majority of these proteins and constitute an important group of inborn errors of metabolism. Affected patients usually present with severe hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy, whereas some patients may suffer acute and/or progressive encephalopathy whose pathogenesis is poorly known. In recent years growing evidence has emerged indicating that energy deficiency/disruption of mitochondrial homoeostasis is involved in the pathophysiology of some fatty acid oxidation defects (FAOD), although the exact underlying mechanisms are not yet established. Characteristic fatty acids and carnitine derivatives are found at high concentrations in these patients and more markedly during episodes of metabolic decompensation that are associated with worsening of clinical symptoms. Therefore, it is conceivable that these compounds may be toxic. We will briefly summarize the current knowledge obtained from patients and genetic mouse models with these disorders indicating that disruption of mitochondrial energy, redox and calcium homoeostasis is involved in the pathophysiology of the tissue damage in the more common FAOD, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiencies. We will also provide evidence that the fatty acids and derivatives that accumulate in these diseases disrupt mitochondrial homoeostasis. The elucidation of the toxic mechanisms of these compounds may offer new perspectives for potential novel adjuvant therapeutic strategies in selected disorders of this group. © 2016 Authors.

  20. Relevance of Conduction Disorders in Bachmann's Bundle During Sinus Rhythm in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuwen, Christophe P; Yaksh, Ameeta; Lanters, Eva A H; Kik, Charles; van der Does, Lisette J M E; Knops, Paul; Taverne, Yannick J H J; van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Oei, Frans B S; Bekkers, Jos A; Bogers, Ad J J C; Allessie, Maurits A; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-05-01

    Bachmann's bundle (BB) is considered to be the main route of interatrial conduction and to play a role in development of atrial fibrillation (AF). The goals of this study are to characterize the presence of conduction disorders in BB during sinus rhythm and to study their relation with AF. High-resolution epicardial mapping (192 unipolar electrodes, interelectrode distance: 2 mm) of sinus rhythm was performed in 185 patients during coronary artery bypass surgery of whom 13 had a history of paroxysmal AF. Continuous rhythm monitoring was used to detect postoperative AF during the first 5 postoperative days. In 67% of the patients, BB was activated from right to left; in the remaining patients from right and middle (21%), right, central, and left (8%), or central (4%) site. Mean effective conduction velocity was 89 cm/s. Conduction block was present in most patients (75%; median 1.1%, range 0-12.8) and was higher in patients with paroxysmal AF compared with patients without a history of AF (3.2% versus 0.9%; P=0.03). A high amount of conduction block (>4%) was associated with de novo postoperative AF (P=0.02). Longitudinal lines of conduction block >10 mm were also associated with postoperative AF (P=0.04). BB may be activated through multiple directions, but the predominant route of conduction is from right to left. Conduction velocity across BB is around 90 cm/s. Conduction is blocked in both longitudinal and transverse direction in the majority of patients. Conduction disorders, particularly long lines of longitudinal conduction block, are more pronounced in patients with AF episodes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human antiiodothyronine antibodies in patients with thyroid disorders and their effect on RIA of Iodothyronines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, P.; Balsamo, A.; Mongardi, L.; Rapetti, C.; de Filippis, V.

    1983-01-01

    Human antiiodothyronine antibodies have been reported to occur with several thyroid conditions, associated or not with anti-thyroglobulin and/or anti-microsomes antibodies. These antibodies interfere in RIA of iodothyronines (T 3 ), giving an underestimation or an overestimation of total hormone levels when using a non-specific precipitation method (e.g. charcoal, PEG) or a specific method (e.g. double antibody), respectively. The presence of anti-iodothyronine antibodies was investigated in seven thyroid patients. The effect of the human anti-T 3 in RIA of total T 3 was ckecked by using different precipitation methods; the results showed that in the presence of circulating antibodies the only reliable method for the evaluation of total hormone is the RIA of serum ethanol extract

  3. Acrolein and Human Disease: Untangling the Knotty Exposure Scenarios Accompanying Several Diverse Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Philip C

    2017-01-17

    Acrolein is a highly toxic electrophile that participates in many diseases, yet efforts to delineate its precise mechanistic contributions to specific conditions are complicated by its wide distribution within human environments. This Perspective develops the proposal that due to its mixed status as environmental pollutant, metabolic byproduct, and endotoxicant which forms via ubiquitous pathophysiological processes, many diseases likely involve acrolein released from multiple sources. Although the category boundaries are indistinct, at least four identifiable exposure scenarios are identifiable. First, in some syndromes, such as those accompanying chronic or acute intoxication with smoke, whatever role acrolein plays in disease pathogenesis mainly traces to exogenous sources such as the combustion of tobacco or other organic matter. A second exposure category involves xenobiotics that undergo metabolism within the body to release acrolein. Still other health conditions, however, involve acrolein that forms via several endogenous pathways, some of which are activated upon intoxication with xenobiotics (i.e., Exposure Category 3), while still others accompany direct physical trauma to body tissues (Exposure Category 4). Further complicating efforts to clarify the role of endogenous acrolein in human disease is the likelihood that many such syndromes are complex phenomena that resemble "chemical mixture exposures" by involving multiple toxic substances simultaneously. This Perspective contends that while recent decades have witnessed much progress in describing the deleterious effects of acrolein at the cellular and molecular levels, more work is needed to define the contributions of different acrolein sources to "real-world" health conditions in human subjects.

  4. Of mice and monkeys: using non-human primate models to bridge mouse- and human-based investigations of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Karli K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs arise from a diverse array of genetic and environmental origins that disrupt the typical developmental trajectory of neural connectivity and synaptogenesis. ASDs are marked by dysfunctional social behavior and cognition, among other deficits. Greater understanding of the biological substrates of typical social behavior in animal models will further our understanding of the etiology of ASDs. Despite the precision and tractability of molecular genetics models of ASDs in rodents, these organisms lack the complexity of human social behavior, thus limiting their impact on understanding ASDs to basic mechanisms. Non-human primates (NHPs provide an attractive, complementary model for ASDs, due in part to the complexity and dynamics of social structures, reliance on vision for social signaling, and deep homology in brain circuitry mediating social behavior and reward. This knowledge is based on a rich literature, compiled over 50 years of observing primate behavior in the wild, which, in the case of rhesus macaques, is complemented by a large body of research characterizing neuronal activity during cognitive behavior. Several recent developments in this field are directly relevant to ASDs, including how the brain represents the perceptual features of social stimuli, how social information influences attention processes in the brain, and how the value of social interaction is computed. Because the symptoms of ASDs may represent extreme manifestations of traits that vary in intensity within the general population, we will additionally discuss ways in which nonhuman primates also show variation in social behavior and reward sensitivity. In cases where variation in species-typical behavior is analogous to similar variations in human behavior, we believe that study of the neural circuitry underlying this variation will provide important insights into the systems-level mechanisms contributing to ASD pathology.

  5. Epileptic negative drop attacks in atypical benign partial epilepsy: a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a computer-assisted polygraphic analysis of drop attacks in a child with atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE) to investigate neurophysiological characteristics. The patient was a six-year two-month-old girl, who had started to have focal motor seizures, later combined with daily epileptic negative myoclonus (ENM) and drop attacks, causing multiple injuries. We studied episodes of ENM and drop attacks using video-polygraphic and computer-assisted back-averaging analysis. A total of 12 ENM episodes, seven involving the left arm (ENMlt) and five involving both arms (ENMbil), and five drop attacks were captured for analysis. All episodes were time-locked to spike-and-wave complexes (SWC) arising from both centro-temporo-parietal (CTP) areas. The latency between the onset of SWC and ENMlt, ENMbil, and drop attacks reached 68 ms, 42 ms, and 8 ms, respectively. The height of the spike as well as the slow-wave component of SWC for drop attacks were significantly larger than that for both ENMlt and ENMbil (p negative myoclonus involving not only upper proximal but also axial muscles, causing the body to fall. Thus, drop attacks in ABPE are considered to be epileptic negative drop attacks arising from bilateral CTP foci and differ from drop attacks of a generalized origin seen in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and myoclonic-astatic epilepsy.

  6. 3D stereotaxis for epileptic foci through integrating MR imaging with neurological electrophysiology data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Min; Peng Chenglin; Wang Kang; Lei Wenyong; Luo Song; Wang Xiaolin; Wang Xuejian; Wu Ruoqiu; Wu Guofeng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To improve the accuracy of the epilepsy diagnoses by integrating MR image from PACS with data from neurological electrophysiology. The integration is also very important for transmiting diagnostic information to 3D TPS of radiotherapy. Methods: The electroencephalogram was redisplayed by EEG workstation, while MR image was reconstructed by Brainvoyager software. 3D model of patient brain was built up by combining reconstructed images with electroencephalogram data in Base 2000. 30 epileptic patients (18 males and 12 females) with their age ranged from 12 to 54 years were confirmed by using the integrated MR images and the data from neurological electrophysiology and their 3D stereolocating. Results: The corresponding data in 3D model could show the real situation of patients' brain and visually locate the precise position of the focus. The suddessful rate of 3D guided operation was greatly improved, and the number of epileptic onset was markedly decreased. The epilepsy was stopped for 6 months in 8 of the 30 patients. Conclusion: The integration of MR image and information of neurological electrophysiology can improve the diagnostic level for epilepsy, and it is crucial for imp roving the successful rate of manipulations and the epilepsy analysis. (authors)

  7. Generalized Hurst exponent estimates differentiate EEG signals of healthy and epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our current study is to check whether multifractal patterns of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals of normal and epileptic patients are statistically similar or different. In this regard, the generalized Hurst exponent (GHE) method is used for robust estimation of the multifractals in each type of EEG signals, and three powerful statistical tests are performed to check existence of differences between estimated GHEs from healthy control subjects and epileptic patients. The obtained results show that multifractals exist in both types of EEG signals. Particularly, it was found that the degree of fractal is more pronounced in short variations of normal EEG signals than in short variations of EEG signals with seizure free intervals. In contrary, it is more pronounced in long variations of EEG signals with seizure free intervals than in normal EEG signals. Importantly, both parametric and nonparametric statistical tests show strong evidence that estimated GHEs of normal EEG signals are statistically and significantly different from those with seizure free intervals. Therefore, GHEs can be efficiently used to distinguish between healthy and patients suffering from epilepsy.

  8. Detection of focal epileptic activity using combined simultaneous electroencephalogram-functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiqiang; Lu Guangming; Tian Lei; Sun Kanjian; Tan Qifu; Zhu Jianguo; Nie Cong; Hao Shaowei; Jiang Li; Liu Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the brain activation of interictal epiletiform discharges (IEDs) and to localize the epileptogenic foci of epilepsy. Methods: The electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional MRI data of 12 focal epileptic patients were acquired using a combination of EEG and functional MRI simultaneously. The IEDs onset time detected with EEG were set as the time parameters in an event- related paradigm of functional MRI analysis. The spatial and temporal characters of IEDs activation were analyzed in detail. In order to confirm the consistency of this method, all patients were scanned repeatedly and the results were correlated with clinical evaluation. Results: Of the 12 patients, valid data from EEG- fMRI were obtained from 10 patients in a total of 18 sessions. Compared with the structural foci, the epileptic foci localization results of eleven sessions were good, five sessions were fairly good, and two sessions were poor. The results obtained from six patients in two separate sessions were concordant, respectively. Moreover, thalamic activation was detected in ten sessions, cerebellar activation was detected in all sessions, and the deactivation was found in the default mode loci in nine sessions. Conclusion: The method of performing EEG and fMRI simultaneously can potentially be a useful tool in epilepsy research. (authors)

  9. Volumetric localization of epileptic activities in tuberous sclerosis using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zheng [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Xiang, Jing [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hunjan, Amrita; Sharma, Rohit; Otsubo, Hiroshi [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a novel noninvasive technique for localizing epileptic zones. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is often associated with medically refractory epilepsy with multiple epileptic zones. Surgical treatment of TSC requires accurate localization of epileptogenic tubers. The objective of this study was to introduce a new MEG technique, synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM), to volumetrically localize irritable zones and clarify the correlations between SAM, dipole modeling and anatomical tubers. Eight pediatric patients with TSC confirmed by clinical and neuroimaging findings were retrospectively studied. MEG data were recorded using a whole-cortex CTF OMEGA system. Sleep deprivation was employed to provoke epileptiform activity. Irritable zones were localized using both dipole modeling and SAM. MRI detected 42 tubers in the eight patients. Dipole modeling localized 28 irritable zones, and 19 out of the 28 zones were near tubers (19/42, 45%). SAM found 51 irritable zones, and 31 out of the 51 zones were near tubers (31/42, 74%). Among the 51 irritable zones determined by SAM, thirty-five zones were in 1-35 Hz, nine zones were in 35-60 Hz, and seven zones were in 60-120 Hz. The new method, SAM, yielded very plausible equivalent sources for patients who showed anatomical tubers on MRI. Compared to conventional dipole modeling, SAM appeared to offer increased detection of irritable zones and beneficial volumetric and frequency descriptions. (orig.)

  10. Ecstatic epileptic seizures: a glimpse into the multiple roles of the insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eGschwind

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecstatic epileptic seizures are a rare but compelling epileptic entity. During the first seconds of these seizures, ecstatic auras provoke feelings of well-being, intense serenity, bliss, and enhanced self-awareness. They are associated with the impression of time dilation, and can be described as a mystic experience by some patients. The functional neuroanatomy of ecstatic seizures is still debated. During recent years several patients presenting with ecstatic auras have been reported by others and us (in total n=49; a few of them in the setting of presurgical evaluation including electrical brain stimulation. According to the recently recognized functions of the insula, and the results of nuclear brain imaging and electrical stimulation, the ecstatic symptoms in these patients seem to localize to a functional network centered around the anterior insular cortex, where we thus propose to locate this rare ictal phenomenon. Here we summarize the role of the multiple sensory, autonomic, affective and cognitive functions of the insular cortex, which are integrated into the creation of self-awareness, and we suggest how this system may become dysfunctional on several levels during ecstatic aura.

  11. Control of epileptic seizures in WAG/Rij rats by means of brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir V.; Maksimenko, Vladimir A.; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Lüttjohann, Annika; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2018-02-01

    The main issue of epileptology is the elimination of epileptic events. This can be achieved by a system that predicts the emergence of seizures in conjunction with a system that interferes with the process that leads to the onset of seizure. The prediction of seizures remains, for the present, unresolved in the absence epilepsy, due to the sudden onset of seizures. We developed an algorithm for predicting seizures in real time, evaluated it and implemented it into an online closed-loop brain stimulation system designed to prevent typical for the absence of epilepsy of spike waves (SWD) in the genetic rat model. The algorithm correctly predicts more than 85% of the seizures and the rest were successfully detected. Unlike the old beliefs that SWDs are unpredictable, current results show that they can be predicted and that the development of systems for predicting and preventing closed-loop capture is a feasible step on the way to intervention to achieve control and freedom from epileptic seizures.

  12. Brain SPECT in the pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchpiguel, C.A.; Cukiert, A.; Hironaka, F.H.; Cerri, G.G.; Magalhaes, A.E.A.; Marino Junior, R.

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen adult epileptic patients were studied pre-operatively using a rotational scintillation camera interfaced to a dedicated computer. The tomographic images were obtained 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 99 m Tc-HMPAO. All had MRI scanning and intensive EEG monitoring which generally included seizure recording. Five patients had progressive lesions (3 meningiomas, 2 astrocytomas). In 10 patients, neuroradiological studies did not show the presence of progressive lesions (2 normal scans and 8 cases with inactive lesions). Two patients with meningioma showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site while the third patient had a marked hypoperfusion which might correlate with the clinical diagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. In the astrocytoma patients SPECT scans showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site. Data obtained from the 10 patients without progressive CNS lesions showed: in 4, SPECT findings correlated well with the anatomical findings; in 5 instances, SPECT was able to disclose additional functional deficits; in one case, there was no SPECT correlate of a discrete anatomical lesion. In 5 of these cases with no progressive lesions (n=10) SPECT findings were useful as a complementary tool in determining the clinical or surgical management of these patients. Despite the small number and heterogeneity of the present sample, SPECT seems to be an useful tool as part of the clinical workup of epileptic who are candidates for epilepsy surgery. (author)

  13. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy associated with microdeletion involving CDKL5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that aberrations of CDKL5 in female patients cause early-onset intractable seizures, severe developmental delay or regression, and Rett syndrome-like features. We report on a Japanese girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, developmental regression, and Rett syndrome-like features. The patient showed generalized tonic seizures, and later, massive myoclonus induced by phone and light stimuli. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed no structural brain anomalies but cerebral atrophy. Electroencephalogram showed frontal dominant diffuse poly spikes and waves. Through copy number analysis by genomic microarray, we found a microdeletion at Xp22.13. A de novo 137-kb deletion, involving exons 5-21 of CDKL5, RS1, and part of PPEF1 gene, was confirmed by quantitative PCR and breakpoint specific PCR analyses. Our report suggests that the clinical features associated with CDKL5 deletions could be implicated in Japanese patients, and that genetic testing of CDKL5, including both sequencing and deletion analyses, should be considered in girls with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and RTT-like features. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes of serum cytokines levels after drug therapy in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jianping; Li Suping; Xiong Gang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of the cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the neuroimmune modulation of epilepsy through measurement of the changes of the serum levels of the these cytokines after drug therapy in epileptic patients. Methods: Serum IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α levels