WorldWideScience

Sample records for human colorectal tumorigenesis

  1. Suppression of colorectal tumorigenesis by recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, You; Ye, Tao; Wang, Hui-Peng; Zhao, Jia-Ying; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wang, Xin; Shen, Chen-Xia; Wu, Yi-Bin; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 (BFT-2, or Fragilysin) on colorectal tumorigenesis in mice induced by azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS). METHODS Recombinant proBFT-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta (DE3) and BFT-2 was obtained and tested for its biological activity via colorectal adenocarcinoma cell strains SW-480. Seventy C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into a blank (BC; n = 10), model (AD; n = 20), model + low-dos...

  2. Suppression of colorectal tumorigenesis by recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, You; Ye, Tao; Wang, Hui-Peng; Zhao, Jia-Ying; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wang, Xin; Shen, Chen-Xia; Wu, Yi-Bin; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-28

    To evaluate the impact of recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 (BFT-2, or Fragilysin) on colorectal tumorigenesis in mice induced by azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS). Recombinant proBFT-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta (DE3) and BFT-2 was obtained and tested for its biological activity via colorectal adenocarcinoma cell strains SW-480. Seventy C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into a blank (BC; n = 10), model (AD; n = 20), model + low-dose toxin (ADLT; n = 20, 10 μg), and a model + high-dose toxin (ADHT; n = 20, 20 μg) group. Mice weight, tumor formation and pathology were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry determined Ki-67 and Caspase-3 expression in normal and tumor tissues of colorectal mucosa. Recombinant BFT-2 was successfully obtained, along with its biological activity. The most obvious weight loss occurred in the AD group compared with the ADLT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.23 ± 0.91, P ADHT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.57 ± 1.06, P ADHT groups (19.75 ± 3.30 vs 6.50 ± 1.73, P ADHT group. The incidence of colorectal adenocarcinoma in both the ADHT group and the ADHT group was reduced compared to that in the AD group ( P ADHT group was 50% and 40%, respectively, both of which were lower than that found in the AD group (94.44%, P ADHT group was 45% and 55%, both of which were higher than that found in the BC group (16.67%, P < 0.05, P < 0.05). Oral administration with lower-dose biologically active recombinant BFT-2 inhibited colorectal tumorigenesis in mice.

  3. Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Mediates Glycolysis and Tumorigenesis in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells via AMPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-tao Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of AEG-1 in glycolysis and tumorigenesis, we construct myc-AEG-1 expression vector and demonstrate a novel mechanism that AEG-1 may increase the activity of AMPK by Thr172 phosphorylation. The higher expression levels of AEG-1 in colorectal carcinoma cells were found but showed significant difference in different cell lines. To study the role of AEG-1 in colorectal cells, myc-AEG-1 vector was constructed and transfected into NCM460 colonic epithelial cells. We observed consistent increasing of glucose consumption and lactate production, typical features of anaerobic glycolysis, suggesting that AEG-1 may promote anaerobic glycolysis. Moreover, we noted that AMPK phosphorylation at Thr172 as well as pPFK2 (Ser466 was increased in NCM460 cells overexpressing AEG-1. Compound C may block AMPK and PFK2 phosphorylation in both control and AEG-1-overexpressed cells and decrease the glucose consumption and lactate production. The present findings indicated that reduced AEG-1 protein levels by RNAi may decrease the glucose consumption and lactate production in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. The present identified AEG-1/AMPK/PFK2 glycolysis cascade may be essential to cell proliferation and tumor growth. The present results may provide us with a mechanistic insight into novel targets controlled by AEG-1, and the components in the AEG-1/AMPK/PFK2 glycolysis process may be targeted for the clinical treatment of cancer.

  4. Mismatch repair deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation in Lynch Syndrome-Associated colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeki; Mori, Taisuke; Ogawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kato, Mamoru; Furukawa, Eisaku; Ochiai, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency is a ubiquitous feature of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenocarcinomas; however, it remains unclear when the MMR-deficient phenotype is acquired during tumorigenesis. To probe this issue, the present study examined genetic alterations and MMR statuses in Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas, in comparison with sporadic adenomas. Among the Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, 68 of 86 adenomas (79%) and all adenocarcinomas were MMR-deficient, whereas all the sporadic adenomas were MMR-proficient, as determined by microsatellite instability testing and immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins. Sequencing analyses identified APC or CTNNB1 mutations in the majority of sporadic adenomas (58/84, 69%) and MMR-proficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas (13/18, 72%). However, MMR-deficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas had less APC or CTNNB1 mutations (25/68, 37%) and frequent frameshift RNF43 mutations involving mononucleotide repeats (45/68, 66%). Furthermore, frameshift mutations affecting repeat sequences constituted 14 of 26 APC mutations (54%) in MMR-deficient adenomas whereas these frameshift mutations were rare in MMR-proficient adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome (1/12, 8%) and in sporadic adenomas (3/52, 6%). Lynch syndrome-associated adenocarcinomas exhibited mutation profiles similar to those of MMR-deficient adenomas. Considering that WNT pathway activation sufficiently drives colorectal adenoma formation, the distinct mutation profiles of WNT pathway genes in Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas suggest that MMR deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation.

  5. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer.

  6. BCKDK of BCAA Catabolism Cross-talking With the MAPK Pathway Promotes Tumorigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peipei; Zeng, Fanfan; Duan, Qiuhong; Xiao, Juanjuan; Liu, Lin; Yuan, Ping; Fan, Linni; Sun, Huimin; Malyarenko, Olesya S; Lu, Hui; Xiu, Ruijuan; Liu, Shaoqing; Shao, Chen; Zhang, Jianmin; Yan, Wei; Wang, Zhe; Zheng, Jianyong; Zhu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids catabolism plays an important role in human cancers. Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females, and the new global incidence is over 1.2 million cases. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase (BCKDK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in branched-chain amino acids catabolism, which plays an important role in many serious human diseases. Here we investigated that abnormal branched-chain amino acids catabolism in colorectal cancer is a result of the disease process, with no role in disease initiation; BCKDK is widely expressed in colorectal cancer patients, and those patients that express higher levels of BCKDK have shorter survival times than those with lower levels; BCKDK promotes cell transformation or colorectal cancer ex vivo or in vivo. Mechanistically, BCKDK promotes colorectal cancer by enhancing the MAPK signaling pathway through direct MEK phosphorylation, rather than by branched-chain amino acids catabolism. And the process above could be inhibited by a BCKDK inhibitor, phenyl butyrate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. BCKDK of BCAA Catabolism Cross-talking With the MAPK Pathway Promotes Tumorigenesis of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Xue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids catabolism plays an important role in human cancers. Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females, and the new global incidence is over 1.2 million cases. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase (BCKDK is a rate-limiting enzyme in branched-chain amino acids catabolism, which plays an important role in many serious human diseases. Here we investigated that abnormal branched-chain amino acids catabolism in colorectal cancer is a result of the disease process, with no role in disease initiation; BCKDK is widely expressed in colorectal cancer patients, and those patients that express higher levels of BCKDK have shorter survival times than those with lower levels; BCKDK promotes cell transformation or colorectal cancer ex vivo or in vivo. Mechanistically, BCKDK promotes colorectal cancer by enhancing the MAPK signaling pathway through direct MEK phosphorylation, rather than by branched-chain amino acids catabolism. And the process above could be inhibited by a BCKDK inhibitor, phenyl butyrate.

  8. Promoter hypermethylation of the DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase is associated with the presence of G:C to A:T transition mutations in p53 in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Risques, R A; Toyota, M; Capella, G; Moreno, V; Peinado, M A; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2001-06-15

    Defects in DNA repair may be responsible for the genesis of mutations in key genes in cancer cells. The tumor suppressor gene p53 is commonly mutated in human cancer by missense point mutations, most of them G:C to A:T transitions. A recognized cause for this type of change is spontaneous deamination of the methylcytosine. However, the persistence of a premutagenic O(6)-methylguanine can also be invoked. This last lesion is removed in the normal cell by the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In many tumor types, epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation has been demonstrated and linked to the appearance of G to A mutations in the K-ras oncogene in colorectal tumors. To study the relevance of defective MGMT function by aberrant methylation in relation to the presence of p53 mutations, we studied 314 colorectal tumors for MGMT promoter hypermethylation and p53 mutational spectrum. Inactivation of MGMT by aberrant methylation was associated with the appearance of G:C to A:T transition mutations at p53 (Fischer's exact test, two-tailed; P = 0.01). Overall, MGMT methylated tumors displayed p53 transition mutations in 43 of 126 (34%) cases, whereas MGMT unmethylated tumors only showed G:C to A:T changes in 37 of 188 (19%) tumors. A more striking association was found in G:C to A:T transitions in non-CpG dinucleotides; 71% (12 of 17) of the total non-CpG transition mutations in p53 were observed in MGMT aberrantly methylated tumors (Fischer's exact test, two-tailed; P = 0.008). Our data suggest that epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation may lead to G:C to A:T transition mutations in p53.

  9. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alison D; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit "kinase" module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways.

  10. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  11. VEGF promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Naoki; Soeda, Akio; Inagaki, Akihito; Onodera, Masafumi; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro; Mori, Hideki; Iwama, Toru

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in malignant brain tumors, and these CSCs may play a pivotal role in tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and the neurogenesis of neural stem cells. Using CSCs derived from human glioblastomas and a retrovirus expressing VEGF, we examined the effects of VEGF on the properties of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Although VEGF did not affect the property of CSCs in vitro, the injection of mouse brains with VEGF-expressing CSCs led to the massive expansion of vascular-rich GBM, tumor-associated hemorrhage, and high morbidity, suggesting that VEGF promoted tumorigenesis via angiogenesis. These results revealed that VEGF induced the proliferation of VEC in the vascular-rich tumor environment, the so-called stem cell niche

  12. Aminopeptidase A initiates tumorigenesis and enhances tumor cell stemness via TWIST1 upregulation in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Hui-Yu; Jiang, Jeng-Kae; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Li, Ming-Chun; Tsai, Chan-Yen; Jhang, Yau-Yun; Huang, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis accounts for the high mortality rate associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), but metastasis regulators are not fully understood. To identify a novel gene involved in tumor metastasis, we used oligonucleotide microarrays, transcriptome distance analyses, and machine learning algorithms to determine links between primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. Aminopeptidase A (APA; also known as ENPEP) was selected as our focus because its relationship with colorectal cancer requires cl...

  13. Irradiation strongly reduces tumorigenesis of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Shoki; Minami, Kazumasa; Ito, Emiko; Imaizumi, Hiromasa; Mori, Seiji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have demonstrated they can undergo self-renewal, attain pluripotency, and differentiate into various types of functional cells. In clinical transplantation of iPS cells, however, a major problem is the prevention of tumorigenesis. We speculated that tumor formation could be inhibited by means of irradiation. Since the main purpose of this study was to explore the prevention of tumor formation in human iPS (hiPS) cells, we tested the effects of irradiation on tumor-associated factors such as radiosensitivity, pluripotency and cell death in hiPS cells. The irradiated hiPS cells showed much higher radiosensitivity, because the survival fraction of hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was < 10%, and there was no change of pluripotency. Irradiation with 2 and 4 Gy caused substantial cell death, which was mostly the result of apoptosis. Irradiation with 2 Gy was detrimental enough to cause loss of proliferation capability and trigger substantial cell death in vitro. The hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy were injected into NOG mice (NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2 Rγnull) for the analysis of tumor formation. The group of mice into which hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was transplanted showed significant suppression of tumor formation in comparison with that of the group into which non-irradiated hiPS cells were transplanted. It can be presumed that this diminished rate of tumor formation was due to loss of proliferation and cell death caused by irradiation. Our findings suggest that tumor formation following cell therapy or organ transplantation induced by hiPS cells may be prevented by irradiation.

  14. 12/15 Lipoxygenase regulation of colorectal tumorigenesis is determined by the relative tumor levels of its metabolite 12-HETE and 13-HODE in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jian; Jiang, Li; Wang, Yinqiu; Yao, Bing; Yang, Shilin; Zhang, Bixiang; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-02-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The arachidonic acid (AA) pathway and linoleic acid (LA) pathway have been implicated as important contributors to CRC development and growth. Human 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LOX-1) converts LA to anti-tumor 13-S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE)and 15-LOX-2 converts AA to 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). In addition, human 12-LOX metabolizes AA to pro-tumor 12-HETE. In rodents, the function of 12-LOX and 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 is carried out by a single enzyme, 12/15-LOX. As a result, conflicting conclusions concerning the role of 12-LOX and 15-LOX have been obtained in animal studies. In the present studies, we determined that PD146176, a selective 15-LOX-1 inhibitor, markedly suppressed 13-HODE generation in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells and HCA-7 tumors, in association with increased tumor growth. In contrast, PD146176 treatment led to decreases in 12-HETE generation in mouse colon cancer MC38 cells and MC38 tumors, in association with tumor inhibition. Surprisingly, deletion of host 12/15-LOX alone led to increased MC38 tumor growth, in association with decreased tumor 13-HODE levels, possibly due to inhibition of 12/15-LOX activity in stroma. Therefore, the effect of 12/15-LOX on colorectal tumorigenesis in mouse models could be affected by tumor cell type (human or mouse), relative 12/15 LOX activity in tumor cells and stroma as well as the relative tumor 13-HODE and 12-HETE levels.

  15. 4-Acetylantroquinonol B inhibits colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and suppresses cancer stem-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Tung-Cheng [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chi-Tai [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan (China); Adebayo, Bamodu Oluwaseun [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ying-Chin [Department of Family Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Deng, Li [Beijing Bioprocess Key Laboratory, College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Amoy-BUCT Industrial Bio-technovation Institute, Amoy 361022 (China); Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Huang, Chun-Chih [Institute of Biochemical Sciences and Technology, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung 41349, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wei-Hwa [Department of Pathology, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan (China); Wu, Alexander T.H. [Ph.D. Program for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Michael [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    4-Acetylantroquinonol B (4-AAQB), closely related to the better known antroquinonol, is a bioactive isolate of the mycelia of Antrodia camphorata, a Taiwanese mushroom with documented anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, vasorelaxative, and recently demonstrated, antiproliferative activity. Based on its traditional use, we hypothesized that 4-AAQB may play an active role in the suppression of cellular transformation, tumor aggression and progression, as well as chemoresistance in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative role of 4-AAQB and its underlying molecular mechanism. We also compared its anticancer therapeutic potential with that of antroquinonol and the CRC combination chemotherapy of choice — folinic acid, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). Our results showed that 4-AAQB was most effective in inhibiting tumor proliferation, suppressing tumor growth and attenuating stemness-related chemoresistance. 4-AAQB negatively regulates vital oncogenic and stem cell maintenance signal transduction pathways, including the Lgr5/Wnt/β-catenin, JAK–STAT, and non-transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways, as well as inducing a dose-dependent downregulation of ALDH and other stemness related factors. These results were validated in vivo, with animal studies showing 4-AAQB possessed comparable tumor-shrinking ability as FOLFOX and potentiates ability of the later to reduce tumor size. Thus, 4-AAQB, a novel small molecule, projects as a potent therapeutic agent for monotherapy or as a component of standard combination chemotherapy. - Highlights: • 4-Acetylantroquinonol B (4-AAQB) suppressed tumor cell proliferation. • 4-AAQB regulates oncogenic and stem cell maintenance signal pathways. • 4-AAQB negatively regulates Lgr5/Wnt/β-catenin and JAK–STAT pathways. • 4-AAQB reduced ALDH and other stemness related factor expression. • In vivo, 4-AAQB has comparable tumor-shrinking ability as FOLFOX.

  16. 4-Acetylantroquinonol B inhibits colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and suppresses cancer stem-like phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tung-Cheng; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Adebayo, Bamodu Oluwaseun; Lin, Ying-Chin; Deng, Li; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Huang, Chun-Chih; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Hsiao, Michael

    2015-01-01

    4-Acetylantroquinonol B (4-AAQB), closely related to the better known antroquinonol, is a bioactive isolate of the mycelia of Antrodia camphorata, a Taiwanese mushroom with documented anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, vasorelaxative, and recently demonstrated, antiproliferative activity. Based on its traditional use, we hypothesized that 4-AAQB may play an active role in the suppression of cellular transformation, tumor aggression and progression, as well as chemoresistance in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative role of 4-AAQB and its underlying molecular mechanism. We also compared its anticancer therapeutic potential with that of antroquinonol and the CRC combination chemotherapy of choice — folinic acid, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). Our results showed that 4-AAQB was most effective in inhibiting tumor proliferation, suppressing tumor growth and attenuating stemness-related chemoresistance. 4-AAQB negatively regulates vital oncogenic and stem cell maintenance signal transduction pathways, including the Lgr5/Wnt/β-catenin, JAK–STAT, and non-transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways, as well as inducing a dose-dependent downregulation of ALDH and other stemness related factors. These results were validated in vivo, with animal studies showing 4-AAQB possessed comparable tumor-shrinking ability as FOLFOX and potentiates ability of the later to reduce tumor size. Thus, 4-AAQB, a novel small molecule, projects as a potent therapeutic agent for monotherapy or as a component of standard combination chemotherapy. - Highlights: • 4-Acetylantroquinonol B (4-AAQB) suppressed tumor cell proliferation. • 4-AAQB regulates oncogenic and stem cell maintenance signal pathways. • 4-AAQB negatively regulates Lgr5/Wnt/β-catenin and JAK–STAT pathways. • 4-AAQB reduced ALDH and other stemness related factor expression. • In vivo, 4-AAQB has comparable tumor-shrinking ability as FOLFOX.

  17. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  18. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Li-Hong [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ma, Qin [Department of Oncology, The General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Shi, Ye-Hui [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Li, Shu-Fen [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Tong, Zhong-Sheng, E-mail: 83352162@qq.com [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  19. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Li-Hong; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Shu-Fen; Tong, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression

  20. Environmental factors in causing human cancers: emphasis on tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankpal, Umesh T; Pius, Hima; Khan, Moeez; Shukoor, Mohammed I; Maliakal, Pius; Lee, Chris M; Abdelrahim, Maen; Connelly, Sarah F; Basha, Riyaz

    2012-10-01

    The environment and dietary factors play an essential role in the etiology of cancer. Environmental component is implicated in ~80 % of all cancers; however, the causes for certain cancers are still unknown. The potential players associated with various cancers include chemicals, heavy metals, diet, radiation, and smoking. Lifestyle habits such as smoking and alcohol consumption, exposure to certain chemicals (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorines), metals and pesticides also pose risk in causing human cancers. Several studies indicated a strong association of lung cancer with the exposure to tobacco products and asbestos. The contribution of excessive sunlight, radiation, occupational exposure (e.g., painting, coal, and certain metals) is also well established in cancer. Smoking, excessive alcohol intake, consumption of an unhealthy diet, and lack of physical activity can act as risk factors for cancer and also impact the prognosis. Even though the environmental disposition is linked to cancer, the level and duration of carcinogen-exposure and associated cellular and biochemical aspects determine the actual risk. Modulations in metabolism and DNA adduct formation are considered central mechanisms in environmental carcinogenesis. This review describes the major environmental contributors in causing cancer with an emphasis on molecular aspects associated with environmental disposition in carcinogenesis.

  1. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.

    2006-01-01

    culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...... with their hierarchical positions along the retinoblastoma pathway. Our data provide new insights into oncogene-evoked DDR in human tumorigenesis, with potential implications for individualized management of tumors with elevated cyclin D1 versus cyclin E, due to their distinct clinical variables and biological behavior....

  2. Ectopic expression of PTTG1/securin promotes tumorigenesis in human embryonic kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Mohammed T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor transforming gene1 (PTTG1 is a novel oncogene that is expressed in most tumors. It encodes a protein that is primarily involved in the regulation of sister chromatid separation during cell division. The oncogenic potential of PTTG1 has been well characterized in the mouse, particularly mouse fibroblast (NIH3T3 cells, in which it induces cell proliferation, promotes tumor formation and angiogenesis. Human tumorigenesis is a complex and a multistep process often requiring concordant expression of a number of genes. Also due to differences between rodent and human cell biology it is difficult to extrapolate results from mouse models to humans. To determine if PTTG1 functions similarly as an oncogene in humans, we have characterized its effects on human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells. Results We report that introduction of human PTTG1 into HEK293 cells through transfection with PTTG1 cDNA resulted in increased cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and formation of tumors after subcutaneous injection of nu/nu mice. Pathologic analysis revealed that these tumors were poorly differentiated. Both analysis of HEK293 cells transiently transfected with PTTG1 cDNA and analysis of tumors developed on injection of HEK293 cells that had been stably transfected with PTTG1 cDNA indicated significantly higher levels of secretion and expression of bFGF, VEGF and IL-8 compared to HEK293 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1 vector or uninvolved tissues collected from the mice. Mutation of the proline-rich motifs at the C-terminal of PTTG1 abolished its oncogenic properties. Mice injected with this mutated PTTG1 either did not form tumors or formed very small tumors. Taken together our results suggest that PTTG1 is a human oncogene that possesses the ability to promote tumorigenesis in human cells at least in part through the regulation of expression or secretion of bFGF, VEGF and IL-8. Conclusions Our results

  3. A transcriptome anatomy of human colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü, Bingjian; Xu, Jing; Lai, Maode; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Jian

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating databases in human genome research have enabled integrated genome-wide study on complicated diseases such as cancers. A practical approach is to mine a global transcriptome profile of disease from public database. New concepts of these diseases might emerge by landscaping this profile. In this study, we clustered human colorectal normal mucosa (N), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), adenoma (A) and cancer (T) related expression sequence tags (EST) into UniGenes via an in-house GetUni software package and analyzed the transcriptome overview of these libraries by GOTree Machine (GOTM). Additionally, we downloaded UniGene based cDNA libraries of colon and analyzed them by Xprofiler to cross validate the efficiency of GetUni. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the expression of β-catenin and. 7 novel genes in colorectal cancers. The efficiency of GetUni was successfully validated by Xprofiler and RT-PCR. Genes in library N, IBD and A were all found in library T. A total of 14,879 genes were identified with 2,355 of them having at least 2 transcripts. Differences in gene enrichment among these libraries were statistically significant in 50 signal transduction pathways and Pfam protein domains by GOTM analysis P < 0.01 Hypergeometric Test). Genes in two metabolic pathways, ribosome and glycolysis, were more enriched in the expression profiles of A and IBD than in N and T. Seven transmembrane receptor superfamily genes were typically abundant in cancers. Colorectal cancers are genetically heterogeneous. Transcription variants are common in them. Aberrations of ribosome and glycolysis pathway might be early indicators of precursor lesions in colon cancers. The electronic gene expression profile could be used to highlight the integral molecular events in colorectal cancers

  4. Novel mouse model recapitulates genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Nicole E; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Buishand, Floryne O; Hue, Yue; Ried, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas are defined by a nonrandom distribution of genomic imbalances that are characteristic for this disease. Often, these imbalances affect entire chromosomes. Understanding the role of these aneuploidies for carcinogenesis is of utmost importance. Currently, established transgenic mice do not recapitulate the pathognonomic genome aberration profile of human colorectal carcinomas. We have developed a novel model based on the spontaneous transformation of murine colon epithelial cells. During this process, cells progress through stages of pre-immortalization, immortalization and, finally, transformation, and result in tumors when injected into immunocompromised mice. We analyzed our model for genome and transcriptome alterations using ArrayCGH, spectral karyotyping (SKY), and array based gene expression profiling. ArrayCGH revealed a recurrent pattern of genomic imbalances. These results were confirmed by SKY. Comparing these imbalances with orthologous maps of human chromosomes revealed a remarkable overlap. We observed focal deletions of the tumor suppressor genes Trp53 and Cdkn2a/p16. High-level focal genomic amplification included the locus harboring the oncogene Mdm2, which was confirmed by FISH in the form of double minute chromosomes. Array-based global gene expression revealed distinct differences between the sequential steps of spontaneous transformation. Gene expression changes showed significant similarities with human colorectal carcinomas. Pathways most prominently affected included genes involved in chromosomal instability and in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Our novel mouse model therefore recapitulates the most prominent genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal cancer, and might serve as a valuable tool for understanding the dynamic process of tumorigenesis, and for preclinical drug testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R Marchesi

    Full Text Available Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC. To this purpose, the microbiomes colonizing colon tumor tissue and adjacent non-malignant mucosa were compared by deep rRNA sequencing. The results revealed striking differences in microbial colonization patterns between these two sites. Although inter-individual colonization in CRC patients was variable, tumors consistently formed a niche for Coriobacteria and other proposed probiotic bacterial species, while potentially pathogenic Enterobacteria were underrepresented in tumor tissue. As the intestinal microbiota is generally stable during adult life, these findings suggest that CRC-associated physiological and metabolic changes recruit tumor-foraging commensal-like bacteria. These microbes thus have an apparent competitive advantage in the tumor microenvironment and thereby seem to replace pathogenic bacteria that may be implicated in CRC etiology. This first glimpse of the CRC microbiome provides an important step towards full understanding of the dynamic interplay between intestinal microbial ecology and sporadic CRC, which may provide important leads towards novel microbiome-related diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions.

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 is a marker for normal and malignant human colonic stem cells (SC) and tracks SC overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Emina H; Hynes, Mark J; Zhang, Tao; Ginestier, Christophe; Dontu, Gabriela; Appelman, Henry; Fields, Jeremy Z; Wicha, Max S; Boman, Bruce M

    2009-04-15

    Although the concept that cancers originate from stem cells (SC) is becoming scientifically accepted, mechanisms by which SC contribute to tumor initiation and progression are largely unknown. For colorectal cancer (CRC), investigation of this problem has been hindered by a paucity of specific markers for identification and isolation of SC from normal and malignant colon. Accordingly, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) was investigated as a possible marker for identifying colonic SC and for tracking them during cancer progression. Immunostaining showed that ALDH1(+) cells are sparse and limited to the normal crypt bottom, where SCs reside. During progression from normal epithelium to mutant (APC) epithelium to adenoma, ALDH1(+) cells increased in number and became distributed farther up the crypt. CD133(+) and CD44(+) cells, which are more numerous and broadly distributed in normal crypts, showed similar changes during tumorigenesis. Flow cytometric isolation of cancer cells based on enzymatic activity of ALDH (Aldefluor assay) and implantation of these cells in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient mice (a) generated xenograft tumors (Aldefluor(-) cells did not), (b) generated them after implanting as few as 25 cells, and (c) generated them dose dependently. Further isolation of cancer cells using a second marker (CD44(+) or CD133(+) serially) only modestly increased enrichment based on tumor-initiating ability. Thus, ALDH1 seems to be a specific marker for identifying, isolating, and tracking human colonic SC during CRC development. These findings also support our original hypothesis, derived previously from mathematical modeling of crypt dynamics, that progressive colonic SC overpopulation occurs during colon tumorigenesis and drives CRC development.

  7. Up-regulation of METCAM/MUC18 promotes motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Guo-fang; Cai, Shao-xi; Wu, Guang-Jer

    2011-01-01

    Conflicting research has identified METCAM/MUC18, an integral membrane cell adhesion molecule (CAM) in the Ig-like gene super-family, as both a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor in the development of breast cancer. To resolve this, we have re-investigated the role of this CAM in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Three breast cancer cell lines were used for the tests: one luminal-like breast cancer cell line, MCF7, which did not express any METCAM/MUC18, and two basal-like breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, which expressed moderate levels of the protein. MCF7 cells were transfected with the human METCAM/MUC18 cDNA to obtain G418-resistant clones which expressed the protein and were used for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro motility and invasiveness, and in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis. Both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells already expressed METCAM/MUC18. They were directly used for in vitro tests in the presence and absence of an anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody. In MCF7 cells, enforced METCAM/MUC18 expression increased in vitro motility, invasiveness, anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenesis), and in vivo tumorigenesis. In both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody inhibited both motility and invasiveness. Though both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells established a disorganized growth in 3D basement membrane culture assay, the introduction of the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody completely destroyed their growth in the 3D culture. These findings support the notion that human METCAM/MUC18 expression promotes the progression of human breast cancer cells by increasing their motility, invasiveness and tumorigenesis

  8. Up-regulation of METCAM/MUC18 promotes motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Shao-xi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting research has identified METCAM/MUC18, an integral membrane cell adhesion molecule (CAM in the Ig-like gene super-family, as both a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor in the development of breast cancer. To resolve this, we have re-investigated the role of this CAM in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Methods Three breast cancer cell lines were used for the tests: one luminal-like breast cancer cell line, MCF7, which did not express any METCAM/MUC18, and two basal-like breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, which expressed moderate levels of the protein. MCF7 cells were transfected with the human METCAM/MUC18 cDNA to obtain G418-resistant clones which expressed the protein and were used for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro motility and invasiveness, and in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis. Both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells already expressed METCAM/MUC18. They were directly used for in vitro tests in the presence and absence of an anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody. Results In MCF7 cells, enforced METCAM/MUC18 expression increased in vitro motility, invasiveness, anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenesis, and in vivo tumorigenesis. In both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody inhibited both motility and invasiveness. Though both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells established a disorganized growth in 3D basement membrane culture assay, the introduction of the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody completely destroyed their growth in the 3D culture. Conclusion These findings support the notion that human METCAM/MUC18 expression promotes the progression of human breast cancer cells by increasing their motility, invasiveness and tumorigenesis.

  9. Tumorigenesis of K-ras mutation in human endometrial carcinoma via upregulation of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zheng; Gui, Liming; Wang, Jianliu; Li, Xiaoping; Sun, Pengming; Wei, Lihui

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the tumorigenesis of mutant [12Asp]-K-ras in endometrial carcinoma and its relationship with ER. We constructed pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B by inserting full-length [12Asp]K-ras4B from human endometrial carcinoma Hec-1A cells, into pcDI vector. Cell proliferation of NIH3T3 after transfection with pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B was measured by MTT assay. The cell transformation was determined by colony formation and tumor nodule development. [12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells were transfected with constitutively active pCMV-RafCAAX and dominant-negative pCMV-RafS621A. Cell growth was measured by MTT assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation. After transfected with pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B or pCMV-RafS621A, the cells were harvested for Western blot and reporter assay to determine the expression and transcriptional activity of ERalpha and ERbeta, respectively. [12Asp]-K-ras4B enhanced NIH3T3 cells proliferation after 48 h post-transfection (P ras4B-NIH3T3 cells (13.48%) than pcDI-NIH3T3 (4.26%) or untreated NIH3T3 (2.33%). The pcDI-[12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells injected to the nude mice Balb/C developed tumor nodules with poor-differentiated cells after 12 days. An increase of ERalpha and ERbeta was observed in pcDI-[12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells. RafS621A downregulated ERalpha and ERbeta expression. Estrogen induced the ER transcriptional activity by 5-fold in pcDI-NIH3T3 cells, 13-fold in pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B-NIH3T3 and 19-fold in HEC-1A. RafS621A suppressed the ER transcriptional activity. K-ras mutation induces tumorigenesis in endometrium, and this malignant transformation involves Raf signaling pathway and ER.

  10. 12/15 lipoxygenase regulation of colorectal tumorigenesis is determined by the relative tumor levels of its metabolite 12-HETE and 13-HODE in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jian; Jiang, Li; Wang, Yinqiu; Yao, Bing; Yang, Shilin; Zhang, Bixiang; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The arachidonic acid (AA) pathway and linoleic acid (LA) pathway have been implicated as important contributors to CRC development and growth. Human 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LOX-1) converts LA to anti-tumor 13-S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE)and 15-LOX-2 converts AA to 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). In addition, human 12-LOX metabolizes AA to pro-tumor 12-HETE. In rodents, the function of 12-LOX ...

  11. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K.; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y.; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B. Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  12. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  13. Overexpression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells increases tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelavkar, U P; Nixon, J B; Cohen, C; Dillehay, D; Eling, T E; Badr, K F

    2001-11-01

    The effect of overexpression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LO-1) was studied in the human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. Stable PC-3 cell lines were generated by transfection with 15-LO-1-sense (15-LOS), 15-LO-1-antisense (15-LOAS) or vector (Zeo) and selection with Zeocin. After characterization by RT-PCR, western and HPLC, a PC3-15LOS clone was selected that possessed 10-fold 15-LO-1 enzyme activity compared with parental PC-3 cells. The PC3-15LOAS clone displayed little or no 15-LO-1 activity. These PC-3 cell lines were characterized for properties of tumorigenesis. The proliferation rates of the cell lines were as follows: PC3-15LOS > PC-3 = PC3-Zeo > PC3-15LOAS. Addition of a specific 15-LO-1 inhibitor, PD146176, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in vitro. Overexpression of 15-LO-1 also caused [(3)H]thymidine incorporation to increase by 4.0-fold (P < 0.01). Compared with parental and PC-3-Zeo cells, PC3-15LOS enhanced whereas PC3-15LOAS reduced the ability of PC-3 cells to grow in an anchorage-independent manner, as assessed by colony formation in soft agar. These data suggested a pro-tumorigenic role for 15-LO-1 in PC-3 cells in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of 15-LO-1 in vivo, the effect of 15-LO-1 expression on the growth of tumors in nude mice was investigated. The PC-3 cell lines were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic nude mice. The frequency of tumor formation was increased and the sizes of the tumors formed were much larger in the PC3-15LOS compared with PC3-15LOAS, parental PC-3 and PC-3-Zeo cells. Immunohistochemistry for 15-LO-1 confirmed expression throughout the duration of the experiment. The expression of factor VIII, an angiogenesis marker, in tumor sections was increased in tumors derived from PC3-15LOS cells and decreased in those from PC3-15LOAS cells compared with tumors from parental or Zeo cells. These data further supported the evaluation by ELISA of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by PC-3

  14. Haemostatic aspects of recombinant human erythropoietin in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Qvist, N; Winther, K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find out whether recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) given perioperatively has any effect on haemostatic activity in patients undergoing elective colorectal resection. DESIGN: A placebo-controlled double-blind study. SETTING: Odense university hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 24...

  15. Non-codingRNA sequence variations in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Sylwia E; Rossi, Simona; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Nicoloso, Milena S; Cimmino, Amelia; Alder, Hansjuerg; Herlea, Vlad; Rassenti, Laura Z; Rai, Kanti R; Kipps, Thomas J; Keating, Michael J; Croce, Carlo M; Calin, George A

    2010-02-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease in which the interplay between alterations in protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) plays a fundamental role. In recent years, the full coding component of the human genome was sequenced in various cancers, whereas such attempts related to ncRNAs are still fragmentary. We screened genomic DNAs for sequence variations in 148 microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs) loci in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or colorectal cancer (CRC) by Sanger technique and further tried to elucidate the functional consequences of some of these variations. We found sequence variations in miRNAs in both sporadic and familial CLL cases, mutations of UCRs in CLLs and CRCs and, in certain instances, detected functional effects of these variations. Furthermore, by integrating our data with previously published data on miRNA sequence variations, we have created a catalog of DNA sequence variations in miRNAs/ultraconserved genes in human cancers. These findings argue that ncRNAs are targeted by both germ line and somatic mutations as well as by single-nucleotide polymorphisms with functional significance for human tumorigenesis. Sequence variations in ncRNA loci are frequent and some have functional and biological significance. Such information can be exploited to further investigate on a genome-wide scale the frequency of genetic variations in ncRNAs and their functional meaning, as well as for the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for leukemias and carcinomas.

  16. Localization of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) in Human Colorectal Adenoma and Adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Mads N.; Hansen, Ulla; Brünner, Nils

    2005-01-01

    -growth. We have previously demonstrated that TIMP-1 is elevated in blood from colorectal cancer patients and that high TIMP-1 levels predict poor prognosis. To clarify the role of TIMP-1 in colorectal tumorigenesis, the expression pattern of TIMP-1 in benign and malignant colorectal tumors was studied....... In all of 24 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma TIMP-1 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization. In all cases TIMP-1 expression was found in fibroblast-like cells located at the invasive front but was seen only sporadically in normal mucosa. No TIMP-1 mRNA was seen in any of the cases in benign...... or malignant epithelial cells, in vascular cells or smooth muscle cells. Comparison of sections processed for TIMP-1 in situ hybridization with sections immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against TIMP-1 showed good correlation between TIMP-1 mRNA and immunoreactivity. Combining TIMP-1 in situ...

  17. Obatoclax, a Pan-BCL-2 Inhibitor, Targets Cyclin D1 for Degradation to Induce Antiproliferation in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Chi-Hung R; Chang, Yachu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Lee, Wee-Chyan; Su, Hong-Lin; Cheung, Muk-Wing; Huang, Chang-Po; Ho, Cheesang; Chang, Chia-Che

    2016-12-27

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Aberrant overexpression of antiapoptotic BCL-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) family proteins is closely linked to tumorigenesis and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. Obatoclax is an inhibitor targeting all antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins. A previous study has described the antiproliferative action of obatoclax in one human colorectal cancer cell line without elucidating the underlying mechanisms. We herein reported that, in a panel of human colorectal cancer cell lines, obatoclax inhibits cell proliferation, suppresses clonogenicity, and induces G₁-phase cell cycle arrest, along with cyclin D1 downregulation. Notably, ectopic cyclin D1 overexpression abrogated clonogenicity suppression but also G₁-phase arrest elicited by obatoclax. Mechanistically, pre-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 restored cyclin D1 levels in all obatoclax-treated cell lines. Cycloheximide chase analyses further revealed an evident reduction in the half-life of cyclin D1 protein by obatoclax, confirming that obatoclax downregulates cyclin D1 through induction of cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation. Lastly, threonine 286 phosphorylation of cyclin D1, which is essential for initiating cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, was induced by obatoclax in one cell line but not others. Collectively, we reveal a novel anticancer mechanism of obatoclax by validating that obatoclax targets cyclin D1 for proteasomal degradation to downregulate cyclin D1 for inducing antiproliferation.

  18. Temporal morphologic changes in human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1983-03-01

    The temporal morphologic changes of human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting into immunosuppressed mice were investigated by the use of light and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that colorectal carcinomas undergo a series of morphologic changes during the initial 30-day period following transplantation. During the initial 1-5-day period the majority of tumor cells die, and during the following 5-10-day period the necrotic debris created during the 1-5-day period is removed by host-supplied inflammatory cells. Only small groups of peripherally placed tumor cells survived at the end of the first 10 days. During the 10-20-day period the tumor cell populations of xenografts were reestablished by a morphologically heterogeneous population of tumor cells, and during the 20-30 day period consolidation of this process continued and some xenografts showed macroscopic evidence of growth. The authors hypothesize that human colorectal carcinomas, like the antecedent epithelium, contain subpopulations of undifferentiated cells that give rise to populations of more-differentiated cells.

  19. DUSP5 is methylated in CIMP-high colorectal cancer but is not a major regulator of intestinal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tögel, Lars; Nightingale, Rebecca; Wu, Rui; Chüeh, Anderly C; Al-Obaidi, Sheren; Luk, Ian; Dávalos-Salas, Mercedes; Chionh, Fiona; Murone, Carmel; Buchanan, Daniel D; Chatterton, Zac; Sieber, Oliver M; Arango, Diego; Tebbutt, Niall C; Williams, David; Dhillon, Amardeep S; Mariadason, John M

    2018-01-29

    The ERK signalling pathway regulates key cell fate decisions in the intestinal epithelium and is frequently dysregulated in colorectal cancers (CRCs). Variations in the dynamics of ERK activation can induce different biological outcomes and are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including activation of negative feedback loops involving transcriptional induction of dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). We have found that the nuclear ERK-selective phosphatase DUSP5 is downregulated in colorectal tumours and cell lines, as previously observed in gastric and prostate cancer. The DUSP5 promoter is methylated in a subset of CRC cell lines and primary tumours, particularly those with a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). However, this epigenetic change alone could not account for reduced DUSP5 expression in CRC cells. Functionally, DUSP5 depletion failed to alter ERK signalling or proliferation in CRC cell lines, and its transgenic overexpression in the mouse intestine had minimal impact on normal intestinal homeostasis or tumour development. Our results suggest that DUSP5 plays a limited role in regulating ERK signalling associated with the growth of colorectal tumours, but that methylation the DUSP5 gene promoter can serve as an additional means of identifying CIMP-high colorectal cancers.

  20. Long-range epigenetic silencing of chromosome 5q31 protocadherins is involved in early and late stages of colorectal tumorigenesis through modulation of oncogenic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallosso, A R; Øster, Bodil; Greenhough, A

    2012-01-01

    Loss of tumour suppressor gene function can occur as a result of epigenetic silencing of large chromosomal regions, referred to as long-range epigenetic silencing (LRES), and genome-wide analyses have revealed that LRES is present in many cancer types. Here we utilize Illumina Beadchip methylation...... array analysis to identify LRES across 800 kb of chromosome 5q31 in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas (n=34) relative to normal colonic epithelial DNA (n=6). This region encompasses 53 individual protocadherin (PCDH) genes divided among three gene clusters. Hypermethylation within these gene clusters......–polymerase chain reaction showed that PCDHGC3 is the highest expressed PCDH in normal colonic epithelium, and that there was a strong reciprocal relationship between PCDHGC3 methylation and expression in carcinomas (R=−0.84). PCDH LRES patterns are reflected in colorectal tumour cell lines; adenoma cell lines...

  1. Estradiol agonists inhibit human LoVo colorectal-cancer cell proliferation and migration through p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ju, Da-Tong; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-11-28

    To investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol via estrogen receptors (ER) or direct administration of ER agonists on human colorectal cancer. LoVo cells were established from the Bioresource Collection and Research Center and cultured in phenol red-free DMEM (Sigma, United States). To investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cellular proliferation, LoVo colorectal cells were treated with E2 or ER-selective agonists for 24 h and 48 h and subjected to the MTT (Sigma) assay to find the concentration. And investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cell used western immunoblotting to find out the diversification of signaling pathways. In order to observe motility and migration the wound healing assay and a transwell chamber (Neuro Probe) plate were tased. For a quantitative measure, we counted the number of migrating cells to the wound area post-wounding for 24 h. We further examined the cellular migration-regulating factors urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human LoVo cells so gelatin zymography that we used and gelatinolytic activity was visualized by Coomassie blue staining. And these results are presented as means ± SE, and statistical comparisons were made using Student's t-test. The structure was first compared with E2 and ER agonists. We then treated the LoVo cells with E2 and ER agonists (10(-8) mol/L) for 24 h and 48 h and subsequently measured the cell viability using MTT assay. Our results showed that treatment with 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists in human LoVo colorectal cancer cells activated p53 and then up-regulated p21 and p27 protein levels, subsequently inhibiting the downstream target gene, cyclin D1, which regulates cell proliferation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the anti-tumorigenesis effects of 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists and suggest that these compounds may prove to be a potential alternative

  2. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  3. The Ras effector RASSF2 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Kimishige; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Hinoda, Yuji; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    Activation of Ras signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the roles of negative regulators of Ras are not fully understood. Our aim was to address that question by surveying genetic and epigenetic alterations of Ras-Ras effector genes in CRC cells. The expression and methylation status of 6 RASSF family genes were examined using RT-PCR and bisulfite PCR in CRC cell lines and in primary CRCs and colorectal adenomas. Colony formation assays and flow cytometry were used to assess the tumor suppressor activities of RASSF1 and RASSF2. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the effect of altered RASSF2 expression on cell morphology. Mutations of K- ras , BRAF, and p53 were identified using single-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing. Aberrant methylation and histone deacetylation of RASSF2 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC. The activities of RASSF2, which were distinct from those of RASSF1, included induction of morphologic changes and apoptosis; moreover, its ability to prevent cell transformation suggests that RASSF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Primary CRCs that showed K- ras /BRAF mutations also frequently showed RASSF2 methylation, and inactivation of RASSF2 enhanced K- ras -induced oncogenic transformation. RASSF2 methylation was also frequently identified in colorectal adenomas. RASSF2 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that regulates Ras signaling and plays a pivotal role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  4. Dual roles for coactivator activator and its counterbalancing isoform coactivator modulator in human kidney cell tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Kyoung; Schiff, Rachel; Ko, Lan; Wang, Tao; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; O'Malley, Bert W

    2008-10-01

    Coactivator activator (CoAA) has been reported to be a coactivator that regulates steroid receptor-mediated transcription and alternative RNA splicing. Herein, we show that CoAA is a dual-function coregulator that inhibits G(1)-S transition in human kidney cells and suppresses anchorage-independent growth and xenograft tumor formation. Suppression occurs in part by down-regulating c-myc and its downstream effectors ccnd1 and skp2 and causing accumulation of p27/Kip1 protein. In this cellular setting, CoAA directly represses the proto-oncogene c-myc by recruiting HDAC3 protein and decreasing both the acetylation of histone H3 and the presence of RNA polymerase II on the c-myc promoter. Interestingly, a splicing isoform of CoAA, coactivator modulator (CoAM), antagonizes CoAA-induced G(1)-S transition and growth inhibition by negatively regulating the mRNA levels of the endogenous CoAA isoform. In addition, we found that expression of CoAA protein is significantly decreased in human renal cell carcinoma compared with normal kidney. Our study presents evidence that CoAA is a potential tumor suppressor in renal carcinoma and that CoAM is a counterbalancing splice isoform. This is, thus far, the only example of a nuclear receptor coregulator involved in suppression of kidney cancer and suggests potentially significant new roles for coregulators in renal cancer biology.

  5. The role of microRNA-200 in progression of human colorectal and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bojmar

    Full Text Available The role of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer has been studied extensively in vitro, but involvement of the EMT in tumorigenesis in vivo is largely unknown. We investigated the potential of microRNAs as clinical markers and analyzed participation of the EMT-associated microRNA-200-ZEB-E-cadherin pathway in cancer progression. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was quantified by real-time RT-PCR analysis of fresh-frozen and microdissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary colorectal tumors, normal colon mucosa, and matched liver metastases. MicroRNA expression was validated by in situ hybridization and after in vitro culture of the malignant cells. To assess EMT as a predictive marker, factors considered relevant in colorectal cancer were investigated in 98 primary breast tumors from a treatment-randomized study. Associations between the studied EMT-markers were found in primary breast tumors and in colorectal liver metastases. MicroRNA-200 expression in epithelial cells was lower in malignant mucosa than in normal mucosa, and was also decreased in metastatic compared to non-metastatic colorectal cancer. Low microRNA-200 expression in colorectal liver metastases was associated with bad prognosis. In breast cancer, low levels of microRNA-200 were related to reduced survival and high expression of microRNA-200 was predictive of benefit from radiotheraphy. MicroRNA-200 was associated with ER positive status, and inversely correlated to HER2 and overactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, that was associated with high ZEB1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that the stability of microRNAs makes them suitable as clinical markers and that the EMT-related microRNA-200-ZEB-E-cadherin signaling pathway is connected to established clinical characteristics and can give useful prognostic and treatment-predictive information in progressive breast and colorectal cancers.

  6. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  7. Role of cyclophilin B in tumorigenesis and cisplatin resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonghwan; Jang, Miran; Lim, Sangbin; Won, Hyeran; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Park, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Hyo Jong; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Won-Sang; Ha, Joohun; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) performs diverse roles in living cells, but its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is largely unclear. To reveal its role in HCC, we investigated the induction of CypB under hypoxia and its functions in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) induces CypB under hypoxia. Interestingly, CypB protected tumor cells, even p53-defective HCC cells, against hypoxia- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, it regulated the effects of HIF-1α, including those in angiogenesis and glucose metabolism, via a positive feedback loop with HIF-1α. The tumorigenic and chemoresistant effects of CypB were confirmed in vivo using a xenograft model. Finally, we showed that CypB is overexpressed in 78% and 91% of the human HCC and colon cancer tissues, respectively, and its overexpression in these cancers reduced patient survival. These results indicate that CypB induced by hypoxia stimulates the survival of HCC via a positive feedback loop with HIF-1α, indicating that CypB is a novel candidate target for developing chemotherapeutic agents against HCC and colon cancer. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. METCAM/MUC18 promoted tumorigenesis of human breast cancer SK-BR-3 cells in a dosage-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang-Yu; Wu, Guang-Jer

    2016-04-01

    Overexpression of METCAM/MUC18, an immunoglobulin-like cell-adhesion molecule, promotes tumorigenesis and progression of human breast cancer cells. We also observed an intriguing phenomenon that a high-expressing SK-BR-3 clone manifested a transient tumor suppression effect in vivo. The purpose of this study was to understand if this was caused by clonal variation, METCAM/MUC18-dosage effect, or the number of cells injected. Several G418-resistant clones of SK-BR-3, expressing different levels of METCAM/MUC18, were obtained for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 on in vitro motility, invasiveness, and anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenicity) and in vivo tumorigenesis in female Balb/C athymic nude mice. Tumor sections were made for histology and immunohistochemistry analyses, and tumor lysates for Western blot analysis to determine the effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on levels of various downstream effectors. METCAM/MUC18 promoted in vitro motility, invasiveness, and in vitro tumorigenicity of SK-BR-3 cells in a dosage-specific manner. Overexpression of METCAM/MUC18 could promote in vivo tumorigenesis of SK-BR-3 cells even when one tenth of the previously used cell number (5 × 10(5)) was injected and in vivo tumorigenesis of SK-BR-3 cells was directly proportional to the dosage of the protein. The previously observed transient tumor suppression effect from the same clone was no longer observed. The downstream effector, such as phospho-AKT/AKT ratio, was elevated in the tumors. Transient suppression observed previously in the clone was caused by injection of a high cell number (2 × 10(6)-5 × 10(6)). METCAM/MUC18 positively promotes tumorigenesis of SK-BR-3 cells by increasing the survival and proliferation pathway. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  10. New structural analogues of curcumin exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen, Ling; Hutzen, Brian; Ball, Sarah; DeAngelis, Stephanie; Chen, Chun-Liang; Fuchs, James R; Li, Chenglong; Li, Pui-Kai; Lin, Jiayuh

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed for colorectal carcinoma. Curcumin, the active component and yellow pigment of turmeric, has been reported to have several anti-cancer activities including anti-proliferation, anti-invasion, and anti-angiogenesis. Clinical trials have suggested that curcumin may serve as a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for colorectal cancer. We compared the inhibitory effects of curcumin and novel structural analogues, GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12, in three independent human colorectal cancer cell lines, SW480, HT-29, and HCT116. MTT cell viability assay was used to examine the cell viability/proliferation and western blots were used to determine the level of PARP cleavages. Half-Maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) were calculated using Sigma Plot 9.0 software. Curcumin inhibited cell viability in all three of the human colorectal cancer cell lines studied with IC 50 values ranging between 10.26 μM and 13.31 μM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 were more potent than curcumin in the inhibition of cell viability in these three human colorectal cancer cell lines with IC 50 values ranging between 0.51 μM and 4.48 μM. In addition, FLLL-11 and FLLL-12 exhibit low toxicity to WI-38 normal human lung fibroblasts with an IC-50 value greater than 1,000 μM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 are also more potent than curcumin in the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 in all three human colorectal cancer cell lines studied. The results indicate that the three curcumin analogues studied exhibit more potent inhibitory activity than curcumin in human colorectal cancer cells. Thus, they may have translational potential as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents for colorectal carcinoma

  11. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common cancer forms developing in industrialized countries, and its incidence appears to be rising. Studies of human population groups provide insufficient information about carcinogenesis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CRC...

  12. Prokineticin 1 protein expression is a useful new prognostic factor for human sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Hematogenous metastasis, regarded as closely related to angiogenic growth factors, is associated with colorectal cancer prognosis. The angiogenic growth factor prokineticin 1 (PROK1) has been cloned from endocrine cells. However, its protein expression in human malignant tumors has not been studied. The current study established the anti-PROK1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and examined the relationship between the expression of PROK1 protein and human colorectal cancer. The expression of PROK1 protein was assessed in 620 resected sporadic colorectal cancer tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining with in-house-developed human PROK1 mAb to investigate the relationship of PROK1 expression to clinicopathologic factors, recurrence, and survival rate and to evaluate its prognostic significance. The expression of PROK1 protein was detected in 36 % (223/620) of human primary colorectal cancer lesions but no in the healthy mucosa adjacent to the colorectal cancer lesions. According to the clinicopathologic examinations, the frequency of positive PROK1 expression was significantly higher in cases with serosal invasion, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, hematogenous metastasis, and higher stage disease. The recurrence rate and prognosis for patients with PROK1 expression-positive lesions were significantly worse. In the Cox proportional hazard model, PROK1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The expression of PROK1 protein was identified for the first time as a new prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  13. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Kang, Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections. (paper)

  14. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  15. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Eleonora; Governa, Valeria; Garzon, Jesus Francisco Glaus; Mele, Valentina; Amicarella, Francesca; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Trella, Emanuele; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Oertli, Daniel; Däster, Silvio Raffael; Droeser, Raoul A; Weixler, Benjamin; Bolli, Martin; Rosso, Raffaele; Nitsche, Ulrich; Khanna, Nina; Egli, Adrian; Keck, Simone; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zajac, Paul; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Borsig, Lubor; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2018-02-06

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues. Chemokine receptor expression on TILs was evaluated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions from digested tissues. Chemokine production by CRC cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, on generation of intraperitoneal or intracecal tumour xenografts in immune-deficient mice. T cell trafficking was assessed on adoptive transfer of human TILs into tumour-bearing mice. Gut flora composition was analysed by 16SrRNA sequencing. CRC infiltration by distinct T cell subsets was associated with defined chemokine gene signatures, including CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and T-helper (Th)1 cells; CCL17, CCL22 and CXCL12 for Th1 and regulatory T cells; CXCL13 for follicular Th cells; and CCL20 and CCL17 for interleukin (IL)-17-producing Th cells. These chemokines were expressed by tumour cells on exposure to gut bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Their expression was significantly higher in intracecal than in intraperitoneal xenografts and was dramatically reduced by antibiotic treatment of tumour-bearing mice. In clinical samples, abundance of defined bacteria correlated with high chemokine expression, enhanced T cell infiltration and improved survival. Gut microbiota stimulate chemokine production by CRC cells, thus favouring recruitment of beneficial T cells into tumour tissues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Human RNA polymerase II associated factor 1 complex promotes tumorigenesis by activating c-MYC transcription in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, Xiuyi; Giroux-Leprieur, Etienne; Wislez, Marie; Hu, Mu; Zhang, Yi; Shi, Huaiyin; Du, Kaiqi; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-associated factor 1 complex (hPAF1C) plays a crucial role in protein-coding gene transcription. Overexpression of hPAF1C has been implicated in the initiation and progression of various human cancers. However, the molecular pathways involved in tumorigenesis through hPAF1C remain to be elucidated. The current study suggested hPAF1C expression as a prognostic biomarker for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and patients with low hPAF1C expression levels had significantly better overall survival. Furthermore, the expression of hPAF1C was found to be positively correlated with c-MYC expression in patient tumor samples and in cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies indicated that hPAF1C could promote lung cancer cell proliferation through regulating c-MYC transcription. These results demonstrated the prognostic value of hPAF1C in early-stage NSCLC and the role of hPAF1C in the transcriptional regulation of c-MYC oncogene during NSCLC tumorigenesis. - Highlights: • hPAF1C expression is a prognostic biomarker for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. • The expression of hPAF1C was positively correlated with c-MYC in tumor samples of patients and in several NSCLC cell lines. • hPAF1C could promote lung cancer cell proliferation through regulating c-MYC transcription.

  17. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, Michele; Giannini, Romina; Notarnicola, Maria; Cavallini, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N 1 -acetyltransferase (SSAT) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis has been established. In this direction, we have evaluated the PPARγ expression and its relationship with polyamine metabolism in tissue samples from 40 patients operated because of colorectal carcinoma. Since it is known that the functional role of K-ras mutation in colorectal tumorigenesis is associated with cell growth and differentiation, polyamine metabolism and the PPARγ expression were also investigated in terms of K-ras mutation. PPARγ, ODC and SSAT mRNA levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase and real-time PCR. Polyamines were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ODC and SSAT activity were measured by a radiometric technique. PPARγ expression, as well as SSAT and ODC mRNA levels were significantly higher in cancer as compared to normal mucosa. Tumour samples also showed significantly higher polyamine levels and ODC and SSAT activities in comparison to normal samples. A significant and positive correlation between PPARγ and the SSAT gene expression was observed in both normal and neoplastic tissue (r = 0.73, p < 0.0001; r = 0.65, p < 0.0001, respectively). Moreover, gene expression, polyamine levels and enzymatic activities were increased in colorectal carcinoma samples expressing K-ras mutation as compared to non mutated K-ras samples. In conclusion, our data demonstrated a close relationship between PPARγ and SSAT in human colorectal cancer and this could represent an attempt to decrease polyamine levels and to reduce cell

  19. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on human colorectal cancer cells exposed to high doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Gong, Aimin; Ji, Jun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Lv, Suqing; Lv, Hongzhu; Sun, Xizhuo

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of a new radiosensitizer, doranidazole, and enhancing irradiation on colorectal cancer cells. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole was determined using colony formation and propidium iodide (PI) assays to measure cell growth inhibition and the cell killing effect of human colorectal cancer cell lines exposed to high doses of γ-ray irradiation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Fluorescence staining and cell migration assays were also used to assess the radiosensitizing effect. Cell proliferation evaluated by clonogenic survival curves was significantly inhibited by 5 mmol/L doranidazole, particularly at doses ranging from 10 to 30 Gy of irradiation. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on colorectal cancer cells occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Doranidazole also inhibited the mobility of cell invasion and migration. Doranidazole can enhance the killing effect and the cell growth inhibition of colorectal cancer after high-dose irradiation in a time and dose-dependent manner

  20. Human breast cancer: concerted role of diet, prolactin and adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J B

    1992-04-01

    The low incidence of breast cancer in Japan disappears within 2 generations in migrant Japanese in the USA. This is of fundamental importance if we are to understand, and perhaps reverse, the high rate seen in Western countries. Diet is the most likely factor involved, and a review of the topic of diet, body mass index, and gain in adult body mass, supports a relationship between these factors and breast-cancer risk in post-menopausal, but not pre-menopausal, women. A direct link between nutritional factors and secretion of the hormones prolactin and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate is proposed. An estrogen 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol is formed peripherally from the latter steroid, and in Western women attains a blood concentration at which it is biologically active. Thus diet/fat provides factors, viz., fatty acids, prolactin and estrogen, which in concerted fashion provide a milieu conducive to mammary tumorigenesis.

  1. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul D. Bernabe-Dones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC. In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45 and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36 was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2% CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males and in 1 of 36 (2.8% controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49. HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted.

  2. Inactivation of the DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by promoter hypermethylation is associated with G to A mutations in K-ras in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Toyota, M; Sanchez-Cespedes, M; Capella, G; Peinado, M A; Watkins, D N; Issa, J P; Sidransky, D; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-05-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair protein that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O6 position of guanine. O6-methylguanine mispairs with thymine during replication, and if the adduct is not removed, this results in conversion from a guanine-cytosine pair to an adenine-thymine pair. In vitro assays show that MGMT expression avoids G to A mutations and MGMT transgenic mice are protected against G to A transitions at ras genes. We have recently demonstrated that the MGMT gene is silenced by promoter methylation in many human tumors, including colorectal carcinomas. To study the relevance of defective MGMT function by aberrant methylation in relation to the presence of K-ras mutations, we studied 244 colorectal tumor samples for MGMT promoter hypermethylation and K-ras mutational status. Our results show a clear association between the inactivation of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation and the appearance of G to A mutations at K-ras: 71% (36 of 51) of the tumors displaying this particular type of mutation had abnormal MGMT methylation, whereas only 32% (12 of 37) of those with other K-ras mutations not involving G to A transitions and 35% (55 of 156) of the tumors without K-ras mutations demonstrated MGMT methylation (P = 0.002). In addition, MGMT loss associated with hypermethylation was observed in the small adenomas, including those that do not yet contain K-ras mutations. Hypermethylation of other genes such as p16INK4a and p14ARF was not associated with either MGMT hypermethylation or K-ras mutation. Our data suggest that epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation may lead to a particular genetic change in human cancer, specifically G to A transitions in the K-ras oncogene.

  3. Effects of mutant human Ki-rasG12C gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-01-01

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras G12C allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 μg/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras G12C allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 μg/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 μg/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 μg/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras G12C expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models

  4. The Relationship between TP53 Gene Status and Carboxylesterase 2 Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Ishimine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Irinotecan (CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is activated by the carboxylesterase CES2 and has been approved for the treatment of many types of solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Recent studies with cell lines show that CES2 expression is regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. However, clinical evidence for this regulatory mechanism in cancer is lacking. In this study, we examined the relationship between TP53 gene status and CES2 expression in human colorectal cancer. Most colorectal cancer specimens (70%; 26 of 37 showed lower CES2 mRNA levels (≥1.5-fold lower than the adjacent normal tissue, and only 30% (12 of 37 showed similar (<1.5-fold lower or higher CES2 mRNA levels. However, TP53 gene sequencing revealed no relationship between CES2 downregulation and TP53 mutational status. Moreover, while colorectal cancer cells expressing wild-type p53 exhibited p53-dependent upregulation of CES2, PRIMA-1MET, a drug that restores the transcriptional activity of mutant p53, failed to upregulate CES2 expression in cells with TP53 missense mutations. These results, taken together, suggest that CES2 mRNA expression is decreased in human colorectal cancer independently of p53.

  5. Kaiso overexpression promotes intestinal inflammation and potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Mavor, Meaghan; Milosavljevic, Snezana B; Chaudhary, Roopali; Gilbreath, Ebony; Yates, Clayton; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a key contributor to colorectal cancer (CRC). Although inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is recognized as an early event in CRC development, it is the accumulation of multiple subsequent oncogenic insults facilitates malignant transformation. One potential contributor to colorectal carcinogenesis is the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso, whose depletion extends lifespan and delays polyp onset in the widely used Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer. These findings suggested that Kaiso potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis, but this was paradoxical as Kaiso was previously implicated as a negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To resolve Kaiso's role in intestinal tumorigenesis and canonical Wnt signaling, we generated a transgenic mouse model (Kaiso(Tg/+)) expressing an intestinal-specific myc-tagged Kaiso transgene. We then mated Kaiso(Tg/+) and Apc(Min/+) mice to generate Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice for further characterization. Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited reduced lifespan and increased polyp multiplicity compared to Apc(Min/+) mice. Consistent with this murine phenotype, we found increased Kaiso expression in human CRC tissue, supporting a role for Kaiso in human CRC. Interestingly, Wnt target gene expression was increased in Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice, suggesting that Kaiso's function as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, as seen in Xenopus, is not maintained in this context. Notably, Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased inflammation and activation of NFκB signaling compared to their Apc(Min/+) counterparts. This phenotype was consistent with our previous report that Kaiso(Tg/+) mice exhibit chronic intestinal inflammation. Together our findings highlight a role for Kaiso in promoting Wnt signaling, inflammation and tumorigenesis in the mammalian intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression. PMID:29693007

  7. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena E. Richardson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression.

  8. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-02-26

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota.

  9. EMX2 gene expression predicts liver metastasis and survival in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Berk; Ochs, Markus; Radhakrishnan, Praveen; Brill, Adrian; Höcker, Hermine; Schwarz, Sandra; Weissinger, Daniel; Kehm, Roland; Kulu, Yakup; Ulrich, Alexis; Schneider, Martin

    2017-08-22

    The Empty Spiracles Homeobox (EMX-) 2 gene has been associated with regulation of growth and differentiation in neuronal development. While recent studies provide evidence that EMX2 regulates tumorigenesis of various solid tumors, its role in colorectal cancer remains unknown. We aimed to assess the prognostic significance of EMX2 expression in stage III colorectal adenocarcinoma. Expression levels of EMX2 in human colorectal cancer and adjacent mucosa were assessed by qRT-PCR technology, and results were correlated with clinical and survival data. siRNA-mediated knockdown and adenoviral delivery-mediated overexpression of EMX2 were performed in order to investigate its effects on the migration of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Compared to corresponding healthy mucosa, colorectal tumor samples had decreased EMX2 expression levels. Furthermore, EMX2 down-regulation in colorectal cancer tissue was associated with distant metastasis (M1) and impaired overall patient survival. In vitro knockdown of EMX2 resulted in increased tumor cell migration. Conversely, overexpression of EMX2 led to an inhibition of tumor cell migration. EMX2 is frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer, and down-regulation of EMX2 is a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. EMX2 might thus represent a promising therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  10. Continuous wave terahertz reflection imaging of human colorectal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-ionizing, and nondestructive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. Fresh excisions of normal colon tissue were obtained from surgeries performed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Reflection measurements of thick sections of colorectal tissues, mounted in an aluminum sample holder, were obtained for both fresh and formalin fixed tissues. The two-dimensional reflection images were acquired by using an optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz with liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance form the samples was collected. Analysis of the images showed the importance of understanding the effects of formalin fixation while determining reflectance level of tissue response. The resulting co- and cross-polarized images of both normal and formalin fixed tissues showed uniform terahertz response over the entire sample area. Initial measurements indicated a co-polarized reflectance of 16%, and a cross-polarized reflectance of 0.55% from fresh excisions of normal colonic tissues.

  11. Cryopreservation of human colorectal carcinomas prior to xenografting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnebacher, Michael; Maletzki, Claudia; Ostwald, Christiane; Klier, Ulrike; Krohn, Mathias; Klar, Ernst; Prall, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    Molecular heterogeneity of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is well recognized, forming the rationale for molecular tests required before administration of some of the novel targeted therapies that now are rapidly entering the clinics. For clinical research at least, but possibly even for future individualized tumor treatment on a routine basis, propagation of patients' CRC tissue may be highly desirable for detailed molecular, biochemical or functional analyses. However, complex logistics requiring close liaison between surgery, pathology, laboratory researchers and animal care facilities are a major drawback in this. We here describe and evaluate a very simple cryopreservation procedure for colorectal carcinoma tissue prior to xenografting that will considerably reduce this logistic complexity. Fourty-eight CRC collected ad hoc were xenografted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice either fresh from surgery (N = 23) or after cryopreservation (N = 31; up to 643 days). Take rates after cryopreservation were satisfactory (71%) though somewhat lower than with tumor tissues fresh from surgery (74%), but this difference was not statistically significant. Re-transplantation of cryopreserved established xenografts (N = 11) was always successful. Of note, in this series, all of the major molecular types of CRC were xenografted successfully, even after cryopreservation. Our procedure facilitates collection, long-time storage and propagation of clinical CRC specimens (even from different centres) for (pre)clinical studies of novel therapies or for basic research

  12. Incidence and Mortality of Colorectal Cancer and Relationships with the Human Development Index across the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Sepehri, Zahra; Shamlou, Reza; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the standardized incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer and its relationship with the human development index (HDI) across the world in 2012. This ecologic study was conducted for assessment of the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its components. Data for SIR and SMR for every country for the year 2012 were obtained from the global cancer project. We used a bivariate method for assessment of the correlation between SIR and SMR and HDI. Statistical significance was assumed at <0.05. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (Version 22.0, SPSS Inc.). Countries with the highest SIR of colorectal cancer in the world in 2012, were Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Hungary and countries with the highest SMR were Hungary, Croatia and Slovakia. The correlation between SIR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.712 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.513 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.641 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.514 (P=0.013). In addition, the correlation between SMR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.628 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.469 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.592 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.378 (P=0.013). The highest SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer was in the WHO Europe region. There was a positive correlation between HDI and SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer.

  13. Identification of a characteristic vascular belt zone in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Nikolas Kather

    Full Text Available Intra-tumoral blood vessels are of supreme importance for tumor growth, metastasis and therapy. Yet, little is known about spatial distribution patterns of these vessels. Most experimental or theoretical tumor models implicitly assume that blood vessels are equally abundant in different parts of the tumor, which has far-reaching implications for chemotherapy and tumor metabolism. In contrast, based on histological observations, we hypothesized that blood vessels follow specific spatial distribution patterns in colorectal cancer tissue. We developed and applied a novel computational approach to identify spatial patterns of angiogenesis in histological whole-slide images of human colorectal cancer.In 33 of 34 (97% colorectal cancer primary tumors blood vessels were significantly aggregated in a sharply limited belt-like zone at the interface of tumor tissue to the intestinal lumen. In contrast, in 11 of 11 (100% colorectal cancer liver metastases, a similar hypervascularized zone could be found at the boundary to surrounding liver tissue. Also, in an independent validation cohort, we found this vascular belt zone: 22 of 23 (96% samples of primary tumors and 15 of 16 (94% samples of liver metastases exhibited the above-mentioned spatial distribution.We report consistent spatial patterns of tumor vascularization that may have far-reaching implications for models of drug distribution, tumor metabolism and tumor growth: luminal hypervascularization in colorectal cancer primary tumors is a previously overlooked feature of cancer tissue. In colorectal cancer liver metastases, we describe a corresponding pattern at the invasive margin. These findings add another puzzle piece to the complex concept of tumor heterogeneity.

  14. 3-D visualization and quantitation of microvessels in transparent human colorectal carcinoma [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-An Liu

    Full Text Available Microscopic analysis of tumor vasculature plays an important role in understanding the progression and malignancy of colorectal carcinoma. However, due to the geometry of blood vessels and their connections, standard microtome-based histology is limited in providing the spatial information of the vascular network with a 3-dimensional (3-D continuum. To facilitate 3-D tissue analysis, we prepared transparent human colorectal biopsies by optical clearing for in-depth confocal microscopy with CD34 immunohistochemistry. Full-depth colons were obtained from colectomies performed for colorectal carcinoma. Specimens were prepared away from (control and at the tumor site. Taking advantage of the transparent specimens, we acquired anatomic information up to 200 μm in depth for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the vasculature. Examples are given to illustrate: (1 the association between the tumor microstructure and vasculature in space, including the perivascular cuffs of tumor outgrowth, and (2 the difference between the 2-D and 3-D quantitation of microvessels. We also demonstrate that the optically cleared mucosa can be retrieved after 3-D microscopy to perform the standard microtome-based histology (H&E staining and immunohistochemistry for systematic integration of the two tissue imaging methods. Overall, we established a new tumor histological approach to integrate 3-D imaging, illustration, and quantitation of human colonic microvessels in normal and cancerous specimens. This approach has significant promise to work with the standard histology to better characterize the tumor microenvironment in colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  16. Protein kinase D1 stimulates proliferation and enhances tumorigenesis of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Manale; Legay, Christine; Auclair, Christian; Ricort, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase D1, PKD1, is a novel serine/threonine kinase whose altered expression and dysregulation in many tumors as well as its activation by several mitogens suggest that this protein could regulate proliferation and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, the precise signaling pathways used are still unclear and the potential direct role of PKD1 in tumor development and progression has not been yet investigated. In order to clarify the role of PKD1 in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, we studied the effects of PKD1 overexpression in a human adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell line, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that overexpression of PKD1 specifically promotes MCF-7 cell proliferation through accelerating G0/G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Moreover, inhibition of endogenous PKD1 significantly reduced cell proliferation. Taken together, these results clearly strengthen the regulatory role of PKD1 in cell growth. We also demonstrated that overexpression of PKD1 specifically diminished serum- and anchorage-dependence for proliferation and survival in vitro and allowed MCF-7 cells to form tumors in vivo. Thus, all these data highlight the central role of PKD1 in biological processes which are hallmarks of malignant transformation. Analysis of two major signaling pathways implicated in MCF-7 cell proliferation showed that PKD1 overexpression significantly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation state without affecting Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, PKD1 overexpression-stimulated cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth were totally impaired by inhibition of the MEK/ERK kinase cascade. However, neither of these effects was affected by blocking the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Thus, the MEK/ERK signaling appears to be a determining pathway mediating the biological effects of PKD1 in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, all these data demonstrate that PKD1 overexpression increases the aggressiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through enhancing their oncogenic

  17. Semi-synthetic salinomycin analogs exert cytotoxic activity against human colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Johannes; Kattner, Sarah; Borgström, Björn; Volz, Claudia; Schmidt, Thomas; Schneider, Martin; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel; Ulrich, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, is a well-known inhibitor of human cancer stem cells. Chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin has enabled access to synthetic analogs that display increased cytotoxic activity compared to the native structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of a cohort of C20-O-acyl analogs of salinomycin on human colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro. Two human colorectal cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620) were exposed to three C20-O-acylated analogs and salinomycin. The impact of salinomycin and its analogs on tumor cell number, migration, cell death, and cancer stem cell specifity was analyzed. Exposure of human colorectal cancer cells to the C20-O-acylated analogs of salinomycin resulted in reduced tumor cell number and impaired tumor cell migration at lower concentrations than salinomycin. When used at higher (micromolar) concentrations, these effects were accompanied by induction of apoptotic cell death. Salinomycin analogs further expose improved activity against cancer stem cells compared to salinomycin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Model for Understanding RAS Proteins and Their Role in Human Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzanelli, Giulia; Francisco, Rita; Azevedo, Luísa; Carvalho, Patrícia Dias; Almeida, Ana; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Oliveira, Maria José; Lucas, Cândida; Sousa, Maria João

    2018-01-01

    The exploitation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a biological model for the investigation of complex molecular processes conserved in multicellular organisms, such as humans, has allowed fundamental biological discoveries. When comparing yeast and human proteins, it is clear that both amino acid sequences and protein functions are often very well conserved. One example of the high degree of conservation between human and yeast proteins is highlighted by the members of the RAS family. Indeed, the study of the signaling pathways regulated by RAS in yeast cells led to the discovery of properties that were often found interchangeable with RAS proto-oncogenes in human pathways, and vice versa. In this work, we performed an updated critical literature review on human and yeast RAS pathways, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. Moreover, we emphasized the contribution of studying yeast RAS pathways for the understanding of human RAS and how this model organism can contribute to unveil the roles of RAS oncoproteins in the regulation of mechanisms important in the tumorigenic process, like autophagy. PMID:29463063

  19. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  20. The oncogenic role of microRNA-130a/301a/454 in human colorectal cancer via targeting Smad4 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liu

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β/Smad signaling plays an important role in colon cancer development, progression and metastasis. In this study we demonstrated that the microRNA-130a/301a/454 family is up-regulated in colon cancer tissues compared to paired adjacent normal mucosa, which share the same 3'-untranslational region (3'-UTR binding seed sequence and are predicated to target Smad4. In colorectal cancer HCT116 and SW480 cells, overexpression of miRNA-130a/301a/454 mimics enhances cell proliferation and migration, while inhibitors of these miRNAs affect cell survival. The biological function of miRNA-130a/301a/454 on colon cancer cells is likely mediated by suppression of Smad4, and the up-regulation of the miRNAs is correlated with Smad4 down-regulation in human colon cancers. Collectively, these results suggest that miRNA-130a/301a/454 are novel oncogenic miRNAs contributing to colon tumorigenesis by regulating TGF-β/Smad signaling, which may have potential application in cancer therapy.

  1. The Oncogenic Role of microRNA-130a/301a/454 in Human Colorectal Cancer via Targeting Smad4 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Dong, Guanglong; Du, Xiaohui; Wu, Xin; Tang, Yun; Han, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signaling plays an important role in colon cancer development, progression and metastasis. In this study we demonstrated that the microRNA-130a/301a/454 family is up-regulated in colon cancer tissues compared to paired adjacent normal mucosa, which share the same 3′-untranslational region (3′-UTR) binding seed sequence and are predicated to target Smad4. In colorectal cancer HCT116 and SW480 cells, overexpression of miRNA-130a/301a/454 mimics enhances cell proliferation and migration, while inhibitors of these miRNAs affect cell survival. The biological function of miRNA-130a/301a/454 on colon cancer cells is likely mediated by suppression of Smad4, and the up-regulation of the miRNAs is correlated with Smad4 down-regulation in human colon cancers. Collectively, these results suggest that miRNA-130a/301a/454 are novel oncogenic miRNAs contributing to colon tumorigenesis by regulating TGF-β/Smad signaling, which may have potential application in cancer therapy. PMID:23393589

  2. Autophagy Enhances the Aggressiveness of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells and Their Ability to Adapt to Apoptotic Stimulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Hai-yang; Zhang, Xiao-yang; Wang, Xing-fen; Sun, Bao-cun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate LC3B-II and active caspase-3 expression in human colorectal cancer to elucidate the role of autophagy, and to explore the relationship of autophagy with apoptosis in human colorectal cancer. LC3B expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 53 human colorectal cancer tissues and 20 normal colon tissues. The protein levels of LC3B-II and active caspase-3 were also determined by Western blot analysis in 23 human colorectal cancer tissues and 10 normal colon tissues. LC3B was expressed both in cancer cells and normal epithelial cells. LC3B expression in the peripheral area of cancer tissues was correlated with several clinicopathological factors, including tumor differentiation (P=0.002), growth pattern of the tumor margin (P=0.028), pN (P=0.002), pStage (P=0.032), as well as vessel and nerve plexus invasion (P=0.002). The protein level of LC3B-II in cancer tissue was significantly higher than in normal tissue (P=0.038), but the expression of active forms of procaspase-3 in cancer tissue was lower (P=0.041). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the expression levels of LC3B-II and the active forms of procaspase-3 (r=0.537, P=0.008). Autophagy has a prosurvival role in human colorectal cancer. Autophagy enhances the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer cells and their ability to adapt to apoptotic stimulus

  3. The direct effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK, dominant-negative FAK, FAK-CD and FAK siRNA on gene expression and human MCF-7 breast cancer cell tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in survival signaling. FAK has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer tumors at early stages of tumorigenesis. Methods To study the direct effect of FAK on breast tumorigenesis, we developed Tet-ON (tetracycline-inducible system of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stably transfected with FAK or dominant-negative, C-terminal domain of FAK (FAK-CD, and also FAKsiRNA with silenced FAK MCF-7 stable cell line. Increased expression of FAK in isogenic Tet-inducible MCF-7 cells caused increased cell growth, adhesion and soft agar colony formation in vitro, while expression of dominant-negative FAK inhibitor caused inhibition of these cellular processes. To study the role of induced FAK and FAK-CD in vivo, we inoculated these Tet-inducible cells in nude mice to generate tumors in the presence or absence of doxycycline in the drinking water. FAKsiRNA-MCF-7 cells were also injected into nude mice to generate xenograft tumors. Results Induction of FAK resulted in significant increased tumorigenesis, while induced FAK-CD resulted in decreased tumorigenesis. Taq Man Low Density Array assay demonstrated specific induction of FAKmRNA in MCF-7-Tet-ON-FAK cells. DMP1, encoding cyclin D binding myb-like protein 1 was one of the genes specifically affected by Tet-inducible FAK or FAK-CD in breast xenograft tumors. In addition, silencing of FAK in MCF-7 cells with FAK siRNA caused increased cell rounding, decreased cell viability in vitro and inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Importantly, Affymetrix microarray gene profiling analysis using Human Genome U133A GeneChips revealed >4300 genes, known to be involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, and adhesion that were significantly down- or up-regulated (p Conclusion Thus, these data for the first time demonstrate the direct effect of FAK expression and function on MCF-7 breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and reveal

  4. Dual roles for CoAA and its counterbalancing isoform CoAM in human kidney cell tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Kyoung; Schiff, Rachel; Ko, Lan; Wang, Tao; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; W. O’Malley, Bert

    2008-01-01

    Co-Activator Activator (CoAA) has been reported to be a coactivator that regulates steroid receptor-mediated transcription and alternative RNA splicing. Herein we show that CoAA is a dual-function coregulator that inhibits G1/S transition in human kidney cells and suppresses anchorage independent growth and xenograft tumor formation. Suppression occurs in part by downregulating c-myc and its downstream effectors ccnd1 and skp2, and causing accumulation of p27/Kip1 protein. In this cellular setting, CoAA directly represses the proto-oncogene, c-myc by recruiting HDAC3 protein and decreasing both the acetylation of histone H3 and the presence of RNA polymerase II on the c-myc promoter. Interestingly, a splicing isoform of CoAA, Coactivator Modulator (CoAM), antagonizes CoAA-induced G1/S transition and growth inhibition by negatively regulating the mRNA levels of the endogenous CoAA isoform. In addition, we found that expression of CoAA protein is significantly decreased in human renal cell carcinoma as compared to normal kidney. Our study presents evidence that CoAA is a potential tumor suppressor in renal carcinoma and that CoAM is a counterbalancing splice-isoform. This is so far the only example of a nuclear receptor coregulator involved in suppression of kidney cancer, and suggests potentially significant new roles for coregulators in renal cancer biology. PMID:18829545

  5. Nardilysin controls intestinal tumorigenesis through HDAC1/p53-dependent transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Keitaro; Sakamoto, Jiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihide; Ikuta, Kozo; Goto, Norihiro; Morita, Yusuke; Ohno, Mikiko; Nishi, Kiyoto; Eto, Koji; Kimura, Yuto; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ikegami, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Takaaki; Fukuda, Akihisa; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Kimura, Takeshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Nishi, Eiichiro; Seno, Hiroshi

    2018-04-19

    Colon cancer is a complex disease affected by a combination of genetic and epigenetic factors. Here we demonstrate that nardilysin (N-arginine dibasic convertase; NRDC), a metalloendopeptidase of the M16 family, regulates intestinal tumorigenesis via its nuclear functions. NRDC is highly expressed in human colorectal cancers. Deletion of the Nrdc gene in ApcMin mice crucially suppressed intestinal tumor development. In ApcMin mice, epithelial cell-specific deletion of Nrdc recapitulated the tumor suppression observed in Nrdc-null mice. Moreover, epithelial cell-specific overexpression of Nrdc significantly enhanced tumor formation in ApcMin mice. Notably, epithelial NRDC controlled cell apoptosis in a gene dosage-dependent manner. In human colon cancer cells, nuclear NRDC directly associated with HDAC1, and controlled both acetylation and stabilization of p53, with alterations of p53 target apoptotic factors. These findings demonstrate that NRDC is critically involved in intestinal tumorigenesis through its epigenetic regulatory function, and targeting NRDC may lead to a novel prevention or therapeutic strategy against colon cancer.

  6. Radiation tumorigenesis in inbred laboratory animals and cancer risks in irradiated human populations. Two widely different problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walinder, G.

    1978-01-01

    The mammal has efficient defence mechanisms against the development of tumours. These mechanisms are successively deteriorated by ionizing radiation when the dose increases beyond certain 'borderline levels'. Consequently, most animal strains demonstrate a bi-phasic dose-tumour relationship with a low-dose limb, the slope of which cannot be distinguished from zero, and a high-dose limb that increases with increasing doses. There are four or five exceptions to this 'rule' but in most of these cases the probable reasons for the deviations are known. Some human tumours as observed in epidemiological investigations do not demonstrate a similar clearly bi-phasic dose response. In all probability, this discrepancy does not reflect a higher susceptibility to radiation-induced tumours in man compared with other mammals. It is rather a consequence of a greater statistical variation in radiosensitivity in heterogeneous human populations than among inbred animals living standardized conditions. Accordingly, when maximum permissible dose levels are to be determined one should extrapolate from epidemiological data. Furthermore, these extrapolations should be linear if the data do not clearly deviate from a straight line, and if there are no scientific reasons to assume that a threshold exists. This formal method would not produce a biological description of what may happen in the low-dose area but rather an upper risk limit for the population studied. The real low-dose risk cannot be known. For the same pragmatic reason other radiological or non-radiological risks should be determined in the same manner, particularly when risks are to be compared. (author)

  7. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins...

  8. Influence of histamine and serotonin antagonists on the growth of xenografted human colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1981-12-01

    Four lines of human colorectal cancer were established and serially propagated as subcutaneous xenographs in immunosuppressed inbred CBA/Lac mice. Established xenografts were then used to investigate the influence of a serotonin antagonist (BW 501c) and a histamine H2 receptor antagonists (Cimetidine) on xenograft growth. The growth of each of the four tumor lines was significantly inhibited by BW 501c throughout the treatment, whereas the growth of only two tumor lines was significantly inhibited by Cimetidine treatment. The response of individual tumor lines was not predictable on the basis of either tumor histopathology or the natural growth rate of the untreated xenograft. A number of alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypotheses are suggested to explain the results. One hypothesis proposes that colorectal tumors are composed of subpopulations of tumor cells that are variously dependent on or independent of amine hormones. Another hypothesis is that tumor cells exhibit temporal changes in hormone sensitivity to amine hormones during treatment. Finally, it is suggested that serotonin and/or histamine H2 antagonists may be useful in preventing the repopulation of colorectal carcinomas following antineoplastic therapy with the use of conventional drugs.

  9. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  10. Autophagy mediates cytotoxicity of human colorectal cancer cells treated with garcinielliptone FC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Shen-Jeu; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Yu; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chen, Jyun-Ti; Su, Chun-Li

    2018-01-01

    The tautomeric pair of garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a novel tautomeric pair of polyprenyl benzophenonoid isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. (G. subelliptica, Clusiaceae), a tree with abundant sources of polyphenols. Our previous report demonstrated that GFC induced apoptosis on various types of human cancer cell lines including chemoresistant human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. In the present study, we observed that many autophagy-related genes in GFC-treated HT-29 cells were up- and down-regulated using a cDNA microarray containing oncogenes and kinase genes. GFC-induced autophagy of HT-29 cells was confirmed by observing the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, LC3 puncta, and double-membrane autophagic vesicles using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Inhibition of AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling as well as formation of Atg5-Atg12 and PI3K/Beclin-1 complexes were observed using Western blot. Administration of autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine and shRNA Atg5) and apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD showed that the GFC-induced autophagy was cytotoxic form and GFC-induced apoptosis enhanced GFC-induced autophagy. Our data suggest the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in GFC-induced anticancer mechanisms of human colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. MNS16A tandem repeats minisatellite of human telomerase gene: a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Philipp; Baierl, Andreas; Feik, Elisabeth; Führlinger, Gerhard; Leeb, Gernot; Mach, Karl; Holzmann, Klaus; Micksche, Michael; Gsur, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Telomerase reactivation and expression of human telomerase gene [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)] are hallmarks of unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells. A polymorphic tandem repeats minisatellite of hTERT gene, termed MNS16A was reported to influence hTERT expression. To assess the role of MNS16A as potential biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC), we investigated for the first time the association of MNS16A genotypes with risk of colorectal polyps and CRC. In the ongoing colorectal cancer study of Austria (CORSA), 3842 Caucasian participants were recruited within a large screening project in the province Burgenland including 90 CRC cases, 308 high-risk polyps, 1022 low-risk polyps and 1822 polyp free controls verified by colonoscopy. MNS16A genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Associations of MNS16A genotypes with CRC risk were estimated by logistic regression analysis computing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified five different variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) of MNS16A including VNTR-364, a newly discovered rare variant. VNTR-274 allele was associated with a 2.7-fold significantly increased risk of CRC compared with the VNTR-302 wild-type (OR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.11-6.50; P = 0.028). In our CORSA study, the medium length VNTR-274 was identified as risk factor for CRC. Although, this population-based study herewith reports the largest cohort size concerning MNS16A thus far, further large-scale studies in diverse populations are warranted to confirm hTERT MNS16A genotype as potential biomarker for assessment of CRC risk.

  12. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2006-01-01

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with δ-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol

  13. Evodiamine Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Migration of HCT-116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv-Cui Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Evodiamine (EVO exhibits strong anti-cancer effects. However, the effect of EVO on the human colorectal cancer cell line HCT-116 has not been explored in detail, and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, cell viability was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry, and morphological changes in the nucleus were examined by fluorescence microscopy and Hoechst staining. Cell motility was detected by Transwell assay. ELISA was used to assess the protein levels of autocrine motility factor (AMF in the cell supernatant, and protein expression was determined by Western blotting. Our results showed that EVO inhibited the proliferation of HCT-116 cells, caused accumulation of cells in S and G2/M phases, and reduced the levels of the secreted form of AMF. The protein levels of tumor suppressor protein (p53, Bcl-2 Associated X protein (Bax, B cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI, phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (p-STAT3 and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3 were altered in cells treated with EVO. Taken together, our results suggest that EVO modulates the activity of the p53 signaling pathway to induce apoptosis and downregulate MMP3 expression by inactivating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway through the downregulation of PGI to inhibit migration of HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells.

  14. Characterization of Human Colorectal Cancer MDR1/P-gp Fab Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the peptide sized 21 kDa covering P-gp transmembrane region was first prepared for generating a novel mouse monoclonal antibody Fab fragment with biological activity against multiple drug resistance protein P-gp21 by phage display technology. Phage-displayed antibody library prepared from mice spleen tissues was selected against the recombinant protein P-gp21 with five rounds of panning. A number of clones expressing Fab bound to P-gp21, showing neutralized activity in vitro, were isolated and screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on its recognition properties to P-gp21 and human colorectal cancer tissue homogenate, resulting in identification of an optimal recombinant Fab clone (Number 29. Further characterization by recloning number 29 into an expression vector showed significant induction of the Fab antibody in the clone number 29 by Isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG. After purified by HiTrap Protein L, the specificity of the Fab antibody to P-gp21 was also confirmed. Not only was the targeted region of this monoclonal Fab antibody identified as a 16-peptide epitope (ALKDKKELEGSGKIAT comprising residues 883–898 within the transmembrane (TM domain of human P-gp, but also the binding ability with it was verified. The clinical implication of our results for development of personalized therapy of colorectal cancer will be further studied.

  15. Single cells from human primary colorectal tumors exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Tahirova, Narmin; Tallapragada, Naren; Yao, Xiaosai; Campion, Liam; Angelini, Alessandro; Douce, Thomas B; Huang, Cindy; Bowman, Brittany; Williamson, Christina A; Kwon, Douglas S; Wittrup, K Dane; Love, J Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is an inflammatory disease of tissue that is largely influenced by the interactions between multiple cell types, secreted factors, and signal transduction pathways. While single-cell sequencing continues to refine our understanding of the clonotypic heterogeneity within tumors, the complex interplay between genetic variations and non-genetic factors ultimately affects therapeutic outcome. Much has been learned through bulk studies of secreted factors in the tumor microenvironment, but the secretory behavior of single cells has been largely uncharacterized. Here we directly profiled the secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines from thousands of single colorectal tumor and stromal cells, using an array of subnanoliter wells and a technique called microengraving to characterize both the rates of secretion of several factors at once and the numbers of cells secreting each chemokine. The ELR+ CXC chemokines are highly redundant, pro-angiogenic cytokines that signal via the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors, influencing tumor growth and progression. We find that human primary colorectal tumor and stromal cells exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in the combinations and magnitudes of secretions for these chemokines. In cell lines, we observe similar variance: phenotypes observed in bulk can be largely absent among the majority of single cells, and discordances exist between secretory states measured and gene expression for these chemokines among single cells. Together, these measures suggest secretory states among tumor cells are complex and can evolve dynamically. Most importantly, this study reveals new insight into the intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity of human primary tumors.

  16. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10 6 cells in 100μL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm 3 before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  17. Conserved mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the Drosophila adult midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Martorell

    Full Text Available Whereas the series of genetic events leading to colorectal cancer (CRC have been well established, the precise functions that these alterations play in tumor progression and how they disrupt intestinal homeostasis remain poorly characterized. Activation of the Wnt/Wg signaling pathway by a mutation in the gene APC is the most common trigger for CRC, inducing benign lesions that progress to carcinomas due to the accumulation of other genetic alterations. Among those, Ras mutations drive tumour progression in CRC, as well as in most epithelial cancers. As mammalian and Drosophila's intestines share many similarities, we decided to explore the alterations induced in the Drosophila midgut by the combined activation of the Wnt signaling pathway with gain of function of Ras signaling in the intestinal stem cells. Here we show that compound Apc-Ras clones, but not clones bearing the individual mutations, expand as aggressive intestinal tumor-like outgrowths. These lesions reproduce many of the human CRC hallmarks such as increased proliferation, blockade of cell differentiation and cell polarity and disrupted organ architecture. This process is followed by expression of tumoral markers present in human lesions. Finally, a metabolic behavioral assay shows that these flies suffer a progressive deterioration in intestinal homeostasis, providing a simple readout that could be used in screens for tumor modifiers or therapeutic compounds. Taken together, our results illustrate the conservation of the mechanisms of CRC tumorigenesis in Drosophila, providing an excellent model system to unravel the events that, upon mutation in Apc and Ras, lead to CRC initiation and progression.

  18. Conserved mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the Drosophila adult midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Òscar; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Campbell, Kyra; Barriga, Francisco M; Christov, Christo P; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Batlle, Eduard; Casanova, Jordi; Casali, Andreu

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the series of genetic events leading to colorectal cancer (CRC) have been well established, the precise functions that these alterations play in tumor progression and how they disrupt intestinal homeostasis remain poorly characterized. Activation of the Wnt/Wg signaling pathway by a mutation in the gene APC is the most common trigger for CRC, inducing benign lesions that progress to carcinomas due to the accumulation of other genetic alterations. Among those, Ras mutations drive tumour progression in CRC, as well as in most epithelial cancers. As mammalian and Drosophila's intestines share many similarities, we decided to explore the alterations induced in the Drosophila midgut by the combined activation of the Wnt signaling pathway with gain of function of Ras signaling in the intestinal stem cells. Here we show that compound Apc-Ras clones, but not clones bearing the individual mutations, expand as aggressive intestinal tumor-like outgrowths. These lesions reproduce many of the human CRC hallmarks such as increased proliferation, blockade of cell differentiation and cell polarity and disrupted organ architecture. This process is followed by expression of tumoral markers present in human lesions. Finally, a metabolic behavioral assay shows that these flies suffer a progressive deterioration in intestinal homeostasis, providing a simple readout that could be used in screens for tumor modifiers or therapeutic compounds. Taken together, our results illustrate the conservation of the mechanisms of CRC tumorigenesis in Drosophila, providing an excellent model system to unravel the events that, upon mutation in Apc and Ras, lead to CRC initiation and progression.

  19. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of γ-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G 2 /M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  20. Utilisation of tracer monoclonal antibodies for the immunoscintigraphic detection of human colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Douillard, J.Y.; Kremer, M.; Curtet, C.; Le Mevel, B.; Fumoleau, P.; Bourdoiseau, M.

    1983-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, 17-1A and 19-9, with recognized human gastrointestinal cancers in cell cultures, were labeled with iodine 131 for immunoscintigraphic application. With the intact 131 I-17-1A antibody, 21 out of 35 (60%) primary or secondary colorectal cancer sites were visualized, whereas all 21 nonepitheliomatous colic cancer sites or noncolic cancer sites were negative. With F(ab') 2 fragments of the 19-9 antibody, 18 out of 27 (67%) colorectal cancer sites were positive. With both radioantibodies, the bestly contrasted tumor images were late, 4 to 5 days after injection. A study with paired-label technique, associating a specific iodine-131-labeled antibody with a non-specific iodine-125-labeled immunoglobulin, demonstrated, that tumor uptake was indeed specific for the 17-1A or 19-9 antibody in tumor and normal colon fragments obtained during operations on 4 patients. A preliminary prospective study showed that only immunoscintigraphy was able to confirm and localize a recurrence of rectal cancer in one patient. A larger series will be necessary to validate the clinical benefit of the technique, as compared with the results of other diagnostic techniques, before immunoscintigraphy can be proposed for routine clinical use [fr

  1. Jagged1 is the pathological link between Wnt and Notch pathways in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Verónica; Villanueva, Alberto; Obrador-Hevia, Antonia; Robert-Moreno, Alex; Fernández-Majada, Vanessa; Grilli, Andrea; López-Bigas, Nuria; Bellora, Nicolás; Albà, M Mar; Torres, Ferran; Duñach, Mireia; Sanjuan, Xavier; Gonzalez, Sara; Gridley, Thomas; Capella, Gabriel; Bigas, Anna; Espinosa, Lluís

    2009-04-14

    Notch has been linked to beta-catenin-dependent tumorigenesis; however, the mechanisms leading to Notch activation and the contribution of the Notch pathway to colorectal cancer is not yet understood. By microarray analysis, we have identified a group of genes downstream of Wnt/beta-catenin (down-regulated when blocking Wnt/beta-catenin) that are directly regulated by Notch (repressed by gamma-secretase inhibitors and up-regulated by active Notch1 in the absence of beta-catenin signaling). We demonstrate that Notch is downstream of Wnt in colorectal cancer cells through beta-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation of the Notch-ligand Jagged1. Consistently, expression of activated Notch1 partially reverts the effects of blocking Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in tumors implanted s.c. in nude mice. Crossing APC(Min/+) with Jagged1(+/Delta) mice is sufficient to significantly reduce the size of the polyps arising in the APC mutant background indicating that Notch is an essential modulator of tumorigenesis induced by nuclear beta-catenin. We show that this mechanism is operating in human tumors from Familial Adenomatous Polyposis patients. We conclude that Notch activation, accomplished by beta-catenin-mediated up-regulation of Jagged1, is required for tumorigenesis in the intestine. The Notch-specific genetic signature is sufficient to block differentiation and promote vasculogenesis in tumors whereas proliferation depends on both pathways.

  2. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0198 TITLE: The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jatin Roper...CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0198 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...substantially reduces colorectal tumorigenesis in our genetically engineered mouse model. We also successfully ablated novel downstream targets of Akt in our

  4. Myeloid translocation genes differentially regulate colorectal cancer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Bobak; Bradley, Amber M.; Mittal, Mukul K.; Short, Sarah P.; Thompson, Joshua J.; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Naik, Rishi D.; Bilotta, Anthony J.; Washington, Mary K.; Revetta, Frank L.; Smith, Jesse J.; Chen, Xi; Wilson, Keith T.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs), originally identified as chromosomal translocations in acute myelogenous leukemia, are transcriptional corepressors that regulate hematopoietic stem cell programs. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database revealed that MTGs were mutated in epithelial malignancy and suggested that loss of function might promote tumorigenesis. Genetic deletion of MTGR1 and MTG16 in the mouse has revealed unexpected and unique roles within the intestinal epithelium. Mtgr1−/− mice have progressive depletion of all intestinal secretory cells, and Mtg16−/− mice have a decrease in goblet cells. Furthermore, both Mtgr1−/− and Mtg16−/− mice have increased intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. We thus hypothesized that loss of MTGR1 or MTG16 would modify Apc1638/+-dependent intestinal tumorigenesis. Mtgr1−/− mice, but not Mtg16−/− mice, had a 10-fold increase in tumor multiplicity. This was associated with more advanced dysplasia, including progression to invasive adenocarcinoma, and augmented intratumoral proliferation. Analysis of ChIP-seq datasets for MTGR1 and MTG16 targets indicated that MTGR1 can regulate Wnt and Notch signaling. In support of this, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis revealed that both Wnt and Notch signaling pathways were hyperactive in Mtgr1−/− tumors. Furthermore, in human colorectal cancer (CRC) samples MTGR1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein level. Overall our data indicates that MTGR1 has a context dependent effect on intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27270437

  5. Exosomal microRNA Biomarkers: Emerging Frontiers in Colorectal and Other Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ajay; Tovar-Camargo, Oscar A; Toden, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic strategies, particularly non-invasive blood-based screening approaches, are gaining increased attention for the early detection and attenuation of mortality associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the majority of current screening approaches are inadequate at replacing the conventional CRC diagnostic procedures. Yet, due to technological advances and a better understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer, a new category of biomarkers are on the horizon. Recent evidence indicates that cells release a distinct class of small vesicles called ‘exosomes’, which contain nucleic acids and proteins that reflect and typify host-cell molecular architecture. Intriguingly, exosomes released from cancer cells have a distinct genetic and epigenetic makeup, which allows them to undertake their tumorigenic function. From a clinical standpoint, these unique cancer-specific fingerprints present in exosomes appear to be detectable in a small amount of blood, making them very attractive substrates for developing cancer biomarkers, particularly noninvasive diagnostic approaches. PMID:26892862

  6. NF-kappaB in Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhenjian [Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N., E-mail: william.rom@nyumc.org [Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2011-12-14

    The development of lung cancer in humans can be divided into three steps initiation, promotion and progression. This process is driven by alterations in related signal transduction pathways. These pathways signal the aberrant activation of NF-kappaB, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes important for lung tumorigenesis. Our current knowledge about the role of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway in the development of lung cancer has been bolstered by animal models demonstrating the connection between K-ras and tobacco induced lung transformation with NF-kappaB. Activation of downstream genes leads to cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, invasion, and metastasis.

  7. NF-kappaB in Lung Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Zhenjian; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N.

    2011-01-01

    The development of lung cancer in humans can be divided into three steps initiation, promotion and progression. This process is driven by alterations in related signal transduction pathways. These pathways signal the aberrant activation of NF-kappaB, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes important for lung tumorigenesis. Our current knowledge about the role of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway in the development of lung cancer has been bolstered by animal models demonstrating the connection between K-ras and tobacco induced lung transformation with NF-kappaB. Activation of downstream genes leads to cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, invasion, and metastasis

  8. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  9. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2005-01-01

    We initiated the present study to identify new genes associated with colorectal cancer. In a previously published microarray study an EST (W80763), later identified as the gene hFKBP10 (NM_021939), was found to be strongly expressed in tumors while absent in the normal mucosa. Here we describe...... this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa....... Immunohistochemical analysis of 26 adenocarcinomas and matching normal mucosa, as well as benign hyperplastic polyps and adenomas, using a monoclonal anti-hFKBP65 antibody, showed that the protein was not present in normal colorectal epithelial cells, but strongly expressed in the tumor cells of colorectal cancer...

  10. A systems biology approach to predict and characterize human gut microbial metabolites in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, QuanQiu; Li, Li; Xu, Rong

    2018-04-18

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. It is estimated that about half the cases of CRC occurring today are preventable. Recent studies showed that human gut microbiota and their collective metabolic outputs play important roles in CRC. However, the mechanisms by which human gut microbial metabolites interact with host genetics in contributing CRC remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that computational approaches that integrate and analyze vast amounts of publicly available biomedical data have great potential in better understanding how human gut microbial metabolites are mechanistically involved in CRC. Leveraging vast amount of publicly available data, we developed a computational algorithm to predict human gut microbial metabolites for CRC. We validated the prediction algorithm by showing that previously known CRC-associated gut microbial metabolites ranked highly (mean ranking: top 10.52%; median ranking: 6.29%; p-value: 3.85E-16). Moreover, we identified new gut microbial metabolites likely associated with CRC. Through computational analysis, we propose potential roles for tartaric acid, the top one ranked metabolite, in CRC etiology. In summary, our data-driven computation-based study generated a large amount of associations that could serve as a starting point for further experiments to refute or validate these microbial metabolite associations in CRC cancer.

  11. Regional differences in prostaglandin E2 metabolism in human colorectal cancer liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Alastair L; Chalmers, Claire R; Hawcroft, Gillian; Perry, Sarah L; Treanor, Darren; Toogood, Giles J; Jones, Pamela F; Hull, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E 2 plays a critical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Activity of the rate-limiting enzyme for PGE 2 catabolism (15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase [15-PGDH]) is dependent on availability of NAD+. We tested the hypothesis that there is intra-tumoral variability in PGE 2 content, as well as in levels and activity of 15-PGDH, in human CRC liver metastases (CRCLM). To understand possible underlying mechanisms, we investigated the relationship between hypoxia, 15-PGDH and PGE 2 in human CRC cells in vitro. Tissue from the periphery and centre of 20 human CRCLM was analysed for PGE 2 levels, 15-PGDH and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, 15-PGDH activity, and NAD+/NADH levels. EMT of LIM1863 human CRC cells was induced by transforming growth factor (TGF) β. PGE 2 levels were significantly higher in the centre of CRCLM compared with peripheral tissue (P = 0.04). There were increased levels of 15-PGDH protein in the centre of CRCLM associated with reduced 15-PGDH activity and low NAD+/NADH levels. There was no significant heterogeneity in COX-2 protein expression. NAD+ availability controlled 15-PGDH activity in human CRC cells in vitro. Hypoxia induced 15-PGDH expression in human CRC cells and promoted EMT, in a similar manner to PGE 2 . Combined 15-PGDH expression and loss of membranous E-cadherin (EMT biomarker) were present in the centre of human CRCLM in vivo. There is significant intra-tumoral heterogeneity in PGE 2 content, 15-PGDH activity and NAD+ availability in human CRCLM. Tumour micro-environment (including hypoxia)-driven differences in PGE 2 metabolism should be targeted for novel treatment of advanced CRC

  12. Possible mechanism of phthalates-induced tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates—substances used in the manufacture of plastics—are considered as possible human carcinogens and tumor-promoting agents. The worldwide annual production of plastics surpassed 300 million tons in 2010. Plastics are an indispensable material in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health; however, plastics also pose health risks. Animal studies have indicated that phthalates are carcinogenic, but human epidemiological data confirming this carcinogenicity in humans are limited. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα, which has been observed in rodent carcinogenesis, has not been observed in humans. Here, we review the hypothesis that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR and its downstream signaling cascade promote phthalate-induced tumorigenesis.

  13. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 contributes to tumorigenesis of human osteosarcoma by sponging miR-9-5p and regulating POU2F1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chu-Hai; Cao, Yan-Ming; Huang, Yan; Shi, Qun-Wei; Guo, Jian-Hong; Fan, Zi-Wen; Li, Ju-Gen; Chen, Bin-Wei; Wu, Bo-Yi

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have critical roles in tumorigenesis, including osteosarcoma. The lncRNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) was reported to be involved in the progression of osteosarcoma. Here, we investigated the role of TUG1 in osteosarcoma cells and the underlying mechanism. TUG1 expression was measured in osteosarcoma cell lines and human normal osteoblast cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The effects of TUG1 on osteosarcoma cells were studied by RNA interference in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) was determined using bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays. Our data showed that TUG1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro, and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Besides, we found that TUG1 acted as an endogenous sponge to directly bind to miR-9-5p and downregulated miR-9-5p expression. Moreover, TUG1 overturned the effect of miR-9-5p on the proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells, which involved the derepression of POU class 2 homeobox 1 (POU2F1) expression. In conclusion, our study elucidated a novel TUG1/miR-9-5p/POU2F1 pathway, in which TUG1 acted as a ceRNA by sponging miR-9-5p, leading to downregulation of POU2F1 and facilitating the tumorigenesis of osteosarcoma. These findings may contribute to the lncRNA-targeted therapy for human osteosarcoma.

  14. Drug transporter gene expression in human colorectal tissue and cell lines: modulation with antiretrovirals for microbicide optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhya, Indrani; Murray, Graeme I; Berry, Susan; Thomson, John; Frank, Bruce; Gwozdz, Garry; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Shattock, Robin; Kelly, Charles; Iannelli, Francesco; Pozzi, Gianni; El-Omar, Emad M; Hold, Georgina L; Hijazi, Karolin

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to comprehensively assess mRNA expression of 84 drug transporters in human colorectal biopsies and six representative cell lines, and to investigate the alteration of drug transporter gene expression after exposure to three candidate microbicidal antiretroviral (ARV) drugs (tenofovir, darunavir and dapivirine) in the colorectal epithelium. The outcome of the objectives informs development of optimal ARV-based microbicidal formulations for prevention of HIV-1 infection. Drug transporter mRNA expression was quantified from colorectal biopsies and cell lines by quantitative real-time PCR. Relative mRNA expression was quantified in Caco-2 cells and colorectal explants after induction with ARVs. Data were analysed using Pearson's product moment correlation (r), hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA). Expression of 58 of the 84 transporters was documented in colorectal biopsies, with genes for CNT2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MRP3 showing the highest expression. No difference was noted between individual subjects when analysed by age, gender or anatomical site (rectum or recto-sigmoid) (r = 0.95-0.99). High expression of P-gp and CNT2 proteins was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Similarity between colorectal tissue and cell-line drug transporter gene expression was variable (r = 0.64-0.84). PCA showed distinct clustering of human colorectal biopsy samples, with the Caco-2 cells defined as the best surrogate system. Induction of Caco-2 cell lines with ARV drugs suggests that darunavir-based microbicides incorporating tenofovir may result in drug-drug interactions likely to affect distribution of individual drugs to sub-epithelial target cells. These findings will help optimize complex formulations of rectal microbicides to realize their full potential as an effective approach for pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV-1 infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  15. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Sayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS, and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF. Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations (P R2 = 0.80. We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10 by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers.

  16. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of microsatellite status. The promoters of the genes studied showed a significant enrichment for several transcription factor binding sites. There was a significant correlation between the number of binding site targets for these transcription factors and the observed gene transcript upregulation. The upregulation...

  17. Effect of β,β-Dimethylacrylshikonin on Inhibition of Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yingying; Jin, Shaoju; He, Jun; Shao, Zhenjun; Yan, Jiao; Feng, Ting; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, shikonin and its derivatives, has been used in East Asia for several years for the prevention and treatment of several diseases, including cancer. We previously identified that β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin (DA) could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of DA on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line HCT-116 in vitro and in vivo. A viability assay showed th...

  18. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  19. Detection of human papillomavirus infection by molecular tests and its relation to colonic polyps and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Gazzaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To prospectively examine the association between human papilloma virus (HPV colonization of the colonic mucosa and the development of colorectal polyps (CRPs, and colorectal cancer (CRC in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A case control study was performed between January 2013 and December 2014. All eligible patients underwent standard diagnostic colonoscopy. Patients with polyps or colorectal cancer were considered cases, while those with any other endoscopic findings were controls. Biopsy samples from polyps and tumors, and/or from normal colonic mucosa were acquired. Human papilloma virus colonization was detected using a hybrid capture technique of samples taken from both normal tissue, and CRPs and CRC. The association between HPV and CRPs/CRC was evaluated. Results: A total of 132 patients were recruited. The mean age was 53 (±15.9 years. Sixty patients had endoscopically detectable CRPs/CRC, and 72 had either inflammation or normal endoscopic evaluations. Only 4 (0.8% of the 132 samples that were collected and analyzed were positive for the HPV gene. Statistical analysis did not identify any significant association between HPV colonization and the presence of CRPs/CRC. The only significant predictor of detecting CRPs/CRC on colonoscopy was symptomatic presentation (odds ratio=11.072, 95% confidence interval 4.7-26.2, p<0.001. Conclusion: Human papilloma virus colonic colonization is rare in Saudi Arabia. An association between HPV colonization and CRP/CRC development could not be identified in this cohort of patients.

  20. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. ► PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. ► PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. ► These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  1. Elevated IGFIR expression regulating VEGF and VEGF-C predicts lymph node metastasis in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Hao, Li; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Yichuan; Ge, Hailiang; Zhu, Zhenya; Luo, Yunbao; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanyun

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGFIR) has been shown to regulate the tumor development. The objective of the current study is to determine the association of IGFIR with lymph node metastasis and to explore the related mechanism in human colorectal cancer in clinic. In a random series of 98 colorectal cancer patients, the expressions of IGFIR, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF-C were investigated by immunohistochemistry, and the association of these expressions with lymph node metastasis was statistically analyzed. The expressions of VEGF and VEGF-C in colorectal cancer cells stimulated with IGF-I were also examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Higher rates of IGFIR (46%), VEGF (53%), and VEGF-C (46%) expression were found in colorectal cancer tissues than in normal and colorectal adenoma tissues. These expressions were significantly associated with clinicopathologic factors and lymph node status. We also found the concomitant high expressions of IGFIR/VEGF (P < 0.001) and IGFIR/VEGF-C (P = 0.001) had a stronger correlation with lymph node metastasis than did each alone or both low expressions. In addition, IGF-I could effectively induce the VEGF and VEGF-C mRNA expression and protein secretion in colorectal cancer cells expressing IGFIR molecules. Moreover, Patients who had strong staining for IGFIR, VEGF and VEGF-C showed significantly less favorable survival rates compared with patients who had low staining for these molecules (P < 0.001). The survival rates of patients who were both high expression of IGFIR/VEGF and IGFIR/VEGF-C also were significantly lower compared with patients who were negative or one of high expression of these molecules (P < 0.001). Together the findings indicated for the first time that simultaneous examination of the expressions of IGFIR, VEGF and VEGF-C will benefit the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in order to assay the

  2. Long noncoding RNA lnc-sox5 modulates CRC tumorigenesis by unbalancing tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaiming; Zhao, Zhenxian; Liu, Kuanzhi; Zhang, Jian; Li, Guanghua; Wang, Liang

    2017-07-03

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) have been recently regarded as systemic regulators in multiple biologic processes including tumorigenesis. In this study, we observed the expression of lncRNA lnc-sox5 was significantly increased in colorectal cancer (CRC). Despite the CRC cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis was not affected by lnc-sox5 knock-down, lnc-sox5 knock-down suppressed CRC cell migration and invasion. In addition, xenograft animal model suggested that lnc-sox5 knock-down significantly suppressed the CRC tumorigenesis. Our results also showed that the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) was significantly reduced by lnc-sox5 knock-down and therefore modulated the infiltration and cytotoxicity of CD3 + CD8 + T cells. Taken together, these results suggested that lnc-sox5 unbalances tumor microenvironment to regulate colorectal cancer progression.

  3. Stress responsive miR-31 is a major modulator of mouse intestinal stem cells during regeneration and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuhua; Ma, Xianghui; Lv, Cong; Sheng, Xiaole; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Ran; Song, Yongli; Andl, Thomas; Plikus, Maksim V; Sun, Jinyue; Ren, Fazheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Lengner, Christopher J; Cui, Wei; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-09-05

    Intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis are believed to be driven by intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Elucidating mechanisms underlying ISC activation during regeneration and tumorigenesis can help uncover the underlying principles of intestinal homeostasis and disease including colorectal cancer. Here we show that miR-31 drives ISC proliferation, and protects ISCs against apoptosis, both during homeostasis and regeneration in response to ionizing radiation injury. Furthermore, miR-31 has oncogenic properties, promoting intestinal tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, miR-31 acts to balance input from Wnt, BMP, TGFβ signals to coordinate control of intestinal homeostasis, regeneration and tumorigenesis. We further find that miR-31 is regulated by the STAT3 signaling pathway in response to radiation injury. These findings identify miR-31 as a critical modulator of ISC biology, and a potential therapeutic target for a broad range of intestinal regenerative disorders and cancers.

  4. Differential expression of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in human colorectal cancer: A comparison with colon and rectal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, SHUAI; CHEN, YIJUN; ZHU, ZHANMENG; DING, YUNLONG; REN, SHUANGYI; ZUO, YUNFEI

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second among women. Accumulating evidence regarding carbohydrate antigen (CA) demonstrated that tumor-associated antigens are clinically useful for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of human gastrointestinal cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. There has been an extensive investigation for sensitive and specific markers of this disease. Currently, the gastrointestinal cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most widely applied tumor marker in cancer diagnosis. Despite a similar etiology and cancer incidence rates, there are anatomical and clinical differences between colon and rectal cancer, as well as differences regarding tumor progression and adjuvant treatments. To investigate whether CA19-9 is differentially expressed between colon and rectal cancer, we conducted a differential analysis of serum CA19-9 levels among 227 cases of colorectal cancer, analyzing gender, age, Dukes’ stage and distant metastasis for human colon and rectal cancer as a single entity, separately and as matched pairs. We demonstrated that the serum CA19-9 levels in colorectal cancer were upregulated in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By contrast, the serum CA19-9 levels in colon cancer displayed a differential and upregulated behavior in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By analyzing as matched pairs, the upregulated serum CA19-9 levels in rectal cancer during the early stages without distant metastasis further supported our hypothesis that the expression of CA19-9 displays a site-specific differential behavior. The integrative analysis suggested a significant difference between human colon and rectal cancer, justifying individualized therapy for these two types of cancer. PMID:24649295

  5. Colorectal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal polyps; Polyps - colorectal; Adenomatous polyps; Hyperplastic polyps; Villous adenomas; Serrated polyp; Serrated adenoma; Precancerous polyps; Colon cancer - polyps; Bleeding - colorectal polyps

  6. The Incidence and Mortality of Colorectal Cancer and Its Relationship With the Human Development Index in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Mohammadian, Maryam; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common cancer among men, and its incidence is increasing in Asia. Awareness about the status of this cancer incidence and mortality is necessary for a better plan. The present study was done with the aim to investigate the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer and its relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) in Asia in 2012. This study was an ecological study, which was conducted based on the GLOBOCAN project of the World Health Organization for Asian countries. We assessed the correlation between standardized incidence rates (SIR) and standardized mortality rates (SMR) of colorectal cancer with HDI and its components using SPSS software, version 18 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). A total of 592,563 incidences of and 325,752 deaths from colorectal cancer were recorded in Asian countries in 2012. The 5 countries with the highest SIR were Republic of Korea (45 per 100,000), Israel (35.9 per 100,000), Singapore (33.7 per 100,000), Japan (32.2 per 100,000), and Jordan (25.6 per 100,000). The 5 countries with the highest SMR for colorectal cancer were Jordan (15.5 per 100,000), Kazakhstan (12.8 per 100,000), Democratic Republic of Korea (12 per 100,000), Brunei (12 per 100,000), and Japan (11.9 per 100,000). Correlation between HDI and SIR was 0.709 overall (P ≤ .001)- 0.667 in men (P ≤ .001) and 0.759 in women (P ≤ .001). Also, correlation between HDI and SMR overall was 0.517 (P ≤ .001)- 0.447 in men (P = .002) and 0.593 in women (P ≤ .001). Cancer incidence and mortality are higher in countries with more development. A positive and statistically significant correlation was found between standardized incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer and the Human Development Index and its components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Effect of crude saponins from Gaultheria trichophylla extract on growth inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiaz Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria also comprised of species with reported cytotoxic activities. Current research work was carried out to evaluate G. trichophylla crude extract and respective saponins fraction against human colorectal cancer cell line (Caco-2 based on cell viability assays. Caco-2 cells treated with the crude extract showed significant growth inhibition (p< 0.001 in a dose dependent manner with apparent IC50 value of 200 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL in MTT and NRU assays respectively. The fractioned crude saponins showed an enhanced response and inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 93.6 and 97.4% in MTT and NRU assays respectively, with compared to actinomycin-D (65%. The DAPI staining of cell treated with crude saponins observed under confocal microscope showed shrunken nuclei with apparent nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation indicating apoptosis mode of cell death. The study exhibited that the G. Trichophylla saponins induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cell lines. This study provides new evidences to further explore this plant for the novel targets in anticancer drug development.

  8. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Jason J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's colorectal cancer (CRC screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  9. Preliminary Comparison of Oral and Intestinal Human Microbiota in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda Russo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS was used to analyze and compare human microbiota from three different compartments, i.e., saliva, feces, and cancer tissue (CT, of a selected cohort of 10 Italian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC vs. 10 healthy controls (saliva and feces. Furthermore, the Fusobacterium nucleatum abundance in the same body site was investigated through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the association with CRC. Differences in bacterial composition, F. nucleatum abundance in healthy controls vs. CRC patients, and the association of F. nucleatum with clinical parameters were observed. Taxonomic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, revealed the presence of three main bacterial phyla, which includes about 80% of reads: Firmicutes (39.18%, Bacteroidetes (30.36%, and Proteobacteria (10.65%. The results highlighted the presence of different bacterial compositions; in particular, the fecal samples of CRC patients seemed to be enriched with Bacteroidetes, whereas in the fecal samples of healthy controls Firmicutes were one of the major phyla detected though these differences were not statistically significant. The CT samples showed the highest alpha diversity values. These results emphasize a different taxonomic composition of feces from CRC compared to healthy controls. Despite the low number of samples included in the study, these results suggest the importance of microbiota in the CRC progression and could pave the way to the development of therapeutic interventions and novel microbial-related diagnostic tools in CRC patients.

  10. The requirement for freshly isolated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in isolating CRC stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, F; Bellister, S; Lu, J; Ye, X; Boulbes, D R; Tozzi, F; Sceusi, E; Kopetz, S; Tian, F; Xia, L; Zhou, Y; Bhattacharya, R; Ellis, L M

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell populations enriched for cancer stem cells (CSCs) may facilitate target identification. There is no consensus regarding the best methods for isolating CRC stem cells (CRC-SCs). We determined the suitability of various cellular models and various stem cell markers for the isolation of CRC-SCs. Established human CRC cell lines, established CRC cell lines passaged through mice, patient-derived xenograft (PDX)-derived cells, early passage/newly established cell lines, and cells directly from clinical specimens were studied. Cells were FAC-sorted for the CRC-SC markers CD44, CD133, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenicity studies were used to validate CRC-SC enrichment. None of the markers studied in established cell lines, grown either in vitro or in vivo, consistently enriched for CRC-SCs. In the three other cellular models, CD44 and CD133 did not reliably enrich for stemness. In contrast, freshly isolated PDX-derived cells or early passage/newly established CRC cell lines with high ALDH activity formed spheres in vitro and enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas cells with low ALDH activity did not. PDX-derived cells, early passages/newly established CRC cell lines and cells from clinical specimen with high ALDH activity can be used to identify CRC-SC-enriched populations. Established CRC cell lines should not be used to isolate CSCs.

  11. The peiminine stimulating autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells via AMPK pathway by SQSTM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process, which functions in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. The self-eating process engulfs cellular long-lived proteins and organelles with double-membrane vesicles, and forms a so-called autophagosome. Degradation of contents via fusion with lysosome provides recycled building blocks for synthesis of new molecules during stress, e.g. starvation. Peiminine is a steroidal alkaloid extracted from Fritillaria thunbergii which is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Previously, peiminine has been identified to induce autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In this study, we further investigated whether peiminine could induce autophagic cell death via activating autophagy-related signaling pathway AMPK-mTOR-ULK by promoting SQSTM1(P62. Xenograft tumor growth in vivo suggested that both peiminine and starvation inhibit the growth of tumor size and weight, which was prominently enhanced when peiminine and starvation combined. The therapeutical effect of peiminine in cancer treatment is to be expected.

  12. Dynamic modulation of thymidylate synthase gene expression and fluorouracil sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Wakasa

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy. However, many biomarker candidates are still in debate. In addition to clinical studies, a priori experimental approaches are needed. Thymidylate synthase (TS expression is a long-standing candidate as a biomarker for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment of cancer patients. Using the Tet-OFF system and a human colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1, we first constructed an in vitro system in which TS expression is dynamically controllable. Quantitative assays have elucidated that TS expression in the transformant was widely modulated, and that the dynamic range covered 15-fold of the basal level. 5-FU sensitivity of the transformant cells significantly increased in response to downregulated TS expression, although being not examined in the full dynamic range because of the doxycycline toxicity. Intriguingly, our in vitro data suggest that there is a linear relationship between TS expression and the 5-FU sensitivity in cells. Data obtained in a mouse model using transformant xenografts were highly parallel to those obtained in vitro. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that TS expression is a determinant of 5-FU sensitivity in cells, at least in this specific genetic background, and, therefore, support the possibility of TS expression as a biomarker for 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy.

  13. BVES regulates EMT in human corneal and colon cancer cells and is silenced via promoter methylation in human colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher S; Zhang, Baolin; Smith, J Joshua; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Pino, Christopher; Russ, Patricia; Presley, Sai H; Peng, DunFa; Rosenblatt, Daniel O; Haselton, Frederick R; Yang, Jin-Long; Washington, M Kay; Chen, Xi; Eschrich, Steven; Yeatman, Timothy J; El-Rifai, Wael; Beauchamp, R Daniel; Chang, Min S

    2011-10-01

    The acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype is a critical step in the metastatic progression of epithelial carcinomas. Adherens junctions (AJs) are required for suppressing this epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) but less is known about the role of tight junctions (TJs) in this process. Here, we investigated the functions of blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES, also known as POPDC1 and POP1), an integral membrane protein that regulates TJ formation. BVES was found to be underexpressed in all stages of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and in adenomatous polyps, indicating its suppression occurs early in transformation. Similarly, the majority of CRC cell lines tested exhibited decreased BVES expression and promoter DNA hypermethylation, a modification associated with transcriptional silencing. Treatment with a DNA-demethylating agent restored BVES expression in CRC cell lines, indicating that methylation represses BVES expression. Reexpression of BVES in CRC cell lines promoted an epithelial phenotype, featuring decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth; impaired growth of an orthotopic xenograft; and blocked metastasis. Conversely, interfering with BVES function by expressing a dominant-negative mutant in human corneal epithelial cells induced mesenchymal features. These biological outcomes were associated with changes in AJ and TJ composition and related signaling. Therefore, BVES prevents EMT, and its epigenetic silencing may be an important step in promoting EMT programs during colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Training in laparoscopic colorectal surgery: A new educational model using specially embalmed human anatomical specimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Slieker (Juliette); H. Theeuwes (Hilco); G.L. van Rooijen (Göran); J.F. Lange (Johan); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: With an increasing percentage of colorectal resections performed laparoscopically nowadays, there is more emphasis on training "before the job" on operative skills, including the comprehension of specific laparoscopic surgical anatomy. As integration of technical skills with

  15. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  16. Cisplatin and ultra-violet-C synergistically down-regulate receptor tyrosine kinases in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Junji

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin are widely used for patients with various types of cancers, however, resistance to cisplatin is observed in some cases. Whereas we have recently reported that high dose UV-C (200 J/m² induces colorectal cancer cell proliferation by desensitization of EGFR, which leads oncogenic signaling in these cells, in this study we investigated the combination effect of low dose cisplatin (10 μM and low dose UV-C (10 J/m² on cell growth and apoptosis in several human colorectal cancer cells, SW480, DLD-1, HT29 and HCT116. Results The combination inhibited cell cycle and colony formation, while either cisplatin or UV-C alone had little effect. The combination also induced apoptosis in these cells. In addition, the combination caused the downregulation of EGFR and HER2. Moreover, UV-C alone caused the transient internalization of the EGFR, but with time EGFR recycled back to the cell surface, while cisplatin did not affect its localization. Surprisingly, the combination caused persistent internalization of the EGFR, which results in the lasting downregulation of the EGFR. Conclusions The combination of low dose cisplatin and low dose UV-C synergistically exerted anti-cancer effect by down-regulating RTK, such as EGFR and HER2. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer.

  17. Correlation of human epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Juan; Shen, Xing-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Xia; Tan, Zhi-Gang; Song, Yan; Guo, Yi-Tong; Yuan, Mei

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the correlation between human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2) protein expression and colorectal cancer (CRC) using a case-control study and meta-analysis. Tumor tissue specimens from 162 CRC patients were selected for the case group. Fifty cases were randomly selected, and normal CRC tissue at least 10 cm away from the tumor margins of these cases was used to generate the control group. The expression of the HER-2 protein in the 162 CRC tissue samples and the 50 adjacent normal mucosa tissue samples was detected via immunohistochemistry. The experimental data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software, and R software version 3.1.0 was utilized for further verification. The expression of HER-2 protein in the 162 CRC tissue samples was significantly higher than in the normal tissue specimens. The data showed that the expression of HER-2 in CRC was related to the Dukes' stage, the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis. The HER-2-positive patients had lower 3- and 5-year OS rates than the HER-2-negative patients, but there was no significant difference. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the 3- and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of HER-2-positive and HER-2-negative patients. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the expression of HER-2 in CRC patients was statistically significantly increased over that of healthy people. The 3-year DFS rate in HER-2-positive patients was markedly lower than that in HER-2-negative patients. Down-regulation of HER-2 expression might be a dependable strategy for CRC therapy.

  18. Period 2 Mutation Accelerates ApcMin/+ Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Patricia A.; Yang, Xiaoming; Taber, Andrew; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Ayers, Stacy E.; Al-Assaad, Ziad; Carnevale, Kevin; Berger, Franklin G.; Peña, Maria Marjorette O.; Hrushesky, William J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is increased in shift workers with presumed circadian disruption. Intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is gated throughout each day by the circadian clock. Period 2 (Per2) is a key circadian clock gene. Per2 mutant (Per2m/m) mice show an increase in lymphomas and deregulated expression of cyclin D and c-Myc genes that are key to proliferation control. We asked whether Per2 clock gene inactivation would accelerate intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis. The effects of PER2 on cell proliferation and β-catenin were studied in colon cancer cell lines by its down-regulation following RNA interference. The effects of Per2 inactivation in vivo on β-catenin and on intestinal and colonic polyp formation were studied in mice with Per2 mutation alone and in combination with an Apc mutation using polyp-prone ApcMin/+ mice. Down-regulation of PER2 in colon cell lines (HCT116 and SW480) increases β-catenin, cyclin D, and cell proliferation. Down-regulation of β-catenin along with Per2 blocks the increase in cyclin D and cell proliferation. Per2m/m mice develop colonic polyps and show an increase in small intestinal mucosa β-catenin and cyclin D protein levels compared with wild-type mice. ApcMin/+Per2m/m mice develop twice the number of small intestinal and colonic polyps, with more severe anemia and splenomegaly, compared with ApcMin/+ mice. These data suggest that Per2 gene product suppresses tumorigenesis in the small intestine and colon by down-regulation of β-catenin and β-catenin target genes, and this circadian core clock gene may represent a novel target for colorectal cancer prevention and control. PMID:19010825

  19. Synthesis and expression of CDw75 antigen in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa-Nogueira, Clotilde; Villar-Portela, Susana; Cuevas, Elisa; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Fernández-Briera, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Increased ST6Gal I activity has been associated with the α(2,6)sialylation enhancement of membrane glycoconjugates observed in metastatic colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Siaα(2,6)Galβ(1,4)GlcNAc sequence, known as CDw75, is a sialylated carbohydrate determinant generated by the ST6Gal I. This epitope has been reported to be associated with the progression of gastric and colorectal tumours, hence there are only a few conclusive studies to date. By radioisotopic techniques we evaluated the ST6Gal I activity in healthy, transitional and tumour tissues from 43 patients with CRC. By immunohistochemistry we assessed the CDw75 expression in 25 colorectal adenomas, 43 tumours, 13 transitional and 28 healthy tissues of CRC patients. ST6Gal I activity was likewise found to be statistically higher in tumour tissue respect to healthy tissue from CRC patients. CDw75 expression was positive in 20% of colorectal adenomas. Furthermore, 70% of tumour specimens and 8.3% of transitional specimens were positive for CDw75 expression, whereas none of the healthy ones showed the presence of the epitope. The major contribution of this study is the inclusion of data from transitional tissue and the analysis of CDw75 antigen expression in CRC and in colorectal adenomas, little known so far. ST6Gal I activity and CDw75 antigen expression were increased in CRC. Although their comparison did not reach the statistical significance, a great extent of patients showed both, an enhanced tumour ST6Gal I activity and an increased CDw75 expression in the tumour tissue. So, these two variables may play a role in malignant transformation. The expression of CDw75 in colorectal adenomas suggests that this antigen may be a tumour marker in CRC

  20. Increased expression of protease-activated receptor 4 and Trefoil factor 2 in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Yu

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4, a member of G-protein coupled receptors family, was recently reported to exhibit decreased expression in gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cancer, yet increased expression during the progression of prostate cancer. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2, a small peptide constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa, plays a protective role in restitution of gastric mucosa. Altered TFF2 expression was also related to the development of gastrointestinal cancer. TFF2 has been verified to promote cell migration via PAR4, but the roles of PAR4 and TFF2 in the progress of colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, the expression level of PAR4 and TFF2 in colorectal cancer tissues was measured using real-time PCR (n = 38, western blotting (n=38 and tissue microarrays (n = 66. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PAR4 and TFF2 were remarkably increased in colorectal cancer compared with matched noncancerous tissues, especially in positive lymph node and poorly differentiated cancers. The colorectal carcinoma cell LoVo showed an increased response to TFF2 as assessed by cell invasion upon PAR4 expression. However, after intervention of PAR4 expression, PAR4 positive colorectal carcinoma cell HT-29 was less responsive to TFF2 in cell invasion. Genomic bisulfite sequencing showed the hypomethylation of PAR4 promoter in colorectal cancer tissues and the hypermethylation in the normal mucosa that suggested the low methylation of promoter was correlated to the increased PAR4 expression. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the up-regulated expression of PAR4 and TFF2 frequently occurs in colorectal cancer tissues, and that overexpression of PAR4 may be resulted from promoter hypomethylation. While TFF2 promotes invasion activity of LoVo cells overexpressing PAR4, and this effect was significantly decreased when PAR4 was knockdowned in HT-29 cells. Our findings will be helpful in further investigations into the

  1. Crosstalk between Wnt Signaling and RNA Processing in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bordonaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA processing involves a variety of processes affecting gene expression, including the removal of introns through RNA splicing, as well as 3' end processing (cleavage and polyadenylation. Alternative RNA processing is fundamentally important for gene regulation, and aberrant processing is associated with the initiation and progression of cancer. Deregulated Wnt signaling, which is the initiating event in the development of most cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC, has been linked to modified RNA processing, which may contribute to Wnt-mediated colonic carcinogenesis. Crosstalk between Wnt signaling and alternative RNA splicing with relevance to CRC includes effects on the expression of Rac1b, an alternatively spliced gene associated with tumorigenesis, which exhibits alternative RNA splicing that is influenced by Wnt activity. In addition, Tcf4, a crucial component of Wnt signaling, also exhibits alternative splicing, which is likely involved in colonic tumorigenesis. Modulation of 3' end formation, including of the Wnt target gene COX-2, also can influence the neoplastic process, with implications for CRC. While many human genes are dependent on introns and splicing for normal levels of gene expression, naturally intronless genes exist with a unique metabolism that allows for intron-independent gene expression. Effects of Wnt activity on the RNA metabolism of the intronless Wnt-target gene c-jun is a likely contributor to cancer development. Further, butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, upregulates Wnt activity in CRC cells, and also modulates RNA processing; therefore, the interplay between Wnt activity, the modulation of this activity by butyrate, and differential RNA metabolism in colonic cells can significantly influence tumorigenesis. Determining the role played by altered RNA processing in Wnt-mediated neoplasia may lead to novel interventions aimed at restoring normal RNA metabolism for

  2. Crosstalk between Wnt Signaling and RNA Processing in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael

    2013-01-01

    RNA processing involves a variety of processes affecting gene expression, including the removal of introns through RNA splicing, as well as 3' end processing (cleavage and polyadenylation). Alternative RNA processing is fundamentally important for gene regulation, and aberrant processing is associated with the initiation and progression of cancer. Deregulated Wnt signaling, which is the initiating event in the development of most cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC), has been linked to modified RNA processing, which may contribute to Wnt-mediated colonic carcinogenesis. Crosstalk between Wnt signaling and alternative RNA splicing with relevance to CRC includes effects on the expression of Rac1b, an alternatively spliced gene associated with tumorigenesis, which exhibits alternative RNA splicing that is influenced by Wnt activity. In addition, Tcf4, a crucial component of Wnt signaling, also exhibits alternative splicing, which is likely involved in colonic tumorigenesis. Modulation of 3' end formation, including of the Wnt target gene COX-2, also can influence the neoplastic process, with implications for CRC. While many human genes are dependent on introns and splicing for normal levels of gene expression, naturally intronless genes exist with a unique metabolism that allows for intron-independent gene expression. Effects of Wnt activity on the RNA metabolism of the intronless Wnt-target gene c-jun is a likely contributor to cancer development. Further, butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, upregulates Wnt activity in CRC cells, and also modulates RNA processing; therefore, the interplay between Wnt activity, the modulation of this activity by butyrate, and differential RNA metabolism in colonic cells can significantly influence tumorigenesis. Determining the role played by altered RNA processing in Wnt-mediated neoplasia may lead to novel interventions aimed at restoring normal RNA metabolism for therapeutic benefit

  3. Salinomycin inhibits metastatic colorectal cancer growth and interferes with Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CD133+ human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klose, Johannes; Eissele, Jana; Volz, Claudia; Schmitt, Steffen; Ritter, Alina; Ying, Shen; Schmidt, Thomas; Heger, Ulrike; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The polyether antibiotic Salinomycin (Sal) is regarded as an inhibitor of cancer stem cells. Its effectiveness on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro has been demonstrated before. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model to investigate the effectiveness of Sal in vivo. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of Sal on Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human CD133 + CRC cells. The two murine CRC cell lines MC38 and CT26 were used to analyze the impact of Sal on tumor cell proliferation, viability, migration, cell cycle progression and cell death in vitro. For in vivo studies, CT26 cells were injected into syngeneic BALB/c mice to initiate (i) subcutaneous, (ii) orthotopic, or (iii) metastatic CRC growth. Sal was administered daily, 5-Fluoruracil served as a control. For mechanistic studies, the CD133 + and CD133 - subpopulations of human CRC cells were separated by flow cytometry and separately exposed to increasing concentrations of Sal. The impact on Wnt/β-catenin signaling was determined by Western blotting and quantitative PCR. Sal markedly impaired tumor cell viability, proliferation and migration, and induced necrotic cell death in vitro. CRC growth in vivo was likewise inhibited upon Sal treatment. Interference with Wnt signaling and reduced expression of the Wnt target genes Fibronectin and Lgr5 indicates a novel molecular mechanism, mediating anti-tumoral effects of Sal in CRC. Sal effectively impairs CRC growth in vivo. Furthermore, Sal acts as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, Salinomycin represents a promising candidate for clinical CRC treatment. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2879-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  4. P1 promoter-driven HNF4α isoforms are specifically repressed by β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Jones, Christine; Geha, Sameh; Carrier, Julie C; Boudreau, François

    2018-06-13

    HNF4α is a key nuclear receptor for regulating gene expression in the gut. While both P1 and P2 isoform classes of HNF4α are expressed in colonic epithelium, specific inhibition of P1 isoforms is commonly found in colorectal cancer. Previous studies have suggested that P1 and P2 isoforms may regulate different cellular functions. Despite these advances, it remains unclear whether these isoform classes are functionally divergent in the context of human biology. Here, the consequences of specific inhibition of P1 or P2 isoform expression was measured in a human colorectal cancer cell transcriptome. Results indicate that P1 isoforms were specifically associated with the control of cell metabolism while P2 isoforms globally supported aberrant oncogenic signalization, promoting cancer cell survival and progression. P1 promoter-driven isoform expression was found to be repressed by β-catenin, one of the earliest oncogenic pathways to be activated during colon tumorigenesis. These findings identify a novel cascade by which the expression of P1 isoforms are rapidly shut down in the early stages of colon tumorigenesis, allowing a change in HNF4α-dependent transcriptome thereby promoting colorectal cancer progression. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. An integrative -omics approach to identify functional sub-networks in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod K Nibbe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence indicates that gene products implicated in human cancers often cluster together in "hot spots" in protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Additionally, small sub-networks within PPI networks that demonstrate synergistic differential expression with respect to tumorigenic phenotypes were recently shown to be more accurate classifiers of disease progression when compared to single targets identified by traditional approaches. However, many of these studies rely exclusively on mRNA expression data, a useful but limited measure of cellular activity. Proteomic profiling experiments provide information at the post-translational level, yet they generally screen only a limited fraction of the proteome. Here, we demonstrate that integration of these complementary data sources with a "proteomics-first" approach can enhance the discovery of candidate sub-networks in cancer that are well-suited for mechanistic validation in disease. We propose that small changes in the mRNA expression of multiple genes in the neighborhood of a protein-hub can be synergistically associated with significant changes in the activity of that protein and its network neighbors. Further, we hypothesize that proteomic targets with significant fold change between phenotype and control may be used to "seed" a search for small PPI sub-networks that are functionally associated with these targets. To test this hypothesis, we select proteomic targets having significant expression changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC from two independent 2-D gel-based screens. Then, we use random walk based models of network crosstalk and develop novel reference models to identify sub-networks that are statistically significant in terms of their functional association with these proteomic targets. Subsequently, using an information-theoretic measure, we evaluate synergistic changes in the activity of identified sub-networks based on genome-wide screens of mRNA expression in CRC

  6. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar, E-mail: s.ganapathy@neu.edu [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Li, Ping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Fagman, Johan [The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Zhang, Guojun [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Chen, Changyan [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  7. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-01-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  8. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Turkel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab. Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 mediates migration of human colorectal carcinoma cells by activation of Src family kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesslie, D P; Summy, J M; Parikh, N U; Fan, F; Trevino, J G; Sawyer, T K; Metcalf, C A; Shakespeare, W C; Hicklin, D J; Ellis, L M; Gallick, G E

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the predominant pro-angiogenic cytokine in human malignancy, and its expression correlates with disease recurrence and poor outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. Recently, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) has been observed on tumours of epithelial origin, including those arising in the colon, but the molecular mechanisms governing potential VEGF-driven biologic functioning in these tumours are not well characterised. In this report, we investigated the role of Src family kinases (SFKs) in VEGF-mediated signalling in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cell lines. Vascular endothelial growth factor specifically activated SFKs in HT29 and KM12L4 CRC cell lines. Further, VEGF stimulation resulted in enhanced cellular migration, which was effectively blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of VEGFR-1 or Src kinase. Correspondingly, migration studies using siRNA clones with reduced Src expression confirmed the requirement for Src in VEGF-induced migration in these cells. Furthermore, VEGF treatment enhanced VEGFR-1/SFK complex formation and increased tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, p130 cas and paxillin. Finally, we demonstrate that VEGF-induced migration is not due, at least in part, to VEGF acting as a mitogen. These results suggest that VEGFR-1 promotes migration of tumour cells through a Src-dependent pathway linked to activation of focal adhesion components that regulate this process. PMID:16685275

  10. Identification of a developmental gene expression signature, including HOX genes, for the normal human colonic crypt stem cell niche: overexpression of the signature parallels stem cell overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatlekar, Seema; Addya, Sankar; Salunek, Moreh; Orr, Christopher R; Surrey, Saul; McKenzie, Steven; Fields, Jeremy Z; Boman, Bruce M

    2014-01-15

    Our goal was to identify a unique gene expression signature for human colonic stem cells (SCs). Accordingly, we determined the gene expression pattern for a known SC-enriched region--the crypt bottom. Colonic crypts and isolated crypt subsections (top, middle, and bottom) were purified from fresh, normal, human, surgical specimens. We then used an innovative strategy that used two-color microarrays (∼18,500 genes) to compare gene expression in the crypt bottom with expression in the other crypt subsections (middle or top). Array results were validated by PCR and immunostaining. About 25% of genes analyzed were expressed in crypts: 88 preferentially in the bottom, 68 in the middle, and 131 in the top. Among genes upregulated in the bottom, ∼30% were classified as growth and/or developmental genes including several in the PI3 kinase pathway, a six-transmembrane protein STAMP1, and two homeobox (HOXA4, HOXD10) genes. qPCR and immunostaining validated that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are selectively expressed in the normal crypt bottom and are overexpressed in colon carcinomas (CRCs). Immunostaining showed that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are co-expressed with the SC markers CD166 and ALDH1 in cells at the normal crypt bottom, and the number of these co-expressing cells is increased in CRCs. Thus, our findings show that these two HOX genes are selectively expressed in colonic SCs and that HOX overexpression in CRCs parallels the SC overpopulation that occurs during CRC development. Our study suggests that developmental genes play key roles in the maintenance of normal SCs and crypt renewal, and contribute to the SC overpopulation that drives colon tumorigenesis.

  11. Methylferulate from Tamarix aucheriana inhibits growth and enhances chemosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Mohamed Salah I; Afzal, Mohammad; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a J; Guleri, Radhika

    2016-10-01

    Natural products are valuable sources for anticancer agents. In the present study, methylferulate (MF) was identified for the first time from Tamarix aucheriana. Spectral data were used for identification of MF. The potential of MF to control cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cancer cell invasion, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) DNA-binding activity and proteasomal activities, as well as the enhancement of chemosensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells, were evaluated. The possible molecular mechanism of MF's therapeutic efficacy was also assessed. Column chromatography and spectral data were used for isolation and identification of MF. MTT, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, in vitro invasion, fluoremetry, EIA and Real time qPCR were used to measure antiproliferative, chemo-sensitizing effects and other biochemical parameters. MF showed a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells (IC 50  = 1.73 - 1.9 mM) with a nonsignificant cytotoxicity toward normal human fibroblast. Colony formation inhibition (P ≤ 0.001, 0.0001) confirmed the growth inhibition by MF. MF arrested cell cycle progression in the S and G2/M phases; induced apoptosis and ROS generation; and inhibited NF-kB DNA-binding activity, proteasomal activities and cell invasion in colorectal cancer cells. MF up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p19 INK4D , p21 WAF1/CIP1 , p27 KIP1 ), pro-apoptotic gene expression (Bax, Bad, Apaf1, Bid, Bim, Smac) and caspases (caspase 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9). Moreover, MF down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk1, Cdk2) and anti-apoptotic gene expression (c-IAP-1, c-IAP-2, Bcl2,FLIP). In addition, MF differentially potentiated the sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. MF showed a multifaceted anti-proliferative and chemosensitizing effects. These results suggest the chemotherapeutic and co-adjuvant potential of MF.

  12. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  13. Radiation-induced apoptosis and cell cycle checkpoints in human colorectal tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playle, L.C.

    2001-03-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in 75% of colorectal carcinomas and is critical for DNA damage-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Data presented in this thesis demonstrate that after treatment with Ionizing Radiation (IR), colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 are unable to arrest at G1 and undergo cell cycle arrest at G2. The staurosporine derivative, UCN-01, was shown to abrogate the IR-induced G2 checkpoint in colorectal tumour cell lines. Furthermore, in some cell lines, abrogation of the G2 checkpoint was associated with radiosensitisation. Data presented in this study demonstrate that 2 out of 5 cell lines with mutant p53 were sensitised to IR by UCN-01. In order to determine whether radiosensitisation correlated with lack of functional p53, transfected derivatives of an adenoma-derived cell line were studied, in which endogenous wild type p53 was disrupted by expression of a dominant negative p53 mutant protein (and with a vector control). In both these cell lines UCN-01 abrogated the G2 arrest however this was not associated with radiosensitisation, indicating that radiosensitisation is a cell type-specific phenomenon. Although 2 colorectal carcinoma cell lines, with mutant p53, were sensitised to IR by UCN-01, the mechanisms of p53-independent IR-induced apoptosis in the colon are essentially unknown. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (that is the JNK, p38 and ERK pathways) have been implicated in apoptosis in a range of cell systems and in IR-induced apoptosis in some cell types. Data presented in this study show that, although the MAPKs can be activated by the known activator anisomycin, there is no evidence of a role for MAPKs in IR-induced apoptosis in colorectal tumour cell lines, regardless of p53 status. In summary, some colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 can be sensitised to IR-induced cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation and this may be an important treatment strategy, however mechanisms of IR-induced p53

  14. Dietary Factors Modulate Colonic Tumorigenesis Through the Interaction of Gut Microbiota and Host Chloride Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Kang, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Lan; Zhou, Min; Chen, Meng-Ting; Zhu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Kai; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2018-03-01

    In recent decades, the association among diet, gut microbiota, and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been established. Gut microbiota and associated metabolites, such as bile acids and butyrate, are now known to play a key role in CRC development. The aim of this study is to identify that the progression to CRC is influenced by cholic acid, sodium butyrate, a high-fat diet, or different dose of dihydromyricetin (DMY) interacted with gut microbiota. An AOM/DSS (azoxymethan/dextran sodium sulfate) model is established to study the gut microbiota compsition before and after tumor formation during colitis-induced tumorigenesis. All above dietary factors profoundly influence the composition of gut microbiota and host colonic tumorigenesis. In addition, mice with DMY-modified initial microbiota display different degrees of chemically induced tumorigenesis. Mechanism analysis reveals that gut microbiota-associated chloride channels participated in colon tumorigenesis. Gut microbiota changes occur in the hyperproliferative stage before tumor formation. Gut microbiota and host chloride channels, both of which are regulated by dietary factors, are associated with CRC development. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Increased rectal microbial richness is associated with the presence of colorectal adenomas in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Sanapareddy, Nina; Legge, Ryan M; Jovov, Biljana; McCoy, Amber; Burcal, Lauren; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Randall, Thomas A; Galanko, Joseph; Benson, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S; Rawls, John F; Abdo, Zaid; Fodor, Anthony A; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbial community have been associated with diseases such as obesity, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC). We used 454 titanium pyrosequencing of the V1–V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize adherent bacterial communities in mucosal biopsy samples from 33 subjects with adenomas and 38 subjects without adenomas (controls). Biopsy samples from subjects with adenomas had greater numbers of bacteria fr...

  16. Identification of α(1,6)fucosylated proteins differentially expressed in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Villar-Portela, Susana; Cuevas, Elisa; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Fernández-Briera, Almudena

    2011-01-01

    A universal hallmark of cancer cells is the change in their glycosylation phenotype. One of the most frequent alterations in the normal glycosylation pattern observed during carcinogenesis is the enhancement of α(1,6)linked fucose residues of glycoproteins, due to the up-regulation of the α(1,6)fucosyltransferase activity. Our previous results demonstrated the specific alteration of this enzyme activity and expression in colorectal cancer, suggesting its implication in tumour development and progression. In the current work we combined a LCA-affinity chromatography with SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry in order to identify α(1,6)fucosylated proteins differentially expressed in colorectal cancer. This strategy allowed the identification of a group of α(1,6)fucosylated proteins candidates to be involved in CRC malignancy. The majority of the identified proteins take part in cell signaling and interaction processes as well as in modulation of the immunological response. Likewise, we confirmed the increased expression of GRP94 in colorectal cancer tissue and the significant down-regulation of the IgGFcBP expression in tumour cells. All these results validate the importance of core-fucosylated proteins profile analysis to understand the mechanisms which promote cancer onset and progression and to discover new tumour markers or therapeutic targets

  17. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis Downstream of Wnt/c-Myc Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated following intestinal regeneration, we investigated the functional importance of FAK following deletion of the Apc tumor suppressor protein within the intestinal epithelium. Following Apc loss, FAK expression increased in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Codeletion of Apc and Fak strongly reduced proliferation normally induced following Apc loss, and this was associated with reduced levels of phospho-Akt and suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc heterozygous mice. Thus, FAK is required downstream of Wnt Signaling, for Akt/mTOR activation, intestinal regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Importantly, this work suggests that FAK inhibitors may suppress tumorigenesis in patients at high risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20708588

  18. Sub-lethal irradiation of human colorectal tumor cells imparts enhanced and sustained susceptibility to multiple death receptor signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ifeadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death receptors (DR of the TNF family function as anti-tumor immune effector molecules. Tumor cells, however, often exhibit DR-signaling resistance. Previous studies indicate that radiation can modify gene expression within tumor cells and increase tumor cell sensitivity to immune attack. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of sub-lethal doses of ionizing radiation in sensitizing colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ability of radiation to modulate the expression of multiple death receptors (Fas/CD95, TRAILR1/DR4, TRAILR2/DR5, TNF-R1 and LTβR was examined in colorectal tumor cells. The functional significance of sub-lethal doses of radiation in enhancing tumor cell susceptibility to DR-induced apoptosis was determined by in vitro functional sensitivity assays. The longevity of these changes and the underlying molecular mechanism of irradiation in sensitizing diverse colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis were also examined. We found that radiation increased surface expression of Fas, DR4 and DR5 but not LTβR or TNF-R1 in these cells. Increased expression of DRs was observed 2 days post-irradiation and remained elevated 7-days post irradiation. Sub-lethal tumor cell irradiation alone exhibited minimal cell death, but effectively sensitized three of three colorectal carcinoma cells to both TRAIL and Fas-induced apoptosis, but not LTβR-induced death. Furthermore, radiation-enhanced Fas and TRAIL-induced cell death lasted as long as 5-days post-irradiation. Specific analysis of intracellular sensitizers to apoptosis indicated that while radiation did reduce Bcl-X(L and c-FLIP protein expression, this reduction did not correlate with the radiation-enhanced sensitivity to Fas and/or TRAIL mediated apoptosis among the three cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Irradiation of tumor cells can overcome Fas and TRAIL

  19. Single-molecule optical genome mapping of a human HapMap and a colorectal cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Audrey S M; Verzotto, Davide; Yao, Fei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Hillmer, Axel M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have changed our understanding of the variability of the human genome. However, the identification of genome structural variations based on NGS approaches with read lengths of 35-300 bases remains a challenge. Single-molecule optical mapping technologies allow the analysis of DNA molecules of up to 2 Mb and as such are suitable for the identification of large-scale genome structural variations, and for de novo genome assemblies when combined with short-read NGS data. Here we present optical mapping data for two human genomes: the HapMap cell line GM12878 and the colorectal cancer cell line HCT116. High molecular weight DNA was obtained by embedding GM12878 and HCT116 cells, respectively, in agarose plugs, followed by DNA extraction under mild conditions. Genomic DNA was digested with KpnI and 310,000 and 296,000 DNA molecules (≥ 150 kb and 10 restriction fragments), respectively, were analyzed per cell line using the Argus optical mapping system. Maps were aligned to the human reference by OPTIMA, a new glocal alignment method. Genome coverage of 6.8× and 5.7× was obtained, respectively; 2.9× and 1.7× more than the coverage obtained with previously available software. Optical mapping allows the resolution of large-scale structural variations of the genome, and the scaffold extension of NGS-based de novo assemblies. OPTIMA is an efficient new alignment method; our optical mapping data provide a resource for genome structure analyses of the human HapMap reference cell line GM12878, and the colorectal cancer cell line HCT116.

  20. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Effect of evodiamine and berberine on miR-429 as an oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu, Chao Huang, Liyun Wu, Bin Wen Institute of Spleen and Stomach, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Loss of epithelial organization and deregulated microRNAs are hallmarks of malignant carcinomas, but the relationship between them has been poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the changes in the expression of E-cadherin, Par3, and miR-429 during the development of human colorectal cancer (CRC. E-cadherin and Par3 levels were quantitatively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. An in vitro culture of colorectal tissue was established to analyze the effect of berberine (BER and evodiamine (EVO on the level of miR-429. Our results suggested that E-cadherin and Par3 were remarkably decreased in tumor tissues compared with those in normal tissues, and miR-429 was upregulated in tumor tissues. After treatment of BER and EVO, the level of miR-429 was lower in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. This study investigated the potential relationship between miR-429, E-cadherin, and Par3 in CRC. The data suggested that BER and EVO can be potential therapeutic agents for CRC, as they downregulated the expression level of miR-429. Keywords: microRNAs, tissue culture

  2. Anticarcinogenic properties of medium chain fatty acids on human colorectal, skin and breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Amoolya; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-03-05

    Colorectal cancer, breast cancer and skin cancer are commonly-reported cancer types in the U.S. Although radiation and chemotherapy are routinely used to treat cancer, they produce side effects in patients. Additionally, resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs has been noticed in cancers. Thus, there is a need for effective and safe bioprophylactics and biotherapeutics in cancer therapy. The medicinal value of goat milk has been recognized for centuries and is primarily attributed to three fatty acids, namely capric, caprylic and caproic acids. This research investigates the anticancer property of these fatty acids on human colorectal, skin and mammary gland cancer cells. The cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of fatty acids for 48 h, and cell viability was monitored by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Additionally, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to elucidate the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of the three fatty acids under investigation. Capric, caprylic and caproic acids reduced cancer cell viability by 70% to 90% (p acids in an appropriate in vivo model.

  3. The classification of secondary colorectal liver cancer in human biopsy samples using angular dispersive x-ray diffraction and multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Farquharson, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The motivation behind this study is to assess whether angular dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) data, processed using multivariate analysis techniques, can be used for classifying secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue and normal surrounding liver tissue in human liver biopsy samples. The ADXRD profiles from a total of 60 samples of normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases were measured using a synchrotron radiation source. The data were analysed for 56 samples using nonlinear peak-fitting software. Four peaks were fitted to all of the ADXRD profiles, and the amplitude, area, amplitude and area ratios for three of the four peaks were calculated and used for the statistical and multivariate analysis. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences between all the peak-fitting parameters and ratios between the normal and the diseased tissue groups. The technique of soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to classify normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases resulting in 67% of the normal tissue samples and 60% of the secondary colorectal liver tissue samples being classified correctly. This study has shown that the ADXRD data of normal and secondary colorectal liver cancer are statistically different and x-ray diffraction data analysed using multivariate analysis have the potential to be used as a method of tissue classification.

  4. Thymosin β4 induces invasion and migration of human colorectal cancer cells through the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Zhengri [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Center for Creative Biomedical Scientists (BK-21 Plus Project), Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Soo [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Mi-Ran [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chan [Department of Pathology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young-Kyu, E-mail: parkyk@jnu.ac.kr [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Center for Creative Biomedical Scientists (BK-21 Plus Project), Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Tβ4 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer cells. • The overexpression of Tβ4 is correlated with stage of colorectal cancer. • Tβ4 stimulates cell adhesion, invasion, migration and EMT. • Tβ4 activates the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway. - Abstract: Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a 43-amino-acid peptide involved in many biological processes. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanism(s) of Tβ4 in cell invasion and migration remain unclear. In this study, we show that Tβ4 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and high levels of Tβ4 were correlated with stage of colorectal cancer, and that Tβ4 expression was associated with morphogenesis and EMT. Tβ4-upregulated cancer cells showed increased adhesion, invasion and migration activity, whereas Tβ4-downregulated cells showed decreased activities. We also demonstrated that Tβ4 interacts with ILK, which promoted the phosphorylation and activation of AKT, the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β, the expression and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and integrin receptor activation. These results suggest that Tβ4 is an important regulator of the ILK/AKT/β-catenin/Integrin signaling cascade to induce cell invasion and migration in colorectal cancer cells, and is a potential target for cancer treatment.

  5. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  6. Toward a Model of Human Information Processing for Decision-Making and Skill Acquisition in Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eoin J; McMahon, Muireann; Walsh, Michael T; Coffey, J Calvin; O Sullivan, Leonard

    To create a human information-processing model for laparoscopic surgery based on already established literature and primary research to enhance laparoscopic surgical education in this context. We reviewed the literature for information-processing models most relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Our review highlighted the necessity for a model that accounts for dynamic environments, perception, allocation of attention resources between the actions of both hands of an operator, and skill acquisition and retention. The results of the literature review were augmented through intraoperative observations of 7 colorectal surgical procedures, supported by laparoscopic video analysis of 12 colorectal procedures. The Wickens human information-processing model was selected as the most relevant theoretical model to which we make adaptions for this specific application. We expanded the perception subsystem of the model to involve all aspects of perception during laparoscopic surgery. We extended the decision-making system to include dynamic decision-making to account for case/patient-specific and surgeon-specific deviations. The response subsystem now includes dual-task performance and nontechnical skills, such as intraoperative communication. The memory subsystem is expanded to include skill acquisition and retention. Surgical decision-making during laparoscopic surgery is the result of a highly complex series of processes influenced not only by the operator's knowledge, but also patient anatomy and interaction with the surgical team. Newer developments in simulation-based education must focus on the theoretically supported elements and events that underpin skill acquisition and affect the cognitive abilities of novice surgeons. The proposed human information-processing model builds on established literature regarding information processing, accounting for a dynamic environment of laparoscopic surgery. This revised model may be used as a foundation for a model describing robotic

  7. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  9. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  10. Evidence for systems-level molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capellá Gabriel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer arises from the consecutive acquisition of genetic alterations. Increasing evidence suggests that as a consequence of these alterations, molecular interactions are reprogrammed in the context of highly connected and regulated cellular networks. Coordinated reprogramming would allow the cell to acquire the capabilities for malignant growth. Results Here, we determine the coordinated function of cancer gene products (i.e., proteins encoded by differentially expressed genes in tumors relative to healthy tissue counterparts, hereafter referred to as "CGPs" defined as their topological properties and organization in the interactome network. We show that CGPs are central to information exchange and propagation and that they are specifically organized to promote tumorigenesis. Centrality is identified by both local (degree and global (betweenness and closeness measures, and systematically appears in down-regulated CGPs. Up-regulated CGPs do not consistently exhibit centrality, but both types of cancer products determine the overall integrity of the network structure. In addition to centrality, down-regulated CGPs show topological association that correlates with common biological processes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis. Conclusion Given the current limited coverage of the human interactome, this study proposes that tumorigenesis takes place in a specific and organized way at the molecular systems-level and suggests a model that comprises the precise down-regulation of groups of topologically-associated proteins involved in particular functions, orchestrated with the up-regulation of specific proteins.

  11. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongara, Sameera [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Karantza, Vassiliki, E-mail: karantva@umdnj.edu [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-11-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging, and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1) is prevalent in human breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers and that Becn1{sup +/-} mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5{sup -/-} and Atg7{sup -/-} livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4C{sup -/-} mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1{sup -/-} mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions

  12. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongara, Sameera; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging, and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1) is prevalent in human breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers and that Becn1 +/- mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5 -/- and Atg7 -/- livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4C -/- mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1 -/- mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions in tumorigenesis.

  13. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  15. Cytotoxic Effect of Luteolin on Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Line (HCT-15: Crucial Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Pandurangan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer, a major health concern worldwide, is the third mostcommon form of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Theflavonoids are naturally occurring diphenylpropanoids ubiquitous in plant foods andimportant components of the human diet. Luteolin, a bioflavonoid, possesses manybeneficial effects including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic activities. Methods:We used the HCT-15 colon adenocarcinoma cell line in this study. Cellswere treated with luteolin (100 µM. Results: Membrane damage markers such as alkaline phosphatase and lactatedehydrogenase were analyzed in a time-dependent manner. Luteolin increased reactiveoxygen species in a time-dependent manner. DNA damage, a hallmark of apoptosis,was induced by luteolin as analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Luteolin acts as a potential cytotoxic agent that can be used to treatcolorectal cancer.

  16. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Uptake of radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies in human colorectal primary tumors as a function of tumor mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.E.; Bares, R.B.; Buell, U.; Fass, J.; Schumpelick, V.; Hauptmann, S.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse correlation has been demonstrated between tumor uptake (u, in units of % injected dose/kg) of monoclonal antibody (Mab) and tumor mass (m, in units of g) for colorectal carcinoma in a series of 19 consecutive patients. The correlation (ρ=-0.510), developed using surgical samples was of the form u=ab b and was significant at the 2% level of confidence. All tumors were positive for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the radiopharmaceutical was in iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA Mab. Such correlations have been predicted earlier from murine and rat tumor uptake data. The slope parameter (b) was -0.362, a number consistent with the previous value (-0.382) found in anti-CEA experiments in mice bearing human xenograft LS174T tumors. (orig.)

  18. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  19. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D.

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPARγ rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  20. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  1. Syringic acid from Tamarix aucheriana possesses antimitogenic and chemo-sensitizing activities in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Mohamed-Salah; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a; Bhardwaj, Radhika; Abbadi, Ghaneim; Koyippally, Mathew; Afzal, Mohammad

    2013-09-01

    For its variety of biological activities, Tamarix aucheriana (Decne.) Baum. (Tamaricaceae) has an extensive history as a traditional Arab medicine. Antimitogenic and chemo-sensitizing activities of syringic acid (SA) were studied against human colorectal cancer. Chromatographic and spectral data were used for the isolation and identification of SA. MTT, flow cytometry, in vitro invasion and angiogenesis assays, fluoremetry, ELISA and Real Time qPCR were used to test antimitogenic and chemo-sensitizing activities of SA, cell cycle, apoptosis, proteasome and NFκB-DNA-binding activities, cancer cell invasion and angiogenesis, and expression of cell cycle/apoptosis-related genes. SA showed a time- and dose-dependent (IC₅₀ = 0.95-1.2 mg mL⁻¹) antimitogenic effect against cancer cells with little cytotoxicity on normal fibroblasts (≤20%). SA-altered cell cycle (S/G2-M or G1/G2-M phases) in a time-dependent manner, induced apoptosis, inhibited DNA-binding activity of NFκB (p ≤ 0.0001), chymotrypsin-like/PGPH (peptidyl-glutamyl peptide-hydrolyzing) (p ≤ 0.0001) and the trypsin-like (p ≤ 0.002) activities of 26S proteasome and angiogenesis. SA also differentially sensitized cancer cells to standard chemotherapies with a marked increase in their sensitivity to camptothecin (500-fold), 5FU (20,000-fold), doxorubicin (210-fold), taxol (3134-fold), vinblastine (1000-fold), vincristine (130-fold) and amsacrine (107-fold) compared to standard drugs alone. SA exerted its chemotherapeutic and chemo-sensitizing effects through an array of mechanisms including cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis, NFκB DNA-binding and proteasome activities. These results demonstrate the potential of SA as an antimitogenic and chemo-sensitizing agent for human colorectal cancer.

  2. Overexpression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 induces growth arrest through phosphorylation of p53 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Sik; Baek, Seung Joon; Bottone, Frank G; Sali, Tina; Eling, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the function of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) in human colorectal cancer, we overexpressed 15-LOX-1 in HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. Clones expressing the highest levels of 15-LOX-1 displayed reduced viability compared with the HCT-116-Vector control cells. Further, by cell cycle gene array analyses, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and MDM2 genes were up-regulated in 15-LOX-1-overexpressing cells. The induction of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and MDM2 were linked to activation of p53 by 15-LOX-1, as there was a dramatic induction of phosphorylated p53 (Ser15) in 15-LOX-1-overesxpressing cells. However, the 15-LOX-1 metabolites 13(S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid failed to induce phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15, and the 15-LOX-1 inhibitor PD146176 did not inhibit the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 in 15-LOX-1-overexpressing cells. Nonetheless, the growth-inhibitory effects of 15-LOX-1 were p53 dependent, as 15-LOX-1 overexpression had no effect on cell growth in p53 (-/-) HCT-116 cells. Finally, treatment of HCT-116-15-LOX-1 cells with different kinase inhibitors suggested that the effects of 15-LOX-1 on p53 phosphorylation and activation were due to effects on DNA-dependent protein kinase. Collectively, these findings suggest a new mechanism to explain the biological activity of 15-LOX-1, where 15-LOX plays a stoichiometric role in activating a DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent pathway that leads to p53-dependent growth arrest.

  3. Chlorinated Water Modulates the Development of Colorectal Tumors with Chromosomal Instability and Gut Microbiota in Apc-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, Tatsunari; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Takakura, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to a variety of chemicals and commensal bacteria. Recent studies have shown that changes in gut microbial populations caused by chlorine or other chemicals in the drinking water influence the development of human colorectal cancer, although the mechanism of tumorigenesis in the gut epithelium is obfuscated by the diversity of microflora and complexity of the tumor microenvironment. In this regard, mouse models that recapitulate human colorectal cancer are an invaluable tool. In this study, we used two conditional adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) knockout mouse models to investigate the effect of chlorinated water on tumorigenesis in the digestive tract. Mice with colon-specific carcinoma--caused by either chromosomal (CDX2P 9.5-NLS Cre;Apc(+/flox), abbreviated to CPC;Apc) or microsatellite (CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox)) instability, respectively--were administered chlorinated (10.0 mg/L chlorine) or tap (0.7 mg/L chlorine) water and evaluated for colon polyp formation. In CPC;Apc mice given chlorinated drinking water, tumors tended to develop in the colon, whereas in those that drank tap water, tumors were mostly observed in the small intestine. There was no difference in the rate of tumor formation of CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox) mice consuming chlorinated as compared to tap water, suggesting that microsatellite instability in the Apc gene does not significantly affect tumorigenesis. Chlorinated water altered the enteric environment by reducing the fecal populations of the obligatory anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile, as well as species belonging to the Atopobium cluster, including Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus sp., which was associated with colon tumorigenesis in CPC;Apc mice. These results suggest that differences in tumorigenesis among CPC;Apc mice consuming chlorinated versus tap water may be due to differences

  4. Andrographolide reversed 5-FU resistance in human colorectal cancer by elevating BAX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weicheng; Guo, Wenjie; Li, Lele; Fu, Zan; Liu, Wen; Gao, Jian; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-12-01

    5-FU is the first line therapy for colorectal cancer, however, treatment effect is often hampered by the development of drug resistance or toxicity at high doses. Andrographolide is a natural diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata which has anti-bacterial, anti-antiviral and anti-inflammation activities. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that Andrographolide reverses 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer and examine the underlying mechanism. In vitro and vivo studies indicated that Andrographolide treatment significantly re-sensitizes HCT116/5-FUR cells (HCT116 cells which are 5-FU resistant) to cytotoxicity of 5-FU. Mechanism analysis showed that Andrographolide/5-FU co-treatment elevated apoptosis level of HCT116/5-FUR cells with highly increased level of BAX. By using biotin-Andrographolide pull down and cellular thermal shift assay, we found out that Andrographolide can directly target to BAX. Andrographolide-BAX interaction prevented BAX degradation, enhancing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis thus reversed 5-FU resistance while BAX silence diminished this effect. Further, by analyzing patient samples who received 5-FU involved chemotherapy, we found that expression level of BAX is correlated with PFS. Our results here provide a novel combination treatment strategy, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing low level of BAX. Meanwhile, we also proposed that BAX expression may be a predicted and prognosis marker of 5-FU involved chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. BAG3 regulates cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huiyong; Xu, Haidong; Li, Zengjun; Zhen, Yanan; Wang, Bin; Huo, Shoujun; Xiao, Ruixue; Xu, Zhongfa

    2016-04-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) has been reported to be elevated in various tumors. However, it is unclear whether BAG3 has a functional role in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we collected CRC samples and cell lines to validate the pathway by using gene and protein assays. RT-PCR showed that the expression of BAG3 mRNA in CRC tissues was obviously higher than that in non-tumor tissues (p BAG3 was found in most CRC tissues and strongly correlated with TNM stage (p = 0.001), differentiation (p = 0.003), and metastasis (p = 0.010). Low expression of BAG3 in HCT-8 significantly reduced cellular proliferation, migration, and invasion. The analysis of in vitro cell showed that HCT-8 cells were exposed to si-BAG3, and its growth was inhibited depending on modulation of cell cycle G1/S checkpoints and cell cycle regulators, involving cyclin D1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1. Furthermore, suppression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by si-BAG3 is linked to the decreased expression of E-cadherin and the increased expression of N-cadherin, vimentin, and MMP9. In conclusion, in the present study, we demonstrated that BAG3 overexpression plays a critical role in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of colorectal cancer. Our data suggests targeted inhibition of BAG3 may be useful for patients with CRC.

  6. Exploration of small RNA-seq data for small non-coding RNAs in Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Hazard, Sprague W; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improved healthcare and recent breakthroughs in technology have substantially reduced cancer mortality rates worldwide. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have allowed genomic analysis of the human transcriptome. Now, using NGS we can further look into small non-coding regions of RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting-RNAs (piRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs (sn/snoRNAs) among others. Recent studies looking at sncRNAs indicate their role in important biological processes such as cancer progression and predict their role as biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Results: In the present study, we data mined publically available small RNA sequencing data from colorectal tissue samples of eight matched patients (benign, tumor, and metastasis) and remapped the data for various small RNA annotations. We identified aberrant expression of 13 miRNAs in tumor and metastasis specimens [tumor vs benign group (19 miRNAs) and metastasis vs benign group (38 miRNAs)] of which five were upregulated, and eight were downregulated, during disease progression. Pathway analysis of aberrantly expressed miRNAs showed that the majority of miRNAs involved in colon cancer were also involved in other cancers. Analysis of piRNAs revealed six to be over-expressed in the tumor vs benign cohort and 24 in the metastasis vs benign group. Only two piRNAs were shared between the two cohorts. Examining other types of small RNAs [sn/snoRNAs, mt_rRNA, miscRNA, nonsense mediated decay (NMD), and rRNAs] identified 15 sncRNAs in the tumor vs benign group and 104 in the metastasis vs benign group, with only four others being commonly expressed. Conclusion: In summary, our comprehensive analysis on publicly available small RNA-seq data identified multiple differentially expressed sncRNAs during colorectal cancer progression at different stages compared to normal colon tissue. We speculate that

  7. Silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haibo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RhoA and RhoC have been proved to be over-expressed in many solid cancers, including colorectal cancer. The reduction of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference (RNAi resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells. The present study was to evaluate the effect of silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNAi on growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC in tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Methods To establish HCT116 cell transplantable model, the nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1.0 × 107 HCT116 cells and kept growing till the tumor xenografts reached 5-7 mm in diameter. Then the mice were randomly assigned to three groups(seven mice in each group: (1 normal saline(NS group, (2replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the negative control shRNA (Ad-HK group and (3replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the 4-tandem linked RhoA and RhoC shRNAs (Ad-RhoA-RhoC group. Ad-HK (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse, Ad-RhoA-RhoC (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse or PBS (30 ul/mouse was injected intratumorally four times once every other day. The weight and volumes of tumor xenografts were recorded. The levels of RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts and proteins in tumor xenografts were detected by reverse quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was used to detect the death of cells. Results The xenografts in mice could be seen at 5th day from the implantation of HCT116 cells and all had reached 5-7 mm in size at 9th day. After injection intratumorally, the growth speed of tumor xenografts in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group was significantly delayed compared with those in NS and Ad-HK group(P RhoA and RhoC reduced more in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group than those in NS and Ad-HK group. The relative RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts were decreased to 48% and 43% respectively (P RhoA and Rho

  8. Human miRNome profiling in colorectal cancer and liver metastasis development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Perilli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative alterations or abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs in colorectal cancer has mainly been demonstrated in primary tumors. The miRNA expression profiles in 78 samples from 46 patients were analyzed to identify changes in miRNA expression level among normal colon mucosa, primary tumor and liver metastasis samples. Using this dataset, we describe the interplay of miRNA groups in regulating pathways that are important for tumor development. Here we describe in details the contents and quality controls for the miRNA expression and clinical data associated with the study published by Pizzini and colleagues in the BMC Genomics in 2013 (Pizzini et al., 2013. Data are deposited in GEO database as GSE35834 series.

  9. Human miRNome profiling in colorectal cancer and liver metastasis development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Lisa; Pizzini, Silvia; Bisognin, Andrea; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Biasiolo, Marta; Facciolli, Arianna; Rossi, Elisabetta; Esposito, Giovanni; Rugge, Massimo; Pilati, Pierluigi; Mocellin, Simone; Nitti, Donato; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Zanovello, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative alterations or abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in colorectal cancer has mainly been demonstrated in primary tumors. The miRNA expression profiles in 78 samples from 46 patients were analyzed to identify changes in miRNA expression level among normal colon mucosa, primary tumor and liver metastasis samples. Using this dataset, we describe the interplay of miRNA groups in regulating pathways that are important for tumor development. Here we describe in details the contents and quality controls for the miRNA expression and clinical data associated with the study published by Pizzini and colleagues in the BMC Genomics in 2013 (Pizzini et al., 2013). Data are deposited in GEO database as GSE35834 series. PMID:26484092

  10. Increased rectal microbial richness is associated with the presence of colorectal adenomas in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapareddy, Nina; Legge, Ryan M; Jovov, Biljana; McCoy, Amber; Burcal, Lauren; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Randall, Thomas A; Galanko, Joseph; Benson, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S; Rawls, John F; Abdo, Zaid; Fodor, Anthony A; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-10-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbial community have been associated with diseases such as obesity, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC). We used 454 titanium pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize adherent bacterial communities in mucosal biopsy samples from 33 subjects with adenomas and 38 subjects without adenomas (controls). Biopsy samples from subjects with adenomas had greater numbers of bacteria from 87 taxa than controls; only 5 taxa were more abundant in control samples. The magnitude of the differences in the distal gut microbiota between patients with adenomas and controls was more pronounced than that of any other clinical parameters including obesity, diet or family history of CRC. This suggests that sequence analysis of the microbiota could be used to identify patients at risk for developing adenomas.

  11. Application of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection in human colorectal cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sheng; Chia, Teck-Chee; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Tang, Choong Leong; Choen, Francis S.; Krishnan, S. M.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated 48 normal patients and 25 diseased patients using our laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection system during their regular colonoscopy. The colon and rectum mucosa autofluorescence were excited by 405 nm continue wavelength laser. We observed that cancer or diseased colorectal mucosa, their autofluorescence spectra are significantly different from normal area. The autofluorescence spectra intensity at about 500 nm was been used for our intensity ratio characteristics intensity for our diagnostic algorithm. The intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 were performed to identify the detection area. From experimental result we concluded that both intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 as guidelines can detect cancerous and polyps disease completely. Our investigation provided some useful insight for laser induced autofluorescence spectra as a diagnosis technique for clinical application.

  12. Chemoprevention of Colorectal Cancer by Artocarpin, a Dietary Phytochemical from Artocarpus heterophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guochuan; Zheng, Zongping; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Xu, Yijuan; Kang, Soouk; Dong, Zigang; Wang, Mingfu; Gu, Zhennan; Li, Haitao; Chen, Wei

    2017-05-03

    Artocarpus heterophyllus is an evergreen tree distributed in tropical regions, and its fruit (jackfruit) is well-known as the world's largest tree-borne fruit. Although A. heterophyllus has been widely used in folk medicines against inflammation, its potential in cancer chemoprevention remains unclear. Herein we identified artocarpin from A. heterophyllus as a promising colorectal cancer chemopreventive agent by targeting Akt kinase. Phenotypically, artocarpin exhibited selective cytotoxicity against human colon cancer cells. Artocarpin impaired the anchorage-independent growth capability, suppressed colon cancer cell growth, and induced a G1 phase cell cycle arrest which was followed by apoptotic as well as autophagic cell death. Mechanistic studies revealed that artocarpin directly targeted Akt 1 and 2 kinase activity evidenced by in vitro kinase assay, ex vivo binding assay as well as Akt downstream cellular signal transduction. Importantly, oral administration of artocarpin attenuated colitis-associated colorectal tumorigenesis in mice. Taken together, artocarpin, a bioactive component of A. heterophyllus, might merit investigation as a potential colorectal cancer chemopreventive agent.

  13. Libidibia ferrea presents antiproliferative, apoptotic and antioxidant effects in a colorectal cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Andreza Conceição Véras de Aguiar; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Ferreira, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; Araújo, Aurigena Antunes de; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre de Oliveira; Medeiros, Juliana Silva de; Cavalcante, Rômulo Dos Santos; Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de Araújo

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is noted for being one of the most frequent of tumors, with expressive morbidity and mortality rates. In new drug discovery, plants stand out as a source capable of yielding safe and high-efficiency products. Well known in Brazilian popular medicine, Libidibia ferrea (Mart. Ex Tul.) L.P. Queiroz var. ferrea (better known as "ironwood" or "jucá"), has been used to treat a wide spectrum of conditions and to prevent cancer. Using methodologies that involved flow cytometry, spectrophotometry and RT-qPCR assays, crude extracts of the fruits of L. ferrea (20T, 40T, 60T and 80T) were evaluated at 24h and/or 48h for: their ability to inhibit cell proliferation; induce apoptosis through Bcl-2, caspase-3 and Apaf-1; their antioxidant activity and effects on important targets related to cell proliferation (EGFR and AKT) in the HT-29 human colorectal cancer lineage. The results revealed high antiproliferative potential as compared to the controls, induction of apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, and probable tumor inhibition activity under the mediation of important targets in tumorigenesis. In addition, L. ferrea revealed antioxidant, lipid peroxidation and chemoprotective effects in healthy cells. Thus, L. ferrea derivatives have important anticancer effects, and may be considered promising candidate for colorectal cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of fried meat-induced colorectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Shaughnessy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing meat cooked at either low (100°C or high temperature (250°C, each for 2 weeks in a crossover design. The other 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing the high-temperature meat diet alone or in combination with 3 putative mutagen inhibitors: cruciferous vegetables, yogurt, and chlorophyllin tablets, also in a crossover design. Subjects were nonsmokers, at least 18 years old, and not currently taking prescription drugs or antibiotics. We used the Salmonella assay to analyze the meat, urine, and feces for mutagenicity, and the comet assay to analyze rectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes for DNA damage. Low-temperature meat had undetectable levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs and was not mutagenic, whereas high-temperature meat had high HCA levels and was highly mutagenic. The high-temperature meat diet increased the mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine and feces compared to the low-temperature meat diet. The mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine was increased nearly twofold by the inhibitor diet, indicating that the inhibitors enhanced conjugation. Inhibitors decreased significantly the mutagenicity of un-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed feces. The diets did not alter the levels of DNA damage in non-target white blood cells, but the inhibitor diet decreased nearly twofold the DNA damage in target colorectal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary factors can reduce DNA damage in the target tissue of fried-meat associated carcinogenesis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00340743.

  15. MNS16A tandem repeat minisatellite of human telomerase gene: functional studies in colorectal, lung and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Philipp; Zöchmeister, Cornelia; Behm, Christian; Brezina, Stefanie; Baierl, Andreas; Doriguzzi, Angelina; Vanas, Vanita; Holzmann, Klaus; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig; Gsur, Andrea

    2017-04-25

    MNS16A, a functional polymorphic tandem repeat minisatellite, is located in the promoter region of an antisense transcript of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene. MNS16A promoter activity depends on the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) presenting varying numbers of transcription factor binding sites for GATA binding protein 1. Although MNS16A has been investigated in multiple cancer epidemiology studies with incongruent findings, functional data of only two VNTRs (VNTR-243 and VNTR-302) were available thus far, linking the shorter VNTR to higher promoter activity.For the first time, we investigated promoter activity of all six VNTRs of MNS16A in cell lines of colorectal, lung and prostate cancer using Luciferase reporter assay. In all investigated cell lines shorter VNTRs showed higher promoter activity. While this anticipated indirect linear relationship was affirmed for colorectal cancer SW480 (P = 0.006), a piecewise linear regression model provided significantly better model fit in lung cancer A-427 (P = 6.9 × 10-9) and prostate cancer LNCaP (P = 0.039). In silico search for transcription factor binding sites in MNS16A core repeat element suggested a higher degree of complexity involving X-box binding protein 1, general transcription factor II-I, and glucocorticoid receptor alpha in addition to GATA binding protein 1.Further functional studies in additional cancers are requested to extend our knowledge of MNS16A functionality uncovering potential cancer type-specific differences. Risk alleles may vary in different malignancies and their determination in vitro could be relevant for interpretation of genotype data.

  16. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line derived from human colorectal laterally spreading tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Ying; Lai, Zhou-Sheng; Yeung, Chung-Man; Wang, Ji-De; Deng, Wen; Li, Hoi Yee; Han, Yu-Jing; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Jiang, Bo; Lin, Marie Chia-mi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the molecular mechanism of laterally spreading tumor (LST), a cell line [Laterally Spreading Tumor-Rectum 1 (LST-R1)] was derived and the characteristics of this cell line were investigated. METHODS: A new cell line (LST-R1) originated from laterally spreading tumor was established. Properties of the cell line were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry method, cytogenetic analysis and nude mice xenograft experiments. In vitro invasion assay, cDNA microarray and Western blotting were used to compare the difference between the LST-R1 and other colorectal cancer cell lines derived from prudent colon cancer. RESULTS: Our study demonstrated that both epithelial special antigen (ESA) and cytokeratin-20 (CK20) were expressed in LST-R1. The cells presented microvilli and tight junction with large nuclei. The karyotypic analysis showed hyperdiploid features with structural chromosome aberrations. The in vivo tumorigenicity was also demonstrated in nude mice xenograft experiments. The invasion assay suggested this cell line has a higher invasive ability. cDNA microarray and Western blotting show the loss of the expression of E-cadherin in LST-R1 cells. CONCLUSION: We established and characterized a colorectal cancer cell line, LST-R1 and LST-R1 has an obvious malignant tendency, which maybe partially attributed to the changes of the expression of some adhesion molecules, such as E-cadherin. It is also a versatile tool for exploring the original and progressive mechanisms of laterally spreading tumor and the early colon cancer genesis. PMID:18300345

  17. Dietary Feeding of Grape Seed Extract Prevents Intestinal Tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaiya Velmurugan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemopreventive effects and associated mechanisms of grape seed extract (GSE against intestinal/colon cancer development are largely unknown. Herein, we investigated GSE efficacy against intestinal tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ mice. Female APCmin/+ mice were fed control or 0.5% GSE (wt/wt mixed AIN-76A diet for 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment, GSE feeding decreased the total number of intestinal polyps by 40%. The decrease in polyp formation in the small intestine was 42%, which was mostly in its middle (51% and distal (49% portions compared with the proximal one. GSE also decreased polyp growth where the number of polyps of 1 to 2 mm in size decreased by 42% and greater than 2 mm in size by 71%, without any significant change in polyps less than 1 mm in size. Immunohistochemical analyses of small intestinal tissue samples revealed a decrease (80%–86% in cell proliferation and an increase (four- to eight-fold in apoptosis. GSE feeding also showed decreased protein levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 (56%–64%, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS (58%–60%, and β-catenin (43%–59% but an increased Cip1/p21-positive cells (1.9- to 2.6-fold. GSE also decreased cyclin D1 and c-Myc protein levels in small intestine. Together, these findings show the chemopreventive potential of GSE against intestinal polyp formation and growth in APCmin/+ mice, which was accompanied with reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis together with down-regulation in COX-2, iNOS, β-catenin, cyclin D1, and c-Myc expression, but increased Cip1/p21. In conclusion, the present study suggests potential usefulness of GSE for the chemoprevention of human intestinal/colorectal cancer.

  18. A protein knockdown strategy to study the function of β-catenin in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Pengbo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway plays critical roles in cell proliferation and cell fate determination at many stages of development. A critical downstream target of Wnt signaling is the cytosolic β-catenin, which is stabilized upon Wnt activation and promotes transcription of a variety of target genes including c-myc and cyclin D. Aberrant Wnt signaling, which results from mutations of either β-catenin or adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, renders β-catenin resistant to degradation, and has been associated with multiple types of human cancers. Results A protein knockdown strategy was designed to reduce the cytosolic β-catenin levels through accelerating its turnover rate. By engineering a chimeric protein with the β-catenin binding domain of E-cadherin fused to βTrCP ubiquitin-protein ligase, the stable β-catenin mutant was recruited to the cellular SCF (Skp1, Cullin 1, and F-box-containing substrate receptor ubiquitination machinery for ubiquitination and degradation. The DLD1 colon cancer cells express wild type β-catenin at abnormally high levels due to loss of APC. Remarkably, conditional expression of βTrCP-E-cadherin under the control of a tetracycline-repressive promoter in DLD1 cells selectively knocked down the cytosolic, but not membrane-associated subpopulation of β-catenin. As a result, DLD1 cells were impaired in their growth and clonogenic ability in vitro, and lost their tumorigenic potential in nude mice. Conclusion We have designed a novel approach to induce degradation of stabilized/mutated β-catenin. Our results suggest that a high concentration of cytoplasmic β-catenin is critical for the growth of colorectal tumor cells. The protein knockdown strategy can be utilized not only as a novel method to dissect the role of oncoproteins in tumorigenesis, but also as a unique tool to delineate the function of a subpopulation of proteins localized to a specific subcellular compartment.

  19. Reduced HRAS G12V-Driven Tumorigenesis of Cell Lines Expressing KRAS C118S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Huang

    Full Text Available In many different human cancers, one of the HRAS, NRAS, or KRAS genes in the RAS family of small GTPases acquires an oncogenic mutation that renders the encoded protein constitutively GTP-bound and thereby active, which is well established to promote tumorigenesis. In addition to oncogenic mutations, accumulating evidence suggests that the wild-type isoforms may also be activated and contribute to oncogenic RAS-driven tumorigenesis. In this regard, redox-dependent reactions with cysteine 118 (C118 have been found to promote activation of wild-type HRAS and NRAS. We sought to determine if this residue is also important for the activation of wild-type KRAS and promotion of tumorigenesis. Thus, we mutated C118 to serine (C118S in wild-type KRAS to block redox-dependent reactions at this site. We now report that this mutation reduced the level of GTP-bound KRAS and impaired RAS signaling stimulated by the growth factor EGF. With regards to tumorigenesis, we also report that oncogenic HRAS-transformed human cells in which endogenous KRAS was knocked down and replaced with KRASC118S exhibited reduced xenograft tumor growth, as did oncogenic HRAS-transformed KrasC118S/C118S murine cells in which the C118S mutation was knocked into the endogenous Kras gene. Taken together, these data suggest a role for redox-dependent activation of wild-type KRAS through C118 in oncogenic HRAS-driven tumorigenesis.

  20. Expression of CIAPIN1 in human colorectal cancer and its correlation with prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Hai; Wang, Weizhong; Zhao, Qingchuan; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Heliang; Chen, Changsheng; Li, Shujun; Li, Nanlin; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine-induced anti-apoptotic molecule (CIAPIN1) had been found to be a differentially-expressed gene involved in a variety of cancers, and it was also considered as a candidate tumour suppressor gene in gastric cancer, renal cancer and liver cancer. However, studies on the role of CIAPIN1 in colorectal cancer were still unavailable. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic impact of CIAPIN1 in 273 colorectal cancer (CRC) samples and to investigate the CIAPIN1 expression in CRC cell lines after inducing differentiation. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to detect the expression of CIAPIN1 in CRC samples from 273 patients. The relationship between CIAPIN1 expression and patients' characteristics (gender, age, location of cancer, UICC stage, local recurrence and tumour grade factors) was evaluated. In addition, these patients were followed up for five consecutive years to investigate the relationship between CIAPIN1 expression and the prognosis of CRC. We induced the differentiation of the CRC cell lines HT29 and SW480, in order to detect the expression of CIAPIN1 in the process of CRC cells differentiation. Results indicated that CIAPIN1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that its expression level in cancer samples was significantly lower than in normal tissues. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test showed a significant difference in the differential expression of CIAPIN1 in patients with different T and UICC stages, and tumour grade (P = 0.0393, 0.0297 and 0.0397, respectively). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that the survival time of CRC patients with high expression of CIAPIN1 was longer than those with low expression during the 5-year follow up period (P = 0.0002). COX regression analysis indicated that low expression of CIAPIN1, cancer stage of > pT1, distant organ metastasis (pM 1 ), regional lymph node metastasis (> pN 1 ) and local recurrence (yes) were independent, poor prognostic factors of CRC

  1. Metformin efficacy and safety for colorectal polyps: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higurashi, Takuma; Fujisawa, Nobutaka; Uchiyama, Shiori; Ezuka, Akiko; Nagase, Hajime; Kessoku, Takaomi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Shoji; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Morita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Endo, Hiroki; Hosono, Kunihiro; Yamada, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Uchiyama, Takashi; Hata, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Metformin, a biguanide, which is widely used for treating diabetes mellitus, has recently been suggestive to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In a previous study conducted in non-diabetic subjects, we showed that oral short-term low-dose metformin suppressed the development of colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF have been considered as a useful surrogate biomarker of CRC, although the biological significance of these lesions remains controversial. We devised a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of metformin against metachronous colorectal polyps and the safety of this drug in non-diabetic post-polypectomy patients. This study is a multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in non-diabetic patients with a recent history of undergoing colorectal polypectomy. All adult patients visiting the Yokohama City University hospital or affiliated hospitals for polypectomy shall be recruited for the study. Eligible patients will then be allocated randomly into either one of two groups: the metformin group and the placebo group. Patients in the metformin group shall receive oral metformin at 250 mg per day, and those in the placebo group shall receive an oral placebo tablet. At the end of 1 year of administration of metformin/placebo, colonoscopy will be performed to evaluate the polyp formation. This is the first study proposed to explore the effect of metformin against colorectal polyp formation. Metformin activates AMPK, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The mTOR pathway plays an important role in the cellular protein translational machinery and cell proliferation. Patients with type 2 diabetes taking under treatment with metformin have been

  2. Metformin efficacy and safety for colorectal polyps: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higurashi Takuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the major neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Metformin, a biguanide, which is widely used for treating diabetes mellitus, has recently been suggestive to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In a previous study conducted in non-diabetic subjects, we showed that oral short-term low-dose metformin suppressed the development of colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF. ACF have been considered as a useful surrogate biomarker of CRC, although the biological significance of these lesions remains controversial. We devised a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of metformin against metachronous colorectal polyps and the safety of this drug in non-diabetic post-polypectomy patients. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in non-diabetic patients with a recent history of undergoing colorectal polypectomy. All adult patients visiting the Yokohama City University hospital or affiliated hospitals for polypectomy shall be recruited for the study. Eligible patients will then be allocated randomly into either one of two groups: the metformin group and the placebo group. Patients in the metformin group shall receive oral metformin at 250 mg per day, and those in the placebo group shall receive an oral placebo tablet. At the end of 1 year of administration of metformin/placebo, colonoscopy will be performed to evaluate the polyp formation. Discussion This is the first study proposed to explore the effect of metformin against colorectal polyp formation. Metformin activates AMPK, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The mTOR pathway plays an important role in the cellular protein translational machinery and cell proliferation. Patients with

  3. CpG Island Methylation in Colorectal Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Curtin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a CpG island methylator phenotype, or CIMP, quickly became the focus of several colorectal cancer studies describing its clinical and pathological features after its introduction in 1999 by Toyota and colleagues. Further characterization of CIMP in tumors lead to widespread acceptance of the concept, as expressed by Shen and Issa in their 2005 editorial, “CIMP, at last.” Since that time, extensive research efforts have brought great insights into the epidemiology and prognosis of CIMP+ tumors and other epigenetic mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. With the advances in technology and subsequent cataloging of the human methylome in cancer and normal tissue, new directions in research to understand CIMP and its role in complex biological systems yield hope for future epigenetically based diagnostics and treatments.

  4. Circulating Inflammatory Mediators as Potential Prognostic Markers of Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Di Caro

    Full Text Available Cytokines and chemokines in the tumor microenvironment drive metastatic development and their serum levels might mirror the ongoing inflammatory reaction at the tumor site. Novel highly sensitive tools are needed to identify colorectal cancer patients at high risk of recurrence that should be more closely monitored during post-surgical follow up. Here we study whether circulating inflammatory markers might be used to predict recurrence in CRC patients.Circulating levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, TNFalpha, CCL2, CXCL8, VEGF and the acute phase protein Pentraxin-3 were measured by ELISA in preoperative serum samples prospectively collected from a cohort of sixty-nine patients undergoing surgical resection for stage 0-IV CRC and associated with post-operative disease recurrence.Cox multivariate analysis showed that combined high levels (≥ROC cut off-value of CXCL8, VEGF and Pentraxin3 were associated with increased risk of disease recurrence [HR: 14.28; 95%CI: (3.13-65.1] independently of TNM staging. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that CXCL8, VEGF and Pentraxin3 levels were significantly associated with worse survival (P<0.001.Circulating inflammatory mediators efficiently predicted postoperative recurrence after CRC surgery. Therefore, this study suggest that their validation in large-scale clinical trials may help in tailoring CRC post-surgical management.

  5. Exosomes from human colorectal cancer induce a tumor-like behavior in colonic mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Valtieri, Mauro; Federici, Cristina; Cecchetti, Serena; Meschini, Stefania; Condello, Maria; Signore, Michele; Fais, Stefano

    2016-08-02

    Cancer cells, including colorectal cancer ones (CRC), release high amounts of nanovesicles (exosomes), delivering biochemical messages for paracrine or systemic crosstalk. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to play contradicting roles in tumor progression. CRC exosomes induce in cMSCs: i) atypical morphology, higher proliferation, migration and invasion; ii) formation of spheroids; iii) an acidic extracellular environment associated with iv) a plasma membrane redistribution of vacuolar H+-ATPase and increased expression of CEA. Colon cancer derived MSCs, which were isolated from tumor masses, produce umbilicated spheroids, a future frequently observed in the inner core of rapidly growing tumors and recapitulate the changes observed in normal colonic MSCs exposed to CRC exosomes. Tissue specific colonic (c)MSCs were exposed to primary or metastatic CRC exosomes and analysed by light and electron microscopy, proliferation in 2D and 3D cultures, migration and invasion assays, Western blot and confocal microscopy for vacuolar H+-ATPase expression. CRC exosomes are able to induce morphological and functional changes in colonic MSCs, which may favour tumor growth and its malignant progression. Our results suggest that exosomes are actively involved in cancer progression and that inhibiting tumor exosome release may represent a way to interfere with cancer.

  6. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  7. Rho GTPase function in tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, R; Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng

    2009-01-01

    , for that reason, Rho GTPases, their regulators, and their effectors have been suggested to control tumor formation and progression in humans. However, while the tumor-relevant functions of Rho GTPases are very well documented in vitro, we are only now beginning to assess their contribution to cancer in human...... patients and in animal models. This review will give a very brief overview of Rho GTPase function in general and then focus on in vivo evidence for a role of Rho GTPases in malignant tumors, both in human patients and in genetically modified mice....

  8. Activated human primary NK cells efficiently kill colorectal cancer cells in 3D spheroid cultures irrespectively of the level of PD-L1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Pilar M; Vigueras, Alan; Olivan, Sara; Prats, Anne C; Costas, Santiago; Llamazares, Guillermo; Sanchez-Martinez, Diego; Ayuso, José María; Fernandez, Luis; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pardo, Julián

    2018-01-01

    Haploidentical Natural Killer (NK) cells have been shown as an effective and safe alternative for the treatment of haematological malignancies with poor prognosis for which traditional therapies are ineffective. In contrast to haematological cancer cells, that mainly grow as single suspension cells, solid carcinomas are characterised by a tridimensional (3D) architecture that provide specific surviving advantages and resistance against chemo- and radiotherapy. However, little is known about the impact of 3D growth on solid cancer immunotherapy especially adoptive NK cell transfer. We have recently developed a protocol to activate ex vivo human primary NK cells using B lymphoblastic cell lines, which generates NK cells able to overcome chemoresistance in haematological cancer cells. Here we have analysed the activity of these allogeneic NK cells against colorectal (CRC) human cell lines growing in 3D spheroid culture and correlated with the expression of some of the main ligands regulating NK cell activity. Our results indicate that activated NK cells efficiently kill colorectal tumour cell spheroids in both 2D and 3D cultures. Notably, although 3D CRC cell cultures favoured the expression of the inhibitory immune checkpoint PD-L1, it did not correlate with increased resistance to NK cells. Finally, we have analysed in detail the infiltration of NK cells in 3D spheroids by microscopy and found that at low NK cell density, cell death is not observed although NK cells are able to infiltrate into the spheroid. In contrast, higher densities promote tumoural cell death before infiltration can be detected. These findings show that highly dense activated human primary NK cells efficiently kill colorectal carcinoma cells growing in 3D cultures independently of PD-L1 expression and suggest that the use of allogeneic activated NK cells could be beneficial for the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Mutator/hypermutable fetal/juvenile metakaryotic stem cells and human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohith G. Kini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates increase exponentially from maturity, reach a maximum, then decline in extreme old age. Armitage and Doll (1957 postulated that the exponential increase resulted from n mutations occurring throughout adult life in normal cells at risk that initiated the growth of a preneoplastic colony in which subsequent m mutations promoted one of the preneoplastic cells at risk to form a lethal neoplasia. We have reported cytologic evidence that these cells at risk are fetal/juvenile organogenic, then preneoplastic metakaryotic stem cells. Metakaryotic cells display stem-like behaviors of both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear divisions and peculiarities such as bell shaped nuclei and amitotic nuclear fission that distinguish them from embryonic, eukaryotic stem cells. Analyses of mutant colony sizes and numbers in adult lung epithelia supported the inferences that the metakaryotic organogenic stem cells are constitutively mutator/hypermutable and that their contributions to cancer initiation are limited to the fetal/juvenile period. We have amended the two-stage model of Armitage and Doll and incorporated these several inferences in a computer program CancerFit v.5.0. We compared the expectations of the amended model to adult (15-104 yr age-specific colon cancer rates for European American males born 1890-99 and observed remarkable concordance. When estimates of normal colonic fetal/juvenile APC and OAT gene mutation rates (~2-5 x 10-5 per stem cell doubling and preneoplastic colonic gene loss rates (~ 8 x 10-3 were applied, the model was in accordance only for the values of n = 2 and m = 4 or 5.

  10. Activity and expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Li, Ge; Choi, Hoon; Park, Hae-Duck; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are involved in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. There is still debate whether the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 differs between tumors located in the colon and rectum. We designed this study to determine any differences in the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA system between colon and rectal cancer tissues. Cancer tissue samples were obtained from colon carcinoma (n = 12) and rectal carcinomas (n = 10). MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting; their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), were assessed by Western blotting. uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of uPA was assessed by casein-plasminogen zymography. In both colon and rectal tumors, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 protein levels were higher than in corresponding paired normal mucosa, while TIMP-2 level in tumors was significantly lower than in normal mucosa. The enzyme activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and their endogenous inhibitors did not reach a statistically significant difference between colon and rectal cancer compared with their normal mucosa. In rectal tumors, there was an increased activity of uPA compared with the activity in colon tumors (P = 0.0266), however urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showed no significant difference between colon and rectal cancer tissues. These findings suggest that uPA may be expressed differentially in colon and rectal cancers, however, the activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, PAI-1 and uPAR are not affected by tumor location in the colon or the rectum

  11. Gamma-tubulin-containing abnormal centrioles are induced by insufficient Plk4 in human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Ryoko; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Arnold, Marc; Sandvig, Lisa

    2009-06-15

    Cancer cells frequently induce aberrant centrosomes, which have been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. Human colorectal cancer cells, HCT116, contain aberrant centrioles composed of disorganized cylindrical microtubules and displaced appendages. These cells also express unique centrosome-related structures associated with a subset of centrosomal components, including gamma-tubulin, centrin and PCM1. During hydroxyurea treatment, these abnormal structures become more abundant and undergo a change in shape from small dots to elongated fibers. Although gamma-tubulin seems to exist as a ring complex, the abnormal structures do not support microtubule nucleation. Several lines of evidence suggest that the fibers correspond to a disorganized form of centriolar microtubules. Plk4, a mammalian homolog of ZYG-1 essential for initiation of centriole biogenesis, is not associated with the gamma-tubulin-specific abnormal centrosomes. The amount of Plk4 at each centrosome was less in cells with abnormal centrosomes than cells without gamma-tubulin-specific abnormal centrosomes. In addition, the formation of abnormal structures was abolished by expression of exogenous Plk4, but not SAS6 and Cep135/Bld10p, which are downstream regulators required for the organization of nine-triplet microtubules. These results suggest that HCT116 cells fail to organize the ninefold symmetry of centrioles due to insufficient Plk4.

  12. Over-expression of GAPDH in human colorectal carcinoma as a preferred target of 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shuqiang; Hu, Yumin; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Wenjing; Zeng, Zhaolei; Yang, Jing; Yun, Jingping; Xu, Ruihua; Huang, Peng

    2012-02-01

    It has long been observed that many cancer cells exhibit increased aerobic glycolysis and rely more on this pathway to generate ATP and metabolic intermediates for cell proliferation. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key enzyme in glycolysis and has been known as a housekeeping molecule. In the present study, we found that GAPDH expression was significantly up-regulated in human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues, and also increased in colon cancer cell lines compared to the non-tumor colon mucosa cells in culture. The expression of GAPDH was further elevated in the liver metastatic tissues compared to the original colon cancer tissue of the same patients, suggesting that high expression of GAPDH might play an important role in colon cancer development and metastasis. Importantly, we found that 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester (3-BrOP) preferentially inhibited GAPDH and exhibited potent activity in inducing colon cancer cell death by causing severe depletion of ATP. 3-BrOP at low concentrations (1-10 μM) inhibited GAPDH and a much higher concentration (300 μM) was required to inhibit hexokinase-2. The cytotoxic effect of 3-BrOP was associated with its inhibition of GAPDH, and colon cancer cells with loss of p53 were more sensitive to this compound. Our study suggests that GAPDH may be a potential target for colon cancer therapy.

  13. Doxorubicin-induced mitophagy contributes to drug resistance in cancer stem cells from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Luo, Lan; Guo, Chang-Ying; Goto, Shinji; Urata, Yoshishige; Shao, Jiang-Hua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to be drug resistant. Mitophagy selectively degrades unnecessary or damaged mitochondria by autophagy during cellular stress. To investigate the potential role of mitophagy in drug resistance in CSCs, we purified CD133 + /CD44 + CSCs from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells and then exposed to doxorubicin (DXR). Compared with parental cells, CSCs were more resistant to DXR treatment. Although DXR treatment enhanced autophagy levels in both cell types, the inhibition of autophagy by ATG7 silencing significantly increased the toxicity of DXR only in parental cells, not in CSCs. Interestingly, the level of mitochondrial superoxide was detected to be significantly lower in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Furthermore, the mitophagy level and expression of BNIP3L, a mitophagy regulator, were significantly higher in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Silencing BNIP3L significantly halted mitophagy and enhanced the sensitivity to DXR in CSCs. Our data suggested that mitophagy, but not non-selective autophagy, likely contributes to drug resistance in CSCs isolated from HCT8 cells. Further studies in other cancer cell lines will be needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chrysin Attenuates Cell Viability of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells through Autophagy Induction Unlike 5-Fluorouracil/Oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yueh-Ming; Chen, Chih-I; Hsiang, Yi-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Chia; Cheng, Kung-Chuan; Chien, Pei-Hsuan; Pan, Hsiao-Lin; Lu, Chien-Chang; Chen, Yun-Ju

    2018-06-14

    Chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with oxaliplatin is often used as the standard treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC). The disturbing side effects and drug resistance commonly observed in chemotherapy motivate us to develop alternative optimal therapeutic options for CRC treatment. Chrysin, a natural and biologically active flavonoid abundant in propolis, is reported to have antitumor effects on a few CRCs. However, whether and how chrysin achieves similar effectiveness to the 5-FU combination is not clear. In this study, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), western blotting, fluorescence microscopy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were assayed. We found that chrysin exhibited similar inhibition of cell viability as the 5-FU combination in a panel of human CRC cells. Furthermore, the results showed that chrysin significantly increased the levels of LC3-II, an autophagy-related marker, in CRC cells, which was not observed with the 5-FU combination. More importantly, blockage of autophagy induction restored chrysin-attenuated CRC cell viability. Further mechanistic analysis revealed that chrysin, not the 5-FU combination, induced ROS generation, and in turn, inhibited the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Collectively, these results imply that chrysin may be a potential replacement for the 5-FU and oxaliplatin combination to achieve antitumor activity through autophagy for CRC treatment in the future.

  15. Cytotoxic Activity of Kenaf Seed Oils from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extraction towards Human Colorectal Cancer (HT29 Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Abd Ghafar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus from the family Malvaceae, is a valuable fiber plant native to India and Africa and is currently planted as the fourth commercial crop in Malaysia. Kenaf seed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterol such as β-sitosterol, vitamin E, and other antioxidants with chemopreventive properties. Kenaf seeds oil (KSO was from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction fluid (SFE at 9 different permutations of parameters based on range of pressures from 200 to 600 bars and temperature from 40 to 80°C. They were 200/40, 200/60, 200/80, 400/40, 400/60, 400/80, 600/40, 600/60, and 600/80. Extraction from 9 parameters of KSO-SFE was screened for cytotoxicity towards human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3 cell lines using MTS assay. KSO-SFE at 600/40 showed the strongest cytotoxicity towards HT29 with IC50 of 200 µg/mL. The IC50 for NIH/3T3 was not detected even at highest concentration employed. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of KSO-SFE-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by KSO-SFE. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Annexin V/PI and AO/PI staining.

  16. The cytotoxic effects of regorafenib in combination with protein kinase D inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ning; Chu, Edward; Wu, Shao-yu; Wipf, Peter; Schmitz, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remains a major public health problem, and diagnosis of metastatic disease is usually associated with poor prognosis. The multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib was approved in 2013 in the U.S. for the treatment of mCRC patients who progressed after standard therapies. However, the clinical efficacy of regorafenib is quite limited. One potential strategy to improve mCRC therapy is to combine agents that target key cellular signaling pathways, which may lead to synergistic enhancement of antitumor efficacy and overcome cellular drug resistance. Protein kinase D (PKD), a family of serine/threonine kinases, mediates key signaling pathways implicated in multiple cellular processes. Herein, we evaluated the combination of regorafenib with a PKD inhibitor in several human CRC cells. Using the Chou-Talalay model, the combination index values for this combination treatment demonstrated synergistic effects on inhibition of cell proliferation and clonal formation. This drug combination resulted in induction of apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, increased PARP cleavage, and decreased activation of the anti-apoptotic protein HSP27. This combination also yielded enhanced inhibition of ERK, AKT, and NF-κB signaling. Taken together, PKD inhibition in combination with regorafenib appears to be a promising strategy for the treatment of mCRC. PMID:25544765

  17. Carcinoma-specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding glycoproteins of human colorectal carcinoma and its relation to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Y; Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, S; Ozawa, M; Muramatsu, T; Sato, E

    1985-08-01

    Glycoproteins binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin, which recognizes the terminal alpha-L-fucose residue, were analyzed in 18 cases of human colorectal carcinoma by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by the Western blotting method. In the distal large bowel (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I existed in carcinoma tissue but not in normal mucosa. In the proximal large bowel (ascending and transverse colon), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I were found both in normal mucosa and in carcinoma tissue, whereas those from the carcinoma tissue had an apparently lower molecular weight as compared to the weight of those from the normal mucosa. Thus there is a biochemical difference in UEA-I binding glycoproteins between the normal mucosa and the carcinoma tissue, although in our previous histochemical study no difference was observed in UEA-I binding glycoproteins of the proximal large bowel between the carcinoma tissue and the normal mucosa. Furthermore, carcinoembryonic antigen from the carcinoma tissue was found to have the same electrophoretical mobility as the UEA-I binding glycoproteins.

  18. Effects of Human Development Index and Its Components on Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality: a Global Ecological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Salman; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh; Mansori, Kamyar; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Ayubi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparity for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality according to the human development index (HDI) might be expected. This study aimed at quantifying the effect measure of association HDI and its components on the CRC incidence and mortality. In this ecological study, CRC incidence and mortality was obtained from GLOBOCAN, the global cancer project for 172 countries. Data were extracted about HDI 2013 for 169 countries from the World Bank report. Linear regression was constructed to measure effects of HDI and its components on CRC incidence and mortality. A positive trend between increasing HDI of countries and age-standardized rates per 100,000 of CRC incidence and mortality was observed. Among HDI components education was the strongest effect measure of association on CRC incidence and mortality, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals) being 2.8 (2.4, 3.2) and 0.9 (0.8, 1), respectively. HDI and its components were positively related with CRC incidence and mortality and can be considered as targets for prevention and treatment intervention or tracking geographic disparities.

  19. Morusin induces apoptosis and suppresses NF-κB activity in human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.-C.; Won, S.-J.; Chao, C.-L.; Wu, F.-L.; Liu, H.-S.; Ling Pin; Lin, C.-N.; Su, C.-L.

    2008-01-01

    Morusin is a pure compound isolated from root bark of Morusaustralis (Moraceae). In this study, we demonstrated that morusin significantly inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. Apoptosis induced by morusin was characterized by accumulation of cells at the sub-G 1 phase, fragmentation of DNA, and condensation of chromatin. Morusin also inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK-α, IKK-β and IκB-α, increased expression of IκB-α, and suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its DNA binding activity. Dephosphorylation of NF-κB upstream regulators PI3K, Akt and PDK1 was also displayed. In addition, activation of caspase-8, change of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, and activation of caspase-9 and -3 were observed at the early time point. Downregulation in the expression of Ku70 and XIAP was exhibited afterward. Caspase-8 or wide-ranging caspase inhibitor suppressed morusin-induced apoptosis. Therefore, the antitumor mechanism of morusin in HT-29 cells may be via activation of caspases and inhibition of NF-κB

  20. Cytotoxic Activity of Kenaf Seed Oils from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extraction towards Human Colorectal Cancer (HT29) Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ghafar, Siti Aisyah; Ismail, Maznah; Saiful Yazan, Latifah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Ismail, Norsharina; Chan, Kim Wei; Md Tahir, Paridah

    2013-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) from the family Malvaceae, is a valuable fiber plant native to India and Africa and is currently planted as the fourth commercial crop in Malaysia. Kenaf seed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterol such as β -sitosterol, vitamin E, and other antioxidants with chemopreventive properties. Kenaf seeds oil (KSO) was from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction fluid (SFE) at 9 different permutations of parameters based on range of pressures from 200 to 600 bars and temperature from 40 to 80°C. They were 200/40, 200/60, 200/80, 400/40, 400/60, 400/80, 600/40, 600/60, and 600/80. Extraction from 9 parameters of KSO-SFE was screened for cytotoxicity towards human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell lines using MTS assay. KSO-SFE at 600/40 showed the strongest cytotoxicity towards HT29 with IC50 of 200 µg/mL. The IC50 for NIH/3T3 was not detected even at highest concentration employed. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of KSO-SFE-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by KSO-SFE. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Annexin V/PI and AO/PI staining.

  1. Crataegus azarolus Leaves Induce Antiproliferative Activity, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human HT-29 and HCT-116 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Simon, Alain; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of CRC. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, we attempted to investigate the signaling pathways that should be involved in its cytotoxic effect. The Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced growth inhibitory effect was associated with DNA fragmentation, sub-G1 peak, loss of mitochondrial potential, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus induced the cleavage of caspase-8. It has no effect on steady-state levels of total Bcl-2 protein. Whereas Bax levels decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in both tested cell lines. Taken together, these findings confirm the involvement of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The apoptotic cell death induced by ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus was accompanied by an enhancement of the p21 expression but not through p53 activation in human colorectal cancer cells. The above-mentioned data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced apoptosis in CRC. Therefore, this compound should be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    indicator of apoptosis, showed that MLH1 translocation only occurred in MMR proficient (SW480) cells upon induction of apoptosis further suggested a MSH2 dependent role of MLH1 in apoptosis. These data suggest a role of MLH1 in mediation of apoptosis in a MSH2-dependent manner. Taken together, our data supported an interdependence of mismatch repair proteins, particularly MLH1 and MSH2, in the mediation of apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

  3. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  4. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible. Research will help us better understand whether chemotherapy can benefit elderly colorectal cancer patients. Such patients often do not receive chemotherapy due to concerns about side effects. We will ...

  5. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  6. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Buchert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1, which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis.

  7. New peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of invasive cancer cells: in vivo studies using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 targeting uPAR in human colorectal cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Rasmussen, Palle; Madsen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    -of-concept for a theranostic approach as treatment modality in a human xenograft colorectal cancer model. MethodsA DOTA-conjugated 9-mer high affinity uPAR binding peptide (DOTA-AE105) was radiolabeled with 64Cu and 177Lu, for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy study, respectively. Human uPAR-positive CRC HT-29...... for the first time the in vivo efficacy of an uPAR-targeted radionuclide therapeutic intervention on both tumor size and its content of uPAR expressing cells thus setting the stage for future translation into clinical use. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  8. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of ...

  9. Stat6 Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Adenomatous Polyposis by Expansion of MDSCs and Inhibition of Cytotoxic CD8 Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Jayakumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ model is initiated by aberrant activation of Wnt pathway. Increased IL-4 expression in human colorectal cancer tissue and growth of colon cancer cell lines implied that IL-4–induced Stat6-mediated tumorigenic signaling likely contributes to intestinal tumor progression in ApcMin/+ mice. Stat6 also appears to promote expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs cells. MDSCs promote polyp formation in the ApcMin/+ model. Hence, Stat6 could have a broad role in coordinating both polyp cell proliferation and MDSC expansion. We found that IL-4–induced Stat6-mediated proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells is augmented by platelet-derived growth factor–BB, a tumor-promoting growth factor. To determine whether polyp progression in ApcMin/+ mice is dependent on Stat6 signaling, we disrupted Stat6 in this model. Total polyps in the small intestine were fewer in ApcMin/+ mice lacking Stat6. Furthermore, proliferation of polyp epithelial cells was reduced, indicating that Stat6 in part controlled polyp formation. Stat6 also promoted expansion of MDSCs in the spleen and lamina propria of ApcMin/+ mice, implying regulation of antitumor T-cell response. More CD8 cells and reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 cells correlated with reduced polyps. In addition, a strong CD8-mediated cytotoxic response led to killing of tumor cells in Stat6-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. Therefore, these findings show that Stat6 has an oncogenic role in intestinal tumorigenesis by promoting polyp cell proliferation and immunosuppressive mediators, and preventing an active cytotoxic process.

  10. Stat6 Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Adenomatous Polyposis by Expansion of MDSCs and Inhibition of Cytotoxic CD8 Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Asha; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ model is initiated by aberrant activation of Wnt pathway. Increased IL-4 expression in human colorectal cancer tissue and growth of colon cancer cell lines implied that IL-4-induced Stat6-mediated tumorigenic signaling likely contributes to intestinal tumor progression in ApcMin/+ mice. Stat6 also appears to promote expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) cells. MDSCs promote polyp formation in the ApcMin/+ model. Hence, Stat6 could have a broad role in coordinating both polyp cell proliferation and MDSC expansion. We found that IL-4-induced Stat6-mediated proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells is augmented by platelet-derived growth factor-BB, a tumor-promoting growth factor. To determine whether polyp progression in ApcMin/+ mice is dependent on Stat6 signaling, we disrupted Stat6 in this model. Total polyps in the small intestine were fewer in ApcMin/+ mice lacking Stat6. Furthermore, proliferation of polyp epithelial cells was reduced, indicating that Stat6 in part controlled polyp formation. Stat6 also promoted expansion of MDSCs in the spleen and lamina propria of ApcMin/+ mice, implying regulation of antitumor T-cell response. More CD8 cells and reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 cells correlated with reduced polyps. In addition, a strong CD8-mediated cytotoxic response led to killing of tumor cells in Stat6-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. Therefore, these findings show that Stat6 has an oncogenic role in intestinal tumorigenesis by promoting polyp cell proliferation and immunosuppressive mediators, and preventing an active cytotoxic process. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. B Subunit of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promotes Tumor Invasion and Predicts Poor Prognosis of Early-Stage Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well established that many non-trophoblastic tumors secrete HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin and that such secretion is correlated with the poor prognosis of tumor patients. This study aims to analyze the correlation between β-HCG expression and outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC and understand its role in CRC pathology Methods: We detected the mRNA and protein expression of β-HCG in human CRC tissues with RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry, and we compared the clinical-pathological characteristics, prognosis and progression between the β-HCG positive and negative groups. We also generated CRC cell lines with β-HCG over-expression as well as β-HCG stable knockout, and evaluated cell function and mechanism in vitro and in vivo. Results: Fifty out of 136 CRC patients (37% expressed β-HCG at the invasive front. Clinical-pathological data showed that β-HCG was positively correlated with Dukes staging (P=0.031 and lymph node metastasis (P=0.012. Survival analysis suggested that the patients with high expression of β-HCG had poorer prognosis than those with low β-HCG expression (P=0.0289. β-HCG expression level was also positively correlated with tumor invasion in early-stage CRC patient tissues (P=0.0227. Additionally β-HCG promoted the migration and invasion of CRC in vitro and in vivo but had no effect on the proliferation of tumor cells. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that β-HCG was ectopically expressed in the CRC patients and its high expression correlated with poor prognosis of early-stage CRC. Additionally it worked as an oncogene that promotes the migration and invasion of CRC by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT.

  12. Inhibition of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells with AdCMV-p53 gene transfection induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Min Fengling; Xie Yi; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjian; Hao Jifang; Zhou Guangming; Gao Qingxiang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of AdCMV-p53 gene transfection induced by γ-ray irradiation on human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The HT-29 cells were irradiated by 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 Gy 60 Co γ-rays, then were transfected with AdCMV-GFP (a replication of deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein) or AdCMV-p53 (a replication of deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and carrying human wild p53 gene). Cytotoxity was measured by clonogenic survival assay; apoptosis and the p53 expression were determined by flow cytometry. The results show that the pre-exposure of 0.5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays significantly enhanced the inhibition of HT-29 cells with AdCMV-53 transfection and promoted cell apoptosis. The inhibition rates for the groups of pre-exposure with 0.5 Gy and transfection with 40 and 80 MOI AdCMV-p53 were 50% and 20% higher than those for the groups of the mere transfection, and 40% more than the mere irradiation group. In the case of higher than 0.5 Gy pre-exposure, no significant difference was found between the pre-exposure with transfection group and the mere irradiation group. So 0.5 Gy pre-irradiation and AdCMV-p53 transfection obviously increases the inhibition of HT-29 cells with AdCMV-p53 transfection. The optimum condition is the lower than 1.0 Gy pre-exposure combined with the lower than 80 MOI AdCMV-p53 transfection. (authors)

  13. In vitro biologic efficacy of sunitinib drug-eluting beads on human colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma-A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lahti

    Full Text Available Sunitinib drug eluting beads (DEB are a novel anti-angiogenic bead preparation for use in transarterial chemoembolization. However, systematic studies of sunitinib DEB's effect on cancer cells have not been reported. Herein, we assess their direct biologic efficacy against carcinoma cell lines and correlate cell viability with drug release in vitro.Sunitinib-HCl (10mg/mL in Milli-Q water was mixed with LC Bead® 300-500μm (Biocompatibles UK Ltd.. Loading and release were assessed by measurement of drug UV absorbance using UV-visible spectrophotometer. Viability of human colorectal cancer (CRC, HCT116 and HT29 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, HepG2 cells upon exposure to sunitinib DEB was measured using a bioluminescent assay. Drug concentration during exposure was quantified using HPLC.When added to cultured HepG2 cells, sunitinib DEB rapidly inhibited viability with a significant decrease observed within 1 hour of incubation. Viability of HCT116 and HT29 cells decreased relatively slower, with significant reductions observed after 8 and 24 hours, respectively. After 24 hours there was nearly complete inhibition of all three cell lines. There was no difference in viability observed between cells treated with 5 μl, 10 μL, or 20 μL of sunitinib DEB. HPLC analysis of the cell culture supernatant demonstrated saturation of the cell medium within approximately 4 hours for each amount added, with sunitinib achieving a final concentration of 17.61 μM (SE ±1.01.Sunitinib can be efficiently loaded to and released from LC beads, and the resulting sunitinib DEB demonstrate strong in vitro inhibition of human CRC and HCC cells.

  14. Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Colorectal Cancer: A Personalized Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Rockall

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is an exciting time for all those engaged in the treatment of colorectal cancer. The advent of new therapies presents the opportunity for a personalized approach to the patient. This approach considers the complex genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis in addition to classical clinicopathological staging. The potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers which have stemmed from the study of the genetic basis of colorectal cancer and therapeutics are discussed with a focus on mismatch repair status, KRAS, BRAF, 18qLOH, CIMP and TGF-β.

  15. Roles of p63 in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Yuan Yao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available pidermis is composed mainly of keratinocytes and is the ma­jor barrier of human body. The development and maintenance of normal epithelial structures and functions require the transcrip­tion factor p63. The p63 gene encodes proteins with structures simi­lar to that of p53, including an N-terminal transacti­vation (TA domain, a DNA-binding domain and a car­boxy-oligomerization domain. TAp63 and ΔNp63 (p63 isoforms without TA domain regulate a wide range of target genes that are important for embryonal development and epithelial integrity. Mutations of p63 gene cause epider­mal abnormalities characterized by ectodermal dysplasia. Recent reports have indicated that p63 plays important role in tumorigenesis as well. However, the relative importance of TAp63 and ΔNp63 in epidermal development and tumorigenesis re­mains mostly unclear and awaits further investigation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the structure and function of p63 and its isoforms.

  16. Undefined familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Theodoropoulos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers of the world, is actually a spectrum of several subtypes, with different molecular profiles, clinico-pathological characteristics and possibly separate pathways of progression. It is estimated that in approximately 25%-35% of cases, a familial component exists, so they are classified as familial CRC (fCRC). However the known hereditary CRC syndromes justify only up to 5%. The rest are attributed to some inherited genetic predisposition passed to offspring through low-penetrance genes, which in the proper environmental setting can bring on tumorigenesis. Furthermore, part of the familial clustering may be attributed to chance. Because of the complexity regarding the etiology of CRC, the clinician is sometimes faced with obscure patient data, and cannot be sure if they are dealing with fCRC or sporadic CRC. The elucidation of what is going on with the as yet "undefined" portion of CRC will aid not only in the diagnosis, classification and treatment of CRC, but more importantly in the proper adjustment of the screening guidelines and in genetic counselling of patients.

  17. Phage display selection of fully human antibody fragments to inhibit growth-promoting effects of glycine-extended gastrin 17 on human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Shirin; Tohidkia, Mohammad Reza; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Mehdipour, Tayebeh; Fathi, Farzaneh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2018-06-09

    Glycine-extended gastrin 17 (G17-Gly), a dominant processing intermediate of gastrin gene, has been implicated in the development or maintenance of colorectal cancers (CRCs). Hence, neutralizing G17-Gly activity by antibody entities can provide a potential therapeutic strategy in the patients with CRCs. To this end, we isolated fully human antibody fragments from a phage antibody library through biopanning against different epitopes of G17-Gly in order to obtain the highest possible antibody diversity. ELISA screening and sequence analysis identified 2 scFvs and 4 V L antibody fragments. Kinetic analysis of the antibody fragments by SPR revealed K D values to be in the nanomolar range (87.9-334 nM). The selected anti-G17-Gly antibody fragments were analyzed for growth inhibition and apoptotic assays in a CRC cell line, HCT-116, which is well-characterized for expressing gastrin intermediate species but not amidated gastrin. The antibody fragments exhibited significant inhibition of HCT-116 cells proliferation ranging from 36.5 to 73% of controls. Further, Annexin V/PI staining indicated that apoptosis rates of scFv H8 and V L G8 treated cells were 45.8 and 63%, respectively. Based on these results, we for the first time, demonstrated the isolation of anti-G17-Gly human scFv and V L antibodies with potential therapeutic applications in G17-Gly-responsive tumors.

  18. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Induces Apoptosis via Reduction of COX-2 Expression in TPA-Induced HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju Shin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA is one of the bioactive compounds found in cheonggukjang, a fast-fermented soybean paste widely utilized in Korean cooking. PGA is reported to have a number of beneficial health effects, and interestingly, it has been identified as a possible anti-cancer compound through its ability to promote apoptosis in cancer cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our findings demonstrate that PGA inhibits the pro-proliferative functions of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, a known chemical carcinogen in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. This inhibition was accompanied by hallmark apoptotic phenotypes, including DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and caspase 3. In addition, PGA treatment reduced the expression of genes known to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer cells, including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Lastly, PGA promoted activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMPK in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PGA treatment enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells, in part by modulating the activity of the COX-2 and AMPK signaling pathways. These anti-cancer functions of PGA make it a promising compound for future study.

  19. Endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) and its receptor PROKR2 are associated to human colorectal cancer progression and peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlahfid, Mohammed; Traboulsi, Wael; Sergent, Frederic; Benharouga, Mohamed; Elhattabi, Khalid; Erguibi, Driss; Karkouri, Mehdi; Elattar, Hicham; Fadil, Abdelaziz; Fahmi, Yassine; Aboussaouira, Touria; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2018-02-06

    The highest risk factor for mortality among malignant tumors is metastasis. Endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) is an angiogenic factor which biological activity is mediated via two G protein-coupled receptors, prokineticin receptor1 (PROKR1) and PROKR2. Recent studies suggested that EG-VEGF expression is deregulated in multiple cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Using distinctive CRC and peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) cohorts and a corresponding control cohort, we determined the circulating levels of EG-VEGF and its in situ expression, and that of its related receptors. Circulating EG-VEGF levels were significantly increased in patients with metastatic PC compared to CRC and control patients (p< 0.05). Furthermore, according to clinicopathologic examinations, local EG-VEGF expression correlated with higher tumor and nodal stages (p< 0.001) of CRC. EG-VEGF and PROKR2 were highly expressed in colorectal primary lesions compared to positive controls. PROKR1 expression was lower and did not change in tumor specimens. Also, EG-VEGF and its receptor PROKR2 were differentially expressed in the colorectal primary lesions and in the control groups. Altogether these findings suggest that EG-VEGF/receptors system might be an important actor in the CRC progression into PC and might be involved in the ability of tumor cells to invade other organs. Circulating EG-VEGF could be proposed as a prognostic marker in human CRC and its progression into PC.

  20. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response.

  1. Naturally-occurring estradiol-17β-fatty acid esters, but not estradiol-17β, preferentially induce mammary tumorigenesis in female rats: Implications for an important role in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Laura H.; Yu Jina; Xu Xiaomeng; Lee, Anthony J.; Zhu Baoting

    2008-01-01

    Because mammary glands are surrounded by adipose tissues, we hypothesize that the ultra-lipophilic endogenous estrogen-17β-fatty acid esters may have preferential hormonal and carcinogenic effects in mammary tissues compared to other target organs (such as the uterus and pituitary). This hypothesis is tested in the present study. We found that all 46 rats implanted with an estradiol-17β pellet developed large pituitary tumors (average weight = 251 ±103 mg) and had to be terminated early, but only 48% of them developed mammary tumors. In addition, approximately one-fourth of them developed a huge uterus. In the 26 animals implanted with a mixture containing estradiol-17β-stearate and estradiol-17β-palmitate (two representative estradiol-17β-fatty acid esters) or in the 29 animals implanted with estradiol-17β-stearate alone (in the same molar dose as estradiol-17β), 73% and 79%, respectively, of them developed mammary tumors, whereas only 3 or 2 animals, respectively, had to be terminated early due to the presence of a large pituitary tumor. Both tumorous and normal mammary tissues contained much higher levels of estrogen esterase than other tissues, which catalyzes the releases of bioactive estrogens from their fatty acid esters. In conclusion, while estradiol-17β is much stronger in inducing pituitary tumor (100% incidence) than mammary tumor, estradiol-17β-fatty acid esters have a higher efficacy than estradiol-17β in inducing mammary tumor and yet it only has little ability to induce uterine out-growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. This study establishes the endogenous estrogen-17β-fatty acid esters as preferential inducers of mammary tumorigenesis

  2. Human papillomavirus infection correlates with inflammatory Stat3 signaling activity and IL-17 level in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xin Li

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major burden of public health and healthcare worldwide. Microbiota has been suggested in promoting chronic inflammation in the intestine which, in turn, promotes tumor development. This study focuses on possible correlations of human papillomavirus (HPV infection with proinflammatory Stat3 signaling activities and the resulting levels of its downstream proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 in CRC patients.HPV was examined using HPV Genotyping Chip technology and constitutively active Stat3 (p-Stat3 and IL-17 levels were tested using immunohistochemistry (IHC in paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent normal tissues (ANT from a cohort of 95 CRC patients. Correlation analyses were performed between HPV infection and clinicopathological characteristics, Stat3 activities and IL-17 levels among these CRC patients.Three major findings were observed: (1 HPV infection existed in a high rate of CRC cases (48.4%, 46/95, of which 45 cases (45/46, 97.8% were high-risk HPV16-positive and only one case was HPV53-positive. (2 HPV infection correlated with poorer clinical stages (III+IV of CRC. (3 HPV infection strongly correlated with both constitutively higher Stat3 activities (P<0.01 and higher IL-17 levels (P<0.01 only in CRC tissues but not in ANT tissues.HPV infection is common in CRC patients suggesting potentially preventive effectiveness of HPV vaccination among high-risk young individuals. We have for the first time revealed a tri-lateral relationship among HPV infection, constitutive Stat3 activity and IL-17 level, whose collaborative act may orchestrate a proinflammatory microenvironment in the colorectum that, in turn, may promote carcinogenesis and possibly facilitate progression of CRC.

  3. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shih Huang

    Full Text Available The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4 axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC's resistance to chemotherapy.

  4. Bovine lactoferrin and lactoferricin exert antitumor activities on human colorectal cancer cells (HT-29) by activating various signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rulan; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding glycoprotein that is present at high concentrations in milk. Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a peptide fragment generated by pepsin proteolysis of bovine lactoferrin (bLf). LfcinB consists of amino acid residues 17-41 proximal to the N-terminus of bLf and a disulfide bond between residues 19 and 36, forming a loop. Both bLf and LfcinB have been demonstrated to have antitumor activities. Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in developed countries. We hypothesized that bLf and LfcinB exert antitumor activities on colon cancer cells (HT-29) by triggering various signaling pathways. bLf and LfcinB significantly induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells but not in normal human intestinal epithelial cells, as revealed by the ApoTox-Glo Triplex Assay. The LIVE/DEAD cell viability assay showed that both bLf and LfcinB reduced the viability of HT-29 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated that bLf, cyclic LfcinB, and linear LfcinB exerted antitumor activities by differentially activating diverse signaling pathways, including p53, apoptosis, and angiopoietin signaling. Immunoblotting results confirmed that both bLf and LfcinBs increased expression of caspase-8, p53, and p21, critical proteins in tumor suppression. These results provide valuable information regarding bLf and LfcinB for potential clinical applications in colon cancer therapy.

  5. High expression of WWP1 predicts poor prognosis and associates with tumor progression in human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    WWP1 (WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1), which is frequently up-regulated in multiple human malignancies, has been demonstrated to play a critical function in cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. However, limited knowledge is known about the expression pattern and prognostic value of WWP1 in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we firstly observed that WWP1 mRNA and protein is commonly up-regulated in CRC tissues compared with normal counterparts. Furthermore, by immunohistochemical analysis in 348 cases of CRC specimens, we demonstrated that the WWP1 protein expression is up-regulated in 58.91% (205/348) samples and detected increasing WWP1 expression is closely correlated with enhanced tumor size (P=0.022), CEA level (P=0.021), T classification (P=0.010), distant metastasis (P=0.021) and TNM stage (P=0.005). Meanwhile, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed CRC patients with a high WWP1 expression have a poorer overall survival (P<0.001) and disease-free survival (P=0.001) than those with a low WWP1 expression. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed WWP1 is the independent prognostic factors for overall survival rate of CRC patients. What’s more, by CCK-8 assays and Transwell assays, we found WWP1 depletion markedly inhibited tumor proliferation and invasion in CRC cells, and cells with WWP1 overexpression had a prominently higher proliferative and invasive capacity. Most notably, we illuminated WWP1 downregulation inactivated PTEN/Akt pathway in CRC cells. Taken together, our studies revealed the prognostic value of WWP1 in CRC and support that WWP1 may act as a molecular target for CRC treatment. PMID:29511596

  6. Association between hMLH1 hypermethylation and JC virus (JCV) infection in human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2011-04-01

    Incorporation of viral DNA may interfere with the normal sequence of human DNA bases on the genetic level or cause secondary epigenetic changes such as gene promoter methylation or histone acetylation. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. Chromosomal instability (CIN) was established as the key mechanism in cancer development. Later, it was found that CRC results not only from the progressive accumulation of genetic alterations but also from epigenetic changes. JC virus (JCV) is a candidate etiologic factor in sporadic CRC. It may act by stabilizing β-catenin, facilitating its entrance to the cell nucleus, initialing proliferation and cancer development. Diploid CRC cell lines transfected with JCV-containing plasmids developed CIN. This result provides direct experimental evidence for the ability of JCV T-Ag to induce CIN in the genome of colonic epithelial cells. The association of CRC hMLH1 methylation and tumor positivity for JCV was recently documented. JC virus T-Ag DNA sequences were found in 77% of CRCs and are associated with promoter methylation of multiple genes. hMLH1 was methylated in 25 out of 80 CRC patients positive for T-Ag (31%) in comparison with only one out of 11 T-Ag negative cases (9%). Thus, JCV can mediate both CIN and aberrant methylation in CRC. Like other viruses, chronic infection with JCV may induce CRC by different mechanisms which should be further investigated. Thus, gene promoter methylation induced by JCV may be an important process in CRC and the polyp-carcinoma sequence.

  7. Modulatory effects of quercetin on proliferation and differentiation of the human colorectal cell line Caco-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.v.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Stierum, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the dietary flavonoid quercetin was investigated on proliferation and differentiation of the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Confluent Caco-2 monolayers exposed to quercetin showed a biphasic effect on cell proliferation and a decrease in cell differentiation (0.001

  8. The Survivin −31 Snp in Human Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Survivin Splice Variant Expression and Improved Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. Antonacopoulou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survivin is involved in the regulation of cell division and survival, two key processes in cancer. The majority of studies on survivin in colorectal cancer (CRC have focused on protein expression and less is known about the expression of survivin splicing variants or survivin gene polymorphisms in CRC. In the present study, the mRNA levels of the five known isoforms of survivin as well as survivin protein were assessed in matched normal and neoplastic colorectal tissue. Moreover, the 9386C/T and −31G/C polymorphisms were investigated.

  9. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanoparticles to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yijuan; Guan, Rongfa; Lyu, Fei; Kang, Tianshu; Wu, Yihang; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The characterization of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs. • The various morphologies of Caco-2 cells stained with AO/EB. • The viability of Caco-2 cells after Ag NPs and ZnO NPs exposure. • The cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs on Caco-2 cells by oxidative stress assays. - Abstract: With the increasing applications of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in foods and cosmetics, the concerns about the potential toxicities to human have been raised. The aims of this study are to observe the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells in vitro, and to discover the toxicity mechanism of nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were exposed to 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (90 nm). AO/EB double staining was used to characterize the morphology of the treated cells. The cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect the proliferation of the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) assay were used to explore the oxidative damage of Caco-2 cells. The results showed that Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (0–200 μg/mL) had highly significant effect on the Caco-2 cells activity. ZnO NPs exerted higher cytotoxicity than Ag NPs in the same concentration range. ZnO NPs have dose-depended toxicity. The LD 50 of ZnO NPs in Caco-2 cells is 0.431 mg/L. Significant depletion of SOD level, variation in GSH level and release of ROS in cells treated by ZnO NPs were observed, which suggests that cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs in intestine cells might be mediated through cellular oxidative stress. While Caco-2 cells treated with Ag NPs at all experimental concentrations showed no cellular oxidative damage. Moreover, the cells’ antioxidant capacity increased, and reached the highest level when the concentration of Ag NPs was 50 μg/mL. Therefore, it can be concluded that Ag NPs are safer antibacterial material in food packaging materials than

  11. In vitro cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanoparticles to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yijuan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Guan, Rongfa, E-mail: rongfaguan@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Lyu, Fei [Department of Food Science and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Kang, Tianshu; Wu, Yihang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Xiaoqiang [Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The characterization of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs. • The various morphologies of Caco-2 cells stained with AO/EB. • The viability of Caco-2 cells after Ag NPs and ZnO NPs exposure. • The cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs on Caco-2 cells by oxidative stress assays. - Abstract: With the increasing applications of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in foods and cosmetics, the concerns about the potential toxicities to human have been raised. The aims of this study are to observe the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells in vitro, and to discover the toxicity mechanism of nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were exposed to 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (90 nm). AO/EB double staining was used to characterize the morphology of the treated cells. The cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect the proliferation of the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) assay were used to explore the oxidative damage of Caco-2 cells. The results showed that Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (0–200 μg/mL) had highly significant effect on the Caco-2 cells activity. ZnO NPs exerted higher cytotoxicity than Ag NPs in the same concentration range. ZnO NPs have dose-depended toxicity. The LD{sub 50} of ZnO NPs in Caco-2 cells is 0.431 mg/L. Significant depletion of SOD level, variation in GSH level and release of ROS in cells treated by ZnO NPs were observed, which suggests that cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs in intestine cells might be mediated through cellular oxidative stress. While Caco-2 cells treated with Ag NPs at all experimental concentrations showed no cellular oxidative damage. Moreover, the cells’ antioxidant capacity increased, and reached the highest level when the concentration of Ag NPs was 50 μg/mL. Therefore, it can be concluded that Ag NPs are safer antibacterial material in food packaging materials

  12. mTORC2 Promotes Tumorigenesis via Lipid Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Yakir; Colombi, Marco; Dazert, Eva; Hindupur, Sravanth K; Roszik, Jason; Moes, Suzette; Jenoe, Paul; Heim, Markus H; Riezman, Isabelle; Riezman, Howard; Hall, Michael N

    2017-12-11

    Dysregulated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cancer, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We describe an mTOR-driven mouse model that displays hepatosteatosis progressing to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Longitudinal proteomic, lipidomics, and metabolomic analyses revealed that hepatic mTORC2 promotes de novo fatty acid and lipid synthesis, leading to steatosis and tumor development. In particular, mTORC2 stimulated sphingolipid (glucosylceramide) and glycerophospholipid (cardiolipin) synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid or sphingolipid synthesis prevented tumor development, indicating a causal effect in tumorigenesis. Increased levels of cardiolipin were associated with tubular mitochondria and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, increased lipogenesis correlated with elevated mTORC2 activity and HCC in human patients. Thus, mTORC2 promotes cancer via formation of lipids essential for growth and energy production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate inhibits lung tumorigenesis without causing liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; North, Paula E; Yang, Shoua; Lubet, Ronald A; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2012-05-01

    3-Bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent and a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism, has been proposed as a specific anticancer agent. However, the chemopreventive effect of 3-bromopyruvate in lung tumorigenesis has not been tested. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of 3-bromopyruvate in a mouse lung tumor model. Benzo(a)pyrene was used to induce lung tumors, and 3-bromopyruvate was administered by oral gavage to female A/J mice. We found that 3-bromopyruvate significantly decreased tumor multiplicity and tumor load by 58% and 83%, respectively, at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight by gavage. Due to the known liver toxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in animal models given large doses of 3-bromopyruvate, confirmed in this study, we decided to test the chemopreventive activity of aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate in the same lung tumor model. As expected, aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate similarly significantly decreased tumor multiplicity and tumor load by 49% and 80%, respectively, at a dose of 10 mg/mL by inhalation. Interestingly, the efficacy of aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate did not accompany any liver toxicity indicating that it is a safer route of administering this compound. Treatment with 3-bromopyruvate increased immunohistochemical staining for cleaved caspase-3, suggesting that the lung tumor inhibitory effects of 3-bromopyruvate were through induction of apoptosis. 3-Bromopyruvate also dissociated hexokinase II from mitochondria, reduced hexokinase activity, and blocked energy metabolism in cancer cells, finally triggered cancer cell death and induced apoptosis through caspase-3, and PARP in human lung cancer cell line. The ability of 3-bromopyruvate to inhibit mouse lung tumorigenesis, in part through induction of apoptosis, merits further investigation of this compound as a chemopreventive agent for human lung cancer.

  14. Wogonin induced G1 cell cycle arrest by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and inactivating CDK8 in human colorectal cancer carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Licheng; Lu, Na; Dai, Qinsheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Li; Wang, Hu; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Guo, Qinglong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Wogonin inhibited HCT116 cells growth and arrested at G1 phase of the cell cycle. • Wogonin down-regulated the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • Wogonin interfered in the combination of β-catenin and TCF/Lef. • Wogonin limited the kinase activity of CDK8. - Abstract: Wogonin, a naturally occurring mono-flavonoid, has been reported to have tumor therapeutic potential and good selectivity both in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we investigated the anti-proliferation effects and associated mechanisms of wogonin in human colorectal cancer in vitro. The flow-cytometric analysis showed that wogonin induced a G1 phase cell cycle arrest in HCT116 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, the cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin A, E, D1, and CDK2, 4 were down-regulated in wogonin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we showed that the anti-proliferation and G1 arrest effect of wogonin on HCT116 cells was associated with deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Wogonin-treated cells showed decreased intracellular levels of Wnt proteins, and activated degradation complex to phosphorylated and targeted β-catenin for proteasomal degradation. Wogonin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcription by interfering in the transcriptional activity of TCF/Lef, and repressing the kinase activity of CDK8 which has been considered as an oncogene involving in the development of colorectal cancers. Moreover, CDK8 siRNA-transfected HCT116 cells showed similar results to wogonin treated cells. Thus, our data suggested that wogonin induced anti-proliferation and G1 arrest via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and it can be developed as a therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer

  15. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  16. Prognostic and predictive roles of microRNA-383 in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavieh Fateh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are impressive regulators of gene expression that have a critical role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC. With respect to the aberrant expression of miRNA-383 (miR-383 in some types of human malignancy, this prospective study characterized its contribution to CRC tumorigenesis. The real-time reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction was used to examine miR-383 expression levels prospectively in 40 sample pairs of CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues (>2 cm from cancer tissue. No significant relationship was found between miR-383 expression levels and clinicopathological features. The ability of miR-383 to function as a tumor marker was also examined. Showing significant changes overall, miR-383 expression levels were significantly down regulated in the group of CRC samples compared with matched noncancerous tissue samples. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve also showed ROC area of 70% for miR-383 with 68 and 75% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Therefore, miR-383 can be considered as a tumor marker in CRC and help as a potential predictive biomarker in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  17. Fbxw7 Deletion Accelerates KrasG12D-Driven Pancreatic Tumorigenesis via Yap Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yaqing; Parsels, Joshua D; Lohse, Ines; Lawrence, Theodore S; Pasca di Magliano, Marina; Sun, Yi; Morgan, Meredith A

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancers driven by KRAS mutations require additional mutations for tumor progression. The tumor suppressor FBXW7 is altered in pancreatic cancers, but its contribution to pancreatic tumorigenesis is unknown. To determine potential cooperation between Kras mutation and Fbxw7 inactivation in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we generated P48-Cre;LSL-Kras G12D ;Fbxw7 fl/fl (KFC fl/fl ) compound mice. We found that KFC fl/fl mice displayed accelerated tumorigenesis: all mice succumbed to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) by 40 days of age, with PDA onset occurring by 2 weeks of age. PDA in KFC fl/fl mice was preceded by earlier onset of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, and associated with chromosomal instability and the accumulation of Fbxw7 substrates Yes-associated protein (Yap), c-Myc, and Notch. Using KFC fl/fl and FBXW7-deficient human pancreatic cancer cells, we found that Yap silencing attenuated growth promotion by Fbxw7 deletion. Our data demonstrate that Fbxw7 is a potent suppressor of Kras G12D -induced pancreatic tumorigenesis due, at least in part, to negative regulation of Yap. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Baum, R.P.; Staib-Sebler, E.; Lorenz, M.; Niesen, A.; Hoer, G.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99m Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  20. Human monoclonal antibody {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B.J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Baum, R.P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Staib-Sebler, E. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Lorenz, M. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Niesen, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hoer, G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Echinacoside Induces Apoptosis in Human SW480 Colorectal Cancer Cells by Induction of Oxidative DNA Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Dong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinacoside is a natural compound with potent reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging and anti-oxidative bioactivities, which protect cells from oxidative damages. As cancer cells are often under intense oxidative stress, we therefore tested if Echinacoside treatment would promote cancer development. Surprisingly, we found that Echinacoside significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of a panel of cancer cell lines. Treatment of the human SW480 cancer cells with Echinacoside resulted in marked apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, together with a significant increase in active caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK blocker CDKN1B (p21. Interestingly, immunocytochemistry examination of drug-treated cancer cells revealed that Echinacoside caused a significant increase of intracellular oxidized guanine, 8-oxoG, and dramatic upregulation of the double-strand DNA break (DSB-binding protein 53BP1, suggesting that Echinacoside induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SW480 cancer cells via induction of oxidative DNA damages. These results establish Echinacoside as a novel chemical scaffold for development of anticancer drugs.

  2. IKKα Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis by Limiting Recruitment of M1-like Polarized Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan I. Göktuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC therapy.

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) efficacy for colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF): a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Maeda, Shin; Morita, Satoshi; Natsumeda, Yutaka; Nagase, Hajime; Nakajima, Atsushi; Hosono, Kunihiro; Endo, Hiroki; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Iida, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Ezuka, Akiko; Uchiyama, Shiori; Yamada, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that is widely used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease, has recently been suggested to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In CRC chemoprevention trials, in general, the incidence of polyps or of the cancer itself is set as the study endpoint. Although the incidence rate of CRC would be the most reliable endpoint, use of this endpoint would be unsuitable for chemoprevention trials, because of the relatively low occurrence rate of CRC in the general population and the long-term observation period that it would necessitate. Moreover, there is an ethical problem in conducting long-term trials to determine whether a test drug might be effective or harmful. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), defined as lesions containing crypts that are larger in diameter and stain more darkly with methylene blue than normal crypts, are considered as a reliable surrogate biomarker of CRC. Thus, we devised a prospective randomized controlled trial as a preliminary study prior to a CRC chemoprevention trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of EPA against colorectal ACF formation and the safety of this drug, in patients scheduled for polypectomy. This study is a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in patients with both colorectal ACF and colorectal polyps scheduled for polypectomy. Eligible patients shall be recruited for the study and the number of ACF in the rectum counted at the baseline colonoscopy. Then, the participants shall be allocated randomly to either one of two groups, the EPA group and the placebo group. Patients in the EPA group shall receive oral 900-mg EPA capsules thrice daily (total daily

  4. Identification of proteins of human colorectal carcinoma cell line SW480 by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Tao Zhang; Yi-Ping Geng; Le Zhou; Bao-Chang Lai; Lv-Sheng Si; Yi-Li Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To conduct the proteomic analysis of human colorectal carcinoma cell line, SW480 by using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption /ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOFMS).METHODS: The total proteins of human colorectal carcinoma cell line, SW480 were separated with 2-DE by using immobilized pH gradient strips and visualized by staining with silver nitrate. The gel images were acquired by scanner and 2-DE analysis software, Image Master 2D Elite. Nineteen distinct protein spots were excised from gel randomly and digested in gel by TPCK-trypsin. Mass analysis ofthe tryptic digest peptides mixture was performed by using MALDI-TOF MS. Peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) obtained by the MALDI-TOF analysis were used to search NCBI,SWISS-PROT and MSDB databases by using Mascot software.RESULTS: PMF maps of all spots were obtained by MALDI-TOF MS and thirteen proteins were preliminarily identified.CONCLUSION: The methods of analysis and identification of protein spots of tumor cells in 2-DE gel with silver staining by MALDI-TOF MS derived PMF have been established.Protein expression profile of SW480 has been obtained.It is demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and cell culture is a useful approach to comprehend the process of colon carcinogenesis.

  5. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  6. Isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid from licorice, blocks M2 macrophage polarization in colitis-associated tumorigenesis through downregulating PGE{sub 2} and IL-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haixia [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Xinhua [Department of Liver, Biliary And Pancreatic Tumors, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430079 (China); Chen, Xuewei; Li, Ying; Ke, Zunqiong [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tang, Tian [Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Austin M. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Chen, Honglei, E-mail: hl-chen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-09-15

    M2 macrophage polarization is implicated in colorectal cancer development. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid from licorice, has been reported to prevent azoxymethane (AOM) induced colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Here, in a mouse model of colitis-associated tumorigenesis induced by AOM/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we investigated the chemopreventive effects of ISL and its mechanisms of action. Mice were treated with AOM/DSS and randomized to receive either vehicle or ISL (3, 15 and 75 mg/kg). Tumor load, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene and protein expressions were determined. Intragastric administration of ISL for 12 weeks significantly decreased colon cancer incidence, multiplicity and tumor size by 60%, 55.4% and 42.6%, respectively. Moreover, ISL inhibited M2 macrophage polarization. Such changes were accompanied by downregulation of PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling. Importantly, depletion of macrophages by clodronate (Clod) or zoledronic acid (ZA) reversed the effects of ISL. In parallel, in vitro studies also demonstrated that ISL limited the M2 polarization of RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages with concomitant inactivation of PGE{sub 2}/PPARδ and IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Conversely, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or IL-6, or overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 reversed ISL-mediated inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization. In summary, dietary flavonoid ISL effectively inhibits colitis-associated tumorigenesis through hampering M2 macrophage polarization mediated by the interplay between PGE{sub 2} and IL-6. Thus, inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization is likely to represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) prevents colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL inhibits M2 macrophage polarization in vivo and in vitro. • ISL inhibits PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling in colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL may be an attractive candidate agent for

  7. Licoricidin inhibits the growth of SW480 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo by inducing cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Shuai [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical University, 209 Tongshan Road, Xuzhou 221004 (China); Tang, Shunan; Li, Kai; Li, Ziwei; Liang, Wenfei; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, Siwang, E-mail: swang_yu@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) possesses significant anti-cancer activities, but the active ingredients and underlying mechanisms have not been revealed. By screening the cytotoxic activities of 122 licorice compounds against SW480 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, we found that licoricidin (LCD) inhibited SW480 cell viability with an IC{sub 50} value of 7.2 μM. Further studies indicated that LCD significantly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SW480 cells, accompanied by inhibition of cyclins/CDK1 expression and activation of caspase-dependent pro-apoptotic signaling. Meanwhile, LCD promoted autophagy in SW480 cells, and activated AMPK signaling and inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway. Overexpression of a dominant-negative AMPKα2 abolished LCD-induced inhibition of Akt/mTOR, autophagic and pro-apoptotic signaling pathways, and significantly reversed loss of cell viability, suggesting activation of AMPK is essential for the anti-cancer activity of LCD. In vivo anti-tumor experiments indicated that LCD (20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the growth of SW480 xenografts in nude mice with an inhibitory rate of 43.5%. In addition, we obtained the glycosylated product LCDG by microbial transformation, and found that glycosylation slightly enhanced the in vivo anti-cancer activities of LCD. This study indicates that LCD could inhibit SW480 cells by inducing cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy, and is a potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent against colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Molecular mechanisms for cytotoxic activity of licoricidin (LCD) were investigated. • LCD promoted autophagy of SW480 cells through AMPK and Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. • Both LCD and its glucoside showed in vivo anti-colorectal cancer activities.

  8. Gender-dependent expression of leading and passenger strand of miR-21 and miR-16 in human colorectal cancer and adjacent colonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasáková, K; Bezakova, J; Vician, M; Reis, R; Zeman, M; Herichova, I

    2017-12-30

    miRNAs are small regulatory RNA molecules involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing. Their biosynthesis results in the formation of duplex consisting of a leading and a passenger strand of mature miRNA. The leading strand exhibits the main activity but recent findings indicate a certain role of the passenger strand as well. Deregulated levels of miRNA were found in many types of cancers including colorectal cancer. miR-21 and miR-16 were indicated as possible markers of colorectal cancer, however, small attention to gender differences in their expression was paid so far. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the expression of miR-21-5p, miR-21-3p, miR-16-5p and miR-16-3p in human colorectal cancer tissue and compare it to the adjacent tissues taken during surgery in men and women separately. Our results showed an up-regulation of all measured miRNAs in tumor tissue compared to adjacent tissues. As expected, tumors and adjacent tissues exhibited a significantly higher expression of leading miRNAs compared to passenger strand of miR-21 and miR-16. The expression of leading and passenger strand of miR-21 and miR-16 positively correlated exhibiting the highest correlation coefficient in the distal tissue. The expression pattern showed gender-dependent differences, with higher levels of miRNA in men than in women. Our findings indicate a gender-related expression pattern of miRNA, which should be considered as an important factor in generating new prognostic or diagnostic biomarkers.

  9. Colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes colorectal cancer risk in relation to A-bomb radiation. The RERF Life Span Study has revealed the incidence of colorectal cancer to be significantly high in the group of A-bomb survivors than the control group. With regard to relative risk or excess relative risk, there is no definitive difference among sites in the colon. Risk for colon cancer is found to be linearly increased with increasing radiation doses, and in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Risk associated with one Gy is estimated to be increased by double. There is no definitive variation between sex and between Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Excess relative risk would be increased rapidly with aging in the whole group of A-bomb survivors and with the cancer-prone age in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. (N.K.)

  10. Maslinic acid-enriched diet decreases intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice through transcriptomic and metabolomic reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sánchez-Tena

    Full Text Available Chemoprevention is a pragmatic approach to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in western countries. In this regard, maslinic acid (MA, a pentacyclic triterpene extracted from wax-like coatings of olives, is known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines without affecting normal intestinal cells. The present study evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy and associated mechanisms of maslinic acid treatment on spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice. Twenty-two mice were randomized into 2 groups: control group and MA group, fed with a maslinic acid-supplemented diet for six weeks. MA treatment reduced total intestinal polyp formation by 45% (P<0.01. Putative molecular mechanisms associated with suppressing intestinal polyposis in Apc(Min/+ mice were investigated by comparing microarray expression profiles of MA-treated and control mice and by analyzing the serum metabolic profile using NMR techniques. The different expression phenotype induced by MA suggested that it exerts its chemopreventive action mainly by inhibiting cell-survival signaling and inflammation. These changes eventually induce G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, the metabolic changes induced by MA treatment were associated with a protective profile against intestinal tumorigenesis. These results show the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of MA against intestinal tumor development in the Apc(Min/+ mice model, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against colorectal cancer.

  11. Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Rezaei, Nousin; Liontos, Michalis

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest...... and senescence markers cosegregate closely. Thus, senescence in human preneoplastic lesions is a manifestation of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress and, together with apoptosis, provides a barrier to malignant progression....

  12. A zebrafish transgenic model of Ewing's sarcoma reveals conserved mediators of EWS-FLI1 tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Basse, Audrey N; Chandler, Garvin L; Kirk, Anne M; Rakheja, Dinesh; Amatruda, James F

    2012-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, a malignant bone tumor of children and young adults, is a member of the small-round-blue-cell tumor family. Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), which include peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), are characterized by chromosomal translocations that generate fusions between the EWS gene and ETS-family transcription factors, most commonly FLI1. The EWS-FLI1 fusion oncoprotein represents an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of Ewing's sarcoma. The cell of origin of ESFT and the molecular mechanisms by which EWS-FLI1 mediates tumorigenesis remain unknown, and few animal models of Ewing's sarcoma exist. Here, we report the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of EWS-FLI1 function and tumorigenesis. Mosaic expression of the human EWS-FLI1 fusion protein in zebrafish caused the development of tumors with histology strongly resembling that of human Ewing's sarcoma. The incidence of tumors increased in a p53 mutant background, suggesting that the p53 pathway suppresses EWS-FLI1-driven tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of the zebrafish tumors defined a set of genes that might be regulated by EWS-FLI1, including the zebrafish ortholog of a crucial EWS-FLI1 target gene in humans. Stable zebrafish transgenic lines expressing EWS-FLI1 under the control of the heat-shock promoter exhibit altered embryonic development and defective convergence and extension, suggesting that EWS-FLI1 interacts with conserved developmental pathways. These results indicate that functional targets of EWS-FLI1 that mediate tumorigenesis are conserved from zebrafish to human and provide a novel context in which to study the function of this fusion oncogene.

  13. The role of menin in parathyroid tumorigenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disorder that involves the pathological enlargement of one or more parathyroid glands resulting in excessive production of parathyroid hormone (PTH). The exact pathogenesis of this disease remains to be fully understood. In recent years interest has focussed on the interaction between menin protein and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta\\/Smad signalling pathway. In vitro experimentation has demonstrated that the presence of menin is required for TGF-beta to effectively inhibit parathyroid cell proliferation and PTH production. This observation correlates with the almost universal occurrence of parathyroid tumors accompanying the inactivation of menin in multiple endocrine neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) syndrome and the high rate of somatic menin gene mutations seen in sporadic parathyroid adenomas. This chapter aims to review the role of menin in primary hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid hormone-regulation, including the influences of MEN1 gene mutations on parathyroid cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis.

  14. Synergistic antitumor effect of 3-bromopyruvate and 5-fluorouracil against human colorectal cancer through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Dianlong; Ma, Linyan; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Zhirui; Zhao, Surong; Huo, Qiang; Zhang, Pei; Zheng, Hailun; Liu, Hao

    2017-09-01

    3-Bromopyruvic acid (3-BP) is a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism. It has been proposed as an anticancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer for use in combination with anticancer drugs. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer; however, most patients develop resistance to 5-FU through various mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 3-BP has a synergistic antitumor effect with 5-FU on human colorectal cancer cells. In our study, combined 3-BP and 5-FU treatment upregulated p53 and p21, whereas cyclin-dependent kinase CDK4 and CDK2 were downregulated, which led to G0/G1 phase arrest. Furthermore, there was an increase in reactive oxygen species levels and a decrease in adenosine triphosphate levels. It was also observed that Bax expression increased, whereas Bcl-2 expression reduced, which were indicative of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, the combination of 3-BP and 5-FU significantly suppressed tumor growth in the BALB/c mice in vivo. Therefore, 3-BP inhibits tumor proliferation and induces S and G2/M phase arrest. It also exerts a synergistic antitumor effect with 5-FU on SW480 cells.

  15. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative (occult disease) CT scans.

  16. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC{sup 1638N/+} Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Shay, Jerry W. [Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC{sup 1638N/+} mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, or {sup 56}Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after {sup 28}Si, followed by {sup 56}Fe and {sup 12}C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after {sup 28}Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with {sup 28}Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  17. Cross-species analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of MAPK-driven colorectal cancer identifies hallmarks of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Belmont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC are limited, survival rates are poor and this disease continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite being a highly heterogeneous disease, a large subset of individuals with sporadic CRC typically harbor relatively few established ‘driver’ lesions. Here, we describe a collection of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs of sporadic CRC that combine lesions frequently altered in human patients, including well-characterized tumor suppressors and activators of MAPK signaling. Primary tumors from these models were profiled, and individual GEMM tumors segregated into groups based on their genotypes. Unique allelic and genotypic expression signatures were generated from these GEMMs and applied to clinically annotated human CRC patient samples. We provide evidence that a Kras signature derived from these GEMMs is capable of distinguishing human tumors harboring KRAS mutation, and tracks with poor prognosis in two independent human patient cohorts. Furthermore, the analysis of a panel of human CRC cell lines suggests that high expression of the GEMM Kras signature correlates with sensitivity to targeted pathway inhibitors. Together, these findings implicate GEMMs as powerful preclinical tools with the capacity to recapitulate relevant human disease biology, and support the use of genetic signatures generated in these models to facilitate future drug discovery and validation efforts.

  18. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  19. Epithelial-derived IL-33 promotes intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc Min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengxiang; Chen, Lili; Souto, Fabricio O; Canasto-Chibuque, Claudia; Bongers, Gerold; Deshpande, Madhura; Harpaz, Noam; Ko, Huaibin M; Kelley, Kevin; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A

    2017-07-14

    Increased expression of Interleukin (IL)-33 has been detected in intestinal samples of patients with ulcerative colitis, a condition associated with increased risk for colon cancer, but its role in the development of colorectal cancer has yet to be fully examined. Here, we investigated the role of epithelial expressed IL-33 during development of intestinal tumors. IL-33 expression was detected in epithelial cells in colorectal cancer specimens and in the Apc Min/+ mice. To better understand the role of epithelial-derived IL-33 in the intestinal tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing IL-33 in intestinal epithelial cells (V33 mice). V33 Apc Min/+ mice, resulting from the cross of V33 with Apc Min/+ mice, had increased intestinal tumor burden compared with littermate Apc Min/+ mice. Consistently, Apc Min/+ mice deficient for IL-33 receptor (ST2), had reduced polyp burden. Mechanistically, overexpression of IL-33 promoted expansion of ST2 + regulatory T cells, increased Th2 cytokine milieu, and induced alternatively activated macrophages in the gut. IL-33 promoted marked changes in the expression of antimicrobial peptides, and antibiotic treatment of V33 Apc Min/+ mice abrogated the tumor promoting-effects of IL-33 in the colon. In conclusion, elevated IL-33 signaling increases tumor development in the Apc Min/+ mice.

  20. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  1. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  2. Stat6 activity-related Th2 cytokine profile and tumor growth advantage of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben Hui; Xu, Shuang Bing; Li, Feng; Zou, Xiao Guang; Saimaiti, Abudukeyoumu; Simayi, Dilixia; Wang, Ying Hong; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Jia; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2012-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat6) is critical in Th2 polarization of immune cells and active Stat6 activity has been suggested in anti-tumor immunity in animal models. The present study aims at investigating the impact of natural Stat6 activity on tumor microenvironment in human colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Using colorectal cancer cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 whose IL-4/Stat6 activities were known and nude mice as a model, we examined correlative relationships between Stat6 activities and gene expression profiles together with cellular behaviors in vitro and in vivo. HT-29 cells carrying active Stat6 signaling displayed spontaneous expression profiles favoring Th2 cytokines, cell cycle promotion, anti-apoptosis and pro-metastasis with increased mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-13, GATA-3, CDK4, CD44v6 and S100A4 using RT-PCR. In contrast, Caco-2 cells carrying defective Stat6 signaling exhibited spontaneous expression profiles favoring Th1 and Th17 cytokines, cell cycle inhibition, pro-apoptosis and anti-metastasis with elevated mRNA expression of IFNγ, TNFα, IL-12A, IL-17, IL-23, T-bet, CDKN1A, CDKNIB, CDKN2A and NM23-H1. Xenograft tumors of Stat6-active HT-29 cells showed a growth advantage over those of Stat6-defective Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, mice bearing HT-29 tumors expressed increased levels of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in the blood and pro-growth and/or pro-metastasis proteins CDK4 and CD44v6 in the tumor. To the contrary, mice bearing Caco-2 tumors expressed heightened levels of Th1 cytokines IFNγ and TNF in the blood and pro-apoptosis and anti-metastatic proteins p53 and p27(kip1) in the tumor. Colorectal cancer cells carrying active Stat6 signaling may create a microenvironment favoring Th2 cytokines and promoting expression of genes related to pro-growth, pro-metastasis and anti-apoptosis, which leads to a tumor growth advantage in vivo. These findings may imply why Stat6 pathway is constitutively activated in a

  3. MiR-218 Mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis: Perspectives and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ying-fei; Zhang, Li; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Fu, Wei-ming; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As a highly conserved miRNA across a variety of species, microRNA-218 (miR-218) was found to play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and progression. A group of evidence has demonstrated that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting many oncogenes related to proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. In this review, we provide a complex overview of miR-218, including its regulatory mechanisms, known functions in cancer and future challenges as a potential therapeutic target in human cancers. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently down regulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways

  4. MiR-218 Mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis: Perspectives and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ying-fei [Institute Guangzhou of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Li [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Waye, Mary Miu Yee [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: wm.fu@giat.ac.cn [Institute Guangzhou of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Jin-fang, E-mail: zhangjf06@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As a highly conserved miRNA across a variety of species, microRNA-218 (miR-218) was found to play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and progression. A group of evidence has demonstrated that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting many oncogenes related to proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. In this review, we provide a complex overview of miR-218, including its regulatory mechanisms, known functions in cancer and future challenges as a potential therapeutic target in human cancers. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently down regulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.

  5. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview What to Expect ... section Overview 2 of 6 sections The Basics: Colorectal Cancer What is colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is a ...

  6. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  7. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Interleukin-6 mediates epithelial-stromal interactions and promotes gastric tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that affects various functions, including tumor development. Although the importance of IL-6 in gastric cancer has been documented in experimental and clinical studies, the mechanism by which IL-6 promotes gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-6 in the epithelial-stromal interaction in gastric tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human gastritis, gastric adenoma, and gastric cancer tissues revealed that IL-6 was frequently detected in the stroma. IL-6-positive cells in the stroma showed positive staining for the fibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting that stromal fibroblasts produce IL-6. We compared IL-6 knockout (IL-6(-/- mice with wild-type (WT mice in a model of gastric tumorigenesis induced by the chemical carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The stromal fibroblasts expressed IL-6 in tumors from WT mice. Gastric tumorigenesis was attenuated in IL-6(-/- mice, compared with WT mice. Impaired tumor development in IL-6(-/- mice was correlated with the decreased activation of STAT3, a factor associated with gastric cancer cell proliferation. In vitro, when gastric cancer cell line was co-cultured with primary human gastric fibroblast, STAT3-related genes including COX-2 and iNOS were induced in gastric cancer cells and this response was attenuated with neutralizing anti-IL-6 receptor antibody. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was increased when fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of gastric cancer cell-conditioned media. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was suppressed by an interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist and siRNA inhibition of IL-1α in the fibroblasts. IL-1α mRNA and protein were increased in fibroblast lysate, suggesting that cell-associated IL-1α in fibroblasts may be involved. Our results suggest the importance of IL-6 mediated stromal-epithelial cell interaction in gastric tumorigenesis.

  9. Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hurst-Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, aka PGP9.5 is an abundant, neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme that has also been suggested to possess E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and/or stabilize ubiquitin monomers in vivo. Recent evidence implicates dysregulation of UCH-L1 in the pathogenesis and progression of human cancers. Although typically only expressed in neurons, high levels of UCH-L1 have been found in many nonneuronal tumors, including breast, colorectal, and pancreatic carcinomas. UCH-L1 has also been implicated in the regulation of metastasis and cell growth during the progression of nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and lymphoma. Together these studies suggest UCH-L1 has a potent oncogenic role and drives tumor development. Conversely, others have observed promoter methylation-mediated silencing of UCH-L1 in certain tumor subtypes, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor role for UCH-L1. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the involvement of UCH-L1 in tumor development and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of UCH-L1 in oncogenesis.

  10. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sox2 Suppresses Gastric Tumorigenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Sarkar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sox2 expression marks gastric stem and progenitor cells, raising important questions regarding the genes regulated by Sox2 and the role of Sox2 itself during stomach homeostasis and disease. By using ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that the majority of Sox2 targets in gastric epithelial cells are tissue specific and related to functions such as endoderm development, Wnt signaling, and gastric cancer. Unexpectedly, we found that Sox2 itself is dispensable for gastric stem cell and epithelial self-renewal, yet Sox2+ cells are highly susceptible to tumorigenesis in an Apc/Wnt-driven mouse model. Moreover, Sox2 loss enhances, rather than impairs, tumor formation in Apc-deficient gastric cells in vivo and in vitro by inducing Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and upregulating intestinal metaplasia-associated genes, providing a mechanistic basis for the observed phenotype. Together, these data identify Sox2 as a context-dependent tumor suppressor protein that is dispensable for normal tissue regeneration but restrains stomach adenoma formation through modulation of Wnt-responsive and intestinal genes.

  12. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL. We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98 and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61, as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93 and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54. Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3 reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for

  13. Hereditary Colorectal Tumors: A Literature Review on MUTYH-Associated Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaella Kantor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MAP (MUTYH-associated polyposis is a syndrome, described in 2002, which is associated with colorectal adenomas, with enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes the available literature on MAP and outlines its pathogenesis, association with colorectal tumorigenesis, screening, treatment, and the subtle differences between it and its close cousins—FAP and AFAP. The preponderance of data is collected using MAP guidelines. However, although AFAP and MAP appear similar, potentially important distinctions exist, warranting targeted diagnostic criteria and treatment approaches. We suggest that it may be prudent to screen for MAP earlier than in current clinical practice, as it has been shown that sequence variants are associated with more severe disease, presenting with an earlier onset of colorectal cancer. Finally, we issue a call-to-action for much-needed further data to establish clear clinical and diagnostic criteria.

  14. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  15. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase induces G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells via inhibition of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hua; Chen, Zhao-Fei; Liang, Qin-Chuan; Du, Wan; Chen, Hui-Min; Su, Wen-Yu; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Han, Ze-Guang; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2009-09-01

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (MTIs) have recently emerged as promising chemotherapeutic or preventive agents for cancer, despite their poorly characterized mechanisms of action. The present study shows that DNA methylation is integral to the regulation of SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP1) expression, but not for regulation of suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS)1 or SOCS3 in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. SHP1 expression correlates with down-regulation of Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK2/STAT3/STAT5) signalling, which is mediated in part by tyrosine dephosphorylation events and modulation of the proteasome pathway. Up-regulation of SHP1 expression was achieved using a DNA MTI, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dc), which also generated significant down-regulation of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signalling. We demonstrate that 5-aza-dc suppresses growth of CRC cells, and induces G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through regulation of downstream targets of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signalling including Bcl-2, p16(ink4a), p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). Although 5-aza-dc did not significantly inhibit cell invasion, 5-aza-dc did down-regulate expression of focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor in CRC cells. Our results demonstrate that 5-aza-dc can induce SHP1 expression and inhibit JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signalling. This study represents the first evidence towards establishing a mechanistic link between inhibition of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signalling and the anticancer action of 5-aza-dc in CRC cells that may lead to the use of MTIs as a therapeutic intervention for human colorectal cancer.

  16. Expression of adrenomedullin in human colorectal tumors and its role in cell growth and invasion in vitro and in xenograft growth in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouguerède, Emilie; Berenguer, Caroline; Garcia, Stéphane; Bennani, Bahia; Delfino, Christine; Nanni, Isabelle; Dahan, Laetitia; Gasmi, Mohamed; Seitz, Jean-François; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a multifunctional peptide vasodilator that transduces its effects through calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein-2 and -3 (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3). In this study, real-time quantitative reverse transcription demonstrated a significant expression of AM mRNA in tumor samples from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in clinical stage II, III, and IV when compared with normal colorectal tissue. AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 proteins were immunohistochemically localized in the carcinomatous epithelial compartment of CRC tissue. Tissue microarray analysis revealed a clear increase of AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 staining in lymph node and distant metastasis when compared with primary tumors. The human colon carcinoma cells HT-29 expressed and secreted AM into the culture medium with a significant increase under hypoxia. Treatment of HT-29 cells with synthetic AM stimulated cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Incubation with anti-AM antibody (αAM), anti-AM receptors antibodies (αAMR), or AM antagonist AM 22–52 inhibited significantly basal levels of proliferation of HT-29 cells, suggesting that AM may function as an autocrine growth factor for CRC cells. Treatment with αAM significantly suppressed the growth of HT-29 tumor xenografts in vivo. Histological examination of αAM-treated tumors showed evidence of disruption of tumor vascularity with decreased microvessel density, depletion of endothelial cells and pericytes, and increased tumor cell apoptosis. These findings highlight the potential importance of AM and its receptors in the progression of CRC and support the conclusion that αAM treatment inhibits tumor growth by suppression of angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that AM may be a useful therapeutic target

  17. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate anticancer effects of bergenin on human colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 was treated with various concentrations of bergenin for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were analyzed ...

  18. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  19. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India); Patra, Samir Kumar, E-mail: samirp@nitrkl.ac.in [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India)

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  20. Cdk2-Null Mice Are Resistant to ErbB-2-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Ray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of targeting G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs in breast cancer treatments is supported by the fact that the genetic ablation of Cdk4 had minimal impacts on normal cell proliferation in majority of cell types, resulting in near-normal mouse development, whereas such loss of Cdk4 completely abrogated ErbB-2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice. In most human breast cancer tissues, another G1-regulatory CDK, CDK2, is also hyperactivated by various mechanisms and is believed to be an important therapeutic target. In this report, we provide genetic evidence that CDK2 is essential for proliferation and oncogenesis of murine mammary epithelial cells. We observed that 87% of Cdk2-null mice were protected from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Cdk2-null mouse showed resistance to various oncogene-induced transformation. Previously, we have reported that hemizygous loss of Cdc25A, the major activator of CDK2, can also protect mice from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis [Cancer Res (2007 67(14: 6605–11]. Thus, we propose that CDC25A-CDK2 pathway is critical for the oncogenic action of ErbB-2 in mammary epithelial cells, in a manner similar to Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway.

  1. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacoli Banerjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research.

  2. Systematic identification of core transcription factors mediating dysregulated links bridging inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows a tight link between inflammation and cancer. However, comprehensive identification of pivotal transcription factors (i.e., core TFs mediating the dysregulated links remains challenging, mainly due to a lack of samples that can effectively reflect the connections between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Here, we constructed a series of TF-mediated regulatory networks from a large compendium of expression profiling of normal colonic tissues, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and colorectal cancer (CRC, which contains 1201 samples in total, and then proposed a network-based approach to characterize potential links bridging inflammation and cancer. For this purpose, we computed significantly dysregulated relationships between inflammation and their linked cancer networks, and then 24 core TFs with their dysregulated genes were identified. Collectively, our approach provides us with quite important insight into inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, which could also be applied to identify functionally dysregulated relationships mediating the links between other different disease phenotypes.

  3. Aberrant TET1 Methylation Closely Associated with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Norihisa; Shinjo, Keiko; An, Byonggu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamao, Kenji; Ohka, Fumiharu; Katsushima, Keisuke; Hatanaka, Akira; Tojo, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Ueda, Minoru; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    Inactivation of methylcytosine dioxygenase, ten-eleven translocation (TET) is known to be associated with aberrant DNA methylation in cancers. Tumors with a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), a distinct subgroup with extensive DNA methylation, show characteristic features in the case of colorectal cancer. The relationship between TET inactivation and CIMP in colorectal cancers is not well understood. The expression level of TET family genes was compared between CIMP-positive (CIMP-P) and CIMP-negative (CIMP-N) colorectal cancers. Furthermore, DNA methylation profiling, including assessment of the TET1 gene, was assessed in colorectal cancers, as well as colon polyps. The TET1 was silenced by DNA methylation in a subset of colorectal cancers as well as cell lines, expression of which was reactivated by demethylating agent. TET1 methylation was more frequent in CIMP-P (23/55, 42%) than CIMP-N (2/113, 2%, P CIMP-P, 16/40, 40%; CIMP-N, 2/24, 8%; P = 0.002), suggesting that TET1 methylation is an early event in CIMP tumorigenesis. TET1 methylation was significantly associated with BRAF mutation but not with hMLH1 methylation in the CIMP-P colorectal cancers. Colorectal cancers with TET1 methylation have a significantly greater number of DNA methylated genes and less pathological metastasis compared to those without TET1 methylation (P = 0.007 and 0.045, respectively). Our data suggest that TET1 methylation may contribute to the establishment of a unique pathway in respect to CIMP-mediated tumorigenesis, which may be incidental to hMLH1 methylation. In addition, our findings provide evidence that TET1 methylation may be a good biomarker for the prediction of metastasis in colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Stratification and prognostic relevance of Jass’s molecular classification of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Inti eZlobec; Inti eZlobec; Michel P Bihl; Anja eFoerster; Alex eRufle; Luigi eTerracciano; Alessandro eLugli; Alessandro eLugli

    2012-01-01

    Background: The current proposed model of colorectal tumorigenesis is based primarily on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), microsatellite instability (MSI), KRAS, BRAF, and methylation status of 0-6-Methylguanine DNA Methyltransferase (MGMT) and classifies tumors into 5 subgroups. The aim of this study is to validate this molecular classification and test its prognostic relevance. Methods: 302 patients were included in this study. Molecular analysis was performed for 5 CIMP-related pro...

  5. The high affinity selectin glycan ligand C2-O-sLex and mRNA transcripts of the core 2 β-1,6-N-acetylglusaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) gene are highly expressed in human colorectal adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Hill, Catherine A; Farooqui, Mariya; Mitcheltree, Gregory; Gulbahce, H Evin; Jessurun, Jose; Cao, Qing; Walcheck, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The metastasis of cancer cells and leukocyte extravasation into inflamed tissues share common features. Specialized carbohydrates modified with sialyl Lewis x (sLe x ) antigens on leukocyte membranes are ligands for selectin adhesion molecules on activated vascular endothelial cells at inflammatory sites. The activity of the enzyme core 2 β1,6 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) in leukocytes greatly increases their ability to bind to endothelial selectins. C2GnT1 is essential for the synthesis of core 2-branched O-linked carbohydrates terminated with sLe x (C2-O-sLe x ). Our goal was to determine the expression profiles of C2-O-sLe x in the malignant progression and metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The well characterized CHO-131 monoclonal antibody (mAb) specifically recognizes C2-O-sLe x present in human leukocytes and carcinoma cells. Using CHO-131 mAb, we investigated whether C2-O-sLe x was present in 113 human primary colorectal adenocarcinomas, 10 colorectal adenomas, 46 metastatic liver tumors, 28 normal colorectal tissues, and 5 normal liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. We also examined mRNA levels of the enzyme core 2 β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) in 20 well, 15 moderately, and 2 poorly differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas, and in 5 normal colorectal tissues by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). We observed high reactivity with CHO-131 mAb in approximately 70% of colorectal carcinomas and 87% of metastatic liver tumors but a lack of reactivity in colorectal adenomas and normal colonic and liver tissues. Positive reactivity with CHO-131 mAb was very prominent in neoplastic colorectal glands of well to moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. The most intense staining with CHO-131 mAb was observed at the advancing edge of tumors with the deepest invasive components. Finally, we analyzed C2GnT1 mRNA levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal colorectal tissues by RT

  6. TIMP-1 expression in human colorectal cancer is associated with TGF-B1, LOXL2, INHBA1, TNF-AIP6 and TIMP-2 transcript profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Hanne Kjær; Brunner, Nils; Mansilla, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    colorectal cancer (CRC) and the other TIMPs 2-4, which have also been associated with the progression of colorectal cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of 172 CRC and normal mucosa samples was used to identify transcript changes for the genes under investigation. We found that TIMP-1 was up...... with the synthesis of extracellullar matrix, genes involved in the TGF-beta signalling pathway, and genes that are likely transcribed by the tumour cells. These insights add to the complex picture emerging about the regulation of TIMPs in colorectal cancer....... that colorectal cancer patients have increased plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and that high plasma TIMP-1 levels are associated with short colorectal cancer patient survival. However, although TIMP-1 has been extensively studied in cancer, very little is known about how...

  7. Omega-3 PUFA Loaded in Resveratrol-Based Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Physicochemical Properties and Antineoplastic Activities in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Serini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available New strategies are being investigated to ameliorate the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of the drugs currently used in colorectal cancer (CRC, one of the most common malignancies in the Western world. Data have been accumulated demonstrating that the antineoplastic therapies with either conventional or single-targeted drugs could take advantage from a combined treatment with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA. These nutrients, shown to be safe at the dosage generally used in human trials, are able to modulate molecules involved in colon cancer cell growth and survival. They have also the potential to act against inflammation, which plays a critical role in CRC development, and to increase the anti-cancer immune response. In the present study, omega-3 PUFA were encapsulated in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN having a lipid matrix containing resveratrol esterified to stearic acid. Our aim was to increase the efficiency of the incorporation of these fatty acids into the cells and prevent their peroxidation and degradation. The Resveratrol-based SLN were characterized and investigated for their antioxidant activity. It was observed that the encapsulation of omega-3 PUFA into the SLN enhanced significantly their incorporation in human HT-29 CRC cells in vitro, and their growth inhibitory effects in these cancer cells, mainly by reducing cell proliferation.

  8. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    Full Text Available KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy.

  9. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yan; Sun Ping; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua; Shang Lihua; Wu Hongbo; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future

  11. The effect of 3-bromopyruvate on human colorectal cancer cells is dependent on glucose concentration but not hexokinase II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nelson; Morrison, Jodi; Silva, Andreza; Coomber, Brenda L

    2016-01-06

    Cancer cells heavily rely on the glycolytic pathway regardless of oxygen tension. Hexokinase II (HKII) catalyses the first irreversible step of glycolysis and is often overexpressed in cancer cells. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) has been shown to primarily target HKII, and is a promising anti-cancer compound capable of altering critical metabolic pathways in cancer cells. Abnormal vasculature within tumours leads to heterogeneous microenvironments, including glucose availability, which may affect drug sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which 3BP acts on colorectal cancer (CRC) cells with focus on the HKII/Akt signalling axis. High HKII-expressing cell lines were more sensitive to 3BP than low HKII-expressing cells. 3BP-induced rapid Akt phosphorylation at site Thr-308 and cell death via both apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms. Cells grown under lower glucose concentrations showed greater resistance towards 3BP. Cells with HKII knockdown showed no changes in 3BP sensitivity, suggesting the effects of 3BP are independent of HKII expression. These results emphasize the importance of the tumour microenvironment and glucose availability when considering therapeutic approaches involving metabolic modulation. © 2016 Authors.

  12. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  13. Molecular Events in Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease, developing through a multipathway sequence of events guided by clonal selections. Pathways included in the development of CRC may be broadly categorized into (a genomic instability, including chromosomal instability (CIN, microsatellite instability (MSI, and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, (b genomic mutations including suppression of tumour suppressor genes and activation of tumour oncogenes, (c microRNA, and (d epigenetic changes. As cancer becomes more advanced, invasion and metastases are facilitated through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, with additional genetic alterations. Despite ongoing identification of genetic and epigenetic markers and the understanding of alternative pathways involved in the development and progression of this disease, CRC remains the second highest cause of malignancy-related mortality in Canada. The molecular events that underlie the tumorigenesis of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma are detailed in this manuscript.

  14. New peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of invasive cancer cells: in vivo studies using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 targeting uPAR in human colorectal cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Morten; Rasmussen, Palle; Madsen, Jacob; Ploug, Michael; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The proposition of uPAR as a potential target in cancer therapy is advanced by its predominant expression at the invasive front of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its value as prognostic biomarker for poor survival in this disease. In this study, we provide the first in vivo proof-of-concept for a theranostic approach as treatment modality in a human xenograft colorectal cancer model. Methods: A DOTA-conjugated 9-mer high affinity uPAR binding peptide (DOTA-AE105) was radiolabeled with 64 Cu and 177 Lu, for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy study, respectively. Human uPAR-positive CRC HT-29 cells were inoculated in Nude mice and treated with 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105 once a visible tumor had formed. To evaluate the true effect of the targeted radiotherapy, two controls groups were included in this study, one receiving a 177 Lu-labeled non-binding control peptide and one receiving vehicle. All animals were treated day 0 and 7. A parallel 18 F-FLT PET/CT study was performed on day 0, 1, 3 and 6. Dosimetry calculations were based on a biodistribution study, where organs and tissue of interest were collected 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 24 h post injection of 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105. Toxicity was assessed by recording mouse weight and by H and E staining of kidneys in each treatment group. Results: uPAR-positive HT-29 xenograft was clearly visualized by PET/CT imaging using 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105. Subsequently, these xenograft transplants were locally irradiated using 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105, where a significant effect on tumor size and the number of uPAR-positive cells in the tumor was found (p 18 F-FLT PET/CT imaging study revealed a significant correlation between 18 F-FLT tumor uptake and efficacy of the radionuclide therapy. A histological examination of the kidneys from one animal in each treatment group did not reveal any gross abnormalities and the general performance of all treated animals also showed no indications of radioactivity-induced toxicity. Conclusion: These findings

  15. Comprehensive and Holistic Analysis of HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells and Tumor-Bearing Nude Mouse Model: Interactions Among Fractions Derived From the Chinese Medicine Formula Tian Xian Liquid in Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Annballaw Bridget; Cheung, Ho Pan; Lin, Li-Zhu; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lao, Lixing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing

    2017-09-01

    The Chinese medicine formula Tian Xian Liquid (TXL) has been used clinically for cancer therapy in China for more than 25 years. However, the comprehensive and holistic effects of its bioactive fractions for various antitumor therapeutic effects have not been unraveled. This is the first study to scientifically elucidate the holistic effect of Chinese medicine formula for treating colon cancer, hence allowing a better understanding of the essence of Chinese medicine formula, through the comparison of the actions of TXL and its functional constituent fractions, including ethyl acetate (EA), butanol (BU), and aqueous (WA) fractions. Tissue-specific proliferative/antiproliferative effects of these fractions on human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells and splenocytes were studied by using the MTT assay. Their modulations on the expression of markers of antiproliferation, antimetastasis, reversion of multidrug resistance in treated HT-29 cells were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and their modulations in a xenografted nude mouse model were examined by Western blot analysis. Results revealed that EA fraction slightly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, but tissue-specifically exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on splenocytes. On the contrary, only TXL and BU fraction tissue-specifically contributed to the proliferation of splenocytes, but inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells. WA fraction exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on HT-29 cells and also the strongest inhibitory action on tumor size in the nude mouse model in our previous study. In the HT-29 model, TXL and WA fraction exerted the most pronounced effect on upregulation of p21 mRNA and protein; TXL, and EA and WA fractions exerted the effect on downregulation of G1 phase cell cycle protein, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein; EA and BU fractions exerted the most prominent anti-invasive effect on anti-invasion via downregulation of MMP-1 m

  16. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Overexpression of arginine transporter CAT-1 is associated with accumulation of L-arginine and cell growth in human colorectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lu

    Full Text Available We previously showed that L-arginine (Arg accumulates in colorectal cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which Arg accumulates and determine its biological significance. The concentration of Arg and Citrulline (Cit in sera and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC patients was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The expression of Arg transporters was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray. We also transfected the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with siRNA specific for the Arg transporter CAT-1 and measured the induction of apoptosis by flow cytometry and cell proliferation by MTT assay. Consistent with our previous results, serum Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer patients were significantly lower than those in normal volunteers, while Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer tissues were significantly higher than in matched adjacent normal colon tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the CAT-1 gene was highly overexpressed in 70.5% of colorectal cancer tissue samples relative to adjacent normal colon tissues in all 122 patients with colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray confirmed that the expression of CAT-1 was higher in all 25 colorectal cancer tissues tested. CAT-1 siRNA significantly induced apoptosis of HCT-116 cells and subsequently inhibited cell growth by 20-50%. Our findings indicate that accumulation of L-Arg and Cit and cell growth in colorectal cancer tissues is associated with over-expression of the Arg transporter gene CAT-1. Our results may be useful for the development of molecular diagnostic tools and targeted therapy for colorectal cancer.

  18. Double targeting of Survivin and XIAP radiosensitizes 3D grown human colorectal tumor cells and decreases migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehlgans, Stephanie; Petraki, Chrysi; Reichert, Sebastian; Cordes, Nils; Rödel, Claus; Rödel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of single and double knockdown of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) Survivin and X-linked IAP (XIAP) on three-dimensional (3D) clonogenic survival, migration capacity and underlying signaling pathways. Materials and methods: Colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-15, SW48, SW480, SW620) were subjected to siRNA-mediated single or Survivin/XIAP double knockdown followed by 3D colony forming assays, cell cycle analysis, Caspase activity assays, migration assays, matrigel transmigration assays and Western blotting (Survivin, XIAP, Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p-FAK Y397, Akt1, p-Akt1 S473, Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p-ERK1/2 T202/Y204, Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β, p-GSK3β S9, nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65). Results: While basal cell survival was altered cell line-dependently, Survivin or XIAP single and Survivin/XIAP double knockdown enhanced cellular radiosensitivity of all tested cancer cell lines grown in 3D. Particularly double knockdown conditions revealed accumulation of cells in G2/M, increased subG1 fraction, elevated Caspase 3/7 activity, and reduced migration. Intracellular signaling showed dephosphorylation of FAK and Akt1 upon Survivin and/or Survivin/XIAP silencing. Conclusions: Our results strengthen the notion of Survivin and XIAP to act as radiation resistance factors and further indicate that these apoptosis-regulating proteins are also functioning in cell cycling and cell migration

  19. PES1 regulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wei [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China); Qu, Like, E-mail: qulike@bjcancer.org [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China); Meng, Lin; Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Jian [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China); Shou, Chengchao, E-mail: scc@bjcancer.org [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► PES1 was overexpressed in diverse cancer cell lines. ► PES1-ablation enhances DNA damage response by decreasing DNA repair. ► PES1-ablation increases the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. ► PES1-ablation is associated with diminished nuclear entry of RAD51. -- Abstract: PES1 (also known as Pescadillo), a nucleolar protein, was involved in biogenesis of ribosomal RNA. Up-regulation of PES1 has been documented in some human cancers, indicating that PES1 may play some crucial roles in tumorigenesis. In our previous study, it was found that silencing of PES1 resulted in decreased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. We also noticed that depletion of PES1 altered expression profiles of diverse genes. In the present study, we validated the expression changes of a subset of genotoxic stress-related genes in PES1-silenced HCT116 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. The steady and etoposide-induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were higher in PES1-silenced cells than in control cells. Besides, etoposide-induced γ-H2AX persisted longer in PES1-silenced cells after removing the etoposide. Next, results of comet assay revealed decreased DNA repair after PES1-ablation. PES1-ablated cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents, which could be reversed by reconstitution with exogenous PES1. Furthermore, deletion of PES1 diminished steady and DNA damage-induced levels of nuclear RAD51. Our results uncover a potential role of PES1 in chemoresistance by regulating DNA damage response in colorectal cancer cells.

  20. Effect of β,β-Dimethylacrylshikonin on Inhibition of Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Feng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine, shikonin and its derivatives, has been used in East Asia for several years for the prevention and treatment of several diseases, including cancer. We previously identified that β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin (DA could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of DA on human colorectal cancer (CRC cell line HCT-116 in vitro and in vivo. A viability assay showed that DA could inhibit tumor cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that DA blocks the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Western blotting results demonstrated that the induction of apoptosis by DA correlated with the induction of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, and Bid, and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl. Furthermore, treatment of HCT-116 bearing nude mice with DA significantly retarded the growth of xenografts. Consistent with the results in vitro, the DA-mediated suppression of HCT-116 xenografts correlated with Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, these results suggest that DA could be a novel and promising approach to the treatment of CRC.

  1. Sulindac targets nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and Wnt signalling in adenomas of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and in human colorectal cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, E. M. J.; Keller, J. J.; Wormhoudt, T. A. M.; Giardiello, F. M.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; van der Neut, R.; Pals, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have chemopreventive potential against colorectal carcinomas (CRCs). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 underlies part of this effect, although COX-2-independent mechanisms may also exist. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs appear to inhibit the

  2. Prognostic and predictive factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, A; Ion, D; Ciocan, D N; Paduraru, D N

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important public health problem; it is a leading cause of cancer mortality in the industrialized world, second to lung cancer: each year there are nearly one million new cases of CRC diagnosed worldwide and half a million deaths (1). This review aims to summarise the most important currently available markers for CRC that provide prognostic or predictive information. Amongst others, it covers serum markers such as CEA and CA19-9, markers expressed by tumour tissues, such as thymidylate synthase, and also the expression/loss of expression of certain oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes such as K-ras and p53. The prognostic value of genomic instability, angiogenesis and proliferative indices, such as the apoptotic index, are discussed. The advent of new therapies created the pathway for a personalized approach of the patient. This will take into consideration the complex genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, besides the classical clinical and pathological stagings. The growing number of therapeutic agents and known molecular targets in oncology lead to a compulsory study of the clinical use of biomarkers with role in improving response and survival, as well as in reducing toxicity and establishing economic stability. The potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers which have arisen from the study of the genetic basis of colorectal cancer and their therapeutical significance are discussed. RevistaChirurgia.

  3. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... Carmen Marc Valvo is an outspoken voice for colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer ...

  4. Epigenetic regulation of multiple tumor-related genes leads to suppression of breast tumorigenesis by dietary genistein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most lethal diseases in women; however, the precise etiological factors are still not clear. Genistein (GE, a natural isoflavone found in soybean products, is believed to be a potent chemopreventive agent for breast cancer. One of the most important mechanisms for GE inhibition of breast cancer may involve its potential in impacting epigenetic processes allowing reversal of aberrant epigenetic events during breast tumorigenesis. To investigate epigenetic regulation for GE impedance of breast tumorigenesis, we monitored epigenetic alterations of several key tumor-related genes in an established breast cancer transformation system. Our results show that GE significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner in precancerous breast cells and breast cancer cells, whereas it exhibited little effect on normal human mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, GE treatment increased expression of two crucial tumor suppressor genes, p21(WAF1 (p21 and p16(INK4a (p16, although it decreased expression of two tumor promoting genes, BMI1 and c-MYC. GE treatment led to alterations of histone modifications in the promoters of p21 and p16 as well as the binding ability of the c-MYC-BMI1 complex to the p16 promoter contributing to GE-induced epigenetic activation of these tumor suppressor genes. In addition, an orally-fed GE diet prevented breast tumorigenesis and inhibited breast cancer development in breast cancer mice xenografts. Our results suggest that genistein may repress early breast tumorigenesis by epigenetic regulation of p21 and p16 by impacting histone modifications as well as the BMI1-c-MYC complex recruitment to the regulatory region in the promoters of these genes. These studies will facilitate more effective use of soybean product in breast cancer prevention and also help elucidate the mechanisms during the process of early breast tumorigenesis.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of multiple tumor-related genes leads to suppression of breast tumorigenesis by dietary genistein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Huaping; Hardy, Tabitha M; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most lethal diseases in women; however, the precise etiological factors are still not clear. Genistein (GE), a natural isoflavone found in soybean products, is believed to be a potent chemopreventive agent for breast cancer. One of the most important mechanisms for GE inhibition of breast cancer may involve its potential in impacting epigenetic processes allowing reversal of aberrant epigenetic events during breast tumorigenesis. To investigate epigenetic regulation for GE impedance of breast tumorigenesis, we monitored epigenetic alterations of several key tumor-related genes in an established breast cancer transformation system. Our results show that GE significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner in precancerous breast cells and breast cancer cells, whereas it exhibited little effect on normal human mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, GE treatment increased expression of two crucial tumor suppressor genes, p21(WAF1) (p21) and p16(INK4a) (p16), although it decreased expression of two tumor promoting genes, BMI1 and c-MYC. GE treatment led to alterations of histone modifications in the promoters of p21 and p16 as well as the binding ability of the c-MYC-BMI1 complex to the p16 promoter contributing to GE-induced epigenetic activation of these tumor suppressor genes. In addition, an orally-fed GE diet prevented breast tumorigenesis and inhibited breast cancer development in breast cancer mice xenografts. Our results suggest that genistein may repress early breast tumorigenesis by epigenetic regulation of p21 and p16 by impacting histone modifications as well as the BMI1-c-MYC complex recruitment to the regulatory region in the promoters of these genes. These studies will facilitate more effective use of soybean product in breast cancer prevention and also help elucidate the mechanisms during the process of early breast tumorigenesis.

  6. Phosphorylation of Nanog is Essential to Regulate Bmi1 and Promote Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujie; Piao, Longzhu; Cavey, Greg S.; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Mapp, Anna K; Pan, Quintin

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that Nanog is intimately involved in tumorigenesis in part through regulation of the cancer initiating cell population. However, the regulation and role of Nanog in tumorigenesis are still poorly understood. In this study, human Nanog was identified to be phosphorylated by human PKCε at multiple residues including T200 and T280. Our work indicated that phosphorylation at T200 and T280 modulates Nanog function through several regulatory mechanisms. Results with phosphorylation-insensitive and phosphorylation-mimetic mutant Nanog revealed that phosphorylation at T200 and T280 enhance Nanog protein stability. Moreover, phosphorylation-insensitive T200A and T280A mutant Nanog had a dominant-negative function to inhibit endogenous Nanog transcriptional activity. Inactivation of Nanog was due to impaired homodimerization, DNA binding, promoter occupancy, and p300, a transcriptional co-activator, recruitment resulting in a defect in target gene promoter activation. Ectopic expression of phosphorylation-insensitive T200A or T280A mutant Nanog reduced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion, migration, and the cancer initiating cell population in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The in vivo cancer initiating ability was severely compromised in HNSCC cells expressing phosphorylation-insensitive T200A or T280A mutant Nanog; 87.5% (14/16), 12.5% (1/8), and 0% (0/8) for control, T200A, and T280A, respectively. Nanog occupied the Bmi1 promoter to directly transactivate and regulate Bmi1. Genetic ablation and rescue experiments demonstrated that Bmi1 is a critical downstream signaling node for the pleiotropic, pro-oncogenic effects of Nanog. Taken together, our study revealed, for the first time, that post-translational phosphorylation of Nanog is essential to regulate Bmi1 and promote tumorigenesis. PMID:23708658

  7. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Jaques [Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Saba, Gabriela Tognini [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Daniel Reis [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues.

  8. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student'st test. The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues.

  9. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues

  10. Effects of hemin and nitrite on intestinal tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sødring

    Full Text Available Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat, and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine.

  11. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    Full Text Available Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the progesterone receptor (PR is not expressed. Expression was confined to sporadic mesenchymal cells. To analyze the influence of systemic progesterone receptor signaling, we crossed mice that lacked the progesterone receptor (PRKO to the Apc(Min/+ mouse, a model for spontaneous intestinal polyposis. PRKO-Apc(Min/+ mice exhibited no change in polyp number, size or localization compared to Apc(Min/+. To examine effects of progestins on the intestinal epithelium that are independent of the PR, we treated mice with MPA. We found no effects of either progesterone or MPA on gross intestinal morphology or epithelial proliferation. Also, in rats treated with MPA, injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane did not result in a difference in the number or size of aberrant crypt foci, a surrogate end-point for adenoma development. We conclude that expression of the progesterone receptor is limited to cells in the intestinal mesenchyme. We did not observe any effect of progesterone receptor signaling or of progestin treatment in rodent models of intestinal tumorigenesis.

  12. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zejun [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Gong, Chaoju [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310058 (China); Liu, Hong [Zhejiang Normal University – Jinhua People' s Hospital Joint Center for Biomedical Research, Jinhua, Zhejiang, 321004 (China); Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Song, Mintao [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS), School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, 100005 (China); Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Chen, Xiang, E-mail: sychenxiang@126.com [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China)

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  13. A study on genetic mutations within the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene in cases of colorectal carcinoma in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Menem, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is the enzyme responsible for the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate, a key single-carbon donor in nucleotide synthesis and the methylation of DNA. In this pilot study we investigated two common polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene 677C→T and 1298A→C and their association with enhanced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in a sample of egyptian individuals. Venous blood samples were withdrawn from 35 cases of CRC and 68 healthy controls . Specimens from colonic and rectal carcinoma tissues in addition to cancer free tissues were obtained from all cases. Polymorphisms was studied by RFLP analysis and confirmed by SSCP analysis using hot SSCP (∼ 1200 Ci/m mol α d ATP S35) and cold SSCP. Frequencies of MTHFR677T and 1298C alleles were significantly higher among cases of CRC tumor tissues (50 % and 56 %, respectively) than germ line alleles in CRC patients (33 % and 41 %, respectively) and healthy controls (21 % and 35 %, respectively). Heterozygous and homozygous polymorphism frequencies of MTHFR at positions 677 and 1298 in carcinoma tissues were always the highest. At position 677TT and CT genotype frequencies were 17 % and 66 % with an odds ratio (OR) of 11(95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.39-50.59) and OR 8.34 (95 % CI 2.97-23.92), respectively, in carcinoma tissues. While in the germ line of patients the genotype frequencies of 677TT and CT were 6 % and 54 % with OR 1.57 (95 % CI 0.26-9.51) and 2.99 (95 % CI 1.25-7-12), respectively, compared to control (6 % and 29 %, respectively). The combined genotype MTHFR1298 CC+AC frequencies were 86 % with OR 3.71(95 % CI 1.28-10.78) in carcinoma tissues, 69 % with OR 1.35(95 % CI 0.57-3.21) in germ line of patients and 62 % in controls. The combined genotype 677CT plus any of the following genotypes 1298 AA, AC or CC enhanced risk of CRC, when comparing germ line DNA polymorphism of patients versus peripheral blood DNA of control subjects OR 4.5(95 % CI 0.94-21.56), OR 3.12 (95

  14. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA.

  15. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 inhibits tumor growth and modifies microRNAs expression profiles in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Sujun [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Wu, Binwen, E-mail: wubinwengd@aliyun.com [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Li, Dongfeng; Zhou, Weihong; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Kaijun; Li, Youjia [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • AEG-1 expression in CRC cell lines and down-regulation or upregulation of AEG-1 in vitro. • Knockdown of AEG-1 inhibits cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • Upregulation of AEG-1 enhances proliferation, invasion and colony formation. • Knockdown of AEG-1 accumulates G0/G1-phase cells and promotes apoptosis in CRC cells. • AEG-1 knockdown increases 5-FU cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 and the relationship between AEG-1 and microRNAs in human CRC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AEG-1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of human CRC and its possible mechanism. We adopted a strategy of ectopic overexpression or RNA interference to upregulate or downregulate expression of AEG-1 in CRC models. Their phenotypic changes were analyzed by Western blot, MTT and transwell matrix penetration assays. MicroRNAs expression profiles were performed using microarray analysis followed by validation using qRT-PCR. Knockdown of AEG-1 could significantly inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of AEG-1 could significantly enhance cell proliferation, invasion and reduced apoptisis. AEG-1 directly contributes to resistance to chemotherapeutic drug. Targeted downregulation of AEG-1 might improve the expression of miR-181a-2{sup ∗}, -193b and -193a, and inversely inhibit miR-31 and -9{sup ∗}. Targeted inhibition of AEG-1 can lead to modification of key elemental characteristics, such as miRNAs, which may become a potential effective therapeutic strategy for CRC.

  16. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 inhibits tumor growth and modifies microRNAs expression profiles in human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Sujun; Wu, Binwen; Li, Dongfeng; Zhou, Weihong; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Kaijun; Li, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AEG-1 expression in CRC cell lines and down-regulation or upregulation of AEG-1 in vitro. • Knockdown of AEG-1 inhibits cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • Upregulation of AEG-1 enhances proliferation, invasion and colony formation. • Knockdown of AEG-1 accumulates G0/G1-phase cells and promotes apoptosis in CRC cells. • AEG-1 knockdown increases 5-FU cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 and the relationship between AEG-1 and microRNAs in human CRC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AEG-1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of human CRC and its possible mechanism. We adopted a strategy of ectopic overexpression or RNA interference to upregulate or downregulate expression of AEG-1 in CRC models. Their phenotypic changes were analyzed by Western blot, MTT and transwell matrix penetration assays. MicroRNAs expression profiles were performed using microarray analysis followed by validation using qRT-PCR. Knockdown of AEG-1 could significantly inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of AEG-1 could significantly enhance cell proliferation, invasion and reduced apoptisis. AEG-1 directly contributes to resistance to chemotherapeutic drug. Targeted downregulation of AEG-1 might improve the expression of miR-181a-2 ∗ , -193b and -193a, and inversely inhibit miR-31 and -9 ∗ . Targeted inhibition of AEG-1 can lead to modification of key elemental characteristics, such as miRNAs, which may become a potential effective therapeutic strategy for CRC

  17. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  18. A zebrafish transgenic model of Ewing’s sarcoma reveals conserved mediators of EWS-FLI1 tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie W. Leacock

    2012-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma, a malignant bone tumor of children and young adults, is a member of the small-round-blue-cell tumor family. Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, which include peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs, are characterized by chromosomal translocations that generate fusions between the EWS gene and ETS-family transcription factors, most commonly FLI1. The EWS-FLI1 fusion oncoprotein represents an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of Ewing’s sarcoma. The cell of origin of ESFT and the molecular mechanisms by which EWS-FLI1 mediates tumorigenesis remain unknown, and few animal models of Ewing’s sarcoma exist. Here, we report the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of EWS-FLI1 function and tumorigenesis. Mosaic expression of the human EWS-FLI1 fusion protein in zebrafish caused the development of tumors with histology strongly resembling that of human Ewing’s sarcoma. The incidence of tumors increased in a p53 mutant background, suggesting that the p53 pathway suppresses EWS-FLI1-driven tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of the zebrafish tumors defined a set of genes that might be regulated by EWS-FLI1, including the zebrafish ortholog of a crucial EWS-FLI1 target gene in humans. Stable zebrafish transgenic lines expressing EWS-FLI1 under the control of the heat-shock promoter exhibit altered embryonic development and defective convergence and extension, suggesting that EWS-FLI1 interacts with conserved developmental pathways. These results indicate that functional targets of EWS-FLI1 that mediate tumorigenesis are conserved from zebrafish to human and provide a novel context in which to study the function of this fusion oncogene.

  19. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  20. Hormone-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis is conserved in multiple rat strains and identifies a core gene expression signature induced by pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Collin M; Stoddard, Alexander J; Belka, George K; Dugan, Katherine D; Notarfrancesco, Kathleen L; Moody, Susan E; D'Cruz, Celina M; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2006-06-15

    Women who have their first child early in life have a substantially lower lifetime risk of breast cancer. The mechanism for this is unknown. Similar to humans, rats exhibit parity-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis. To explore the basis for this phenomenon, we identified persistent pregnancy-induced changes in mammary gene expression that are tightly associated with protection against tumorigenesis in multiple inbred rat strains. Four inbred rat strains that exhibit marked differences in their intrinsic susceptibilities to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis were each shown to display significant protection against methylnitrosourea-induced mammary tumorigenesis following treatment with pregnancy levels of estradiol and progesterone. Microarray expression profiling of parous and nulliparous mammary tissue from these four strains yielded a common 70-gene signature. Examination of the genes constituting this signature implicated alterations in transforming growth factor-beta signaling, the extracellular matrix, amphiregulin expression, and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis in pregnancy-induced alterations in breast cancer risk. Notably, related molecular changes have been associated with decreased mammographic density, which itself is strongly associated with decreased breast cancer risk. Our findings show that hormone-induced protection against mammary tumorigenesis is widely conserved among divergent rat strains and define a gene expression signature that is tightly correlated with reduced mammary tumor susceptibility as a consequence of a normal developmental event. Given the conservation of this signature, these pathways may contribute to pregnancy-induced protection against breast cancer.

  1. Activations of Both Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Contribute to Apoptosis through p53-Mediated ATM/Fas Signaling by Emilia sonchifolia Extract, a Folklore Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emilia sonchifolia (L. DC (Compositae, an herbaceous plant found in Taiwan and India, is used as folk medicine. The clinical applications include inflammation, rheumatism, cough, cuts fever, dysentery, analgesic, and antibacteria. The activities of Emilia sonchifolia extract (ESE on colorectal cancer cell death have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study explored the induction of apoptosis and its molecular mechanisms in ESE-treated HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The methanolic ESE was characterized, and γ-humulene was formed as the major constituent (63.86%. ESE induced cell growth inhibition in a concentration- and time-dependent response by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells (DNA fragmentation, an apoptotic catachrestic were found after ESE treatment by TUNEL assay and DNA gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, ESE stimulated the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 and their specific caspase inhibitors protected against ESE-induced cytotoxicity. ESE promoted the mitochondria-dependent and death-receptor-associated protein levels. Also, ESE increased ROS production and upregulated the levels of ATM, p53, and Fas in HCT 116 cells. Strikingly, p53 siRNA reversed ESE-reduced viability involved in p53-mediated ATM/Fas signaling in HCT 116 cells. In summary, our result is the first report suggesting that ESE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. Synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.M. van der Pool (Anne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and ranks second in cancer-related deaths in many parts of the Western world. Once in the lymph or blood vessels, colorectal cancer can quickly spread and the liver is known to be a favourable site for metastases. The

  3. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  4. Reduced type II interleukin-4 receptor signalling drives initiation, but not progression, of colorectal carcinogenesis: evidence from transgenic mouse models and human case?control epidemiological observations

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Nicola; Northwood, Emma L.; Perry, Sarah L.; Marston, Gemma; Snowden, Helen; Taylor, John C.; Scott, Nigel; Bishop, D. Timothy; Coletta, P. Louise; Hull, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin (IL)-4 receptor (IL-4R) signalling during mouse carcinogen-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and in a case-control genetic epidemiological study of IL-4Rα single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt focus (ACF; 6 weeks) and tumours (32 weeks) were analysed in wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice, as well as in IL-4Rα (-) (/-) , IL-13 (-/-) and 'double-knockout' (DKO) animals. Colorectal cancer (CRC) cases (1502) and controls (584) ...

  5. Natural killer cells inhibit oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer by repressing WBSCR22 via upregulating microRNA-146b-5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Su, Wuyun; Kang, Qingmei; Xing, Ze; Lin, Xue; Wu, Zhongjun

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have exhibited promising efficacy in inhibiting cancer growth. We aimed to explorer the effect of NK cells on oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer and the underlying molecular mechanism. Oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines were co-cultured with NK cells to evaluate the effect on viability, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro . Oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells were also co-injected with NK cells into mice to establish xenograft tumor model, to assess the in vivo effect of NK cells on tumorigenesis of the oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells. Expression of WBSCR22 gene was assessed in the oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells following NK cell treatment to elucidate the mechanism. NK cell treatment significantly reduces growth of oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo , as well as reduced WBSCR22 expression. MicroRNAs potentially targeting WBSCR22 were analyzed, and microRNA-146b-5p was found to be significantly upregulated following NK cell treatment. MicroRNA-146b-5p directly targeted WBSCR22 mRNA 3'-UTR to inhibit its expression, which was required for NK cell-induced inhibition of oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines. NK cells inhibit oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer by repressing WBSCR22 via upregulating microRNA-146b-5p, both of which could serve as candidates for targeted therapy against oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer.

  6. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  7. Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Sporadic CRC and Hereditary Nonpolyosis Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Sun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Extent neuroendocrine differentiation can be encountered in many human neoplasm derived from different organs and systems using immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural techniques. The tumor cells' behaviors resemble those of neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The presence of neuroendocrine differentiation reputedly appears to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the adenocarcinoma counterparts in sporadic human neoplasm. In this review the neuroendocrine carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation of colon and rectum both in sporadic colorectal carcinoma and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, the relationship of neuroendocrine differentiation and some possible molecular pathways in tumorogenesis of colorectal cancer will be discussed. Possible treatment strategy will also be addressed.

  8. Cellular interactions of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer complex of carbon nanotubes with human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonju; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2012-08-01

    Water-soluble, PAX-loaded carbon nanotubes are fabricated by employing a synthetic polyampholyte, PDM. To investigate the suitability of the polyampholyte and the nanotubes as drug carriers, different cellular interactions such as the human epithelial Caco-2 cells viability, their effect on the cell growth, and the change in the transepithelial electrical resistance in Caco-2 cells are studied. The resulting complex is found to exhibit an effective anti-cancer effect against colon cancer cells and an increased the reduction of the electrical resistance in the Caco-2 cells when compared to the precursor PAX. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Estrogen and estrogen receptor alpha promotes malignancy and osteoblastic tumorigenesis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sweta; Tai, Qin; Gu, Xiang; Schmitz, James; Poullard, Ashley; Fajardo, Roberto J; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xueqiong; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2015-12-29

    The role of estrogen signaling in regulating prostate tumorigenesis is relatively underexplored. Although, an increasing body of evidence has linked estrogen receptor beta (ERß) to prostate cancer, the function of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in prostate cancer is not very well studied. We have discovered a novel role of ERα in the pathogenesis of prostate tumors. Here, we show that prostate cancer cells express ERα and estrogen induces oncogenic properties in prostate cancer cells through ERα. Importantly, ERα knockdown in the human prostate cancer PacMetUT1 cells as well as pharmacological inhibition of ERα with ICI 182,780 inhibited osteoblastic lesion formation and lung metastasis in vivo. Co-culture of pre-osteoblasts with cancer cells showed a significant induction of osteogenic markers in the pre-osteoblasts, which was attenuated by knockdown of ERα in cancer cells suggesting that estrogen/ERα signaling promotes crosstalk between cancer and osteoblastic progenitors to stimulate osteoblastic tumorigenesis. These results suggest that ERα expression in prostate cancer cells is essential for osteoblastic lesion formation and lung metastasis. Thus, inhibition of ERα signaling in prostate cancer cells may be a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the osteoblastic lesion development as well as lung metastasis in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

  10. PLZF mediates the PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a signaling in suppression of prostate tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JingPing Cao

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF protein expression is closely related to the progression of human cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa. However, the according context of a signaling pathway for PLZF to suppress prostate tumorigenesis remains greatly unknown. Here we report that PLZF is a downstream mediator of the PTEN signaling pathway in PCa. We found that PLZF expression is closely correlated with PTEN expression in a cohort of prostate cancer specimens. Interestingly, both PTEN rescue and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 treatment increase the PLZF expression in prostate cancer cell lines. Further, luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate that FOXO3a, a transcriptional factor phosphorylated by PI3K/AKT, could directly bind to the promoter of PLZF gene. These results indicate that PTEN regulates PLZF expression by AKT/FOXO3a. Moreover, our animal experiments also demonstrate that PLZF is capable of inhibiting prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, our study defines a PTEN/PLZF pathway and would shed new lights for developing therapeutic strategy of prostate cancer.

  11. The Rab2A GTPase Promotes Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorigenesis via Erk Signaling Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Li Luo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proline-directed phosphorylation is regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, which plays a fundamental role in driving breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs. Rab2A is a small GTPase critical for vesicle trafficking. Here, we show that Pin1 increases Rab2A transcription to promote BCSC expansion and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Rab2A directly interacts with and prevents dephosphorylation/inactivation of Erk1/2 by the MKP3 phosphatase, resulting in Zeb1 upregulation and β-catenin nuclear translocation. In cancer cells, Rab2A is activated via gene amplification, mutation or Pin1 overexpression. Rab2A overexpression or mutation endows BCSC traits to primary normal human breast epithelial cells, whereas silencing Rab2A potently inhibits the expansion and tumorigenesis of freshly isolated BCSCs. Finally, Rab2A overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Thus, Pin1/Rab2A/Erk drives BCSC expansion and tumorigenicity, suggesting potential drug targets.

  12. Impaired PRC2 activity promotes transcriptional instability and favors breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Michel; Rodilla, Veronica; Teissandier, Aurélie; Zeitouni, Bruno; Gruel, Nadege; Sadacca, Benjamin; Irondelle, Marie; Charruel, Margaux; Ducos, Bertrand; Michaud, Audrey; Caron, Matthieu; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Chavrier, Philippe; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Pasmant, Eric; Vidaud, Michel; Servant, Nicolas; Reyal, Fabien; Meseure, Dider; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Fre, Silvia; Margueron, Raphaël

    2015-12-15

    Alterations of chromatin modifiers are frequent in cancer, but their functional consequences often remain unclear. Focusing on the Polycomb protein EZH2 that deposits the H3K27me3 (trimethylation of Lys27 of histone H3) mark, we showed that its high expression in solid tumors is a consequence, not a cause, of tumorigenesis. In mouse and human models, EZH2 is dispensable for prostate cancer development and restrains breast tumorigenesis. High EZH2 expression in tumors results from a tight coupling to proliferation to ensure H3K27me3 homeostasis. However, this process malfunctions in breast cancer. Low EZH2 expression relative to proliferation and mutations in Polycomb genes actually indicate poor prognosis and occur in metastases. We show that while altered EZH2 activity consistently modulates a subset of its target genes, it promotes a wider transcriptional instability. Importantly, transcriptional changes that are consequences of EZH2 loss are predominantly irreversible. Our study provides an unexpected understanding of EZH2's contribution to solid tumors with important therapeutic implications. © 2015 Wassef et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Mechanisms of Reactive Stroma-Induced Tumorigenesis in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    type I receptor blocker (SI Appendix, Fig. S9). Together, these results further support the concept that TGF-β1–expressing prostate cancer cells induce...of NBT-II bladder carcinoma cells to condi- tioned medium from normal fetal urogenital sinus. Cancer Res 47(11):2955–2960. 22. Nimmo R, Woollard A...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0197 TITLE: Mechanisms of Reactive Stroma - Induced Tumorigenesis in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  14. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Indian Hedgehog Controls Proliferation and Differentiation in Skin Tumorigenesis and Protects against Malignant Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Kakanj

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the hedgehog pathway drive the formation of tumors in many different organs, including the development of basal cell carcinoma in the skin. However, little is known about the role of epidermal Indian hedgehog (Ihh in skin physiology. Using mouse genetics, we identified overlapping and distinct functions of Ihh in different models of epidermal tumorigenesis. Epidermal deletion of Ihh resulted in increased formation of benign squamous papilloma. Strikingly, Ihh-deficient mice showed an increase in malignant squamous cell carcinoma and developed lung and lymph node metastases. In a sebaceous gland tumor model, Ihh deficiency inhibited tumor cell differentiation. More mechanistically, IHH stimulated cell proliferation by activating the transcription factor GLI2 in human keratinocytes and human tumors. Thus, our results uncover important functions for Ihh signaling in controlling proliferation, differentiation, malignant progression, and metastasis of epithelial cancer, establishing Ihh as a gatekeeper for controlling the grade of tumor malignancy.

  16. Potential markers for early diagnostics of Colorectal cancer and Inflammatory bowel disease in humans : intestinal microorganisms and immune system (teammates or rivals)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, P.; Kučerová, Petra; Červinková, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2017), s. 59-64 E-ISSN 2560-8304 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1609 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : colorectal cancer * inflammatory bowel disease * immune markers Subject RIV: EC - Immunology OBOR OECD: Immunology

  17. Molecular Features and Methylation Status in Early Onset (≤40 Years Colorectal Cancer: A Population Based, Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Magnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is usually considered a disease of the elderly. However, a small fraction of patients develops colorectal cancer earlier. The aim of our study was to define the frequency of known hereditary colorectal syndromes and to characterise genetic and epigenetic features of early nonhereditary tumors. Thirty-three patients ≤40 years with diagnosis of colorectal cancer and 41 patients with disease at >60 years of age were investigated for MSI, Mismatch Repair proteins expression, KRAS and BRAF mutations, hypermethylation, and LINE-1 hypomethylation. Detection of germline mutations was performed in Mismatch Repair, APC and MUTYH genes. Early onset colorectal cancer showed a high incidence of hereditary forms (18%. KRAS mutations were detected in 36% of early nonhereditary tumors. Early onset colorectal cancer disclosed an average number of methylated genes significantly lower when compared to the controls (p=0.02. Finally both of the two groups were highly methylated in ESR1, GATA5, and WT1 genes and were similar for LINE-1 hypomethylation. The genetic make-up of carcinomas differs from young to elderly patients. Early onset tumors showed more frequently a constitutional defective of Mismatch Repair System and a minor number of methylated genes. Hypermethylation of ESR1, GATA5, and WT1 genes suggests possible markers in the earlier diagnosis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  18. Vitex rotundifolia Fruit Suppresses the Proliferation of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells through Down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 via Proteasomal-Dependent Degradation and Transcriptional Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hun Min; Park, Gwang Hun; Park, Su Bin; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2018-01-01

    Viticis Fructus (VF) as the dried fruit from Vitex rotundifolia L. used as a traditional medicine for treating inflammation, headache, migraine, chronic bronchitis, eye pain, and gastrointestinal infections has been reported to have antiproliferative effects against various cancer cells, including breast, lung and colorectal cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which VF mediates the inhibitory effect of the proliferation of cancer cells have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of VF on the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 level associated with cancer cell proliferation. VF suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116 and SW480. VF induced decrease in cyclin D1 and CDK4 in both protein and mRNA levels. However, the protein levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were decreased by VF at an earlier time than the change of mRNA levels; rather it suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 via the proteasomal degradation. In cyclin D1 and CDK4 degradation, we found that Thr286 phosphorylation of cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in VF-mediated cyclin D1 degradation. Subsequent experiments with several kinase inhibitors suggest that VF-mediated degradation of cyclin D1 may be dependent on GSK3[Formula: see text] and VF-mediated degradation of CDK4 is dependent on ERK1/2, p38 and GSK3[Formula: see text]. In the transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, we found that VF inhibited Wnt activation associated with cyclin D1 transcriptional regulation through TCF4 down-regulation. In addition, VF treatment down-regulated c-myc expression associated CDK4 transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that VF has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  19. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  20. Vitamin D in thyroid tumorigenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinckspoor, Isabelle; Verlinden, Lieve; Mathieu, Chantal; Bouillon, Roger; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Decallonne, Brigitte

    2013-08-01

    Besides its classical role in bone and calcium homeostasis, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, has many non-classical effects; antiproliferative, anti-apoptotic and prodifferentiating effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 have been described in several tumour types in preclinical models. This review focuses on the insights gained in the elucidation of the role of 1,25(OH)2D3 in the normal thyroid and in the pathogenesis, progression and treatment of thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine malignancy. An increasing amount of observations points towards a role for impaired 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signalling in the occurrence and progression of thyroid cancer, and a potential for structural analogues in the multimodal treatment of dedifferentiated iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. A role for vitamin D in thyroid-related autoimmunity is less convincing and needs further study. Altered 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signalling does not influence normal thyroid development nor thyrocyte function, but does affect C-cell function, at least in rodents. If these findings also apply to humans deserves further study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  2. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed eight cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA...... value was 18% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Combinations of serological protein biomarkers provided a significant identification of subjects with high risk of the presence of colorectal neoplasia. The present set of biomarkers could become important adjunct in early detection of CRC....

  3. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J.; Jakobsen, Karen V.; Christensen, Ib J.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...... procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest....

  4. Thymoquinone from Nigella sativa Seeds Promotes the Antitumor Activity of Noncytotoxic Doses of Topotecan in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalife, Rana; Hodroj, Mohammad Hassan; Fakhoury, Rajaa; Rizk, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Topotecan, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, is an anticancer drug widely used in the therapy of lung, ovarian, colorectal, and breast adenocarcinoma. Due to the primary dose-limiting toxicity of topotecan, which is myelosuppressive, it is necessary to identify other chemotherapeutic agents that can work synergistically with topotecan to increase its efficacy and limit its toxicity. Many studies have shown synergism upon the combination of topotecan with other chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine. Other studies have demonstrated that pre-exposing cells to naturally occurring compounds such as thymoquinone, followed by gemcitabine or oxaliplatin, resulted in higher growth inhibition compared to treatment with gemcitabine or oxaliplatin alone. Our aim was to elucidate the underlying mechanism of action of topotecan in the survival and apoptotic pathways in human colon cancer cell lines in comparison to thymoquinone, to study the proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects of thymoquinone on the effectiveness of the chemotherapeutic agent topotecan, and to investigate the potential synergistic effect of thymoquinone with topotecan. Cells were incubated with different topotecan and thymoquinone concentrations for 24 and 48 hours in order to determine the IC50 for each drug. Combined therapy was then tested with ± 2 values for the IC50 of each drug. The reduction in proliferation was significantly dose- and time-dependent. After determining the best combination (40 µM thymoquinone and 0.6 µM topotecan), cell proteins were extracted after treatment, and the expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 and of its associated X protein, proteins p53 and p21, and caspase-9, caspase-3, and caspase-8 were studied by Western blot. In addition, cell cycle analysis and annexin/propidium iodide staining were performed. Both drugs induced apoptosis through a p53-independent mechanism, whereas the expression of p21 was only seen in thymoquinone treatment. Cell cycle arrest in the S

  5. Apc inactivation, but not obesity, synergizes with Pten deficiency to drive intestinal stem cell-derived tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Tahmineh; Wang, Donghai; Guan, Fangxia; Hu, Zunju; Beck, Amanda P; Delahaye, Fabien; Huffman, Derek M

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and can accelerate Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell (ISC)-derived tumorigenesis after the inactivation of Apc However, whether non-canonical pathways involving PI3K-Akt signaling in ISCs can lead to tumor formation, and if this can be further exacerbated by obesity is unknown. Despite the synergy between Pten and Apc inactivation in epithelial cells on intestinal tumor formation, their combined role in Lgr5+-ISCs, which are the most rapidly dividing ISC population in the intestine, is unknown. Lgr5+-GFP mice were provided low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 months, and the transcriptome was evaluated in Lgr5+-ISCs. For tumor studies, Lgr5+-GFP and Lgr5+-GFP- Pten flox/flox mice were tamoxifen treated to inactivate Pten in ISCs and provided LFD or HFD until 14-15 months of age. Finally, various combinations of Lgr5+-ISC-specific, Apc- and Pten -deleted mice were generated and evaluated for histopathology and survival. HFD did not overtly alter Akt signaling in ISCs, but did increase other metabolic pathways. Pten deficiency, but not HFD, increased BrdU-positive cells in the small intestine ( P  Apc deficiency synergistically increased proliferative markers, tumor pathology and mortality, in a dose-dependent fashion ( P  Apc deficiency in ISCs synergistically increases proliferation, tumor formation and mortality. Thus, aberrant Wnt/β-catenin, rather than PI3K-Akt signaling, is requisite for obesity to drive Lgr5+ ISC-derived tumorigenesis. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  7. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship........59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...

  8. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  9. Colorectal cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, A. A.; Halligan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide. There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use. Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing. The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests. In addition, their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can...

  10. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  11. High expression of PTBP1 promote invasion of colorectal cancer by alternative splicing of cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Na; Liu, Dan; Yin, Bin; Ju, Wen-Yi; Qiu, Hui-Zhong; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Peng, Xiao-Zhong; Lu, Chong-Mei

    2017-05-30

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) involving in almost all steps of mRNA regulation including alternative splicing metabolism during tumorigenesis due to its RNA-binding activity. Initially, we found that high expressed PTBP1 and poor prognosis was interrelated in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with stages II and III CRC, which widely different in prognosis and treatment, by immunohistochemistry. PTBP1 was also upregulated in colon cancer cell lines. In our study, knockdown of PTBP1 by siRNA transfection decreased cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Denovirus shRNA knockdown of PTBP1 inhibited colorectal cancer growth in vivo. Furthermore, PTBP1 regulates alternative splicing of many target genes involving in tumorgenesis in colon cancer cells. We confirmed that the splicing of cortactin exon 11 which was only contained in cortactin isoform-a, as a PTBP1 target. Knockdown of PTBP1 decreased the expression of cortactin isoform-a by exclusion of exon 11. Also the mRNA levels of PTBP1 and cortactin isoform-a were cooperatively expressed in colorectal cancer tissues. Knocking down cortactin isoform-a significantly decreased cell migration and invasion in colorectal cancer cells. Overexpression of cortactin isoform-a could rescue PTBP1-knockdown effect of cell motility. In summary the study revealed that PTBP1 facilitates colorectal cancer migration and invasion activities by inclusion of cortactin exon 11.

  12. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Swanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. Human papilloma virus (HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades.

  13. Near Infrared Optical Visualization of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Levels in COLO205 Colorectal Cell Line, Orthotopic Tumor in Mice and Human Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lazarovici

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the applicability of imaging epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor levels in preclinical models of COLO205 carcinoma cells in vitro, mice with orthotopic tumors and ex vivo colorectal tumor biopsies, using EGF-labeled with IRDye800CW (EGF-NIR. The near infrared (NIR bio-imaging of COLO205 cultures indicated specific and selective binding, reflecting EGF receptors levels. In vivo imaging of tumors in mice showed that the highest signal/background ratio between tumor and adjacent tissue was achieved 48 hours post-injection. Dissected colorectal cancer tissues from different patients demonstrated ex vivo specific imaging using the NIR bio-imaging platform of the heterogeneous distributed EGF receptors. Moreover, in the adjacent gastrointestinal tissue of the same patients, which by Western blotting was demonstrated as EGF receptor negative, no labeling with EGF-NIR probe was detected. Present results support the concept of tumor imaging by measuring EGF receptor levels using EGF-NIR probe. This platform is advantageous for EGF receptor bio-imaging of the NCI-60 recommended panel of tumor cell lines including 6–9 colorectal cell lines, since it avoids radioactive probes and is appropriate for use in the clinical setting using NIR technologies in a real-time manner.

  14. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  15. In vivo overexpression of Emi1 promotes chromosome instability and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S; Cato, K; Tang, L; Pavey, S; Haass, N K; Gabrielli, B G; Duijf, P H G

    2016-10-13

    Cell cycle genes are often aberrantly expressed in cancer, but how their misexpression drives tumorigenesis mostly remains unclear. From S phase to early mitosis, EMI1 (also known as FBXO5) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, which controls cell cycle progression through the sequential degradation of various substrates. By analyzing 7403 human tumor samples, we find that EMI1 overexpression is widespread in solid tumors but not in blood cancers. In solid cancers, EMI1 overexpression is a strong prognostic marker for poor patient outcome. To investigate causality, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which we overexpressed Emi1. Emi1-overexpressing animals develop a wide variety of solid tumors, in particular adenomas and carcinomas with inflammation and lymphocyte infiltration, but not blood cancers. These tumors are significantly larger and more penetrant, abundant, proliferative and metastatic than control tumors. In addition, they are highly aneuploid with tumor cells frequently being in early mitosis and showing mitotic abnormalities, including lagging and incorrectly segregating chromosomes. We further demonstrate in vitro that even though EMI1 overexpression may cause mitotic arrest and cell death, it also promotes chromosome instability (CIN) following delayed chromosome alignment and anaphase onset. In human solid tumors, EMI1 is co-expressed with many markers for CIN and EMI1 overexpression is a stronger marker for CIN than most well-established ones. The fact that Emi1 overexpression promotes CIN and the formation of solid cancers in vivo indicates that Emi1 overexpression actively drives solid tumorigenesis. These novel mechanistic insights have important clinical implications.

  16. A Novel Notch-YAP Circuit Drives Stemness and Tumorigenesis in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemmons, Katherine K; Crose, Lisa E S; Riedel, Stefan; Sushnitha, Manuela; Belyea, Brian; Linardic, Corinne M

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a cancer characterized by skeletal muscle features, is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of childhood. While low- and intermediate-risk groups have seen improved outcomes, high-risk patients still face a 5-year survival rate of statistic that has not changed in over 40 years. Understanding the biologic underpinnings of RMS is critical. The developmental pathways of Notch and YAP have been identified as potent but independent oncogenic signals that support the embryonal variant of RMS (eRMS). Here, the cross-talk between these pathways and the impact on eRMS tumorigenesis is reported. Using human eRMS cells grown as three-dimensional (3D) rhabdospheres, which enriches in stem cells, it was found that Notch signaling transcriptionally upregulates YAP1 gene expression and YAP activity. Reciprocally, YAP transcriptionally upregulates the Notch ligand genes JAG1 and DLL1 and the core Notch transcription factor RBPJ This bidirectional circuit boosts expression of key stem cell genes, including SOX2 , which is functionally required for eRMS spheres. Silencing this circuit for therapeutic purposes may be challenging, because the inhibition of one node (e.g., pharmacologic Notch blockade) can be rescued by upregulation of another (constitutive YAP expression). Instead, dual inhibition of Notch and YAP is necessary. Finally, supporting the existence of this circuit beyond a model system, nuclear Notch and YAP protein expression are correlated in human eRMS tumors, and YAP suppression in vivo decreases Notch signaling and SOX2 expression. Implications: This study identifies a novel oncogenic signaling circuit driving eRMS stemness and tumorigenesis, and provides evidence and rationale for combination therapies co-targeting Notch and YAP. Mol Cancer Res; 15(12); 1777-91. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. FHL2 silencing reduces Wnt signaling and osteosarcoma tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular mechanisms that are involved in the growth and invasiveness of osteosarcoma, an aggressive and invasive primary bone tumor, are not fully understood. The transcriptional co-factor FHL2 (four and a half LIM domains protein 2 acts as an oncoprotein or as a tumor suppressor depending on the tissue context. In this study, we investigated the role of FHL2 in tumorigenesis in osteosarcoma model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot analyses showed that FHL2 is expressed above normal in most human and murine osteosarcoma cells. Tissue microarray analysis revealed that FHL2 protein expression is high in human osteosarcoma and correlates with osteosarcoma aggressiveness. In murine osteosarcoma cells, FHL2 silencing using shRNA decreased canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduced the expression of Wnt responsive genes as well as of the key Wnt molecules Wnt5a and Wnt10b. This effect resulted in inhibition of osteosarcoma cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. Using xenograft experiments, we showed that FHL2 silencing markedly reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis occurence in mice. The anti-oncogenic effect of FHL2 silencing in vivo was associated with reduced cell proliferation and decreased Wnt signaling in the tumors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that FHL2 acts as an oncogene in osteosarcoma cells and contributes to tumorigenesis through Wnt signaling. More importantly, FHL2 depletion greatly reduces tumor cell growth and metastasis, which raises the potential therapeutic interest of targeting FHL2 to efficiently impact primary bone tumors.

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  19. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  20. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Micah G; Selmin, Ornella I; Doetschman, Tom C; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern.

  1. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Micah G.; Selmin, Ornella I.; Doetschman, Tom C.; Romagnolo, Donato F.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern. PMID:29259973

  2. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micah G. Donovan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern.

  3. STAT3: An Anti-Invasive Factor in Colorectal Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Petrus Rudolf de [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr. MC 0663, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Mo, Ji-Hun [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Dankook University College of Medicine, 16-5 Anseo-dong, Cheonan, Chungcheongnam-do 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jongdae, E-mail: j142lee@ucsd.edu; Raz, Eyal [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr. MC 0663, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is activated in a majority of cancers, and promotes tumorigenesis and even metastasis through transcriptional activation of its target genes. Recently, we discovered that STAT3 suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and thus metastasis in a mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC), while it did not affect the overall tumor burden. Furthermore, we found that STAT3 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) suppresses EMT by regulating stability of an EMT inducer, SNAI-1 (Snail-1). Here, STAT3 functions as an adaptor rather than a transcription factor in the post-translational modification of SNAI-1. In this review, we discuss the unexpected and contradictory role of STAT3 in metastasis of CRC and its clinical implications.

  4. Interplay between apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hao-Ran; Shi, Zhao-Qi; Zhu, He-Pan; Gu, Li-Hu; Wang, Xian-Fa; Yang, Yi

    2017-09-22

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two pivotal mechanisms in mediating cell survival and death. Cross-talk of autophagy and apoptosis has been documented in the tumorigenesis and progression of cancer, while the interplay between the two pathways in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not yet been comprehensively summarized. In this study, we outlined the basis of apoptosis and autophagy machinery firstly, and then reviewed the recent evidence in cellular settings or animal studies regarding the interplay between them in CRC. In addition, several key factors that modulate the cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as its significance in clinical practice were discussed. Understanding of the interplay between the cell death mechanisms may benefit the translation of CRC treatment from basic research to clinical use.

  5. STAT3: An Anti-Invasive Factor in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Rudolf de Jong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 is activated in a majority of cancers, and promotes tumorigenesis and even metastasis through transcriptional activation of its target genes. Recently, we discovered that STAT3 suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and thus metastasis in a mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC, while it did not affect the overall tumor burden. Furthermore, we found that STAT3 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC suppresses EMT by regulating stability of an EMT inducer, SNAI-1 (Snail-1. Here, STAT3 functions as an adaptor rather than a transcription factor in the post-translational modification of SNAI-1. In this review, we discuss the unexpected and contradictory role of STAT3 in metastasis of CRC and its clinical implications.

  6. MicroRNA‑133b inhibits connective tissue growth factor in colorectal cancer and correlates with the clinical stage of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yihang; Li, Xiaorong; Lin, Changwei; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Gui; Zhou, Jianyu; Du, Juan; Gao, Kai; Gan, Yi; Deng, Hao

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that dysregulation of microRNA‑133b (miR‑133b) is an important step in the development of certain types of human cancer and contributes to tumorigenesis. Altered expression of miR‑133b has been reported in colon carcinoma, but its association with clinical stage in colorectal cancer (CRC) has remained elusive. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a potentially promising candidate gene for interaction with miR‑133b, was screened using microarray analysis. The expression of miR‑133b and CTGF was evaluated using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The regulatory effects of miR‑133b on CTGF were evaluated using a dual‑luciferase reporter assay. CTGF was identified as a functional target of miR‑133b. The results demonstrated low expression of miR‑133b in CRC specimens with poor cell differentiation (P=0.011), lymph node metastasis (P=0.037) and advanced clinical stages (stage III or IV vs. I or II; P=0.036). Furthermore, there was a significant association between a high level of expression of CTGF mRNA and an advanced clinical stage (stage III or IV vs. I or II; P=0.015) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.034). CTGF expression was negatively regulated by miR‑133b in the human colorectum, suggesting that miR‑133b and CTGF may be candidate therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer.

  7. Loss of Pin1 Suppresses Hedgehog-Driven Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Therapeutic approaches to medulloblastoma (combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to significant improvements, but these are achieved at a high cost to quality of life. Alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Genetic mutations leading to the activation of the Hedgehog pathway drive tumorigenesis in ~30% of medulloblastoma. In a yeast two-hybrid proteomic screen, we discovered a novel interaction between GLI1, a key transcription factor for the mediation of Hedgehog signals, and PIN1, a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase that regulates the postphosphorylation fate of its targets. The GLI1/PIN1 interaction was validated by reciprocal pulldowns using epitope-tagged proteins in HEK293T cells as well as by co-immunoprecipiations of the endogenous proteins in a medulloblastoma cell line. Our results support a molecular model in which PIN1 promotes GLI1 protein abundance, thus contributing to the positive regulation of Hedgehog signals. Most importantly, in vivo functional analyses of Pin1 in the GFAP-tTA;TRE-SmoA1 mouse model of Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma demonstrate that the loss of Pin1 impairs tumor development and dramatically increases survival. In summary, the discovery of the GLI1/PIN1 interaction uncovers PIN1 as a novel therapeutic target in Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis.

  8. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... at the National Cancer Institute, shared developments in colorectal cancer screening methods with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What ...

  9. Improving Quality in Colorectal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Slieker (Juliette)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Colorectal surgery is an important aspect of our current health system, due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer combined with an ageing population, improved long-term outcomes after colorectal surgery, and the perfectioning of the operative and postoperative

  10. Periostin Expression and Its Prognostic Value for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewu Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrin is important for cell growth, invasion and metastasis, which are frequently observed in malignant tumors. The periostin (POSTN gene encodes the ligand for integrin, one of the key focal adhesion proteins contributing to the formation of a structural link between the extracellular matrix and integrins. High expression levels of the POSTN gene are correlated with numerous human malignancies. We examined POSTN protein in colorectal cancer specimens from 115 patients by strictly following up using immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasm immunohistochemical staining showed POSTN protein expression in colorectal cancers. The positive expression rate of POSTN protein (59.13%, 68/115 in colorectal cancers was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosa (0.47%, 11/109. POSTN over-expression in colorectal cancers was positively correlated with tumor size, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion, clinical stage and five-year survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer and high POSTN expression levels had lower survival rates than those with early stage colorectal cancer and low POSTN expression levels. Overall, our results showed that POSTN played an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers.

  11. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  12. Mdm2 Deficiency Suppresses MYCN-Driven Neuroblastoma Tumorigenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaowen Chen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is derived from neural crest precursor components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and accounts for more than 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. A clearer understanding of the molecular basis of neuroblastoma is required for novel therapeutic approaches to improve morbidity and mortality. Neuroblastoma is uniformly p53 wild type at diagnosis and must overcome p53-mediated tumor suppression during pathogenesis. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene correlates with the most clinically aggressive form of the cancer, and MDM2, a primary inhibitor of the p53 tumor suppressor, is a direct transcriptional target of, and positively regulated by, both MYCN and MYCC. We hypothesize that MDM2 contributes to MYCN-driven tumorigenesis helping to ameliorate p53-dependent apoptotic oncogenic stress during tumor initiation and progression. To study the interaction of MYCN and MDM2, we generated an Mdm2 haploinsufficient transgenic animal model of neuroblastoma. In Mdm2+/-MYCN transgenics, tumor latency and animal survival are remarkably extended, whereas tumor incidence and growth are reduced. Analysis of the Mdm2/p53 pathway reveals remarkable p53 stabilization counterbalanced by epigenetic silencing of the p19Arf gene in the Mdm2 haploinsufficient tumors. In human neuroblastoma xenograft models, conditional small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MDM2 in cells expressing wild-type p53 dramatically suppresses tumor growth in a p53-dependent manner. In summary, we provided evidence for a crucial role for direct inhibition of p53 by MDM2 and suppression of the p19ARF/p53 axis in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, supporting the development of therapies targeting these pathways.

  13. Loss of Dickkopf 3 Promotes the Tumorigenesis of Basal Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lorsy

    Full Text Available Dickkopf 3 (DKK3 has been associated with tumor suppression of various tumor entities including breast cancer. However, the functional impact of DKK3 on the tumorigenesis of distinct molecular breast cancer subtypes has not been considered so far. Therefore, we initiated a study analyzing the subtype-specific DKK3 expression pattern as well as its prognostic and functional impact with respect to breast cancer subtypes. Based on three independent tissue cohorts including one in silico dataset (n = 30, n = 463 and n = 791 we observed a clear down-regulation of DKK3 expression in breast cancer samples compared to healthy breast tissue controls on mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, most abundant reduction of DKK3 expression was detected in the highly aggressive basal breast cancer subtype. Analyzing a large in silico dataset comprising 3,554 cases showed that low DKK3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with reduced recurrence free survival (RFS of luminal and basal-like breast cancer cases. Functionally, DKK3 re-expression in human breast cancer cell lines led to suppression of cell growth possibly mediated by up-regulation of apoptosis in basal-like but not in luminal-like breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic DKK3 expression in mesenchymal basal breast cancer cells resulted in partial restoration of epithelial cell morphology which was molecularly supported by higher expression of epithelial markers like E-Cadherin and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers such as Snail 1. Hence, we provide evidence that down-regulation of DKK3 especially promotes tumorigenesis of the aggressive basal breast cancer subtype. Further studies decoding the underlying molecular mechanisms of DKK3-mediated effects may help to identify novel targeted therapies for this clinically highly relevant breast cancer subtype.

  14. Inhibition of induced tumorigenesis by dietary 2-deoxy-D-Glucose in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Saurabh; Pandey, Sanjay; Bhuria, Vikas; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Taneja, Pankaj; Soni, Ravi; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.; Oberoi, Raghav; Chawla, Aman Preet; Saluja, Daman

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced glycolysis facilitating proliferation and defence against death, besides energy production is a fundamental metabolic change exhibited by majority of the tumor types. Recent evidences support Warburg's proposition that this metabolic re-programming may also drive tumorigenesis induced by chemical carcinogens and radiation. Targeting this phenotype using the glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D glucose (2-DG) has been shown to enhance the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs in experimental systems as well as clinics. 2-DG is also a potent Energy Restriction Mimetic Agent (ERMA) as an alternative to Dietary Energy Restriction (DER) for combating cancer. Since DER regimen is difficult to sustain in humans, we have hypothesized that 2-DG may impair the process of induced tumorigenesis, thereby offering an attractive chemopreventive strategy. Systematic studies have indeed shown that dietary 2-DG administration impairs the formation and growth of implanted tumor (Lewis Lung carcinoma; Ehrlich ascites carcinoma) as well as chemical (DMBA and TPA) and radiation-induced skin tumors in C57BL/6, Strain A and Swiss Albino mice respectively in the tumor implant study. Decrease in the fraction of animals bearing tumor and growth rate, besides increase in the latency period were evident. In the chemical and radiation induced tumor studies, a significant reduction in the percentage of tumor (papillomas) bearing animals (incidence), number of tumors per animal (tumor burden) and increased latency were observed. Although, mechanisms underlying cancer preventive/inhibitory potential of dietary 2-DG is not completely understood, our current findings suggests modifications of certain circulating factors (glucose and insulin), oxidative stress (LPO and GSH), immune status (CD4/CD8 and regulatory T-cells; T-regs), extracellular matrix (MMP-9) and angiogenesis (tumor associated and radiation-induced) as some of the contributing factors. Further studies are required

  15. Germline Mutations in Mtap Cooperate with Myc to Accelerate Tumorigenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwaraj Kadariya

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the methionine salvage pathway methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in a wide variety of human cancers. In this study, we have examined if heterozygosity for a null mutation in Mtap (Mtap(lacZ could accelerate tumorigenesis development in two different mouse cancer models, Eμ-myc transgenic and Pten(+/- .Mtap Eμ-myc and Mtap Pten mice were generated and tumor-free survival was monitored over time. Tumors were also examined for a variety of histological and protein markers. In addition, microarray analysis was performed on the livers of Mtap(lacZ/+ and Mtap (+/+ mice.Survival in both models was significantly decreased in Mtap(lacZ/+ compared to Mtap(+/+ mice. In Eµ-myc mice, Mtap mutations accelerated the formation of lymphomas from cells in the early pre-B stage, and these tumors tended to be of higher grade and have higher expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase compared to those observed in control Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ mice. Surprisingly, examination of Mtap status in lymphomas in Eµ-myc Mtap(lacZ/+ and Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ animals did not reveal significant differences in the frequency of loss of Mtap protein expression, despite having shorter latency times, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of Mtap may be playing a direct role in accelerating tumorigenesis. Consistent with this idea, microarray analysis on liver tissue from age and sex matched Mtap(+/+ and Mtap(lacZ/+ animals found 363 transcripts whose expression changed at least 1.5-fold (P<0.01. Functional categorization of these genes reveals enrichments in several pathways involved in growth control and cancer.Our findings show that germline inactivation of a single Mtap allele alters gene expression and enhances lymphomagenesis in Eµ-myc mice.

  16. Dose and Spatial Effects in Long-Distance Radiation Signaling In Vivo: Implications for Abscopal Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Giardullo, Paola; Leonardi, Simona; Pasquali, Emanuela; Casciati, Arianna; De Stefano, Ilaria; Tanori, Mirella; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose and spatial dependence of abscopal radiation effects occurring in vivo in the mouse, along with their tumorigenic potential in the central nervous system (CNS) of a radiosensitive mouse model. Methods and Materials: Patched1 (Ptch1) +/− mice, carrying a germ-line heterozygous inactivating mutation in the Ptch1 gene and uniquely susceptible to radiation damage in neonatal cerebellum, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation (1, 2, or 3 Gy of x-rays) or treated in a variety of partial-body irradiation protocols, in which the animals' head was fully protected by suitable lead cylinders while the rest of the body was exposed to x-rays in full or in part. Apoptotic cell death was measured in directly irradiated and shielded cerebellum shortly after irradiation, and tumor development was monitored in lifetime groups. The same endpoints were measured using different shielding geometries in mice irradiated with 3 or 10 Gy of x-rays. Results: Although dose-dependent cell death was observed in off-target cerebellum for all doses and shielding conditions tested, a conspicuous lack of abscopal response for CNS tumorigenesis was evident at the lowest dose of 1 Gy. By changing the amount of exposed body volume, the shielding geometry could also significantly modulate tumorigenesis depending on dose. Conclusions: We conclude that interplay between radiation dose and exposed tissue volume plays a critical role in nontargeted effects occurring in mouse CNS under conditions relevant to humans. These findings may help understanding the mechanisms of long-range radiation signaling in harmful effects, including carcinogenesis, occurring in off-target tissues

  17. Cytotoxic and anti-colorectal tumor effects of sulfated saponins from sea cucumber Holothuria moebii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siran; Ye, Xuewei; Chen, Lu; Xie, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Lian, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Zhizhen

    2015-11-15

    Whether sulfated saponins from Holothuria moebii inhibit the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and have anti-colorectal tumor effects in animal model has not been investigated. To evaluate the cytotoxic and anti-colorectal tumor effects of sulfated saponins from sea cucumber Holothuria moebii. (1) Column chromatography was used to prepare the total and individual saponins and HPLC was applied to define the components of the total saponins; (2) the activity of the total and individual saponins inhibiting the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells was determined by SRB assay and the apoptosis induced by the saponins was qualified using cytometric analysis with Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining; and (3) the antitumor effects of the sulfated saponins on colorectal CT-26 tumor-bearing Balb/c mice were tested. The total and individual sulfated saponins significantly inhibited the proliferation of four different human colorectal cancer cells with IC50 values ranging from 1.04 to 4.08 μM (or 1.46 to 3.24 μg/ml for total saponins) and induced late apoptosis at an early treatment time in cancer cells. The total saponins (120 mg/kg) had antitumor activity in colorectal CT-26 tumor-bearing Balb/c mice. The sulfated saponins from H. moebii remarkably inhibited the proliferation of different human colorectal cancer cells and had significant anti-colorectal tumor activity in animal model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Focus on periodontal disease and colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritano, D; Sbordone, L; Nardone, M; Iapichino, A; Scapoli, L; Carinci, F

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of focal disease, the theory that the human oral microbial (HOM) could affect the onset and development of systemic diseases, was very popular in the past, but the lack of scientific evidence has led to the abandonment of this idea. Interestingly, increasing evidence over the past 3 or so decades suggests that HOM can indeed serve as a reservoir for systemic dissemination of pathogenic bacteria and their toxins in distant body sites, favouring the developments of malignant tumours. Malignant tumours are complex communities of oncogenically transformed cells with aberrant genomes, associated non-neoplastic cells including immune and stromal cells, and sometimes HOM, including bacteria and viruses. Recent data suggest that HOM and periodontal disease play an active role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, in fact HOM has been found within the colorectal cancer microenvironment, and the composition of the HOM was different from that of adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. An association of fusobacterium nucleatum with the colonic mucosa of colorectal cancer has been proven. Several questions thus arise. Is periodontal disease a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma? Given the connectivity of the digestive tract, could fusubacterium nucleatum or other HOM be involved in additional gastrointestinal disorders? Furthermore, based on the "mobility" of Fusubacterium nucleatum and the omnipresence of cadherins, could this organism be involved in cancers beyond the gastrointestinal tract? Answers to these questions will shed new lights on the role of the HOM in onset of diseases.

  19. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as potential colorectal microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carolina; Cranage, Martin; McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter; Shattock, Robin J

    2009-05-01

    We investigated whether reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (RTI) can be combined to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of colorectal tissue ex vivo as part of a strategy to develop an effective rectal microbicide. The nucleotide RTI (NRTI) PMPA (tenofovir) and two nonnucleoside RTI (NNRTI), UC-781 and TMC120 (dapivirine), were evaluated. Each compound inhibited the replication of the HIV isolates tested in TZM-bl cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and colorectal explants. Dual combinations of the three compounds, either NRTI-NNRTI or NNRTI-NNRTI combinations, were more active than any of the individual compounds in both cellular and tissue models. Combinations were key to inhibiting infection by NRTI- and NNRTI-resistant isolates in all models tested. Moreover, we found that the replication capacities of HIV-1 isolates in colorectal explants were affected by single point mutations in RT that confer resistance to RTI. These data demonstrate that colorectal explants can be used to screen compounds for potential efficacy as part of a combination microbicide and to determine the mucosal fitness of RTI-resistant isolates. These findings may have important implications for the rational design of effective rectal microbicides.

  20. Generation of a mouse model for studying the role of upregulated RTEL1 activity in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Sandhu, Sumit; Nabi, Zinnatun; Ding, Hao

    2012-10-01

    Regulator of telomere length 1 (RTEL1) is a DNA helicase protein that has been demonstrated to be required for the maintenance of telomere length and genomic stability. It has also been found to be essential for DNA homologous recombination during DNA repairing. Human RTEL1 genomic locus (20q13.3) is frequently amplified in multiple types of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma and gastrointestinal tract tumors, indicating that upregulated RTEL1 activity could be important for tumorigenesis. In this study, we have developed a conditional transgenic mouse model that overexpress mouse Rtel1 in a Cre-excision manner. By crossing with a ubiquitous Cre mouse line, we further demonstrated that these established Rtel1 conditional transgenic mice allow to efficiently and highly express a functional Rtel1 that is able to rescue the embryonic defects of Rtel1 null mouse allele. Furthermore, we demonstrated that more than 70% transgenic mice that widely overexpress Rtel1 developed liver tumors that recapitulate many malignant features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our work not only generated a valuable mouse model for determining the role of RTEL1 in the development of cancers, but also provided the first genetic evidence to support that amplification of RTEL1, as observed in several types of human cancers, is tumorigenic.

  1. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Rao, Yerra Koteswara [Institute of Biochemical Sciences and Technology, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ye, Min [Department of Natural Medicine, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Wu, Wen-Shi [Department of Horticulture and Biotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Tung-Chen [Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Liang-Shun [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Hsiung [Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Alexander T.H., E-mail: chaw1211@tmu.edu.tw [Ph.D. Program for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yew-Min, E-mail: ymtzeng@cyut.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemical Sciences and Technology, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of β-catenin, Tcf4 and β-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of β-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-α, JNK, NF-κB, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of IκBα. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ► Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ► MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ► DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ► DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components β-catenin, Tcf4. ► DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  2. Chronic ethanol feeding promotes azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colonic tumorigenesis potentially by enhancing mucosal inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Pradeep K.; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Mir, Hina; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is one of the major risk factors for colorectal cancer. However, the mechanism involved in this effect of alcohol is unknown. We evaluated the effect of chronic ethanol feeding on azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS)-induced carcinogenesis in mouse colon. Inflammation in colonic mucosa was assessed at a precancerous stage by evaluating mucosal infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, and analysis of cytokine and chemokine gene expression. Chronic ethanol feeding significantly increased the number and size of polyps in colon of AOM/DSS treated mice. Confocal microscopic and immunoblot analyses showed a significant elevation of phospho-Smad, VEGF and HIF1α in the colonic mucosa. RT-PCR analysis at a precancerous stage indicated that ethanol significantly increases the expression of cytokines IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα, and the chemokines CCL5/RANTES, CXCL9/MIG and CXCL10/IP-10 in the colonic mucosa of AOM/DSS treated mice. Confocal microscopy showed that ethanol feeding induces a dramatic elevation of myeloperoxidase, Gr1 and CD68-positive cells in the colonic mucosa of AOM/DSS-treated mice. Ethanol feeding enhanced AOM/DSS-induced suppression of tight junction protein expression and elevated cell proliferation marker, Ki-67 in the colonic epithelium. This study demonstrates that chronic ethanol feeding promotes colonic tumorigenesis potentially by enhancing inflammation and elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines

  3. Colorectal cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, Monica Ramona

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden and is the most common cause of mortality from cancer in Europe. Over the last two decades robust evidence from randomised clinical trials and case-control series have confirmed that the mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by screening. The challenge over the next decade is how to implement this in clinical practice. This is what we set out to answer with this thesis. Not all individuals are equal when it comes to screening and tho...

  4. Potential role of TRIM3 as a novel tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Hai-Long; He, Na-Na; Xu, Meng-Que; Dong, Wen-Xiao; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Bang-Mao; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Recent cancer genome-sequencing efforts and complementary functional studies have led to the identification of a collection of candidate 'driver' genes involved in CRC tumorigenesis. Tripartite motif (TRIM3) is recently identified as a tumour suppressor in glioblastoma but this tumour-suppressive function has not been investigated in CRC. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TRIM3 as a tumour suppressor in CRC development by manipulating the expression of TRIM3 in two authentic CRC cell lines, HCT116 and DLD1, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, colony formation, scratch wound healing, soft agar, and invasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour-suppressive properties of TRIM3. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated knockdown of TRIM3 conferred growth advantage in CRC cells. In contrast, overexpression of TRIM3 affected cell survival, cell migration, anchorage independent growth and invasive potential in CRC cells. In addition, TRIM3 was found to be down-regulated in human colon cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Overexpression of TRIM3 significantly inhibited tumour growth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that TRIM3 can regulate p53 protein level through its stabilisation. TRIM3 functions as a tumour suppressor in CRC progression. This tumour-suppressive function is exerted partially through regulation of p53 protein. Therefore, this protein may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of CRC.

  5. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer, using anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tadashi; Tadokoro, Masanori; Takagi, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Sadayuki; Sakamoto, Junichi.

    1989-01-01

    Aiming at radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer, anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (CEA102) were produced by immunization with purified CEA. CEA102 showed high specificity with clorectal cancer by mixed hemadsorption assay and immunoperoxidase technique. The antigen detected by CEA102 was confirmed to be carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and its molecular weight was estimated to be ca. 180,000 by biochemical analysis. The in vivo study using nude mice grafted a human colorectal cancer or a human malignant melanoma showed greater accumulation of 125 I-labeled CEA102 in CEA-positive colorectal cancer than in nude mouse tissues and CEA-negative malignant melanoma. Moreover we successfully obtained scans with good localization of the grafted colorectal cancer on FCR (Fuji Computed Radiography). Using 131 I-labeled CEA102 liver metastasis in the patient with colorectal cancer was successfully detected by external scanning with γ-camera. These results suggest that radiolabeled CEA102 is useful for the detection of colorectal cancer. (author)

  6. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  7. Analysis of the association between CIMP and BRAF in colorectal cancer by DNA methylation profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinori Hinoue

    Full Text Available A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP is displayed by a distinct subset of colorectal cancers with a high frequency of DNA hypermethylation in a specific group of CpG islands. Recent studies have shown that an activating mutation of BRAF (BRAF(V600E is tightly associated with CIMP, raising the question of whether BRAF(V600E plays a causal role in the development of CIMP or whether CIMP provides a favorable environment for the acquisition of BRAF(V600E. We employed Illumina GoldenGate DNA methylation technology, which interrogates 1,505 CpG sites in 807 different genes, to further study this association. We first examined whether expression of BRAF(V600E causes DNA hypermethylation by stably expressing BRAF(V600E in the CIMP-negative, BRAF wild-type COLO 320DM colorectal cancer cell line. We determined 100 CIMP-associated CpG sites and examined changes in DNA methylation in eight stably transfected clones over multiple passages. We found that BRAF(V600E is not sufficient to induce CIMP in our system. Secondly, considering the alternative possibility, we identified genes whose DNA hypermethylation was closely linked to BRAF(V600E and CIMP in 235 primary colorectal tumors. Interestingly, genes that showed the most significant link include those that mediate various signaling pathways implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis, such as BMP3 and BMP6 (BMP signaling, EPHA3, KIT, and FLT1 (receptor tyrosine kinases and SMO (Hedgehog signaling. Furthermore, we identified CIMP-dependent DNA hypermethylation of IGFBP7, which has been shown to mediate BRAF(V600E-induced cellular senescence and apoptosis. Promoter DNA hypermethylation of IGFBP7 was associated with silencing of the gene. CIMP-specific inactivation of BRAF(V600E-induced senescence and apoptosis pathways by IGFBP7 DNA hypermethylation might create a favorable context for the acquisition of BRAF(V600E in CIMP+ colorectal cancer. Our data will be useful for future investigations toward

  8. Analysis of the association between CIMP and BRAF in colorectal cancer by DNA methylation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Pan, Fei; Campan, Mihaela; Kim, Myungjin; Young, Joanne; Whitehall, Vicki L; Leggett, Barbara A; Laird, Peter W

    2009-12-21

    A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is displayed by a distinct subset of colorectal cancers with a high frequency of DNA hypermethylation in a specific group of CpG islands. Recent studies have shown that an activating mutation of BRAF (BRAF(V600E)) is tightly associated with CIMP, raising the question of whether BRAF(V600E) plays a causal role in the development of CIMP or whether CIMP provides a favorable environment for the acquisition of BRAF(V600E). We employed Illumina GoldenGate DNA methylation technology, which interrogates 1,505 CpG sites in 807 different genes, to further study this association. We first examined whether expression of BRAF(V600E) causes DNA hypermethylation by stably expressing BRAF(V600E) in the CIMP-negative, BRAF wild-type COLO 320DM colorectal cancer cell line. We determined 100 CIMP-associated CpG sites and examined changes in DNA methylation in eight stably transfected clones over multiple passages. We found that BRAF(V600E) is not sufficient to induce CIMP in our system. Secondly, considering the alternative possibility, we identified genes whose DNA hypermethylation was closely linked to BRAF(V600E) and CIMP in 235 primary colorectal tumors. Interestingly, genes that showed the most significant link include those that mediate various signaling pathways implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis, such as BMP3 and BMP6 (BMP signaling), EPHA3, KIT, and FLT1 (receptor tyrosine kinases) and SMO (Hedgehog signaling). Furthermore, we identified CIMP-dependent DNA hypermethylation of IGFBP7, which has been shown to mediate BRAF(V600E)-induced cellular senescence and apoptosis. Promoter DNA hypermethylation of IGFBP7 was associated with silencing of the gene. CIMP-specific inactivation of BRAF(V600E)-induced senescence and apoptosis pathways by IGFBP7 DNA hypermethylation might create a favorable context for the acquisition of BRAF(V600E) in CIMP+ colorectal cancer. Our data will be useful for future investigations toward understanding

  9. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The influence of royal jelly and human interferon-alpha (HuIFN-αN3) on proliferation, glutathione level and lipid peroxidation in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipič, Bratko; Gradišnik, Lidija; Rihar, Klemen; Šooš, Eugen; Pereyra, Adriana; Potokar, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Among royal jelly's (RJ) various biological activities, its possible antitumour activity deserves particular attention. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of RJ, its bioactive component 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10- HDA), and human interferon-alpha (HuIFN-αN3) on the proliferation of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (CaCo- 2), and ascertain their effect on intracellular glutathione (GSH) level and lipid peroxidation. We studied the antiproliferative (AP) activity of RJ [(0.1 g/10 mL phosphate buffer saline (PBS)], HuIFN-αN3 (1000 I.U. mL⁻¹), 10-HDA at 100.0 μmol L⁻¹, and their different combinations, in the ratio 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 on CaCo-2 cells. The GSH level was measured by glutathione assay. The lipid peroxidation was measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) assay. Single RJ had a low AP activity: 2.0 (0.5 mg mL⁻¹). HuIFN-αN3 had an AP activity of 2.5 (208.33 I.U. mL⁻¹), while 10-HDA had an AP activity of 1.5 (37.5 μmol mL⁻¹). The highest AP activity of 3.8 was obtained when RJ and HuIFN-αN3 were applied at the ratio 2:1. In that combination the level of GSH was 24.9±2.4 nmol g⁻³ of proteins (vs. 70.2±3.2 nmol g⁻³ in the control) and the level of MDA was 72.3±3.1 nmol g⁻³ (vs. 23.6±9.1 nmol g⁻³ in the control). It is generally assumed that 10-HDA, an important constituent of RJ, together with HuIFN-αN3, is responsible for the inhibition of CaCo-2 cells proliferation in vitro. In our study, however, RJ and HuIFN-αN3 applied at 2:1 decreased the level of GSH the most and significantly increased lipid peroxidation via MDA in CaCo-2 cells. Future studies should show whether these GSH- and MDA-related activities of RJ, HuIFN-αN3, 10-HDA, and their combinations may decrease the tumorigenicity index and tumorigenic potential of various tumour cells in vitro.

  11. Diverse microRNAs with convergent functions regulate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min-Yan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate several biological processes, including tumorigenesis. In order to comprehend the roles of miRNAs in cancer, various screens were performed to investigate the changes in the expression levels of miRNAs that occur in different types of cancer. The present review focuses on the results of five recent screens, whereby a number of overlapping miRNAs were identified to be downregulated or differentially regulated, whereas no miRNAs were observed to be frequently upregulated. Furthermore, the majority of the miRNAs that were common to >1 screen were involved in signaling networks, including wingless-related integration site, receptor tyrosine kinase and transforming growth factor-β, or in cell cycle checkpoint control. The present review will discuss the aforementioned miRNAs implicated in cell cycle checkpoint control and signaling networks.

  12. Association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colorectal cancer: Progress and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Sanjun; Ma, Yanlei

    2018-01-01

    The initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) involves genetic and epigenetic alterations influenced by dietary and environmental factors. Increasing evidence has linked the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer. More recently, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), an opportunistic commensal anaerobe in the oral cavity, has been associated with CRC. Several research teams have reported an overabundance of Fn in human CRC and have elucidated the possible mechanisms by which Fn is involved in colorectal carcinogenesis in vitro and in mouse models. However, the mechanisms by which Fn promotes colorectal carcinogenesis remain unclear. To provide new perspectives for early diagnosis, the identification of high risk populations and treatment for colorectal cancer, this review will summarize the relative research progresses regarding the relationship between Fn and colorectal cancer. PMID:29760804

  13. Role of intestinal flora in colorectal cancer from the metabolite perspective: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuwen; Gao, Jianlan; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Shanshan; Wen, Caixia

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common human malignant tumors. Recent research has shown that colorectal cancer is a dysbacteriosis-induced disease; however, the role of intestinal bacteria in colorectal cancer is unclear. This review explores the role of intestinal flora in colorectal cancer. In total, 57 articles were included after identification and screening. The pertinent literature on floral metabolites in colorectal cancer from three metabolic perspectives – including carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism – was analyzed. An association network regarding the role of intestinal flora from a metabolic perspective was constructed by analyzing the previous literature to provide direction and insight for further research on intestinal flora in colorectal cancer. PMID:29440929

  14. Specitic gene alterations in radiation-induced tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Joo Mee; Kang, Chang Mo; Lee, Seung Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Su Jae; Lee, Yun Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    To identify a set of genes involved in the development of radiation-induced tumorigenesis, we used DNA microarrays consisting of 1,176 mouse genes and compared expression profiles of radioresistant cells, designated NIH3T3-R1 and -R4. These cells were tumorigenic in a nude mouse grafting system, as compared to the parental NIH3T3 cells. Expressions of MDM2, CDK6 and CDC25B were found to increase more than 3-fold. Entactin protein levels were downregulated in NIH3T3-R1 and -R4 cells. Changes in expression genes were confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR or western blotting. When these genes were transfected to NIH3T3 cells, the CDC25B and MDM2 overexpressing NIH3T3 cells showed radioresistance, while 2 CDK6 overexpressing cells did not. In the case of entactin overexpressing NIH3T3-R1 or R-4 cells were still radioresistant. Furthermore, the CDC25B and MDM2 overexpressing cells grafted to nude mice, were tumorigenic. NIH3T3-R1 and R4 cells showed increased radiation-induced apoptosis, accompanied by faster growth rate, rather than and earlier radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest, suggesting that the radioresistance of NIH3T3-R1 and R4 cells was due to faster growth rate, rather than induction of apoptosis. In the case of MDM2 and CDC25B overexpressing cells, similar phenomena, such as increased apoptosis and faster growth rate, were shown. The above results, therefore, demonstrate involvement of CDC25B and MDM2 overexpression in radiation-induced tumorigenesis and provide novel targets for detection of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  15. New and emerging factors in tumorigenesis: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Suwon Kim1,2 1Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, 2Cancer and Cell Biology Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: This article provides an overview of the genes and cellular processes that have emerged recently as new key factors in tumorigenesis. We review these in the context of three broad categories. First, genome-scale sequencing studies have revealed a set of frequently mutated genes in cancer. Genes that are mutated in >5% of all cancers across tissue types are discussed, with a highlighted focus on the two most frequently mutated genes, TP53 and PIK3CA. Second, the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy are reviewed. These include acquired resistance under targeted therapy selection owing to mutations and amplification of genes in the same or parallel signaling pathways. Importantly, sequencing of primary tumors has revealed that therapy-resistant clones already exist prior to targeted therapy, demonstrating that tumor heterogeneity in primary tumors confers a mechanism for inherent therapy resistance. Third, “metastasis-specific genes”, or rather lack thereof, are discussed. While many genes have been shown to be capable of promoting metastasis in experimental systems, no common genetic alterations have been identified specific to metastatic lesions. Rather, the same gene mutations frequently found in primary tumors are also found prevalent in metastases, suggesting that the genes that drive tumorigenesis may also drive metastasis. In this light, an emerging view of metastatic progression is discussed. Collectively, these recent advances in cancer research have refined our knowledge on cancer etiology and progression but also present challenges that will require innovative new approaches to treat and manage cancer. Keywords: cancer, genomics, gene mutations, targeted therapy resistance, tumor heterogeneity, metastasis

  16. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H; Murray, Graeme I; Stewart, Keith N; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N Ashley G; Drew, Janice E; El-Omar, Emad M

    2011-01-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  17. The Inflammatory Microenvironment in Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H.; Murray, Graeme I.; Stewart, Keith N.; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L.; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N. Ashley G.; Drew, Janice E.; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified. PMID:21249124

  18. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairi H McLean

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5 are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  19. DEK over expression as an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lijuan; Piao, Junjie; Gao, Wenbin; Piao, Yingshi; Jin, Guang; Ma, Yue; Li, Jinzi; Lin, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    The DEK protein is related to chromatin reconstruction and gene transcription, and plays an important role in cell apoptosis. High expression levels of the human DEK gene have been correlated with numerous human malignancies. This study explores the roles of DEK in tumor progression and as a prognostic determinant of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer specimens from 109 patients with strict follow-up, and colorectal adenomas from 52 patients were selected for analysis of DEK protein by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between DEK over expression and the clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers were evaluated by Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact tests. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient survival was also analyzed by the Cox proportional hazard models. DEK protein showed a nuclear immunohistochemical staining pattern in colorectal cancers. The strongly positive rate of DEK protein was 48.62% (53/109) in colorectal cancers, which was significantly higher than that in either adjacent normal colon mucosa (9.17%, 10/109) or colorectal adenomas (13.46%, 7/52). DEK over expression in colorectal cancers was positively correlated with tumor size, grade, lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion, late stage, and disease-free survival- and 5-year survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with late stage colorectal cancer and high DEK expression had worse survival rates than those with low DEK expression. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed high DEK expression, serosal invasion, and late stage are significant independent risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer. DEK plays an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers and it is an independent poor prognostic factor of colorectal cancers

  20. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  1. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  2. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lei Li,1,* Dongxi Xiang,2,* Sarah Shigdar,2 Wenrong Yang,3 Qiong Li,2 Jia Lin,4 Kexin Liu,1 Wei Duan2 1College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, People's Republic of China; 2School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, VIC, Australia; 3School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, West China School of Preclinical and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA Aptamers (Apts against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01. Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug

  3. EPHB2 germline variants in patients with colorectal cancer or hyperplastic polyposis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokko, Antti; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Laiho, Päivi; Lehtonen, Rainer; Korja, Sanna; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Eng, Charis; Schleutker, Johanna

    2006-01-01

    Ephrin receptor B2 (EPHB2) has recently been proposed as a novel tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer (CRC). Inactivation of the gene has been shown to correlate with progression of colorectal tumorigenesis, and somatic mutations have been reported in both colorectal and prostate tumors. Here we have analyzed the EPHB2 gene for germline alterations in 101 individuals either with 1) CRC and a personal or family history of prostate cancer (PC), or 2) intestinal hyperplastic polyposis (HPP), a condition associated with malignant degeneration such as serrated adenoma and CRC. Four previously unknown missense alterations were observed, which may be associated with the disease phenotype. Two of the changes, I361V and R568W, were identified in Finnish CRC patients, but not in over 300 Finnish familial CRC or PC patients or more than 200 population-matched healthy controls. The third change, D861N, was observed in a UK HPP patient, but not in additional 40 UK HPP patients or in 200 UK healthy controls. The fourth change R80H, originally identified in a Finnish CRC patient, was also found in 1/106 familial CRC patients and in 9/281 healthy controls and is likely to be a neutral polymorphism. We detected novel germline EPHB2 alterations in patients with colorectal tumors. The results suggest a limited role for these EPHB2 variants in colon tumor predisposition. Further studies including functional analyses are needed to confirm this

  4. Gene expression profiles of primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that metastases are the leading cause of colorectal cancer deaths, little is known about the underlying molecular changes in these advanced disease stages. Few have studied the overall gene expression levels in metastases from colorectal carcinomas, and so far, none has investigated the peritoneal carcinomatoses by use of DNA microarrays. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate and compare the gene expression patterns of primary carcinomas (n = 18, liver metastases (n = 4, and carcinomatoses (n = 4, relative to normal samples from the large bowel. Results Transcriptome profiles of colorectal cancer metastases independent of tumor site, as well as separate profiles associated with primary carcinomas, liver metastases, or peritoneal carcinomatoses, were assessed by use of Bayesian statistics. Gains of chromosome arm 5p are common in peritoneal carcinomatoses and several candidate genes (including PTGER4, SKP2, and ZNF622 mapping to this region were overexpressed in the tumors. Expression signatures stratified on TP53 mutation status were identified across all tumors regardless of stage. Furthermore, the gene expression levels for the in vivo tumors were compared with an in vitro model consisting of cell lines representing all three tumor stages established from one patient. Conclusion By statistical analysis of gene expression data from primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses, we are able to identify genetic patterns associated with the different stages of tumorigenesis.

  5. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131 I at a total dose of at least 1.0 μCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131 I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131 I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures

  6. Microbiota, Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécily Lucas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, is a multifactorial disease involving genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors. In addition, increased evidence has established a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer. Indeed, changes in the intestinal microbiota composition in colorectal cancer patients compared to control subjects have been reported. Several bacterial species have been shown to exhibit the pro-inflammatory and pro-carcinogenic properties, which could consequently have an impact on colorectal carcinogenesis. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the potential links between the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer, with a focus on the pro-carcinogenic properties of bacterial microbiota such as induction of inflammation, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation and the production of toxic metabolites. Finally, we will describe the potential therapeutic strategies based on intestinal microbiota manipulation for colorectal cancer treatment.

  7. Intrabilary obstruction by colorectal metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Traeger, Luke; Kiroff, George

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Intrabiliary colorectal metastases are rare. We present a case of an 84-year-old man who developed obstructive jaundice secondary to intrabiliary growth of colorectal metastases. The patient presented with three weeks of jaundice and significant weight loss in the preceding months. The patient’s background included metastatic colorectal carcinoma, with a previous right hemicolectomy and left hepatectomy for liver metastases. A MRCP showed an obstruction of the biliary tract transitio...

  8. Overexpression of SAMD9 suppresses tumorigenesis and progression during non small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qing; Yu, Tao; Ren, Yao-Yao; Gong, Ting; Zhong, Dian-Sheng, E-mail: zhongdsyx@126.com

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • Knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro. • Overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells in vitro. • Depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. - Abstract: The Sterile Alpha Motif Domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) gene has been recently emphasized during the discovery that it is expressed at a lower level in aggressive fibromatosis and some cases of breast and colon cancer, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found that SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro and overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells. Finally, depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking NSCLC tumorigenesis and progression.

  9. K-Ras and β-catenin mutations cooperate with Fgfr3 mutations in mice to promote tumorigenesis in the skin and lung, but not in the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ahmad

    2011-07-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is frequently mutated in superficial urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC. To test the functional significance of FGFR3 activating mutations as a ‘driver’ of UCC, we targeted the expression of mutated Fgfr3 to the murine urothelium using Cre-loxP recombination driven by the uroplakin II promoter. The introduction of the Fgfr3 mutations resulted in no obvious effect on tumorigenesis up to 18 months of age. Furthermore, even when the Fgfr3 mutations were introduced together with K-Ras or β-catenin (Ctnnb1 activating mutations, no urothelial dysplasia or UCC was observed. Interestingly, however, owing to a sporadic ectopic Cre recombinase expression in the skin and lung of these mice, Fgfr3 mutation caused papilloma and promoted lung tumorigenesis in cooperation with K-Ras and β-catenin activation, respectively. These results indicate that activation of FGFR3 can cooperate with other mutations to drive tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner, and support the hypothesis that activation of FGFR3 signaling contributes to human cancer.

  10. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  11. Endoscopic management of colorectal adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel; Fischer, Andreas; Schmidt, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal adenomas are well known precursors of invasive adenocarcinoma. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for adenoma detection. Colonoscopy is far more than a diagnostic tool, as it allows effective treatment of colorectal adenomas. Endoscopic resection of colorectal adenomas has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer. Difficult resection techniques are available, such as endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection and endoscopic full-thickness resection. This review aims to provide an overview of the different endoscopic resection techniques and their indications, and summarizes the current recommendations in the recently published guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

  12. 64Cu-ATSM Reflects pO2 Levels in Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts but Not in Colorectal Cancer Xenografts: Comparison with 64CuCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper T; Forman, Julie; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The hypoxia PET tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazonate) ((64)Cu-ATSM) has shown promising results in clinical studies. However, concerns have been raised with regard to the possible effect of copper metabolism and free copper on tumor uptake and thereby the robustness of (64)Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia marker. In this study, accumulation and distribution of (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 in tumor tissue were compared with partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) probe measurements. One-hour dynamic PET scans were performed on nude mice bearing subcutaneous human head and neck tumors (FaDu) and human colorectal tumors (HT29) after administration of either (64)Cu-ATSM or (64)CuCl2. Subsequently, tracks were generated and track markers were positioned in tumors to allow for registration of their exact location on the high-resolution CT scan. After completion of the CT scan, pO2 probe measurements were performed along each track. PET and CT images were coregistered and ROIs drawn on the basis of the location of track markers and pO2 probe measurement depth. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was applied for the comparison of PET tracer uptake to corresponding pO2 values. Comparable uptake of (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 was found in the kidney, muscle, and liver of all animals, but (64)CuCl2 showed a higher uptake 10-60 min after injection in both tumor models. Significant differences were also found for both tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-liver ratios. The intratumoral distribution of (64)Cu-ATSM, but not (64)CuCl2, showed a significant negative relationship with pO2 measurements in FaDu tumors. However, this relationship was not found in HT29 tumors. (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 displayed different uptake in tumors. In human head and neck xenografts, (64)Cu-ATSM but not (64)CuCl2 reflected pO2 measurements, indicating that (64)Cu-ATSM is a hypoxia-specific marker in this tumor type. However, data from colorectal cancer xenografts indicated that (64)Cu-ATSM may not be

  13. The Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3' -OH Kinase Signaling in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchinson, John

    2002-01-01

    ...) and its downstream target Akt kinase in the induction of mammary tumors. To assess the role of Akt in mammary development and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice that express an activated Akt (Akt-DD...

  14. The Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3' -OH Kinase Signaling in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchinson, John

    2001-01-01

    ...) and its downstream targets such as the Akt kinase in the induction of mammary tumors. To assess the role of Akt in mammary development and tumorigenesis, we have generated transgenic mice that express an activated Akt (Akt-DD...

  15. Potential Therapeutic Uses of p19ARF Mimics in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hann, Stephen R

    2005-01-01

    Since many breast tumors have deregulated c-Myc we hypothesize that an ARF mimic would be a valuable therapeutic agent for breast cancer to inhibit c-Myc-induced transformation/tumorigenesis without...

  16. MicroRNA-1291 targets the FOXA2-AGR2 pathway to suppress pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing-Xin; Kim, Edward J.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology may help identify new oncotargets towards more effective therapies. This study investigated the mechanistic actions of microRNA-1291 (miR-1291) in the suppression of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our data showed that miR-1291 was downregulated in a set of clinical pancreatic carcinoma specimens and human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Restoration of miR-1291 expression inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, which was associated with cell cycle arrest and enhanced apoptosis. Furthermore, miR-1291 sharply suppressed the tumorigenicity of PANC-1 cells in mouse models. A proteomic profiling study revealed 32 proteins altered over 2-fold in miR-1291-expressing PANC-1 cells that could be assembled into multiple critical pathways for cancer. Among them anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) was reduced to the greatest degree. Through computational and experimental studies we further identified that forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2), a transcription factor governing AGR2 expression, was a direct target of miR-1291. These results connect miR-1291 to the FOXA2-AGR2 regulatory pathway in the suppression of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, providing new insight into the development of miRNA-based therapy to combat pancreatic cancer. PMID:27322206

  17. Apoptosis-promoted tumorigenesis: γ-irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis requires Puma-driven leukocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Ewa M.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Delbridge, Alex R.D.; Wu, Li; Scott, Clare L.; Adams, Jerry M.; Strasser, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Although tumor development requires impaired apoptosis, we describe a novel paradigm of apoptosis-dependent tumorigenesis. Because DNA damage triggers apoptosis through p53-mediated induction of BH3-only proteins Puma and Noxa, we explored their roles in γ-radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. Surprisingly, whereas Noxa loss accelerated it, Puma loss ablated tumorigenesis. Tumor suppression by Puma deficiency reflected its protection of leukocytes from γ-irradiation-induced death, because...

  18. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Enrique; Saito, Yutaka; Hassan, Cessare; Senore, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should wo...

  19. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  20. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualtrough, David, E-mail: david.qualtrough@uwe.ac.uk [Department of Biological, Biomedical & Analytical Sciences, University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos [School of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-17

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  1. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Qualtrough

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer

  3. Exploring the gain of function contribution of AKT to mammary tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Blanco-Aparicio

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of AKT has been noted in a significant percentage of primary human breast cancers, mainly as a consequence of the PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation. To investigate the mechanistic basis of the AKT gain of function-dependent mechanisms of breast tumorigenesis, we explored the phenotype induced by activated AKT transgenes in a quantitative manner. We generated several transgenic mice lines expressing different levels of constitutively active AKT in the mammary gland. We thoroughly analyzed the preneoplastic and neoplastic mammary lesions of these mice and correlated the process of tumorigenesis to AKT levels. Finally, we analyzed the impact that a possible senescent checkpoint might have in the tumor promotion inhibition observed, crossing these lines to mammary specific p53(R172H mutant expression, and to p27 knock-out mice. We analyzed the benign, premalignant and malignant lesions extensively by pathology and at molecular level analysing the expression of proteins involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and in cellular senescence. Our findings revealed an increased preneoplastic phenotype depending upon AKT signaling which was not altered by p27 or p53 loss. However, p53 inactivation by R172H point mutation combined with myrAKT transgenic expression significantly increased the percentage and size of mammary carcinoma observed, but was not sufficient to promote full penetrance of the tumorigenic phenotype. Molecular analysis suggest that tumors from double myrAKT;p53(R172H mice result from acceleration of initiated p53(R172H tumors and not from bypass of AKT-induced oncogenic senescence. Our work suggests that tumors are not the consequence of the bypass of senescence in MIN. We also show that AKT-induced oncogenic senescence is dependent of pRb but not of p53. Finally, our work also suggests that the cooperation observed between mutant p53 and activated AKT is due to AKT-induced acceleration of mutant p53-induced tumors. Finally, our

  4. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  5. Cripto-1 overexpression is involved in the tumorigenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhengrong; Li, Gang; Wu, Lirong; Weng, Desheng; Li, Xiangping; Yao, Kaitai

    2009-01-01

    Human Cripto-1, a member of the EGF-CFC family, is indispensable for early embryonic development. Cripto-1 plays an important oncogenic role during tumorigenesis and is overexpressed in a wide range of epithelial carcinomas, yet little is known about Cripto-1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of this study was to analyze the roles of Cripto-1 in the progression and clinical characteristics in NPC clinical samples and cell lines. The expression of Cripto-1 at mRNA level was detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR, and western blot was used to examine the protein expression. Cripto-1 expression and its clinical characteristics were investigated by performing immunohistochemical analysis on a total of 37 NPC clinical tissue samples. Lentiviral vectors were constructed to get an efficient expression of anti-Cripto-1 siRNA in CNE-2 and C666-1 cells, with invalid RNAi sequence as control. After the inhibition of the endogenous Cripto-1, the growth, cell cycle and invasion of cells were detected by MTT, FACS and Boyden chamber assay respectively. Moreover, in vivo, the proliferation of the tumor cells was evaluated in xenotransplant nude mice model with whole-body visualizing instrument. The results of real-time RT-PCR and western blot showed that the expression level of Cripto-1 was markedly higher in NPC cell lines than that in the immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell at both mRNA and protein levels. RT-PCR of 17 NPC tissues showed a high expression rate in 76.5% (13/17) cases. In an immunohistochemical study, Cripto-1 was found to express in 54.1% (20/37) cases of NPC. In addition, Cripto-1 overexpression was significantly associated with N classification (p = 0.034), distant metastasis (p = 0.036), and clinical stage (p = 0.007). Inhibition of endogenous Cripto-1 by lentivirus-mediated RNAi silencing technique suppressed NPC cell growth and invasion in vitro. In vivo, the average weight (p = 0

  6. The dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leersum, N.J. van; Snijders, H.S.; Henneman, D.; Kolfschoten, N.E.; Gooiker, G.A.; Berge, M.G. Ten; Eddes, E.H.; Wouters, M.W.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Bemelman, W.A.; Dam, R.M. van; Elferink, M.A.; Karsten, T.M.; Krieken, J.H. van; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Manusama, E.R.; Velde, C.J. van de; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Harst, E. van der; Dekker, J.W.T.; Boerma, D.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated

  7. Colorectal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer often begins as a growth called a polyp inside the colon or rectum. Finding and removing polyps can prevent colorectal cancer. Start here to find information on colon and rectal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  8. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leersum, N. J.; Snijders, H. S.; Henneman, D.; Kolfschoten, N. E.; Gooiker, G. A.; ten Berge, M. G.; Eddes, E. H.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Elferink, M. A.; Karsten, Th M.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Manusama, E. R.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E.; Dekker, J. W. T.; Boerma, D.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch

  9. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation

  10. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  11. Constitutively active transforming growth factor β receptor 1 in the mouse ovary promotes tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Vincent, David F.; Davis, Anna Jane; Sansom, Owen J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established tumor suppressive role of TGFβ proteins, depletion of key TGFβ signaling components in the mouse ovary does not induce a growth advantage. To define the role of TGFβ signaling in ovarian tumorigenesis, we created a mouse model expressing a constitutively active TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFBR1) in ovarian somatic cells using conditional gain-of-function approach. Remarkably, these mice developed ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with complete penetrance, leading to reproductive failure and mortality. The tumors expressed multiple granulosa cell markers and caused elevated serum inhibin and estradiol levels, reminiscent of granulosa cell tumors. Consistent with the tumorigenic effect, overactivation of TGFBR1 altered tumor microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis and enhanced ovarian cell proliferation, accompanied by impaired cell differentiation and dysregulated expression of critical genes in ovarian function. By further exploiting complementary genetic models, we substantiated our finding that constitutively active TGFBR1 is a potent oncogenic switch in mouse granulosa cells. In summary, overactivation of TGFBR1 drives gonadal tumor development. The TGFBR1 constitutively active mouse model phenocopies a number of morphological, hormonal, and molecular features of human granulosa cell tumors and are potentially valuable for preclinical testing of targeted therapies to treat granulosa cell tumors, a class of poorly defined ovarian malignancies. PMID:27344183

  12. Radon-induced cancer: a cell-based model of tumorigenesis due to protracted exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    In 1982, results with C3H mouse embryo cells showed that the frequency of neoplastic transformation was enhanced when exposures to fission-spectrum neutrons were protracted in time. This finding was unexpected because the opposite was found with low-LET radiations. Similar neutron enhancements were reported with normal life-span Syrian hamster embryo cells, and with human hybrid cells. Because other studies did not confirm the preceding, in 1990 - at a conference convened by the US Armed