WorldWideScience

Sample records for human enamel surfaces

  1. Patterns of morphological variation in enamel-dentin junction and outer enamel surface of human molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Wataru; Yano, Wataru; Nagaoka, Tomohito; Abe, Mikiko; Ohshima, Hayato; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2014-06-01

    Tooth crown patterning is governed by the growth and folding of the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) and the following enamel deposition forms outer enamel surface (OES). We hypothesized that overall dental crown shape and covariation structure are determined by processes that configurate shape at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), the developmental vestige of IEE. This this hypothesis was tested by comparing patterns of morphological variation between EDJ and OES in human permanent maxillary first molar (UM1) and deciduous second molar (um2). Using geometric morphometric methods, we described morphological variation and covariation between EDJ and OES, and evaluated the strength of two components of phenotypic variability, canalization and morphological integration, in addition to the relevant evolutionary flexibility, i.e. the ability to respond to selective pressure. The strength of covariation between EDJ and OES was greater in um2 than in UM1, and the way that multiple traits covary between EDJ and OES was different between these teeth. The variability analyses showed that EDJ had less shape variation and a higher level of morphological integration than OES, which indicated that canalization and morphological integration acted as developmental constraints. These tendencies were greater in UM1 than in um2. On the other hand, EDJ and OES had a comparable level of evolvability in these teeth. Amelogenesis could play a significant role in tooth shape and covariation structure, and its influence was not constant among teeth, which may be responsible for the differences in the rate and/or period of enamel formation. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  2. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  3. Near-surface structural examination of human tooth enamel subject to in vitro demineralization and remineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Carmen Veronica

    The early stages of chemical tooth decay are governed by dynamic processes of demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel that initiates along the surface of the tooth. Conventional diagnostic techniques lack the spatial resolution required to analyze near-surface structural changes in enamel at the submicron level. In this study, slabs of highly-polished, decay-free human enamel were subjected to 0.12M EDTA and buffered lactic acid demineralizing agents and MI Paste(TM) and calcifying (0.1 ppm F) remineralizing treatments in vitro. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), a technique typically used for thin film analysis, provided depth profiles of crystallinity changes in surface enamel with a resolution better than 100 nm. In conjunction with nanoindentation, a technique gaining acceptance as a means of examining the mechanical properties of sound enamel, these results were corroborated with well-established microscopy and Raman techniques to assess the nanohardness, morphologies and chemical nature of treated enamel. Interestingly, the average crystallite size of surface enamel along its c-axis dimension increased by nearly 40% after a 60 min EDTA treatment as detected by GIXD. This result was in direct contrast to the obvious surface degradation observed by microscopic and confocal Raman imaging. A decrease in nanohardness from 4.86 +/- 0.44 GPa to 0.28 +/- 0.10 GPa was observed. Collective results suggest that mineral dissolution characteristics evident on the micron scale may not be fully translated to the nanoscale in assessing the integrity of chemically-modified tooth enamel. While an intuitive decrease in enamel crystallinity was observed with buffered lactic acid-treated samples, demineralization was too slow to adequately quantify the enamel property changes seen. MI Paste(TM) treatment of EDTA-demineralized enamel showed preferential growth along the a-axis direction. Calcifying solution treatments of both demineralized sample types

  4. Evaluation of human enamel surfaces treated with theobromine: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargul, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu; Peker, Sertac; Nakamoto, Tetsuo; Simmons, William B; Falster, Alexander U

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this in-vitro study were to investigate the effect of theobromine, which is the principle xanthine species in Theobroma cacao, at two concentrations on the surface hardness and topography of human enamel. Twenty-four freshly extracted human third molars were collected and stored in distilled water with 0.1% thymol solution at room temperature prior to the experiments. The enamel specimens were treated with one coat of theobromine at two concentrations (100 mg/l or 200 mg/l in distilled water) for 5 min. Enamel surfaces in the control group received no theobromine. They were then kept in distilled water for 1 week and subjected to SEM analysis. The specimens were demineralised by storing them in acidic hydroxyethylcellulose for three days. After baseline microhardness measurements, they were incubated either in 100 or 200 mg/l theobromine for 5 min. The control group was kept in distilled water. After washing the specimens under distilled water, they were kept in a remineralising solution for 18 h. Microhardness of the enamel surface was initially determined for each specimen before artificial demineralisation. After demineralisation, the experimental groups were incubated in 100 mg or 200 mg theobromine and control-group specimens were placed in remineralising solution. Enamel surfaces of the untreated control group presented a generally smooth and slightly hummocky surface with small lines of pits. Specimens treated with theobromine showed differences between the two concentrations. The group treated with 200 mg/l solution for 5 min showed a greater quantity of globules on enamel than did specimens treated with 100 mg/l solution. As shown by the microhardness values, a consistent and remarkable protection of the enamel surface was found with the application of theobromine.

  5. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  6. Diagenesis-inspired reaction of magnesium ions with surface enamel mineral modifies properties of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Eimar, Hazem; Bassett, David C; Schnabel, Martin; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Nelea, Valentin; McKee, Marc D; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2016-06-01

    Mineralized tissues such as teeth and bones consist primarily of highly organized apatitic calcium-phosphate crystallites within a complex organic matrix. The dimensions and organization of these apatite crystallites at the nanoscale level determine in part the physical properties of mineralized tissues. After death, geological processes such as diagenesis and dolomitization can alter the crystallographic properties of mineralized tissues through cycles of dissolution and re-precipitation occurring in highly saline environments. Inspired by these natural exchange phenomena, we investigated the effect of hypersalinity on tooth enamel. We discovered that magnesium ions reacted with human tooth enamel through a process of dissolution and re-precipitation, reducing enamel crystal size at the surface of the tooth. This change in crystallographic structure made the teeth harder and whiter. Salt-water rinses have been used for centuries to ameliorate oral infections; however, our discovery suggests that this ancient practice could have additional unexpected benefits. Here we describe an approach inspired by natural geological processes to modify the properties of a biomineral - human tooth enamel. In this study we showed that treatment of human tooth enamel with solutions saturated with magnesium induced changes in the nanocrystals at the outer surface of the protective enamel layer. As a consequence, the physical properties of the tooth were modified; tooth microhardness increased and the color shade became whiter, thus suggesting that this method could be used as a clinical treatment to improve dental mechanical properties and esthetics. Such an approach is simple and straightforward, and could also be used to develop new strategies to synthesize and modify biominerals for biomedical and industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks exhibit risks for human enamel surface loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Sampaio de Melo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this investigation was to give insights into the impact of carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks on the likely capacity of enamel surface dissolution and the influence of human saliva exposure as a biological protective factor. Materials and Methods The pH, titratable acidity (TA to pH 7.0, and buffer capacity (β of common beverages ingested by patients under physical activity were analyzed. Then, we randomly distributed 50 specimens of human enamel into 5 groups. Processed and natural coconut water served as controls for testing three carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks. In all specimens, we measured surface microhardness (Knoop hardness numbers and enamel loss (profilometry, µm for baseline and after simulated intake cycling exposure model. We also prepared areas of specimens to be exposed to human saliva overnight prior to the simulated intake cycling exposure. The cycles were performed by alternated immersions in beverages and artificial saliva. ANOVA two-way and Tukey HDS tests were used. Results The range of pH, TA, and β were 2.85 - 4.81, 8.33 - 46.66 mM/L and 3.48 - 10.25 mM/L × pH, respectively. The highest capacity of enamel surface dissolution was found for commercially available sports drinks for all variables. Single time human saliva exposure failed to significantly promote protective effect for the acidic attack of beverages. Conclusions In this study, carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks usually consumed during endurance training may have a greater capacity of dissolution of enamel surface depending on their physicochemical proprieties associated with pH and titratable acidity.

  8. [Influence of Coca-Cola on early erosion and surface microhardness of human enamel: an in situ study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, M; Zhang, Q; Gao, X J

    2016-06-01

    Assessed the effect of single dose attack of Coca-Cola on early erosion and surface microhardness of permanent human enamel, in order to provide diet instructions on minimum amount and frequency of carbonated beverage consumption. Eighty enamel slabs were prepared out of 10 extracted human mandibular third molars, and distributed into 8 groups with randomized block design(n=10). Ten generally healthy volunteers with normal saliva secretion wore acrylic palatal appliances containing 2 enamel slabs, with formation of a salivary pellicle 2 h ahead. The volunteers were instructed to drink 100 ml fresh Coca-Cola within 20 s. And then the alterations of the enamel slabs were measured using a Vicker's microhardness tester at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20 and 30 min after the consumption of Coca-Cola. For each volunteer, the experiment was carried out in four days, 2 samples were examined each time. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests(α =0.05). Significant decreases in surface microhardness(SMH)were observed in each time point(PCoca-Cola could lead to significant decrease of enamel microhardness and initiate erosion of enamel surface. Enamel surface microhardness decreased to the lowest points at 2-8 min, and began to recover after 10 min. The enamel surface microhardness could not fully recovered to the baseline level in 30 min if no intervention was performed.

  9. Clinical and laboratory surface finishing procedures for zirconia on opposing human enamel wear: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Bevan J; Thangavel, Arun K; Rolton, Shane B; Guazzato, Massimiliano; Klineberg, Iven J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of laboratory and clinical finishing procedures for zirconia on antagonistic enamel wear. Forty-eight yttria-tetragonal partially stabilised zirconia (Y-TZP) specimens were prepared and divided into four groups according to their surface preparation: laboratory polished (LP); laboratory polished and glazed (G); clinically adjusted (CA); and clinically adjusted and repolished (CAR). Enamel opposing enamel was used as a control. Pre-testing surface roughness for each group was determined using contact profilometry. Two-body wear resistance tests were conducted using a masticatory simulator. Enamel specimens were subjected to 120,000 cycles in distilled water (frequency 1.6 Hz, loading force of 49 N). Volumetric and vertical enamel losses were measured by superimposition of pre- and post-testing images using a three-dimensional laser scanner and software analysis. Scanning electron microscopy was used for qualitative surface analysis of pre- and post-testing zirconia and enamel surfaces. One-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons with Bonferroni corrections were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of α=0.05. There was no statistical difference in volumetric and vertical enamel loss between CAR, G and LP. CAR produced statistically significantly less volumetric enamel loss compared with CA and control, and statistically significantly less vertical enamel loss compared with CA. Volumetric and vertical enamel loss were highly correlated in all groups. Enamel wear by clinically ground zirconia is comparable to that of opposing enamel surfaces and greater than clinically repolished zirconia. Repolishing of zirconia restorations following clinical adjustment with diamond burs is effective in reducing antagonistic enamel wear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Can demineralized enamel surfaces be bonded safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mehmet; Baka, Zeliha Muge; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of enamel demineralization, microabrasion therapy and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) application on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel surfaces and enamel color. Eighty freshly extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were allocated to one of the four groups. Brackets were bonded directly to non-demineralized enamel surfaces in Group I (control group), directly to the demineralized enamel surfaces in Group II, to demineralized enamel surfaces after CPP-ACP application in Group III and to demineralized enamel surfaces after microabrasion therapy in Group IV. The samples were stored in water for 24 h at 37°C and then underwent thermocycling. The SBS in megapascals (MPa) was determined by a shear test with 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and failure types were classified with modified adhesive remnant index scores. The data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and chi-square tests at the α = 0.05 level. Significant differences were found among the four groups (F = 21.57, p microabrasion therapy and CPP-ACP application affected enamel color significantly. CPP-ACP application and microabrasion therapy are able to increase the decreased SBS of orthodontic brackets because of enamel demineralization.

  11. Surface variations affecting human dental enamel studied using nanomechanical and chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Michelle Emma

    The enamel surface is the interface between the tooth and its ever changing oral environment. Cavity (caries) formation and extrinsic tooth staining are due, respectively, to degradation of the enamel structure under low pH conditions and interactions between salivary pellicle and dietary elements. Both of these occur at the enamel surface and are caused by the local environment changing the chemistry of the surface. The results can be detrimental to the enamel's mechanical integrity and aesthetics. Incipient carious lesions are the precursor to caries and form due to demineralisation of enamel. These carious lesions are a reversible structure where ions (e.g. Ca2+, F -) can diffuse in (remineralisation) to preserve the tooth's structural integrity. This investigation used controlled in vitro demineralisation and remineralisation to study artificial carious lesion formation and repair. The carious lesions were cross-sectioned and characterised using nanoindentation, electron probe micro-analysis and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Mechanical and chemical maps showed the carious lesion had a significantly reduced hardness and elastic modulus, and the calcium and phosphate content was lower than in sound enamel. Fluoride based remineralisation treatments gave a new phase (possibly fluorohydroxyapatite) within the lesion with mechanical properties higher than sound enamel. The acquired salivary pellicle is a protein-rich film formed by the physisorption of organic molecules in saliva onto the enamel surface. Its functions include lubrication during mastication and chemical protection. However, pellicle proteins react with dietary elements such as polyphenols (tannins in tea) causing a brown stain. This study has used in vitro dynamic nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to examine normal and stained pellicles formed in vivo. The effects of polyphenols on the pellicle's mechanical properties and morphology have been studied. It was found that the

  12. Noncontact, nondestructive elasticity evaluation of sound and demineralized human dental enamel using a laser ultrasonic surface wave dispersion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Chuan; Fleming, Simon; Lee, Yung-Chun; Law, Susan; Swain, Michael; Xue, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed to replace conventional in vivo dental clinical diagnosis tools that are either destructive or incapable of quantifying the elasticity of human dental enamel. In this work, a laser NDE system that can perform remote measurements on samples of small dimensions is presented. A focused laser line source is used to generate broadband surface acoustic wave impulses that are detected with a simplified optical fiber interferometer. The measured surface wave velocity dispersion spectrum is in turn used to characterize the elasticity of the specimen. The NDE system and the analysis technique are validated with measurements of different metal structures and then applied to evaluate human dental enamel. Artificial lesions are prepared on the samples to simulate different states of enamel elasticity. Measurement results for both sound and lesioned regions, as well as lesions of different severity, are clearly distinguishable from each other and fit well with physical expectations and theoretical value. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a laser-based surface wave velocity dispersion technique is successfully applied on human dental enamel, demonstrating the potential for noncontact, nondestructive in vivo detection of the development of carious lesions.

  13. Measurement uncertainty associated with chromatic confocal profilometry for 3D surface texture characterization of natural human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, F; Bartlett, D; Austin, R S

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the measurement performance of a chromatic confocal profilometer for quantification of surface texture of natural human enamel in vitro. Contributions to the measurement uncertainty from all potential sources of measurement error using a chromatic confocal profilometer and surface metrology software were quantified using a series of surface metrology calibration artifacts and pre-worn enamel samples. The 3D surface texture analysis protocol was optimized across 0.04mm2 of natural and unpolished enamel undergoing dietary acid erosion (pH 3.2, titratable acidity 41.3mmolOH/L). Flatness deviations due to the x, y stage mechanical movement were the major contribution to the measurement uncertainty; with maximum Sz flatness errors of 0.49μm. Whereas measurement noise; non-linearity's in x, y, z and enamel sample dimensional instability contributed minimal errors. The measurement errors were propagated into an uncertainty budget following a Type B uncertainty evaluation in order to calculate the Standard Combined Uncertainty (uc), which was ±0.28μm. Statistically significant increases in the median (IQR) roughness (Sa) of the polished samples occurred after 15 (+0.17 (0.13)μm), 30 (+0.12 (0.09)μm) and 45 (+0.18 (0.15)μm) min of erosion (Pmeasurement uncertainty using chromatic confocal profilometry was from flatness deviations however by optimizing measurement protocols the profilometer successfully characterized surface texture changes in enamel from erosive wear in vitro. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  14. Topographic assessment of human enamel surface treated with different topical sodium fluoride agents: Scanning electron microscope consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurlal Singh Brar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous balanced demineralization and remineralization are natural dynamic processes in enamel. If the balance is interrupted and demineralization process dominates, it may eventually lead to the development of carious lesions in enamel and dentine. Fluoride helps control decay by enhancing remineralization and altering the structure of the tooth, making the surface less soluble. Methodology: One hundred and twenty sound human permanent incisors randomly and equally distributed into six groups as follows: Group I - Control, II - Sodium fluoride solution, III - Sodium fluoride gel, IV - Sodium fluoride varnish, V - Clinpro Tooth Crème (3M ESPE, and VI-GC Tooth Mousse Plus or MI Paste Plus. The samples were kept in artificial saliva for 12 months, and the topical fluoride agents were applied to the respective sample groups as per the manufacturer instructions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM evaluation of all the samples after 6 and 12 months was made. Results: Morphological changes on the enamel surface after application of fluoride in SEM revealed the presence of globular precipitate in all treated samples. Amorphous, globular, and crystalline structures were seen on the enamel surface of the treated samples. Clear differences were observed between the treated and untreated samples. Conclusion: Globular structures consisting of amorphous CaF2precipitates, which acted as a fluoride reservoir, were observed on the enamel surface after action of different sodium fluoride agents. CPP-ACPF (Tooth Mousse and Tricalcium phosphate with fluoride (Clinpro tooth crème are excellent delivery vehicles available in a slow release amorphous form to localize fluoride at the tooth surface.

  15. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel...

  16. EFFECT OF SURFACE TREATMENT ON ENAMEL SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyda Erşahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different methods of surface treatment on enamel roughness. Materials and Methods: Ninety human maxillary first premolars were randomly divided into three groups (n=30 according to type of enamel surface treatment: I, acid etching; II, Er:YAG laser; III, Nd:YAG laser. The surface roughness of enamel was measured with a noncontact optical profilometer. For each enamel sample, two readings were taken across the sample—before enamel surface treatment (T1 and after enamel surface treatment (T2. The roughness parameter analyzed was the average roughness (Ra. Statistical analysis was performed using a Paired sample t test and the post-hoc Mann- Whitney U test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest Ra (average roughness values were observed for Group II, with a significant difference with Groups I and III (P<0.001. Ra values for the acid etching group (Group I were significantly lower than other groups (P<0.001. Conclusion: Surface treatment of enamel with Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser results in significantly higher Ra than acid-etching. Both Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser can be recommended as viable treatment alternatives to acid etching.

  17. In vitro evaluation of human dental enamel surface roughness bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide and submitted to abrasive dentifrice brushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worschech Claudia Cia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide at different times and submitted to different superficial cleaning treatments: G1 - not brushed; G2 - brushed with fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G3 - brushed with a non-fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G4 - brushed without dentifrice. Sixty fragments of human molar teeth with 4 x 4 mm were obtained using a diamond disc. The specimens were polished with sandpaper and abrasive pastes. A perfilometer was used to measure roughness average (Ra values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval after the beginning of treatment. The bleaching was performed on the surface of the fragments for 1 hour a week, and the surface cleaning treatment for 3 minutes daily. The samples were stored in individual receptacles with artificial saliva. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test revealed significant differences in surface roughness values for G2 and G3, which showed an increase in roughness over time; G1 and G4 showed no significant roughness differences. The bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with brushing with abrasive dentifrices, there was a significant increase in roughness values.

  18. The effects of brushing on human enamel surface roughness after NaF gel and theobromine gel exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahardhika, A.; Noerdin, A.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of brushing on human enamel surface roughness after different exposure times of 200 mg/L theobromine gel (8, 16, and 32 minutes) and 2% NaF gel (16 minutes). Twenty-four human upper premolars were used and divided into four groups. Group 1 was exposed to 2% NaF gel for 16 minutes. In contrast, groups 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to 200 mg/L theobromine gel for 8 minutes, 16 minutes, and 32 minutes, and each group was then brushed for 9 minutes and 20 seconds. After the treatment, samples were tested using a surface roughness tester (Mitutoyo SJ 301, Japan). The Wilcoxon test showed significant changes (p < 0.05) in roughness values after exposure to the theobromine gel or NaF gel and after brushing for 9 minutes and 20 seconds. It can be concluded that exposure to 200 mg/L theobromine gel or 2% NaF gel can soften the enamel surface and then increase roughness after brushing.

  19. Fluorine uptake into the human enamel surface from fluoride-containing sealing materials during cariogenic pH cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuhiro, Matsuda, E-mail: matsuda@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Katsushi, Okuyama [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Hiroko, Yamamoto [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University (Japan); Hisanori, Komatsu [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Masashi, Koka; Takahiro, Sato [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA (Japan); Naoki, Hashimoto; Saiko, Oki; Chiharu, Kawamoto; Hidehiko, Sano [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    To prevent the formation of caries and reduce dentin hypersensitivity, sealing materials, either with or without fluoride, are generally applied on the tooth in clinical practice. Application of fluoride-free sealing materials results in the formation of an acid-resistant layer on the tooth surface. On the other hand, fluoride-containing sealing materials might not only form an acid-resistant layer but could possibly further provide fluoride to enhance remineralization and reduce demineralization. In this study, the demineralization prevention ability and fluorine uptake rate in human enamel of fluoride-containing sealing materials [“MS coats F” (MSF)] and fluoride-free sealing materials (“hybrid coats 2” [HI]) were evaluated using an automatic pH cycling system. Each material was applied to the original tooth surface, the cut surfaces were covered with sticky wax, and the automatic pH-cycling system simulated daily acid changes (pH 6.8–4.5) occurring in the oral cavity for 4 weeks. Caries progression was analyzed using transverse microradiography (TMR) taken pre and post the 4 weeks of pH cycling. The fluorine and calcium distributions in the carious lesion in each specimen were evaluated using the proton-induced gamma emission (PIGE) and proton-induced X-ray (PIXE) techniques, respectively. TMR analysis showed that both MSF and HI had a caries-preventing effect after 4 weeks of pH cycling. PIGE/PIXE analysis demonstrated that only MSF resulted in fluoride uptake in the enamel surface. Therefore, MSF can help to form an acid-resistant layer and provide fluoride to the enamel surface. The presence of fluoride on the enamel surface suggested that MSF could prevent demineralization, even if the acid-resistant layer was removed, in clinical settings. The data obtained using the PIGE and PIXE techniques are useful for understanding the benefits of the use of a fluoride-containing sealing material for preventing caries.

  20. Surface integrity governs the proteome of hypomineralized enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, J E; Crombie, F A; Kilpatrick, N; Manton, D J; Hubbard, M J

    2010-10-01

    Growing interest in the treatment and prevention of Molar/Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) warrants investigation into the protein composition of hypomineralized enamel. Hypothesizing abnormality akin to amelogenesis imperfecta, we profiled proteins in hypomineralized enamel from human permanent first molars using a biochemical approach. Hypomineralized enamel was found to have from 3- to 15-fold higher protein content than normal, but a near-normal level of residual amelogenins. This distinguished MIH from hypomaturation defects with high residual amelogenins (amelogenesis imperfecta, fluorosis) and so typified it as a hypocalcification defect. Second, hypomineralized enamel was found to have accumulated various proteins from oral fluid and blood, with differential incorporation depending on integrity of the enamel surface. Pathogenically, these results point to a pre-eruptive disturbance of mineralization involving albumin and, in cases with post-eruptive breakdown, subsequent protein adsorption on the exposed hydroxyapatite matrix. These insights into the pathogenesis and properties of hypomineralized enamel hold significance for prevention and treatment of MIH.

  1. Erosive effect of energy drinks alone and mixed with alcohol on human enamel surface.An in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Beltrán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the erosive effect of energy drinks (ED alone and mixed with alcohol on the human enamel surface in vitro. Methods: Twenty non-erupted human third molars were vertically sectioned in half. Specimens were exposed to 5mL of ED plus 5mL of artificial saliva or 5mL of ED plus 5mL of artificial saliva plus 5mL of alcohol (Pisco. Exposure times were set at 30min and 60min. Erosive assessments were made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The ED analyzed were Mr. Big, Kem Extreme, Red Bull, and Monster Energy. ED pH measurements were performed at 25°C and titration was done with NaOH 0.1mol/L. Results: The pH ranges were: ED alone 2.55 to 3.46, ED mixed with artificial saliva 2.60 to 3.55, ED mixed with Pisco 2.82 to 3.70, and ED mixed with both 2.92 to 3.86. The pH of Pisco was 6.13, and Pisco mixed with artificial saliva had a pH of 6.23. Titration showed a pH range from 3.5 to 5.7. SEM-EDS analysis showed that Mr. Big and Monster led to clear demineralization at 30 min and remineralization at 60m in. Pisco slightly decreased the erosive effect of these ED. Kem Xtreme and Red Bull led to no demineralization in the first hour. Conclusion: According to the pH, acidity and EDS analysis, the ED of the present study likely caused enamel erosion in human teeth surface dependent on exposure time.

  2. Enamel surface morphology after bracket debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, R; Toledano, M; García-Godoy, F

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets and the enamel morphology after using six methods for removal of adhesive after bracket debonding. A total of thirty-five recently extracted noncarious human premolars were used. The twin bracket Mini-Taurus was used with the Mono-Lok2 TM bonding system. Shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated. Immediately after the brackets were removed, the teeth were rinsed and dried, using an air-water syringe. The adhesive remnant index was calculated and the debonded teeth with residual adhesive material attached to the enamel surface were equally sorted in seven groups of five, as follows: Group 1. The residual adhesive was removed with a 12-blade tungsten carbide finishing bur in a high-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 2. The residual adhesive was removed with a 12-blade tungsten carbide finishing bur in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 3. The residual adhesive was removed with an Arkansas stone: Dura-white stones for finishing composite in a high-speed handpiece using water as the coolant. Group 4. The residual adhesive was removed with an Arkansas stone: Dura-white stones for finishing composite in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 5. The residual adhesive was removed with Sof-Lex aluminum oxide discs according to manufacturer's instructions in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 6. The residual adhesive was removed with Enhance Composite Finishing Discs in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. In this group, the paste was not applied after the polishing discs. Group 7. The residual adhesive was removed with Enhance Composite Finishing Discs and Polishing Cups in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Prisma-gloss polishing paste and ultrafine polishing paste were applied according to manufacturer's instructions. After removal of the adhesive, all teeth were evaluated with the scanning

  3. Hexahedrally based crystals in human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, T; Debari, K; Abe, M

    1992-01-01

    Mg-containing calcium phosphate crystals including pseudocuboidal, rhombohedral shapes and groupings of quadrangular blades cubically arranged were found in human tooth enamel by scanning electron microscopy and by electron probe microanalysis. In caries-free old enamel, these hexahedrally based crystals measuring 0.5-2.5 microns in length were observed in some crevices of tufts and lamellae. The crystals were rarely seen in the inner crevices of caries-free exfoliated deciduous enamel and none could be seen in sound young enamel. In brown-coloured old enamel possessing arrested caries with lamellae, some of the lamellae contained crystals measuring 0.1-1.5 mu in length adjacent to half-dissolved prisms. These crystals, identified as Mg-containing whitlockite, will grow during a long period after eruption of the tooth or during the enamel caries process.

  4. FLUORESCENCE IN DISSOLVED FRACTIONS OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAFSTROMBJORKMAN, U; SUNDSTROM, F; TENBOSCH, JJ

    Fluorescence induced by laser light is useful in early detection of enamel caries. The present work studied the fluorescence emission pattern in dissolved human enamel and in different molecular weight fractions obtained after gel chromatography or dialysis followed by ultrafiltration. For

  5. Morphological characteristics of primary enamel surfaces versus permanent enamel surfaces: SEM digital analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, A; Storti, E

    2011-09-01

    The morphology of permanent and primary enamel surface merits further analysis. The objective of this study was to illustrate a method of SEM digital image processing able to quantify and discriminate between the morphological characteristics of primary and permanent tooth enamel. Sixteen extracted teeth, 8 primary teeth and 8 permanent teeth, kept in saline solution, were analysed. The teeth were observed under SEM. The SEM images were analysed by means of digitally processed algorithms. The two algorithms used were: Local standard deviation to measure surface roughness with the roughness index (RI); Hough's theorem to identify linear structures with the linear structure index (LSI). The SEM images of primary teeth enamel show smooth enamel with little areas of irregularity. No linear structures are apparent. The SEM images of permanent enamel show a not perfectly smooth surface; there are furrows and irregularities of variable depth and width. In the clinical practice a number of different situations require the removal of a thin layer of enamel. Only a good morphological knowledge of both permanent and primary tooth enamel gives the opportunity to identify and exploit the effects of rotary tools on enamel, thus allowing for a correct finishing technique.

  6. Surface effects after a combination of dental bleaching and enamel microabrasion: An in vitro and in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Laura Molinar; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Salomão, Fabio Martins; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of combining enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching on the physical properties of enamel, using in vitro and in situ conditions and evaluating surface roughness, enamel microhardness and scanning electron microscopy images. One hundred sound bovine teeth were sectioned and cut into discs and randomly divided into 10 study groups (n=10). The results were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test, with significance at 5%. Enamel surface roughness was significantly influenced by microabrasion, regardless of being combined with dental bleaching, for both HS (Human Saliva) or AS (Artificial Saliva) condition. Enamel microhardness was significantly decreased in the groups in which enamel microabrasion was performed, regardless its combination with dental bleaching; although storage in HS reestablished the initial enamel microhardness. It was concluded that dental bleaching does not cause major damage to microabraided enamel, and that only human saliva recovered the initial enamel microhardness.

  7. Spectrally enhanced image resolution of tooth enamel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Short-wavelength 405 nm laser illumination of surface dental enamel using an ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) produced enhanced detail of dental topography. The surfaces of human extracted teeth and artificial erosions were imaged with 405 nm, 444 nm, 532 nm, or 635 nm illumination lasers. The obtained images were then processed offline to compensate for any differences in the illumination beam diameters between the different lasers. Scattering and absorption coefficients for a Monte Carlo model of light propagation in dental enamel for 405 nm were scaled from published data at 532 nm and 633 nm. The value of the scattering coefficient used in the model was scaled from the coefficients at 532 nm and 633 nm by the inverse third power of wavelength. Simulations showed that the penetration depth of short-wavelength illumination is localized close to the enamel surface, while long-wavelength illumination travels much further and is backscattered from greater depths. Therefore, images obtained using short wavelength laser are not contaminated by the superposition of light reflected from enamel tissue at greater depths. Hence, the SFE with short-wavelength illumination may make it possible to visualize surface manifestations of phenomena such as demineralization, thus better aiding the clinician in the detection of early caries.

  8. In vitro study of the diode laser effect on artificial demineralized surface of human dental enamel; Estudo in vitro do efeito do laser diodo sobre a superficie de esmalte dental humano desmineralizado artificialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebel, Patricia

    2003-07-01

    In scientific literature there are many reports about fusion and resolidification of dental enamel after laser irradiation and their capability to generate surfaces with increased resistance to demineralization compared to non-irradiated areas. The use of high power diode laser on demineralized surfaces of human dental enamel is presented as a good alternative in caries prevention. The purpose of this study is to investigate the morphological changes produced by the use of one high power diode laser on human dental enamel surface after demineralization treatment with lactic acid, under chosen parameters. Fifteen samples of human dental molars were used and divided in four groups: control - demineralization treatment with lactic acid and no irradiation, and demineralization treatment with lactic acid followed of irradiation with 212,20 mJ/cm{sup 2}, 282,84 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 325,38 mJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The samples were irradiated with high power diode laser (808 nm) with a 300 {mu}m diameter fiber optics. Black ink was used on enamel surface to enhance the superficial absorption. The samples were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Modifications on the enamel surfaces were observed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified region of the enamel. According with our results the best parameter was 2.0 W, presenting the most uniform surface. The use of high power diode laser as demonstrated in this study is able to promote melting and re-solidification on human dental enamel. (author)

  9. [Incipient cariogenic demineralization of human enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M M; Uribe Echevarría, J; Gendelman, H

    1991-09-01

    32 teeth (12 premolars and 20 molars) were studied under light microscopy, polarized microscopy, transparence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These teeth presented changes in colour in their free and proximal surface as well as close to pits and fissures. As an extra diagnostic test the PAS reaction was used to assess descalcifying processes in both light and transparence microscopy. Polarized light was used to assess normal enamel. Scanning electron microscopy corroborated the lesions produced in the enamel surface in the form of micropores. PAS reaction diagnosed decalcifying processes in yellow, brown and brownish stains. White staims not always were PAS-positive and when they reacted in the same manner as other positive stains, with the immersion technique. This penetrated 40-60 umtrs. and in some areas in relation to lamellae they reached dentin. Light, polarized and scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of micropores in the external surface of enamel in PAS-positive cases. The possibility of a modified PAS technique to use in clinical practice is discussed. It is concluded that PAS relation is useful as "ex situ" test to detect the first signs of mineral salt loss at the enamel surface. More research is needed to transfer these results to clinical practice.

  10. Enamel proteins mitigate mechanical and structural degradations in mature human enamel during acid attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V.; Lemoine, Patrick; Meenan, Brian J.; Deb, Sanjukta; Mutreja, Isha; Carolan, Patrick; Petkov, Nikolay

    2014-04-01

    A hydrazine deproteination process was used to investigate the role of enamel proteins in the acid erosion of mature human dental enamel. Bright field high resolution transmission electron micrographs and x-ray diffraction analysis show no crystallographic changes after the hydrazine treatment with similar nanoscale hydroxyapatite crystallite size and orientation for sound and de-proteinated enamel. However, the presence of enamel proteins reduces the erosion depth, the loss of hardness and the loss of structural order in enamel, following exposure to citric acid. Nanoindentation creep is larger for sound enamel than for deproteinated enamel but it reduces in sound enamel after acid attack. These novel results are consistent with calcium ion-mediated visco-elasticty in enamel matrix proteins as described previously for nacre, bone and dental proteins. They are also in good agreement with a previous double layer force spectroscopy study by the authors which found that the proteins electrochemically buffer enamel against acid attack. Finally, this suggests that acid attack, and more specifically dental erosion, is influenced by ionic permeation through the enamel layer and that it is mitigated by the enamel protein matrix.

  11. The role of enamel proteins in protecting mature human enamel against acidic environments: a double layer force spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V; D'Sa, Raechelle A; Deb, Sanjukta; Meenan, Brian J; Lemoine, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Characterisation of the electrostatic properties of dental enamel is important for understanding the interfacial processes that occur on a tooth surface and how these relate to the natural ability of our teeth to withstand chemical attack from the acids in many soft drinks. Whereas, the role of the mineral component of the tooth enamel in providing this resistance to acid erosion has been studied extensively, the influence of proteins that are also present within the structure is not well understood. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of double-layer force spectroscopy to directly measure electrostatic forces on as received and hydrazine-treated (deproteinated) enamel surfaces in solutions with different pH to determine how the enamel proteins influence acid erosion surface potential and surface charge of human dental enamel. The deproteination of the treated samples was confirmed by the loss of the amide bands (~1,300-1,700 cm(-1)) in the FTIR spectrum of the sample. The force characteristics observed were found to agree with the theory of electrical double layer interaction under the assumption of constant potential and allowed the surface charge per unit area to be determined for the two enamel surfaces. The values and, importantly, the sign of these adsorbed surface charges indicates that the protein content of dental enamel contributes significantly to the electrostatic double layer formation near the tooth surface and in doing so can buffer the apatite crystals against acid attack. Moreover, the electrostatic interactions within this layer are a driving factor for the mineral transfer from the tooth surface and the initial salivary pellicle formation.

  12. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Syafira; Rina Permatasari; Nina Wardani

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces...

  13. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  14. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, A. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained.

  15. Impact wear behavior of human tooth enamel under simulated chewing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Zeng, Yangyang; Wen, Jian; Zheng, Liang; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies mostly focused on the sliding wear behavior of human teeth, and little effort has been made so far to study the impact wear of human teeth. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact wear process and mechanism of human tooth enamel and the influence of water content within enamel. In this paper, the impact wear behaviors of fresh and dried human tooth enamel against SiC ceramic have been investigated using a specially designed impact test machine. Tests lasting up to 5×10(3), 5×10(4), 2.5×10(5), 5.5×10(5), 8×10(5) and 1×10(6) cycles were conducted, respectively. Results showed that for the fresh enamel, the surface damage was dominated by plastic deformation at the early stage of impact wear. Iridescent rings appeared around the impact mark as a result of the accumulation and spread of plastic deformation. As the impact wear progressed, delamination occurred on the surface of enamel, and thus the iridescent rings gradually disappeared. Wear loss increased rapidly with the increase of impact cycles. When a wear particle layer was formed on the enamel surface, the wear rate decreased. It was found that the surface hardness of enamel increased with the impact cycles, and no cracks appeared on the cross section of wear scar. Compared with the fresh enamel, the fracture toughness of dried enamel decreased, and thus there were microcracks appearing on the cross section of wear scar. More obvious delamination occurred on the worn surface of dried enamel, and no iridescent rings were observed. The wear loss of dried enamel was higher than that of fresh enamel. In summary, the impact wear behavior of sound human tooth enamel was metal-like to some degree, and no subsurface cracking occurred. The water content within enamel could increase its fracture toughness and protect the surface from impact wear. The wear mechanism of human tooth enamel is determined by its microstructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface microhardness of enamel after different home bleaching procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantner, Catharina; Beheim-Schwarzbach, Nils; Neumann, Konrad; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different home bleaching procedures on surface microhardness of human enamel. Among eight groups 192 incisors were distributed. The facial surface of each incisor was polished and baseline hardness of enamel (m0; Knoop) was assessed with a load of 1N for 30s. Subsequently, the enamel was treated for 14 days with the bleaching agent: groups 1, 2 and 4 Viva Style Paint on, 8% carbamide peroxide (CP) 1x20min, 2x20min and 2x5min; group 3 Colgate Simply White, 5.9% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 2x30min; group 5 Viva Style 10% CP 1x1h; group 6 Blend-a-med White Strips, 5.9% HP 2x30min; group 7 Odol-med3 Beauty-Kur, sodium chlorite 2x10min; group 8 control, running water 1x1h. Hardness was reassessed after the last bleaching treatment (m1) and after 6 weeks storage in artificial saliva (m2). Changes in microhardness were as follows (m0-m1): (1) -2.3 (+/-20.3); (2) -8.9 (+/-27.2); (3) 63.4 (+/-56.3); (4) 9.6 (+/-30.1); (5) 12.8 (+/-62.6); (6) 92.2 (+/-50.2); (7) 158.4 (+/-59.7); (8) 10.6 (+/-38.5). Statistical analysis showed that hardness values were significantly (p< or =0.0005; Wilcoxon test) reduced in groups 3, 6, and 7 (m1) and in group 7 (m2). Both type of bleaching agent and concentration have a significant influence on the microhardness of enamel. The most critical bleaching agent seems to be the one containing sodium chlorite in combination with citric acid.

  17. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Enamel Parameters on Laser-Induced Surface Acoustic Waves in Human Incisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ling; Sun, Kaihua; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The laser ultrasound technique has great potential for clinical diagnosis of teeth because of its many advantages. To study laser surface acoustic wave (LSAW) propagation in human teeth, two theoretical methods, the finite element method (FEM) and Laguerre polynomial extension method (LPEM), are presented. The full field temperature values and SAW displacements in an incisor can be obtained by the FEM. The SAW phase velocity in a healthy incisor and dental caries is obtained by the LPEM. The methods and results of this work can provide a theoretical basis for nondestructive evaluation of human teeth with LSAWs.

  18. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    ..., and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear...

  19. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface roughness and wettability of enamel and dentine surfaces prepared with different dental burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, W M; Mitchell, C A; Cunningham, J L

    2001-07-01

    The aim of dental adhesive restorations is to produce a long lasting union between the restoration and the tooth structure. This bond depends on many variables including the geometry of the preparation and the type of bonding agent or luting cement. It is therefore suggested that the topography of the tooth surface may influence the wettability and the bonding quality of adhesive systems. This study measured the surface roughness and wettability of enamel and dentine after preparation with different dental burs. The mesial and distal surfaces of 15 extracted sound human premolar teeth were prepared with a tungsten carbide crown bur, a diamond bur and a tungsten carbide finishing bur and finished in enamel or dentin, respectively. The prepared surfaces were analysed with a surface profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The contact angle of distilled water on each of the prepared surfaces was used as the measure of wettability. The differences in average surface roughness (Ra) were significant between the rotary instrument groups, as revealed by a two-way ANOVA test. No differences were detected between enamel and dentine surfaces prepared with the same type of dental bur. The smoothest surfaces were those completed with tungsten carbide finishing burs. The diamond bur preparations were intermediate in the roughness assessment and the tungsten carbide crown burs gave the roughest surfaces. There were no significant differences in the contact angle measurements for the various groups. It was concluded that the surface roughness of enamel and dentine prepared by different rotary instruments had no significant influence on the wettability of distilled water on these surfaces.

  1. Measurement of surface roughness changes of unpolished and polished enamel following erosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Mullan

    Full Text Available To determine if Sa roughness data from measuring one central location of unpolished and polished enamel were representative of the overall surfaces before and after erosion.Twenty human enamel sections (4x4 mm were embedded in bis-acryl composite and randomised to either a native or polishing enamel preparation protocol. Enamel samples were subjected to an acid challenge (15 minutes 100 mL orange juice, pH 3.2, titratable acidity 41.3mmol OH/L, 62.5 rpm agitation, repeated for three cycles. Median (IQR surface roughness [Sa] was measured at baseline and after erosion from both a centralised cluster and four peripheral clusters. Within each cluster, five smaller areas (0.04 mm2 provided the Sa roughness data.For both unpolished and polished enamel samples there were no significant differences between measuring one central cluster or four peripheral clusters, before and after erosion. For unpolished enamel the single central cluster had a median (IQR Sa roughness of 1.45 (2.58 μm and the four peripheral clusters had a median (IQR of 1.32 (4.86 μm before erosion; after erosion there were statistically significant reductions to 0.38 (0.35 μm and 0.34 (0.49 μm respectively (p<0.0001. Polished enamel had a median (IQR Sa roughness 0.04 (0.17 μm for the single central cluster and 0.05 (0.15 μm for the four peripheral clusters which statistically significantly increased after erosion to 0.27 (0.08 μm for both (p<0.0001.Measuring one central cluster of unpolished and polished enamel was representative of the overall enamel surface roughness, before and after erosion.

  2. Hydroxyapatite-anchored dendrimer for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duo; Yang, Jiaojiao; Li, Jiyao; Chen, Liang; Tang, Bei; Chen, Xingyu; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2013-07-01

    In situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA) on human tooth enamel surface induced by organic matrices is of great interest in the fields of material science and stomatology. In order to mimic the organic matrices induced biomineralization process in developing enamel and enhance the binding strength at the remineralization interface, carboxyl-terminated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM-COOH)-alendronate (ALN) conjugate (ALN-PAMAM-COOH) was synthesized and characterized. PAMAM-COOH has a highly ordered architecture and is capable of promoting the HA crystallization process. ALN is conjugated on PAMAM-COOH due to its specific adsorption on HA (the main component of tooth enamel), resulting in increased binding strength which is tight enough to resist phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing as compared with that of PAMAM-COOH alone. While incubated in artificial saliva, ALN-PAMAM-COOH could induce in situ remineralization of HA on acid-etched enamel, and the regenerated HA has the nanorod-like crystal structure similar to that of human tooth enamel. The hardness of acid-etched enamel samples treated by ALN-PAMAM-COOH can recover up to 95.5% of the original value with strong adhesion force. In vivo experiment also demonstrates that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is effective in repairing acid-etched enamel in the oral cavity. Overall, these results suggest that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is highly promising as a restorative biomaterial for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  4. Protein and bacteria binding to exposed root surfaces and the adjacent enamel surfaces in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Stefan G; Dahlén, Gunnar; Carlén, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of root surfaces due to inflammatory tissue breakdown is a clinical characteristic of periodontitis. The gingival margin may further recede during treatment. Pellicles and early dental plaque on enamel surfaces of periodontitis patients have previously been described. The binding properties of exposed root surfaces, which may affect the incorporation of proteins from especially the GCF into the enamel pellicle and thereby early dental plaque formation are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine if exposed root surfaces could affect pellicle and initial dental plaque formation on the enamel surface by the analysis of proteins and early adhering bacteria binding to the exposed root surfaces and to the adjacent, gingival enamel surface. Supragingival pellicle and plaque samples were taken from exposed root surfaces and the adjacent enamel surfaces in eleven surgically treated periodontitis patients. For comparison, samples were taken from enamel surfaces of teeth not in need of treatment. Additionally, subgingival bacterial samples were taken. Pellicle proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting and image analysis, and bacterial samples by culturing. Significantly more plasma proteins and bacteria were found on the exposed root surfaces than on the enamel. The depth of the gingival recessions was negatively correlated to the amount of plasma proteins in the enamel pellicle. Actinomyces spp. were most frequently found on the exposed root surfaces. The total viable counts and streptococci (%TVC) were positively correlated between subgingival samples and samples from the root surface and enamel of surgically treated teeth. A positive correlation was also found for the findings of Gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival samples and samples from the enamel surface. Our findings suggest that an exposed root surface has binding properties different from an enamel surface and could affect early biofilm formation on the adjacent enamel surface.

  5. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Machoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM. Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements.

  6. Surface changes of enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertiwi, U. I.; Eriwati, Y. K.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the surface roughness changes of tooth enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste. Thirty specimens were brushed using distilled water (the first group), Strong® Formula toothpaste (the second group), and Charcoal® Formula toothpaste for four minutes and 40 seconds (equivalent to one month) and for 14 minutes (equivalent to three months) using a soft fleece toothbrush with a mass of 150 gr. The roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester, and the results were tested with repeated ANOVA test and one-way ANOVA. The value of the surface roughness of tooth enamel was significantly different (p<0.05) after brushing for an equivalent of one month and an equivalent of three months. Using toothpaste containing charcoal can increase the surface roughness of tooth enamel.

  7. Surface roughness of the restored enamel after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Törün; Başaran, Güvenç; Kama, Jalen Devecioğlu

    2010-03-01

    After fixed appliance treatment, one concern is to restore the enamel surface as closely to its original state as possible. A variety of cleanup processes are available, but all are time-consuming and carry some risk of enamel damage. The purpose of this study was to examine tooth surfaces restored with different cleanup protocols. Ninety-nine premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were used. The 2 materials tested were Sof-Lex disks (3 M ESPE AG, Seefeld, Germany) and fiberglass burs (Stain Buster, Carbotech, Ganges, France). These were used alone and in combination with high- and low-speed handpieces, with which they were also compared. Eight groups were ultimately tested. All groups were compared with intact enamel, which served as the control group. From each group, 10 samples were examined with profilometry and 1 with scanning electron microscopy. Adhesive remnant index scores were recorded to ensure equal distributions for the groups. The time required for the cleanup processes and profilometry test results were also recorded. The fastest procedure was performed with high-speed handpieces, followed by low-speed handpieces. Sof-Lex disks and fiberglass burs required more time than carbide burs but did not result in significantly longer times for the cleanup procedure when combined with tungsten carbide-driven low- or high-speed handpieces or when used alone with low-speed handpieces. Although Sof-Lex disks were the most successful for restoring the enamel, it was not necessary to restore the enamel to its original surface condition. Generally, all enamel surface-roughness parameters were increased when compared with the values of intact enamel. The average roughness and maximum roughness depth measurements with Sof-Lex disks were statistically similar to measurements of intact enamel. No cleanup procedure used in this study restored the enamel to its original roughness. The most successful was Sof-Lex disks, which restored the enamel closer to its

  8. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Syafira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces that were embedded in epoxy resin. Furthermore specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were control (distilled water, theobromine 100 mg/L (T100, theobromine 500 mg/L (T500 and theobromine 1000 mg/L (T1000. Specimens were immersed for 15 minutes and microhardness test was performed using Knoop microhardness tester. Results: Increasing enamel microhardness was observed after treatment with four different theobromine concentrations. The highest icreased of enamel microhardness was shown in T1000 group and difference compared to other groups were statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: theobromine is a potential dental caries prevention material due to its effect in improving the microhardness of tooth enamel.

  9. The effects of microabrasion on demineralization inhibition of enamel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, A; Donly, K J; Wefel, J S

    1997-07-01

    Microabraded enamel acquires a highly polished surface of mineralized tissue. The purpose of this study was to determine if microabraded enamel surfaces are more resistant to demineralization. Twenty extracted permanent incisors were used in the experiment. Four treatment modalities were investigated: (1) microabrasion in conjunction with a topical fluoride treatment, (2) topical fluoride treatment, (3) microabrasion, and (4) no treatment. All surfaces, following their respective treatment regimen, were stored in artificial saliva for 2 months and then exposed to an artificial caries system for 5 days. Teeth treated with microabrasion followed by a 4-minute application of 1% neutral topical sodium fluoride exhibited significantly less enamel demineralization when subjected to an artificial caries challenge than did teeth that underwent microabrasion alone, topical fluoride treatment alone, or no treatment at all.

  10. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pglass ceramic, and enamel (Pglass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of Ca, Zn and Sr in enamel of human teeth by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) has been employed to measure Ca, Zn, and Sr in enamel of human teeth. The calibration of the EDXRF system was performed by comparing Sr/Ca ratios with values obtained by atomic absorption analysis of acid etched biopsies of the enamel surface. Two calibration lines were obtained, one line for untreated teeth and the second line for teeth immersed (treated) in solutions containing Sr. A simple analytical model demonstrated that the two calibration lines were the result of the difference in the depth of the enamel sampled by EDXRF and by the acid-etched biopsy. The multi-elemental, non-destructive and quantitative aspects of EDXRF permit the sequential monitoring of the effects of Sr and Zn ions on the mineralization and demineralization processes in human enamel. The portability of the system and adaptability to non-invasive measurements makes it suitable for field studies. 26 references, 4 figures.

  12. Enamel thickness in Asian human canines and premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Robin N. M.; Zermeno, John P.; Reid, Donald J.; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Dental enamel thickness continues to feature prominently in anthropological studies of ape and human evolution, as well as studies of preventative oral care and treatment. Traditional studies of enamel thickness require physical sectioning of teeth for linear and scaled measurements. Recent applications of microtomographic imaging allow scientists to employ larger and more diverse samples, including global samples of recent humans as well as fossil hominin teeth. Unfortunately, little is know...

  13. Evaluation of enamel surface after orthodontic debonding and cleanup using different procedures: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjoy Khatria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the efficiency of four protocols of adhesive remnant removal and polishing after bracket debonding on enamel surfaces using scanning electron microscope (SEM and to compare the time spent to remove resin remnants. Materials and Methods: The present study was a comparative study, in which brackets were bonded on forty freshly extracted human premolar teeth. They were debonded after 24 h and removal of remnant adhesive to as close as possible to the original condition using tungsten carbide burs (TCBs (30 flutted with low-speed contra-angle handpiece, Super Snap ® discs (course, medium, fine, and superfine, TCB + Brownie and Greenie (BG polishers, and TCB + Super Snap ® discs. The surfaces were evaluated under SEM and graded according to the modified surface roughness index. Time taken to remove the residual adhesive was recorded using a stopwatch. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Super Snap ® discs showed a smooth surface with minimal scratches. TCB resulted in an irregular enamel surface in SEM evaluation, showing horizontal scars with a consistent pattern and left remnants on the enamel surfaces. TCB followed by Super Snap ® discs produced some scratches on the enamel surface. The mean time was significantly higher in Group I than the other three groups (P = 0.000. The mean time was significantly lower in Group II than the other three groups (P = 0.000. TCB took the least amount of time followed by TCB + stainless steel and TCB + BG polishers. Conclusion: Enamel surface was restored as close to the original using the Super Snap ® discs. TCB produced a very rough surface, but it is an efficient and least time-consuming procedure. The resultant enamel surface with enamel scars needs to be finished by other polishing techniques after bulk removal using TCB as the sequential use of Super Snap ® discs and polishers is less aggressive in removing

  14. Preliminary surface analysis of etched, bleached, and normal bovine enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruse, N.D.; Smith, D.C.; Torneck, C.D.; Titley, K.C. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and secondary ion-mass spectroscopic (SIMS) analyses were performed on unground un-pumiced, unground pumiced, and ground labial enamel surfaces of young bovine incisors exposed to four different treatments: (1) immersion in 35% H2O2 for 60 min; (2) immersion in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s; (3) immersion in 35% H2O2 for 60 min, in distilled water for two min, and in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s; (4) immersion in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s, in distilled water for two min, and in 35% H2O2 for 60 min. Untreated unground un-pumiced, unground pumiced, and ground enamel surfaces, as well as synthetic hydroxyapatite surfaces, served as controls for intra-tooth evaluations of the effects of different treatments. The analyses indicated that exposure to 35% H2O2 alone, besides increasing the nitrogen content, produced no other significant change in the elemental composition of any of the enamel surfaces investigated. Exposure to 37% H3PO4, however, produced a marked decrease in calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and an increase in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentrations in unground un-pumiced specimens only, and a decrease in C concentration in ground specimens. These results suggest that the reported decrease in the adhesive bond strength of resin to 35% H2O2-treated enamel is not caused by a change in the elemental composition of treated enamel surfaces. They also suggest that an organic-rich layer, unaffected by acid-etching, may be present on the unground un-pumiced surface of young bovine incisors. This layer can be removed by thorough pumicing or by grinding. An awareness of its presence is important when young bovine teeth are used in a model system for evaluation of resin adhesiveness.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization of healthy and fluorotic human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaço, M. V.; Barroso, R. C.; Porto, I. M.; Gerlach, R. F.; Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Droppa, R.; de Sousa, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basic physical-chemistry reactions of demineralization and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory—LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed both in powder samples and polished surfaces. The powder samples were analyzed to obtain the characterization of a typical healthy enamel pattern. The polished surfaces were analyzed in specific areas that have been identified as fluorotic ones. X-ray diffraction data were obtained for all samples and these data were compared with the control samples and also with the literature data.

  16. A Novel Kinetic Method to Measure Apparent Solubility Product of Bulk Human Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Hassanali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tooth enamel mineral loss is influenced by its solubility product value, which is fundamental to the understanding of de- and remineralization resulting from a carious or erosive challenge. Published pKsp values for human enamel and hydroxyapatite range from 110 to 126 suggesting a heterogeneous nature of enamel solubility. However, this range of values may also result from the variety of methods used, e.g., some authors reporting values for suspensions of enamel powder and others for bulk enamel. The aim of this study was to develop a method to measure the solubility of bulk human enamel under controlled in vitro conditions simulating demineralization behavior of enamel within the oral environment using scanning microradiography (SMR. SMR was used to monitor real-time changes in enamel demineralization rates at increasing calcium concentrations in a caries simulating demineralization solution until the concentration at which thermodynamic equilibrium between enamel and solution was achieved.Method: 2 mm thick caries free erupted human enamel slabs with the natural buccal surfaces exposed were placed in SMR cells exposed to circulating caries-simulating 2.0 L 0.1 M pH = 4.0 acetic acid, at 25°C. SMR was used to continuously measure in real-time the decrease in mineral mass during the demineralization at 5 different points from on each slab. Demineralization rates were calculated from a linear regression curve of projected mineral mass against demineralization time. Changes in the demineralization rates were monitored following a series of successive increases in calcium (and phosphate at hydroxyapatite stoichiometric ratios of Ca:P 1.67 were added to the demineralizing solution, until demineralization ceased. The pH was maintained constant throughout.Results: Demineralization halted when the calcium concentration was ~30 mM. At higher calcium concentrations, mineral deposition (remineralization occurred. By comparison with results

  17. Characteristics of hydroxyapatite film formed on human enamel with the powder jet deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Ryo; Sasaki, Keiichi; Zahmaty, Mohammed Saeed Sepasy; Noji, Miyoko; Anada, Takahisa; Suzuki, Osamu; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to create hydroxyapatite (HAp) film by powder jet deposition with manipulating the blasting nozzle above human enamel and to examine the microstructural and mechanical properties of the HAp film and the bonding strength at the interface between the HAp film and the enamel substrate. HAp particles calcinated at 1200°C with an average size of 4.7 μm were used. The HAp particles were mixed with carrier gas (N₂) to form an aerosol flow and was accelerated and blasted from the nozzle onto the enamel substrate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To evaluate the microstructure, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the surface and cross section of the HAp films and a three-dimensional profile of the HAp films were observed. To evaluate the mechanical properties, the micro-Vickers hardness and the bonding strength of the HAp films to the enamel substrate were measured. The deposition area of the HAp film was over 3 × 4 mm. The average and maximum thickness were about 30 and 40 μm, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the hardness of the HAp film and the enamel (p > 0.05). The bonding strength of the HAp film was the same as the bonding strength between composite resin and enamel. Compared with previous reports, wider and thicker HAp film was created on the enamel substrate successfully. The HAp film, which has same hardness with enamel and same bonding strength to the enamel with composite resin, would be a candidate as dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modeling of the human enamel laser ablation process at the mesoscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana C.; Duarte Ramos, Marta Maria; Mendes Ribeiro, Ricardo; Stoneham, Marshall

    2003-06-01

    A mesoscopic simulation of the process of human enamel laser ablation by Er:YAG and CO2 lasers is being developed using the finite element method, taking into account the complex structure and chemical composition of this material. A geometric model that allows studying in detail the temperature, stress and displacement distribution within a few enamel rods is presented. The heat generation that takes place inside the enamel at the centre of the laser spot, caused by a non-ablative laser pulse emitted by CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, was simulated. The sensitivity of our model to the estimated material parameters was studied. Temperature, displacement and stress distribution maps obtained for both lasers are presented. These preliminary results suggest that the temperature distribution across the enamel rods is different in the two situations considered; thermally induced stresses in the material are higher in the regions that are richer in hydroxyapatite (HA), and the higher displacements are observed in the regions that are rich in water. The rod tails inside enamel present higher stresses in the direction perpendicular to the surface of enamel than the ones that are created at the surface of our simulated structure. We conclude that the mesostructure plays a crucial role in the accurate modelling of dental laser ablation.

  19. The effect of remin pro and MI paste plus on bleached enamel surface roughness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Heshmat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching.Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed.The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P0.05.There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness.

  20. The effect of remin pro and MI paste plus on bleached enamel surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Jaberi, Solmaz; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharrazi

    2014-03-01

    The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus) and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching. Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus) and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control) were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed. The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P0.05). There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness.

  1. Mechanism of Action of TiF4 on Dental Enamel Surface: SEM/EDX, KOH-Soluble F, and X-Ray Diffraction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comar, Lívia P; Souza, Beatriz M; Al-Ahj, Luana P; Martins, Jessica; Grizzo, Larissa T; Piasentim, Isabelle S; Rios, Daniela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2017-10-12

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the action of TiF4 on sound and carious bovine and human enamel. Sound (S) and pre-demineralised (DE) bovine and human (primary and permanent) enamel samples were treated with TiF4 (pH 1.0) or NaF varnishes (pH 5.0), containing 0.95, 1.95, or 2.45% F for 12 h. The enamel surfaces were analysed using SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) (n = 10, 5 S and 5 DE) and KOH-soluble fluoride was quantified (n = 20, 10 S and 10 DE). Hydroxyapatite powder produced by precipitation method was treated with the corresponding fluoride solutions for 1 min (n = 2). The formed compounds were detected using X-ray diffraction (XRD). All TiF4 varnishes produced a coating layer rich in Ti and F on all types of enamel surface, with micro-cracks in its extension. TiF4 (1.95 and 2.45% F) provided higher fluoride deposition than NaF, especially for bovine enamel (p enamel. The Ti content was higher for bovine and human primary enamel than human permanent enamel, with some differences between S and DE. The XRD analysis showed that TiF4 induced the formation of new compounds such as CaF2, TiO2, and Ti(HPO4)2·H2O. In conclusion, TiF4 (>0.95% F) interacts better, when compared to NaF, with bovine and human primary enamel than with human permanent enamel. TiF4 provoked higher F deposition compared to NaF. Carious enamel showed higher F uptake than sound enamel by TiF4 application, while Ti uptake was dependent on the enamel condition and origin. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6: Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique.

  3. Saliva and Serum Protein Exchange at the Tooth Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, D; Helmerhorst, E J; Oppenheim, F G

    2017-04-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle is an oral, fluid-derived protein layer that forms on the tooth surface. It is a biologically and clinically important integument that protects teeth against enamel demineralization, and abrasion. Tooth surfaces are exposed to different proteinaceous microenvironments depending on the enamel location. For instance, tooth surfaces close to the gingival sulcus contact serum proteins that emanate via this sulcus, which may impact pellicle composition locally. The aims of this study were to define the major salivary and serum components that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, to study competition among them, and to obtain preliminary evidence in an in vivo saliva/serum pellicle model. Hydroxyapatite powder was incubated with saliva and serum, and the proteins that adsorbed were identified by mass spectrometry. To study competition, saliva and serum proteins were labeled with CyDyes, mixed in various proportions, and incubated with hydroxyapatite. In vivo competition was assessed using a split-mouth design, with half the buccal tooth surfaces coated with serum and the other half with saliva. After exposure to the oral environment for 0 min, 30 min and 2 h, the pellicles were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In pure saliva- or serum-derived pellicles, 82 and 84 proteins were identified, respectively. When present concomitantly, salivary protein adsorbers effectively competed with serum protein adsorbers for the hydroxyapatite surface. Specifically, acidic proline-rich protein, cystatin, statherin and protein S100-A9 proteins competed off apolipoproteins, complement C4-A, haptoglobin, transthyretin and serotransferrin. In vivo evidence further supported the replacement of serum proteins by salivary proteins. In conclusion, although significant numbers of serum proteins emanate from the gingival sulcus, their ability to participate in dental pellicle formation is likely reduced in the presence of strong salivary protein adsorbers. The functional properties of the

  4. Do enamel microabrasion and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate affect shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to a demineralized enamel surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Asli; Uysal, Tancan

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of enamel microabrasion, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), and their combination on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to demineralized enamel surface. One hundred human first premolar teeth were randomly allocated to one of five groups. Group I was considered as the control of other groups. For the remaining groups, demineralization was performed via solutions. In group II, brackets were directly bonded to the demineralized enamel surface. CPP-ACP was applied in group III, microabrasion was performed in group IV, and both microabrasion and CPP-ACP application were performed in group V. The specimens were tested for SBS. Bond failures were scored according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used to compare the SBS of the groups. ARI scores of the groups were evaluated with a G-test. The statistical significance was set at P Microabrasion and combination with CPP-ACP showed higher SBS compared to the control group. The differences between ARI scores of the groups were statistically significant (P microabrasion of the enamel, and the combination of these two methods improve the bonding to demineralized enamel.

  5. Chemical analysis and surface morphology of enamel following ozone application with different concentrations and exposure times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman I. Elsayad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of different ozone concentrations applied with different exposure times on the chemical composition and the surface morphology of enamel. Twenty human mandibular molars were divided into four groups according to ozone concentration and exposure times. Group A received 90 μg of ozone/ml oxygen for 1 min, group B received 90 μg of ozone/ml oxygen for 2 min, group C received 120 μg of ozone/ml oxygen for 1 min and group D received 120 μg of ozone/ml oxygen for 2 min. The ozone source was from a medical ozone generator equipped with a device to adjust the concentration. Buccal surfaces of teeth were tested before and after ozone application so that each tooth served as a control for itself, using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM connected to an Electron Dispersive Analytical X-ray (EDAX. Changes in calcium and phosphorus percentage levels were recorded and the Ca/P ratio was calculated. The values were statistically analyzed using the one-way ANOVA test with a level of significance set at P ⩽ 0.05. No statistical significant difference was found between the control and the tested groups in minerals content or ratio as P > 0.05. ESEM images showed enamel surface roughness with 2 min ozone exposure times. High ozone concentration with prolonged exposure time does not change the chemical composition of enamel. Applying ozone for 2 min alters the surface morphology of enamel causing variable degrees of roughness. Using high ozone concentrations with prolonged exposure times for caries reversal or prevention and for bleaching may be contraindicated if this changes the surface morphology of enamel.

  6. Protection of enamel surfaces in the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazovic, Maja Bruvo

    integrity were determined by testing the effect of 22 standard chemical variables in drinking water on caries experience (DMF-S) among 15-year-olds schoolchildren. By iterative search and testing calcium and fluoride were identified to explain 45 % of the variations in DMF-S among 52,057 15-year...... and foodstuffs or gastric juice can cause dental erosion. During a lifetime the enamel surface is also exposed to fluids that can have protective effects against dental caries and erosion such as saliva, various foodstuffs, drinking water and many types of drinks. However, little is still known about simple...... caries and erosion. Drinking water was used as a model system to test previously undetermined inorganic effects with importance for dental caries and the pellicle forming properties of the saliva proteins were used to test organic effects of importance for dental erosion. Inorganic effects on enamel...

  7. Erosive Effect of Different Soft Drinks on Enamel Surface in vitro: Application of Stylus Profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Radomir; Gasic, Jovanka; Trutic, Natasa; Sunaric, Slavica; Popovic, Jelena; Djekic, Petar; Radenkovic, Goran; Mitic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    To assess the erosive potential of various soft drinks by measuring initial pH and titratable acidity (TA) and to evaluate enamel surface roughness using different exposure times. The initial pH of the soft drinks (group 1: Coca-Cola; group 2: orange juice; group 3: Cedevita; group 4: Guarana, and group 5: strawberry yoghurt) was measured using a pH meter, and TA was measured by titration with NaOH. Enamel samples (n = 96), cut from unerupted human third molars, were randomly assigned to 6 groups: experimental (groups 1-5) and control (filtered saliva). The samples were exposed to 50 ml of soft drinks for 15, 30 and 60 min, 3 times daily, during 10 days. Between immersions, the samples were kept in filtered saliva. Enamel surface roughness was measured by diamond stylus profilometer using the following roughness parameters: Ra, Rq, Rz, and Ry. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey's post hoc and Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests. The pH values of the soft drinks ranged from 2.52 (Guarana) to 4.21 (strawberry yoghurt). Orange juice had the highest TA, requiring 5.70 ml of NaOH to reach pH 7.0, whereas Coca-Cola required only 1.87 ml. Roughness parameters indicated that Coca-Cola had the strongest erosion potential during the 15 min of exposure, while Coca-Cola and orange juice were similar during 30- and 60-min exposures. There were no significant differences related to all exposure times between Guarana and Cedevita. Strawberry yoghurt did not erode the enamel surface regardless of the exposure time. All of the tested soft drinks except yoghurt were erosive. Erosion of the enamel surfaces exposed to Coca-Cola, orange juice, Cedevita, and Guarana was directly proportional to the exposure time. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. [Effects of tooth whitening agents and acidic drinks on the surface properties of dental enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Chen, Zhiqun; Lin, Yao; Shao, Jinquan; Yin, Lu

    2013-10-01

    Using tooth whitening agents (bleaching clip) in vitro and acidic drinks, we conducted a comparative study of the changes in enamel surface morphology, Ca/P content, and hardness. Tooth whitening glue pieces, cola, and orange juice were used to soak teeth in artificial saliva in vitro. Physiological saline was used as a control treatment. The morphology of the four groups was observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after the teeth were soaked for 7 and 14 d. The changes in Ca/P content and microhardness were analyzed. The enamel surfaces of the teeth in the three test groups were demineralized. The Ca/P ratio and the average microhardness were significantly lower than those of the control group immediately after the teeth were soaked (P 0.05). Bleaching agents caused transient demineralization of human enamel, but these agents could induce re-mineralization and repair of enamel over time. Demineralization caused by bleaching covered a relatively normal range compared with acidic drinks and daily drinking.

  9. Effect of acidity upon attrition-corrosion of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Qi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Attrition-corrosion is a synthesized human enamel wear process combined mechanical effects (attrition) with corrosion. With the rising consumption of acidic food and beverages, attrition-corrosion is becoming increasingly common. Yet, research is limited and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, in vitro wear loss of human enamel was investigated and the attrition-corrosion process and wear mechanism were elucidated by the analysis of the wear scar and its subsurface using focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human enamel flat-surface samples were prepared with enamel cusps as the wear antagonists. Reciprocating wear testing was undertaken under load of 5N at the speed of 66 cycle/min for 2250 cycles with lubricants including citric acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5), acetic acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5) and distilled water. All lubricants were used at 37°C. Similar human enamel flat-surface samples were also exposed to the same solutions as a control group. The substance loss of enamel during wear can be linked to the corrosion potential of a lubricant used. Using a lubricant with very low corrosion potential (such as distilled water), the wear mechanism was dominated by delamination with high wear loss. Conversely, the wear mechanism changed to shaving of the softened layer with less material loss in an environment with medium corrosion potential such as citric acid at pH 3.2 and 5.5 and acetic acid at pH 5.5. However, a highly corrosive environment (e.g., acetic acid at pH 3.2) caused the greatest loss of substance during wear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of microabrasion on substance loss, surface roughness, and colorimetric changes on enamel in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Paic, M; Sener, B; Schug, J; Schmidlin, P R

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine in vitro the effects of 2 commercially available microabrasion compounds (Prema [Premiere Dental Products] and Opalustre [Ultradent]) on human enamel under standardized conditions after treatment periods of 10, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. Nonacidified pumice served as an abrasive control compound. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Mean substance loss was determined by measuring dissolved Ca2+ using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Differences in the mean surface roughness were pr...

  11. Human and bovine enamel erosion under 'single-drink' conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, A.J.; Yorath, C.; Hengel, V. ten; Leary, S.D.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Barbour, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth-surface pH is lowered, during drinking, to a value close to the pH of the drink itself. After the drink is swallowed, the pH rises to baseline values but this process can take several minutes. Few techniques can quantify enamel erosion at timescales representative of single drinks. The

  12. Human and bovine enamel erosion under 'single-drink' conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Andrew J.; Yorath, Celyn; ten Hengel, Valerie; Leary, Sam D.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Barbour, Michele E.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth-surface pH is lowered, during drinking, to a value close to the pH of the drink itself. After the drink is swallowed, the pH rises to baseline values but this process can take several minutes. Few techniques can quantify enamel erosion at timescales representative of single drinks. The

  13. In-Vitro Comparative Study of In-office and Home Bleaching Agents on Surface Micro-morphology of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on surface micro-morphology of enamel. An experimental study. The discs were prepared at Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, and surface morphology was analyzed at Centralized Science Laboratory of Karachi University, Pakistan. Duration of study was one year from January to December 2012. Forty five sound human third molar crowns, extracted for periodontal reason, were included in the study. Longitudinal sections were made using diamond disks (0.2 mm) under water lubrication to obtain enamel slabs measuring (3 mm x 3 mm). The slabs were embedded in polystyrene resin by using 2.0 cm diameter PVC molds, leaving the outer enamel surface uncovered by the resin. Ninety dental enamel slabs were prepared. The slabs were then randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained thirty specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator (Memart, Germany) during whole experiment. Group 2 was treated with power whitening gel (White Smile 2011, Germany). Group 3 was treated with tooth whitening pen (White Smile 2011, Germany). The most central region or the region that was most representative of the entire surface area was used. The SEM (Jeol-Japan-JSM6380A, JAPAN) micrographs were examined to determine the type of surface presented. The enamel changes were classified as no or mild alteration, moderate alteration and severe altered surface. Regarding micro-morphology, the enamel surface of control groups showed smooth surface in general with some scattered clear scratches due to the polishing procedure. The specimens bleached in group 2 and group 3, represented areas of mild erosion. Bleaching with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) and 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) resulted in mild changes in surface micro-morphology of enamel.

  14. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  15. Surface roughness and enamel loss with two microabrasion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Sonia Saeger; Andre, Darvi de Almeida; Leida, Ferdinan Luis; Bocangel, Jorge Saldivar; Demarco, Flavio Fernando

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the surface roughness and enamel loss produced by two microabrasion techniques. Bovine teeth were selected and an area was delimited for microabrasion techniques. Surface roughness was determined before and after treatment using a digital profilometer. Specimens were randomized to one of two acid treatments (n = 10): 18% hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pumice or 37% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and pumice. Acid treatments were applied using a wooden spatula for 5 seconds for a total of ten applications. Then, specimens were sectioned through the center of the demineralization area to obtain 80 microm thick slices. The wear produced by the microabrasion techniques was evaluated using stereomicroscopy (40 x). The greatest depth (microm) and the total surface area (microm(2)) of demineralization were measured using the Image Tool software (University of Texas Health Science, San Antonio, TX, USA). In addition, three specimens of each group were subjected to SEM analysis at different magnifications. The mean surface roughness was statistically lower for HCl than for H3PO4 (p Microabrasion using H3PO4 produced greater surface roughness but less demineralization than the microabrasion technique using HCl. Both microabrasion techniques effectively remove the superficial enamel layer. However, the technique using H3PO4 was less aggressive, safer, and easier to perform.

  16. Molecular Basis of Human Enamel Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzopoulos Georgios

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During eruption of teeth in the oral cavity, the effect of gene variations and environmental factors can result in morphological and structural changes in teeth. Amelogenesis imperfecta is a failure which is detected on the enamel of the teeth and clinical picture varies by the severity and type of the disease. Classification of the types of amelogenesis imperfecta is determined by histological, genetic, clinical and radiographic criteria. Specifically, there are 4 types of amelogenesis imperfecta (according to Witkop: hypoplastic form, hypo-maturation form, hypo-calcified form, and hypo-maturation/hypoplasia form with taurodontism and 14 subcategories. The diagnosis and classification of amelogenesis imperfecta has traditionally been based on clinical presentation or phenotype and the inheritance pattern. Several genes can be mutated and cause the disease. Millions of genes, possibly more than 10,000 genes produce proteins that regulate synthesis of enamel. Some of the genes and gene products that are likely associated with amelogenesis imperfecta are: amelogenin (AMELX, AMELY genes, ameloblastin (AMBN gene, enamelin (ENAM gene, enamelysin (MMP20 gene, kalikryn 4 (KLK 4 gene, tuftelins (Tuftelin gene, FAM83H (FAM83H gene and WDR72 (WDR72 gene. Particular attention should be given by the dentist in recognition and correlation of phenotypes with genotypes, in order to diagnose quickly and accurately such a possible disease and to prevent or treat it easily and quickly. Modern dentistry should restore these lesions in order to guarantee aesthetics and functionality, usually in collaboration with a group of dentists.

  17. Penetration of chlorhexidine coating into tooth enamel: A surface analytical study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sodhi, Rana N S; Symington, John

    2016-01-01

    .... In this work, surface analytical techniques have been applied to study the chemical composition, distribution, and penetration of an applied liquid coating containing chlorhexidine onto tooth enamel...

  18. Penetration of etched enamel and dentin cavity surfaces by bonding agent/composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, J M; Clarke-Martin, J A

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical and adhesive advantage of resin bonding agents depend upon the ability to penetrate microspaces created with acid-etchants and close adaptation to cavity surfaces. As a replicating material, these resins may reveal morphologic characteristics of the cavity surfaces not seen by direct scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation. The purpose of this study was to describe, with the SEM, the resin replications of acid-etched cavity walls of Class V cavity preparations in the labial and lingual surfaces of extracted premolar teeth. Cavities were prepared in the gingival third of these surfaces in 26 freshly extracted human premolar teeth using fissure burs in water-cooled, high-speed handpieces. The cavosurface margins were bevelled. The preparations were washed in tap water, dried, etched for 20 seconds with 35% phosphoric acid, coated with light-cured bonding agent and filled with light-cured composite resin in two applications. The teeth were dissolved in acid and the cavity walls of the composite examined in the SEM. Features observed included: (a) Type II resin penetration of interrod regions, (b) resin penetration of the lamellae to the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ), (c) a 10-20 microns step in surface contour at the DEJ, with penetration of terminal tubule branches, (d) insular regions of deep dentin tubule penetration and (e) 100-300 microns deep, 10-30 microns incremental microlamellar penetrations into the enamel at the DEJ corresponding to enamel tufts.

  19. Chemical regeneration of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yujing; Yun, Song; Fang, Jieshi; Chen, Haifeng

    2009-10-21

    Regenerating the microstructure of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions (pH 6.0, 37 degrees C, 1 atm) using a simple chemical approach demonstrates a potential application to repair enamel damage in dental clinics.

  20. [Application of atomic force microscopy in evaluation of three-dimensional morphology of eroded human enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-yong; Jiang, Li; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wei

    2012-06-01

    To compare the three dimensional morphology and surface roughness changes of enamel eroded for different etching time. Fifteen freshly extracted sound human pre-molars for orthodontic purpose were collected. The buccal surface of teeth were prepared into smooth enamel slices, and then were randomly divided into 5 groups based on their etching time 0 s (control group), 5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 30 s, respectively by 37% phosphoric acid. The three dimensional morphology was observed under atomic force microscope (AFM). The profile was analyzed, and the value of Ra, Rq, Rz and the surface area and volume were measured. The AFM photograph showed that with the etching time from 0 s to 20 s the enamel surface demineralised gradually, the top structure of enamel rod and the fish scaled structure became obvious. But the morphology only changed a bit after 20 s. The surrounding inter-rod enamel eroded first, the depth increased to 2.8 µm at 20 s but decreased to 1.8 µm at 30 s. The value of Ra increased from (19.69 ± 3.42) nm to (359.51 ± 75.79) nm, and Rq from (22.02 ± 5.57) nm to (431.02 ± 83.09) nm, Rz from (0.24 ± 0.08) µm to (2.38 ± 0.26) µm. Except for groups 20 s and 30 s, the difference among other groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The surface area expanded from (406.77 ± 3.88) µm(2) to (546.69 ± 84.02) µm(2), and surface volume from (65.73 ± 14.46) µm(3) to (474.63 ± 52.50) µm(3). The depth, surface roughness, surface area and volume caused by erosion increased with etching time. The three dimensional morphology greatly changed by acid-etching process.

  1. The effects of three different food acids on the attrition-corrosion wear of human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    With increased consumption of acidic drinks and foods, the wear of human teeth due to attrition in acidic environments is an increasingly important issue. Accordingly, the present paper investigates in vitro the wear of human enamel in three different acidic environments. Reciprocating wear tests in which an enamel cusp slides on an enamel flat surface were carried out using acetic, citric and lactic acid lubricants (at pH 3-3.5). Distilled water was also included as a lubricant for comparison. Focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging were then used to investigate the enamel subsurfaces following wear tests. Nanoindentation was used to ascertain the changes in enamel mechanical properties. The study reveals crack generation along the rod boundaries due to the exposure of enamel to the acidic environments. The wear mechanism changes from brittle fracture in distilled water to ploughing or shaving of the softened layer in acidic environments, generating a smooth surface with the progression of wear. Moreover, nanoindentation results of enamel samples which were exposed to the above acids up to a duration of the wear tests show decreasing hardness and Young’s modulus with exposure time.

  2. Treatment of Enamel Surfaces After Bracket Debonding: Case Reports and Long-term Follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, R H; Franco, L M; Machado, L S; Pini, Nip; Salomao, F M; Anchieta, R B; Sundfeld, D

    2016-01-01

    After bracket debonding, residual bonded material may be observed on the enamel surface. When not properly removed, this residual material can interfere with the surface smoothness of the enamel, potentially resulting in staining at the resin/enamel interface and contributing to biofilm accumulation. Clinical case reports demonstrate clinical procedures to remove residual bonded material after bracket debonding. A water-cooled fine tapered 3195 FF diamond bur was used to remove the residual bonded material. Subsequently, the enamel surface was treated with Opalustre microabrasive compound. After one week, overnight dental bleaching was initiated using 10% carbamide peroxide in custom-formed trays for four weeks. The enamel microabrasion technique was found to be effective for polishing the enamel surface and for reestablishing the dental esthetics associated with dental bleaching. Longitudinal clinical controls of other clinical cases are presented.

  3. Evaluation of enamel surfaces following interproximal reduction and polishing with different methods: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eenal Bhambri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interproximal reduction was introduced as an alternative to tooth extraction in patients with mild-to-moderate crowding, the beneficial outcomes of interdental reduction have been well documented, but nevertheless, possible detrimental effects on enamel have also been an issue of debate. Interproximal reduction generates the formation of grooves and valleys creating plaque retentive areas, predisposing teeth to caries, and periodontal disease. Various proximal stripping techniques, it is postulated, produce varying grades of roughness of the enamel surface; it is in this area that the research in this paper was focused. Aim: The aim is to evaluate enamel surface roughness after various interproximal reduction and polishing methods. Materials and Methods: 16-blade tungsten carbide bur, diamond disc, diamond-coated metal strip, fine Sof-Lex disc, and fine diamond bur were used for interproximal reduction and polishing on extracted human premolars. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM and surface plots of images were made using Image J software. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained were subjected to ANOVA and posthoc multiple tests. Results: Under the SEM, all interproximal reduction protocols resulted in roughened and grooved enamel surfaces. The use of diamond-coated metal strip followed by polishing with fine Sof-Lex disc created surfaces that were reasonably smooth. Conclusions: The enamel surfaces after reduction with diamond-coated metal strip and polishing by fine Sof-Lex disc (group F were the smoothest.

  4. Biological evaluation of enamel sealants in an organotypic model of the human gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingler, Sebastian; Matthei, Byron; Diercke, Katja; Frese, Cornelia; Ludwig, Björn; Kohl, Annette; Lux, Christopher J; Erber, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Various sealant materials have been suggested to decrease decalcification during orthodontic treatment. However, only a few in vitro studies on the cytotoxicity of resinous pit and fissure sealants have been published, and to the best of our knowledge no similar studies are available for the enamel sealants used in orthodontics. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the possible adverse effects of enamel sealants, especially on the gingival epithelium. Organotypic cultures of the human gingival mucosa were used to assess the possible impact of six enamel sealants. Differentiation and apoptosis were determined by immunofluorescent staining. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 were quantified by ELISA. Cytotoxicity was measured using MTS assays in monolayer cultures of human gingival fibroblasts. Leaching of monomers from enamel sealants was quantified using HPLC. The differentiation of the organotypic gingival mucosa remained unaffected. All under-cured and several standard-cured sealants (Light Bond™ Sealant, Light Bond™ Filled Sealant, and L.E.D. Pro Seal®) significantly induced apoptosis in the organotypic model. Light Bond™ Sealant, Light Bond™ Filled Sealant, and L.E.D. Pro Seal® caused a significant induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Reducing curing time had an influence on cytotoxicity in monolayer cultures of primary human oral cells. All resin-based sealants leached monomers. Enamel sealants might exert adverse effects on the gingival epithelium. Due to the vicinity of the enamel sealant to the gingival epithelium, and the large surface area of applied sealants, these materials should be carefully applied and sufficiently cured. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrastructural effects caused by the irradiation of Er:YAG laser on smooth surfaces of deciduous tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Denise G.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Watanabe-Sei, Ii

    1999-05-01

    Enamel surface morphologic alterations were investigated when an Er:YAG focused moistened laser radiation (λ =2.94μm) was applied on canine deciduous teeth enamel. The results were compared to the data already reported concerning permanent dental enamel. The results indicated that the ultrastructural effects obtained were very alike to permanent enamel literature reports.

  6. Using bearing area parameters to quantify early erosive tooth surface changes in enamel: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, James; German, Matthew; Waterhouse, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Most in vitro studies investigate the erosive process using relatively simple roughness parameters such as roughness average (Ra). In isolation, Ra may misrepresent the surface features. Further, few studies report baseline surface characteristics after sample preparation. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that measuring the bearing area parameters in addition to Ra may be useful when qualifying the surface of enamel at baseline and after an erosive challenge. The null hypothesis for this study was that the bearing area parameters provide no more useful information than Ra alone, when qualifying the surface of enamel at baseline and after an erosive challenge. Enamel slabs (n=20) were prepared from human (n=2) and bovine (n=4) incisor teeth and polished with 0.05μm paste. Roughness average (Ra) and bearing parameters (MR1, MR2, Rpk, Rk, Rvk) were used to record baseline characteristics. Specimens were subjected to erosion with 1% citric acid solution for 1min. Profilometric characteristics were recorded post-erosion, along with the maximum height changes within the profile. T-tests were carried out in order to compare baseline surface characteristics between tissue types. Post-erosion, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the effects of tissue type (bovine or human). There was no significant difference in Ra between human and bovine incisor enamel at baseline (human 0.11μm, bovine 0.12μm P>0.05), and no significant difference was observed post-erosion (human 0.23μm, bovine 0.20μm P>0.05). There were significant differences in bearing parameters at baseline and post-erosion that were not identified by the Ra measurement alone. The results suggest that if Ra alone is measured, important differences in surface characteristics may be missed. The null hypothesis is rejected, and the recommendation is made that bearing parameters are included within profile measurements in order to further triangulate the results of surface analysis studies. In

  7. Effect of plasma on composition of human enamel and cementum pellicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajisa, L.; Prakobphol, A. (Division of Oral Biology, Department of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of California at San Francisco (USA)); Schioedt, M. (Department of Oral Medicine and Oral Surgery, University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Fisher, S.J. (Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Slabs of human enamel and cementum were incubated with plasma alone or with various mixtures of plasma and saliva. Proteins and glycoproteins that adsorbed to the surface of the slabs in 0 to 60 min were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed {sup 125}I-iodination and by mild periodate oxidation followed by NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} reduction. The labeled components were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography or fluorography. From plasma alone, a 58 and a 66 kDa protein (probably albumin) were adsorbed to the enamel surface in relatively equal amounts, but no {sup 125}I-labeled components were detected on the cementum surface in the absence of saliva. Adding 10% saliva to the incubation mixture promoted the adsorption of the 58 and 66 kDa components to cementum. In Addition, another set of proteins, including components of 44, 47, 29, and 25 kDa, was adsorbed to both cementum and enamel in the presence of saliva. These six proteins were the major {sup 125}I-labeled species in all of the pellicles formed from mixtures of plasma and saliva. The electrophoretic mobility of the major 120 and 140 kDa {sup 3}H-labeled sialoglycoproteins adsorbed to both cementum and enamel was similar to that of the low-molecular-weight mucin of submandibular/sublingual saliva. (author).

  8. The effect of cold-light-activated bleaching treatment on enamel surfaces in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin-Chang; Ma, He; Zhou, Jing-Lin; Li, Wei

    2012-12-01

    This in vitro study aims to evaluate the crystal and surface microstructure of dental enamel after cold-light bleaching treatment. Twelve sound human premolars were cross-split into four specimens, namely, mesio-buccal (Group LP), disto-buccal (Group P), mesio-lingual (Group NP) and disto-lingual (Group L) specimens. These four groups were treated using the standard cold-light bleaching procedure, a bleaching agent, a peroxide-free bleaching agent and cold-light, respectively. Before and after treatment, all specimens were analyzed by high-resolution, micro-area X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using a spectrometer, tooth color of all specimens was measured before and after treatment. The phase of the enamel crystals was identified as hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite. After treatment, specimens in Groups LP and P showed significantly weaker X-ray diffraction peaks, significant reduction in crystal size and crystallinity, significant increase in L* but decrease in a* and b*, and obvious alterations in the surface morphology. However, specimens in Groups NP and L did not show any significant changes. The cold-light bleaching treatment leads to demineralization in the enamel surface. The acidic peroxide-containing bleaching agent was the major cause of demineralization, whereas cold-light did not exhibit significant increase or decrease effect on this demineralization.

  9. Surface Structure Study of Crystal Hydroxy-Apatite from Fluorosis Enamels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdillah Imron Nasution

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluorosis is a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluor which can cause the change in tooth structure and strength. However, there is still lack of explanation on the surface structure of crystal hydroxyapatite that influences the microscopic characteristic of fluorosis enamel. Objectives: To investigate the surface structure of crystal hydroxy-apatite in fluorosis enamel. Materials and Methods: Determination of fluor concentration and the surface structure of normal and fluorosis enamel specimen were carried out by using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Disperse X-Ray (SEM/EDX. Results: Fluor concentration of fluorosis enamel was significantly higher with increased surface roughness and porosity than normal enamel. SEM observation also showed gaps areas between enamel rods and visible aprismatic zone in some regions. Conclusion: High level of fluor concentration on fluorosis enamel indicated the subtitution of OH- by F- increasing the surface roughness of enamel surface.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i3.100

  10. Effect of hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate on the microhardness of human enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, I; Hirschfeld, Z; Stabholz, A; Rotstein, I

    1994-02-01

    The effect of 30% hydrogen peroxide and a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at different temperatures and time intervals on the microhardness of human enamel and dentin was examined. Intact extracted human teeth were sectioned, embedded in acrylic resin, polished, and divided into four test groups related to surface treatment. The groups were 30% hydrogen peroxide at 37 degrees C, 30% hydrogen peroxide at 50 degrees C in an illuminated chamber, a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at 37 degrees C, and a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at 50 degrees C in an illuminated chamber. Teeth treated with distilled water at either 37 degrees C or 50 degrees C served as controls. The results indicated that treatment with 30% hydrogen peroxide reduced the microhardness of both enamel and dentin. This reduction was statistically significant after 5-min treatment for the dentin and after 15-min treatment for the enamel (p sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide did not alter the microhardness of either the enamel or dentin at the tested temperatures and time intervals. It is therefore suggested that the use of high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for bleaching purposes should be limited. Sodium perborate appears to be a less damaging bleaching agent.

  11. Copper and zinc isotope ratios in human bone and enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Herrscher, Estelle; Balter, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report Cu and Zn isotope ratios of bones and teeth of French people from various historical periods with the aim to understand how Cu and Zn isotope ratios of bone, a tissue that is continuously remodeled throughout life but that is prone to post-mortem diagenesis, compare with that of tooth enamel, a tissue that forms once during childhood but that is more resistant to diagenesis. Specifically, we examine (1) the potential existence of sex-related differences in the Cu isotope ratios (represented as δ65 Cu) in the tooth enamel of identified men and women, and (2) a decrease of Zn isotope delta ratios (represented as δ66 Zn) related to the increase of meat and fish consumption during the 20th century. Four series of material were studied: the archeological population of Saint-Laurent de Grenoble (17th -18th centuries AD), an anatomical collection of skulls (19th century AD), a contemporary anatomical collection of bones never buried, and contemporary teeth samples. The metals were purified by liquid chromatography and their isotopic ratios measured by means of multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We describe a clear offset between bone and tooth enamel for Zn isotope ratios, as previously observed in animals. There is a similar offset for Cu isotope ratios. We did not observe any difference between the δ65 Cu values of men and women when looking at dental enamel. For the contemporary samples, the δ66 Zn values of bioapatite decreased, which might be explained by the increase of animal product consumption among the French people during this period, notably when the access to seafood became widespread. Our study demonstrates that the Cu and Zn isotope compositions of dental enamel are promising tools for childhood diet reconstruction. Meanwhile, the Cu isotope ratio of tooth enamel is unlikely to be useful for the identification of biological sex, even in the case of populations with early menarche. Further works are needed to

  12. Monitoring Demineralization and Subsequent Remineralization of Human Teeth at the Dentin-Enamel Junction with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Bob-Dan; Röper, Stephanie; Messerschmidt, Jens; Blume, Alfred; Magerle, Robert

    2015-09-02

    Using atomic force microscopy, we monitored the nanoscale surface morphology of human teeth at the dentin-enamel junction after performing successive demineralization steps with an acidic soft drink. Subsequently, we studied the remineralization process with a paste containing calcium and phosphate ions. Repeated atomic force microscopy imaging of the same sample areas on the sample allowed us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the specific mechanism of the demineralization process and the subsequent remineralization process. The about 1-μm-deep grooves that are caused by the demineralization process were preferentially filled with deposited nanoparticles, leading to smoother enamel and dentine surfaces after 90 min exposure to the remineralizing agent. The deposited material is found to homogeneously cover the enamel and dentine surfaces in the same manner. The temporal evolution of the surface roughness indicates that the remineralization caused by the repair paste proceeds in two distinct successive phases.

  13. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5) treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group); G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure...

  14. Etching effect of acidic fluorides on human tooth enamel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortsjö, Carl; Jonski, Grazyna; Young, Alix; Saxegaard, Erik

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study aimed to examine the etching effect of acidic fluoride solutions on enamel. 24 human teeth divided into 48 enamel-specimens were partly isolated with impression material. Specimens were exposed for 10 min to 20ml of the following solutions: 1.6% TiF4, 3.9% SnF2, 0.2% HF and 1.8% citric acid (CA). The isolation was removed and 24 specimens analysed by profilometry (Δheight: exposed/isolated enamel surfaces, surface roughness parameters). For the remaining 24 specimens [Ca(2+)] in the test solutions was analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Median Δheights (μm) after exposure were: TiF4 0.07, SnF2 -0.03, HF -0.14 and CA -5.92. TiF4-exposed surfaces showed both deposits and etched areas and exhibited statistically significant different surface roughness parameters compared to the HF- and SnF2-exposed surfaces. Median [Ca(2+)] values (ppm): TiF4 1.88, SnF2 0.11, HF 0.10 and CA 2.17. At the [F] tested in this study it can be concluded that SnF2- and HF solutions had negligible erosive effects on enamel. TiF4 solution resulted in an incomplete surface deposition associated with calcium dissolution suggesting that TiF4 applied as solution may not be advisable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protostylid expression at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of mandibular molars of Paranthropus robustus and Australopithecus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Distinctive expressions and incidences of discrete dental traits at the outer enamel surface (OES) contribute to the diagnoses of many early hominin taxa. Examination of the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), imaged non-destructively using micro-computed tomography, has elucidated the morphological development of dental traits and improved interpretations of their variability within and among taxa. The OES expressions of one of these dental traits, the protostylid, have been found to differ among African Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominin taxa. In this study protostylid expression is examined at the OES and at the EDJ of Paranthropus robustus (n=23) and Australopithecus africanus (n=28) mandibular molars, with the goals of incorporating EDJ morphology into the definition of the protostylid and assessing the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to its expression in these taxa. The results provide evidence (a) of statistically significant taxon-specific patterns of protostylid morphology at the EDJ that are not evident at the OES; (b) that in P. robustus, thick enamel reduces the morphological correspondence between the form of the protostylid seen at the EDJ and the OES, and (c) that if EDJ images can be obtained, then the protostylid retains its taxonomic value even in worn teeth.

  16. Surface Structure Study of Crystal Hydroxy-Apatite from Fluorosis Enamels

    OpenAIRE

    Abdillah Imron Nasution; Harun Asyiq Gunawan; Sri Angky Soekanto

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis is a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluor which can cause the change in tooth structure and strength. However, there is still lack of explanation on the surface structure of crystal hydroxyapatite that influences the microscopic characteristic of fluorosis enamel. Objectives: To investigate the surface structure of crystal hydroxy-apatite in fluorosis enamel. Materials and Methods: Determination of fluor concentration and the surface structure of normal and fluor...

  17. Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on tensile bond strength and caries resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X; Zhang, L; Liu, R; Deng, M; Wang, Y; Liu, L; Nie, X

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin to human enamel and caries resistance of human enamel. A total of 201 human premolars were used in this in vitro study. A flat enamel surface greater than 4 × 4 mm in area was prepared on each specimen using a low-speed cutting machine under a water coolant. Twenty-one specimens were divided into seven groups for morphology observations with no treatment, 35% phosphoric acid etching (30 seconds), and laser irradiation (30 seconds) of pulsed Nd:YAG laser with five different laser-parameter combinations. Another 100 specimens were used for TBS testing. They were embedded in self-cured acrylic resin and randomly divided into 10 groups. After enamel surface pretreatments according to the group design, resin was applied. The TBS values were tested using a universal testing machine. The other 80 specimens were randomly divided into eight groups for acid resistance evaluation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the enamel surfaces treated with 1.5 W/20 Hz and 2.0 W/20 Hz showed more etching-like appearance than those with other laser-parameter combinations. The laser-parameter combinations of 1.5 W/15 Hz and 1.5 W/20 Hz were found to be efficient for the TBS test. The mean TBS value of 14.45 ± 1.67 MPa in the laser irradiated group was significantly higher than that in the untreated group (3.48 ± 0.35 MPa) but lower than that in the 35% phosphoric acid group (21.50 ± 3.02 MPa). The highest mean TBS value of 26.64 ± 5.22 MPa was identified in the combination group (laser irradiation and then acid etching). Acid resistance evaluation showed that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser was efficient in preventing enamel demineralization. The SEM results of the fractured enamel surfaces, resin/enamel interfaces, and demineralization depths were consistent with those of the TBS test and the acid resistance evaluation. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser as an enamel surface

  18. Surge-Resistant Nanocomposite Enameled Wire Using Silica Nanoparticles with Binary Chemical Compositions on the Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeseung Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed polyesterimide (PEI nanocomposite enameled wires using surface-modified silica nanoparticles with binary chemical compositions on the surface. The modification was done using silanes assisted by ultrasound, which facilitated high density modification. Two different trimethoxysilanes were chosen for the modification on the basis of resemblance of chemical compositions on the silica surface to PEI varnish. The surface-modified silica was well dispersed in PEI varnish, which was confirmed by optical observation and viscosity measurement. The glass transition temperature of the silica-PEI nanocomposite increased with the silica content. The silica-dispersed PEI varnish was then used for enameled wire fabrication. The silica-PEI nanocomposite enameled wire exhibited a much longer lifetime compared to that of neat PEI enameled wire in partial discharge conditions.

  19. Using bearing area parameters to quantify early erosive tooth surface changes in enamel: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Field, James; German, Matthew; Waterhouse, Paula

    2013-01-01

    .... This study aimed to test the hypothesis that measuring the bearing area parameters in addition to Ra may be useful when qualifying the surface of enamel at baseline and after an erosive challenge...

  20. Color Properties of Demineralized Enamel Surfaces Treated with a Resin Infiltration System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin; Akyalcin, Sercan; English, Jeryl; Tufekci, Eser; Paravina, Rade D

    2016-09-01

    To assess color properties of white spot lesions (WSLs) following resin infiltration treatment in vitro. WSLs were artificially created on 30 extracted human teeth. Two groups were formed: (a) control, and (b) resin infiltrant group (n = 15, each). Instrumental color measurements were performed using a spectrophotometer and visual color evaluation was performed by three independent evaluators. Color assessment was determined at three time points: baseline (T0), after WSL formation (T1), and after resin infiltrant or control treatment (T2). CIELAB color coordinates were determined and the resultant color difference (ΔE*) was calculated between the time points. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and One-way ANOVA analyses were used to evaluate the color changes. Pearson chi-square analysis was performed to evaluate the visual ratings between treatment and control groups. Level of significance was set p <0.05. After treatment of WSLs there was a significant color change (ΔE*) between treatment and control groups (p <0.05). Resin infiltration group showed a regression of all values toward the pretreatment levels. There was a significant difference in visual evaluation ratings between groups after treatment; treatment group had all surfaces receive a rating of being clinically acceptable, with 73% of these surfaces having no perceptible color difference to adjacent sound enamel. Meanwhile, control group received ratings of all surfaces having a visual color difference that was deemed as unacceptable (p < 0.05). In-vitro resin infiltration for the treatment of enamel WSLs produced a significant improvement in color, reverting L*, a*, and b* values back toward baseline values. Resin infiltration of enamel white spot lesions on teeth is capable of managing the esthetic problem by reverting the L*, a*, and b* color coordinates back to their baseline values. (J Esthet Restor Dent 28:339-346, 2016). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  2. Conventional and whitening toothpastes: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and effect on the enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Jóias, Renata Pilli; Santana-Melo, Gabriela Fátima; Ferreira, Lara Tolentino; El Achkar, Vivian Narana Ribeiro; Rode, Sigmar de Mello

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of whitening and common toothpastes, and the surface roughness of tooth enamel submitted to brushing with both toothpastes. Samples of whitening toothpastes [Colgate Whitening (CW) and Oral-B Whitening (OBW)] and regular (non-whitening) toothpastes (Colgate and Oral-B) were extracted in culture medium. Gingival human fibroblasts (FMM-1) were placed in contact with different dilutions of culture media that had been previously exposed to such materials, and the cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The genotoxicity was assessed by the micronucleus formation assay in Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79). The cell survival rate and micronuclei number were assessed before and after exposure to the toothpaste extracts. For the surface roughness evaluation, 20 bovine tooth specimens, divided into four groups according to toothpastes, were submitted to 10,000 brushing cycles. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and two-way ANOVA tests (P toothpaste (P whitening toothpastes showed the highest numbers of micronuclei compared to the untreated control (UC) (P toothpastes were not genotoxic compared to UC (P = 0.326). The OBW toothpaste was statistically significantly abrasive to the enamel surface (P whitening toothpastes and Oral-B were cytotoxic to the cells. The whitening toothpastes were more genotoxic to cells in vitro than the common toothpastes, and genotoxicity was more pronounced in the OBW toothpaste.

  3. Phytolith analysis on dental calculus, enamel surface, and burial soil: information about diet and paleoenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, C L; Juan, J; Albert, R M

    1996-09-01

    Silica phytoliths (microscopic remains originating in plant tissues) have been identified on the enamel surface and dental calculus of a sample of teeth selected from well preserved skeletons from a Late Roman necropolis in Tarragona (Spain). Phytoliths were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their siliceous nature was confirmed by X-ray microanalysis. The phytoliths were compared to those of soil samples from both the areas of the tombs corresponding to the abdomen and the periphery of the skeletons, and were classified taxonomically by comparison with a large collection of silica particles from modern plants in the Mediterranean area. Most of the phytoliths identified on the enamel and the dental calculus belong to the family of Poaceae, while the phytoliths from the abdominal area belong to Poaceae, Leguminosae, Cyperaceae, and Chenopodiaceae. Results are concordant with archaeological, ecological, and historical data from the same site, and with the human Mediterranean diet. If done properly, the study of phytoliths can provide direct information about the vegetable diet of past human populations, and could be applied to the study of human fossils.

  4. A scanning electron microscopic and microradiographic study of pits in fluorosed human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylstrup, A; Fejerskov, O

    1979-04-01

    The aim of the present study has been to correlate the surface appearance of pitted, fluorosed enamel in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with the microradiographic features of the underlying tissue. Intact enamel surfaces of severely fluorosed teeth appeared similar to that of normal enamel. In the unabraded surfaces discrete pits were sharply demarcated from the surrounding intact enamel surface leaving steep walls of parallel running rods. The microradiographic appearance of sections made through pits indicated that focal loss of surface enamel occurred corresponding to the inner highly hypomineralized part of the fluorotic subsurface lesion. The abrupt wall formation and the finding that the striae of Retzius never changed direction along the margins of the lesions indicated that pits in fluorosed enamel may be secondarily produced defects rather than true hypoplasias. Further evidence of the posteruptive origin of the defects was derived from the observation that enamel lamellae occasionally formed part of the lateral border. The relatively higher degree of radiopacity observed in the tissue surrounding the pit indicates a posteruptively acquired deposition of minerals in the exposed porous enamel.

  5. Self-cleaning and antibiofouling enamel surface by slippery liquid-infused technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiali; Mei, May Lei; Li, Quanli; Xia, Rong; Zhang, Zhihong; Chu, Chun Hung

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to create a slippery liquid-infused enamel surface with antibiofouling property to prevent dental biofilm/plaque formation. First, a micro/nanoporous enamel surface was obtained by 37% phosphoric acid etching. The surface was then functionalized by hydrophobic low-surface energy heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetra- hydrodecyltrichlorosilane. Subsequent infusion of fluorocarbon lubricants (Fluorinert FC-70) into the polyfluoroalkyl-silanized rough surface resulted in an enamel surface with slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS). The results of water contact angle measurement, diffuse-reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope confirmed that the SLIPS was successfully constructed on the enamel surface. The antibiofouling property of the SLIPS was evaluated by the adsorption of salivary protein of mucin and Streptococcus mutans in vitro, as well as dental biofilm formation using a rabbit model in vivo. The results showed that the SLIPS on the enamel surface significantly inhibited mucin adhesion and S. mutans biofilm formation in vitro, and inhibited dental plaque formation in vivo.

  6. Chromatic and surface alterations in enamel subjected to brushing with desensitizing whitening toothpaste

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Queiroz de Melo Monteiro; Isabelle Lins Macedo de Oliveira; Oscar Felipe Fonseca de Brito; Brunna Paredes Guedes; Marina Schuler Mello Lula de Amorim; Ana Marly Araujo Maia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the chromatic and surface changes on enamel after toothbrushing with whitening and desensitizing toothpaste. Materials and Methods: Sixty enamel blocks were prepared, pigmented, and stratified according to initial Knoop microhardness and divided into six groups. The average roughness (Ra) was determined from two readings. After 24 h in artificial saliva, 10,000 cycles of simulated brushing were applied. The Ra was measured after 5000 and 10,000 cycles, and tooth wear...

  7. Evaluation of the Effects of Utilizing Carbon Dioxide as a Pulpal Test. Part I. In Vitro Effect on Human Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-21

    to be a safe test. INTRODUCTION Thermal testing has proven one of the most predictable tests in endodontics .1 -3 In the United States, for cold...Microscope, Advanced Metals Research Corp, Wooten, Mass). Photographs of the surface were made at 30, 100, and 600 magnifications (Fig 2, 3B-D). Prior to and...confirmed by the SEM. The SEM photomicrographs at 100 magnification were excellent for evaluating the fissures (Fig 2B,E,H). At this , magnification , very

  8. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  9. Crystalline structure of human enamel irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, L.; Rosa, K.; da Ana, P. A.; Zezell, D. M.; Craievich, A. F.; Kellermann, G.

    2009-02-01

    The Er,Cr:YSGG system is commonly employed in tissue removal, but recently it has also been clinically evaluated for caries prevention. The present work explains the clinical and pre-clinical observations on the basis of the crystallographic changes that this laser can produce in the dental enamel. The analyzed samples were obtained from sound human third molar teeth. The laser irradiation was conducted with a Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 12.5 mJ/pulse, 0.25 W, and 2.8 J/cm2. The laser device operates at a wavelength of 2.79 μm, and the pulse width duration is 140 μs, with a repetition rate of 20 Hz of spot size of 750 μm. The crystalline structure of the samples was evaluated by X-ray diffraction at a synchrotron beamline The X-ray beam was configured at a grazing angle, to maximize the surface diffraction signal and to better detect the possible new crystallographic phase produced after the laser irradiation. It was observed that the crystallographic structure tetracalcium phosphate (TetCP, JCPDF 25-1137) exhibits several peaks that match more precisely with the new experimental peaks of the irradiated enamel. The present results suggesting the coexistence of tetracalcium phosphate with hydroxyapatite in enamel irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser and can be the answer to the clinical and pre-clinical observations reported in the literature.

  10. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  11. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  12. In-vitro study investigating influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized human enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febrian, K.; Triaminingsih, S.; Indrani, DJ

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized enamel. Human tooth, which was demineralised in citric acid solution, had a toothpaste containing green tea extract of concentration of 5, 10 or 15% application. Microhardness measurement was carried out on each enamel surface of the teeth for initial, after the demineralization and after application of the tooth pastes. It showed that there was significant decrease between enamel microhardness of the teeth at the initial condition and after demineralization. After application of the toothpaste containing green tea extract of each concentration the microhardnss increased significantly. However, there the microhardness was insignificant between the applications of each green tea concentration.

  13. Potential of CO2 lasers (10.6 µm associated with fluorides in inhibiting human enamel erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanne Monteiro RAMOS-OLIVEIRA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential of CO2 lasers associated with different fluoride agents in inhibiting enamel erosion. Human enamel samples were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 12: G1-eroded enamel; G2-APF gel; G3-AmF/NaF gel; G4-AmF/SnF2 solution; G5-CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µm+APF gel; G6-CO2 laser+AmF/NaF gel; G7-CO2laser+AmF/SnF2solution; G8-CO2 laser; and G9-sound enamel. The CO2 laser parameters were: 0.45 J/cm2; 6 μs; and 128 Hz. After surface treatment, the samples (except from G9 were immersed in 1% citric acid (pH 4.0, 3 min. Surface microhardness was measured at baseline and after surface softening. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p < 0.05. G2 (407.6 ± 37.3 presented the highest mean SMH after softening, followed by G3 (407.5 ± 29.8 and G5 (399.7 ± 32.9. Within the fluoride-treated groups, G4 (309.0 ± 24.4 had a significantly lower mean SMH than G3 and G2, which were statistically similar to each other. AmF/NaF and APF application showed potential to protect and control erosion progression in dental enamel, and CO2 laser irradiation at 0.45J/cm2 did not influence its efficacy. CO2 laser irradiation alone under the same conditions could also significantly decrease enamel erosive mineral loss, although at lower levels.

  14. A histological study of the organic elements in the human enamel focusing on the extent of the odontoblast process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Y; Iwai-Liao, Y; Higashi, Y

    1998-03-01

    tubule, peritubular (intratubular) dentine, membranous structures or lamina limitans surrounding the enamel spindles and simple projections occluded in the human enamel.

  15. The effect of different chemical agents on human enamel: an atomic force and scanning electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominu, Roxana O.; Rominu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Pop, Daniela; Petrescu, Emanuela

    2010-12-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the changes in enamel surface roughess induced by the application of different chemical substances by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. METHOD: Five sound human first upper premolar teeth were chosen for the study. The buccal surface of each tooth was treated with a different chemical agent as follows: Sample 1 - 38% phosphoric acid etching (30s) , sample 2 - no surface treatment (control sample), 3 - bleaching with 37.5 % hydrogen peroxide (according to the manufacturer's instructions), 4 - conditioning with a self-etching primer (15 s), 5 - 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching (30s). All samples were investigated by atomic force microscopy in a non-contact mode and by scanning electron microscopy. Several images were obtained for each sample, showing evident differences regarding enamel surface morphology. The mean surface roughness and the mean square roughness were calculated and compared. RESULTS: All chemical substances led to an increased surface roughness. Phosphoric acid led to the highest roughness while the control sample showed the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid also led to an increase in surface roughness but its effects have yet to be investigated due to its potential toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: By treating the human enamel with the above mentioned chemical compounds a negative microretentive surface is obtained, with a morphology depending on the applied substance.

  16. Influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on bond durability of universal adhesives and surface free-energy characteristics of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel. Three universal adhesives and extracted human molars were used. Two no-pre-etching groups were prepared: ground enamel; and enamel after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 s to remove the smear layer. Four pre-etching groups were prepared: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 3, 5, 10, and 15 s. Shear bond strength (SBS) values of universal adhesive after no thermal cycling and after 30,000 or 60,000 thermal cycles, and surface free-energy values of enamel surfaces, calculated from contact angle measurements, were determined. The specimens that had been pre-etched showed significantly higher SBS and surface free-energy values than the specimens that had not been pre-etched, regardless of the aging condition and adhesive type. The SBS and surface free-energy values did not increase for pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. There were no significant differences in SBS values and surface free-energy characteristics between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Synthetic tooth enamel: SEM characterization of a fluoride hydroxyapatite coating for dentistry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Marise de Oliveira; Herman Sander Mansur

    2007-01-01

    An alternative to etching enamel for retention of an adhesive is to grow crystals on the enamel surface. The potential advantages of crystal growth include easy procedure and less damage to the enamel. These crystals retain the adhesive or are the actual dental restoration. In this work, a paste of synthetic enamel was used to grow crystals of fluoride hydroxyapatite (F-HA) onto the human tooth surface. This technique can be used for several dentistry applications like enamel whitening, stren...

  18. Effects of sour curry temperature with fermented shrimp paste on surface hardness of tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pojjanut Benjakul

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature of Thai sour curry with and without fermented shrimppaste (Kapi on enamel hardness. The pH and the titratable acidity of the assigned food were determined for Kangsom withKapi and Kangsom without Kapi at 25C, 37C and 55C. Thirty six enamel specimens were randomly assigned into 6 groups.Each group was exposed to the assigned foods at 25C, 37C and 55C at 15 min interval for 3 periods and the last intervalsat 60 min. The enamel surface hardness was evaluated by a Vickers microhardness tester. Increasing the temperature of thefood resulted in a decreasing pH and a slightly increased titratable acidity content. The hardness values of enamel exposurefor Kangsom with Kapi and Kangsom without Kapi were significantly different for all temperatures. The hardness value ofenamel exposure for Kangsom with Kapi at 55C was higher than that for exposure at 25C and 37C. In contrast, the hardnessvalue of enamel exposure for Kangsom without Kapi at 55oC was significant lower than that for exposure at 25C and37C. The temperature of Kangsom had an effect on enamel softening and Kangsom without Kapi had higher erosive potentialthan Kangsom with Kapi.

  19. Effects of remineralization procedures on shear bond strengths of brackets bonded to demineralized enamel surfaces with self-etch systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, Zeliha Müge; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2016-07-01

    To compare the effects of different remineralization procedures on the surface roughness of teeth, shear bond strengths (SBSs), and Adhesive Remnant Index scores of self-etching primer (SEP) used to bond orthodontic brackets to previously treated demineralized enamel surfaces. A total of 140 extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into seven equal groups. Group I was the control group. A demineralization procedure was performed in the other six groups. A remineralization procedure was performed before bonding by using casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, fluoride, a microabrasion mixture (18% hydrochloric acid-fine pumice), a microabrasion agent, and resin infiltration in groups III to VII. Brackets were bonded using a self-etching primer/adhesive system. The specimens were tested for SBS. The roughness and morphology of the enamel surfaces were analyzed using profilometer and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance, Tukey, and G-tests at the α  =  .05 level. Significant differences were found in the SBS values among the seven groups (F  =  32.69, P  =  .003). The lowest SBS value was found in group II (2.62 ± 1.46 MPa). No significant differences were found between groups I, III, and VII, between groups III and IV, or between groups V and VI. The differences in the roughness values were statistically significant among the groups (P  =  .002). Remineralization procedures restore the decreased SBS of orthodontic brackets and decrease surface roughness caused by enamel demineralization. SEPs provide clinically acceptable SBS values for bonding orthodontic brackets to previously treated demineralized enamel surfaces.

  20. Maintaining the integrity of the enamel surface: the role of dental biofilm, saliva and preventive agents in enamel demineralization and remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Godoy, Franklin; Hicks, M John

    2008-05-01

    Dental caries is an infectious disease, and it affects 90 percent of late adolescents and young adults in the United States. It is a complex disease that occurs along the interface between the dental biofilm and the enamel surface. Many components in saliva are taken up by dental biofilm and protect the enamel surface. On the other hand, newly erupted teeth depend on the enamel pellicle for posteruption maturation of acid-susceptible substituted hydroxyapatite. When Streptococcus mutans colonizes dental biofilm, it depends on vertical transmission, horizontal transmission or both. These acidogenic, aciduric bacteria are considered to be the primary organisms responsible for enamel caries. The ability of the biofilm to sequester calcium, phosphate and fluoride from the saliva, as well as from sources outside the oral cavity allows enamel to undergo remineralization after demineralization. Optimal remineralization depends on the enamel surface's being exposed to low concentrations of calcium, phosphate and fluoride for prolonged periods. Outside sources of bioavailable calcium, phosphate and fluoride can alter dental biofilm's cariogenicity. The use of sugar alcohols, povidone-iodine, delmopinol, triclosan and chlorhexidine may modulate the caries process. In addition, studies involving probiotics and molecular genetics have provided results showing that these methods can replace and displace cariogenic bacteria with noncariogenic bacteria, while maintaining normal oral homeostasis.

  1. Enamel surface evaluation after bracket debonding and different resin removal methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Machado Vidor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess enamel surface under scanning electron microscopy (SEM after resin removal and enamel polishing procedures following brackets debonding, as well as compare the time required for these procedures. METHODS: A total of 180 deciduous bovine incisors were used. The enamel surface of each tooth was prepared and brackets were bonded with light cured Transbond XT composite resin. Brackets were removed in a testing machine. The samples were randomized and equally distributed into nine groups according to the resin removal and polishing technique: Group 1, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed; Group 2, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by a sequence of 4 Sof-lex polishing discs (3M; Group 3, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips (Dentsply. All groups were subdivided into (a unpolished; (b polished with aluminum oxide paste; and (c polished with water slurry of fine pumice. Subsequently, the enamel surface was assessed and statistical analysis was carried out. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in enamel roughness and removal time among all groups. Groups 3a, 3b and 3c appeared to be the most efficient methods of removing resin with low damages to enamel. Groups 2a, 2b and 2c were the most time consuming procedures, and Group 2a caused more damages to enamel. CONCLUSION: The suggested protocol for resin removal is the 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips and polishing with aluminum oxide paste. This procedure seems to produce less damages and is less time consuming.

  2. Enamel surface evaluation after bracket debonding and different resin removal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, Michele Machado; Felix, Rafael Perdomo; Marchioro, Ernani Menezes; Hahn, Luciane

    2015-01-01

    To assess enamel surface under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after resin removal and enamel polishing procedures following brackets debonding, as well as compare the time required for these procedures. A total of 180 deciduous bovine incisors were used. The enamel surface of each tooth was prepared and brackets were bonded with light cured Transbond XT composite resin. Brackets were removed in a testing machine. The samples were randomized and equally distributed into nine groups according to the resin removal and polishing technique: Group 1, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed; Group 2, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by a sequence of 4 Sof-lex polishing discs (3M); Group 3, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips (Dentsply). All groups were subdivided into (a) unpolished; (b) polished with aluminum oxide paste; and (c) polished with water slurry of fine pumice. Subsequently, the enamel surface was assessed and statistical analysis was carried out. There were statistically significant differences in enamel roughness and removal time among all groups. Groups 3a, 3b and 3c appeared to be the most efficient methods of removing resin with low damages to enamel. Groups 2a, 2b and 2c were the most time consuming procedures, and Group 2a caused more damages to enamel. The suggested protocol for resin removal is the 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips and polishing with aluminum oxide paste. This procedure seems to produce less damages and is less time consuming.

  3. Electrophoretic demonstration of glycoproteins, lipoproteins, and phosphoproteins in human and bovine enamel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Bøg-Hansen, T C

    1990-01-01

    Enamel proteins from fully mineralized human molars and from bovine tooth germs were separated by electrophoresis. The gels were stained for detection of glycoproteins, lipoproteins, and phosphoproteins. Glycoproteins were shown by periodic acid-Schiff staining and lectin blotting. In mature human...... enamel a number of high molecular weight proteins could be demonstrated after ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid demineralization and subsequent Triton X-100 extraction. These proteins are suggested to be lipoproteins. Phosphoproteins could only be visualized in enamel matrix from the tooth germs....

  4. Microchemical and structural regular variability of apatites in 'overbuilt' enamel and dentin of human molar teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuczumow, A., E-mail: kuczon@kul.lublin.pl [Department of Chemistry, Lublin Catholic University, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Nowak, J. [Department of Chemistry, Lublin Catholic University, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); ChaLas, R. [Department of Conservative Medicine, Lublin Medical University, 20-081 Lublin (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of a recent paper was to recognize the chemical and structural changes in apatites, which form both the enamel and the dentin of the human tooth. The aim was achieved by scrutinizing the linear elemental profiles along the cross-sections of human molar teeth. Essentially, the task was accomplished with the application of the Electron Probe Microanalysis method and with some additional studies by Micro-Raman spectrometry. All the trends in linear profiles were strictly determined. In the enamel zone they were either increasing or decreasing curves of exponential character. The direction of the investigations was to start with the tooth surface and move towards the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ). The results of the elemental studies were more visible when the detected material was divided, in an arbitrary way, into the prevailing 'core' enamel ({approx}93.5% of the total mass) and the remaining 'overbuilt' enamel. The material in the 'core' enamel was fully stable, with clearly determined chemical and mechanical features. However, the case was totally different in the 'overbuilt enamel', with dynamic changes in the composition. In the 'overbuilt' layer Ca, P, Cl and F profiles present the decaying distribution curves, whereas Mg, Na, K and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} present the growing ones. Close to the surface of the tooth the mixture of hydroxy-, chlor- and fluor-apatite is formed, which is much more resistant than the rest of the enamel. On passing towards the DEJ, the apatite is enriched with Na, Mg and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. In this location, three of six phosphate groups were substituted with carbonate groups. Simultaneously, Mg is associated with the hydroxyl groups around the hexad axis. In this way, the mechanisms of exchange reactions were established. The crystallographic structures were proposed for new phases located close to DEJ. In the dentin zone, the variability of elemental profiles looks different, with

  5. Fluctuations in surface pH of maturing rat incisor enamel are a result of cycles of H(+)-secretion by ameloblasts and variations in enamel buffer characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkier, Helle H; Josephsen, Kaj; Takano, Yoshiro; Zahn, Dirk; Fejerskov, Ole; Frische, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    It is disputed if ameloblasts in the maturation zone of the enamel organ mainly buffer protons released by hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal growth or if they periodically secrete protons to create alternating acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter hypothesis predicts alternating pH regimes in maturing enamel, which would be affected by pharmacological interference with ameloblast H(+)-secretion. This study tests these predictions. Colorimetric pH-indicators and ratiometric fluorometry were used to measure surface pH in maturation zone enamel of rat incisors. Alternating acidic (down to pH6.24±0.06) and alkaline zones (up to pH7.34±0.08) were found along the tooth coinciding with ameloblast morphological cycles. Underlying the cyclic pattern, a gradual decrease in pH towards the incisal edge was seen. Vinblastine or FR167356 (H(+)-ATPase-inhibitor) disturbed ameloblast acid-secretion, especially in the early parts of acidic zones. Enamel surface pH reflects the titration state of surface PO4(3-)-ions. At the pH-values observed, PO4(3-) would be protonated (pKa>12) and HA dissolved. However, by molecular dynamics simulations we estimate the pKa of HPO4(2-) at an ideal HA surface to be 4.3. The acidic pH measured at the enamel surface may thus only dissolve non-perfect domains of HA crystals in which PO4(3-) is less electrostatically shielded. During repeated alkaline/acidic cycles, near-perfect HA-domains may therefore gradually replace less perfect HA-domains resulting in near-perfect HA-crystals. In conclusion, cyclic changes in ameloblast H(+)-secretion and the degree of enamel maturation determine enamel surface pH. This is in accordance with a hypothesis implicating H(+)-ATPase mediated acid-secretion by ameloblasts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydroxyapatite and Carbonated Apatite as Models for the Dissolution Behavior of Human Dental Enamel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budz, J.A; Lore, M; Nancollas, G.H

    1987-01-01

    ... to understand the mechanism of dental caries. In the present study, kinetic comparisons of the dissolution of hydroxyapatite, carbonated apatite, and ground human dental enamel have been made in order that the appropriateness of these synthetic...

  7. Oral bacterial adhesion forces to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction in orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Chen, Yangxi; de Vries, Joop; Ren, Yijin

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction represents a growing problem in orthodontics, because bacteria can adversely affect treatment by causing demineralization of the enamel surface around the brackets. It is important to know the forces with

  8. Tooth enamel surface micro-hardness with dual species Streptococcus biofilm after exposure to Java turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isjwara, F. R. G.; Hasanah, S. N.; Utami, Sri; Suniarti, D. F.

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus biofilm on tooth surfaces can decrease mouth environment pH, thus causing enamel demineralization that can lead to dental caries. Java Turmeric extract has excellent antibacterial effects and can maintain S. mutans biofilm pH at neutral levels for 4 hours. To analyze the effect of Java Turmeric extract on tooth enamel micro-hardness, the Java Turmeric extract was added on enamel tooth samples with Streptococcus dual species biofilm (S. sanguinis and S. mutans). The micro-hardness of enamel was measured by Knoop Hardness Tester. Results showed that Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. could not maintain tooth enamel surface micro-hardness. It is concluded that Java Turmeric extract ethanol could not inhibit the hardness of enamel with Streptococcus dual species biofilm.

  9. Histological, morphological, profilometric and optical changes of human tooth enamel after microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Patrick Roger; Göhring, Till Nicolaus; Schug, Jens; Lutz, Felix

    2003-09-01

    To determine the loss of enamel after a single 20-secondsapplication of a microabrasion slurry and to evaluate structural changes by means of laser fluorescence, and microscopic and optical measurements. Defined buccal areas with a diameter of 2 mm from 16 extracted human molars were demineralized for 12 weeks using a demineralization gel (pH 4.8). The created artificial white-spot lesions were divided corono-apically in control and test sites, using a rubber cement that prospectively covered the untreated control site. Teeth were divided into two groups of eight teeth each. One group was treated with an abrasive cleaning paste (Pell-ex) and the other group with a commercially available microabrasion slurry (Opalustre) for 20 seconds, applying a load of 200 g. Before and after treatment, standardized photographs were taken for the determination of luminescence and profilometric tracings of the surface, and these were recorded for the determination of enamel loss. The grade of demineralization was quantified using a laser fluorescence method (Diagnodent). Statistical differences were checked using a Mann Whitney and student t-test. Replicas of the treated areas were made for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, and teeth were histologically investigated by polarized light microscopy. Loss of tooth substance was significantly higher (P microabrasion group (134.8 +/- 35.5 microm) compared with the abrasive cleaning paste group (4.5 +/- 1.2 microm). After treatment, statistically significant differences in fluorescence and luminescence measurements could only be detected for microabraded teeth. No significant changes were noted for teeth treated with an abrasive cleaning paste. Histological findings confirmed removal of the demineralized surface zone when microabrading the enamel, whereas no changes were observed in the test group treated with an abrasive cleaning paste. Polarized light microscopy did not indicate any changes in the mineralization pattern, for

  10. Surge-Resistant Nanocomposite Enameled Wire Using Silica Nanoparticles with Binary Chemical Compositions on the Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Jeseung Yoo; Yongbeom Kim; Suyong Kwon; Joohyun Lee; Young-Soo Seo

    2015-01-01

    We developed polyesterimide (PEI) nanocomposite enameled wires using surface-modified silica nanoparticles with binary chemical compositions on the surface. The modification was done using silanes assisted by ultrasound, which facilitated high density modification. Two different trimethoxysilanes were chosen for the modification on the basis of resemblance of chemical compositions on the silica surface to PEI varnish. The surface-modified silica was well dispersed in PEI varnish, which was co...

  11. Evaluation Of The Effect Of Different Methods Of Microabrasion And Polishing On Surface Roughness Of Dental Enamel.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoldo, Carlos; Lima, Debora; Fragoso, Larissa; Ambrosano, Glaucia; Aguiar, Flavio; Lovadino, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Description of the Technique: The microabrasion technique of enamel consists of selectively abrading the discolored areas or causing superficial structural changes in a selective way. Objective: In microabrasion technique, abrasive products associated with acids are used, and the evaluation of enamel roughness after this treatment, as well as surface polishing, is necessary. This in-vitro study evaluated the enamel roughness after microabrasion, followed by different polishing techniques...

  12. Effect of different dental ceramic systems on the wear of human enamel: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandparsa, Roya; El Huni, Rabie M; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Johnson, Marc I

    2016-02-01

    The wear of tooth structure opposing different advanced dental ceramic systems requires investigation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the wear of advanced ceramic systems against human enamel antagonists. Four ceramic systems (IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3, and LAVA Plus Zirconia) and 1 control group containing human enamel specimens were used in this study (n = 12). All specimens were fabricated as disks 11 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick. The mesiopalatal cusps of the maxillary third molars were prepared to serve as the enamel styluses. All specimens were embedded individually in 25 mm(3) autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Wear was measured with a cyclic loading machine and a newly designed wear simulator. All enamel styluses (cusps) were scanned using the Activity 880 digital scanner (SmartOptics). Data from the base line and follow-up scans were collected and compared with Qualify 2012 3-dimensional (3D) and 2D digital inspection software (Geomagic), which aligned the models and detected the geometric changes and the wear caused by the antagonist specimen. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the collected data. After 125,000 bidirectional loading cycles, the mean loss of opposing enamel volume for the enamel disks in the control group was 37.08 μm(3), the lowest mean value for IPS e.max Press system was 39.75 μm(3); 40.58 μm(3) for IPS e.max CAD; 45.08 μm(3) for Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system; and 48.66 μm(3) for the Lava Plus Zirconia system. No statically significant differences were found among the groups in opposing enamel volume loss (P=.225) or opposing enamel height loss (P=.149). In terms of opposing enamel height loss, Lava Plus Zirconia system showed the lowest mean value of 27.5 μm. The mean value for the IPS e.max CAD system was 27.91 μm; 29.08 μm for the control enamel; 33.25 μm for the IPS e.max Press system; and 34.75 μm for the Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system. Within the

  13. Optical spectroscopy study of transparent noncarious human dentin and dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Balooch, Mehdi; Marshall, Grayson W.; Marshall, Sally J.; Gallagher, R. R.

    2000-03-01

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  14. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  15. Surface pre-conditioning with bioactive glass air-abrasion can enhance enamel white spot lesion remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Hussam; Festy, Frederic; Andiappan, Manoharan; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-conditioning enamel white spot lesion (WSL) surfaces using bioactive glass (BAG) air-abrasion prior to remineralization therapy. Ninety human enamel samples with artificial WSLs were assigned to three WSL surface pre-conditioning groups (n=30): (a) air-abrasion with BAG-polyacrylic acid (PAA-BAG) powder, (b) acid-etching using 37% phosphoric acid gel (positive control) and (c) unconditioned (negative control). Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to the following remineralization therapy (n=10): (I) BAG paste (36 wt.% BAG), (II) BAG slurry (100 wt.% BAG) and (III) de-ionized water (negative control). The average surface roughness and the lesion step height compared to intra-specimen sound enamel reference points were analyzed using non-contact profilometry. Optical changes within the lesion subsurface compared to baseline scans were assessed using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Knoop microhardness evaluated the WSLs' mechanical properties. Raman micro-spectroscopy measured the v-(CO3)(2-)/v1-(PO4)(3-) ratio. Structural changes in the lesion were observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). All comparisons were considered statistically significant if pair-abrasion removed 5.1 ± 0.6 μm from the lesion surface, increasing the WSL surface roughness. Pre-conditioning WSL surfaces with PAA-BAG air-abrasion reduced subsurface light scattering, increased the Knoop microhardness and the mineral content of the remineralized lesions (pconditioning WSL surfaces with PAA-BAG air-abrasion modified the lesion surface physically and enhanced remineralization using BAG 45S5 therapy. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  17. Enamel thickness variation of deciduous first and second upper molars in modern humans and Neanderthals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornai, Cinzia; Benazzi, Stefano; Svoboda, Jiří; Pap, Ildikó; Harvati, Katerina; Weber, Gerhard W

    2014-11-01

    Enamel thickness and dental tissue proportions have been recognized as effective taxonomic discriminators between Neanderthal and modern humans teeth. However, most of the research on this topic focused on permanent teeth, and little information is available for the deciduous dentition. Moreover, although worn teeth are more frequently found than unworn teeth, published data for worn teeth are scarce and methods for the assessment of their enamel thickness need to be developed. Here, we addressed this issue by studying the 2D average enamel thickness (AET) and 2D relative enamel thickness (RET) of Neanderthal and modern humans unworn to moderately worn upper first deciduous molars (dm(1)s) and upper second deciduous molars (dm(2)s). In particular, we used 3D μCT data to investigate the mesial section for dm(1)s and both mesial and buccal sections for dm(2)s. Our results confirmed previous findings of an Neanderthal derived condition of thin enamel, and thinner enamel in dm(1)s than dm(2)s in both Neanderthal and modern humans. We demonstrated that the Neanderthal 2D RET indices are significantly lower than those of modern humans at similar wear stages in both dm(1)s and dm(2)s (p Neanderthal unworn to moderately worn upper deciduous molars. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Marcela Charantola; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian de; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Baseggio, Wagner; Wang, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Material and Methods: Fifty (50) fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm × 5 mm) were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10) according to the product utilized: G1 (control)= silicone polisher (TDV), G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE) + pumice stone (SS White), G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment), G4= Opalustre (Ultradent) and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products). Roug...

  19. Effects of bleaching agents and Tooth Mousse(™) on human enamel hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhtib, Asmaa; Manton, David J; Burrow, Michael F; Saber-Samandari, Saeed; Palamara, Joseph E A; Gross, Kārlis A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the effect of three commercial bleaching agents and Tooth Mousse(™) containing 10% w/w casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the hardness of tooth enamel. Sixteen human enamel specimens were exposed to one of three commercial bleaching agents with or without subsequent exposure to Tooth Mousse(™) . Nanoindentation was used to measure the hardness and reduced modulus before and after treatments. When bleaching materials were applied for a short period of time following the manufacturers' instructions, there was an increase in enamel hardness and reduced modulus for some bleaching groups, with no statistically significant difference from the baseline values. After extended bleaching periods a statistically significant decrease in enamel hardness and reduced modulus was found and after applying Tooth Mousse(™) post-bleaching, the hardness and reduced modulus returned to close to baseline values. The application of bleaching agents for an extended period of time significantly decreases enamel hardness and the reduced modulus. The application of Tooth Mousse(™) after bleaching was able to reestablish the baseline enamel hardness and reduced modulus, decreasing the adverse effects of bleaching enamel. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Raman spectroscopic studies of CO2 laser-irradiated human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, A.; Shahabi, S.; Walsh, L. J.

    1999-06-01

    While the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser radiation on the physical properties of human dental enamel are well characterized, little is known regarding laser-induced chemical changes. In this study, enamel was exposed to CO2 laser radiation to induce fusion and recrystallization, and the Raman spectra recorded using both dispersive and Fourier-transformed (FT) Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were compared to a heat-treated specimen of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and enamel. Laser irradiation induced chemical changes which differed from those induced by heat treatment. Comparing the Raman spectra of lased enamel to HAP and tricalcium phosphate (TCP), it is evident that CO2 laser irradiation of enamel causes the partial conversion of HAP to TCP. The effect of laser irradiation is not merely a simple local heating effect as previously thought, since simple heating of enamel leads to the formation of both TCP and Ca(OH)2, while laser treatment of enamel results in the formation of TCP but not Ca(OH)2.

  1. Loss of surface enamel after bracket debonding : An in-vivo and ex-vivo evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pont, Huib Berghauser; Özcan, Mutlu; Bagis, Bora; Ren, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the surface enamel after bracket debonding and residual resin removal. METHODS: Thirty patients (female, 20; male, 10; mean age, 18.4 years) who completed orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (Twin Brackets, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif)

  2. Effects of Bleaching Agents Combined with Regular and Whitening Toothpastes on Surface Roughness and Mineral Content of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Mariana Lerner; Cavalli, Vanessa; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Martin, Airton Abrahão; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; do Rego, Marcos Augusto; Cavalcanti, Andréa Nóbrega; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and changes in the composition of enamel submitted to different bleaching protocols and toothbrushing with regular and whitening toothpastes. Bleaching treatment could promote morphological and chemical changes in enamel surface. Enamel blocks were randomized into nine groups (n=10) according to the bleaching treatment (no bleaching, control group; 6% hydrogen peroxide, HP; or 10% carbamide peroxide, CP) and toothpaste used (placebo, PL; regular, R; or whitening dentifrice, W). Bleaching was performed according to manufacturers' instructions and all groups were submitted to 30,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing with toothpaste (PL, R, or W). Mineral content evaluation and enamel roughness were evaluated initially (T1), after bleaching (T2), and after toothbrushing (T3), using an energy-dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and profilometry, respectively. Data were statistically analyzed with two way ANOVA, Tukey, and Dunnett tests (5%). Enamel surface roughness was influenced by bleaching and toothbrushing. Surface roughness increased for the groups that brushed with the placebo dentifrice (CP+PL, HP+PL, C+PL) and for the control group that brushed with whitening dentifrice (C+W). Enamel Ca/P ratio decreased after bleaching, but toothbrushing, regardless of the dentifrice used, did not reduce the enamel mineral content. The bleaching treatment resulted in a decrease of enamel mineral content, but the studied dentifrices did not contribute to surface mineral loss.

  3. In-vitro Thermal Maps to Characterize Human Dental Enamel and Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Paula; Brettle, David; Carmichael, Fiona; Clerehugh, Val

    2017-01-01

    The crown of a human tooth has an outer layer of highly-mineralized tissue called enamel, beneath which is dentin, a less-mineralized tissue which forms the bulk of the tooth-crown and root. The composition and structure of enamel and dentin are different, resulting in different thermal properties. This gives an opportunity to characterize enamel and dentin from their thermal properties and to visually present the findings as a thermal map. The thermal properties of demineralized enamel and dentin may also be sufficiently different from sound tissue to be seen on a thermal map, underpinning future thermal assessment of caries. The primary aim of this novel study was to produce a thermal map of a sound, human tooth-slice to visually characterize enamel and dentin. The secondary aim was to map a human tooth-slice with demineralized enamel and dentin to consider future diagnostic potential of thermal maps for caries-detection. Two human slices of teeth, one sound and one demineralized from a natural carious lesion, were cooled on ice, then transferred to a hotplate at 30°C where the rewarming-sequence was captured by an infra-red thermal camera. Calculation of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity was undertaken, and two methods of data-processing used customized software to produce thermal maps from the thermal characteristic-time-to-relaxation and heat-exchange. The two types of thermal maps characterized enamel and dentin. In addition, sound and demineralized enamel and dentin were distinguishable within both maps. This supports thermal assessment of caries and requires further investigation on a whole tooth.

  4. In-vitro Thermal Maps to Characterize Human Dental Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Lancaster

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The crown of a human tooth has an outer layer of highly-mineralized tissue called enamel, beneath which is dentin, a less-mineralized tissue which forms the bulk of the tooth-crown and root. The composition and structure of enamel and dentin are different, resulting in different thermal properties. This gives an opportunity to characterize enamel and dentin from their thermal properties and to visually present the findings as a thermal map. The thermal properties of demineralized enamel and dentin may also be sufficiently different from sound tissue to be seen on a thermal map, underpinning future thermal assessment of caries. The primary aim of this novel study was to produce a thermal map of a sound, human tooth-slice to visually characterize enamel and dentin. The secondary aim was to map a human tooth-slice with demineralized enamel and dentin to consider future diagnostic potential of thermal maps for caries-detection. Two human slices of teeth, one sound and one demineralized from a natural carious lesion, were cooled on ice, then transferred to a hotplate at 30°C where the rewarming-sequence was captured by an infra-red thermal camera. Calculation of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity was undertaken, and two methods of data-processing used customized software to produce thermal maps from the thermal characteristic-time-to-relaxation and heat-exchange. The two types of thermal maps characterized enamel and dentin. In addition, sound and demineralized enamel and dentin were distinguishable within both maps. This supports thermal assessment of caries and requires further investigation on a whole tooth.

  5. Effects of microabrasion on substance loss, surface roughness, and colorimetric changes on enamel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paic, Maja; Sener, Beatrice; Schug, Jens; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2008-06-01

    To determine in vitro the effects of 2 commercially available microabrasion compounds (Prema [Premiere Dental Products] and Opalustre [Ultradent]) on human enamel under standardized conditions after treatment periods of 10, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. Nonacidified pumice served as an abrasive control compound. Mean substance loss was determined by measuring dissolved Ca2+ using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Differences in the mean surface roughness were profilometrically assessed. These findings were completed with micromorphologic observations using SEM. In addition, color changes after microabrasion were evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* system. Opalustre caused the highest tooth substance loss, followed by the Prema compound and pumice, which showed a lesser substance-removal capacity. These findings were in concordance with the mean surface roughness difference measurements and micromorphologic analyses. Microabrasion did not cause any significant colorimetric changes. Microabrasion should be considered a microinvasive method, and clinical application should be used with caution to avoid excessive substance removal. Subsequent polishing appears crucial to maintain optimal esthetics and avoid surface alterations.

  6. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser selective ablation of surface enamel caries: II. Histology and clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Arcoria, Charles J.; Simon, James; Burkart, John; Yessik, Michael J.; Myers, Terry D.

    2000-03-01

    High intensity infrared light from the pulsed Nd:YAG dental laser is absorbed by pigmented carious enamel and not absorbed by normal enamel. Therefore, this system is capable of selective removal of surface enamel caries. Safety and efficacy of the clinical procedure was evaluated in two sets of clinical trials at three dental schools. Carious lesions were randomized to drill or laser treatment. Pulp vitality, surface condition, preparations and restorations were evaluated by blinded evaluators. In Study 1 surface caries were removed from 104 third molars scheduled for extraction. One week post-treatment teeth were extracted and the pulp was examined histologically. In Study 2 90 patients with 422 lesions on 376 teeth were randomized to laser or drill and followed for six months. There were no adverse events and both clinical and histological evaluations of pulp vitality showed no abnormalities. Caries were removed in all conditions. A significantly greater number of preparations in the drill groups vs. laser groups entered dentin (drill equals 11, laser equals 1, p less than 0.001). This indicates that the more conservative laser treatment removed the caries but not the sound enamel below the lesion.

  7. 3D enamel thickness in Neandertal and modern human permanent canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Laura; Le Cabec, Adeline; Panetta, Daniele; Tripodi, Maria; Salvadori, Piero A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Feeney, Robin N M; Benazzi, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Enamel thickness figures prominently in studies of human evolution, particularly for taxonomy, phylogeny, and paleodietary reconstruction. Attention has focused on molar teeth, through the use of advanced imaging technologies and novel protocols. Despite the important results achieved thus far, further work is needed to investigate all tooth classes. We apply a recent approach developed for anterior teeth to investigate the 3D enamel thickness of Neandertal and modern human (MH) canines. In terms of crown size, the values obtained for both upper and lower unworn/slightly worn canines are significantly greater in Neandertals than in Upper Paleolithic and recent MH. The 3D relative enamel thickness (RET) is significantly lower in Neandertals than in MH. Moreover, differences in 3D RET values between the two groups appear to decrease in worn canines beginning from wear stage 3, suggesting that both the pattern and the stage of wear may have important effects on the 3D RET value. Nevertheless, the 3D average enamel thickness (AET) does not differ between the two groups. In both groups, 3D AET and 3D RET indices are greater in upper canines than in lower canines, and overall the enamel is thicker on the occlusal half of the labial aspect of the crown, particularly in MH. By contrast, the few early modern humans investigated show the highest volumes of enamel while for all other components of 3D enamel, thickness this group holds an intermediate position between Neandertals and recent MH. Overall, our study supports the general findings that Neandertals have relatively thinner enamel than MH (as also observed in molars), indicating that unworn/slightly worn canines can be successfully used to discriminate between the two groups. Further studies, however, are needed to understand whether these differences are functionally related or are the result of pleiotropic or genetic drift effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface remineralization potential of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on enamel eroded by cola-drinks: An in-situ model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Grewal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the remineralization potential of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP on enamel eroded by cola drinks. Subjects and Methods: A total of 30 healthy subjects were selected from a random sample of 1200 children and divided into two groups of 15 each wherein calcium and phosphorus analyses and scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis was carried out to investigate the remineralization of enamel surface. A total of 30 non-carious premolar teeth were selected from the human tooth bank (HTB to prepare the in-situ appliance. Three enamel slabs were prepared from the same. One enamel slab was used to obtain baseline values and the other two were embedded into the upper palatal appliances prepared on the subjects′ maxillary working model. The subjects wore the appliance after which 30 ml cola drink exposure was given. After 15 days, the slabs were removed and subjected to respective analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Means of all the readings of soluble calcium and phosphorous levels at baseline,post cola-drink exposure and post cpp-acp application were subjected to statistical analysis SPSS11.5 version.Comparison within groups and between groups was carried out using ANOVA and F-values at 1% level of significance. Results: Decrease in calcium solubility of enamel in the CPP-ACP application group as compared to post-cola drink exposure group (P < 0.05 was seen. Distinctive change in surface topography of enamel in the post-CPP-ACP application group as compared to post-cola drink exposure group was observed. Conclusion: CPP-ACP significantly promoted remineralization of enamel eroded by cola drinks as revealed by significant morphological changes seen in SEM magnification and spectrophotometric analyses.

  9. Effect of high energy X-ray irradiation on the nano-mechanical properties of human enamel and dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue LIANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiotherapy for malignancies in the head and neck can cause common complications that can result in tooth damage that are also known as radiation caries. The aim of this study was to examine damage to the surface topography and calculate changes in friction behavior and the nano-mechanical properties (elastic modulus, nanohardness and friction coefficient of enamel and dentine from extracted human third molars caused by exposure to radiation. Enamel and dentine samples from 50 human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups or a control group. The test groups were exposed to high energy X-rays at 2 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 days (10 Gy group, 15 days (30 Gy group, 25 days (50 Gy group, 35 days (70 Gy group; the control group was not exposed. The nanohardness, elastic modulus, and friction coefficient were analyzed using a Hysitron Triboindenter. The nano-mechanical properties of both enamel and dentine showed significant dose-response relationships. The nanohardness and elastic modulus were most variable between 30-50 Gy, while the friction coefficient was most variable between 0-10 Gy for dentine and 30-50 Gy for enamel. After exposure to X-rays, the fracture resistance of the teeth clearly decreased (rapidly increasing friction coefficient with increasing doses under the same load, and they were more fragile. These nano-mechanical changes in dental hard tissue may increase the susceptibility to caries. Radiotherapy caused nano-mechanical changes in dentine and enamel that were dose related. The key doses were 30-50 Gy and the key time points occurred during the 15th-25th days of treatment, which is when application of measures to prevent radiation caries should be considered.

  10. Effect of high energy X-ray irradiation on the nano-mechanical properties of human enamel and dentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xue; Zhang, Jing Yang; Cheng, Iek Ka [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Ji Yao, E-mail: jiyao_li@aliyun.com [West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy for malignancies in the head and neck can cause common complications that can result in tooth damage that are also known as radiation caries. The aim of this study was to examine damage to the surface topography and calculate changes in friction behavior and the nano-mechanical properties (elastic modulus, nano hardness and friction coefficient) of enamel and dentine from extracted human third molars caused by exposure to radiation. Enamel and dentine samples from 50 human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups or a control group. The test groups were exposed to high energy X-rays at 2 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 days (10 Gy group), 15 days (30 Gy group), 25 days (50 Gy group), 35 days (70 Gy group); the control group was not exposed. The nano hardness, elastic modulus, and friction coefficient were analyzed using a Hysitron Triboindenter. The nano-mechanical properties of both enamel and dentine showed significant dose-response relationships. The nano hardness and elastic modulus were most variable between 30-50 Gy, while the friction coefficient was most variable between 0-10 Gy for dentine and 30-50 Gy for enamel. After exposure to X-rays, the fracture resistance of the teeth clearly decreased (rapidly increasing friction coefficient with increasing doses under the same load), and they were more fragile. These nano-mechanical changes in dental hard tissue may increase the susceptibility to caries. Radiotherapy caused nano-mechanical changes in dentine and enamel that were dose related. The key doses were 30-50 Gy and the key time points occurred during the 15{sup th}-25{sup th} days of treatment, which is when application of measures to prevent radiation caries should be considered. (author)

  11. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PRISMLESS ENAMEL IN HUMAN NON-ERUPTED DECIDUOUS MOLAR TEETH: A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVA Marcelo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency, structure and thickness of the prismless enamel layer in the buccal and lingual surfaces of non-erupted deciduous molar teeth were described. The teeth were extracted, kept in a 70% ethanol solution, dried, coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM-6.100. The aprismatic layer was observed in the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds of all buccal and lingual surfaces. The hydroxyapatite crystals were arranged parallel to each other and perpendicular to the enamel surface. No statistically significant differences were observed between the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds, which had 7.257 m m of average thickness.

  13. HeNe-laser light scattering by human dental enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijp, [No Value; tenBosch, JJ; Groenhuis, RAJ

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of tooth enamel and an understanding of the origin of these properties are necessary for the development of new optical methods for caries diagnosis and the measurement of tooth color. We measured the scattering intensity functions for HeNe-laser light of 80- to

  14. Penetration of chlorhexidine coating into tooth enamel: A surface analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Rana N S; Symington, John

    2016-06-19

    Chlorhexidine has proved an efficient antibacterial agent and has been used successfully to prevent new carious lesions in the teeth of adults and children. The substantivity of chlorhexidine has not been identified with any precision, but is certainly not of short duration. In this work, surface analytical techniques have been applied to study the chemical composition, distribution, and penetration of an applied liquid coating containing chlorhexidine onto tooth enamel in order to ascertain mechanisms by which chlorhexidine keeps its long term substantivity. Several hypotheses have been put forward with regard to its substantivity, including concepts of chlorhexidine remaining as a reservoir upon application either in the epithelial surfaces, the tooth surface, or the biofilm. Alternatively, it has been proposed the teeth themselves act as the reservoir. To study this, a chlorhexidine containing liquid coating was applied to the surface of teeth. These were subsequently transversely cross-sectioned. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were performed on both surfaces to ascertain chemical composition and distribution of the applied coating. It was found that it formed a coating layer of about 25 μm thick. High spatial ToF-SIMS images showed little evidence of substantial diffusion of chlorhexidine into the enamel, either from the surface or via the enamel lamellae.

  15. Enamel silicon and fluoride relationships demonstrating a surface silicon effect that facilitates fluoride uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J S; Koritzer, R T

    1976-01-01

    This study indicated that a clear relationship exists between silicon and fluoride. We have also demonstrated a probable surface enamel silicon effect that increases fluoride uptake. The complex set of relationships described in the surface chemistry of calcium, tin, and zirconium with fluoride, hydroxide, phosphate, and other surface-occurring ions need not be considered to confuse the specific silicon-fluoride relationship presented here because in this computation we are relating the changes in the silicon and fluoride ion values only. We have, however, considered the thermodynamics of such reactions and intend to elaborate on it in a later publication. We are aware of the small depth of fluoride penetration into enamel after topical treatment Health Foundation, Research Unit at the National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC 20034, USA.

  16. Comparison of microtensile bond strength to enamel and dentin of human, bovine, and porcine teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, AF; Giannini, M; Kavaguchi, A; Soares, CJ; Line, SRP

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the bond strengths promoted by an adhesive system to human, bovine, and porcine enamel and dentin, and compare their etched micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Thirty sound freshly extracted teeth were used in this study: ten human third molars, ten bovine incisors, and ten porcine molars. The crowns of human (H), bovine (B), and porcine (P) teeth were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose either enamel (E) or mid-depth dentin (D) s...

  17. A method for monitoring enamel erosion using laser irradiated surfaces and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenneth H; Tom, Henry; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for measuring small dimensional changes on tooth surfaces, OCT has great potential for monitoring tooth erosion. Previous studies have shown that enamel areas ablated by a carbon dioxide laser manifested lower rates of erosion compared to the non-ablated areas. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to monitor erosion in vitro that could potentially be used in vivo. Thirteen bovine enamel blocks were used in this in vitro study. Each 10 mm × 2 mm block was partitioned into five regions, the central region was unprotected, the adjacent windows were irradiated by a CO2 laser operating at 9.3 µm with a fluence of 2.4 J/cm(2) , and the outermost windows were coated with acid resistant varnish. The samples were exposed to a pH cycling regimen that caused both erosion and subsurface demineralization for 2, 4 and 6 days. The surfaces were scanned using a time-domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system and the degree of surface loss (erosion) and the integrated reflectivity with lesion depth was calculated for each window. There was a large and significant reduction in the depth of surface loss (erosion) and the severity of demineralization in the areas irradiated by the laser. Irradiation of the enamel surface with a pulsed carbon dioxide laser at sub-ablative intensities results in significant inhibition of erosion and demineralization under the acid challenge employed in this study. In addition, these results suggest that it may be feasible to modify regions of the enamel surface using the laser to serve as reference marks to monitor the rate of erosion in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Enamel biorhythms of humans and great apes: the Havers-Halberg Oscillation hypothesis reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Patrick; Miszkiewicz, Justyna J; Pitfield, Rosie; Deter, Chris; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie

    2017-02-01

    The Havers-Halberg Oscillation (HHO) hypothesis links evidence for the timing of a biorhythm retained in permanent tooth enamel (Retzius periodicity) to adult body mass and life history traits across mammals. Potentially, these links provide a way to access life history of fossil species from teeth. Recently we assessed intra-specific predictions of the HHO on human children. We reported Retzius periodicity (RP) corresponded with enamel thickness, and cusp formation time, when calculated from isolated deciduous teeth. We proposed the biorhythm might not remain constant within an individual. Here, we test our findings. RP is compared between deciduous second and permanent first molars within the maxillae of four human children. Following this, we report the first RPs for deciduous teeth from modern great apes (n = 4), and compare these with new data for permanent teeth (n = 18) from these species, as well as with previously published values. We also explore RP in teeth that retain hypoplastic defects. Results show RP changed within the maxilla of each child, from thinner to thicker enameled molars, and from one side of a hypoplastic defect to the other. When considered alongside correlations between RP and cusp formation time, these observations provide further evidence that RP is associated with enamel growth processes and does not always remain constant within an individual. RP of 5 days for great ape deciduous teeth lay below the lowermost range of those from permanent teeth of modern orangutan and gorilla, and within the lowermost range of RPs from chimpanzee permanent teeth. Our data suggest associations between RP and enamel growth processes of humans might extend to great apes. These findings provide a new framework from which to develop the HHO hypothesis, which can incorporate enamel growth along with other physiological systems. Applications of the HHO to fossil teeth should avoid transferring RP between deciduous and permanent enamel, or including

  19. On the relationship between enamel band complexity and occlusal surface area in Equids (Mammalia, Perissodactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Famoso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enamel patterns on the occlusal surfaces of equid teeth are asserted to have tribal-level differences. The most notable example compares the Equini and Hipparionini, where Equini have higher crowned teeth with less enamel-band complexity and less total occlusal enamel than Hipparionini. Whereas previous work has successfully quantified differences in enamel band shape by dividing the length of enamel band by the square root of the occlusal surface area (Occlusal Enamel Index, OEI, it was clear that OEI only partially removes the effect of body size. Because enamel band length scales allometrically, body size still has an influence on OEI, with larger individuals having relatively longer enamel bands than smaller individuals. Fractal dimensionality (D can be scaled to any level, so we have used it to quantify occlusal enamel complexity in a way that allows us to get at an accurate representation of the relationship between complexity and body size. To test the hypothesis of tribal-level complexity differences between Equini and Hipparionini, we digitally traced a sample of 98 teeth, one tooth per individual; 31 Hipparionini and 67 Equini. We restricted our sampling to the P3-M2 to reduce the effect of tooth position. After calculating the D of these teeth with the fractal box method which uses the number of boxes of various sizes to calculate the D of a line, we performed a t-test on the individual values of D for each specimen, comparing the means between the two tribes, and a phylogenetically informed generalized least squares regression (PGLS for each tribe with occlusal surface area as the independent variable and D as the dependent variable. The slopes of both PGLS analyses were compared using a t-test to determine if the same linear relationship existed between the two tribes. The t-test between tribes was significant (p < 0.0001, suggesting different D populations for each lineage. The PGLS for Hipparionini was a positive but not

  20. Effect of different concentrations of fluoride varnish on enamel surface microhardness: An in vitro randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries occurs as a result of demineralization-remineralization phases occurring alternately at the tooth surface. Fluoride varnishes have a caries-inhibiting effect on teeth through remineralization. The resulting enamel is resistant to acid dissolution. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess enamel surface microhardness (SMH following varnish application with different fluoride concentrations. Materials and Methods: Ninety freshly extracted, caries-free premolar teeth were used. Teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel blocks from the buccal surface of crown. The blocks were serially polished and flattened, embedded in acrylic blocks and smoothened to achieve a flat surface. The samples were divided into three groups, namely, A, B, and C consisting of 30 enamel blocks each. In Group A, Fluor Protector® varnish and in Group B, Bi-Fluorid 10® varnish was applied. Group C served as controls. All samples were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization cycle for 7 days. The SMH of enamel was measured. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using the Student's t-test and one-way ANOVA. Results: The mean values of enamel SMH of Groups A and B were 496.99 ± 4.81 and 449.47 ± 7.37 Vickers Hardness Number, respectively. Conclusion: Fluor Protector varnish showed significantly higher enamel SMH than that of the other two groups (P < 0.05.

  1. Properties of tooth enamel in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J-W; Morris, Dylan; Constantino, Paul J; Lucas, Peter W; Smith, Tanya M; Lawn, Brian R

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study has been made of human and great ape molar tooth enamel. Nanoindentation techniques are used to map profiles of elastic modulus and hardness across sections from the enamel-dentin junction to the outer tooth surface. The measured data profiles overlap between species, suggesting a degree of commonality in material properties. Using established deformation and fracture relations, critical loads to produce function-threatening damage in the enamel of each species are calculated for characteristic tooth sizes and enamel thicknesses. The results suggest that differences in load-bearing capacity of molar teeth in primates are less a function of underlying material properties than of morphology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Guy

    Full Text Available The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (p<0.05. Moreover, we show that, for all selected topometrical parameters apart from occlusal patch count, the recorded correlations significantly decrease along with enamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction

  3. Effects of tannin-fluoride and milk-fluoride mixture on human enamel erosion from inappropriately chlorinated pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonviriya, Sumalee; Tannukit, Sissada; Jitpukdeebodintra, Suwanna

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the efficacy of tannin-fluoride and milk-fluoride mixtures on human enamel erosion after exposure to inappropriately chlorinated pool water. Enamel specimens were immersed in swimming pool water (pH 2.7) for 30 min and in each test reagent for 4 min once a day for 60 consecutive days (group I: control, group II: tannin-fluoride, group III: milk-fluoride, group IV: tannin-fluoride before and milk-fluoride after erosive challenge, and group V: milk containing tannin-fluoride before and after erosive exposure). Surface microhardness was assessed on days 0, 30, and 60. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were performed after treatment of samples for 60 days. Surface microhardness of experimental groups was ranked as follows: group III > group IV-group V > group II > group I (P EPMA profiles showed decrease of phosphorus and increase of fluoride content in groups II and IV. In conclusion, we demonstrated that treatment with fluoridated milk with or without tannin-fluoride has protective effects against enamel erosion caused by low-pH swimming pool water.

  4. A randomised clinical trial to determine the abrasive effect of the tongue on human enamel loss with and without a prior erosive challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, J; Claydon, N; Macdonald, E; Garner, S; Newcombe, R G; West, N

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the abrasive effect of the tongue on human enamel loss with and without a prior dietary acid challenge in an in situ model. A single centre, single blind, randomly allocated, split mouth, four treatment regimen, in situ study in healthy adult volunteers was undertaken. Twenty four subjects wore two lower intra-oral appliances each fitted with 4 human enamel samples 6h/day for 15 days. The samples were treated with either 50ml orange juice or water for 5min ex vivo 4x/day; prior to being licked or not licked with the subject's tongue for 60s. There were 2 samples per group per subject. Surface loss was measured by contact profilometry. 23 subjects completed the study with no adverse events. The mean loss of enamel at 15days was: 0.08μm for water without licking, 0.10μm with water and licking; 1.55μm with orange juice alone, 3.65μm with orange juice and licking. In the absence of erosive challenge, licking had no detectable effect on enamel loss p=0.28. Without licking, orange juice had a highly significant effect on loss compared to water, p<0.001. Erosive challenge followed by licking more than doubled the loss of enamel p<0.001. When enamel was exposed to orange juice prior to licking, tissue loss as a result of tongue abrasion of the eroded surface was increased, and double that of the erosive challenge alone. Licking enamel with the tongue had no perceptible effect on enamel loss in the absence of the erosive challenge. Enamel wear resulting from tongue abrasion on tooth surfaces softened by acid challenge, can be an unavoidable consequence of oral function. This may account for the pattern of erosive toothwear on palatal and occlusal tooth surfaces, reinforcing the importance of restricting the frequency of dietary acid challenge in susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hierarchical modelling of elastic behaviour of human enamel based on synchrotron diffraction characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2013-11-01

    Human enamel is a hierarchical mineralized tissue with a two-level composite structure. Few studies have focused on the structure-mechanical property relationship and its link to the multi-scale architecture of human enamel, whereby the response to mechanical loading is affected not only by the rod distribution at micro-scale, but also strongly influenced by the mineral crystallite shape, and spatial arrangement and orientation. In this study, two complementary synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques, wide and small angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS) were used to obtain multi-scale quantitative information about the structure and deformation response of human enamel to in situ uniaxial compressive loading. The apparent modulus was determined linking the external load and the internal strain in hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystallites. An improved multi-scale Eshelby model is proposed taking into account the two-level hierarchical structure of enamel. This framework has been used to analyse the experimental data for the elastic lattice strain evolution within the HAp crystals. The achieved agreement between the model prediction and experiment along the loading direction validates the model and suggests that the new multi-scale approach reasonably captures the structure-property relationship for the human enamel. The ability of the model to predict multi-directional strain components is also evaluated by comparison with the measurements. The results are useful for understanding the intricate relationship between the hierarchical structure and the mechanical properties of enamel, and for making predictions of the effect of structural alterations that may occur due to the disease or treatment on the performance of dental tissues and their artificial replacements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count) are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (penamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction, potentially modifying dental functionalities such as blunt versus sharp dental tools. In terms of natural selection, there is a balance between increasing tooth resistance and maintaining

  7. Effects of enamel matrix proteins on tissue formation along the roots of human teeth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosshardt, D.D.; Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Pjetursson, B.E.; Lang, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Enamel matrix-derived proteins (EMD) are thought to trigger the formation of acellular extrinsic fibre cementum (AEFC), while other reports indicate that EMD may have osteogenic potential. The aim of the present study was to characterize the tissues developing on the root surface

  8. Identification of surface domain structure on enamel crystals using polyamidoamine dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haifeng; Clarkson, Brian H.; Orr, Bradford; Majoros, Istvan; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.

    2002-03-01

    The control of hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation and crystal growth is central to the mineralization and remineralization of enamel and dentin of teeth. However, the precise biomolecular mechanisms involved remain obscure. The intimate association between the crystal's surface and extracellular protein components implies a modulating role for organic crystal interactions probably mediated via specific crystal surface domains. These include lattice defects and specific stereochemical arrays on associated organic molecules. The nature of protein-crystal interaction depends upon the physical forces of attraction / repulsion between specific biomolecular groups and crystal surface domains. The proposed study is to utilize specific polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, also known as “artificial proteins”, acting as nanoprobe. These will be used to probe specific surface domain on the surface of the naturally derived crystals of hydroxyapatite and to determine how control of growth and dissolution may be affected at the biomolecular level. The hydroxyapatite crystals are extracted from the maturation stage enamel of rats. Three types of PAMAM dendrimers, respectively with amine-, carboxylic acid and methyl-capped surface, will be applied in the study. The dendrimer binding on the surface of the hydoxyapatite crystals will be characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The different dendrimer binding on the crystals will disclose the specific surface domain structure on the crystals, which is assumed to be important in binding the extracellular protein.

  9. Deproteinization of tooth enamel surfaces to prevent white spot lesions and bracket bond failure: A revolution in orthodontic bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Justus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment success is jeopardized by the risk of development of white spot lesions (WSLs around orthodontic brackets. Unfortunately, the formation of WSLs still remains a common complication during treatment in patients with poor oral hygiene. Nearly 75% of orthodontic patients are reported to develop enamel decalcification because of prolonged plaque retention around brackets. It is the orthodontist′s responsibility to minimize the risk of patients having enamel decalcifications as a consequence of orthodontic treatment. This can be achieved by using hybrid, fluoride-releasing, glass ionomer cement to bond brackets, with deproteinization of the enamel surface before phosphoric acid etching.

  10. Subfractions of enamel matrix derivative differentially influence cytokine secretion from human oral fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Oscar; Brookes, Steven J; Thiede, Bernd; Heijl, Lars; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; Reseland, Janne E

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative is used to promote periodontal regeneration during the corrective phase of the treatment of periodontal defects. Our main goal was to analyze the bioactivity of different molecular weight fractions of enamel matrix derivative. Enamel matrix derivative, a complex mixture of proteins, was separated into 13 fractions using size-exclusion chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were treated with either enamel matrix derivative or the different fractions. Proliferation and cytokine secretion to the cell culture medium were measured and compared to untreated cells. The liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the most abundant peptides were amelogenin and leucine-rich amelogenin peptide related. The fractions containing proteins above 20 kDa induced an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 secretion, whereas lower molecular weight fractions enhanced proliferation and secretion of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduced interleukin-4 release. The various molecular components in the enamel matrix derivative formulation might contribute to reported effects on tissue regeneration through their influence on vascularization, the immune response, and chemotaxis.

  11. Some observations on the trace element concentrations in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D W; Peach, D F

    1997-01-01

    The concentration of trace elements has been measured for dental enamel from 86 healthy human teeth using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The majority of the teeth (n = 70) were collected from dentists in the county of Oxfordshire in the United Kingdom, although a smaller group (n = 16) were collected from Cornwall. The elements K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Pb, and Hg have been detected and statistically analyzed by grouping according to sex, age, and geographical location. The concentrations of Fe and Cu were found to be lower in the teeth from female donors (P apatite (HAP) within the dental enamel.

  12. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  13. X-ray diffraction patterns in human dentin, enamel and synthetic apatites related to Zn concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, R; Knuuttila, M

    1981-12-01

    The crystallization of human dentin and enamel containing different concentrations of Zn was studied using X-ray diffraction analysis. The concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Sr and Pb in the samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentration of F was assayed with a combination fluoride electrode. The increase of the Zn concentration (microgram/g) from 150 to 572 in dentin was found to intensify apatite reflections indicating changes parallel to c-axis. A slight increase parallel to a-axis (or better crystallization) of lattices was demonstrated in both dentin and enamel. The increase of Zn concentration from 164 microgram/g to 692 microgram/g in enamel weakened 002 and 112 reflections. The effect of Zn on the crystallinity of synthetic apatite prepared at 37 degrees C was of the same kind as its effect on the dentin.

  14. Comparison of bond strength and surface morphology of dental enamel for acid and Nd-YAG laser etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Ratna, P.; Koteeswaran, D.

    1999-05-01

    Recently, laser pretreatment of dental enamel has emerged as a new technique in the field of orthodontics. However, the changes in the morphology of the enamel surface is very much dependent on the wavelength of laser, emission mode of the laser, energy density, exposure time and the nature of the substance absorbing the energy. Based on these, we made a comparative in vitro study on laser etching with acid etching with reference to their bond strength. Studies were conducted on 90 freshly extracted, non carious, human maxillary or mandibular anteriors and premolars. Out of 90, 60 were randomly selected for laser irradiation. The other 30 were used for conventional acid pretreatment. The group of 60 were subjected to Nd-YAG laser exposure (1060 nm, 10 Hz) at differetn fluences. The remaining 30 were acid pretreated with 30% orthophosphoric acid. Suitable Begg's brackets were selected and bound to the pretreated surface and the bond strength were tested using Instron testing machine. The bond strength achieved through acid pretreatment is found to be appreciably greater than the laser pretreated tooth. Though the bond strength achieved through the acid pretreated tooth is found to be significantly greater than the laser pretreated specimens, the laser pretreatement is found to be successful enough to produce a clinically acceptable bond strength of > 0.60 Kb/mm. Examination of the laser pre-treated tooth under SEM showed globule formation which may produce the mechanical interface required for the retention of the resin material.

  15. Depth Dependence of the Mechanical Properties of Human Enamel by Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J; Hsiung, L L

    2006-02-17

    Nanoindentation has recently emerged to be the primary method to study the mechanical behavior and reliability of human enamel. Its hardness and elastic modulus were generally reported as average values with standard deviations that were calculated from the results of multiple nanoindentation tests. In such an approach, it is assumed that the mechanical properties of human enamel are constant, independent of testing parameters, like indent depth and loading rate. However, little is known if they affect the measurements. In this study, we investigated the dependence of the hardness and elastic modulus of human enamel on the indent depth. We found that in a depth range from 100 nm to 2000 nm the elastic moduli continuously decreased from {approx} 104 GPa to {approx} 70 GPa, and the hardnesses decreased from {approx} 5.7 GPa to {approx} 3.6 GPa. We then considered human enamel as a fiber-reinforced composite, and used the celebrated rule of mixture theory to quantify the upper and lower bounds of the elastic moduli, which were shown to cover the values measured in the current study and previous studies. Accordingly, we attributed the depth dependence of the hardness and modulus to the continuous microstructure evolution induced by nanoindenter.

  16. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  17. A laboratory investigation of stain removal from enamel surface: comparative efficacy of three electric toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemehorn, B R; Henry, G M

    1996-07-01

    To evaluate in a controlled laboratory investigation the efficacy of three electric toothbrushes with respect to removal of extrinsic dental stain from labial enamel surfaces of bovine permanent central incisors. Enamel specimens were treated to produce a uniformly stained pellicle film. Staining was assessed photometrically, before and after brushing 16 specimens per group for 4.5 minutes with either the Braun Oral-B Plaque Remover (D7), the Braun Oral-B Ultra Plaque Remover (D9) or a high frequency electric toothbrush. A manual brush with the ADA reference abrasive was used as a positive control, and this was compared with the three electric toothbrushes, using a dentifrice slurry prepared from Crest toothpaste. Tension on the enamel specimens was set at 150 g, except for the high frequency toothbrush which was set at the manufacturer's recommended tension of 50 g. Stain removal was expressed as a cleaning ratio (CR), where larger values represented greater removal of stained pellicle. Compared with the ADA control (CR = 100), the D9 was the most effective (CR = 98) removing significantly more stain (P toothbrush was found to be the least effective (CR = 48), removing significantly less stain than any of the other toothbrushes (P < 0.05).

  18. New methodology to reconstruct in 2-D the cuspal enamel of modern human lower molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Mata, Mario; García-Campos, Cecilia; Martín-Francés, Laura; Martínez de Pinillos, Marina; García-González, Rebeca; Quintino, Yuliet; Canals, Antoni; Lozano, Marina; Dean, M Christopher; Martinón-Torres, María; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2017-08-01

    In the last years different methodologies have been developed to reconstruct worn teeth. In this article, we propose a new 2-D methodology to reconstruct the worn enamel of lower molars. Our main goals are to reconstruct molars with a high level of accuracy when measuring relevant histological variables and to validate the methodology calculating the errors associated with the measurements. This methodology is based on polynomial regression equations, and has been validated using two different dental variables: cuspal enamel thickness and crown height of the protoconid. In order to perform the validation process, simulated worn modern human molars were employed. The associated errors of the measurements were also estimated applying methodologies previously proposed by other authors. The mean percentage error estimated in reconstructed molars for these two variables in comparison with their own real values is -2.17% for the cuspal enamel thickness of the protoconid and -3.18% for the crown height of the protoconid. This error significantly improves the results of other methodologies, both in the interobserver error and in the accuracy of the measurements. The new methodology based on polynomial regressions can be confidently applied to the reconstruction of cuspal enamel of lower molars, as it improves the accuracy of the measurements and reduces the interobserver error. The present study shows that it is important to validate all methodologies in order to know the associated errors. This new methodology can be easily exportable to other modern human populations, the human fossil record and forensic sciences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Energy Delivery: Pulse and Power Effects on Enamel Surface and Erosive Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renan Mota; de Souza, Vinicius Matsuzaki; Esteves, Camila Machado; de Oliveira Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco; Cassoni, Alessandra; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Brugnera Junior, Aldo

    2017-11-01

    High power lasers have been suggested as a useful tool for dental caries and erosion prevention due to the increase of enamel acid resistance. to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium,chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser irradiation pulse frequency and power on enamel surface and acid erosion resistance. By combining pulse frequency (5-75 Hz) and power settings (0.10-1.00 W), 20 irradiated groups and one nonirradiated control group were tested. A total of 63 bovine enamel blocks (n = 3/group) were prepared for surface hardness and roughness evaluation, performed in three phases: baseline, after irradiation, and after erosive challenge. Enamel blocks were irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser with MZ8 tip (iPlus; Waterlase, Biolase, CA) for 30 sec according to experimental group and submitted. Erosive challenge consisted of four cycles alternating immersion in 0.01 M HCl (5 mL/mm2; 2 min; at 37°C) and immersion in artificial saliva for 3 h. Analysis of variance (three-way ANOVA), Tukey's test, and Pearson correlation were performed for the statistical analysis (p power and pulse frequency settings may alter enamel surface and erosive resistance differently. Pulse frequency of 30 Hz and power of 0.50 W was considered the best parameter to prevent enamel acid erosion.

  20. Intra-oral remineralization of enamel with a MFP/DCPD and MFP/silica dentifrice using surface microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y P; Din, C S; Miller, S; Nathoo, S A; Gaffar, A

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) abrasive in a dentifrice on the remineralizaton of enamel using a surface microhardness technique. The method of assessing enamel remineralization via surface microhardness (SMH) was validated in a randomized, crossover, double-blind, intra-oral remineralization study conducted with 12 healthy adults. Enamel demineralization was achieved in vitro by covering bovine enamel blocks with exogenous oral bacteria, S. Mutans 1600 Ingbritt, containing glucan which was then exposed to sucrose. In the intra-oral treatment phase, subjects were fitted with oral maxillary palatal retainers, each holding four demineralized enamel blocks. Subjects brushed their teeth for 30 seconds with a test dentifrice, swished for an additional 60 seconds, rinsed with water and then retained the blocks intra-orally for 4 hours. Percent mineral recovery for each enamel block was calculated as the ratio of the changes in enamel microhardness due to treatment (remin) and sucrose challenge (demin). Treatments included DCPD-based dentifrices containing 0, 250 and 1000 ppm fluoride (F) from sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). Using SMH, respective mean percent mineral recoveries of 5.7, 18.7 and 41.4% were obtained. All ADA criteria for model validation were fulfilled. This same model was then used to compare the remineralization effects of a silica placebo, DCPD placebo, 1000 ppm F MFP/silica and 1000 ppm F MFP/DCPD dentifrice. Mean percent mineral recoveries of -0.9, 24.1, 30.2 and 55.7% were obtained, respectively. The MFP/DCPD dentifrice was superior to MFP/silica (<0.01) with use of the MFP/DCPD dentifrice when compared to MFP/silica or the silica placebo. These results indicate that more active calcium and a higher degree of saturation (DS(EN)) with respect to enamel exists for an extended period of time after use of a MFP/DCPD dentifrice. Since an elevation in DS(EN) is considered a major parameter

  1. The Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to the Fluorosed Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Zarif Najafi; Vahid Moshkelgosha; Atefeh Khanchemehr; Akram Alizade; Ali Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Some studies have reported the bond strength to be significantly lower in fluorotic enamels than the non-fluorosed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of metallic brackets to non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth after different enamel conditioning. Materials and Method: A total of 176 freshly extracted human premolars (88 non-fluorosed and 88 fluorosed teeth) were used in this study for bonding the metallic brackets. Teeth w...

  2. Investigation of acid-etched CO2 laser ablated enamel surfaces using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10-15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (Plaser modified enamel layer after 5-10 seconds.

  3. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  4. [Determination of Ca2+ content in human enamel by electroprobe after polypeptide tooth paste usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the capability of polypeptide tooth paste for remineralization of human enamel. 8 enamel slabs,which were taken from extracted tooth for orthodontics reason, were immersed in artificial cariogenic solution for 0.5h. Then,the slabs were treated by tooth paste with polypeptide and tooth paste without polypeptide for 5 min. After tooth paste were washed away by warm water, the slabs were immersed in artificial saliva. The experiment were carried out twice per day for 15 days. Two slabs were taken from test group(treated by tooth paste with polypeptide) and control group (treated by tooth paste without polypeptide) on the twelfth day and fifteenth day, respectively. The Ca(2+) content in enamel slabs were determined by electroprobe and analyzed by image process. The content of Ca(2+) in test group was higher than that in control group significantly. The polypeptide tooth paste has certain capability of inhibiting demineralization for human enamel.

  5. Mapping the spatial and temporal progression of human dental enamel biomineralization using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Lisa M; Montgomery, Janet; Beaumont, Julia; Davis, Graham R; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2013-11-01

    The complex biological, physicochemical process of human dental enamel formation begins in utero and for most teeth takes several years to complete. Lost enamel tissue cannot regenerate, therefore a better understanding of the spatial and temporal progression of mineralization of this tissue is needed in order to design improved in vivo mineral growth processes for regenerative dentistry and allow the possibility to grow a synthetic whole or partial tooth. Human dental enamel samples across a range of developmental stages available through archaeological collections have been used to explore the spatial and temporal progression of enamel biomineralization. Position sensitive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to quantify spatial and temporal variations in crystallite organization, lattice parameters and crystallite thickness at three different stages in enamel maturation. In addition X-ray microtomography was used to study mineral content distributions. An inverse correlation was found between the spatial variation in mineral content and the distribution of crystallite organization and thickness as a function of time during enamel maturation. Combined X-ray microtomography and synchrotron X-ray diffraction results show that as enamel matures the mineral content increases and the mineral density distribution becomes more homogeneous. Starting concurrently but proceeding at a slower rate, the enamel crystallites become more oriented and larger; and the crystallite organization becomes spatially more complex and heterogeneous. During the mineralization of human dental enamel, the rate of mineral formation and mineral organization are not identical. Whilst the processes start simultaneously, full mineral content is achieved earlier, and crystallite organization is slower and continues for longer. These findings provide detailed insights into mineral development in human dental enamel which can inform synthetic biomimetic approaches for the benefit of clinical

  6. Oriented and Ordered Biomimetic Remineralization of the Surface of Demineralized Dental Enamel Using HAP@ACP Nanoparticles Guided by Glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haorong; Xiao, Zuohui; Yang, Jie; Lu, Danyang; Kishen, Anil; Li, Yanqiu; Chen, Zhen; Que, Kehua; Zhang, Qian; Deng, Xuliang; Yang, Xiaoping; Cai, Qing; Chen, Ning; Cong, Changhong; Guan, Binbin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Achieving oriented and ordered remineralization on the surface of demineralized dental enamel, thereby restoring the satisfactory mechanical properties approaching those of sound enamel, is still a challenge for dentists. To mimic the natural biomineralization approach for enamel remineralization, the biological process of enamel development proteins, such as amelogenin, was simulated in this study. In this work, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) conjugated with alendronate (ALN) was applied to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form CMC/ACP nanoparticles. Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) functioned as the protease which decompose amelogenin in vivo to degrade the CMC-ALN matrix and generate HAP@ACP core-shell nanoparticles. Finally, when guided by 10 mM glycine (Gly), HAP@ACP nanoparticles can arrange orderly and subsequently transform from an amorphous phase to well-ordered rod-like apatite crystals to achieve oriented and ordered biomimetic remineralization on acid-etched enamel surfaces. This biomimetic remineralization process is achieved through the oriented attachment (OA) of nanoparticles based on non-classical crystallization theory. These results indicate that finding and developing analogues of natural proteins such as amelogenin involved in the biomineralization by natural macromolecular polymers and imitating the process of biomineralization would be an effective strategy for enamel remineralization. Furthermore, this method represents a promising method for the management of early caries in minimal invasive dentistry (MID).

  7. Oriented and Ordered Biomimetic Remineralization of the Surface of Demineralized Dental Enamel Using HAP@ACP Nanoparticles Guided by Glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haorong; Xiao, Zuohui; Yang, Jie; Lu, Danyang; Kishen, Anil; Li, Yanqiu; Chen, Zhen; Que, Kehua; Zhang, Qian; Deng, Xuliang; Yang, Xiaoping; Cai, Qing; Chen, Ning; Cong, Changhong; Guan, Binbin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Achieving oriented and ordered remineralization on the surface of demineralized dental enamel, thereby restoring the satisfactory mechanical properties approaching those of sound enamel, is still a challenge for dentists. To mimic the natural biomineralization approach for enamel remineralization, the biological process of enamel development proteins, such as amelogenin, was simulated in this study. In this work, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) conjugated with alendronate (ALN) was applied to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form CMC/ACP nanoparticles. Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) functioned as the protease which decompose amelogenin in vivo to degrade the CMC-ALN matrix and generate HAP@ACP core-shell nanoparticles. Finally, when guided by 10 mM glycine (Gly), HAP@ACP nanoparticles can arrange orderly and subsequently transform from an amorphous phase to well-ordered rod-like apatite crystals to achieve oriented and ordered biomimetic remineralization on acid-etched enamel surfaces. This biomimetic remineralization process is achieved through the oriented attachment (OA) of nanoparticles based on non-classical crystallization theory. These results indicate that finding and developing analogues of natural proteins such as amelogenin involved in the biomineralization by natural macromolecular polymers and imitating the process of biomineralization would be an effective strategy for enamel remineralization. Furthermore, this method represents a promising method for the management of early caries in minimal invasive dentistry (MID). PMID:28079165

  8. Protective potential of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate containing paste on enamel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Padmini; Vimala, N; Mandke, Lalita Gauri

    2013-03-01

    Dental caries remains the most common dental disease facing mankind. Prevention of initiation and interruption in progression of early lesions are the desirable modes of caries management. There is a scope for agents, which may be used to enhance anti - caries activity. This need has redirected research to develop novel preventive agents that can act as an adjunct to fluoride or independent of it. Casein Phosphopeptide - Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) is one such agent that has been proposed to have anti cariogenic properties. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of paste containing CPP-ACP, MI Paste, on enamel remineralization. This study consisted of 30 samples embedded in orthodontic resin with either the buccal or lingual surface exposed. The samples were assigned to either a CPP-ACP containing paste; Fluoridated toothpaste; or a control group. The groups were then subjected to cycling in a demineralizing solution and a remineralizing solution. Groups II and III received prior application of MI paste and Fluoridated toothpaste respectively followed by cycling in a demineralizing solution and a remineralizing solution. Following 14 days of cycling, the samples were sectioned and examined using confocal microscopy. The lesion depth, were evaluated. Image Proplus software was used to analyze the images. The values were statistically evaluated using one - way ANOVA and Scheffe's Test. Within the limitations of the study it was concluded that enamel surfaces treated with the CPP-ACP paste exhibited the least lesion depths followed by the enamel surfaces treated with the fluoridated tooth paste and control group respectively.

  9. An in vitro comparison of short and long term bond strengths of polyacid modified composite resins to primary human and bovine enamel and dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titley, K C; Childers, S; Kulkarni, G

    2006-12-01

    This in vitro study compared the shear bond strengths and fracture patterns over 7 and 180 day periods of two PMCRs bonded to both human and bovine primary tooth enamel and dentine to determine if the bovine tooth model is a suitable substitute for the human tooth model. Flattened enamel and dentine surfaces were produced using water irrigated #600 grit SiC paper and the teeth randomly placed in groups of N=10. Cylinders of Dyrat AP (Dentsply/DeTrey) or F2000 (3M/ESPE) were bonded to the surfaces that were either etched with 37% H(3)PO(4) (etch, E groups) or treated with their respective conditioners, primers and adhesives (no etch, NE groups). The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37(o)C and shear bond strength (SBS) tested to failure at either 7 (human and bovine) or 180 days (bovine). The modes of failure were assessed under a dissecting microscope at x30. In general the results showed comparable mean SBS for both human and bovine enamel with Dyract AP, E and NE and also for F2000, E. Lower enamel SBS were recorded for F2000 NE but there was no significant differences in mean SBS for bovine enamel after long term storage. For dentine, significantly larger SBS were recorded for human versus bovine teeth for all of the four bonding protocols. There were also significant species differences, the mean SBS for Dyract AP, E and F2000, E for human dentine were higher than bovine but the mean SBS for the respective NE groups showed no significant differences between species. It was concluded that 37% H(3)PO(4) has a detrimental effect on SBS for bovine dentine. Over long term storage SBS of bovine dentine bonds decreased. The modes of failure were related to SBS with varying degrees of significance. Bovine primary incisor enamel and dentine, provided the latter is not conditioned with 37% H(3)PO(4), are suitable alternative test SBS substrates for human enamel and dentine.

  10. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Charantola Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Material and Methods: Fifty (50 fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm × 5 mm were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10 according to the product utilized: G1 (control= silicone polisher (TDV, G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE + pumice stone (SS White, G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment, G4= Opalustre (Ultradent and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products. Roughness and wear were the responsible variables used to analyze these surfaces in four stages: baseline, 60 s and 120 s after the micro-abrasion and after polishing, using a Hommel Tester T1000 device. After the tests, a normal distribution of data was verified, with repeated ANOVA analyses (p≤0.05 which were used to compare each product in different stages. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied for individual comparisons between the products in each stage (p≤0.05. Results: Means and standard deviations of roughness and wear (µm after all the promoted stages were: G1=7.26(1.81/13.16(2.67, G2=2.02(0.62/37.44(3.33, G3=1.81(0.91/34.93(6.92, G4=1.92(0.29/38.42(0.65 and G5=1.98(0.53/33.45(2.66. At 60 seconds, all products tended to produce less surface roughness with a variable gradual decrease over time. After polishing, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups, except for G1. Independent of the product utilized, the enamel wear occurred after the micro-abrasion. Conclusions: In this in vitro study, enamel micro-abrasion presented itself as a conservative approach, regardless of the type of the paste compound utilized. These products promoted minor roughness alterations and minimal wear. The use of phosphoric acid and pumice stone showed similar results to commercial products for the micro-abrasion with regard to the surface roughness and wear.

  11. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcela Charantola; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Baseggio, Wagner; Wang, Linda

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Fifty (50) fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm × 5 mm) were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10) according to the product utilized: G1 (control)= silicone polisher (TDV), G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE) + pumice stone (SS White), G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment), G4= Opalustre (Ultradent) and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products). Roughness and wear were the responsible variables used to analyze these surfaces in four stages: baseline, 60 s and 120 s after the micro-abrasion and after polishing, using a Hommel Tester T1000 device. After the tests, a normal distribution of data was verified, with repeated ANOVA analyses (p≤0.05) which were used to compare each product in different stages. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied for individual comparisons between the products in each stage (p≤0.05). Means and standard deviations of roughness and wear (µm) after all the promoted stages were: G1=7.26(1.81)/13.16(2.67), G2=2.02(0.62)/37.44(3.33), G3=1.81(0.91)/34.93(6.92), G4=1.92(0.29)/38.42(0.65) and G5=1.98(0.53)/33.45(2.66). At 60 seconds, all products tended to produce less surface roughness with a variable gradual decrease over time. After polishing, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups, except for G1. Independent of the product utilized, the enamel wear occurred after the micro-abrasion. In this in vitro study, enamel micro-abrasion presented itself as a conservative approach, regardless of the type of the paste compound utilized. These products promoted minor roughness alterations and minimal wear. The use of phosphoric acid and pumice stone showed similar results to commercial products for the micro-abrasion with regard to the surface roughness and wear.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical changes induced by Q-Switched pulse laser on human enamel with aim of caries prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsari, R.; Pratomo, D. A.; Hikmawati, D.; Bidin, N.

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser energy dose to human enamel caries. The specifications of Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser as followed: wavelength of 1064 nm and 6 ns pulse width. Caries enamel samples taken from human teeth molars of 17-35 ages and the type of media caries. Energy doses used in this study were 723.65 mJ/cm2, 767.72 mJ/cm2, and 1065.515 mJ/cm2; 5 Hz repetition rate, and 20 second exposure time. Samples characterized the surface morphology and the percentage of constituent elements, especially calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) with FESEM-EDAX. The fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of hydroxyapatite (HA) with XRD and hardness value using Vickers Microhardness Test. The results indicated that exposure of Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser on enamel caries resulting cracks, holes, and melt due to plasma production effects in the surface. Plasma production effect also resulted in micro properties such as percentage of Ca/P was close to normal, the fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of HA went up but did not change the crystal structure (in terms of the lattice structure). The hardness value also rose as linear as exposure energy dose caused by phototermal effect. Based on the results, Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser can be used as contactless drill dental caries replacement candidate with the additional therapy effect such as localized caries in order to avoid the spread, the ratio of Ca/P approaching healthy teeth, the fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of HA rose and established stronger teeth with peak energy dose 1065.515 mJ/cm2.

  13. Remineralisation and repair of enamel surface by biomimetic Zn-carbonate hydroxyapatite containing toothpaste: A comparative in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of acidic foods and drinks and other factors that cause enamel wear are responsible for the daily enamel loss and degradation. In order to contrast these effects, some toothpastes have been showed to possess different properties of remineralisation and/or repair of the enamel surface. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether the use of toothpaste containing Zn-carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHA nanostructured microcrystals may exert remineralisation/repair effects of the enamel surface.Two groups of patients, aged between 18 and 75 years, used for 8 weeks a Zn-CHA nanocrystals-based toothpaste (experimental group and a potassium nitrate/sodium fluoride toothpaste (active control group. At the end of this period, extractions were performed in five subjects for each group. Negative controls consisted on two subjects treated with non-specified fluoride toothpaste. Teeth were processed for morphological and chemical-physic superficial characterizations by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy with Elementary analysis, X-Ray Diffraction analysis and Infrared analysis. The results showed that the use of a Zn-CHA nanocrystals toothpaste may lead to a remineralisation/repair of the enamel surface, by deposing a hydroxyapatite-rich coating. On the other hand, the use of both a nitrate potassium/sodium fluoride and non-specified fluoride toothpastes do not appreciably change the enamel surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the toothpaste containing Zn-CHA nanostructured microcrystals, differently from nitrate potassium/sodium fluoride and non-specified fluoride toothpastes, may promote enamel superficial repair by means of the formation of a protective biomimetic CHA coating.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human dental enamel after bracket debonding: a noncontact three-dimensional optical profilometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fabiano G; Nouer, Darcy F; Silva, Nelson P; Garbui, Ivana U; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Nouer, Paulo R A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to undertake a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of changes on enamel surfaces after debonding of brackets followed by finishing procedures, using a high-resolution three-dimensional optical profiler and to investigate the accuracy of the technique. The labial surfaces of 36 extracted upper central incisors were examined. Before bonding, the enamel surfaces were subjected to profilometry, recording four amplitude parameters. Brackets were then bonded using two types of light-cured orthodontic adhesive: composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Finishing was performed by three different methods: pumice on a rubber cup, fine and ultrafine aluminum oxide discs, and microfine diamond cups followed by silicon carbide brushes. The samples were subsequently re-analyzed by profilometry. Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Kruskal-Wallis test (p enamel roughness when diamond cups followed by silicon carbide brushes were used to finish surfaces that had remnants of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive and when pumice was used to finish surfaces that had traces of composite resin. Enamel loss was minimal. The 3D optical profilometry technique was able to provide accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of changes on the enamel surface after debonding. Morphological changes in the topography of dental surfaces, especially if related to enamel loss and roughness, are of considerable clinical importance. The quantitative evaluation method used herein enables a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of orthodontic bonding on teeth.

  15. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Enderami, Seyede Anese; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide- amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.

  16. In vivo imaging of enamel by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM): non-invasive analysis of dental surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaldo, Maria; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-07-01

    The aim is to establish the feasibility to image in vivo microscopic dental surface by non-invasive, real-time, en face Reflectance Confocal Microscopy (RCM). Fifteen healthy volunteers referred at the Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, were enrolled. A commercially available hand-held RCM (Vivascope(®)3000, Lucid, Rochester, NY, USA) was used to image in vivo the dental surface of the upper right and left central incisors of each volunteer. Totally, thirty vestibular surfaces of upper central incisors were imaged in vivo by RCM to preliminary image the dental surface and assess the feasibility of a more extended study on teeth. In vivo RCM was able to image the dental surface within the enamel, at a maximum depth imaging of 300 μm, with images good in quality and the capability to detect enamel structures such as enamel lamellae and enamel damages, such as unevenness and cracks. In conclusion, enamel "optical biopsy", gained by RCM imaging, revealed to be a non-invasive real-time tool valid to obtain architectural details of the dental surface with no need for extraction or processing the samples. RCM appears to be an optimum auxiliary device for investigating the architectural pattern of superficial enamel, therefore inviting further experiments aimed to define our knowledge about damages after etching treatments or bracket removal and the responsiveness to fluoride seals and the morphology of the tooth/restoration interface. Moreover, this device could also be used to detect relevant diseases like caries, or to assess surface properties to evaluate lesion activity.

  17. Levels of enamel erosion for the application of bleaching agents

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Soriano, Ana; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Pérez Vargas, Luis; Departamento Academico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Mattos Vela, Manuel; Departamento Academico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Asurza Ruiz, José; Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas - INEN.; Bernuy Torres, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Dental bleaching systems and its use of toothpaste with bleaching agents lead to search the effect of these systems on the enamel surface. Scientific evidence shows that these systems can provoke an answer in chemical shucture of the dental enamel with loss of calcium . The concentration of calcium was measured in ppm in 27 crowns of human bicuspids. The enamel erosion was measured through the liberation of calcium salts into teeth in two kinds of bleaching toothpastes : Crest whitening and C...

  18. Electron probe microanalysis of permanent human enamel and dentine. A methodological and quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Nieto-Albano, O.H.; García, J. M.; Gómez de Ferraris, M.E.; Campos, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Sample preparation of dental tissues for quantitative electron microprobe analysis has not been critically examined because of the highly mineralized nature of these structures. The present study was designed to establish the most suitable method for the electron probe quantitative determination of calcium in human permanent enamel and dentine while preserving the morphological features. Comparisons of quantitative data obtained with air-drying and freeze-dryin...

  19. Comparative Morphology of Incisor Enamel and Dentin in Humans and Fat Dormice (Glis glis)

    OpenAIRE

    Konjević, Dean; Keros, Tomislav; Brkić, Hrvoje; Slavica, Alen; Janicki, Zdravko; Margaletić, Josip

    2003-01-01

    The structure of teeth in all living beings is genetically predetermined, although it can change under external physiological and pathological factors. The author’s hypothesis was to indicate evolutional shifts resulting from genetic, functional and other differences. A comparative study about certain characteristics of incisors in humans and myomorpha, the fat dormouse (Glis glis) being their representative as well, comprised measurements of enamel and dentin thickness in indi...

  20. Appositional enamel growth in molars of South African fossil hominids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G

    2006-01-01

    Enamel is formed incrementally by the secretory activity of ameloblast cells. Variable stages of secretion result in the formation of structures known as cross striations along enamel prisms, for which experimental data demonstrate a correspondence with daily periods of secretion. Patterns of variation in this daily growth are important to understanding mechanisms of tooth formation and the development of enamel thickness. Transmitted light microscopy (TLM) of histological ground sections and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of bulk specimens or their surface replicas are the usual methods for investigating cross striations. However, these methods pose some constraints on the study of these features in Plio-Pleistocene hominid enamel, the specimens of which may only rarely be sectioned for TLM or examined on only their most superficial surfaces for SEM. The recent development of portable confocal scanning optical microscopy (PCSOM) resolves some of the restrictions on fractured enamel surfaces, allowing the visualization of cross striations by direct examination. This technology has been applied here to the study of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus hominid molars from the Plio-Pleistocene of South Africa. We hypothesize that these taxa have increased enamel appositional rates compared with modern humans, because despite having thicker enamelled molars (particularly P. robustus), the enamel crowns of these fossil taxa take an equivalent or reduced amount of time to form. Cross striations were measured in cuspal, lateral and cervical regions of the enamel crowns, and, within each region, the inner, middle and outer zones. Values obtained for A. africanus outer zones of the enamel crown are, in general, lower than those for P. robustus, indicating faster forming enamel in the latter, while both taxa show higher rates of enamel growth than modern humans and the African great apes. This demonstrates a relatively high degree of variability in the

  1. Nanostructural effect of acid-etching and fluoride application on human primary and permanent tooth enamels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Youjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Samjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Orthodontics, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Jung [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hun-Kuk, E-mail: sigmoidus@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program of Medical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the nanostructural effects of fluoride application and the acid-etching time with respect to the time elapsed after fluoride application on the primary and permanent tooth enamel layers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 192 non-carious teeth were assigned to sixteen experimental groups (n = 12) including primary (1 to 8) and permanent (9 to 16) teeth, based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. The APF pre-treatment led to a decrease in surface roughness in both the primary and permanent teeth. After the APF treatment, the roughness in both primary and permanent teeth increased with the time elapsed. An acid-etching time of 40 s led to increased nanostructural changes in the enamel surfaces compared to the conventional acid-etching time of 20 s. This acid-etching process led to a higher roughness changes in the primary teeth than in the permanent teeth. To obtain proper enamel adhesion of a sealant after APF pre-treatment, it is important to apply acid-etching two weeks after pre-treatment. In addition, the acid-etching time should be prolonged to apply etching more quickly than two weeks, regardless of the primary and permanent teeth. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APF pre-treatment led to decreased surface roughness in the enamel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After APF treatment, the more roughness increased with increasing time elapsed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid-etching should be performed two weeks after fluoride application.

  2. Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, J E; Seka, W; Featherstone, J D B; Rechmann, P

    2012-04-01

    The selective ablation of extrinsic dental enamel stains using a 400-nm laser is evaluated at several fluences for completely removing stains with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser (400-nm wavelength, 60-nanosecond pulse duration, 10-Hz repetition rate) was used to treat 10 extracted human teeth with extrinsic enamel staining. Each tooth was irradiated perpendicular to the surface in a back-and-forth motion over a 1-mm length using an ∼300-µm-diam 10th-order super-Gaussian beam with fluences ranging from 0.8 to 6.4 J/cm(2) . Laser triangulation determined stain depth and volume removed by measuring 3D surface images before and after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy evaluated the surface roughness of enamel following stain removal. Fluorescence spectroscopy measured spectra of unbleached and photobleached stains in the spectral range of 600-800 nm. Extrinsic enamel stains are removed with laser fluences between 0.8 and 6.4 J/cm(2) . Stains removed on sound enamel leave behind a smooth enamel surface. Stain removal in areas with signs of earlier cariogenic acid attacks resulted in isolated and randomly located laser-induced, 50-µm-diam enamel pits. These pits contain 0.5-µm diam, smooth craters indicative of heat transfer from the stain to the enamel and subsequent melting and water droplet ejection. Ablation stalling of enamel stains is typically observed at low fluences (Laser ablation of extrinsic enamel stains at 400 nm is observed to be most efficient above 3 J/cm(2) with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. Unsound underlying enamel is also observed to be selectively removed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on bovine enamel surface during in-office tooth bleaching ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Strakas, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Koumpia, Effimia

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of using Er,Cr:YSGG laser during in-office tooth bleaching on bovine enamel surface to evaluate the safety of this therapy on tooth tissues. Thirty-six enamel specimens were prepared from bovine incisors and divided into three groups: Group 1 specimens (control) received no bleaching treatment; Group 2 received a conventional in-office bleaching treatment (40 % H2O2); Group 3 received laser-assisted bleaching procedure (40 % H2O2) utilizing an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The specimens were stored for 10 days after the bleaching treatment in artificial saliva. Vickers hardness was determined using a microhardness tester, and measurements for surface roughness were done using a VSI microscope. Three specimens for each experimental group were examined under SEM and mineral composition of the specimens was evaluated using EDS. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's post hoc, Wilcoxon signed rank and Kruskal-Wallis tests (a = 0.05). The Vickers hardness of the enamel was reduced after in-office bleaching procedures (p  0.05), and no changes in mineral composition of the enamel were detected after in-office bleaching procedures (p > 0.05). The laser-assisted bleaching treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG laser did not influence the enamel surface compared to the conventional bleaching technique. The safety of the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser during in-office tooth bleaching regarding the surface properties of the enamel was confirmed under in vitro conditions.

  4. Salivary a-amylase protects enamel surface against acid induced softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazovic, Maja Bruvo; Moe, Dennis; Kirkeby, Svend

    Objectives: Recently we have demonstrated individual differences in protection against acid-induced enamel softening offered by experimentally developed saliva pellicles. Although ethnicity seemed to be related to protection level, the saliva proteins responsible for the differences were not iden......Objectives: Recently we have demonstrated individual differences in protection against acid-induced enamel softening offered by experimentally developed saliva pellicles. Although ethnicity seemed to be related to protection level, the saliva proteins responsible for the differences were...... not identified. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to identify the proteins responsible. Methods: Sour taste stimulated parotid saliva was collected from 20 subjects (23±1 years) comprising ten Scandinavians (Sc) and ten non-Scandinavians (NSc) including two Arabs, two Persians, four Pakistanis, one Indian...... min along with measurements of surface microhardness (SMH). Changes in SMH from before to after exposure were used to calculate the protective effect of each saliva sample. Quantification and identification of salivary proteins was performed by dual wavelength HPLC at various conditions and MALDI...

  5. The influence of topical application of grapeseed extract gel on enamel surface hardness after demineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, D. A.; Herda, E.; Triaminingsih, S.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of topical application of 6.5% and 12.5% grapeseed extract gels for duration of application 16 and 32 minutes on the enamel surface hardness following tooth demineralization by an energy drink. The samples were 21 bovine teeth that underwent demineralization by immersion in the energy drink for 5 minutes in an incubator at 37°C. The demineralized specimens were randomly divided into a control group and 2 treatment groups. The control group was immersed in artificial saliva for 6 hours at 37°C, whereas the treatment groups were treated with topical 6.5% and 12.5% grapeseed extract gels for durations of 16 and 32 minutes and then immersed in artificial saliva for 6 hours at 37°C. The hardness was measured with a Knoop hardness tester. Statistical analysis by repeated ANOVA and one-way ANOVA revealed a significant increase in the enamel hardness value (p0.05).

  6. Confocal Raman mapping of collagen cross-link and crystallinity of human dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Amel; Nouioua, Fares; Desoutter, Alban; Levallois, Bernard; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Tassery, Hervé; Terrer, Elodie; Salehi, Hamideh

    2017-08-01

    The separation zone between enamel and dentin [dentin-enamel junction (DEJ)] with different properties in biomechanical composition has an important role in preventing crack propagation from enamel to dentin. The understanding of the chemical structure (inorganic and organic components), physical properties, and chemical composition of the human DEJ could benefit biomimetic materials in dentistry. Spatial distribution of calcium phosphate crystallinity and the collagen crosslinks near DEJ were studied using confocal Raman microscopy and calculated by different methods. To obtain collagen crosslinking, the ratio of two peaks 1660 cm-1 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) is calculated. For crystallinity, the inverse full-width at half maximum of phosphate peak at 960 cm-1, and the ratio of two Raman peaks of phosphate at 960/950 cm-1 is provided. In conclusion, the study of chemical and physical properties of DEJ provides many benefits in the biomaterial field to improve the synthesis of dental materials in respect to the natural properties of human teeth. Confocal Raman microscopy as a powerful tool provides the molecular structure to identify the changes along DEJ and can be expanded for other mineralized tissues.

  7. Carabelli's trait revisited: an examination of mesiolingual features at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of Pan and Homo sapiens upper molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alejandra; Skinner, Matthew M; Bailey, Shara E; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Carabelli's trait is a morphological feature that frequently occurs on the mesiolingual aspect of Homo sapiens upper molars. Similar structures also referred to as Carabelli's trait have been reported in apes and fossil hominins. However, the morphological development and homology of these mesiolingual structures among hominoids are poorly understood. In this study, we employ micro-computed tomography to image the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) and outer enamel surface (OES) of Pan (n = 48) and H. sapiens (n = 52) upper molars. We investigate the developmental origin of mesiolingual features in these taxa and establish the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to feature expression. Results demonstrate that mesiolingual features of H. sapiens molars develop at the EDJ and are similarly expressed at the OES. Morphological variation at both surfaces in this taxon can satisfactorily be assessed using standards for Carabelli's trait developed by the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS). Relative to H. sapiens, Pan has an even greater degree of correspondence in feature expression between the EDJ and OES. Morphological manifestations in Pan molars are not necessarily limited to the protocone and are best characterized by a lingual cingulum that cannot be captured by the ASUDAS. Cusp-like structures, similar to those seen in marked Carabelli's trait expressions in H. sapiens, were not found in Pan. This study provides a foundation for further analyses on the evolutionary history of mesiolingual dental traits within the hominoid lineage. It also highlights the wealth of morphological data that can be obtained at the EDJ for understanding tooth development and for characterizing tooth crown variation in worn fossil teeth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro study of hydroxy apatite and enamel powder fused in human enamel by Nd:YAG laser; Estudo in vitro da fusao de hidroxiapatita e esmalte em superficies de esmalte humano pelo laser de Nd:YAg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrreira, Marcus Vinicius Lucas

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation on hydroxyapatite and enamel powder fusion. This laser beam is not well absorbed by this two compounds for this reason they were mixed with vegetal coal to increase the absorption of the laser beam. Fifteen enamel flat surfaces and six occlusal enamel surfaces were prepared with three different substances: hydroxyapatite mixed with vegetal coal (3:1 in weigh); enamel powder mixed with vegetal coal (3:1 in weigh); vegetal coal. The occlusal surfaces were utilized to determine if the compounds could seal pits and fissures. Flat surfaces were utilized to determine fusion of hydroxyapatite and enamel powder. All samples were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser with the parameters: 80 mJ, 15 Hz, 1,2 W, 100 {mu}s pulse-width, 131,1 J/cm{sup 2}. Laser beam was delivered to the samples with a 300 {mu}m diameter fiber optic. Morphology of the irradiated surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compounds with hydroxyapatite and enamel powder were fused to enamel surfaces. Only partial pits and fissures sealing could be observed. (author)

  9. The role of organic proteins on the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-06-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mesoscopic modeling of the response of human dental enamel to mid-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Ramos, Marta; Stoneham, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Ablation of human dental enamel, a composite biomaterial with water pores, is of significant importance in minimally invasive laser dentistry but progress in the area is hampered by the lack of optimal laser parameters. We use mesoscopic finite element models of this material to study its response to mid-infrared radiation. Our results indicate that the cost-effective, off-the-shelf CO2 laser at λ = 10.6 μm may in fact ablate enamel precisely, reproducibly and with limited unwanted side effects such as cracking or heating, provided that a pulse duration of 10 μs is used. Furthermore, our results also indicate that the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm), currently popular for laser dentistry, may in fact cause unwanted deep cracking in the enamel when regions with unusually high water content are irradiated, and also provide an explanation for the large range of ablation threshold values observed for this material. The model may be easily adapted to study the response of any composite material to infrared radiation and thus may be useful for the scientific community.

  11. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    stored in 0.5% chloramine-T (Science Stuff, Austin, TX). The teeth were sectioned buccolingualy at the cemento- enamel junction to remove the root using...etching or the etch morphology achieved. The enamel hybrid layer is very important in etch-and-rinse adhesive systems because it allows resin to...Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner

  12. In vitro evaluation of remineralization efficacy of different calcium- and fluoride-based delivery systems on artificially demineralized enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangrade, Aparajita; Gade, Vandana; Patil, Sanjay; Gade, Jaykumar; Chandhok, Deepika; Thakur, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most common dental disease facing the world population. Caries can be prevented by remineralizing early enamel lesions. To evaluate remineralization efficacy of stannous fluoride (SnF2), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF) and calcium sucrose phosphate (CaSP). Fifty enamel samples were taken; they were divided into five groups (n = 10). Demineralization was carried out with Groups A, B, C, and E. Remineralization was carried out with Groups A, B, and C for 7 days using SnF2, CPP-ACPF, and CaSP, respectively. In Group D, no surface treatment was carried out, to mark as positive control whereas Group E was kept as negative control with only surface demineralization of enamel. Enamel microhardness was tested using Vickers's microhardness tester after 7 day remineralization regime. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests were performed. The mean microhardness values in descending order: Positive control > SnF2> CaSP > CPP-ACPF > negative control. All remineralizing agents showed improved surface remineralization. However, complete remineralization did not occur within 7 days. SnF2 showed the highest potential for remineralization followed by CaSP and CPP-ACPF.

  13. Changes in surface morphology of enamel after Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    1998-04-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the surface and subsurface structure of enamel after irradiation with an Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 micrometer, pulse duration 250 - 500 microseconds, free running, beam profile close to tophead, focus diameter 600 micrometer, focus distance 13 mm, different power settings, air-water spray 2 ml/min; KAVO Key Laser 1242, Kavo Biberach, Germany). The surface of more than 40 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were irradiated using a standardized application protocol (pulse repetition rate 4 and 6 Hz, moving speed of the irradiation table 2 mm/sec and 3 mm/sec, respectively). On each surface between 3 and 5 tracks were irradiated at different laser energies (60 - 500 mJ/pulse) while each track was irradiated between one and ten times respectively. For the scanning electron microscope investigation teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. For light microscopic examinations following laser impact, samples were fixed in formaldehyde, dried in alcohol and embedded in acrylic resin. Investigations revealed that at subsurface level cracks can not be observed even at application of highest energies. Borders of the irradiated tracks seem to be sharp while melted areas of different sizes are observed on the bottom of the tracks depending on applied energy. Small microcracks can be seen on the surface of these melted areas.

  14. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Normal and Fluorotic Enamel after Microabrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Mohammadi Basir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of surface treatments such as tooth reduction and extending the etching time on microtensile bond strength (µTBS of composite resin to normal and fluorotic enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Fifty non-carious anterior teeth were classified into two groups of normal and fluorotic (n=25 using Thylstrup and Fejerskov index (TFI=4-6. Teeth in each group were treated with five modalities as follows and restored with OptiBond FL and Z350 composite resin: 1-Etching (30 seconds, bonding, filling (B; 2-Tooth reduction (0.3mm, etching, bonding, filling (R-B; 3-Microabrasion (120 seconds, etching, bonding, filling (M-B; 4- Microabrasion, tooth reduction, etching, bonding, filling (M-R-B; and 5- Microabrasion, etching (60 seconds, bonding, filling (M-2E-B. Ten experimental groups (n=5 were designed; 150 rectangular samples (10 in each group with a cross-sectional area of 1×1mm2 were prepared for µTBS test. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope and one specimen was selected from each group for scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test.Results: The µTBS to normal enamel was higher than to fluorotic enamel in all groups except for group (R-B. The Maximum and minimum µTBS were noted in the group (normal, reduction, bonding and (fluorosed, microabrasion, bonding, respectively.  Tooth reduction increased µTBS more effectively than extended etching time after microabrasion. Conclusions: Fluorosis may reduce µTBS of composite resin to enamel. Microabrasion reduced the bond strength. Tooth reduction and extended etching time increased µTBS of composite resin to both normal and fluorotic enamel.Keywords: Fluorosis, Dental; Enamel Microabrasion; Dental Bonding; Composite Resins

  15. Erosive potential of soft drinks on human enamel: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: All tested soft drinks were found to be erosive. Soft drinks with high calcium contents have significantly lower erosive potential. Low pH value and high citrate content may cause more surface enamel loss. As the erosive time increased, the titratable acidity to pH 7 may be a predictor of the erosive potential for acidic soft drinks. The erosive potential of the soft drinks may be predicted based on the types of acid content, pH value, titratable acidity, and ion concentration.

  16. Evaluation of Novel Microabrasion Paste as a Dental Bleaching Material and Effects on Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağlar, Serdar; Çolak, Hakan; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Dental fluorosis is an enamel dysplasia that can cause serious aesthetic and psychological problems. An examination of the literature shows that the microabrasion method is the most effective way to treat fluorosis. This study aimed to produce a prototype microabrasion paste for the treatment of fluorosis stains and to examine the effects of the paste on tooth structure and color in vitro. Forty extracted upper incisor teeth were used in this study. The teeth were divided into four treatment groups: a prototype microabrasion paste group (N = 10), an Opalustre paste group (N = 10), a 37% phosphoric acid gel group (N = 10), and a distilled water (control) group (N = 10). Following treatment, all specimens in each of the four groups were examined by scanning electron microscopy for changes in their surface enamel. Changes in tooth color changes of the 1st and 2nd groups were measured before and after treatment by a VITA Easyshade Advance spectrophotometer. In scanning electron microscopy evaluations, significant differences were not observed between the 1st and 2nd groups. Differences in three color-measuring coordinates between the 1st and 2nd were also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The study demonstrated that the prototype paste is a viable treatment option for dental fluorosis. The findings in this study demonstrated that the tested prototype microabrasion paste is extremely harmless, minimally invasive agent, and able to improve the color, shine and chrome values of the teeth. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Erosive cola-based drinks affect the bonding to enamel surface: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Apayco, Leslie Caroll; Dreibi, Vanessa Manzini; Hipólito, Ana Carolina; Graeff, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Wang, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of in vitro erosion provoked by different cola-based drinks (Coke types), associated or not with toothbrushing, to bonding to enamel. Fifty-six [Corrected] bovine enamel specimens were prepared and randomly assigned into seven groups (N=8): C- Control (neither eroded nor abraded), ERO-RC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Regular Coke (RC), ERO-LC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Light Coke (LC), ERO-ZC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Zero Coke (ZC) and three other eroded groups, subsequently abraded for 1-minute toothbrushing (EROAB-RC, EROAB-LC and EROAB-ZC, respectively). After challenges, they were stored overnight in artificial saliva for a total of 24 hours and restored with Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350. Buildup coronal surfaces were cut in 1 mm2 -specimens and subjected to a microtensile test. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy (X40). The Interface of the restorations were observed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). All tested cola-based drinks significantly reduced the bond strength, which was also observed in the analyses of interfaces. Toothbrushing did not have any impact on the bond strength. CLSM showed that except for Zero Coke, all eroded specimens resulted in irregular hybrid layer formation. All cola-based drinks reduced the bond strength. Different patterns of hybrid layers were obtained revealing their impact, except for ZC.

  18. Erosive cola-based drinks affect the bonding to enamel surface: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Caroll CASAS-APAYCO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the impact of in vitro erosion provoked by different cola-based drinks (Coke types, associated or not with toothbrushing, to bonding to enamel. Material and methods: Forty-six bovine enamel specimens were prepared and randomly assigned into seven groups (N=8: C- Control (neither eroded nor abraded, ERO-RC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Regular Coke (RC, ERO-LC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Light Coke (LC, ERO-ZC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Zero Coke (ZC and three other eroded groups, subsequently abraded for 1-minute toothbrushing (EROAB-RC, EROAB-LC and EROAB-ZC, respectively. After challenges, they were stored overnight in artificial saliva for a total of 24 hours and restored with Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350. Buildup coronal surfaces were cut in 1 mm2 -specimens and subjected to a microtensile test. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α=0.05. Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy (X40. The Interface of the restorations were observed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM. Results: All tested cola-based drinks significantly reduced the bond strength, which was also observed in the analyses of interfaces. Toothbrushing did not have any impact on the bond strength. CLSM showed that except for Zero Coke, all eroded specimens resulted in irregular hybrid layer formation. Conclusions: All cola-based drinks reduced the bond strength. Different patterns of hybrid layers were obtained revealing their impact, except for ZC.

  19. Effect of milk and soy-based infant formulas on in situ demineralization of human primary enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mazer Papa, Anna Maria Cia; Tabchoury, Cínthia Pereira Machado; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Arthur, Rodrigo Alex; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2010-01-01

    The effect of infant formulas sweetened or not with sucrose on primary enamel demineralization and dental biofilm is not known. This study's purpose was to evaluate the effect of infant formula and sucrose association on demineralization of primary enamel and dental biofilm formed. A cross-over, split-mouth, and blind in situ study was conducted during 3 phases, each of 10 days duration, during which 11 volunteers wore palatal appliances containing slabs of human primary enamel. The dental slabs were extraorally subjected 8 times a day to 6 groups of treatment: distilled and deionized water; 10% sucrose solution; and milk-based and soy-based formula with or without 10% sucrose added. After each phase, the acidogenicity, biochemical and microbiological composition of dental biofilm formed was analyzed, and enamel demineralization was assessed by microhardness. Both formulas induced significant enamel mineral loss, which increased when sucrose was added. Both formulas were fermented, resulting in a decrease of biofilm pH, irrespective of sucrose addition. Also, lactobacilli counts were higher in biofilm formed in the presence of both formulas when compared to the water group. Milk and soy-based formulas present potential to induce demineralization in primary enamel, which increased when sweetened with sucrose.

  20. Effect of acidic food and drinks on surface hardness of enamel, dentine, and tooth-coloured filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkhantee, S; Patanapiradej, V; Maneenut, C; Tantbirojn, D

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of acidic food and drinks (Cola soft drink, drinking yogurt, orange juice, sports drink, Tom-yum soup) on surface hardness of various substrates (enamel, dentine, universal composite, microfilled composite, conventional glass ionomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified resin composite). Specimens (n = 10) were alternately immersed, 5 s each, in food or drinks and in artificial saliva for 10 cycles. Baseline and post-immersion Vickers hardness were compared using paired t-test. The difference in hardness between the groups was analysed with one-way ANOVA followed by a least significant different (LSD) test. Cola soft drink significantly reduced surface hardness of enamel, dentine, microfilled composite, and resin modified glass ionomer (p Tom-yum soup did not reduce surface hardness of any substrate. This in vitro study confirms the erosive potential of certain acidic food and drinks that public should be aware of.

  1. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p0.05). A firm attachment of acellular cementum to the root dentin with functional organization of its collagen fibers was noted, and, the accumulation and organization of cellular cementum in the control group was more irregular than the cellular cementum formed in the test group. The amount of new bone was 2.41+/-0.75 mm in

  2. Observations on the structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 2. Observation on the ultrastructure of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1992-12-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the structural features of biological crystals, using an electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of human enamel crystals at near atomic resolution through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. The materials used for this study were the middle layer of the noncarious enamel from freshly extracted human erupted permanent molars. The small cubes of the enamel were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification. The sections were examined with HITACHI H-500 and H-700 types of transmission electron microscopes operated at 125-200 kV. Each crystal was observed at the initial magnification of 300,000 times and at the final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. Using this approach, the authors have been able to show the configuration of the hydroxyapatite in the cross and longitudinal sections of the enamel crystals and observe the basic hexagonal pattern of the unit cell viewed down the c-axis. The authors sincerely believe that the electron micrograph shown in this report is the first atomic image to be obtained from a hydroxyapatite crystal from the human enamel, using the sections.

  3. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide– amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential. PMID:27252753

  4. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents. PMID:23743618

  5. Effect of Reduced Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching Times 
on Enamel Surface Characteristics and Shear Fatigue Strength Using Universal Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Fischer, Nicholas; Barkmeier, Wayne; Baruth, Andrew; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of reduced phosphoric acid pre-etching times on enamel fatigue bond strength of universal adhesives and surface characteristics by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three universal adhesives were used in this study (Clearfil Universal Bond [C], G-Premio Bond [GP], Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SU]). Four pre-etching groups were employed: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid and immediately rinsed with an air-water spray, and enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 5, 10, or 15 s. Ground enamel was used as the control group. For the initial bond strength test, 15 specimens per etching group for each adhesive were used. For the shear fatigue test, 20 specimens per etching group for each adhesive were loaded using a sine wave at a frequency of 20 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Initial shear bond strengths and fatigue shear strengths of composite adhesively bonded to ground and pre-etched enamel were determined. AFM observations of ground and pre-etched enamel were also conducted, and surface roughness as well as surface area were evaluated. The initial shear bond strengths and fatigue shear strengths of the universal adhesives in the pre-etched groups were significantly higher than those of the control group, and were not influenced by the pre-etching time. Significantly higher surface roughness and surface area of enamel surfaces in pre-etched groups were observed compared with those in the control group. While the surface area was not significantly influenced by etching time, surface roughness of the enamel surfaces in the pre-etched groups significantly increased with pre-etching time. The results of this in vitro study suggest that reduced phosphoric acid pre-etching times do not impair the fatigue bond strength of universal adhesives. Although fatigue bond strength and surface area were not influenced by phosphoric-acid etching times, surface roughness increased with increasing etching time.

  6. Modulated regeneration of acid-etched human tooth enamel by a functionalized dendrimer that is an analog of amelogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Yang, Jiaojiao; Li, Jiyao; Liang, Kunneng; He, Libang; Lin, Zaifu; Chen, Xingyu; Ren, Xiaokang; Li, Jianshu

    2014-10-01

    In the bioinspired repair process of tooth enamel, it is important to simultaneously mimic the organic-matrix-induced biomineralization and increase the binding strength at the remineralization interface. In this work, a fourth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) is modified by dimethyl phosphate to obtain phosphate-terminated dendrimer (PAMAM-PO3H2) since it has a similar dimensional scale and peripheral functionalities to that of amelogenin, which plays important role in the natural development process of enamel. Its phosphate group has stronger affinity for calcium ion than carboxyl group and can simultaneously provide strong hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding capability. The MTT assay demonstrates the low cytotoxicity of PAMAM-PO3H2. Adsorption tests indicate that PAMAM-PO3H2 can be tightly adsorbed on the human tooth enamel. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to analyze the remineralization process. After being incubated in artificial saliva for 3weeks, there is a newly generated HA layer of 11.23μm thickness on the acid-etched tooth enamel treated by PAMAM-PO3H2, while the thickness for the carboxyl-terminated one (PAMAM-COOH) is only 6.02μm. PAMAM-PO3H2 can regulate the remineralization process to form ordered new crystals oriented along the Z-axis and produce an enamel prism-like structure that is similar to that of natural tooth enamel. The animal experiment also demonstrates that PAMAM-PO3H2 can induce significant HA regeneration in the oral cavity of rats. Thus PAMAM-PO3H2 shows great potential as a biomimetic restorative material for human tooth enamel. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical analysis and surface morphology of enamel and dentin following 9.6mu CO2 laser irradiation versus high speed drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Stabholz, Adam; Bar-Hilel, Rita; Peretz, Benjamin

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present in vitro study was to determine whether there is a change in the chemical composition and surface morphology of enamel and dentin following 9.6mu CO2 laser irradiation and high-speed drilling. Ten permanent, non-carious, young premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were selected. The crowns were separated longitudinally into two equal parts at their mesiodistal axis. Two areas on the inner enamel surface of each specimen and two on the dentinal surface were selected. A high-speed drill and 9.6mu CO2 laser irradiation were applied to the selected enamel and dentinal areas. A random area on the unlased enamel and on the unlased dentin of each specimen served as controls. The morphology of the specimens was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Calcium, phosphorus and oxygen levels were measured using an energy dispersive spectrometer. Mineral analysis revealed no significant difference in the mineral content of the enamel and dentin after laser irradiation or high speed drilling versus the control. Use of the high-speed drill on enamel and dentin resulted in very clear cavity margins, with characteristic grooves, whereas laser irradiation of enamel and dentin did not produce clear margins and the floor of the cavity displayed an irregular surface. The 9.6mu CO2 laser appears to be a promising tool in the clinical setting. However, further investigation is indicated to ensure maximum effectiveness.

  8. High-resolution electron microscope and computed images of human tooth enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brés, E F; Barry, J C; Hutchison, J L

    1985-03-01

    The structure of human enamel crystallites has been studied at a near atomic level by high-resolution electron microscopy. Electron micrographs have been obtained from crystallites present in human enamel with a structure resolution of 0.2 nm in the [0001], [1210], [1213], [1100] and [4510] zone axes directions. In most cases it was possible to match the experimental images with images calculated using the atomic positions of mineral hydroxyapatite. However, in some cases a discrepancy between calculated and experimental image detail was observed in the c direction of the [1210] and the [1100] images. This shows: (i) a structural heterogeneity of the crystals, and (ii) a loss of hexagonal symmetry of the structure. The resolution required to distinguish individual atomic sites in the different zones has been determined, and this will provide a useful basis for future work. As the determination of the "real structure" of biological crystals is of prime importance for the study of calcification mechanisms (crystal growth), biological properties and destructive phenomena of calcified tissues (i.e., dental caries and bone resorption).

  9. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L., E-mail: esmemapi@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois, E-mail: galoisborre@yahoo.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@yahoo.com.mx [Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); García-García, Ramiro, E-mail: ramiro@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI){sub XRD} index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI){sub FTIR} index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI){sub XRD} value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI){sub FTIR} indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI){sub XRD} than with (CI){sub FTIR}. • Regardless of the temperature, (CI){sub XRD} and (CI){sub FTIR} showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement.

  10. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Normal and Fluorotic Enamel After Microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Ghomsheh, Elham Tabatabai; Hosseini, Zahra Malek

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of surface treatments such as tooth reduction and extending the etching time on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of composite resin to normal and fluorotic enamel after microabrasion. Fifty non-carious anterior teeth were classified into two groups of normal and fluorotic (n=25) using Thylstrup and Fejerskov index (TFI=4-6). Teeth in each group were treated with five modalities as follows and restored with OptiBond FL and Z350 composite resin: 1-Etching (30 seconds), bonding, filling (B); 2-Tooth reduction (0.3mm), etching, bonding, filling (R-B); 3-Microabrasion (120 seconds), etching, bonding, filling (MB); 4- Microabrasion, tooth reduction, etching, bonding, filling (M-R-B); and 5- Microabrasion, etching (60 seconds), bonding, filling (M-2E-B). Ten experimental groups (n=5) were designed; 150 rectangular samples (10 in each group) with a cross-sectional area of 1×1mm2 were prepared for μTBS test. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope and one specimen was selected from each group for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The μTBS to normal enamel was higher than to fluorotic enamel in all groups except for group (R-B). The Maximum and minimum μTBS were noted in the group (normal, reduction, bonding) and (fluorosed, microabrasion, bonding), respectively. Tooth reduction increased μTBS more effectively than extended etching time after microabrasion. Fluorosis may reduce μTBS of composite resin to enamel. Microabrasion reduced the bond strength. Tooth reduction and extended etching time increased μTBS of composite resin to both normal and fluorotic enamel.

  11. SEM-EDX analysis of brushing abrasion of chitosan and propolis based toothpastes on sound and artificial carious primary enamel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozalp, Serife; Tulunoglu, Ozlem

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the brushing abrasion effects of toothpastes containing chitosan and propolis on sound and demineralized primary tooth enamel. Pairs of enamel specimens were prepared from human extracted primary teeth, embedded in epoxy resin and polished. An artificial subsurface lesion was created in one specimen from each pair. All samples were divided into four groups (Chitodent, Aagaard propolis, Elmex, and Control) and brushed with slurry of toothpastes and artificial saliva in a brushing machine. The brushing abrasion depths were evaluated using computer-guided optical profilometry. No significant differences existed in terms of brushing depths between artificial carious enamel and brushed sound enamel specimens (P>0.05). The abrasion values of the sound enamel samples brushed with Aagaard propolis and control samples were significantly lower than the Elmex group (Pbrushing abrasion values of demineralized enamel specimens were observed in the Chitodent group (P>0.05). The tested toothpastes exhibited similar effects in terms of brushing abrasion on both sound and artificially demineralized enamel. Based on mean values without statistical significance, the lowest brushing abrasion values in the demineralized brushed enamel samples were detected in the Chitodent group. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Improving esthetically objectionable human enamel fluorosis with a simple microabrasion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limeback, Hardy; Vieira, Anya P G F; Lawrence, Herenia

    2006-05-01

    Mild-to-moderately severe enamel fluorosis (EF) is an unsightly maturation-phase dental disorder. Despite extensive epidemiological studies on EF, little is known about individual treatment options. This study was carried out to determine whether a simple microabrasion technique is effective in improving the esthetics of EF. Patients with a variety of severities were treated using a water-cooled fine diamond polishing bur at high speed to remove the surface enamel layers. Photographs of the affected teeth before and after treatment were shown by computer to a panel of three judges (two lay and one experienced), who rated the appearance of the teeth using a newly developed visual analog scale. The severity of EF was rated randomly and blind for 52 individual teeth (26 before and 26 after treatment). Reteated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the results. The lay judges rated the appearance of the teeth with EF as significantly more objectionable before treatment. All judges found a significant improvement in the severity of EF after treatment. Using a newly developed visual analog scale, our study indicates that EF of an objectionable nature can be significantly improved with a simple microabrasion technique, thus conserving tooth structure and minimizing the cost of treating EF.

  13. Effect of different surface treatments on adhesion of In-Ceram Zirconia to enamel and dentin substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Ibrahim, Fatma; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    Resin bonding of In-Ceram Zirconia (ICZ) ceramics is still a challenge, especially for minimally invasive applications. This study evaluated the adhesion of ICZ to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments of the ceramic. ICZ ceramic specimens (diameter: 6 mm; thickness: 2 mm) (N = 100) were fabricated following the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 20), according to the surface treatment methods applied. The groups were as follows: group C: no treatment; group SB: sandblasting; group SCS-S: CoJet+silane; group SCS-P: CoJet+Alloy Primer; group GE-S: glaze+ hydrofluoric acid etching (9.6%) for 60 s+silane. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups to be bonded to either enamel or dentin (n = 10 per group) using MDP-based resin cement (Panavia F2.0). All the specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C-55°C). The specimens were mounted in a universal testing machine and tensile force was applied to the ceramic/cement interface until failure occurred (1 mm/min). After evaluating all the debonded specimens under SEM, the failure types were defined as either "adhesive" with no cement left on the ceramic surface (score 0) or "mixed" with less than 1/2 of the cement left adhered to the surface with no cohesive failure of the substrate (score 1). The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The highest tensile bond strength for the enamel surfaces was obtained in group GE-S (18.1 ± 2 MPa) and the lowest in group SB (7.1 ± 1.4 MPa). Regarding dentin, group CSC-P showed the highest (12 ± 1.3 MPa) and SB the lowest tensile bond strength (5.7 ± 0.4 MPa). Groups SB, CSC-S, CSC-P, and GE-S did not show significant differences between the different surface treatments on either enamel or dentin surfaces (p dentin substrates (p dentin exclusively mixed failures were observed (score 1). Adhesion of ICZ to both enamel and dentin can be improved when ceramics are glazed

  14. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gasga, José; Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois; Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E; García-García, Ramiro; Brès, Etienne F

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI)XRD index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI)FTIR index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI)XRD value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI)FTIR indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. © 2013.

  15. Measurement of hydroxyapatite density and Knoop hardness in sound human enamel and a correlational analysis between them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Huang, Shengbin; Jing, Junjun; Hao, Yuqing

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the hydroxyapatite (HAP) density and Knoop hardness (KHN) of enamel slabs and to analyse the relationship between them. Twenty enamel slabs (10 lingual sides and 10 buccal sides) were prepared and scanned with micro-CT. Tomographic images of each slab from dental cusp to dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) were reconstructed. On these three-dimensional (3D) images, regions of interest (ROIs) were defined at an interval of 50 microm, and the HAP density for each ROI was calculated. Then the polished surfaces were indented from cusp to DEJ at intervals of 50 microm with a Knoop indenter. Finally, the data were analysed with one-way ANOVA, Student's t-test, and linear regression analysis. The HAP density and KHN decreased from the dental cusp to DEJ. Both HAP density and KHN in the outer-layer enamel were significantly higher than those in the middle- or inner-layer enamel (Penamel in the outer, middle and inner layers, respectively (P>0.05). The KHN in the outer-layer enamel of the lingual sides was significantly lower than that of the buccal sides (Pdental cusp to DEJ, and the two properties are highly correlated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of Curcuma domestica Val - Tamarindus indica L mixed solution (“kunyit asam” on microhardness and roughnessof human tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Pratiwi Iljas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays,peoples tendto seekan alternative treatment from traditional plants because it is side effects relatively less than synthetic drugs. One of the famous traditional medicinedrinks in Indonesia is “kunyit asam”. People was make it with mixed both Curcuma domestica Val and Tamarindus indica L. Beside it has many advantages for health such as increasing stamina, it also has a good taste, so many people consumed it. However, the acid content in this drink maycause enamel erosion. Therefore the aim of this present study is to determine thein vitro effect of “kunyit asam” solution towards microhardness and roughness of human enamel tooth. The pH of solutionwas measure using a digital pH meter, while the calcium content measure using the Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. This study used 40 permanent maxillary first incisor that has been extracted from the patient who came to dental polyclinic of hospitals in Polewali Mandar regency, West Sulawesi Province during February 2015-April 2015 period. The roots of the teeth were removed at the cementoenamel junction. Tooth crowns placed on blocks orthoplast with labial surface facing up. Samples were randomly divided into 2 groups equally andimmersed in aquadest solution pH 7.0 (negative control (Group I or “kunyit asam” solution pH 3.0 (Group II for 14, 28, 42 and 56 minutes respectively. An Universal Hardness Tester (Affri® Universal Hardness Tester, Japan was used to measure enamel surface microhardness, while to measure enamel surface roughness wasused a Roughness Tester (Surftest 301 Mitutoyo, Japan. Both measure were done before and after immersed in solution. Data were statistically analyzed using Levene, paired-t one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Least Significance Different (LSD tests. The results of present study showed that there was no significant difference (p>0.05 microhardness but significant differences (p<0.05 for the roughness of tooth enamelbefore and

  17. [Peculiarities of the morphological structure of the inorganic component of human dental enamel and dentin at nano-level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, I N; Goncharov, V D; Kipchuk, A V; Bobrova, Ye A

    2014-01-01

    Using the polished sections of 20 permanent human molars and premolars, the regimes of probe atomic force microscopy were assessed that permit the definition of the size, shape, spatial configuration of the structure-forming hydroxyapatite crystals of enamel and dentin inorganic component. It was found that the major part of enamel crystals had the size of 40-60 nm and were more flattened. Dentin crystal average size was equal to 60-80 nm. Microspaces between them had the shape of rotational ellipsoid sized 120 nm by 60 nm.

  18. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  19. Observations on structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 8. Observation on fusion of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1993-12-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the basic structural features and characteristics of the biological apatite crystals, using a transmission electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of the human enamel, dentin, and bone crystals at near atomic resolution and showed the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. Subsequently, based on the results of the observations by the authors of the ultrastructure of the tooth and bone, using the same approach, we have been able to directly examine the images of the lattice imperfections in the human tooth and bone crystals, such as the point defect structure, line defect, and face defect, in the crystals. In this report, we describe the images of the crystal fusion obtained by using the same approach from the sections of the human enamel crystals. The materials used for this study were the noncarious enamel from the freshly extracted human erupted lower first molars. The small cubes of the material were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification. The sections were examined with the HITACHI H-800 H and H-9000 type transmission electron microscopes operated at 200 kV and 300 kV. Each crystal was observed at an initial magnification of 300,000 times and at a final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. We are, therefore, able to confirm that the fusion between the adjacent crystals can occur at some time during the life history of the human enamel. We sincerely believe that the electron micrographs shown in this report are the first to show the ultrastructures of the crystal fusion in the human enamel crystals at near atomic resolution.

  20. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around a fluoride-containing dental material during cariogenic pH cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)]. E-mail: kom@den.hokudai.ac.jp; Yamamoto, H. [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [Wakasa wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Hase, Tsuruga 914-0192 (Japan); Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Murata, Y. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Kijimura, T. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Sano, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Sakai, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan); Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Using PIGE (TIARA, JAPAN) technique, we measured fluorine (F) uptake into the tooth enamel around a fluoride-containing material during caries progression using pH cycling. Class I cavities in the buccal surfaces of 6 extracted human teeth were drilled and filled with fluoride-containing material; a glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX(GC)). Three 300 {mu}m sections through the material were obtained from each tooth. Two of these specimens were utilized to measure the F distribution in enamel adjacent to the material. A 1.7 MeV proton beam accelerated by the TIARA single-ended accelerator was delivered to a micro-beam apparatus. The beam spot size was about 1 {mu}m with a beam current of about 100 pA. A nuclear reaction, {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}0, was used to measure the F concentration and the gamma-rays from this reaction were detected with a 4' NaI detector. X-rays induced by proton were detected with a Si(Li) detector to measure calcium concentration and the beam intensity was monitored with the X-ray yield from a copper foil for quantitative analysis. After measurement of F uptake, all specimens were polished to a thickness of 120 {mu}m. In order to simulate daily acid challenges occurring in the oral cavity, the pH cycling (pH6.8-pH4.5) was carried out for 1, 3 and 5 weeks, separately. The duration that the solution remained below pH 5.5 was 37 min per cycle. The cycles were repeated 6 times per day with 2 h interval between cycles, and the specimens were kept in remineralizing solution for the rest of pH cycle. After pH cycling, F and calcium distribution of each specimen was evaluated using PIGE technique. The F distribution of the specimens before pH cycling clearly showed the F uptake from fluoride-containing material into enamel adjacent to the material. After pH cycling, the caries progression in all specimens was observed by the image of transverse microradiography (TMR). The depth of caries and mineral loss progressed with increasing the

  1. Amelogenin-assisted ex vivo remineralization of human enamel: effects of supersaturation degree and fluoride concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yuwei; Nelson, James R.; Alvarez, Jason R.; Hagan, Joseph; Berrier, Allison; Xu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    The formation of organized nanocrystals that resemble enamel is crucial for successful enamel remineralization. Calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions and amelogenin are important ingredients for the formation of organized hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals in vitro. However, the effects of these remineralization agents on the enamel crystal morphology have not been thoroughly studied. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoride ions, supersaturation degree and amelogenin ...

  2. Comparison of the effect of resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on surface hardness and streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznezhad, Mahdiye; Alaghemand, Homayoon; Shahande, Zahra; Pasdar, Nilgoon; Bijani, Ali; Eslami, Abdolreza; Dastan, Zohre

    2017-03-01

    Dental caries is a major public health problem, and Streptococcus mutans is considered the main causal agent of dental caries. This study aimed to compare the effect of three re-mineralizing materials: resin infiltrant, fluoride varnish, and nano-hydroxy apatite paste on the surface hardness and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans as noninvasive treatments for initial enamel lesions. This experimental study was conducted from December 2015 through March 2016 in Babol, Iran. Artificial enamel lesions were created on 60 enamel surfaces, which were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B (30 subjects per group). Group A was divided into three subgroups (10 samples in each subgroup), including fluoride varnish group, nano-hydroxy apatite paste group (Nano P paste), and resin infiltrant group (Icon-resin). In Group A, the surface hardness of each sample was measured in three stages: First, on an intact enamel (baseline); second, after creating artificial enamel lesions; third, after application of re-mineralizing materials. In Group B, the samples were divided into five subgroups, including intact enamel, demineralized enamel, demineralized enamel treated with fluoride varnish, Nano P paste, and Icon-resin. In Group B, standard Streptococcus mutans bacteria adhesion (PTCC 1683) was examined and reported in terms of colony forming units (CFU/ml). Then, data were analyzed using ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and post hoc tests. In Group A, after treatment with re-mineralizing materials, the Icon-resin group had the highest surface hardness among the studied groups, then the Nano P paste group and fluoride varnish group, respectively (p = 0.035). In Group B, in terms of bacterial adhesion, fluoride varnish group had zero bacterial adhesion level, and then the Nano P paste group, Icon-resin group, intact enamel group, and the de-mineralized enamel group showed bacterial adhesion increasing in order (p tooth surface hardness as the intact enamel and fluoride varnish

  3. Enamel microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhazindar, M M; Welbury, R R

    2000-05-01

    A significant number of patients complain of discoloured teeth. The enamel microabrasion technique described in this article is a simple conservative method for improving the appearance of discoloured enamel.

  4. The effect of Trigona sp propolis from Luwu regency, South Sulawesi province, Indonesia on human enamel teeth (an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardo Sabir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honey bees. It is well-known that propolis exhibits both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities therefore it has been used in folk medicine since primeval times.In recent years, propolis has been used as active component of mouthwashes in the attempt to treat gingivitis and periodontitis. The purpose of the present study is to know in vitro effect of Ethanolic Extract of Propolis (EEP solution on the microhardness of human enamel teeth. Solution of 0.125% EEP has been made from propolis which was collected from honeycombs in Luwu Regency, South Sulawesi Province. Aquadest and 1% povidone iodine were used as negative and positive control. Calcium, phosphate, fluoride concentrations and pH of the solutions were also measured using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and a digital pH meter. Ninety human maxillary first incisors which extracted for periodontal reasons were used in this study. The roots of the teeth were removed at the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were randomly divided into three groups of 30 each and were immersed in aquadest solution pH 8.4 (Group I; 0.125% EEP solution pH 4.3 (Group II or 1% povidone iodine solution pH 3.0 (Group III for 21, 42, 63, and 84 minutes respectively. A Vickers Hardness Tester was used to measure enamel surface microhardness before and after immersion. Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests with significance level of 5%. The results showed that except immersed in aquadest, enamel microhardness increased after being immersed in EEP and povidone iodine solutions, although statistical analysis did not show significant differences (p>0.05 microhardness of enamel teeth before and after immersed in each group.In conclusion, immersion the teeth in 0.125% EEP solution pH 4.3 with 2.69 ppm phosphate, 1.49 ppm calcium, and 0.00 ppm fluoride concentrations for 84 minutes increased human enamel hardness in vitro.

  5. Evaluating the interaction of 308-nm xenon chloride excimer laser with human dentin and enamel hard tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Yaghmaeian-Mahabadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pulsed output of the 308 nm XeCl laser and its photoablation action rather than photothermal action offers the ability to remove dental hard tissues with minimal generation of heat in the tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 human molar teeth (ten teeth used as enamel samples and ten teeth used as dentin samples after removing the enamel tissue from their crowns were irradiated by the laser. The crown of each sample was regarded as a cube which its lateral sides were exposed in 2Hz frequency without water cooling. Also, 18 holes for all enamel samples and 18 holes for all dentin samples were obtained. Three different amounts of energy were selected as a variable factor with 6 different numbers of pulses in each energy. The images of these holes were prepared by optic and computer combining, and the amounts of the ablation depth and effective ablation area were calculated using the MATLAB software. Results: The amounts of ablation depth were increased with increasing the number of pulses for both enamel and dentin tissues. The amounts of ablation depth were also increased with increasing the amounts of energy for both enamel and dentin tissues. The greater amounts of ablation depth and effective ablation area were observed in the dentin tissue rather than the enamel tissue. The borders of created holes were reported sharp and clear. Conclusion: The application of the XeCl laser for hard tissue removal and cavity preparation can be possible after some certain modifications.

  6. Dental enamel: qualitative evaluation of the surface after application of aluminum oxide (microetching using the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA Paulo César Gomes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry nowadays can count on a wide range of resources to treat patients. With the development of adhesive materials and several newly introduced restorative techniques, the dental structure can be subjected to different sorts of surface treatment. The use of aluminum oxide flow at high speed to remove dental structure was described by Black in 1945, however, the literature regarding the use of aluminum oxide jet is still scarce, as far as the alterations occurring in the dental structure are concerned. At the present, with the development of new abrasive air equipment, microabrasion has been added to several adhesive restorative techniques, in the preparation of the dental surface and of inner surfaces of indirect restorations, which will receive the application of adhesive materials. The aim of this study was to assess the alterations produced by abrasive air applied on the dental enamel by means of electronic microscopy, taking into consideration micromorphological surface alterations. The importance of this study is based on the fact that alternative surface treatments both chemical and mechanical could be introduced in surface priming, including dental enamel priming.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of different methods of microabrasion and polishing on surface roughness of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo, Carlos; Lima, Debora; Fragoso, Larissa; Ambrosano, Glaucia; Aguiar, Flavio; Lovadino, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The microabrasion technique of enamel consists of selectively abrading the discolored areas or causing superficial structural changes in a selective way. In microabrasion technique, abrasive products associated with acids are used, and the evaluation of enamel roughness after this treatment, as well as surface polishing, is necessary. This in-vitro study evaluated the enamel roughness after microabrasion, followed by different polishing techniques. Roughness analyses were performed before microabrasion (L1), after microabrasion (L2), and after polishing (L3).Thus, 60 bovine incisive teeth divided into two groups were selected (n=30): G1- 37% phosphoric acid (37%) (Dentsply) and pumice; G2- hydrochloric acid (6.6%) associated with silicon carbide (Opalustre - Ultradent). Thereafter, the groups were divided into three sub-groups (n=10), according to the system of polishing: A - Fine and superfine granulation aluminum oxide discs (SofLex 3M); B - Diamond Paste (FGM) associated with felt discs (FGM); C - Silicone tips (Enhance - Dentsply). A PROC MIXED procedure was applied after data exploratory analysis, as well as the Tukey-Kramer test (5%). No statistical differences were found between G1 and G2 groups. L2 differed statistically from L1 and showed superior amounts of roughness. Differences in the amounts of post-polishing roughness for specific groups (1A, 2B, and 1C) arose, which demonstrated less roughness in L3 and differed statistically from L2 in the polishing system. All products increased enamel roughness, and the effectiveness of the polishing systems was dependent upon the abrasive used.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of different methods of microabrasion and polishing on surface roughness of dental enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bertoldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the Technique: The microabrasion technique of enamel consists of selectively abrading the discolored areas or causing superficial structural changes in a selective way. Objective: In microabrasion technique, abrasive products associated with acids are used, and the evaluation of enamel roughness after this treatment, as well as surface polishing, is necessary. This in-vitro study evaluated the enamel roughness after microabrasion, followed by different polishing techniques. Settings and Design: Roughness analyses were performed before microabrasion (L1, after microabrasion (L2, and after polishing (L3.Thus, 60 bovine incisive teeth divided into two groups were selected (n=30: G1- 37% phosphoric acid (37% (Dentsply and pumice; G2- hydrochloric acid (6.6% associated with silicon carbide (Opalustre - Ultradent. Thereafter, the groups were divided into three sub-groups (n=10, according to the system of polishing: A - Fine and superfine granulation aluminum oxide discs (SofLex 3M; B - Diamond Paste (FGM associated with felt discs (FGM; C - Silicone tips (Enhance - Dentsply. A PROC MIXED procedure was applied after data exploratory analysis, as well as the Tukey-Kramer test (5%. Results: No statistical differences were found between G1 and G2 groups. L2 differed statistically from L1 and showed superior amounts of roughness. Differences in the amounts of post-polishing roughness for specific groups (1A, 2B, and 1C arose, which demonstrated less roughness in L3 and differed statistically from L2 in the polishing system. Conclusion: All products increased enamel roughness, and the effectiveness of the polishing systems was dependent upon the abrasive used.

  9. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group; Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1 exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1 area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention.

  10. Wettability modification of human tooth surface by water and UV and electron-beam radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@gmail.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Coyoacan, México, D.F. (Mexico); Elefterie, Florina, E-mail: elefterie_florina@yahoo.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Beyens, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.beyens@ed.univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Maschke, Ulrich, E-mail: Ulrich.Maschke@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Brès, Etienne F., E-mail: etienne.bres@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-01

    The wettability of the human tooth enamel and dentin was analyzed by measuring the contact angles of a drop of distilled water deposited on the surface. The samples were cut along the transverse and longitudinal directions, and their surfaces were subjected to metallographic mirror-finish polishing. Some samples were also acid etched until their microstructure became exposed. Wettability measurements of the samples were done in dry and wet conditions and after ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) irradiations. The results indicate that water by itself was able to increase the hydrophobicity of these materials. The UV irradiation momentarily reduced the contact angle values, but they recovered after a short time. EB irradiation raised the contact angle and maintained it for a long time. Both enamel and dentin surfaces showed a wide range of contact angles, from approximately 10° (hydrophilic) to 90° (hydrophobic), although the contact angle showed more variability on enamel than on dentin surfaces. Whether the sample's surface had been polished or etched did not influence the contact angle value in wet conditions. - Highlights: • Human tooth surface wettability changes in dry/wet and UV/EB radiation conditions. • More variability in contact angle is observed on enamel than on dentin surfaces. • Water by itself increases the hydrophobicity of the human tooth surface. • UV irradiation reduces momentarily the human tooth surface hydrophobicity. • EB irradiation increases and maintains the hydrophobicity for a long time.

  11. Automatic method of analysis of OCT images in the assessment of the tooth enamel surface after orthodontic treatment with fixed braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    605 μm. The enamel thickness before and after the whole treatment decreased by about 125 μm. Conclusions This paper presents an automatic quantitative method for the assessment of tooth enamel thickness. This method has proven to be an effective diagnostic tool that allows evaluation of the surface and cross section of tooth enamel after orthodontic treatment with fixed thin-arched braces and proper selection of the methodology and course of treatment. PMID:24755213

  12. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and

  13. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Normal and Fluorotic Enamel After Microabrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Bassir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Ghomsheh, Elham Tabatabai; Hosseini, Zahra Malek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of surface treatments such as tooth reduction and extending the etching time on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composite resin to normal and fluorotic enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Fifty non-carious anterior teeth were classified into two groups of normal and fluorotic (n=25) using Thylstrup and Fejerskov index (TFI=4-6). Teeth in each group were treated with five modalities as follows and restored with OptiBond F...

  14. The Presence of MMP-20 Reinforces Biomimetic Enamel Regrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, S; Ruan, Q; Mukherjee, K; Nutt, S; Moradian-Oldak, J

    2018-01-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of artificial enamel is a promising strategy for the prevention and restoration of defective enamel. We have recently reported that a hydrogel system composed of chitosan-amelogenin (CS-AMEL) and calcium phosphate is effective in forming an enamel-like layer that has a seamless interface with natural tooth surfaces. Here, to improve the mechanical system function and to facilitate the biomimetic enamel regrowth, matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) was introduced into the CS-AMEL hydrogel. Inspired by our recent finding that MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside enamel crystals, we hypothesized that addition of MMP-20 to CS-AMEL hydrogel could reinforce the newly grown layer. Recombinant human MMP-20 was added to the CS-AMEL hydrogel to cleave full-length amelogenin during the growth of enamel-like crystals on an etched enamel surface. The MMP-20 proteolysis of amelogenin was studied, and the morphology, composition, and mechanical properties of the newly grown layer were characterized. We found that amelogenin was gradually degraded by MMP-20 in the presence of chitosan. The newly grown crystals in the sample treated with MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel showed more uniform orientation and greater crystallinity than the samples treated with CS-AMEL hydrogel without MMP-20. Stepwise processing of amelogenin by MMP-20 in the CS-AMEL hydrogel prevented undesirable protein occlusion within the newly formed crystals. As a result, both the modulus and hardness of the repaired enamel were significantly increased (1.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively) by the MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel. Although future work is needed to further incorporate other enamel matrix proteins into the system, this study brings us one step closer to biomimetic enamel regrowth.

  15. Study in vitro of dental enamel irradiated with a high power diode laser operating at 960 nm: morphological analysis of post-irradiation dental surface and thermal effect analysis in pulp chamber due to laser application; Estudo in vitro do esmalte dental irradiado com laser de diodo de alta potencia em 960 nm: analise morfologica da superficie dental pos-irradiada e analise do comportamento termico na camara pulpar devido a aplicacao laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto Junior, Jose

    2001-07-01

    Objectives: This study examines the structural and thermal modifications induced in dental enamel under dye assisted diode laser irradiation. The aim of this study is to verify if this laser-assisted treatment is capable to modify the enamel surface by causing fusion of the enamel surface layer. At the same time, the pulpal temperature rise must be kept low enough in order not to cause pulpar necrosis. To achieve this target, it is necessary to determine suitable laser parameters. As is known, fusion of the enamel surface followed by re-solidification produce a more acid resistant layer. This surface treatment is being researched as a new method for caries prevention. Method and Materials: A series of fourteen identically prepared enamel samples of human teeth were irradiated with a high power diode laser operating at 960 nm and using fiber delivery. Prior to irradiation, a fine layer of cromophorous ink was applied to the enamel surface. In the first part of the experiment the best parameter for pulse duration was determined. In the second part of the experimental phase the same energy density was used but with different repetition rates. During irradiation we monitored the temperature rise in the pulpal cavity. The morphology of the treated samples was analysed under SEM. Results: The morphology of the treated samples showed a homogeneously re-solidified enamel layer. The results of the temperature analysis showed a decrease of the pulpal temperature rise with decreasing repetition rate. Conclusion: With the diode laser it is possible to cause morphological alterations of the enamel surface, which is known to increase the enamel resistance against acid attack, and still maintain the temperature rise in the pulpar chamber below damage threshold. (author)

  16. Enamel-calibrated lamellar bone reveals long period growth rate variability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G; Juwayeyi, Yusuf M; Smolyar, Igor; Hu, Bin; Gomez, Santiago; Chisi, John

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian teeth exhibit incremental structures representing successive forming fronts of enamel at varying time scales, including a short daily increment called a cross striation and a long period called a stria of Retzius, the latter of which, in humans, occurs on average every 8-9 days. The number of daily increments between striae is called the repeat interval, which is the same period as that required to form one increment of bone, i.e. the lamella, the fundamental - if not archetypal - unit of bone. Lamellae of known formation time nevertheless vary in width, and thus their measures provide time-calibrated growth rate variability. We measured growth rate variability for as many as 6 years of continuously forming primary incremental lamellar bone from midshaft femur histological sections of sub-Saharan Africans of Bantu origin and known life history. We observed periodic growth rate variability in approximately 6- to 8-week intervals, and in some cases annual rhythms were visible. Endogenous biological periodicities, cycles manifest in the external environment, and/or perturbations of development are all potentially contained within growth rate variability studies of lamellar incremental patterns. Because lamellae are formed within defined periods of time, quantitative measures of widths of individual lamellae provide time-resolved growth rate variability that may reveal rhythms in human bone growth heretofore unknown. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) enhances human tongue carcinoma cells gelatinase production, migration and metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Matti; Suojanen, Juho; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Läärä, Esa; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-08-01

    Enamel matrix derivative Emdogain (EMD) is widely used in periodontal treatment to regenerate lost connective tissue and to improve the attachment of the teeth. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9) have an essential role in the promotion and progression of oral cancer growth and metastasis formation. We studied the effects of EMD on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, EMD (100 microg/ml and 200 microg/ml) remarkably induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from HSC-3 cells analysed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMD also slightly induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from benign human mucosal keratinocytes (HMK). Furthermore, EMD clearly induced the transmigration of HSC-3 cells but had no effect on the HMK migration in transwell assays. The in vitro wound closure of HSC-3 cells was notably accelerated by EMD, whereas it had only minor effect on the wound closure of HMKs. The migration of both cell lines was inhibited by a selective cyclic anti-gelatinolytic peptide CTT-2. EMD had no effect on HSC-3 cell proliferation or apoptosis and only a limited effect on cell attachment to various extracellular matrix components. The in vivo mice experiment revealed that EMD substantially induced HSC-3 xenograft metastasis formation. Our results suggest that the use of EMD for patients with oral mucosal carcinomas or premalignant lesions should be carefully considered, possibly avoided.

  18. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel; Determinacao da composicao e numero atomico efetivo do esmalte humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN), Recife, PE (Brazil); Rodas Duran, J.E. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  19. The effectiveness of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn extract gel and cocoa bean (Theobroma cacao L extract gel application against the hardness of enamel surface in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Jekti Nugroho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Nowadays several ways  have been evolved  to increase the hardness of the enamel surface as an effort to prevent caries. One of the alternatives that can be used is application of gel with herbal basic material. Material and Methods : The use of herbal basic material is preferred by people because the side effects are relatively small compared to synthetic drugs. Piper betle and cocoa beans are medicinal plants that is often used by people to inhibit caries. This is because piper betle and cocoa beans contain hardness that may influence the enamel surface. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of piper betle extract gel and cocoa bean extract gel against the hardness of enamel surface. The samples, maxillary first premolar teeth, which has been extracted and does not have caries, were divided into 3 treatment groups: piper betle extract gel, cocoa bean extract gel, and distilled water as a negative control. Each treatment group consisted of 8 samples. The samples are decoronated in cemento-enamel junction (CEJ areas and planted on orthoplast blocks with labial surface facing up. Samples were applied in labial enamel surface to 5, 15 and 35 minutes period times. Samples before and after the application in each treatment group were measured using Universal Hardness Tester. Data were collected and analyzed using ANNOVA Repeated test. Results : Showed there were significant differences (p 0.05 of enamel surface hardness before and after the application of piper betel extract gel and distilled water. Conclusion : Therefore it can be concluded that cocoa been extract gel is more effective to increase the hardness of email surface.

  20. Evaluation of enamel surface modification using PS-OCT after laser treatment to increase resistance to demineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wan; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    At laser intensities below ablation, carbonated hydroxyapatite in enamel is converted into a purer phase hydroxyapatite with increased acid resistance. Previous studies suggested the possibility of achieving the conversion without surface modification. This study attempts to evaluate the thresholds for the modification without additional changes in physical and optical properties of the enamel. Bovine specimens were irradiated using an RF-excited CO2 laser operating at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26- μs, pulse repetition rates of 100-1000 Hz, with a Gaussian spatial beam profile - 1.4 mm in diameter. After laser treatment, the samples were subjected to acid demineralization for 48 hours to simulate acidic intraoral conditions of a caries attack. The resulting demineralization and erosion were assessed using polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) and 3D digital microscopy. The images from digital microscopy demonstrated a clear delineation between laser protected zones without visual changes and zones with higher levels of demineralization and erosion. Distinct changes in the surface morphology were found within the laser treated area in accordance with the Gaussian spatial beam profile. There was significant protection from the laser in areas that were not visually altered.

  1. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Treatment of fluorosed and white-spot human enamel with calcium sucrose phosphate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Besten, P; Giambro, N

    1995-01-01

    A number of treatments have been devised to improve the appearance of fluorosed enamel. However, many of these have been empirically based, and the success of the various treatment regimens have not been quantitated. In this study, the relative whiteness of normal, mildly fluorosed, moderately fluorosed, and carious white-spot lesions on extracted teeth was quantitated by light reflectance using a Minolta Chroma Meter. The color was again determined following a number of treatment regimens to assess the potential use of various agents in treating the enamel lesions. Treatment of the enamel with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel resulted in a significantly increased whitening, which was not reduced by subsequent treatment (P calcium sucrose phosphate paste and placement in artificial saliva was most successful in returning both white-spot and fluorosed lesions to a normal color. SEM imaging of the calcium sucrose phosphate treated enamel suggests that this treatment filled the porous enamel, resulting in a normal light reflectance from the enamel.

  3. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  4. Two-dimensional patterns of human enamel thickness on deciduous (dm1, dm2) and permanent first (M1) mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    To characterise patterns of enamel thickness on deciduous (dm1, dm2) and permanent first (M1) mandibular molars and evaluate these against functional and morphological interpretative models. Histological sections of mesial and distal cusps from 69 unworn molars were produced and examined using transmitted light microscopy. Enamel cap area, dentine area, as well as average and linear measurements of enamel thickness were recorded from digital images of the sections using image analysis software. Comparisons were made along the molar row, and between the mesial and distal sections of each tooth, using univariate and multivariate inferential statistics. The enamel cap area, dentine area, and average enamel thickness increased from the anterior to the posterior molars. The greatest proportional increase in linear enamel thickness occurred between the outside surface of the lingual cusps when dm1 was compared to dm2, and between the outside surface of the buccal cusps when dm2 was compared to M1. The enamel cap area increased from the mesial to the distal sections in M1. Dentine area decreased from the mesial to distal sections in dm1. Enamel cap and dentine areas did not change across dm2. Results for the deciduous molars are interpreted within a functional model of mastication, in which the dm2 dissipates less laterally orientated loads compared to dm1. Differences in enamel thickness between dm2 and M1 support previous functional interpretations for this permanent molar. Some mesial-distal results are not easily explained from either a functional or a morphological perspective and suggest an underlying developmental constraint. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enamel matrix derivative promote primary human pulp cell differentiation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Elisabeth Aurstad; Landin, Maria A; Reppe, Sjur; Nakamura, Yukio; Lyngstadaas, Ståle Petter; Reseland, Janne E

    2014-05-05

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has been found to induce reactive dentin formation; however the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. The effect of EMD (5-50 μg/mL) on primary human pulp cells were compared to untreated cells and cells incubated with 10⁻⁸ M dexamethasone (DEX) for 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 days in culture. Expression analysis using Affymetrix microchips demonstrated that 10 μg/mL EMD regulated several hundred genes and stimulated the gene expression of proteins involved in mesenchymal proliferation and differentiation. Both EMD and DEX enhanced the expression of amelogenin (amel), and the dentinogenic markers dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSSP) and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), as well as the osteogenic markers osteocalcin (OC, BGLAP) and collagen type 1 (COL1A1). Whereas, only EMD had effect on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA expression, the stimulatory effect were verified by enhanced secretion of OC and COL1A from EMD treated cells, and increased ALP activity in cell culture medium after EMD treatment. Increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCP-1) in the cell culture medium were also found. Consequently, the suggested effect of EMD is to promote differentiation of pulp cells and increases the potential for pulpal mineralization to favor reactive dentine formation.

  6. Radiation therapy alters microhardness and microstructure of enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ligia Maria Napolitano; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra da; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the effects of ionizing radiation on the mechanical and micro-morphological properties of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. Enamel and dentin microhardness (n=12 hemi-sections) was evaluated at three depths (superficial, middle and deep) prior to (control) and after every 10Gy radiation dose up to a cumulative dose of 60Gy by means of longitudinal microhardness. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. Enamel and dentin morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for semi-quantitative analysis (n=8 hemi-sections). Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's or Fisher exact tests at a significance level of 5%. The application of ionizing radiation did not change the overall enamel microhardness, although an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. The micro-morphological analysis of enamel revealed that irradiation did not influence rod structure but interprismatic structure became more evident. Dentin microhardness decreased after 10, 20, 30, 50 and 60Gy cumulative doses (pmorphological analysis revealed fissures in the dentin structure, obliterated dentinal tubules and fragmentation of collagen fibers after 30 and 60Gy cumulative doses. Although ionizing radiation did not affect the enamel microhardness of permanent teeth as a whole, an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. Dentin microhardness decreased after almost all radiation doses compared with the control, with the greatest reduction of microhardness in the middle depth region. The morphological alterations on enamel and dentin structures increased with the increase of the radiation dose, with a more evident interprismatic portion, presence of fissures and obliterated dentinal tubules, and progressive fragmentation of the collagen fibers. This study shows that irradiation affects microhardness and micro-morphology of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. The

  7. Behavior in vitro of the dentin-enamel junction in human premolars submitted to high temperatures: prediction of the maximum temperature based on logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, C; Herrera, A; Sánchez, A I; Moreno, S; Moreno, F

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to provide scientific evidence that would permit DEJ separation to be used as a parameter to estimate the temperature to which burnt, carbonized or incinerated cadavers or human remains had been subjected. A descriptive pseudo-experimental study was carried out in vitro using cone beam tomography to determine the physical behavior of the dentine-enamel junction in 60 human premolars submitted to high temperatures (200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C and 1000°C). Spearman's concordance and correlation index was used to determine the relationship between longitudinal separation of the dentine-enamel junction (mm) and temperature (°C) and a simple linear regression model developed to show that once micro- and macrostructural changes are initiated in the enamel and dentine. The dentine-enamel junction begins to separate from the cervical towards the occlusal as temperature increases.

  8. Cellular viability and genetic expression of human gingival fibroblasts to zirconia with enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Heesu; Lee, Jung-Woo; Weber, Hans-Peter; Pae, Ahran

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biologic effects of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) with different concentrations on cell viability and the genetic expression of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) to zirconia surfaces. Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were cultured (1) without EMD, (2) with EMD 25 µg/mL, and (3) with EMD 100 µg/mL on zirconia discs. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cell proliferation activity and SEM was carried out to examine the cellular morphology and attachment. The mRNA expression of collagen type I, osteopontin, fibronectin, and TGF-β1 was evaluated with the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). From MTT assay, HGF showed more proliferation in EMD 25 µg/mL group than control and EMD 100 µg/mL group (P<.05). HGFs showed more flattened cellular morphology on the experimental groups than on the control group after 4h culture and more cellular attachments were observed on EMD 25 µg/mL group and EMD 100 µg/mL group after 24h culture. After 48h of culture, cellular attachment was similar in all groups. The mRNA expression of type I collagen increased in a concentration dependent manner. The genetic expression of osteopontin, fibronectin, and TGF-β1 was increased at EMD 100 µg/mL. However, the mRNA expression of proteins associated with cellular attachment was decreased at EMD 25 µg/mL. Through this short term culture of HGF on zirconium discs, we conclude that EMD affects the proliferation, attachment, and cell morphology of HGF cells. Also, EMD stimulates production of extracellular matrix collagen, osteopontin, and TGF-β1 in high concentration levels. With the use of EMD, protective barrier between attached gingiva and transmucosal zirconia abutment may be enhanced leading to final esthetic results with implants.

  9. The dentin-enamel junction and the fracture of human teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbeni, V.; Kruzic, J. J.; Marshall, G. W.; Marshall, S. J.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2005-03-01

    The dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), which is the interfacial region between the dentin and outer enamel coating in teeth, is known for its unique biomechanical properties that provide a crack-arrest barrier for flaws formed in the brittle enamel1. In this work, we re-examine how cracks propagate in the proximity of the DEJ, and specifically quantify, using interfacial fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness of the DEJ region. Careful observation of crack penetration through the interface and the new estimate of the DEJ toughness (~5 to 10 times higher than enamel but ~75% lower than dentin) shed new light on the mechanism of crack arrest. We conclude that the critical role of this region, in preventing cracks formed in enamel from traversing the interface and causing catastrophic tooth fractures, is not associated with the crack-arrest capabilities of the interface itself; rather, cracks tend to penetrate the (optical) DEJ and arrest when they enter the tougher mantle dentin adjacent to the interface due to the development of crack-tip shielding from uncracked-ligament bridging.

  10. Extra-high doses detected in the enamel of human teeth in the Techa riverside region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, E.A., E-mail: ElenaA.Shishkina@gmail.com [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Degteva, M.O.; Tolstykh, E.I.; Volchkova, A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 S. Kovalevsky Str, 620041 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Della Monaca, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, 00161 Rome (Italy); Istituto Regina Elena, 00144 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, 00161 Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    During the long-term study of tooth enamel by EPR dosimetry for population exposed to radiation due to contamination of the Techa River, it was found out that for some of the tooth donors the dose accumulated in tooth enamel could be as high as several tens of Gy. Such doses were absorbed only in tooth enamel and they should not be associated with exposures to other organs or the whole body. The nature of such doses was discussed in a number of previous papers where it was shown that the source of such doses is {sup 90}Sr incorporated in the calcified dental tissues. However, among specialists in radiation dosimetry who were not involved in the biokinetic studies, the nature and dosimetric significance of extra-high doses in tooth enamel are still raising questions. The aim of the current paper is to summarize the accumulated information on extra-high doses in the teeth of the Techa riverside residents, describe the dose levels observed, explain the nature of extra-high doses in the enamel and discuss their informative value. The paper includes an overview of already published findings and an analysis of information collected in the data bank of the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), Chelyabinsk, Russia, which has not been published before.

  11. Effect of 7.5% hydrogen peroxide containing remineralizing agents on hardness, color change, roughness and micromorphology of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Catelan, Anderson; Bertoldo, Eduardo dos Santos; Venâncio, Paulo César; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Marchi, Giselle M; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

    2015-10-01

    To determine the microhardness, color change, surface roughness, and micromorphology of tooth enamel submitted to bleaching treatment with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with added calcium, amorphous calcium phosphate, sodium fluoride (NaF), and hydroxyapatite (HA). 80 enamel slabs were used (n = 10). Three commercial agents [Pola Day 7.5%, Day White ACP 7.5% (DW-ACP), and White Class Calcium 7.5% (WC-Calcium)], three experimental (7.5% HP+NaF, 7.5% HP+HA, and 7.5% PH+NaF+HA), a positive control (with HP), and a negative control (without HP) groups were assessed. The commercial products were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and the experimental ones were applied for 1.5 hours daily. During and after treatment, specimens were stored in artificial saliva. Tests were performed at baseline, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). DW-ACP presented lower microhardness and HP+HA presents the highest values (P change similar to the commercial agents (P > 0.05). Overall, roughness increased with time (P agent was capable of reducing the loss of enamel microhardness due to bleaching and also present color change similar to the commercial products.

  12. Evaluation of primary tooth enamel surface morphology and microhardness after Nd:YAG laser irradiation and APF gel treatment--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Naveen Reddy; Vanaja Reddy, G; Shashikiran, N D

    2011-01-01

    Laser irradiation and fluoride has been used as a preventive tool to combat dental caries in permanent teeth, but little has been done for primary teeth which are more prone to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate microhardness alterations in the primary tooth enamel after Nd-YAG laser irradiation alone and combined with topical fluoride treatment either before or after Nd-YAG laser irradiation. Ten primary molars were sectioned and assigned randomly to: control group, Nd-YAG laser irradiation, Nd-YAG lasing before APF and APF followed by Nd-YAG lasing. The groups were evaluated for microhardness. Surface morphological changes were observed using SEM. Statistical comparisons were performed. The control group's SEM showed a relatively smooth enamel surface and lasing group had fine cracks and porosities. In the lasing + fluoride group a homogenous confluent surface was seen. In the fluoride + lasing group an irregular contour with marked crack propagation was noted. There was a significant increase in the microhardness of the treatment groups. Nd-YAG laser irradiation and combined APF treatment of the primary tooth enamel gave morphologically hardened enamel surface which can be a protective barrier against a cariogenic attack.

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Enamel Surface Treatment Using Er.Cr:YSSG and Applying Two Bondings with Current Clinical Method on A Fissure Sealant Microleakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saharkhizan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The clinical success of sealant therapy depends on its ability to pro-vide a marginal integrity resulting in micro leakage absence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel surface treatment using Er.Cr:YSSG and applying bandings with current clinical method on a fissure sealant microleakage. Material & Methods: In this experimental study 60 human premolar teeth were assigned to 3 groups according to the conditioning as follows: (1 35% phosphoric acid gel etching; (2 Er,Cr:YSSG laser + applying a self-etch adhesive; and (3 Er,Cr:YSSG laser + applying margin bond. All fissures were sealed by Helioseal F according to the manufacturer's instruc-tions. The samples were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5 degrees -55 degrees C, and im-mersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 h. After sectioning, microleakage was evalu-ated by stereomicroscope at 6x magnification. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results: No dye penetration was perceived in 20%, 15%, and 0% of cases in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively; all specimens were suffering from microleakage, in group 3. There was no statistically significant difference of microleakage scores between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.976. in group 1 were significantly lower than those of group 3 (P=0.016, and those of group 2 were lower than group 3 (P=0.009. Conclusions: The findings of this study showed that enamel conditioning prior to the place-ment of sealant by Er,Cr:YSSG laser combined with an self-etch adhesive prevent micro-leakage as effective as conventional acid etching. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (1:1-7

  14. Surface morphology of sound deciduous tooth enamel after application of a photo-absorbing cream and infrared low-level laser irradiation: an in vitro scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues; Paleari, Giovanna Souza Leão; Duarte, Danilo Antônio; Brugnera, Aldo; Soares, Cristina Pacheco

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive scanning electron microscopic study was to characterize surface alterations in deciduous tooth enamel after in vitro infrared diode laser irradiation, using a photo-absorbing agent alone and also combined with fluoride, before and after laser irradiation. Previous investigations have demonstrated increased enamel caries resistance after laser irradiation. Seven extracted or exfoliated primary molar teeth underwent soft tissue débridement and fluoride-free prophylaxis. Buccal surfaces were determined to be caries free by macroscopic examination. Sample groups were divided into: (1) control (no treatment); (2) infrared diode laser irradiation (lambda = 810 nm, 68 nm, 60 mW/mm(2), 30 W) using the photo-absorbing agent alone (IRDL + PA; 500 J/cm(2)); and (3) infrared diode laser irradiation using a photo-absorbing agent combined with 2% fluoride (IRDL + PFA; 500 J/cm(2)). Buccal surfaces were evaluated following standard scanning electron microscopy preparation techniques. Control samples of enamel surfaces were relatively smooth but presented occasional enamel prism ends. There were no areas with cavitations or surface defects. After the IRDL + PA treatment, irradiated surfaces became rough and mildly to moderately irregular with scarce enamel cavitations and without exposure of enamel prism ends. The surfaces had adherent granules and only occasional fine cracks and porosities in surface coatings were noted. After the IRDL + PFA treatment, there was a homogenous confluent surface that masked typical enamel surface markings. The surfaces had well-defined globules resulting from the IRDL + PFA treatment, that were not seen after IRDL + PA treatment. Treatment of deciduous tooth enamel with infrared diode laser irradiation using a photo-absorbing agent and a photo-absorbing agent combined with 2% fluoride created surface coatings that may act as reservoirs for mineral phases during cariogenic activity on enamel, and also provide a

  15. Surface morphological changes on the human dental enamel and cement after the Er:YAG laser irradiation at different incidence angles; Avaliacao morfologica das superficies do esmalte e do cimento dental apos a irradiacao do laser de Er:YAG em diferentes angulacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannous, Jose Trancoso

    2001-07-01

    This is a morphological analysis study through SEM of the differences of the laser tissue interaction as a function of the laser beam irradiation angle, under different parameters of energy. Fourteen freshly extracted molars stored in a 0,9% sodium chloride solution were divided in seven pairs and were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 mJ per pulse, respectively. Each sample received three enamel irradiations and three cement irradiations, either in the punctual or in the contact mode, one near to the other, with respectively 30, 45 and 90 inclinations degrees of dental surface-laser-beam incidence. Four Er:YAG pulses (2,94 {mu}m, 7-20 Hz, 0,1-1 J energy/pulse - Opus 20 - Opus Dent) with water cooling system (0,4 ml/s) were applied. After the laser irradiation the specimens were analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were analysed by SEM micrographs showing a great difference on the laser tissue interaction characteristics as a function of the irradiation angle of the laser beam. All the observations led to conclude that, considering the laser parameters used, the incidence angle variation is a very important parameter regarding the desired morphological effects. This represents an extremely relevant detail on the technical description of the Er:YAG laser irradiation protocols on dental tissues. (author)

  16. Effects of Treatment with Various Remineralizing Agents on the Microhardness of Demineralized Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh Esfahani, Kiana; Mazaheri, Romina; Pishevar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Remineralization of incipient caries is one of the goals in dental health care. The present study aimed at comparing the effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP), Remin Pro(®), and 5% sodium fluoride varnish on remineralization of enamel lesions. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 60 enamel samples were randomly allocated to six groups of 10. After four days of immersion in demineralizing solution, microhardness of all samples was measured. Afterward, groups 1-3 underwent one-time treatment with fluoride varnish, CPP-ACP, and Remin Pro(®), respectively. Microhardness of groups 4-6 was measured not only after one-month treatment with the above-mentioned materials (for eight hours a day), but also after re-exposing to the demineralizing solution. The results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA, and Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) test. Results . None of the regimens could increase microhardness in groups 1-3. However, one-month treatment regimens in groups 4-6 caused a significant increase in microhardness. The greatest microhardness was detected in the group treated with CPP-ACP (P = 0.001). In addition, although microhardness reduced following re-demineralization in all three groups, the mean reduction was minimum in the CPP-ACP-treated group (P microhardness, the remineralization potential of CPP-ACP was significantly higher than that of Remin Pro(®) and sodium fluoride varnish.

  17. The effect of enamel matrix proteins on the spreading, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts cultured on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Oates, Christine J; Molenberg, Aart; Dard, Michel; Hamilton, Douglas W

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of implant surface topography and chemistry have proven a means to enhance osseointegration, a process that ensures the stability of bone-contacting devices, including titanium dental implants. The commercial product Emdogain is an enamel matrix derivative (EMD) extracted from porcine teeth commonly used in periodontal surgery, where it has been shown to potentiate regeneration of bone. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of EMD on the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on titanium surfaces in vitro. Pickled (smooth) and SLA (roughened) titanium discs were coated with EMD or left uncoated. Primary rat calvarial osteoblasts were cultured on each surface from 1h to 4 weeks. EMD significantly increased cell spreading and proliferation at time points ranging from 3 to 7 days on both topographies. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased on EMD-coated titanium compared with titanium alone. Moreover, there was a 6 fold increase in levels of mRNA encoding bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin in osteoblasts cultured on EMD-coated titanium surfaces compared with uncoated surfaces. We conclude that coating of titanium with EMD enhances the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts irrespective of the titanium substratum topography.

  18. Quaternary dating by electron spin resonance (ESR applied to human tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvajal Eduar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR to analyse tooth enamel found at the Aguazuque archaeological site (Cundinamarca, Colombia, located on the savannah near Bogota at 4° 37' North and 74°17' West. It was presumed that the tooth enamel came from a collective burial consisting of 23 people, involving men, women and children. The tooth enamel was irradiated with gamma rays and the resulting free radicals were measured using an electron spin resonance (ESR X-band spectrometer to obtain a signal intensity compared to absorbed doses curve. Fitting this curve allowed the mean archaeological dose accumulated in the enamel during the period that it was buried to be estimated, giving a 2.10 ± 0.14 Gyvalue. ROSY software was used for estimating age, giving a mean 3,256 ± 190y before present (BP age. These results highlight EPR's potential when using the quaternary ancient ruins dating technique in Colombia and its use with other kinds of samples like stalagmites, calcite, mollusc shells and reefs.

  19. Protective effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on enamel erosion: Atomic force microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Matteo; Mirando, Maria; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (GC Tooth Mousse- TM, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) on preventing enamel erosion, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). 30 human incisors, were equally assigned to 6 groups: intact enamel, enamel + soft drink, enamel + TM, enamel + TM + soft drink, enamel + soft drink + TM, enamel + soft drink + TM + soft drink. Specimens were observed through atomic force microscopy (AFM). The most common topographical parameters were determined, such as the surface roughness (Rrms ). The use of soft drink on intact enamel has roughened the surface of the sample. The application of the CPP-ACP paste on non-treated enamel made the surface smoother. A significant decrease in roughness was seen after remineralization with CPP-ACP paste. Significant differences were recorded when comparing softened enamel with softened enamel remineralized with CPP-ACP paste. Comparing eroded enamel with demineralized/remineralized specimens, the application of a CPP-ACP paste leads to a significant reduction in roughness values. AFM images of enamel surface treated with CPP-ACP resulted in less morphological changes of the tooth substrate when compared with the only eroded enamel surface morphology; thus, indicating that CPP-ACP paste promoted remineralization. Specimens' surface roughness remained similar regardless that the protective agent is used before or after exposure to coke or between two demineralizing cycles. The results confirmed the effectiveness of the CPP-ACP paste on preventing enamel erosion produced by soft drinks. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The enamel protein amelotin is a promoter of hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbarin, Nastaran; San Miguel, Symone; Holcroft, James; Iwasaki, Kengo; Ganss, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered protein that is specifically expressed during the maturation stage of dental enamel formation. It is localized at the interface between the enamel surface and the apical surface of ameloblasts. AMTN knock-out mice have hypomineralized enamel, whereas transgenic mice overexpressing AMTN have a compact but disorganized enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) microstructure, indicating a possible involvement of AMTN in regulating HA mineralization directly. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant human (rh) AMTN dissolved in a metastable buffer system, based on light scattering measurements, promotes HA precipitation. The mineral precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Colloidal gold immunolabeling of AMTN in the mineral deposits showed that protein molecules were associated with HA crystals. The binding affinity of rh-AMTN to HA was found to be comparable to that of amelogenin, the major protein of the forming enamel matrix. Overexpression of AMTN in mouse calvaria cells also increased the formation of calcium deposits in the culture medium. Overexpression of AMTN during the secretory stage of enamel formation in vivo resulted in rapid and uncontrolled enamel mineralization. Site-specific mutagenesis of the potential serine phosphorylation motif SSEEL reduced the in vitro mineral precipitation to less than 25%, revealing that this motif is important for the HA mineralizing function of the protein. A synthetic short peptide containing the SSEEL motif was only able to facilitate mineralization in its phosphorylated form ((P)S(P) SEEL), indicating that this motif is necessary but not sufficient for the mineralizing properties of AMTN. These findings demonstrate that AMTN has a direct influence on biomineralization by promoting HA mineralization and suggest a critical role for AMTN in the formation of the compact aprismatic enamel surface layer during the maturation

  1. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) as a surface primer for biomimetic remineralization of superficial enamel defects: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Farhad; Hossein, Bagheri G; Farajollahi, Mohammad M; Fathollah, Moztarzadeh; Marjan, Behroozibakhsh; Tahereh, Jafarzadeh Kashi

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to obtain more information about the assembly of hydroxyapatite bundles formed in the presence of Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide (LRAP) and to evaluate its effect on the remineralization of enamel defects through a biomimetic approach. One or 2 mg/mL LRAP solutions containing 2.5 mM of Ca(+2) and 1.5 mM phosphate were prepared (pH = 7.2) and stored at 37 °C for 24 h. The products of the reaction were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Vickers surface microhardness recovery (SMR%) of acid-etched bovine enamel, with or without LRAP surface treatment, were calculated to evaluate the influence of peptide on the lesion remineralization. Distilled water and 1 or 2 mg/mL LRAP solution (pH = 7.2) were applied on the lesions and the specimens were incubated in mineralization solution (2.5mM Ca(+2) , 1.5mM PO4 (-3) , pH = 7.2) for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's multi-comparison tests were used for statistical analysis. The pattern of enamel surface repair was studied using FE-SEM. AFM showed the formation of highly organized hierarchical structures, composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals, similar to the dental enamel microstructure. ANOVA procedure showed significant effect of peptide treatment on the calculated SMR% (p enamel as a surface treatment agent. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Crystal Initiation Structures in Developing Enamel: Possible Implications for Caries Dissolution of Enamel Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Robinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of developing enamel crystals using Atomic and Chemical Force Microscopy (AFM, CFM have revealed a subunit structure. Subunits were seen in height images as collinear swellings about 30 nM in diameter on crystal surfaces. In friction mode they were visible as positive regions. These were similar in size (30–50 nM to collinear spherical structures, presumably mineral matrix complexes, seen in developing enamel using a freeze fracturing/freeze etching procedure. More detailed AFM studies on mature enamel suggested that the 30–50 nM structures were composed of smaller units, ~10–15 nM in diameter. These were clustered in hexagonal or perhaps a spiral arrangement. It was suggested that these could be the imprints of initiation sites for mineral precipitation. The investigation aimed at examining original freeze etched images at high resolution to see if the smaller subunits observed using AFM in mature enamel were also present in developing enamel i.e., before loss of the organic matrix. The method used was freeze etching. Briefly samples of developing rat enamel were rapidly frozen, fractured under vacuum, and ice sublimed from the fractured surface. The fractured surface was shadowed with platinum or gold and the metal replica subjected to high resolution TEM. For AFM studies high-resolution tapping mode imaging of human mature enamel sections was performed in air under ambient conditions at a point midway between the cusp and the cervical margin. Both AFM and freeze etch studies showed structures 30–50 nM in diameter. AFM indicated that these may be clusters of somewhat smaller structures ~10–15 nM maybe hexagonally or spirally arranged. High resolution freeze etching images of very early enamel showed ~30–50 nM spherical structures in a disordered arrangement. No smaller units at 10–15 nM were clearly seen. However, when linear arrangements of 30–50 nM units were visible the picture was more complex but also

  3. Type VII collagen deficiency causes defective tooth enamel formation due to poor differentiation of ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Hiroko; Akiyama, Masashi; Domon, Takanori; Nomura, Toshifumi; Shinkuma, Satoru; Ito, Kei; Asaka, Takuya; Sawamura, Daisuke; Uitto, Jouni; Uo, Motohiro; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils in the epidermal basement membrane zone. Patients with RDEB present a low oral hygiene index and prevalent tooth abnormalities with caries. We examined the tooth enamel structure of an RDEB patient by scanning electron microscopy. It showed irregular enamel prisms, indicating structural enamel defects. To elucidate the pathomechanisms of enamel defects due to COL7 deficiency, we investigated tooth formation in Col7a1(-/-) and COL7-rescued humanized mice that we have established. The enamel from Col7a1(-/-) mice had normal surface structure. The enamel calcification and chemical composition of Col7a1(-/-) mice were similar to those of the wild type. However, transverse sections of teeth from the Col7a1(-/-) mice showed irregular enamel prisms, which were also observed in the RDEB patient. Furthermore, the Col7a1(-/-) mice teeth had poorly differentiated ameloblasts, lacking normal enamel protein-secreting Tomes' processes, and showed reduced mRNA expression of amelogenin and other enamel-related molecules. These enamel abnormalities were corrected in the COL7-rescued humanized mice expressing a human COL7A1 transgene. These findings suggest that COL7 regulates ameloblast differentiation and is essential for the formation of Tomes' processes. Collectively, COL7 deficiency is thought to disrupt epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, leading to defective ameloblast differentiation and enamel malformation in RDEB patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enamel hypoplasia: A restorative approach (Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahriah Usman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect of the enamel that is produced by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects on the tooth’s surface which resulted  in a decrease  of enamel quantity. This condition, not only cause tooth become more sensitive but also affect the aesthetic result of the defect. Enamel hypoplasia can be corrected with a variety of treatment options, one of them is porcelain veneer treatment. Porcelain veneer restorations can  rehabilitate aesthetic and functional. A 19 years woman, complained premolar discolored since several years ago. Preparation of porcelain veneers in the tooth with enamel hypoplasia. The purpose of this case report is to rehabilitated the aesthetic of enamel hypoplasia with indirect veneer restoration.

  5. Influence of multi-wavelength laser irradiation of enamel and dentin surfaces at 0.355, 2.94, and 9.4 μm on surface morphology, permeability, and acid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Yuan N; Jew, Jamison M; Simon, Jacob C; Chen, Kenneth H; Lee, Robert C; Fried, William A; Cho, Jinny; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    Ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) lasers can be used to specifically target protein, water, and mineral, respectively, in dental hard tissues to produce varying changes in surface morphology, permeability, reflectivity, and acid resistance. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of laser irradiation and topical fluoride application on the surface morphology, permeability, reflectivity, and acid resistance of enamel and dentin to shed light on the mechanism of interaction and develop more effective treatments. Twelve bovine enamel surfaces and twelve bovine dentin surfaces were irradiated with various combinations of lasers operating at 0.355 (Freq.-tripled Nd:YAG (UV) laser), 2.94 (Er:YAG laser), and 9.4 μm (CO2 laser), and surfaces were exposed to an acidulated phosphate fluoride gel and an acid challenge. Changes in the surface morphology, acid resistance, and permeability were measured using digital microscopy, polarized light microscopy, near-IR reflectance, fluorescence, polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), and surface dehydration rate measurements. Different laser treatments dramatically influenced the surface morphology and permeability of both enamel and dentin. CO2 laser irradiation melted tooth surfaces. Er:YAG and UV lasers, while not melting tooth surfaces, showed markedly different surface roughness. Er:YAG irradiation led to significantly rougher enamel and dentin surfaces and led to higher permeability. There were significant differences in acid resistance among the various treatment groups. Surface dehydration measurements showed significant changes in permeability after laser treatments, application of fluoride and after exposure to demineralization. CO2 laser irradiation was most effective in inhibiting demineralization on enamel while topical fluoride was most effective for dentin surfaces. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of fluoride toothpastes on enamel demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintner Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of four different toothpastes with differing fluoride compounds on enamel remineralization. Methods A 3 × 3 mm window on the enamel surface of 90 human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 6 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. The teeth were immersed in a toothpaste slurry containing: placebo tooth paste (group 1; remineralization solution (group 2; Elmex Anticaries (group 3; Elmex Sensitive (group 4; Blend-a-med Complete (group 5 and Colgate GRF (group 6. Ten teeth of each group were used for the determination of the F- content in the superficial enamel layer and acid solubility of enamel expressed in soluble phosphorus. Of 6 teeth of each group serial sections were cut and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Results The PLM results showed an increased remineralization of the lesion body in the Elmex Anticaries, Elmex Sensitive and Colgate GRF group but not in the Blend-a-med group. A statistically significant higher Ca content was found in the Elmex Anticaries group. The fluoride content in the superficial enamel layer was significantly increased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Phosphorus solubility was significantly decreased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Conclusion It can be concluded that amine fluoride compounds in toothpastes result in a clearly marked remineralization of caries like enamel lesions followed by sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate formulations.

  7. Combining casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride: synergistic remineralization potential of artificially demineralized enamel or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayad, Iman; Sakr, Amal; Badr, Yahia

    2009-07-01

    Recaldent is a product of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP). The remineralizing potential of CPP-ACP per se, or when combined with 0.22% Fl gel on artificially demineralized enamel using laser florescence, is investigated. Mesial surfaces of 15 sound human molars are tested using a He-Cd laser beam at 441.5 nm with 18-mW power as an excitation source on a suitable setup based on a Spex 750-M monochromator provided with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) for detection of collected autofluorescence from sound enamel. Mesial surfaces are subjected to demineralization for ten days. The spectra from demineralized enamel are measured. Teeth are divided into three groups according to the remineralizing regimen: group 1 Recaldent per se, group 2 Recaldent combined with fluoride gel and ACP, and group 3 artificial saliva as a positive control. After following these protocols for three weeks, the spectra from the remineralized enamel are measured. The spectra of enamel autofluorescence are recorded and normalized to peak intensity at about 540 nm to compare spectra from sound, demineralized, and remineralized enamel surfaces. A slight red shift occurred in spectra from demineralized enamel, while a blue shift may occur in remineralized enamel. Group 2 shows the highest remineralizing potential. Combining fluoride and ACP with CPP-ACP can give a synergistic effect on enamel remineralization.

  8. Hardness and surface roughness of enamel and base layers of resin denture teeth after long-term repeated chemical disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Kurokawa, Luciana Ayumi; Procópio, Andréa Lemos Falcão; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Hotta, Juliana; Mello Lima, Jozely Francisca; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of successive cycles of disinfection in different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and the Vickers hardness of two layers of acrylic resin (base-BL and enamel-EL) of two commercial cross-linked artificial teeth. The occlusal surfaces of 60 acrylic resin denture posterior teeth (Trilux-TLX and SR Orthosit PE-SRO) embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin were ground fat with 1200-grit silicon carbide paper. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C and then submitted to the microhardness (VHN) and roughness (μm) tests. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 90 days and submitted to 720 disinfection cycles in sodium hypochlorite at 0.5%, 30% vinegar solution or distilled water (control). Afterward, micro-hardness and roughness tests were again performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Hypochlorite immersion decreased the hardness of BL and EL of SRO teeth, with an average reduction of 10.11% (p0.37). Hypochlorite promoted deleterious effects on the hardness of both layers of the artificial teeth tested. Immersion in vinegar and water also resulted in reduction of hardness of TLX teeth. The surface hardness of the different layers of cross-linked artificial teeth can be altered by daily disinfection in denture cleansers commonly indicated for removable dentures.

  9. Insular dentin formation pattern in human odontogenesis in relation to the scalloped dentino-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    This study is a first report on the modality of early dentin formation in respect to the scalloped pattern of the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). We applied scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), histological serial sections, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. TEM and SEM showed scallops and secondary scallops on the DEJ of deciduous dental primordia and on deciduous teeth with the enamel cap removed. This peculiar outline of the DEJ requires a specific dentin formation pattern; histological sections showed that dentin formation began at the brims of the scallops, seen as triangular spikes in serial sections. The dentin formation front was not uniform; instead, it was characterized by multiple, insular forming centers, as revealed by our 3D reconstructions. As thicker dentin layers formed, the islands became confluent. Factors are discussed, which may lead to crimpling of the inner enamel epithelium, and maintained as the scalloped pattern of the DEJ develops. Signaling patterns in accordance with the insular dentin formation are unknown so far.

  10. Dissolution studies of bovine dental enamel surfaces modified by high-speed scanning ablation with a lambda = 9.3-microm TEA CO(2) laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D B; Le, Charles Q; Fan, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lasers can be used to modify the chemical composition of dental enamel to render the mineral phase more resistant to acid dissolution with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Transverse excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers tuned to the strong mineral absorption of hydroxyapatite (HAP) near lambda = 9 microm are well-suited for the efficient ablation of dental hard tissues if the laser-pulse is stretched to greater than 5-10 microseconds to avoid plasma shielding phenomena. Moreover, TEA CO(2) lasers can be operated at very high repetition rates and are inherently less expensive and more versatile than Er:YAG and Er:YSGG solid-state lasers. In this study a lambda = 9.3-microm TEA CO(2) with a pulse duration of 8 microseconds and a repetition rate of 300 Hz was used to uniformly treat bovine enamel surfaces at ablative irradiation intensities. We hypothesized that a uniform surface layer of modified enamel of improved crystallinity and CaP phase composition would be formed with an enhanced resistance to acid-dissolution in the ablated areas at higher scanning rates used with the water spray. Such a modified layer of enamel formed at the base and walls of a cavity preparation under the irradiation conditions employed in this study have the potential to inhibit secondary caries under sealants and restorations. The surfaces of bovine enamel blocks (3 x 3 mm(2)) were rapidly scanned across the laser beam at rates of 2, 3, and 6 mm/second with and without a water-spray at an incident fluence of 30 J/cm(2). The resistance to acid dissolution was evaluated using controlled surface dissolution experiments on laser-irradiated and control samples. The groups irradiated at a fluence of 30 J/cm(2) with a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a high scan rate of 6 mm/second with and without water-cooling significantly reduced the overall surface dissolution rates (P enamel surface with enhanced resistance to acid dissolution is produced after

  11. Influence of photo-activation source on enamel demineralization around restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira Ferla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of the photoactivation source and restorative material on the development of caries-like lesions on human enamel after an in vitro pH challenge. Enamel cavities were prepared in 36 blocks, which were assigned to two groups according to the restorative material: resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI and composite resin (CR. Samples were exposed to quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp, argon-ion laser, or light-emitting diode (n = 6. The Knoop microhardness (KHN values of the top surface of all materials were evaluated. Restored enamel blocks were thermocycled and subjected to 10 demineralization-remineralization cycles at 37°C. KHN analysis of the superficial enamel was performed by four indentations located 100 mm from the restoration margin. The material KHN was not affected by the photoactivation source. No significant difference in KHN was noted between CR and RMGI. The enamel surface around RMGI exhibited a higher KHN (272.8 KHN than the enamel around CR (93.3 KHN, regardless of the photoactivation source. Enamel demineralization around the dental restoration was not influenced by the photoactivation source. Less enamel demineralization was observed around the RMGI than around the CR restoration.

  12. Enamel microabrasion: 10 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1995-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion was developed in the mid 1980's as a method of eliminating enamel discolouration defects and improving the appearance of teeth. Ten years after the method was developed, much has been learned about the best technique, long term results of treatment and microscopic changes to the enamel surface that have distinguishable clinical implications. In addition, certain patients can benefit from combined enamel microabrasion/tooth bleaching therapy that yields the most attractive cosmetic results. This article reviews the current status of enamel microabrasion one decade after its introduction to the profession. The latest treatment protocol is presented and photographic case histories document results of treatment. Clinical observations made over ten years are discussed.

  13. Shear bond strength to enamel of primary teeth irradiated with varying Er:YAG laser energies and SEM examination of the surface morphology: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderley, Rosimeyri L; Monghini, Elisângela M; Pecora, Jesus D; Palma-Dibb, Regina G; Borsatto, Maria C

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed to assess in vitro the influence of Er:YAG laser energy on the shear bond strength of a total-etch adhesive system to lased enamel of primary teeth, and to observe by SEM the morphological appearance of laser-ablated enamel surfaces. For the SBS test, primary canines were assigned to four groups (n = 12): a control (G1) and three groups irradiated with different Er:YAG laser energies- 60 mJ/2 Hz (G2), 80 mJ/2 Hz (G3), and 100 mJ/2 Hz (G4). In all groups, enamel surfaces were acidetched, Single Bond was applied, and resin cylinders were fabricated from Z250 resin. Bond strength was tested in shear (0.5 mm/min). For morphological analysis, 21 specimens were irradiated using the same energies, with or without acid-etching, and observed by SEM. SBS means, in MPa, were: G1-14.28 (+/-3.24); G2-18.48 (+/-4.58); G3-17.82 (+/-4.38); G4-16.59 (+/-5.40). Overall, Er:YAG laser ablation of primary teeth enamel, prior to the adhesive protocol, influenced the shear bond strength. Bond strengths recorded after irradiation with energies of 60 and 80 mJ were statistically similar among them (p > 0.05), and both were superior to those yielded by the acid-etched control group (p primary teeth enamel prior to the placement of adhesive restorative systems.

  14. The effect of time in the exposure of theobromine gel to enamel and surface hardness after demineralization with 1% citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, M. I. P.; Noerdin, A.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    Theobromine is one of the alkaloid compounds that can be found in cacao (Theobroma cacao). It is said that theobromine can prevent enamel demineralization. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of different exposure times to 200 mg/L theobromine gel on enamel microhardness after demineralization in 1% citric acid. Twenty-eight specimens of human premolar teeth were divided into four groups and were immersed in 1% citric acid (pH 4) for 2.5 minutes. Then 200 mg/L theobromine gel was exposed to the specimens for 16 minutes (n = 7), 48 minutes (n = 7), and 96 minutes (n = 7). Enamel microhardness (KHN) values were tested using the Knoop Microhardness Tester (Shimadzu, Japan) using a 50-gram load for 5 seconds. A statistical test was performed using the Friedman test, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney test. The results showed a significant decrease, of microhardness values after demineralization with 1% citric acid. There was also a significant increase in hardness (p<0.05) after exposure of the demineralized specimens to theobromine gel for 16 minutes (32.3%), 48 minutes (39.8%), and 96 minutes (43.7%). It can be concluded that exposure to 200 mg/L theobromine gel for 16, 48, and 96 minutes increased enamel microhardness.

  15. Temperature changes inside the molar pulp chamber and on the enamel and root surfaces induced by the CO2 laser beam, in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anic, Ivica; Dzubur, A.; Skala, Karolj; Sutalo, Jozo

    1993-12-01

    The application of the CO2 laser continuous wave to hard dental tissue causes temperature changes on the impact area, on the adjacent area and inside the pulp chamber. The purpose of this study was to investigate the thermal effects induced by the CO2 laser continuous wave, and the temperature flow through adjacent areas. Forty healthy molars, 15 molars with class II amalgam restoration and 10 canines with cervical caries extracted for periodontal reasons were irradiated with laser beam. On the occlusal surface the class I preparation was made just beyond the dentine-enamel junction. Temperature changes were measured at the enamel, root surface and at the cross section of the previously prepared holes 3 mm in diameter which were made 2 mm above the bifurcation level.

  16. Comparative evaluation of two different remineralizing agents on the microhardness of bleached enamel surface: Results of an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunpriya Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Both GC Tooth Mousse (Recaldent and Toothmin Tooth cream (Abbott Healthcare Pvt.Ltd increase the microhardness of bleached enamel. Toothmin tooth cream is a better agent for increasing microhardness, although difference is not significant.

  17. Remineralizing efficacy of Calcarea Fluorica tablets on the artificial carious enamel lesions using scanning electron microscope and surface microhardness testing: In vivostudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: (1 Remineralization occurred in both the groups as indicated by SEM and the increase in surface hardness values in both the groups. (2 Remineralization of enamel samples in the control group as indicated by SEM and also by increase in VHN values indicated that the saliva has a tendency of remineralizing the early carious lesions. Conclusions drawn from the study are that the calc-f tablets can be used as safe and cost effective remineralizing agent.

  18. In vitro evaluation of remineralization efficacy of different calcium- and fluoride-based delivery systems on artificially demineralized enamel surface

    OpenAIRE

    Aparajita Gangrade; Vandana Gade; Sanjay Patil; Jaykumar Gade; Deepika Chandhok; Deepa Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Caries is the most common dental disease facing the world population. Caries can be prevented by remineralizing early enamel lesions. Aim: To evaluate remineralization efficacy of stannous fluoride (SnF2), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF) and calcium sucrose phosphate (CaSP). Materials and Methods: Fifty enamel samples were taken; they were divided into five groups (n = 10). Demineralization was carried out with Groups A, B, C, and E. Remi...

  19. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Shahabi; Reza Fekrazad; Maryam Johari; Nasim Chiniforoush; Yashar Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-cariou...

  20. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical and histologic evaluation of an enamel matrix protein derivative combined with a bioactive glass for the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Keglevich, T.; Gera, I.

    2005-01-01

    The present study clinically and histologically evaluated healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with a combination of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and bioactive glass (BG) or BG alone. Six patients displaying either combined one- and two-walled (five patients) or three-walled (one

  2. Application of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to investigate trace metal spatial distributions in human tooth enamel and dentine growth layers and pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Daniel; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Goodman, Alan H. [School of Natural Science, Hampshire College, 01002, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Human tooth enamel provides a nearly permanent and chronological record of an individual's nutritional status and anthropogenic trace metal exposure during development; it might thus provide an excellent bio archive. We investigated the micro-spatial distribution of trace metals (Cu, Fe, Mg, Sr, Pb, and Zn) in 196 x 339 {mu}m{sup 2} raster pattern areas (6.6 x 10{sup 4} {mu}m{sup 2}) in a deciduous tooth using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Ablated areas include prenatal and postnatal enamel, the neonatal line, the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ), dentine, and the dentine-pulp junction. Topographic variations in the surface elemental distribution of lead, zinc, strontium, and iron intensities in a deciduous tooth revealed heterogeneous distribution within and among regions. {sup 43}Ca normalized elemental intensities showed the following order: Sr>Mg>>Zn>Pb>Fe>Cu. Elevated zinc and lead levels were present in the dental pulp region and at the neonatal line. This study demonstrates the ability of LA-ICP-MS to provide unique elemental distribution information in micro spatial areas of dental hard tissues. Elemental distribution plots could be useful in decoding nutrition and pollution information embedded in their bio apatite structure. (orig.)

  3. In vitro cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes in human dental enamel-microhardness evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Melina Mayumi; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes. Ninety-five dental fragments were obtained from nonerupted third molars. The fragments were embedded in polystyrene resin and sequentially polished with abrasive papers (400-, 600-, and 1,000-grit) and diamond pastes of 6, 3, and 1 microm. The fragments were assigned in five groups according to toothpaste treatment: G1 = Rembrandt Plus with Peroxide; G2 = Crest Dual Action Whitening; G3 = Aquafresh Whitening Triple Protection; and the control groups: G4 = Sensodyne Original (without fluoride); G5 = Sensodyne Sodium Bicarbonated (with fluoride). The initial enamel microhardness evaluations were done. For 2 weeks the fragments were submitted daily to a de-remineralization cycle followed by a 10-minute toothpaste slurry. After that, the final microhardness tests were done. The percentage of mineral loss of enamel was determined for statistical analysis. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test were applied. The results did not show statistically significant differences in mineral loss among groups G1, G2, G3, and G5, which statistically differ from G4 (toothpaste without fluoride). G4 showed the highest mineral loss (P whitening toothpastes evaluated showed a cariostatic effect similar to regular, nonwhitening toothpaste.

  4. Performance of laser fluorescence for the detection of enamel caries in non-cavitated occlusal surfaces: clinical study with total validation of the sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalos, Camilo; Mendoza, Asunción; Jimenez-Planas, Amparo; Guerrero, Elena; Chaparro, Antonio; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance of a laser fluorescence device in detecting enamel caries in non-cavitated occlusal surfaces. The sample included 96 first and second permanent molars, selected according to the criteria of Ekstrand: 44 not suspected of having dentin caries (score: 0-2) and 52 under suspicion (score: 3-4). Once measured by laser fluorescence, all teeth were validated by fissurotomy (gold standard). To avoid ethical questions, the 44 teeth (score: 0-2) used were to serve as abutments for a fixed dental prostheses. Following fissurotomy, the 52 teeth with suspected caries were treated with resin composite restorations. Kruskall-Wallis statistical analysis (PLaser fluorescence showed an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve of Az = 0.803 for enamel caries. The cut-off point with the highest sensitivity and specificity was 15, with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.97 and 0.63, respectively. Values under 10 indicated healthy teeth.

  5. Polymer coated liposomes for dental drug delivery--interactions with parotid saliva and dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S; Hiorth, M; Rykke, M; Smistad, G

    2013-09-27

    The interactions between pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva and dental enamel were studied to investigate their potential to mimic the protective biofilm formed naturally on tooth surfaces. Different pectin coated liposomes with respect to pectin type (LM-, HM- and AM-pectin) and concentration (0.05% and 0.2%) were prepared. Interactions between the pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva were studied by turbidimetry and imaging by atomic force microscopy. The liposomes were adsorbed to hydroxyapatite (HA) and human dental enamel using phosphate buffer and parotid saliva as adsorption media. A continuous flow was imposed on the enamel surfaces for various time intervals to examine their retention on the dental enamel. The results were compared to uncoated, charged liposomes. No aggregation tendencies for the pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva were revealed. This makes them promising as drug delivery systems to be used in the oral cavity. In phosphate buffer the adsorption to HA of pectin coated liposomes was significantly lower than the negative liposomes. The difference diminished in parotid saliva. Positive liposomes adsorbed better to the dental enamel than the pectin coated liposomes. However, when subjected to flow for 1h, no significant differences in the retention levels on the enamel were found between the formulations. For all formulations, more than 40% of the liposomes still remained on the enamel surfaces. At time point 20 min the retention of HM-pectin coated and positive liposomes were significantly higher. It was concluded that pectin coated liposomes can adsorb to HA as well as to the dental enamel. Their ability to retain on the enamel surfaces promotes the concept of using them as protective structures for the teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enamel thickness after preparation of tooth for porcelain laminate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Pahlevan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation the thickness of enamel in the gingival, middle, and incisal thirds of the labial surface of the anterior teeth were measured regarding preparation of the teeth for porcelain laminate veneers.Part one, 20 extracted intact human maxillary central and lateral incisors ten of each were selected. The teeth were imbedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin. Cross section was preformed through the midline of the incisal, middle and cervical one-third of the labial surface of the teeth. The samples were observed under reflected stereomicroscope and the thickness of enamel was recorded. Part II, the effect of different types of preparation on dentin exposure was evaluated. Thirty maxillary central incisor teeth were randomly divided into two groups: A: Knife-edge preparation. B: Chamfer preparation. All samples were embedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin using a silicon mold. The samples were cut through the midline of the teeth. The surface of the samples were polished and enamel and dentin were observed under the stereomicroscope.Data were analyzed by ANOVA-one way test. The results of this study showed that the least enamel thickness in the central incisor was 345 and in lateral incisor is 235 μ this thickness is related to the one-third labial cervical area. Maximum thickness in maxillary central and lateral incisors in the one-third labial incisal surface was 1260 μ and 1220μ, respectively. In the second part of the study, the tendency of dentinal exposure was shown with the chamfer preparation, but no dentinal exposure was found in the knife-edge preparation. The differences between groups were significant (p<0.05.The knowledge of enamel thickness in different part of labial surface is very important. The thickness of enamel in the gingival area does not permit a chamfer preparation. The knife edge preparation is preferable in gingival area.

  7. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around fluoride-containing dental materials during cariogenic pH cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)], E-mail: kom@den.hokudai.ac.jp; Yamamoto, H. [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [The Wakasa wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Hase, Tsuruga 914-0192 (Japan); Matsuda, Y.; Kinugawa, M.; Kijimura, T.; Sano, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Satou, T.; Oikawa, S.; Kamiya, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology, TARRI, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Using PIGE (Proton Induced Gamma Emission) technique at TARRI (Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute), Japan, we measured fluorine (F) uptake into the tooth enamel around two fluoride-containing materials during caries progression using pH cycling. Class V cavities in extracted human teeth were drilled and filled with fluoride-containing materials (i.e. 'Fuji IX' (FN) and 'UniFil flow with MEGA bond' (UF)) and a non-fluoride-containing material (i.e. 'SOLARE with MEGA bond' (SO)). Three 120 {mu}m longitudinal sections including the filling material were obtained from each tooth. In order to simulate daily acid attack occurring in the oral cavity, the pH cycling (pH 6.8-4.5) was carried out for 1, 3 and 5 weeks, separately. After pH cycling, the caries progression in all specimens was observed using transverse microradiography (TMR). The F and calcium distributions of the specimens were evaluated using PIGE and PIXE techniques. The F distribution of the specimens clearly showed the F uptake from FN into enamel adjacent to the filling material, while the F uptakes from UF and SO were not detected. For UF, the MEGA bond (non-fluoride-containing) between the tooth and UniFil flow interfered with the F absorption into the tooth. For FN, the amount of F uptake into the subsurface enamel increased during pH cycling. The amount of F uptake in 5-week pH cycling had significantly higher value compared to those in 1- and 3-week pH cycling. For UF and SO, there were no significant differences between the different durations of pH cycling. Among fluoride-containing materials, there were some differences in the F uptake with increased pH cycling, which could possibly lead to obtaining difference in clinical performance. The data obtained using PIGE and PIXE techniques were useful in understanding the benefit of fluorine by means of fluoride-containing material for preventing caries.

  8. Effect of a self-etching primer and phosphoric acid etching on the bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Hiraba, Haruto; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel. A self-etching primer that contained 4-META (Teeth Primer, TP) and 35-45% or 60-65% concentrations of phosphoric acid (K-Etchant Gel, KE, and Super Bond C&B Red Activator, RA) were used as the surface treatment agents. A methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based self-polymerizing resin (Super-Bond C&B) was used as a luting agent. The shear bond strength was determined both pre and post thermocycling. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The post-thermocycling shear bond strength of the TP group was significantly higher than that of other groups, and that of the KE group was significantly higher compared with the RA group. These results demonstrated that 4-META was effective. Furthermore, when the degree of tooth demineralization was compared, surface treatment with less demineralization using TP was the most effective treatment.

  9. Synthetic tooth enamel: SEM characterization of a fluoride hydroxyapatite coating for dentistry applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise Oliveira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative to etching enamel for retention of an adhesive is to grow crystals on the enamel surface. The potential advantages of crystal growth include easy procedure and less damage to the enamel. These crystals retain the adhesive or are the actual dental restoration. In this work, a paste of synthetic enamel was used to grow crystals of fluoride hydroxyapatite (F-HA onto the human tooth surface. This technique can be used for several dentistry applications like enamel whitening, strengthening and restoration of early carie lesions. The low cost of reagents and simplicity of the technique along with the biocompatibility of the paste render possible the utilization on the market. The samples were prepared through the application of the paste by the incremental technique. The results obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM/EDX have indicated the deposition of a homogeneous layer of calcium phosphate that was grown onto the enamel substrate. The average thickness of the deposited film was in the range of 50-100 µm and with a similar density from the natural enamel observed by radiographic images.

  10. Comparative study of the possible effect of bovine and some plant-based milk on cola-induced enamel erosion on extracted human mandibular first premolar (scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalysis evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehad M. Abd-elmonsif

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Almond milk showed better results than other types of milk used concerning Ca and P levels as well as surface morphological alternations. Soy milk showed the least enamel remineralizing effect.

  11. The measurement of enamel wear of two toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Andrew; Weader, Elizabeth; Cox, Trevor F

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the enamel abrasivity of a whitening toothpaste with a standard silica toothpaste. Polished human enamel blocks (4 x 4 mm) were indented with a Knoop diamond. The enamel blocks were attached to the posterior buccal surfaces of full dentures and worn by adult volunteers for 24 hours per day. The blocks were brushed ex vivo for 30 seconds, twice per day with the randomly assigned toothpaste (n = 10 per treatment). The products used were either a whitening toothpaste containing Perlite or a standard silica toothpaste. After four, eight and twelve weeks, one block per subject was removed and the geometry of each Knoop indent was re-measured. From the baseline and post-treatment values of indent length, the amount of enamel wear was calculated from the change in the indent depth. The mean enamel wear (sd) for the whitening toothpaste and the standard silica toothpaste after four weeks was 0.20 (0.11) and 0.14 (0.10); after 8 weeks was 0.44 (0.33) and 0.18 (0.17), and after 12 weeks was 0.60 (0.72) and 0.67 (0.77) microns respectively. After four, eight and twelve weeks, the difference in enamel wear between the two toothpastes was not of statistical significance (p > 0.05, 2 sample t-test) at any time point. The whitening toothpaste did not give a statistically significantly greater level of enamel wear as compared to a standard silica toothpaste over a 4-, 8- and 12-weeks period.

  12. Aesthetic approach for anterior teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Martos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect of the enamel that is produced by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects. Disorders that occur during the stages of enamel development and maturation reduce the amount or thickness of the enamel, resulting in white spots, tiny grooves, depressions and fissures in the enamel surface. The complexity and intensity of the dental deformity lesions will conduct the ideal treatment-associating conservative techniques. This article presents a case report of a restorative treatment of enamel hypoplasia using hybrid composite resin to mask color alteration and enamel defects. An aesthetic appearance that respects the tooth polychromatic and the self-esteem of the patient can be achieved with this approach.

  13. Effects of the enamel matrix derivative on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yuming; Ge, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    The enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has a positive effect on the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells and the healing of periodontal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of EMD on the proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) in vitro. hDPCs were isolated from human impacted third molars and cultured in vitro. After treatment with100μg/mL EMD, the proliferation of hDPCs was determined by a cell counting kit 8 (CCK8) assay. After incubation in EMD osteogenic induction medium for 14 days, the osteogenic differentiation of hDPCs was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin staining and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The EMD osteogenic induction medium enhanced the proliferation of hDPCs. After osteogenic induction, EMD increased the osteogenic potential of hDPCs, as measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium accumulation; the expression levels of osteogenesis-related genes, such as ALP, DSPP, BMP, and OPN were also upregulated. In addition, the expression levels of odontogenesis-related transcription factors Osterix and Runx2 were upregulated. EMD could enhance the mineralization of hDPSCs upregulated the expression of markers for odontoblast/osteoblast-like cells. Further studies are required to determine if EMD can improve pulp tissue repair and regeneration. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effect of orthodontic debonding and residual adhesive removal on 3D enamel microroughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Janiszewska-Olszowska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Termination of fixed orthodontic treatment is associated with bracket debonding and residual adhesive removal. These procedures increase enamel roughness to a degree that should depend on the tool used. Enamel roughening may be associated with bacterial retention and staining. However, a very limited data exists on the alteration of 3D enamel roughness resulting from the use of different tools for orthodontic clean-up. Aims 1. To perform a precise assessment of 3D enamel surface roughness resulting from residual adhesive removal following orthodontic debonding molar tubes. 2. To compare enamel surfaces resulting from the use of tungsten carbide bur, a one-step polisher and finisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Material and Methods Buccal surfaces of forty-five extracted human third molars were analysed using a confocal laser microscope at the magnification of 1080× and 3D roughness parameters were calculated. After 20 s etching, molar tubes were bonded, the teeth were stored in 0.9% saline solution for 24 hours and debonded. Residual adhesive was removed using in fifteen specimen each: a twelve-fluted tungsten carbide bur, a one-step finisher and polisher and Adhesive Residue Remover. Then, surface roughness analysis was repeated. Data normality was assessed using Shapiro–Wilk test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare between variables of normal distribution and for the latter—Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Sa (arithmetical mean height was significantly different between the groups (p = 0, 01326; the smoothest and most repeatable surfaces were achieved using Adhesive Residue Remover. Similarly, Sq (root mean square height of the scale-limited surface had the lowest and most homogenous values for Adhesive Residue Remover (p = 0, 01108. Sz (maximum height of the scale-limited surface was statistically different between the groups (p = 0, 0327, however no statistically significant differences were found concerning Ssk

  15. Effect of Bracket Base Sandblasting on Bonding of Orthodontic Brackets on Enamel Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In evaluating bond failure, considerable attention has been paid to the various factors that affect bond strength. The bracket–resin interface is the site of usual bond failure. Therefore, many efforts have been accomplished on this interface. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sandblasting on shear bond strength of three different metal brackets. Materials and Methods: For this experimental study, 180 human maxillary first and second premolars teeth were cleaned and stored in 0.1% thymol solution. The teeth were randomly assigned to either the control (n = 90 or experimental group (n = 90. Each group was subdivided into three equal groups (n = 30. In the control group, three different non-sandblasted metal brackets (American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek were bonded with 3M (Unitek no-mix resin. In the next stage of the experiment, similar brackets were sandblasted and bonded. All samples were pumiced and etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s. The teeth were embedded in blocks of autopolymerization polymethyl methacrylate, utilizing a special device to make their slots parallel to the horizontal. Samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h before testing. Shear bond testing was carried out with UTM Instron machine. Results: Mean shear bond strength of untreated groups was 15.51, 16.60, and 18.58 MPa for American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek brackets, respectively. Mean shear bond strength of sandblasted brackets was 15.8, 19.36, and 18.66 for American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek brackets, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that there was a significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between untreated and sandblasted specimens only in the Dentarum bracket groups.

  16. Effect of moist bonding on composite/enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Karlheinz; Gärtner, Thomas; Haller, Bernd

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of moist bonding on shear bond strength of resin-based composite to enamel using different adhesive systems. Six restorative systems were selected for this study: OptiBond FL/Prodigy, Solid Bond/Charisma F, Syntac Single Component/Tetric, Prime&Bond 2.1/Spectrum TPH, Single Bond/Z100, Etch&Prime 3.0/Degufill Mineral. Flat enamel surfaces were ground on the buccal and lingual aspects of 80 extracted human molars. OptiBond FL and Solid Bond were tested with and without primer application. Prior to application of the adhesives, the enamel was either carefully dried with compressed air (dry bonding) or blot dried with a cotton pellet (moist bonding). Shear bond strength was determined with a universal testing machine after 24-hour storage in 0.9% NaCl at 37 degrees C. Moist bonding did not significantly affect shear bond strength to enamel of the adhesives tested except for Solid Bond without primer application. Primer contamination of the etched enamel did not significantly influence bond strength, neither in the dry bonding nor in the moist bonding group. Of all adhesives tested in both groups, the highest mean bond strength was observed with Prime&Bond 2.1 and the lowest with Etch&Prime 3.0.

  17. The effect of a bioglass paste on enamel exposed to erosive challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Ahmed Samir; Marghalani, Hanadi Y; Amin, Omayma A; Tagami, Junji

    2014-11-01

    The current study is evaluating the effect of using a 45S5 bioglass paste and topical fluoride application on the cross sectional micro-hardness and the chemical surface changes of eroded enamel. Enamel discs were obtained from the buccal surface of one hundred extracted human non-carious third molars. The enamel surfaces were ground flat and each disc was coated with two layers of acid resistant nail varnish except for an exposed treatment window (3mm×2mm) on the buccal surface of the tooth. All specimens were challenged for 60 min by orange juice (Tropicana, Chicago, USA) pH 3.85+0.5. The specimens were divided into four groups: the 45S5 bioglass paste group, fluoride gel group (5 min application), fluoride gel group (24h application) while the rest of specimens served as control. The cross-sectional micro-hardness of 20 specimens from each group was measured. Five specimens from each group had their top eroded enamel surfaces examined by SEM-EDS. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the cross-sectional micro-hardness of the three groups pbioglass paste application significantly improved the sub-surface eroded enamel when compared to fluoride and control specimens (pbioglass paste can efficiently improve the micro-hardness of the sub-surface eroded enamel surface. The use of the 45S5 Bioglass paste can be used efficiently as a potent remineralizing agent for the sub-surface enamel lesions resulting from erosive challenges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of three whitening oral rinses on enamel micro-hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, E; Osman, Y; Grobler, S R

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect on human enamel micro-hardness of three over-the-counter whitening oral rinses available in South Africa. Enamel fragments were gathered into three groups of 15 each. One group was exposed to Colgate Plax Whitening Blancheur, the second group to White Glo 2 in 1 and the third to Plus White, in each case for periods recommended by the respective manufacturers. Surface micro-hardness of all groups was measured before and after a 14 day treatment period. pH levels of the oral rinses were also determined with a combination pH electrode. Pre- and post- treatment data were analysed by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Sum Test. According to the micro-hardness values no significant (p > 0.05) enamel damage was found as a result of treatment. However, it was observed that Colgate Pax and White Glo decreased the enamel hardness, an early sign of enamel damage, while Plus White showed a small increase in hardness. The three whitening oral rinses on the South African market do not damage the tooth enamel significantly when used as recommended by the manufacturers. However, extending the contact period and increasing the frequency of application might lead to damage of enamel.

  19. Observations on structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 5. Three-dimensional observation on ultrastructure of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1993-09-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the structural features of the biological crystals, such as the tooth and bone, using an electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of the enamel, dentin, and bone crystals at near atomic resolution and showed the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. Thereafter, based on the results of the observations by the authors of the ultrastructure of the tooth and bone crystals, thinking that it might be possible to conduct direct three-dimensional observation of the configuration composing the unit cell of the hydroxyapatite crystals, we conducted a study on this. These results indicated that it was possible to sterically observe the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the enamel crystal. The materials used for this study were the middle layer of the noncarious enamel from the freshly extracted human erupted permanent molars. The small cubes of the enamel were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification and were examined with the HITACHI H-9000 H type transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV. Each crystal was observed at an initial magnification of 500,000 times and at the final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. We sincerely believe that the electron micrographs shown in this report are the first to show three-dimensionally the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the crystal in the cross and longitudinal sections of an enamel crystal.

  20. Effects of in-office and at-home bleaching on human enamel and dentin: an in vitro application of Fourier transform infrared study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severcan, Feride; Gokduman, Kurtulus; Dogan, Ayca; Bolay, Sukran; Gokalp, Saadet

    2008-11-01

    In-office and at-home bleaching techniques are widely used methods for the whitening of teeth. However, the safety of these techniques has not been clarified yet. The aim of the current study is to investigate the in-office- and at-home-bleaching-induced structural and quantitative changes in human enamel and dentin at the molecular level, under in vitro conditions. The Fourier transform mid-infrared (mid-FT-IR) spectroscopic technique was used to monitor bleaching-induced structural changes. Band frequency and intensity values of major absorptions such as amide A, amide I, phosphate (PO(4)), and carbonate (CO(3)(-2)) bands, for treatment groups and control, were measured and compared. The results revealed that both procedures have negligible effects on dentin constituents. In office-bleached enamel, in addition to demineralization, a decrease in protein and polysaccharide concentrations, mineral-to-protein ratio, and the strength of hydrogen bonds around NH groups, as well as a change in protein secondary structure were observed. The protein structure changed from beta-sheet to random coil, which is an indication of protein denaturation. However, no significant variations were observed for at-home bleached enamel. The control, at-home, and in-office bleached enamel samples were differentiated with a high accuracy using cluster analysis based on FT-IR data. This study revealed that office bleaching caused deleterious alterations in the composition and structure of enamel that significantly affected the crystallinity and mineralization of the tissue. Therefore, at-home bleaching seems to be much safer than in-office bleaching in terms of molecular variations.

  1. Enamel pearl on an unusual location associated with localized periodontal disease: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Malhotra, Sumit; Baliga, Vidya; Hans, Manoj

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial plaque has been implicated as the primary etiologic factor in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Anatomic factors (such as enamel pearls) are often associated with advanced localized periodontal destruction. The phenomenon of ectopic development of enamel on the root surface, variedly referred to as enameloma, enamel pearl, enamel drop or enamel nodule, is not well-understood. Such an anomaly may facilitate the progression of periodontal breakdown. A rare case of enamel pearl on the lingual aspect of mandibular central incisor associated with localized periodontal disease is presented. Removal and treatment of enamel pearl along with possible mechanisms to account for the pathogenesis of ectopic enamel formation are also discussed.

  2. In situ Effect of Chewing Gum with and without CPP-ACP on Enamel Surface Hardness Subsequent to ex vivo Acid Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, M C; Alencar, C R B; Mesquita, I M; Buzalaf, M A R; Magalhães, A C; Machado, M A A M; Honório, H M; Rios, D

    2016-01-01

    The erosion-protective effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is controversial. This study aimed to investigate the ability of CPP-ACP chewing gum to prevent a single event of erosive demineralization in situ. Bovine enamel blocks (n = 120) were randomly assigned to 3 phases according to the baseline surface hardness: phase I (PI) - chewing gum with CPP-ACP, phase II (PII) - chewing gum without CPP-ACP, and control phase (PIII) - salivary effect without stimulation (no gum). Nineteen volunteers participated in this study during 3 crossover phases of 2 h. In PI and PII, the volunteers wore intraoral palatal appliances for 120 min and chewed a unit of the corresponding chewing gum for the final 30 min. In the control phase the volunteers wore the appliance for 2 h, without chewing gum. Immediately after intraoral use, the appliances were extraorally immersed in a cola drink for 5 min to promote erosive demineralization. The percentage of surface hardness loss was calculated. The data were analyzed by ANOVA models and Tukey's test. Lower enamel hardness loss was found after the use of chewing gum with CPP-ACP (PI: 32.7%) and without CPP-ACP (PII: 33.5%) compared to the salivary effect without stimulation (PIII: 39.8%) (p 0.05). The results suggest that the use of chewing gum immediately before an erosive demineralization can diminish enamel hardness loss. However, the presence of CPP-ACP in the chewing gum cannot enhance this protective effect. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Enamel demineralization after different methods of interproximal polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas F; Riepe, Esther M; Seubert, Andreas; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the demineralization rate in human enamel after interproximal polishing (IPP) and to detect possible correlations with the IPP method used, with special emphasis on the surface characteristics of the enamel being treated. This in vitro study tested five IPP systems (Profin Directional System®, Intensiv ProxoStrip®, OS discs®, ARS Safe-Tipped Bur Kit® and Ortho-Strips Set®) that are currently available on the market. Each of the five examination groups comprised 12 randomly selected teeth, while the control group consisted of six teeth. The teeth were placed in an artificial model for each group. The proximal contacts were then resolved by IPP. To allow detection of any surface characteristics, one surface was not further processed after IPP, while the other side was additionally polished. After IPP, the teeth were exposed to a pH-cycling model with alternating phases of demineralization and remineralization. Substance loss was analyzed using optical emission spectrometry. Data were subjected to simple analysis of variance (ANOVA) performed with Tukey's test. Comparison between the groups with and without polishing was conducted using the t test for independent samples. The significance level was set at p Rotor Stripping® system (ARS; 145.34 ± 20.37 μm). In all of the examination groups, subsequent polishing of the surfaces did not significantly reduce the amount of demineralization (polished 119.64 ± 28.61 μm; unpolished 114.16 ± 28.61 μm). No correlation between surface morphology and the degree of susceptibility of human enamel was detected. However, it must be taken into consideration that there was no potential bacterial colonization in this in vitro erosive set-up. Thus, in contrast to previous explanations, the outermost fluorapatite layer and the individual composition of the enamel may have a greater impact on the solubility of the enamel and the amount of enamel loss after IPP than

  4. Human tooth enamel dissolution in citric acid as a function of degree of saturation and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbour, Michele Emily

    2002-07-01

    There is increasing concern among the dental community regarding the damage caused to teeth by the acids in soft drinks. Enamel dissolution in acidic solution can be reduced by addition of calcium and/or phosphate salts to increase the degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (DS{sub HA}), or by an increase in pH. In soft drinks, however, both of these approaches are associated with a reduced taste quality. The separate effects of each parameter are not known. In the work presented here, enamel dissolution was studied in citric acid solutions with compositions typical of soft drinks. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate very early stages of enamel dissolution, with typical exposure times of 30-600 s. Preliminary investigations of the application of SIMS, ESEM and XPS to enamel dissolution studies are also reported. The individual effects of DS{sub HA}, pH and calcium and phosphate concentrations on enamel dissolution have been investigated. It was shown that there exists a threshold condition defined by calcium and phosphate concentrations and pH, below which there is considerable dissolution and a rapid dependence of dissolution rate on DS{sub HA}, and above which little or no discernible dissolution takes place. This threshold condition corresponds to a considerably undersaturated solution (DS{sub HA} {approx_equal} 0.1). However, contrary to assumptions in many enamel dissolution models in the literature, DS{sub HA} is not sufficient to predict the dissolution rate and the individual calcium and phosphate concentrations are also important. The dependence of enamel dissolution on pH is comparatively minor, with only a small change in dissolution rate for a change in pH. In terms of soft drink modification, it has been shown here that DS{sub HA} adjustment can be used to greatly reduce the rate of enamel dissolution, and that a concurrent change in pH may be superfluous. (author)

  5. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  6. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface wi...

  7. Does ozone enhance the remineralizing potential of nanohydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel? A laser induced fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Samuelraj; Prabhu, Vijendra; Chandra, Subhash; Koshy, Shalini; Acharya, Shashidhar; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-02-01

    The present era of minimal invasive dentistry emphasizes the early detection and remineralization of initial enamel caries. Ozone has been shown to reverse the initial demineralization before the integrity of the enamel surface is lost. Nano-hydroxyapatite is a proven remineralizing agent for early enamel caries. In the present study, the effect of ozone in enhancing the remineralizing potential of nano-hydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel was investigated using laser induced fluorescence. Thirty five sound human premolars were collected from healthy subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Fluorescence was recorded by exciting the mesial surfaces using 325 nm He-Cd laser with 2 mW power. Tooth specimens were subjected to demineralization to create initial enamel caries. Following which the specimens were divided into three groups, i.e ozone (ozonated water for 2 min), without ozone and artificial saliva. Remineralization regimen was followed for 3 weeks. The fluorescence spectra of the specimens were recorded from all the three experimental groups at baseline, after demineralization and remineralization. The average spectrum for each experimental group was used for statistical analysis. Fluorescence intensities of Ozone treated specimens following remineralization were higher than that of artificial saliva, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (Plaser induced fluorescence was found to be effective in assessing the surface mineral changes in enamel. Ozone can be considered an effective agent in reversing the initial enamel caries there by preventing the tooth from entering into the repetitive restorative cycle.

  8. Modelling the influence of pore size on the response of materials to infrared lasers An application to human enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, A.; Ramos, Marta M. D.

    2005-07-01

    We present an analytical model for a ceramic material (hydroxyapatite, HA) containing nanometre-scale water pores, and use it to estimate the pressure at the pore as a function of temperature at the end of a single 0.35 μs laser pulse by Er:YAG (2.94 μm) and CO 2 (10.6 μm) lasers. Our results suggest that the pressure at the pore is directly related to pore temperature, and that very high pressures can be generated simply by the thermal expansion of liquid water. Since the temperature reached in the pores at the end of the laser pulse is a strong function of pore size for Er:YAG lasers, but is independent of pore size for CO 2 lasers, our present results provide a possible explanation for the fact that human dental enamel threshold ablation fluences vary more for Er:YAG lasers than for CO 2 lasers. This suggests that experimentalists should analyse their results accounting for factors, like age or type of tooth, that may change the pore size distribution in their samples.

  9. Modelling the influence of pore size on the response of materials to infrared lasers - An application to human enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila Verde, A. [Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ramos, Marta M.D. [Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)]. E-mail: marta@fisica.uminho.pt

    2005-07-30

    We present an analytical model for a ceramic material (hydroxyapatite, HA) containing nanometre-scale water pores, and use it to estimate the pressure at the pore as a function of temperature at the end of a single 0.35 {mu}s laser pulse by Er:YAG (2.94 {mu}m) and CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) lasers. Our results suggest that the pressure at the pore is directly related to pore temperature, and that very high pressures can be generated simply by the thermal expansion of liquid water. Since the temperature reached in the pores at the end of the laser pulse is a strong function of pore size for Er:YAG lasers, but is independent of pore size for CO{sub 2} lasers, our present results provide a possible explanation for the fact that human dental enamel threshold ablation fluences vary more for Er:YAG lasers than for CO{sub 2} lasers. This suggests that experimentalists should analyse their results accounting for factors, like age or type of tooth, that may change the pore size distribution in their samples.

  10. Crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness of mandibular second bicuspids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Fernandes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To achieve proper recontouring of anterior and posterior teeth, to obtain optimal morphology during enamel stripping, it is important to be aware of dental anatomy. This study aimed at evaluating crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness in a sample of 40 extracted sound, human, mandibular, second bicuspids (20 right and 20 left. Mesiodistal, cervico-occlusal and buccolingual crown dimensions were measured using a digital caliper, accurate to 0.01 mm. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axes through the proximal surfaces to obtain 0.7 mm-thick central sections. Enamel thickness on the cut sections was measured using a perfilometer. Comparative analyses were carried out using the Student's-t test (α= 5%. The mean mesiodistal crown widths for right and left teeth were 7.79 mm (± 0.47 and 7.70 mm (± 0.51, respectively. Mean cervico-occlusal heights ranged from 8.31 mm (± 0.75 on the right to 8.38 mm (± 0.85 on the left teeth. The mean values for the buccolingual dimension were 8.67 mm (± 0.70 on the right and 8.65 mm (± 0.54 on the left teeth. The mean enamel thickness on the mesial surfaces ranged from 1.35 mm (± 0.22 to 1.40 mm (± 0.17, on the left and right sides, respectively. On the distal surfaces, the corresponding values were 1.44 mm (± 0.21 and 1.46 mm (± 0.12. No significant differences were found between measurements for right and left teeth. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces, compared with the mesial surfaces.

  11. Clinical and histologic evaluation of an enamel matrix protein derivative combined with a bioactive glass for the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Windisch, Péter; Keglevich, Tibor; Gera, István

    2005-04-01

    The present study clinically and histologically evaluated healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with a combination of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and bioactive glass (BG) or BG alone. Six patients displaying either combined one- and two-walled (five patients) or three-walled (one patient) intrabony defects around teeth scheduled for extraction were included. A notch was placed at the most apical extent of the calculus on the root surface to serve as a reference. Six months after surgery, the teeth or roots were extracted, together with some of their surrounding soft and hard tissues, and processed for histologic evaluation; a gain of clinical attachment was found in all cases. Healing in all three defects treated with EMD + BG was mainly characterized by new cementum with inserting collagen fibers and new periodontal ligament; most graft particles were surrounded by bone-like tissue, indicating ongoing mineralization. Treatment with BG resulted in epithelial down-growth and connective tissue encapsulation of the graft material in all three specimens. Reformation of cementum and periodontal ligament was observed in one of the specimens, limited to the most apical part of the defect. Formation of bone-like tissue around the graft particles was observed in only one of the three specimens treated with BG. Direct contact between the BG particles and root surface (cementum or dentin) was not observed in any of the six specimens. BG alone has low potential to facilitate periodontal regeneration. However, EMD + BG resulted in formation of new cementum with an associated periodontal ligament, as well as enhanced mineralization around the BG particles.

  12. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    OpenAIRE

    SUNDFELD,Renato Herman; SUNDFELD-NETO,Daniel; MACHADO,Lucas Silveira; FRANCO,Laura Molinar; FAGUNDES,Ticiane Cestari; BRISO,André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel m...

  13. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  14. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  15. Human tooth enamel dissolution in citric acid as a function of degree of saturation and pH

    CERN Document Server

    Barbour, M E

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing concern among the dental community regarding the damage caused to teeth by the acids in soft drinks. Enamel dissolution in acidic solution can be reduced by addition of calcium and/or phosphate salts to increase the degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (DS sub H sub A), or by an increase in pH. In soft drinks, however, both of these approaches are associated with a reduced taste quality. The separate effects of each parameter are not known. In the work presented here, enamel dissolution was studied in citric acid solutions with compositions typical of soft drinks. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate very early stages of enamel dissolution, with typical exposure times of 30-600 s. Preliminary investigations of the application of SIMS, ESEM and XPS to enamel dissolution studies are also reported. The individual effects of DS sub H sub A , pH and calcium and phosphate concentrations on enamel dissolution have been investigated. It was show...

  16. On the mechanistic role of the dentin-enamel junction in preventing the fracture of human teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbeni, V.; Kruzic, J.J.; Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2004-09-01

    The dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), which is the interface between the dentin and outer enamel coating in teeth, is known for its unique biomechanical properties that provide a crack-arrest barrier for flaws formed in the brittle enamel. In this work, we re-examine how cracks propagate in the proximity of the DEJ, and specifically quantify, using interfacial fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness of the DEJ region. Additionally, we show that the vital function of the DEJ, in preventing cracks formed in enamel from traversing the interface and causing catastrophic tooth fractures, is not necessarily associated with the crack-arrest capabilities of the DEJ itself, but rather with the development of crack-tip shielding, primarily from uncracked-ligament bridging, in the mantle dentin adjacent to the DEJ. Measurements of the toughness of the DEJ region give estimates of G{sub c} {approx} 115 J/m{sup 2}, i.e., {approx}5 to 10 times higher than enamel and {approx}75 percent of that of dentin.

  17. Enamel cracks. The role of enamel lamellae in caries initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B N; Makinson, O F; Peters, M C

    1998-04-01

    Lamellae or cracks are distributed throughout tooth enamel in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. While earlier authors postulated that lamellae may be pathways of entry for caries, no evidence was adduced and the theory appears to have been discounted. The present study seeks to show that, at least in some cases, lamellae are permeable to dyes, may be associated with caries initiated in the dentine, supporting the hypothesis of Hardwick and Manly of lamellae penetration by Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli. The enamel lamellae are shown to be a permeable pathway allowing caries-producing bacteria access to the dentine-enamel junction. Caries can thus be established within the tooth without visible evidence at the surface.

  18. Enamel Thickness After Preparation of Tooth for Porcelain Laminate

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub Pahlevan; Mansoreh Mirzaee; Esmaeil Yassine; Ladan Ranjbar Omrany; Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee; Hamid Kermanshah; Sakineh Arami; Mehdy Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this investigation the thickness of enamel in the gingival, middle, and incisal thirds of the labial surface of the anterior teeth were measured regarding preparation of the teeth for porcelain laminate veneers. Materials and Methods: Part one, 20 extracted intact human maxillary central and lateral incisors ten of each were selected. The teeth were imbedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin. Cross section was preformed through the midline of the incisal, middle and cervical one-t...

  19. The Measurement and Research of Surface Potentials of Human Tooth in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    dental hard tissue, no mater enamel , dentin or cementum, is formed mostly by the mineral, hydroxyapatite . It is soaked in the electrolyte surroundings...property made by Klein and Amberson, 1932, had suggested that the dental enamel was an electrostatic ion screen and it had permselectivity[1]. Then...developed the surface potentials of tooth. A preliminary study of the dental electrochemical property in vivo had found that the potential of enamel lesion

  20. In vitro effect of fluoride oral hygiene tablets on artificial caries lesion formation and remineralization in human enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremniczky Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this in-vitro-study was to assess the remineralization potential of a tooth cleaning tablet with different fluoride content. Methods Twenty three caries free impacted third molars were examined, enamel surfaces were wax coated leaving two 3 × 4 mm windows for exposure to demineralization/remineralization cycles. The teeth were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 5 control and 6 experimental teeth. Demineralization by standardised HEC-gel, pH 4.7 at 37°C for 72 h, was alternated by rinsing in remineralization solution, pH 7.0 at 37°C for 72 h, total challenge time 432 h. The negative control group N was treated during remineralization cycles with saline; positive control group P was treated with remineralization solution; experimental group D1 was exposed to remineralization solution containing Denttabs®-tablets with 1450 ppm F; experimental group D2 was exposed to remineralization solution and Denttabs®-tablets with 4350 ppm F. Each tooth was cut into serial sections and analyzed by polarized light microscopy for assessment of the different zones of white-spot lesions in 3 representative sections. Statistical analysis was based on the Mann-Whitney-Test. Results Both control groups N(- and P(+ exhibited characteristic white-spot lesions. The remineralization and the demineralization inhibition of the lesions increased considerably from N®-2 administration showed partial/total remineralization including lamination and/or disappearance of the body of the lesion. The different results of all 4 groups were statistically highly significant (p Conclusion Based on these results the novel Denttabs® formulation represents a highly effective oral hygiene product and the remineralization is correlated to the fluoride content.

  1. Tooth enamel oxygen "isoscapes" show a high degree of human mobility in prehistoric Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Maura; Pouncett, John; Jay, Mandy; Pearson, Mike Parker; Richards, Michael P

    2016-10-07

    A geostatistical model to predict human skeletal oxygen isotope values (δ18Op) in Britain is presented here based on a new dataset of Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age human teeth. The spatial statistics which underpin this model allow the identification of individuals interpreted as 'non-local' to the areas where they were buried (spatial outliers). A marked variation in δ18Op is observed in several areas, including the Stonehenge region, the Peak District, and the Yorkshire Wolds, suggesting a high degree of human mobility. These areas, rich in funerary and ceremonial monuments, may have formed focal points for people, some of whom would have travelled long distances, ultimately being buried there. The dataset and model represent a baseline for future archaeological studies, avoiding the complex conversions from skeletal to water δ18O values-a process known to be problematic.

  2. Tooth enamel oxygen “isoscapes” show a high degree of human mobility in prehistoric Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Maura; Pouncett, John; Jay, Mandy; Pearson, Mike Parker; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-10-01

    A geostatistical model to predict human skeletal oxygen isotope values (δ18Op) in Britain is presented here based on a new dataset of Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age human teeth. The spatial statistics which underpin this model allow the identification of individuals interpreted as ‘non-local’ to the areas where they were buried (spatial outliers). A marked variation in δ18Op is observed in several areas, including the Stonehenge region, the Peak District, and the Yorkshire Wolds, suggesting a high degree of human mobility. These areas, rich in funerary and ceremonial monuments, may have formed focal points for people, some of whom would have travelled long distances, ultimately being buried there. The dataset and model represent a baseline for future archaeological studies, avoiding the complex conversions from skeletal to water δ18O values-a process known to be problematic.

  3. The Effects of the ND:YAG Laser on In vitro Fibroblast Attachment to Endotoxin Treated Root Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Keller and Hibst (1990) and Hibst and Keller (1989) used an Er:YAG laser on dentin and enamel surfaces of human teeth . They hypothesized that vaporization...layer. Hess (1990) examined the morphologic changes of enamel after Nd:YAG laser exposure. SEM observation revealed a pockmarked surface with...Scanning electron microscnpic study of laser- induced morphologic changes of a coated enamel surface. Lasers Surg Med 10:458-462, 1990. Hibst, R. and U

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. Characterization of enamel caries lesions in rat molars using synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Free, R.D.; DeRocher, K.; Stock, S.R.; Keane, D.; Scott-Anne, K.; Bowen, W.H.; Joester, D. (Rochester); (NWU)

    2017-08-18

    Dental caries is a ubiquitous infectious disease with a nearly 100% lifetime prevalence. Rodent caries models are widely used to investigate the etiology, progression and potential prevention or treatment of the disease. To explore the suitability of these models for deeper investigations of intact surface zones during enamel caries, the structures of early-stage carious lesions in rats were characterized and compared with previous reports on white spot enamel lesions in humans. Synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography non-destructively mapped demineralization in carious rat molar specimens across a range of caries severity, identifying 52 lesions across the 30 teeth imaged. Of these lesions, 13 were shown to have intact surface zones. Depth profiles of fractional mineral density were qualitatively similar to lesions in human teeth. However, the thickness of the surface zone in the rat model ranges from 10 to 58 µm, and is therefore significantly thinner than in human enamel. These results indicate that a fraction of lesions in rat caries possess an intact surface zone and are qualitatively similar to human lesions at the micrometer scale. This suggests that rat caries models may be a suitable analog through which to investigate the structure of surface zone enamel and its role during dental caries.

  6. Enamel roughness and incidence of caries after interproximal enamel reduction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsi, V; Chatzigianni, A; Sidiropoulou, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of interproximal enamel reduction (IER) on tooth surfaces regarding the level of enamel roughness after applying different IER methods and the caries risk of treated teeth. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Two independent reviewers rated the articles at every step according to predetermined eligibility criteria. Data on enamel roughness were pooled if the same IER method was used and arithmetic values were available. Data on occurrence of caries were suitable for the analysis if the same units for caries development were used. From 2396 citations initially identified, 18 articles met the inclusion criteria and were further considered (14 studying enamel roughness and four studying the risk of caries after IER). A meta-analysis of quantitative data regarding enamel roughness was not possible due to statistical heterogeneity; instead, the enamel roughness findings are only described. The meta-analysis of studies focusing on the incidence of caries revealed no statistical difference between treated and untreated enamel surfaces (p = NS) from 1 to 7 years after IER. Drawing reliable conclusions on enamel roughness after IER is difficult owing to the diversity of the available studies. Statistically, the occurrence of caries on surfaces previously treated with IER was the same as that on intact surfaces, indicating that IER does not increase the risk of caries on treated teeth. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Morphology and structure of polymer layers protecting dental enamel against erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Markus; Reichert, Jörg; Sigusch, Bernd W; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D

    2012-10-01

    Human dental erosion caused by acids is a major factor for tooth decay. Adding polymers to acidic soft drinks is one important approach to reduce human dental erosion caused by acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the thickness and the structure of polymer layers adsorbed in vitro on human dental enamel from polymer modified citric acid solutions. The polymers propylene glycol alginate (PGA), highly esterified pectin (HP) and gum arabic (GA) were used to prepare polymer modified citric acids solutions (PMCAS, pH 3.3). With these PMCAS, enamel samples were treated for 30, 60 and 120s respectively to deposit polymer layers on the enamel surface. Profilometer scratches on the enamel surface were used to estimate the thickness of the polymer layers via atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the deposited polymer layers was investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition the polymer-enamel interaction was investigated with zeta-potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been shown that the profilometer scratch depth on the enamel with deposited polymers was in the range of 10nm (30s treatment time) up to 25nm (120s treatment time). Compared to this, the unmodified CAS-treated surface showed a greater scratch depth: from nearly 30nm (30s treatment time) up to 60nm (120s treatment time). Based on XPS measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zeta-potential measurements, a model was hypothesized which describes the layer deposited on the enamel surface as consisting of two opposing gradients of polymer molecules and hydroxyapatite (HA) particles. In this study, the structure and composition of polymer layers deposited on in vitro dental enamel during treatment with polymer modified citric acid solutions were investigated. Observations are consistent with a layer consisting of two opposing gradients of hydroxyapatite particles and polymer molecules. This leads to reduced erosive effects of

  8. Morphology of the cemento-enamel junction in premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arambawatta, Kapila; Peiris, Roshan; Nanayakkara, Deepthi

    2009-12-01

    The present study attempted to describe the distribution of the mineralized tissues that compose the cemento-enamel junction, with respect to both the different types of permanent premolars of males and females and the various surfaces of individual teeth. The cervical region of ground sections of 67 premolars that had been extracted for orthodontic reasons were analyzed using transmitted light microscopy to identify which of the following tissue interrelationships was present at the cemento-enamel junction: cementum overlapping enamel; enamel overlapping cementum; edge-to-edge relationship between cementum and enamel; or the presence of gaps between the enamel and cementum with exposed dentin. An edge-to-edge interrelation between root cementum and enamel was predominant (55.1%). In approximately one-third of the sample, gaps between cementum and enamel with exposed dentin were observed. Cementum overlapping enamel was less prevalent than previously reported, and enamel overlapping cementum was seen in a very small proportion of the sample. In any one tooth, the distribution of mineralized tissues at the cemento-enamel junction was irregular and unpredictable. The frequency of gaps between enamel and cementum with exposure of dentin was higher than previously reported, which suggests that this region is fragile and strongly predisposed to pathological changes. Hence, this region should be protected and carefully managed during routine clinical procedures such as dental bleaching, orthodontic treatment, and placement of restorative materials.

  9. Microhardness and morphological changes induced by Nd: Yag laser on dental enamel: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was a scanning electron microscopy (SEM evaluation of the hardness and morphological changes of enamel irradiated by neodymium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser with different energy levels. Twenty-eight human teeth samples were divided into 4 groups: control, where enamel surface was not lased, and 3 test treated with 3 different levels of energy power 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 Watt, respectively. In each group, 5 samples underwent Vickers microhardness test and 2 samples were processed for SEM. No significant differences between treated and non treated samples were found by micro-hardness test. However, by SEM, test samples showed a rougher enamel surface than control. Specifically, the 0.6 Watt treated samples showed vertical scratches and glass-like areas, while in the other 2 groups enamel surface was covered by craters and cracks. These findings suggest that enamel should be lased at a low energy level to preserve its integrity and reduce demineralization, and thus for dental caries prevention purposes; while high energy level creates a retentive surface suitable for sealant or composite anchorage.

  10. Enamel Regeneration - Current Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baswaraj; H.K, Navin; K.B, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Dental Enamel is the outermost covering of teeth. It is hardest mineralized tissue present in the human body. Enamel faces the challenge of maintaining its integrity in a constant demineralization and remineralization within the oral environment and it is vulnerable to wear, damage, and decay. It cannot regenerate itself, because it is formed by a layer of cells that are lost after the tooth eruption. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials to restore lost enamel that cannot mimic natural enamel. With advances in material science and understanding of basic principles of organic matrix mediated mineralization paves a way for formation of synthetic enamel. The knowledge of enamel formation and understanding of protein interactions and their gene products function along with the isolation of postnatal stem cells from various sources in the oral cavity, and the development of smart materials for cell and growth factor delivery, makes possibility for biological based enamel regeneration. This article will review the recent endeavor on biomimetic synthesis and cell based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:25386548

  11. Enamel of primary teeth--morphological and chemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is one of the most important structures of the tooth, both from a functional and esthetic point of view. Primary enamel carries registered information regarding metabolic and physiological events that occurred during the period around birth and the first year of life. Detailed knowledge of normal development and the structure of enamel is important for the assessment of mineralization defects. The aim of the thesis is to add more detailed information regarding the structure of primary enamel. The structural appearance of the neonatal line and the quantitative developmental enamel defect, enamel hypoplasia, was thoroughly investigated with a polarized light microscope, microradiography and scanning electron microscope. X-ray microanalysis of some elements was also performed across the enamel and the neonatal line. Postnatal mineralization of enamel at different ages and from different individuals was studied regarding the chemical content, by using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The enamel's response to demineralization was investigated in relation to the individual chemical content and the degree of mineralization of the enamel, by using polarized light microscope, microradiography, scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalysis. The neonatal line is a hypomineralized structure seen as a step-like rupture in the enamel matrix. The neonatal line is due to disturbances in the enamel secretion stage. The enamel prisms in the postnatal enamel appeared to be smaller than the prenatal prisms. The hypoplasias showed a rough surface at the base and no aprismatic surface layer was seen in the defect. The enamel of the rounded border of hypoplasia appeared to be hypomineralized, with the bent prisms not being densely packed. Mineralization of enamel is a gradual process, still continuous at 6 months postnatally in the primary mandibular incisors. The thickness of the buccal enamel is reached at 3-4 months of age. Demineralization of enamel depends on the

  12. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  13. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Methods: Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C–55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Padhesives tested (P=.17). Conclusion: Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested. PMID:22904656

  14. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C-55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Padhesives tested (P=.17). Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested.

  15. The effect of theobromine 200 mg/l topical gel exposure duration against surface enamel hardness resistance from 1% citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herisa, H. M.; Noerdin, A.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    Theobromine can be used to prevent the demineralization of enamel and can stimulate the growth of new enamels. This study analyzes the effect of theobromine’s gel duration exposure on enamel hardness resistance from 1% citric acid. Twenty-eight specimens were divided into three experimental groups; were exposed to theobromine gel 200 mg/l for 16, 48, and 96 minutes; and were then immersed in 1% citric acid. The control group was only immersed in 1% citric acid. Results: A Wilcoxon test showed a significant increase and decrease in enamel microhardness after exposure to theobromine gel and citric acid (p theobromine gel and immersion in citric acid (p theobromine gel 200mg/L increased enamel microhardness but did not contribute to the enamel’s hardness resistance after immersion in 1% citric acid. The duration of theobromine gel application affected enamel microhardness and acid resistance.

  16. Enamel pearl on an unusual location associated with localized periodontal disease: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shivani; Malhotra, Sumit; Baliga, Vidya; Hans, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial plaque has been implicated as the primary etiologic factor in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Anatomic factors (such as enamel pearls) are often associated with advanced localized periodontal destruction. The phenomenon of ectopic development of enamel on the root surface, variedly referred to as enameloma, enamel pearl, enamel drop or enamel nodule, is not well-understood. Such an anomaly may facilitate the progression of periodontal breakdown. A rare case of...

  17. SEM investigation of composite restoration adaptation to enamel after use of total etch and self etch adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dačić Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Quality and durability of enamel/composite interface essentially depend on an adhesive restorative system. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of marginal adaptation of composite adhesive systems to enamel by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and to analyze the morphology of the enamel surface along margins of composite restorations, following exposure to cariogenic solution. Methods The study material included 56 extracted human third molars. Class V cavities were prepared with margins at enamel. Cavities were restored with Single Bond/Z250 and Single Bond/Filtek flow, using the total etch adhesive system, and Prompt-L-Pop/Z250 and Prompt-L-Pop/Filtek flow, using the self etch adhesive system. After the restorative procedure, the restorations were submitted to demineralization during 7 and 28 days. Samples were stored in a cariogenic solution (lactic acid, pH 4.5; 0.1 M at 37°C or in deionized water (the control group. The margins of restorations and perimarginal enamel were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The gap formations around restoration were measured on cervical, occlusal and approximate margins. Results The usage of the total etch adhesive system showed statistically significant lower marginal gap width around composite restoration, compared with the self etch system (p<0.01. The SEM examination also showed perimarginal enamel zones presenting several signs of demineralization and erosion (alteration of rods, porosities after acting of a cariogenic solution, in both adhesive methods. Less alteration was found on the enamel surfaces not included in the perimarginal zone. Conclusion Treating the cavity with 35% phosphoric acid in the total etch system significantly improved the adaptation of the composite resins to enamel, compared with the self etch treatment. Stronger demineralization of the perimarginal enamel in a cariogenic solution was observed around all restorations in both

  18. Anisotropic local physical properties of human dental enamel in comparison to properties of some common dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Lars; Hartmann, Christiane D; Rödiger, Matthias; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    A major aspect in evaluating the quality of dental materials is their physical properties. Their properties should be a best fit of the ones of dental hard tissues. Manufacturers give data sheets for each material. The properties listed are characterized by a specific value. This assumes (but does not prove) that there is no direction dependence of the properties. However, dental enamel has direction-dependent properties which additionally vary with location in the tooth. The aim of this paper is to show the local direction dependence of physical properties like the elastic modulus or the thermal expansion in dental hard tissues. With this knowledge the 'perfect filling/dental material' could be characterized. Enamel sections of ∼400-500 μm thickness have been cut with a diamond saw from labial/buccal to palatal/lingual (canine, premolar and molar) and parallel to labial (incisor). Crystallite arrangements have been measured in over 400 data points on all types of teeth with x-ray scattering techniques, known from materials science. X-ray scattering measurements show impressively that dental enamel has a strong direction dependence of its physical properties which also varies with location within the tooth. Dental materials possess only little or no property direction dependence. Therefore, a mismatch was found between enamel and dental materials properties. Since dental materials should possess equal (direction depending) properties, worthwhile properties could be characterized by transferring the directional properties of enamel into a property 'wish list' which future dental materials should fulfil. Hereby the 'perfect dental material' can be characterized.

  19. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Comparison of hydroxyapatite and dental enamel for testing shear bond strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imthiaz, Nishat; Georgiou, George; Moles, David R; Jones, Steven P

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using artificial hydroxyapatite as a future biomimetic laboratory substitute for human enamel in orthodontic bond strength testing by comparing the shear bond strengths and nature of failure of brackets bonded to samples of hydroxyapatite and enamel. One hundred and fifty hydroxyapatite discs were prepared by compression at 20 tons and fired in a furnace at 1300 degrees C. One hundred and five enamel samples were prepared from the buccal and palatal/lingual surfaces of healthy premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to each sample and these were subjected to shear bond strength testing using a custom-made jig mounted in an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The force value at bond failure was obtained, together with the nature of failure which was assessed using the Adhesive Remnant Index. The mean shear bond strength for the enamel samples was 16.62 MPa (95 per cent CI: 15.26, 17.98) and for the hydroxyapatite samples 20.83 MPa (95 per cent CI: 19.68, 21.98). The difference between the two samples was statistically significant (p enamel samples scored 2 or 3, while 49 per cent of the hydroxyapatite samples scored 0 or 1. Hydroxyapatite was an effective biomimetic substrate for bond strength testing with a mean shear bond strength value (20.83 MPa) at the upper end of the normal range attributed to enamel (15-20 MPa). Although the difference between the shear bond strengths for hydroxyapatite and enamel was statistically significant, hydroxyapatite could be used as an alternative to enamel for comparative laboratory studies until a closer alternative is found. This would eliminate the need for extracted teeth to be collected. However, it should be used with caution for quantitative studies where true bond strengths are to be investigated.

  1. In vitro inhibition of bovine enamel demineralization by enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jin Mei; Ieong, Cheng Cheng; Xiang, Chen Yang; Lv, Xue Ping; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Xue Dong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ling Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) affects the demineralization of bovine enamel in vitro and to assess the agent's anti-caries potential. Bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 15 per group), which were treated with distilled water (negative control), NaF (positive control), or Emdogain. All three groups were pH-cycled 12 times over 6 days. The percentage of surface enamel microhardness reduction (%SMHR), calcium demineralization rate (CDR), surface roughness, lesion depth and mineral loss after demineralization were examined. Surface morphology of specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The Emdogain and positive control groups showed similar surface roughness, lesion depths and mineral loss, which were significantly lower than those in the negative control group. In addition, the enamel surfaces of both the Emdogain and NaF groups showed much narrower intercrystalline spaces than the surfaces of the negative control group, which exhibited extensive microfractures along the crystal edges. %SMHR differed significantly among all three groups, with the smallest value in the Emdogain group and the greatest in the negative control group. These results indicate that enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) can significantly inhibit demineralization of bovine enamel in vitro, suggesting that it has potential as an anti-caries agent. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Measurement and Research of Surface Potentials of Human Tooth in vitro

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, J

    2001-01-01

    .... To confirm the existence of the surface potentials in extracted tooth and research the development of the potentials, the surface potentials between mid-spots of enamel crown's buccal side and tooth...

  3. Microstructure and nanomechanical properties of enamel remineralized with asparagine-serine-serine peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hsiu-Ying, E-mail: hychung@mail.fcu.edu.tw; Li, Cheng Che

    2013-03-01

    A highly biocompatible peptide, triplet repeats of asparagine-serine-serine (3NSS) was designed to regulate mineral deposition from aqueous ions in saliva for the reconstruction of enamel lesions. Healthy human enamel was sectioned and acid demineralized to create lesions, then exposed to the 3NSS peptide solution, and finally immersed in artificial saliva for 24 h. The surface morphology and roughness were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the phases and crystallinity of the deposited minerals observed on the enamel surface. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to quantitatively analyze the mineral variation by calculating the relative integrated-area of characteristic bands. Nanohardness and elastic modulus measured by nanoindentation at various treatment stages were utilized to evaluate the degree of recovery. Biomimetic effects were accessed according to the degree of nanohardness recovery and the amount of hydroxyapatite deposition. The charged segments in the 3NSS peptide greatly attracted aqueous ions from artificial saliva to form hydroxyapatite crystals to fill enamel caries, in particular the interrod areas, resulting in a slight reduction in overall surface roughness. Additionally, the deposited hydroxyapatites were of a small crystalline size in the presence of the 3NSS peptide, which effectively restrained the plastic deformations and thus resulted in greater improvements in nanohardness and elastic modulus. The degree of nanohardness recovery was 5 times greater for remineralized enamel samples treated with the 3NSS peptide compared to samples without peptide treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The degree of nanohardness recovery of enamel was 4 times greater with the aid of 3NSS peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3NSS peptide promoted the formation of hydroxyapatites with

  4. Glycol chitin-based thermoresponsive hydrogel scaffold supplemented with enamel matrix derivative promotes odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jung; Li, Zhengzheng; Hwang, In-Nam; Huh, Kang Moo; Min, Kyung-San

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogels have been widely studied as tissue engineering scaffolds over the past 2 decades because of their favorable biological properties. Recently, a new biodegradable glycol chitin-based thermoresponsive hydrogel scaffold (GC-TRS) was developed that can be easily applied as a mild viscous solution at room temperature but quickly transforms into a durable hydrogel under physiological conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GC-TRS on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of colony-forming human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) in the presence of enamel matrix derivative. Glycol chitin was synthesized by N-acetylation of glycol chitosan. The morphology of the thermoresponsive hydrogel scaffold was observed by using scanning electron microscopy. The sol gel phase transition of the aqueous solution of glycol chitin was investigated by using the tilting method and rheometer studies. hDPCs were isolated based on their ability to generate clonogenic adherent cell clusters. The effect of GC-TRS and collagen on cell viability was examined by performing 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Expression of markers for odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation (ie, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osteonectin, and osteopontin) was analyzed by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction. GC-TRS exhibited a highly macroporous and well-interconnected porous structure. The polymer solution existed in a mildly viscous sol state, but it transitioned to a gel state and did not flow above approximately 37°C. Rheometer studies showed that the glycol chitin solution exhibited a fast sol gel transition approximately at body temperature. GC-TRS and collagen did not inhibit cell viability until 7 days. Dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin matrix protein-1 were expressed by cells cultured in GC-TRS at a higher level than that in cells cultured in collagen (P matrix protein-1, and osteopontin

  5. E-Cadherin Can Replace N-Cadherin during Secretory-Stage Enamel Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaomu; Bidlack, Felicitas B.; Stokes, Nicole; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. Methodology/Principal Findings The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT) and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO) mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. Conclusions/Significance The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is normally down

  6. E-cadherin can replace N-cadherin during secretory-stage enamel development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Guan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is

  7. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Abed Kahnemooyi; Amir Ahmad Ajami; Soodabeh Kimyai; Fatemeh Pournaghiazar; Siavash Savadi Oskoee; • Mohammad Ali Mhammadi Torkani

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 3...

  8. Application of periodontal tissue engineering using enamel matrix derivative and a human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute to stimulate periodontal wound healing in Class III furcation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Lawrence R; Jones, Archie A; McGuire, Michael; Mellonig, James T; Schoolfield, John; Cochran, David L

    2006-05-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has been shown to promote several aspects of periodontal regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Recently, a bioengineered tissue (DG) was developed to promote wound healing of chronic skin ulcers. This pilot study sought to assess the effects of EMD and DG, alone or in combination, on periodontal wound healing in surgically created Class III furcation defects. Six female baboons received bilateral ostectomy of approximately 10 mm around the first and second mandibular molars to achieve Class III, subclass C furcation defects. Wire ligatures and cotton pellets were left in place for 2 months to maintain the depth of the defects and promote plaque accumulation. Each furcally involved molar was then assigned to one of four treatments: open flap debridement (OFD), OFD plus EMD, OFD plus DG, or OFD plus DG and EMD. This resulted in six total sites per treatment group. Seven months after defect creation and 5 months after treatment, and after no oral hygiene, tissue blocks of the mandible were taken for blinded histometric analysis to assess parameters of periodontal regeneration adjacent to furcal root surfaces and from the mid-furcal aspect (i.e., new bone, new connective tissue attachment, new epithelial attachment, and new cementum formation). Histometric analysis demonstrated differential regenerative responses with respect to treatment within each animal. However, statistically significant differences between treatments from all six animals were not observed (P >0.20, mixed-model analysis of variance). EMD-treated sites presented mildly positive regenerative results and no negative responses. Both DG only and combination therapy demonstrated similar or less than positive responses relative to OFD controls. The descriptive analysis may suggest a positive effect of enamel matrix proteins and a negative effect of DG used alone or in combination with enamel matrix proteins on the regeneration of Class III furcation defects in baboons.

  9. Influence of trace elements on dental enamel properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Zeeshan; Haji Abdul Rahim, Zubaidah Binti; Chew, Hooi Pin; Fatima, Tayyaba

    2017-01-01

    Dental enamel, an avascular, irreparable, outermost and protective layer of the human clinical crown has a potential to withstand the physico-chemical effects and forces. These properties are being regulated by a unique association among elements occurring in the crystallites setup of human dental enamel. Calcium and phosphate are the major components (hydroxyapatite) in addition to some trace elements which have a profound effect on enamel. The current review was planned to determine the aptitude of various trace elements to substitute and their influence on human dental enamel in terms of physical and chemical properties.

  10. Regulation of dental enamel shape and hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, J P; Papagerakis, P; Smith, C E; Fisher, D C; Rountrey, A N; Zheng, L; Hu, J C C

    2010-10-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions guide tooth development through its early stages and establish the morphology of the dentin surface upon which enamel will be deposited. Starting with the onset of amelogenesis beneath the future cusp tips, the shape of the enamel layer covering the crown is determined by five growth parameters: the (1) appositional growth rate, (2) duration of appositional growth (at the cusp tip), (3) ameloblast extension rate, (4) duration of ameloblast extension, and (5) spreading rate of appositional termination. Appositional growth occurs at a mineralization front along the ameloblast distal membrane in which amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) ribbons form and lengthen. The ACP ribbons convert into hydroxyapatite crystallites as the ribbons elongate. Appositional growth involves a secretory cycle that is reflected in a series of incremental lines. A potentially important function of enamel proteins is to ensure alignment of successive mineral increments on the tips of enamel ribbons deposited in the previous cycle, causing the crystallites to lengthen with each cycle. Enamel hardens in a maturation process that involves mineral deposition onto the sides of existing crystallites until they interlock with adjacent crystallites. Neutralization of acidity generated by hydroxyapatite formation is a key part of the mechanism. Here we review the growth parameters that determine the shape of the enamel crown as well as the mechanisms of enamel appositional growth and maturation.

  11. Regulation of Dental Enamel Shape and Hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, J.P.; Papagerakis, P.; Smith, C.E.; Fisher, D.C.; Rountrey, A.N.; Zheng, L.; Hu, J.C.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions guide tooth development through its early stages and establish the morphology of the dentin surface upon which enamel will be deposited. Starting with the onset of amelogenesis beneath the future cusp tips, the shape of the enamel layer covering the crown is determined by five growth parameters: the (1) appositional growth rate, (2) duration of appositional growth (at the cusp tip), (3) ameloblast extension rate, (4) duration of ameloblast extension, and (5) spreading rate of appositional termination. Appositional growth occurs at a mineralization front along the ameloblast distal membrane in which amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) ribbons form and lengthen. The ACP ribbons convert into hydroxyapatite crystallites as the ribbons elongate. Appositional growth involves a secretory cycle that is reflected in a series of incremental lines. A potentially important function of enamel proteins is to ensure alignment of successive mineral increments on the tips of enamel ribbons deposited in the previous cycle, causing the crystallites to lengthen with each cycle. Enamel hardens in a maturation process that involves mineral deposition onto the sides of existing crystallites until they interlock with adjacent crystallites. Neutralization of acidity generated by hydroxyapatite formation is a key part of the mechanism. Here we review the growth parameters that determine the shape of the enamel crown as well as the mechanisms of enamel appositional growth and maturation. PMID:20675598

  12. Microshear bond strength of a flowable resin to enamel according to the different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ho Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (uSBS of two total-etch and four self-etch adhesive systems and a flowable resin to enamel. Materials and Methods Enamels of sixty human molars were used. They were divided into one of six equal groups (n = 10 by adhesives used; OS group (One-Step Plus, SB group (Single Bond, CE group (Clearfil SE Bond, TY group (Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus, AP group (Adper Prompt L-Pop and GB group (G-Bond. After enamel surfaces were treated with six adhesive systems, a flowable composite resin (Filek Z 350 was bonded to enamel surface using Tygon tubes. the bonded specimens were subjected to uSBS testing and the failure modes of each group were observed under FE-SEM. Results 1. The uSBS of SB group was statistically higher than that of all other groups, and the uSBS of OS, SE and AP group was statistically higher than that of TY and GB group (p < 0.05. 2. The uSBS for TY group was statistically higher than that for GB group (p < 0.05. 3. Adhesive failures in TY and GB group and mixed failures in SB group and SE group were often analysed. One cohesive failure was observed in OS, SB, SE and AP group, respectively. Conclusions Although adhesives using the same step were applied the enamel sur

  13. Supplementation of an orange juice with dietary proteins to prevent enamel and dentin erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Stella S; Scaramucci, Tais; Hara, Anderson T; Aoki, Idalina V; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita

    2015-01-01

    Protein supplementation may be an alternative to reduce the erosive potential of acidic drinks. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the erosive potential of an orange juice modified by dietary proteins. A commercially available orange juice was added 0.2 g/L casein, 2.0 g/L ovalbumin and their combination. The juice with no additives and a commercially available calcium-modified juice were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Human enamel and dentin specimens (n=11) were tested in an erosion-remineralization cycling model. Enamel was analyzed by surface microhardness and profilometry, whilst dentin by profilometry only. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (pprotein-added groups did not differ from each other (p>0.05) and showed significantly lower enamel loss compared to negative control (pprotein-added groups showed lower values of surface loss compared to negative control (p>0.05). In conclusion, for enamel the protein-modified orange juices presented reduced erosion of enamel, with casein showing a trend for better protection. For dentin, no reduction in the erosive potential was observed for the tested protein-modified orange juices.

  14. 2D mapping of texture and lattice parameters of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Steuwer, Axel; Kilcoyne, Susan H; Shore, Roger C; Cywinski, Robert; Wood, David J

    2007-06-01

    We have used synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the texture and the change in lattice parameter as a function of position in a cross section of human dental enamel. Our study is the first to map changes in preferred orientation and lattice parameter as a function of position within enamel across a whole tooth section with such high resolution. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction with a micro-focused beam spot was used to collect two-dimensional (2D) diffraction images at 150 microm spatial resolution over the entire tooth crown. Contour maps of the texture and lattice parameter distribution of the hydroxyapatite phase were produced from Rietveld refinement of diffraction patterns generated by azimuthally sectioning and integrating the 2D images. The 002 Debye ring showed the largest variation in intensity. This variation is indicative of preferred orientation. Areas of high crystallite alignment on the tooth cusps match the expected biting surfaces. Additionally we found a large variation in lattice parameter when travelling from the enamel surface to the enamel-dentine junction. We believe this to be due to a change in the chemical composition within the tooth. The results provide a new insight on the texture and lattice parameter profiles within enamel.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength of universal adhesives on etched and nonetched enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Allegretti, Jessica; Poggio, Claudio

    2016-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface pretreatment with 37% phosphoric acid on the enamel bond strength of different universal adhesives. One hundred and sixty bovine permanent mandibular incisors freshly extracted were used as a substitute for human teeth. The materials tested in this study included 6 universal adhesives, and 2 self-etch adhesives as control. The teeth were assigned into 2 groups: In the first group, etching was performed using 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds. In the second group, no pretreatment agent was applied. After adhesive application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the enamel surface by packing the material into cylindrical-shaped plastic matrices. After storing, the specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The normality of the data was calculated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine whether significant differences in debond strength values existed among the various groups. Groups with phosphoric acid pretreatment showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than groups with no enamel pretreatment (p<0.001). No significant variation in shear strength values was detected when comparing the different adhesive systems applied onto enamel after orthophosphoric acid application (p>0.05). All adhesives provide similar bond strength values when enamel pretreatment is applied even if compositions are different. Bond strength values are lower than promised by manufacturers.

  16. Enamel thickness after preparation of tooth for porcelain laminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Ayoub; Mirzaee, Mansoreh; Yassine, Esmaeil; Ranjbar Omrany, Ladan; Hasani Tabatabaee, Masumeh; Kermanshah, Hamid; Arami, Sakineh; Abbasi, Mehdy

    2014-07-01

    In this investigation the thickness of enamel in the gingival, middle, and incisal thirds of the labial surface of the anterior teeth were measured regarding preparation of the teeth for porcelain laminate veneers. Part one, 20 extracted intact human maxillary central and lateral incisors ten of each were selected. The teeth were imbedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin. Cross section was preformed through the midline of the incisal, middle and cervical one-third of the labial surface of the teeth. The samples were observed under reflected stereomicroscope and the thickness of enamel was recorded. Part II, the effect of different types of preparation on dentin exposure was evaluated. Thirty maxillary central incisor teeth were randomly divided into two groups: A: Knife-edge preparation. B: Chamfer preparation. All samples were embedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin using a silicon mold. The samples were cut through the midline of the teeth. The surface of the samples were polished and enamel and dentin were observed under the stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by ANOVA-one way test. The results of this study showed that the least enamel thickness in the central incisor was 345 and in lateral incisor is 235 μ this thickness is related to the one-third labial cervical area. Maximum thickness in maxillary central and lateral incisors in the one-third labial incisal surface was 1260 μ and 1220μ, respectively. In the second part of the study, the tendency of dentinal exposure was shown with the chamfer preparation, but no dentinal exposure was found in the knife-edge preparation. The differences between groups were significant (ppreparation. The knife edge preparation is preferable in gingival area.

  17. Intrapupal temperature variation during Er,Cr: YSGG enamel irradiation on carries prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Moreira de Freitas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown the cariostatic effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 mm laser irradiation on human enamel and have suggested its use on caries prevention. However there are still no reports on the intrapulpal temperature increase during enamel irradiation using parameters for caries prevention. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature variation in the pulp chamber during human enamel irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at different energy densities. Fifteen enamel blocks obtained from third molars (3 x 3 x 3 mm were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=5: G1 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.25 W, 20 Hz, 2.84 J/cm², G2 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.50 W, 20 Hz, 5.68 J/cm², G3 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.75 W, 20 Hz, 8.52 J/cm². During enamel irradiation, two thermocouples were fixed in the inner surface of the specimens and a thermal conducting paste was used. One-way ANOVA did not show statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (a=0.05. There was intrapulpal temperature variation <0.1ºC for all irradiation parameters. In conclusion, under the tested conditions, the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with parameters set for caries prevention lead to an acceptable temperature increase in the pulp chamber.

  18. Enamel structural changes induced by hydrochloric and phosphoric acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertacci, Angelica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Taddei, Paola; Gherlone, Enrico F; Chersoni, Stefano

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate enamel acid-induced structural changes after 2 different treatments, by means of Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy analyses, and to correlate these findings with permeability measured as fluid discharge from outer enamel. Two different treatments were investigated: 10 enamel slices were etched with 15% hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 120 seconds and 10 slices with 37% phosphoric acid gel (H3PO4) for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds and then air-dried for 20 seconds. Powders of enamel treated as previously described were produced. Replicas of enamel subjected to the same treatments were obtained to evaluate the presence of fluid droplets on enamel surface. Raman and IR spectroscopy showed that the treatment with both hydrochloric and phosphoric acids induced a decrease in the carbonate content of the enamel apatite. At the same time, both acids induced the formation of HPO42- ions. After H3PO4 treatment, the bands due to the organic component of enamel decreased in intensity, while they increased after HCl treatment. Replicas of H3PO4 treated enamel showed a strongly reduced permeability. Replicas of HCl 15% treated samples showed a maintained permeability. A decrease of the enamel organic component, as resulted after H3PO4 treatment, involves a decrease in enamel permeability, while the increase of the organic matter (achieved by HCl treatment) still maintains enamel permeability.The results suggested a correlation between organic matter and enamel permeability. Permeability was affected by etching technique and could be involved in marginal seal, gap and discoloration at the enamel interface, still causes of restoration failure.

  19. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Franco, Laura Molinar; Fagundes, Ticiane Cestari; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost...

  20. A novel approach to study in situ enamel erosion and abrasion lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablal, M A; Milosevic, A; Preston, A J; Higham, S M

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated previous hypotheses that the tongue can abrade acid softened/eroded enamel surfaces. Twelve upper removable appliances each retaining 2 anterior and 2 posterior human enamel specimens were constructed. Each specimen was exposed to acid on both surfaces, but only one surface was allowed contact with the tongue. Therefore, 96 surfaces were assessed. Appliances were worn from 9.30 to 17.00 Monday to Friday for 22days. Acid eroded lesions were created by immersing the specimens for 5min in 50ml orange juice three times daily. Enamel loss was measured using Quantitative light- induced fluorescence (QLF) and Non- contact profilometry (NCLP) and the differences (D) between tongue (Dt) and palate facing (DP) surfaces determined. %ΔFD(t-p) from the two anterior specimens were greater than from those placed posteriorly with mean values of 15.9% (±9.1) and 14.4% (±8.4), 5.6% (±8.7) and 4.5% (±6.6) respectively. Similarly, NCLP data showed anterior specimens had greater differences for mean step height (MSH) between tongue- facing and the palate- facing (control) surfaces than posterior specimens. MSHD(t-p) values were 59.4μm (±30.3) for anterior tongue facing surfaces and 55.5μm (±29.4) for posterior palate facing surfaces. For the posterior specimens MSH was 48.1μm (±26.1) and 51.7μm (±30.4) respectively (p<0.05). The greater enamel surface loss of the anterior specimens demonstrates that abrasion by the tongue on acid softened/eroded enamel in situ is likely. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Endocytosis and Enamel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Dat Pham

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enamel formation requires consecutive stages of development to achieve its characteristic extreme mineral hardness. Mineralization depends on the initial presence then removal of degraded enamel proteins from the matrix via endocytosis. The ameloblast membrane resides at the interface between matrix and cell. Enamel formation is controlled by ameloblasts that produce enamel in stages to build the enamel layer (secretory stage and to reach final mineralization (maturation stage. Each stage has specific functional requirements for the ameloblasts. Ameloblasts adopt different cell morphologies during each stage. Protein trafficking including the secretion and endocytosis of enamel proteins is a fundamental task in ameloblasts. The sites of internalization of enamel proteins on the ameloblast membrane are specific for every stage. In this review, an overview of endocytosis and trafficking of vesicles in ameloblasts is presented. The pathways for internalization and routing of vesicles are described. Endocytosis is proposed as a mechanism to remove debris of degraded enamel protein and to obtain feedback from the matrix on the status of the maturing enamel.

  2. Endocytosis and Enamel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Cong-Dat; Smith, Charles E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.; Chun, Yong-Hee P.

    2017-01-01

    Enamel formation requires consecutive stages of development to achieve its characteristic extreme mineral hardness. Mineralization depends on the initial presence then removal of degraded enamel proteins from the matrix via endocytosis. The ameloblast membrane resides at the interface between matrix and cell. Enamel formation is controlled by ameloblasts that produce enamel in stages to build the enamel layer (secretory stage) and to reach final mineralization (maturation stage). Each stage has specific functional requirements for the ameloblasts. Ameloblasts adopt different cell morphologies during each stage. Protein trafficking including the secretion and endocytosis of enamel proteins is a fundamental task in ameloblasts. The sites of internalization of enamel proteins on the ameloblast membrane are specific for every stage. In this review, an overview of endocytosis and trafficking of vesicles in ameloblasts is presented. The pathways for internalization and routing of vesicles are described. Endocytosis is proposed as a mechanism to remove debris of degraded enamel protein and to obtain feedback from the matrix on the status of the maturing enamel. PMID:28824442

  3. Enamelin Directs Crystallite Organization at the Enamel-Dentine Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S; Al-Jawad, M

    2016-05-01

    Enamel is an acellular material formed by the intricate process of amelogenesis. Disruption caused at the initial stages of development, by means of mutations in the ENAM gene encoding the enamelin protein, results in enamel hypoplasia. Little is known about the consequence of ENAM mutation on the enamel structure at a crystallographic level. The aim of this study was to characterize the structure of ENAM-mutated enamel to develop a deeper understanding of the role of enamelin protein during formation with regard to crystal organization. Synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction (SXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to measure and correlate enamel crystallography and microstructure in hypoplastic and healthy enamel. Rietveld refinement carried out on 2-dimensional diffraction patterns, collected from the Advanced Photon Source, were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) within the labial regions of each tooth slice and then correlated with the local microstructure. In general, healthy deciduous incisors displayed a higher degree of crystal organization across the labial surface in comparison with the hypoplastic enamel. ENAM plays the greatest functional role at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), as it was the region that exhibited lowest texture relative to unaffected controls. Other areas within the tooth, however, such as the cusp tip, displayed greater organization in line with healthy enamel, suggesting its effects are restricted to the early stages of enamel secretion. Observed clinically, the surface of ENAM-mutated hypoplastic enamel can appear to be normal, yet severe sub-nano and microstructural defects appear beneath the subsurface layer. Quantitative characterization of the crystallographic properties from enamel with known genotype expands the understanding of enamel formation processes and can aid better clinical diagnosis and tailor-made treatment. © International & American Associations for

  4. Considerations about enamel microabrasion after 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Croll, Theodore P; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    To review of the current status of enamel microabrasion method and its results 18 years after the development and application of this method. A technique performing enamel microabrasion with hydrochloric acid mixed with pumice and other techniques employing a commercially available compound of hydrochloric acid and fine-grit silicon carbide particles in a water-soluble paste have been described. Much has been learned about the application of this esthetic technique, long-term treatment results and microscopic changes to the enamel surface that has significant clinical implications. The latest treatment protocol is presented and photographic case histories document the treatment results. Clinical observations made over 18 years are discussed. According to our findings, the dental enamel microabrasion technique is a highly satisfactory, safe and effective procedure.

  5. Enamel morphology after microabrasion with experimental compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia I P; Costa, Rafaela; Bertoldo, Carlos E S; Aguiar, Flavio H B; Lovadino, José R; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion is an esthetic treatment for removing superficial stains or defects of enamel. This study evaluated the roughness after enamel microabrasion using experimental microabrasive systems. One hundred and ten samples (5 × 5 mm) were obtained from bovine incisors and divided into 11 groups (n = 10) in accordance with the treatment: Microabrasion using 6.6% hydrochloric acid (HCl) or 35% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) associated with aluminum oxide (AlO3) or pumice (Pum) with active application (using rubber cup coupled with a micro-motor of low rotation) or passive application (just placing the mixture on the enamel surface); just the use of acids in a passive application (negative control), and a group without treatment (positive control). Roughness analysis was performed before and after treatments. The statistical analysis used analysis of variance (PROC MIXED), Tukey-Kramer and Dunnet tests (P microabrasive systems.

  6. Interactions between dodecyl phosphates and hydroxyapatite or tooth enamel: relevance to inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Siân B; Barbour, Michele E; Shellis, R Peter; Rees, Gareth D

    2014-05-01

    Tooth surface modification is a potential method of preventing dental erosion, a form of excessive tooth wear facilitated by softening of tooth surfaces through the direct action of acids, mainly of dietary origin. We have previously shown that dodecyl phosphates (DPs) effectively inhibit dissolution of native surfaces of hydroxyapatite (the type mineral for dental enamel) and show good substantivity. However, adsorbed saliva also inhibits dissolution and DPs did not augment this effect, which suggests that DPs and saliva interact at the hydroxyapatite surface. In the present study the adsorption and desorption of potassium and sodium dodecyl phosphates or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to hydroxyapatite and human tooth enamel powder, both native and pre-treated with saliva, were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass Spectrometry. Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to analyse residual saliva and surfactant on the substrates. Both DPs showed a higher affinity than SDS for both hydroxyapatite and enamel, and little DP was desorbed by washing with water. SDS was readily desorbed from hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the phosphate head group is essential for strong binding to this substrate. However, SDS was not desorbed from enamel, so that this substrate has surface properties different from those of hydroxyapatite. The presence of a salivary coating had little or no effect on adsorption of the DPs, but treatment with DPs partly desorbed saliva; this could account for the failure of DPs to increase the dissolution inhibition due to adsorbed saliva. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Linear enamel hypoplasia as an indicator of physiological stress in great apes: reviewing the evidence in light of enamel growth variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie; Ferrell, Rebecca J; Spence, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Physiological stress, such as malnutrition or illness, can disrupt normal enamel growth, resulting in linear enamel hypoplasias (LEHs). Although ecological factors may contribute to LEH expression, other factors, such as surface abrasion and enamel growth variables, are also likely to be involved. Attention to these other factors is necessary before we can begin to understand what LEH might signify in terms of ecological sources of physiological stress in non-human primates. This study focuses on assessing the contribution of these other factors to variation in LEH expression within and across great ape taxa. Here, we present LEH data from unabraded crown regions in samples of seven great ape species. We analyze these data with respect to lateral enamel formation time and the angles that striae of Retzius make with the enamel surface, as these variables are expected to affect variation in LEH expression. We find that although the duration of enamel formation is associated with sex differences in LEH expression, it is not clearly related to taxonomic variation in LEH expression, and does not explain the low frequency of LEH in mountain gorillas found in this and a previous study. Our data on striae of Retzius angles suggest that these influence LEH expression along the tooth crown and may contribute to the consistently high frequencies of LEH seen in Pongo in this and previous studies. We suggest that future work aimed at understanding species variation in these angles is crucial to evaluating taxonomic patterns of LEH expression in great apes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Use of the laser for welding cracks on the dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammour, S; Carleer, M; Renneboog-Squilbin, C; Dourov, N

    1987-03-01

    An all line argon laser beam of initial power 2W (4000W/cm2-800 J/cm2, after focusing), was used to weld enamel cracks on extracted human teeth. The welding, observed with the naked eye, caused a small heightening in the welded area which was whiter in color than the rest of the enamel. Examinations were performed on the outer surface of the welding with an inverted metallurgical microscope and using a microdurometer. Sections were then made and studied, on the one hand with a light microscope, and on the other using microradiographical methods. The welding was seen to reach across half the enamel thickness. The possibilities for therapeutic applications of this work are discussed.

  9. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    OpenAIRE

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of t...

  10. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  11. Influence of a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 9.4  μm on the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance of dental enamel below the threshold for melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wan; Lee, Raymond; Chan, Kenneth H; Jew, Jamison M; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Below the threshold for laser ablation, the mineral phase of enamel is converted into a purer phase hydroxyapatite with increased acid resistance. Studies suggest the possibility of achieving the conversion without visible surface alteration. In this study, changes in the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance were monitored with varying irradiation intensity. Bovine enamel specimens were irradiated using a CO 2 laser operating at 9.4 ?? ? m with a Gaussian spatial beam profile—1.6 to 3.1 mm in diameter. After laser treatment, samples were subjected to demineralization to simulate the acidic intraoral conditions of dental decay. The resulting demineralization and erosion were assessed using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography, three-dimensional digital microscopy, and polarized light microscopy. Distinct changes in the surface morphology and the degree of inhibition were found within the laser-treated area in accordance with the laser intensity profile. Subtle visual changes were noted below the melting point for enamel that appear to correspond to thresholds for denaturation of the organic phase and thermal decomposition of the mineral phase. There was significant protection from laser irradiation in areas in which the reflectivity was not increased significantly, suggesting that aesthetically sensitive areas of the tooth can be treated for caries prevention.

  12. Influence of a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 9.4 μm on the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance of dental enamel below the threshold for melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wan; Lee, Raymond; Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Below the threshold for laser ablation, the mineral phase of enamel is converted into a purer phase hydroxyapatite with increased acid resistance. Studies suggest the possibility of achieving the conversion without visible surface alteration. In this study, changes in the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance were monitored with varying irradiation intensity. Bovine enamel specimens were irradiated using a CO2 laser operating at 9.4 μm with a Gaussian spatial beam profile-1.6 to 3.1 mm in diameter. After laser treatment, samples were subjected to demineralization to simulate the acidic intraoral conditions of dental decay. The resulting demineralization and erosion were assessed using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography, three-dimensional digital microscopy, and polarized light microscopy. Distinct changes in the surface morphology and the degree of inhibition were found within the laser-treated area in accordance with the laser intensity profile. Subtle visual changes were noted below the melting point for enamel that appear to correspond to thresholds for denaturation of the organic phase and thermal decomposition of the mineral phase. There was significant protection from laser irradiation in areas in which the reflectivity was not increased significantly, suggesting that aesthetically sensitive areas of the tooth can be treated for caries prevention.

  13. Penetration of Filled and Unfilled Resin Sealants on Different Enamel Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Moreira, Kelly Maria Silva; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Nociti, Francisco Humberto; Machado Tabchoury, Cinthia P; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the penetration ratio of filled and unfilled resin-based sealants on different enamel substrates and pit and fissure morphologies. Forty-eight occlusal enamel blocks obtained from impacted human third molars were randomly divided (n equals eight) according to enamel substrates (sound; caries-like lesion; caries-like lesion plus topical fluoride application) and sealant material (FluroShield; Helioseal Clear Chroma). Sealants were applied on the enamel surface. The specimens were stored in 100 percent humidity for 24 hours at 37 degrees Celsius, sectioned in a buccal-lingual direction (at approximately 50 μm), and examined to determine the sealant penetration ratio (b x 100/a; a equals total fissure length and b equals sealant penetration length) and pit and fissure morphology (V-, U-, or Y-shaped). Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests (Ppenetration ratio, with no interactions between these factors. Moreover, the morphology significantly affected the sealant penetration, with the "Y"-shaped fissures presenting the lowest sealant penetration ratio compared to "U-"shaped (P=0.0001) and "V-" shaped fissures (P=0.0018). Pit and fissure morphology was a critical factor on sealant's penetration capacity; however, enamel substrate and sealant type did not affect sealant's penetration ratio.

  14. Effect of adhesive resin flexibility on enamel fracture during metal bracket debonding: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kyung; Park, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2015-10-01

    To test the null hypothesis that neither the flexural properties of orthodontic adhesive resins nor the enamel pre-treatment methods would affect metal bracket debonding behaviours, including enamel fracture. A dimethacrylate-based resin (Transbond XT, TX) and two methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based resins (Super-Bond C&B, SB; an experimental light-cured resin, EXP) were tested. Flexural strength and flexural modulus for each resin were measured by a three-point-bending test. Metal brackets were bonded to human enamel pretreated with total-etch (TE) or self-etch adhesive using one of the three resins (a total of six groups, n = 15). After 24 hours of storage in water at 37°C, a shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using the wire loop method. After debonding, remaining resin on the enamel surfaces and occurrence of enamel fracture were assessed. Statistical significance was set at P 0.05), except for the TE-TX group (13.51MPa, P bracket debonding. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effects of a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and various prophylaxis polishing pastes on tooth enamel and restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, David A; Barnes, Caren; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W

    2011-01-01

    The application of cleaning and polishing agents to a patient's dentition is a routine part of many dental practices. This study measured the surface roughness and surface gloss of tooth enamel, composite resin, and dental porcelain restorative materials when exposed to a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup as well as a conventional prophylaxis polishing paste. Samples of human tooth enamel, a composite resin restorative material, and dental porcelain were prepared by a series of polishing papers to produce a flat smooth surface. The baseline average surface roughness (Ra) was measured using a contact stylus profilometer, and the surface gloss was measured with a glossmeter. The test samples were subjected to a standardized polishing routine using a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and a fine- or coarse-particle prophylaxis paste. Post-treatment surface roughness and gloss measurements were compared using a paired t statistical test. The conventional prophylaxis pastes increased surface roughness and decreased the gloss of the composite resin and tooth enamel test groups. The paste-free cups did not significantly affect the surface roughness of the enamel or the restorative materials. Dental porcelain surface roughness essentially was not affected by the application of paste-free cups and the fine and coarse pastes.

  16. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  17. Active application of primer acid on acid-treated enamel: Influence on the bond effectiveness of self-etch adhesives systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Costa, Daiane Cristianismo; Bosso, Mariana Avalone; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the composite-to-enamel bond after passive or active application of self-etching primer systems on polished or pre-etched enamel with phosphoric acid. Two self-etch adhesives systems (SEAS) were used: Clearfil SE Bond and Easy Bond. Third human molars were divided into 8 groups (N = 10). The crown of each tooth was sectioned into halves and the mesial/distal surfaces were used. The adhesives were actively or passively applied on enamel with or without prior phosphoric-acid etching. Resin composite cylinders were built after adhesive application. After stored in relative humidity for 24 hr/37°C the specimens were subjected to microshear test in universal testing a machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under SEM. The 2-step SEAS system presented significantly higher adhesive bond strength means (47.37 MPa) than the 1-step (36.87 MPa). A poor enamel- etching pattern was observed in active mode showing irregular and short resin tags, however there was not compromised the bond strength. Active or passive application produced similar values of bond strength to enamel regardless of enamel pretreatment and type of SEAS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Methods for the measurement and characterization of erosion in enamel and dentine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlueter, N; Hara, A; Shellis, R P; Ganss, C

    2011-01-01

    .... The most suitable and most widely used methods are: chemical analyses of mineral release and enamel surface hardness for early erosion, and surface profilometry and microradiography for advanced...

  19. Changes in surface content and crystal structure after fluoride gel or hydroxyapatite paste application on stripped enamel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Sang-Cheol; Hong, Hyun-Sil; Hwang, Young-Cheol

    2008-01-01

    .... Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to compare the change of surface contents and crystal structures before and after the application of fluoride gel or hydroxyapatite paste...

  20. Impact of Crest Night Effects bleaching gel on dental enamel, dentin and key restorative materials. In vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R; Duschner, Heinz J; Goetz, Hermann

    2003-11-01

    To examine the effects of a paint-on 19% sodium percarbonate 'overnight' bleaching gel on the structure and integrity of enamel, dentin and some common restorative materials, with a laboratory cycling model. Enamel, root dentin and restorative materials (glass-ionomer, composite and amalgam) were prepared in methacrylate molds with surface polishing. A treatment regimen was carried out including diurnal incubation in pooled human saliva and including twice daily toothbrushing with standard fluoridated dentifrice. Test samples were treated daily with Crest Night Effects bleaching gel, which included drying of surfaces, painting of percarbonate bleaching gel, and then incubation throughout the day (8 hours) to simulate overnight wear. Treatments were carried out over 14 days, to simulate clinical exposure periods. Control and test specimens were evaluated for surface and subsurface structure and morphological integrity utilizing surface microhardness, surface profilometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Percarbonate bleaching film treatments had no effects on enamel or root dentin surface microhardness, or on subsurface ultrastructural integrity of enamel and coronal dentin. Surface profilometry confirmed retention of small amounts of residual silicone polymers, which contributed to CLSM air objective appearance and surface roughness measures. Restoratives were generally passive to bleaching gel treatments, though composite showed a tendency to attract retained residual silicone film.

  1. Modification of dentin surface to enamel-like structure: A potential strategy for improving dentin bonding durability, desensitizing and self-repairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongye Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Current theories of dentin bonding are based on the concept of "hybrid layer". However, the histological complexity of dentin, as well as the vulnerability of the hybrid layer, goes against the long-term effect of dentin bonding. At the same time, post-operative sensitivity is more likely to occur after traditional adhesive restoration. The Hypothesis: Compared to dentin bonding, enamel bonding exhibits a more optimal immediate and long-term performance, owing to its higher degree of mineralization, well-arranged enamel crystals and the porous structure after etching. Moreover, "enamel hypersensitivity" is never going to happen due to the lack of tubules existing in dentin. In light of this phenomenon, we brought up the concept and the proposal method to form an "enamel-like" dentin, simulating enamel structure to achieve satisfying durability of dentin bonding and obtain good performance for preventing post-operative sensitivity. With the application of mesoporous silicon bi-directionally binding to hydroxyapatite of dentin itself and hydroxyapatite nanorods synthetized in vitro, we may be able to form an enamel-like "functional layer" via ion-regulating self-assembly. Evaluation of Hypothesis: This paper explains how to achieve dentin enamel-like modification by chemical methods, especially, details the strategies and possible mechanisms of the hypothesis. Validation of the hypothesis is more likely to eliminate the adverse effect of dentinal fluid, improve long-term performance of dentin bonding, offer strategies for desensitizing treatment and self-repairing carious-affected dentin, and furthermore, provide the possibility to introduce new theories of dentin bonding.

  2. Comparative evaluation of microhardness and morphology of permanent tooth enamel surface after laser irradiation and fluoride treatment - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Puneet; Goswami, Mridula; Dhillon, Jatinder Kaur; Rehman, Ferah; Thakkar, Deepti; Bharti, Kusum

    2016-10-01

    Background and aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the surface microhardness and surface morphology of permanent tooth enamel after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and Fluoride application. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were used in the study and randomly divided into 6 groups. Group A was not subjected to any treatment. Group B was subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. Group C was subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation followed by application of 2% NaF gel for 4 minutes. Group D was subjected to laser irradiation and 1.23% APF gel for 4 minutes. Group E was subjected to 2% NaF gel pretreatment technique followed by laser irradiation. Group F was subjected to 1.23% APF gel pretreatment technique followed by laser irradiation. All the test groups were subjected to microhardness testing and scanning electron microscope evaluation at 500 X and 1500 X. Results: All the treated groups showed an increase in microhardness value in comparison to the control group. The highest increase in microhardness was seen in Group F. Increase in microhardness values of Group B and Group D was not statistically significant as compared to Group A. Scanning Electron Micrographs showed few craters and fine porosities for Group A. These craters and porosities increased in size and often showed glass like appearance after laser irradiation. Conclusions: It can be suggested by means of present study that Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation alone or in combination with fluoride gel is an effective tool to provide resistance against the caries. Significantly higher resistance (p< 0.05) was seen when APF gel was used prior to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and this combination can act as an efficient tool for prevention against dental caries.

  3. Caries risk after interproximal enamel reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarjoura, Karim; Gagnon, Genevieve; Nieberg, Lewis

    2006-07-01

    Air-rotor stripping (ARS) is a commonly used method to alleviate crowding in the permanent dentition. Its widespread acceptance, however, has been limited by the potential increase in caries risk of the abraded enamel surface. The aim of this study was to compare the susceptibility of ARS-treated enamel surfaces with intact surfaces in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy. Forty patients treated with ARS were examined clinically and radiographically for caries 1 to 6 years after interproximal enamel reduction. All patients were seen by their dentists for prophylaxis at 6-month intervals during active orthodontic treatment and were exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Topical fluoride agents or sealants were not applied on the abraded surface after any ARS session. Caries incidence was compared between ARS-treated and unaltered surfaces within subjects. The decayed, missing, filled tooth (DMFT) and surface (DMFS) scores were used to evaluate the subjects' overall caries risk. Totals of 376 test and 376 control surfaces were examined. The number of interproximal lesions detected was found to be low with no statistically significant difference detected between the groups (test = 3; control = 6; P = .33]. The DMFT and DMFS scores increased significantly during the study period, indicating that these patients were clearly at risk of tooth decay (P caries is not affected by ARS. Furthermore, our data show that the application of topical fluoride on the enamel surfaces immediately after ARS in patients exposed to fluoridated water and fluoride-containing toothpaste may not provide any additional benefit.

  4. Oral biofilm and caries-infiltrant interactions on enamel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tawakoli, Pune N; Attin, Thomas; Mohn, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    ...-infiltrated enamel [4–6] , only very little is known about the interaction of oral microflora with resin-infiltrated enamel. It is known that biofilms develop on all orally exposed surfaces and consist of different cross-linked bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances [7] . Bacteria in biofilms show a higher pathogenicity compared to thei...

  5. Effect of CPP-ACP paste with and without CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and bracket shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Farhadian

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Many patients seeking orthodontic treatment already have incipient enamel lesions and should be placed under preventive treatments. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste and CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Methods: Eighty caries-free human premolars were subjected to a demineralization challenge using Streptococcus mutans. After demineralization, the samples were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups: Group 1 (control, the brackets were bonded without any surface treatment; Group 2, the enamel surfaces were treated with CPP-ACP paste for 4 minutes before bonding; Group 3, the teeth were irradiated with CO2 laser beams at a wavelength of 10.6 µm for 20 seconds. The samples in Groups 4 and 5 were treated with CO2 laser either before or through CPP-ACP application. SEM photomicrographs of a tooth from each group were taken to observe the enamel surface. The brackets were bonded to the buccal enamel using a conventional method. Shear bond strength of brackets and ARI scores were measured. Vickers microhardness was measured on the non-bonded enamel surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test at the p< 0.05 level. Results: The mean shear bond strength and microhardness of the laser group were higher than those in the control group and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05. All groups showed a higher percentage of ARI score 4. Conclusion: CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm significantly increased demineralized enamel microhardness and enhanced bonding to demineralized enamel.

  6. Effect of CPP-ACP paste with and without CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and bracket shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Nasrin; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Jamalian, Seyed Farzad; Farhadian, Maryam; Tamasoki, Shahrzad; Malekshoar, Milad; Javanshir, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Many patients seeking orthodontic treatment already have incipient enamel lesions and should be placed under preventive treatments. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste and CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Eighty caries-free human premolars were subjected to a demineralization challenge using Streptococcus mutans. After demineralization, the samples were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups: Group 1 (control), the brackets were bonded without any surface treatment; Group 2, the enamel surfaces were treated with CPP-ACP paste for 4 minutes before bonding; Group 3, the teeth were irradiated with CO2 laser beams at a wavelength of 10.6 µm for 20 seconds. The samples in Groups 4 and 5 were treated with CO2 laser either before or through CPP-ACP application. SEM photomicrographs of a tooth from each group were taken to observe the enamel surface. The brackets were bonded to the buccal enamel using a conventional method. Shear bond strength of brackets and ARI scores were measured. Vickers microhardness was measured on the non-bonded enamel surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test at the p< 0.05 level. The mean shear bond strength and microhardness of the laser group were higher than those in the control group and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05). All groups showed a higher percentage of ARI score 4. CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm significantly increased demineralized enamel microhardness and enhanced bonding to demineralized enamel.

  7. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to acid etched or Nd:Yag lased enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Goswami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In vitro evaluation of the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel which is pretreated using acid etchant or pulsed Nd:YAG. Qualitative morphological changes in enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: 60 extracted human teeth were divided in two groups of 30 each (Groups A and B. In Group A, prepared surface of enamel was etched using 35% phosphoric acid (Scotchbond, 3M. In Group B, enamel was surface treated by a surgical Nd:YAG laser beam (Medilas 4060 Fibertom at 0.8 W, 10 Hz, for 10 s with 80 mJ/pulse power. Bonding agent (single bond dental adhesive, 3M was applied over the test areas on 20 samples of Groups A and B each, and light cured. Composite resin (Z 100, 3M was applied onto the test areas as a 3 mm diameter cylinder, and light cured. The samples were tested for shear bond strength. Remaining 10 samples from each group were observed under SEM for morphological changes. Results: The mean shear bond strength was 20.00 MPa (΁ 1.93 and 13.28 MPa (΁1.97 for Group A and B, respectively. The difference in mean values was statistically significant between Groups A and B (P<0.001. Under SEM, Group A showed typical honeycomb appearance and Group B showed bubble-like cavities. Conclusions: In enamel, acid etch technique showed higher shear bond strength.

  8. Atomic force microscopy analysis of enamel nanotopography after interproximal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Lydia; Farella, Mauro; Lowrey, Sam; Cannon, Richard D; Mei, Li

    2017-04-01

    Interproximal reduction (IPR) removes enamel and leaves grooves and furrows on the tooth surface, which may increase the risk of caries. The aims of this study were to assess the nanotopography of enamel surfaces produced by the most commonly used IPR instruments and to evaluate the effect of polishing after IPR. Enamel slabs were cut from the interproximal surfaces of healthy premolars and then treated with diamond burs, strips, or discs, or Sof-Lex polishing discs (3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn). All samples were cleaned by sonication in distilled water. The control group had no IPR performed and was subjected only to cleaning by sonication. The enamel surfaces were assessed using atomic force microscopy. The IPR instruments all produced surfaces rougher than the control sample; however, the samples that received polishing with Sof-Lex discs after enamel reduction were smoother than untreated enamel (P <0.05 for all comparisons). The larger grit medium diamond burs and medium strips generated rougher enamel surfaces than their smaller grit counterparts: fine diamond burs and fine strips (P <0.001). The difference in roughness generated by mesh and curved disks was not statistically significant (P = 0.122), nor was the difference caused by fine strips and mesh discs (P = 0.811) or by fine strips and curved discs (P = 0.076) (surface roughness values for medium bur, 702 ± 134 nm; medium strip, 501 ± 115 nm; mesh disc, 307 ± 107 nm; fine bur, 407 ± 95 nm; fine strip, 318 ± 50 nm; curved disc, 224 ± 65 nm). The smoothest surfaces were created by use of the entire series of Sof-Lex polishing discs after the enamel reduction (surface roughness, 37 ± 14 nm), and these surfaces were significantly smoother than the control surfaces (surface roughness, 149 ± 39 nm; P = 0.017). Different IPR instruments produced enamel surfaces with varied nanotopography and different degrees of roughness. Enamel surfaces treated with diamond-coated burs

  9. The impact of fluoride on ameloblasts and the mechanisms of enamel fluorosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Denbesten, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intake of excess amounts of fluoride during tooth development cause enamel fluorosis, a developmental disturbance that makes enamel more porous. In mild fluorosis, there are white opaque striations across the enamel surface, whereas in more severe cases, the porous regions increase in size, with

  10. Beneficial effects of hydroxyapatite on enamel subjected to 30% hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Zhejun; Tong, Hua; Hu, Jiming; Wang, Yining

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of combination of hydroxyapatite (HA) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) on color, microhardness and morphology of human tooth enamel. Forty-eight human dental blocks were obtained from 12 pairs of premolars and were randomly divided into four groups. Group DW was treated with distilled water, group HP with 30% HP, group HA+DW with HA mixed with distilled water and group HA+HP with HA mixed with 30% HP. Baseline and final color measurements and microhardness test were carried out before and after bleaching experiments. Two specimens from each group were selected for morphological investigation after final tests. The DeltaE of group HP and HA+HP were significantly higher than those of group DW (p=0.000 and p=0.000) and group HA+DW (p=0.000 and p=0.000). The percentage microhardness loss of group HA+HP was significantly lower than that of group HP (p=0.047), but significantly higher than those of group DW (p=0.000) and group HA+DW (p=0.000). The obvious variation of morphology was only observed on enamel surfaces in group HP. This study suggested that combination of HA and HP was effective in tooth whitening. HA could significantly reduce the microhardness loss of enamel caused by 30% HP and keep enamel surface morphology almost unchanged.

  11. In vitro study on tooth enamel lesions related to whitening dentifrice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Barral de Araújo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tooth whitening substances for extrinsic use that are available in Brazil contain hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. Several studies have attributed the appearance of lesions in the enamel morphology, including hypersensitivity, to these substances. Such lesions justify fluoride therapy and application of infrared lasers, among other procedures. However, there is no consensus among researchers regarding the relevance of the severity of lesions detected on the tooth surface. Objectives: The present study was carried out with an aim of evaluating in vitro the effects of the hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide and sodium bicarbonate contained in dentifrice formulations, on human tooth enamel. Materials and Methods: After darkening process in laboratory, human premolars were brushed using dentifrice containing the two whitening substances (Rembrandt - carbamide peroxide and Mentadent - hydrogen peroxide and the abrasive product (Colgate - sodium bicarbonate. The degree of specimen staining before and after this procedure was determined using spectrophotometry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to obtain images, which were analyzed to show the nature of the lesions that appeared on the enamel surface. Results: The effectiveness of the whitening caused by hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and the abrasion caused by bicarbonate were confirmed, given that the treated test pieces returned to their original coloration. Based on SEM, evaluation of the enamel surfaces subjected to the test products showed that different types of morphologic lesions of varying severity appeared. Conclusions: Whitening dentifrice containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide produced lesions on the enamel surface such that the greatest sequelae were associated with exposure to hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Microabrasion Technique for Enamel with Fluorosis: A Case Report Utilizing Two Distinct Pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Carla Müller; Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru - Universidade de São Paulo; Bim Júnior, Odair; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Wang, Linda; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo

    2013-01-01

    The technique of enamel microabrasion is considered an aesthetic alternative conservative and effective for stain removal or surface irregularities of the enamel and different materials or pastes can be used for this purpose Objetives: The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of the technique of enamel microabrasion using two different pastes at removing hypoplastic stains by fluorosis. Methods: The female patient, 18 years, was submitted to enamel microabrasion, and in the r...

  13. In vitro studies of morphological changes in enamel surface after Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser irradiation, by SEM; Estudo in vitro do efeito do laser Nd:YAG e Er:YAG sobre o esmalte dental humano atraves de microscopia eletronica de varredura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlangieri, Eleonora Jaeger

    2001-07-01

    The caries prevention by using laser irradiation has been investigated by many authors using various lasers with different irradiations conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigated the morphological changes in enamel surface after Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser irradiation, in vitro, by SEM. Fifteen freshly extracted, intact, caries-free, human third molars, were used in this study. The coronary portions were sectioned, from buccal to lingual direction, in two half-parts. Each one was irradiated by a different laser. The first one was irradiated with water-air spray, by a Nd:YAG laser, at 1.084 nm wave length, at 10 W, 10 Hz, 100 mJ for 60 sec., with an optical fiber in contact mode (0,32 mm of diameter); and the other half, with water-air spray by an Er:YAG laser at 2,94 micrometers wave length at the parameters of 4 Hz, 80 mJ, 24.95 J/cm{sup 2} for 60 sec. The results of this study suggested that both lasers promoted morphological changes in the enamel surface enhancing resistance and can be an alternative clinical method for caries preventions. (author)

  14. Fluorine analysis of human enamel around fluoride-containing materials under different pH-cycling by {mu}-PIGE/PIXE system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, H., E-mail: kom@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuda, Y.; Kijimura, T.; Kinugawa, M.; Okuyama, K. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Hase, Tsuruga 914-0192 (Japan); Satoh, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology, TARRI, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan); Oikawa, S. [National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The caries preventive effect of fluoride-containing materials (FCMs) might depend on the caries risk of the individuals. Two pairs of demineralizing and remineralizing solutions of pH-cycling were prepared for simulating low and high caries risk. The purpose of this study was to determine fluorine (F) uptake into human enamel around FCMs under different pH-cycling using the in-air {mu}-PIGE/PIXE system. Fluoride-containing glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX{sub GP} FAST CAPSULE (FN)), and composite resin (BEAUTIFIL II with FLUORO BOND SHAKE ONE (BS)) were used in this study. The pH-cycling (pH 6.8-4.5) was carried out for 5 weeks. After pH-cycling, the caries progression was analyzed using transverse micro-radiography (TMR). The fluorine and calcium distributions in the carious lesion in each specimen were evaluated using the PIGE/PIXE system. From TMR analysis, there was a difference in caries risk between the two kinds of pH-cycling. Although the caries preventive effect of BS and FN was confirmed at low risk, the effect at high risk was confirmed for FN only. From the analysis of the fluorine uptake in the outer 200 {mu}m of the lesion we concluded that there was no significant difference between the pH-cycling solutions. However, we found different fluorine concentrations in the enamel for the two FCMs. The decreased caries progression under high risk for FN indicated that an adequate amount of fluorine supplied from the material is required at higher caries risk. It was confirmed that the caries preventive effect of FCM depends on the caries risk. The fluorine analysis of teeth under various pH-cycling conditions gives information to evaluate the caries preventive effect of fluoride-containing materials according to the caries risk.

  15. The effects of single application of pastes containing ion-releasing particles on enamel demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Kawamura, Naohiko; Ito, Shuichi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2017-07-26

    We investigated single application of pastes containing a surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler on enamel demineralization. Human enamel blocks were polished using pastes containing S-PRG filler (0, 5, and 30%) and immersed in demineralizing solution for 5 days with daily change of solutions. The pH measurement and nanoindentation testing was carried out during the immersion period, and the enamel surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. A non-fluoride paste and a hydroxyapatite-containing paste were used for comparison. The specimens polished with the S-PRG filler-containing paste exhibited acid-neutralizing properties, which became stronger with an increasing S-PRG filler content. Following immersion in the demineralizing solution, specimens polished with the S-PRG filler-containing paste exhibited significantly greater hardness and elastic modulus values than those polished with the other pastes and exhibited a smoother surface than did the other specimens. Pastes containing S-PRG filler inhibits the demineralization of enamel.

  16. The circadian clock modulates enamel development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Hacia, Joseph G; Bromage, Timothy G; Boyde, Alan; Lei, Yaping; Xu, Yucheng; Miller, Joseph D; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L

    2012-06-01

    Fully mature enamel is about 98% mineral by weight. While mineral crystals appear very early during its formative phase, the newly secreted enamel is a soft gel-like matrix containing several enamel matrix proteins of which the most abundant is amelogenin (Amelx). Histological analysis of mineralized dental enamel reveals markings called cross-striations associated with daily increments of enamel formation, as evidenced by injections of labeling dyes at known time intervals. The daily incremental growth of enamel has led to the hypothesis that the circadian clock might be involved in the regulation of enamel development. To identify daily rhythms of clock genes and Amelx, we subjected murine ameloblast cells to serum synchronization to analyze the expression of the circadian transcription factors Per2 and Bmal1 by real-time PCR. Results indicate that these key genetic regulators of the circadian clock are expressed in synchronized murine ameloblast cell cultures and that their expression profile follows a circadian pattern with acrophase and bathyphase for both gene transcripts in antiphase. Immunohistological analysis confirms the protein expression of Bmal and Cry in enamel cells. Amelx expression in 2-day postnatal mouse molars dissected every 4 hours for a duration of 48 hours oscillated with an approximately 24-hour period, with a significant approximately 2-fold decrease in expression during the dark period compared to the light period. The expression of genes involved in bicarbonate production (Car2) and transport (Slc4a4), as well as in enamel matrix endocytosis (Lamp1), was greater during the dark period, indicating that ameloblasts express these proteins when Amelx expression is at the nadir. The human and mouse Amelx genes each contain a single nonconserved E-box element within 10 kb upstream of their respective transcription start sites. We also found that within 2 kb of the transcription start site of the human NFYA gene, which encodes a positive

  17. Effect of carbonated beverages, coffee, sports and high energy drinks, and bottled water on the in vitro erosion characteristics of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, Michael; Owens, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of carbonated and non-carbonated beverages, bottled and tap water, on the erosive potential of dental enamel with and without fluoride varnish protection. Beverages used in this study included: Coca Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, Starbucks Frappuccino coffee drink, Dasani water (bottled), and tap water (control). Enamel surfaces were coated with Cavity Shield 5% sodium fluoride treatment varnish. Twenty-eight previously extracted human posterior teeth free of hypocalcification and caries were used in this study. The coronal portion of each tooth was removed and then sectioned transverse from the buccal to lingual surface using a diamond coated saw blade. The crown sections were embedded in acrylic resin blocks leaving the enamel surfaces exposed. The enamel surfaces were polished using 600 to 2000 grit abrasive paper and diamond paste. Test specimens were randomly distributed to seven beverage groups and comprised 4 specimens per group. Two specimens per beverage group were treated with a fluoride varnish while 2 specimens did not receive fluoride coating. Surface roughness (profilometer) readings were performed at baseline (prior to fluoride treatment and immersion in the beverage) and again, following immersion for 14 days (24 hours/day). The test beverages were changed daily and the enamel specimens were immersed at 37 degrees C. Surface roughness data was evaluated using multiple factor ANOVA at a significance level of pStarBucks coffee, Dasani water, and tap water. Fluoride varnish was not a significant impact factor; however, beverage (type) and exposure time were significant impact variables. Both carbonated and non-carbonated beverages displayed a significant erosive effect on dental enamel; however, fluoride varnish treatments did not demonstrate a significant protective influence on enamel surfaces.

  18. Tooth Surface Comparison after Air Polishing and Rubber Cup: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camboni, Sara; Donnet, Marcel

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate, using microscopic observations, the difference between two well-known oral prophylaxis techniques: polishing paste and air polishing. The observations were performed on human enamel. Enamel samples were obtained from plaque-rich human teeth extracted for orthodontic or clinical purposes. In order to allow a reliable comparison between different applications, each enamel sample was divided into two parts: one underwent air-polishing, whereas polishing paste was applied to the other. AIR-FLOW® Master was selected together with AIR-FLOW® PLUS for the prophylaxis powder application. For the polishing-paste application, several different pastes where used, including Cleanic®, CCS®, Proxyt®, and SuperPolish. A comparative test control was also used by cleaning the enamel with sodium hypochlorite (6%). The enamel treated with AIR-FLOW PLUS showed a similar surface when compared to the control enamel; however, there was complete cleaning down to the tooth microstructure. On the other hand, use of the polishing paste resulted in an enamel surface that appeared abraded and flattened. Moreover, some of the natural irregular enamel surfaces demonstrated some filling in with debris. AIR-FLOW PLUS powder was able to more deeply clean without creating any damage to the enamel, making it suitable for regular cleaning treatments. The polishing pastes were found to abrade the enamel surface, to flatten it, and deposit debris into the microcavities. Both methods having different mechanical effects can therefore be considered as complementary, in that some patients experience a sense of "roughness" following a cleaning. A clinical recommendation for this experience would be to use the air polish first to clean the enamel surface, and follow with a little polishing paste to smooth the surface, if required.

  19. Enamelin is critical for ameloblast integrity and enamel ultrastructure formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C-C Hu

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human enamelin gene cause autosomal dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in which the affected enamel is thin or absent. Study of enamelin knockout NLS-lacZ knockin mice revealed that mineralization along the distal membrane of ameloblast is deficient, resulting in no true enamel formation. To determine the function of enamelin during enamel formation, we characterized the developing teeth of the Enam-/- mice, generated amelogenin-driven enamelin transgenic mouse models, and then introduced enamelin transgenes into the Enam-/- mice to rescue enamel defects. Mice at specific stages of development were subjected to morphologic and structural analysis using β-galactosidase staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Enamelin expression was ameloblast-specific. In the absence of enamelin, ameloblasts pathology became evident at the onset of the secretory stage. Although the aggregated ameloblasts generated matrix-containing amelogenin, they were not able to create a well-defined enamel space or produce normal enamel crystals. When enamelin is present at half of the normal quantity, enamel was thinner with enamel rods not as tightly arranged as in wild type suggesting that a specific quantity of enamelin is critical for normal enamel formation. Enamelin dosage effect was further demonstrated in transgenic mouse lines over expressing enamelin. Introducing enamelin transgene at various expression levels into the Enam-/- background did not fully recover enamel formation while a medium expresser in the Enam+/- background did. Too much or too little enamelin abolishes the production of enamel crystals and prism structure. Enamelin is essential for ameloblast integrity and enamel formation.

  20. Enamelin is critical for ameloblast integrity and enamel ultrastructure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jan C-C; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yuhe; Smith, Charles E; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Wright, John Timothy; Suggs, Cynthia; McKee, Marc D; Beniash, Elia; Kabir, M Enamul; Simmer, James P

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human enamelin gene cause autosomal dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in which the affected enamel is thin or absent. Study of enamelin knockout NLS-lacZ knockin mice revealed that mineralization along the distal membrane of ameloblast is deficient, resulting in no true enamel formation. To determine the function of enamelin during enamel formation, we characterized the developing teeth of the Enam-/- mice, generated amelogenin-driven enamelin transgenic mouse models, and then introduced enamelin transgenes into the Enam-/- mice to rescue enamel defects. Mice at specific stages of development were subjected to morphologic and structural analysis using β-galactosidase staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Enamelin expression was ameloblast-specific. In the absence of enamelin, ameloblasts pathology became evident at the onset of the secretory stage. Although the aggregated ameloblasts generated matrix-containing amelogenin, they were not able to create a well-defined enamel space or produce normal enamel crystals. When enamelin is present at half of the normal quantity, enamel was thinner with enamel rods not as tightly arranged as in wild type suggesting that a specific quantity of enamelin is critical for normal enamel formation. Enamelin dosage effect was further demonstrated in transgenic mouse lines over expressing enamelin. Introducing enamelin transgene at various expression levels into the Enam-/- background did not fully recover enamel formation while a medium expresser in the Enam+/- background did. Too much or too little enamelin abolishes the production of enamel crystals and prism structure. Enamelin is essential for ameloblast integrity and enamel formation.

  1. Influence of Etching Mode on Enamel Bond Durability of Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the enamel bond durability of three universal adhesives in different etching modes through fatigue testing. The three universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Prime&Bond Elect universal dental adhesive, and All-Bond Universal light-cured dental adhesive. A single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil S3 Bond Plus was used as a control. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human enamel were evaluated in total-etch mode and self-etch mode. A stainless steel metal ring with an internal diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to the flat-ground (4000-grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFS. For each enamel surface treatment, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. The staircase method for fatigue testing was then used to determine the SFS of the resin composite bonded to the enamel using 10-Hz frequencies for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe representative debonded specimen surfaces and the resin-enamel interfaces. A two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of the SBS data, whereas a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFS data. All adhesives in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than those in self-etch mode. Although All-Bond Universal in self-etch mode showed a significantly lower SBS value than the other adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS values among the adhesives in this mode. All adhesives showed higher SFS:SBS ratios in total-etch mode than in self-etch mode. With regard to the adhesive systems used in this study, universal adhesives showed higher enamel bond strengths in total-etch mode. Although the influence of different etching modes on the enamel-bonding performance of universal adhesives was found to be dependent on the adhesive material, total-etch mode

  2. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  3. The effect of increasing sodium fluoride concentrations on erosion and attrition of enamel and dentine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R S; Rodriguez, J M; Dunne, S; Moazzez, R; Bartlett, D W

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effect of an aqueous sodium fluoride solution of increasing concentration on erosion and attrition of enamel and dentine in vitro. Enamel and dentine sections from caries-free human third molars were polished flat and taped (exposing a 3 mm x 3 mm area) before being randomly allocated to 1 of 5 groups per substrate (n=10/gp): G1 (distilled water control); G2 (225 ppm NaF); G3 (1450 ppm NaF); G4 (5000 ppm NaF); G5 (19,000 ppm NaF). All specimens were subjected to 5, 10 and 15 cycles of experimental wear [1 cycle=artificial saliva (2h, pH 7.0)+erosion (0.3% citric acid, pH 3.2, 5 min)+fluoride/control (5 min)+attrition (60 linear strokes in artificial saliva from enamel antagonists loaded to 300 g)]. Following tape removal, step height (SH) in mum was measured using optical profilometry. When the number of cycles increased the amount of tooth surface loss increased significantly in enamel and dentine after attrition and erosion and for dentine after attrition. Attrition and erosion resulted in greater surface loss than attrition alone after 15 cycles of experimental wear of enamel. 5000 ppm and 19,000 ppm sodium fluoride solutions had a protective effect on erosive and attritional enamel tooth wear in vitro, however no other groups showed significant differences. The more intensive the fluoride regime the more protection was afforded to enamel from attrition and erosion. However, in this study no such protective effect was demonstrated for dentine. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Franco, Laura Molinar; Fagundes, Ticiane Cestari; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel microabrasion were also presented after 11, 20 and 23 years of follow-ups.

  5. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Herman SUNDFELD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel microabrasion were also presented after 11, 20 and 23 years of follow-ups.

  6. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (pdentin, the results were the lowest in group 8 (DHF(5)P: 1.5 ± 1.6), being significantly lower than those of group

  7. Influence of biofilm formation on the mechanical properties of enamel after treatment with CPP-ACP crème

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Regina Almeida de Oliveira; Thereza Christina Lopes Coutinho; Maristela Barbosa Portela; Viviane Cancio Andrade de Paula; Mônica Almeida Tostes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The study aimed to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilms on changes in the surface microhardness of enamel treated with casein phosphopeptide—amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) with and without fluoride. Human enamel blocks with incipient caries-like lesions were divided into four groups of 13: G1: Saliva (Control); G2: fluoride dentifrice (Crest™, 1100 ppm as NaF); G3: CPP-ACP (MI Paste; Recaldent™); and G4: CPP-ACPF (MI Paste Plus; Recaldent™ 900 ppm as NaF). The specim...

  8. Human permanent teeth are divided into two parts at the cemento-enamel junction in the divine golden ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Rahul; Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S; Patil, Shankargouda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out whether tooth length (crown length + root length) follows the rule of most divine and mysterious phi (ϕ) or the golden ratio. A total of 140 teeth were included in the study. The crown-root ratio was manually calculated using vernier caliper and its approximation to golden ratio or the divine number phi (ϕ) was examined. The average root-crown ratio (R/C) for maxillary central incisor was 1.627 ± 0.04, and of its antagonist, mandibular central incisor was 1.628 ± 0.02. The tooth-root ratio (T/R) for the same was 1.609 ± 0.016 and 1.61 ± 0.008, respectively. Similar values were appreciated for lateral incisors where the R/C ratio in the maxillary and mandibular teeth was 1.632 ± 0.015 and 1.641 ± 0.012 and the T/R ratio was 1.606 ± 0.005 and 1.605 ± 0.005, respectively. On measuring the tooth length in linear fashion from the cusp tip to the root apex, we found that the tooth was divided into two parts at the cemento-enamel junction in the golden ratio. This information can be exploited in restorative and implant dentistry in future.

  9. Effect of Different Protocols in Preconditioning With EDTA in Sclerotic Dentin and Enamel Before Universal Adhesives Applied in Self-etch Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E C; Parreiras, S O; Gutierrez, M F; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different protocols of 17% ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) conditioning on the etching pattern and immediate bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and sclerotic dentin. Forty bovine teeth with sclerotic dentin and 20 human third molars were randomly divided into eight groups resulting from the combination of the main factors surface treatment (none, two-minute EDTA conditioning manual application, 30-second EDTA manual application, 30-second EDTA sonic application) and adhesives systems (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU] and Prime & Bond Elect [PBE]). Resin-dentin and enamel-dentin bond specimens were prepared and tested under the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and microshear bond strength (μSBS) tests, respectively. The etching pattern produced on the unground enamel and the sclerotic dentin surfaces under the different protocols and adhesive systems was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy. For enamel, only the main factor adhesive was significant (padhesives in the self-etch mode on sclerotic dentin, mainly when applied for 30 seconds with the aid of a sonic device. EDTA pretreatment also improves the retentive etching pattern of enamel, but it does not result in higher enamel bond strength.

  10. Protective effect of calcium nanophosphate and CPP-ACP agents on enamel erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti de; Santos, Rogerio Lacerda dos, E-mail: fabigalbi@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Patos, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas. Div. de Odontologia; Silva Filho, Tiago Joao da; Carlo, Hugo Lemes [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Dept. de Odontologia Restauradora; Lima, Bruno Alessandro Silva Guedes de [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica. Lab. de Solidificacao Rapida

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different remineralizing agents on enamel microhardness (KHN) and surface topography after an erosive challenge. Forty-eight human enamel specimens (4 X 4 mm) were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (no treatment), fluoride varnish, calcium nanophosphate paste and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste (CPP-ACP). Both pastes were applied for 5 minutes, and fluoride varnish, for 24 h. Four daily erosive cycles of 5 minutes of immersion in a cola drink and 2 h in artificial saliva were conducted for 5 days. KHN readings were performed at baseline and after 5 days. The percentage of enamel hardness change (%KHN) was obtained after erosion. The surface topography was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The data were tested using ANOVA, Tukey's and paired-T tests (p < 0.05). After an erosive challenge, there was no statistically significant difference between the control (96.8 ± 11.4 KHN / 72.4 ± 3.0 %KHN) and the varnish (91.7 ± 14.1 KHN / 73.4 ± 5.5 %KHN) groups. The nanophosphate group showed lower enamel hardness loss (187.2 ± 27.9 /49.0 ± 7.9 %KHN), compared with the CPP-ACP group (141.8 ± 16.5 /60.6 ± 4.0 %KHN), and both were statistically different from the varnish and the control groups. AFM images showed a rough surface for the control and the varnish groups, a non-homogeneous layer with globular irregularities for CPP-ACP, and a thick homogeneous layer for the nanophosphate group. None of the agents provided protection against the development of erosion; however, nanophosphate paste was able to reduce enamel surface softening after the erosive challenge. (author)

  11. Protective effect of calcium nanophosphate and CPP-ACP agents on enamel erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Galbiatti de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different remineralizing agents on enamel microhardness (KHN and surface topography after an erosive challenge. Forty-eight human enamel specimens (4 × 4 mm were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (no treatment, fluoride varnish, calcium nanophosphate paste and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste (CPP-ACP. Both pastes were applied for 5 minutes, and fluoride varnish, for 24 h. Four daily erosive cycles of 5 minutes of immersion in a cola drink and 2 h in artificial saliva were conducted for 5 days. KHN readings were performed at baseline and after 5 days. The percentage of enamel hardness change (%KHN was obtained after erosion. The surface topography was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The data were tested using ANOVA, Tukey's and paired-T tests (p < 0.05. After an erosive challenge, there was no statistically significant difference between the control (96.8 ± 11.4 KHN / 72.4 ± 3.0 %KHN and the varnish (91.7 ± 14.1 KHN / 73.4 ± 5.5 %KHN groups. The nanophosphate group showed lower enamel hardness loss (187.2 ± 27.9 / 49.0 ± 7.9 %KHN, compared with the CPP-ACP group (141.8 ± 16.5 / 60.6 ± 4.0 %KHN, and both were statistically different from the varnish and the control groups. AFM images showed a rough surface for the control and the varnish groups, a non-homogeneous layer with globular irregularities for CPP-ACP, and a thick homogeneous layer for the nanophosphate group. None of the agents provided protection against the development of erosion; however, nanophosphate paste was able to reduce enamel surface softening after the erosive challenge

  12. Intra-individual metameric variation expressed at the enamel-dentine junction of lower post-canine dentition of South African fossil hominins and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Thackeray, John Francis; Dumoncel, Jean; Zanolli, Clément; Oettlé, Anna; de Beer, Frikkie; Hoffman, Jakobus; Duployer, Benjamin; Tenailleau, Christophe; Braga, José

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the degree and patterning of inter- and intra-individual metameric variation in South African australopiths, early Homo and modern humans. Metameric variation likely reflects developmental and taxonomical issues, and could also be used to infer ecological and functional adaptations. However, its patterning along the early hominin postcanine dentition, particularly among South African fossil hominins, remains unexplored. Using microfocus X-ray computed tomography (µXCT) and geometric morphometric tools, we studied the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology and we investigated the intra- and inter-individual EDJ metameric variation among eight australopiths and two early Homo specimens from South Africa, as well as 32 modern humans. Along post-canine dentition, shape changes between metameres represented by relative positions and height of dentine horns, outlines of the EDJ occlusal table are reported in modern and fossil taxa. Comparisons of EDJ mean shapes and multivariate analyses reveal substantial variation in the direction and magnitude of metameric shape changes among taxa, but some common trends can be found. In modern humans, both the direction and magnitude of metameric shape change show increased variability in M 2 -M 3 compared to M 1 -M 2 . Fossil specimens are clustered together showing similar magnitudes of shape change. Along M 2 -M 3 , the lengths of their metameric vectors are not as variable as those of modern humans, but they display considerable variability in the direction of shape change. The distalward increase of metameric variation along the modern human molar row is consistent with the odontogenetic models of molar row structure (inhibitory cascade model). Though much remains to be tested, the variable trends and magnitudes in metamerism in fossil hominins reported here, together with differences in the scale of shape change between modern humans and fossil hominins may provide valuable information

  13. Evaluation of new treatment for incipient enamel demineralization using 45S5 bioglass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, A S; Takahashi, H; Otsuki, M; Tagami, J

    2014-03-01

    Bioglass 45S5 is a silica-based bioactive glass capable of depositing a layer of hydroxyl carbonate apatite on the surface of the glass when immersed in body fluids. The present paper studies a new technique for treating early human dental enamel caries lesions by using a paste composed of 45S5 bioglass and phosphoric acid. Artificial caries lesions were induced in enamel flat surfaces by means of a decalcification solution. All specimens were exposed to a brushing-abrasion challenge to test the durability of any newly formed layer resulting from the application of 45S5 bioglass paste. The specimens treated with bioglass paste showed complete coverage with a layer of brushite crystals. The brushing-abrasion challenge did not statistically affect the percentage of enamel coverage with the crystalline layer formed by the application of bioglass (p<0.05). These crystals were converted to hydroxyapatite crystals when stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. The current technique suggests the possibility of restoring incipient enamel erosive lesion with an abrasion durable layer of hydroxyapatite crystals. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Dental Enamel Surface Submitted to Fruit Juice Plus Soymilk by Micro X-Ray Fluorescence: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Salmos Brito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper aimed to analyze the in vitro industrialized fruit juices effect plus soy to establish the erosive potential of these solutions. Materials and Methods. Seventy bovine incisors were selected after being evaluated under stereomicroscope. Their crowns were prepared and randomly divided into 7 groups, using microhardness with allocation criteria. The crowns were submitted to the fruit juice plus soy during 15 days, twice a day. The pH values, acid titration, and Knoop microhardness were recorded and the specimens were evaluated using X-ray microfluorescence (µXRF. Results. The pH average for all juices and after 3 days was significantly below the critical value for dental erosion. In average, the pH value decreases 14% comparing initial time and pH after 3 days. Comparing before and after, there was a 49% microhardness decrease measured in groups (p<0.05. Groups G1, G2, G5, and G6 are above this average. The analysis by μXRF showed a decrease of approximately 7% Ca and 4% P on bovine crowns surface. Florida (FL statistical analysis showed a statistically significant 1 diff