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Sample records for human colorectal tumor

  1. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  2. DNA end binding activity and Ku70/80 heterodimer expression in human colorectal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Mazzarelli; Carolina Gravina; Marco Caricato; Maria Luana Poeta; Monica Rinaldi; Sergio Valeri; Roberto Coppola; Vito Michele Fazio; Paola Parrella; Davide Seripa; Emanuela Signori; Giuseppe Perrone; Carla Rabitti; Domenico Borzomati; Armando Gabbrielli; Maria Giovanna Matera

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the DNA binding activity and protein levels of the Ku70/80 heterodimer, the functional mediator of the NHEJ activity, in human colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: The Ku70/80 DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays in 20 colon adenoma and 15 colorectal cancer samples as well as matched normal colonic tissues. Nuclear and cytoplasmic protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis.RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was found in both adenomas and carcinomas as compared to matched normal colonic mucosa (P<0.00). However,changes in binding activity were not homogenous with approximately 50% of the tumors showing a clear increase in the binding activity, 30% displaying a modest increase and 15% showing a decrease of the activity.Tumors, with increased DNA-binding activity, also showed a statistically significant increase in Ku70 and Ku86nuclear expression, as determined by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses (P<0.001). Cytoplasmic protein expression was found in pathological samples,but not in normal tissues either from tumor patients or from healthy subjects.CONCLUSION: Overall, our DNA-binding activity and protein level are consistent with a substantial activation of the NHEJ pathway in colorectal tumors. Since the NHEJ is an error prone mechanism, its abnormal activation can result in chromosomal instability and ultimately lead to tumorigenesis.

  3. Codon 201 Mutation of DCC Gene and Tumor Biologic Behavior in Human Colorectal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between a point mutation of codon 201 in deleted in colorectal carcinoma ( DCC) gene and the biological behavior of colorectal carcinoma. Methods Tumor tissues and matched adjacent normal colon mucosa collected in 35 patients during surgical resection for colorectal carcinoma were analyzed. Forty normal colon mucosa tissues obtained by biopsy from patients who had neither colorectal tumor nor a family history of colorectal cancer during colonscop ic examination were used as control. Codon 201 mutatian was detected with allele-specific PCR and a restriction enzyme digestion method. The tumors were reviewed as clinical data, tumor location, histology,metastasis, and pathological staging (Dukes classification). Results The frequency of mutation at codon 201 in tumor tissue and corresponding adjacent normal mucosa was 71.4 % and 60 %, respectively, and either of the rates was significantly higher than that of normal control(32.5 % ). The point mutation rate in tumor tissues did not differ from that in the corresponding normal adjacent tissues. Statistic analysis showed that the mutation rate had no relationship to the sex, age of the patients, the histological pattern , differentiation, and invasion depth of the tumors. However, 93. 8 % of the mutation rate in colorectal cancer with lymph node invasion and/or distant metastasis is significantly higher than 52. 6 % of mutant rate in colorectal cancer uithout lymph nodes invasion or metastasis ( P <0. 05). Conclusion The point mutation at codon 201 of DCC gene is an early genetic event in colorectal cancer, and play some role in invasion and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. It may serve as a useful genetic marker for identifying higher risk patients with colorectal carcinoma.

  4. Codon 201 Mutation of DCC Gene and Tumor Biologic Behavior in Human Colorectal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between a point mutation of codon 201 in deleted in colorectal carcinoma ( DCC) gene and the biological behavior of colorectal carcinoma. Methods Tumor tissues and matched adjacent normal colon mucosa collected in 35 patients during surgical resection for colorectal carcinoma were analyzed. Forty normal colon mucosa tissues obtained by biopsy from patients who had neither colorectal tumor nor a family history of colorectal cancer during colonscop ic examination were used as control. Codon 201 mutatian was detected with allele-specific PCR and a restriction enzyme digestion method. The tumors were reviewed as clinical data, tumor location, histology,metastasis, and pathological staging (Dukes classification). Results The frequency of mutation at codon 201 in tumor tissue and corresponding adjacent normal mucosa was 71.4 % and 60 %, respectively, and either of the rates was significantly higher than that of normal control(32.5 % ). The point mutation rate in tumor tissues did not differ from that in the corresponding normal adjacent tissues. Statistic analysis showed that the mutation rate had no relationship to the sex, age of the patients, the histological pattern , differentiation, and invasion depth of the tumors. However, 93. 8 % of the mutation rate in colorectal cancer with lymph node invasion and/or distant metastasis is significantly higher than 52. 6 % of mutant rate in colorectal cancer uithout lymph nodes invasion or metastasis ( P <0. 05). Conclusion The point mutation at codon 201 of DCC gene is an early genetic event in colorectal cancer, and play some role in invasion and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. It may serve as a useful genetic marker for identifying higher risk patients with colorectal carcinoma.

  5. Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human tumors: relationship to breast, colorectal, and prostate tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zeqiu; Slack, Rebecca S; Li, Wenping; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-01-01

    High levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), the alternative-binding site for diazepam, are part of the aggressive human breast cancer cell phenotype in vitro. We examined PBR levels and distribution in normal tissue and tumors from multiple cancer types by immunohistochemistry. Among normal breast tissues, fibroadenomas, primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas, there is a progressive increase in PBR levels parallel to the invasive and metastatic ability of the tumor (p cancers, such as those of breast, colon-rectum and prostate tissues, where elevated PBR expression is associated with tumor progression. Thus, we propose that PBR overexpression could serve as a novel prognostic indicator of an aggressive phenotype in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to human colorectal tumor-associated antigens: improved elicitation and subclass restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A C; Woodhouse, C S; Knost, J A; Abrams, P G; Clarke, G C; Arthur, L O; McIntyre, R; Ochs, J J; Foon, K A; Oldham, R K

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) of human colorectal cancer were elicited using immunosorbents of lectins combined with peripheral protein extracts of xenografted colon adenocarcinoma. This method of immunization was compared with whole cells from surgical specimens and to crude membranes from xenografted tumors. The immunosorbent immunogens were superior to the other immunogens in three ways: (1) the number of hybrids reactive with colon tumor cells or extracts, but not with lymphoid cells or extracts, (2) the number of stable hybrids after cloning, and (3) the number of hybridoma clones reactive with tissue sections of colon tumors, but not normal colonic mucosa. In addition, lectin immunosorbents elicited primarily IgG antibodies, especially IgG3, with almost 50% of the clones of interest reacting to seemingly less immunogenic glycoproteins. The improved elicitation of monoclonal antibodies to TAA by the use of lectin immunosorbents and peripheral protein extracts has considerable potential for generating reagents useful in diagnosis and therapy of human tumors.

  7. Functional EpoR pathway utilization is not detected in primary tumor cells isolated from human breast, non-small cell lung, colorectal, and ovarian tumor tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Patterson

    Full Text Available Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1 were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues.

  8. [Intraoperative staging of colorectal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Iu B; Mel'nikov, O R; Egorenkov, V V; Moiseenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of intraoperative staging of tumor by sentinel node staining with lymphotropic dyes was evaluated in 60 patients with colorectal tumors (colon carcinoma -39, rectal cancer- 21). High sensitivity (84.6% and 87.5%, respectively) and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) for regional lymph node assessment were identified for both colonic and rectal cancer.

  9. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

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    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  10. Sub-lethal irradiation of human colorectal tumor cells imparts enhanced and sustained susceptibility to multiple death receptor signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ifeadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death receptors (DR of the TNF family function as anti-tumor immune effector molecules. Tumor cells, however, often exhibit DR-signaling resistance. Previous studies indicate that radiation can modify gene expression within tumor cells and increase tumor cell sensitivity to immune attack. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of sub-lethal doses of ionizing radiation in sensitizing colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ability of radiation to modulate the expression of multiple death receptors (Fas/CD95, TRAILR1/DR4, TRAILR2/DR5, TNF-R1 and LTβR was examined in colorectal tumor cells. The functional significance of sub-lethal doses of radiation in enhancing tumor cell susceptibility to DR-induced apoptosis was determined by in vitro functional sensitivity assays. The longevity of these changes and the underlying molecular mechanism of irradiation in sensitizing diverse colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis were also examined. We found that radiation increased surface expression of Fas, DR4 and DR5 but not LTβR or TNF-R1 in these cells. Increased expression of DRs was observed 2 days post-irradiation and remained elevated 7-days post irradiation. Sub-lethal tumor cell irradiation alone exhibited minimal cell death, but effectively sensitized three of three colorectal carcinoma cells to both TRAIL and Fas-induced apoptosis, but not LTβR-induced death. Furthermore, radiation-enhanced Fas and TRAIL-induced cell death lasted as long as 5-days post-irradiation. Specific analysis of intracellular sensitizers to apoptosis indicated that while radiation did reduce Bcl-X(L and c-FLIP protein expression, this reduction did not correlate with the radiation-enhanced sensitivity to Fas and/or TRAIL mediated apoptosis among the three cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Irradiation of tumor cells can overcome Fas and TRAIL

  11. Early insights into the function of KIAA1199, a markedly overexpressed protein in human colorectal tumors.

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    Amit Tiwari

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the expression of KIAA1199 in human colorectal tumors (benign and malignant is markedly higher than that in the normal colonic mucosa. In this study, we investigated the functions of the protein encoded by this gene, which are thus far unknown. Immunostaining studies were used to reveal its subcellular localization, and proteomic and gene expression experiments were conducted to identify proteins that might interact with KIAA1199 and molecular pathways in which it might play roles. Using colon cancer cell lines, we showed that both endogenous and ectopically expressed KIAA1199 is secreted into the extracellular environment. In the cells, it was found mainly in the perinuclear space (probably the ER and cell membrane. Both cellular compartments were also over-represented in lists of proteins identified by mass spectrometry as putative KIAA1199 interactors and/or proteins encoded by genes whose transcription was significantly changed by KIAA1199 expression. These proteomic and transcriptomic datasets concordantly link KIAA1199 to several genes/proteins and molecular pathways, including ER processes like protein binding, transport, and folding; and Ca(2+, G-protein, ephrin, and Wnt signaling. Immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed KIAA1199's interaction with the cell-membrane receptor ephrin A2 and with the ER receptor ITPR3, a key player in Ca(2+ signaling. By modulating Ca(2+ signaling, KIAA1199 could affect different branches of the Wnt network. Our findings suggest it may negatively regulate the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling, and its expression is associated with decreased cell proliferation and invasiveness.

  12. Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.

  13. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, D C T; Ho, Y M; Rudduck, C; Chin, K; Kuo, W-L; Lie, D K H; Chua, C L M; Tan, P H; Eu, K W; Seow-Choen, F; Wong, C Y; Hong, G S; Gray, J W; Lee, A S G

    2009-11-26

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, using both loss of heterozygosity analysis and customized microarray comparative genomic hybridization. LARG (leukemia-associated Rho guanine-nucleotide exchange factor) (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analysed region, is frequently underexpressed in breast and colorectal carcinomas with a reduced expression observed in all breast cancer cell lines (n=11), in 12 of 38 (32%) primary breast cancers, 5 of 10 (50%) colorectal cell lines and in 20 of 37 (54%) primary colorectal cancers. Underexpression of the LARG transcript was significantly associated with genomic loss (P=0.00334). Hypermethylation of the LARG promoter was not detected in either breast or colorectal cancer, and treatment of four breast and four colorectal cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or trichostatin A did not result in a reactivation of LARG. Enforced expression of LARG in breast and colorectal cancer cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced cell proliferation and colony formation, as well as in a markedly slower cell migration rate in colorectal cancer cells, providing functional evidence for LARG as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  14. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  15. Differentiated human colorectal cancer cells protect tumor-initiating cells from irinotecan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.; Houdt, W.J.; Vries, R.G.J.; Hoogwater, F.J.; Govaert, K.M.; Verheem, A.; Nijkamp, M.W.; Steller, E.J.; Jimenez, C.R.; Clevers, H.; Rinkes, I.H.; Kranenburg, O.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Stem cells of normal tissues have resistance mechanisms that allow them to survive genotoxic insults. The stem cell-like cells of tumors are defined by their tumor-initiating capacity and may have retained these resistance mechanisms, making them resistant to chemotherapy. We stud

  16. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

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    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  17. Genomic changes defining the progression of human colorectal and cervical tumors

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Defining changes during the carcinogenesis and progression of tumors is a major way to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of cancer development. We therefore investigated the cacinogenesis process in the colon-rectum and in the uterine cervix by different cellchemical, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic methods. Cell proliferation, assessed by immunohistochemical detection of the Ki-67 antigen (MIB 1 antibody), DNA ploify, determined by image cytometry, e...

  18. Osteopontin Overexpression Induced Tumor Progression and Chemoresistance to Oxaliplatin through Induction of Stem-Like Properties in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common and fatal malignancies worldwide. The poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients is due to development of chemoresistance and cancer metastasis. Recently osteopontin (OPN has been associated with stem-like properties in colorectal cancer. This study further examined the clinicopathological significance of OPN in CRC and its effect on chemoresistance and transcription of stem cell markers. We examined the transcription level of OPN in 84 CRC patients and correlated the expression with their clinicopathological parameters. The associations of OPN overexpression with transcription of stem cell markers and response to chemotherapy in DLD1-OPN overexpressing clones and CRC patients were also investigated. Our results showed that OPN was significantly overexpressed in CRC, and its overexpression correlated with tumor stage and poor prognosis. Overexpression of CRC induced OCT4 and SOX2 expression in vitro and correlated with SOX2 overexpression in CRC patients. In addition, DLD1-OPN overexpressing cells showed enhanced ability to survive upon oxaliplatin treatment, and OPN expression was higher in CRC patients who were resistant to oxaliplatin-involved chemotherapy treatment. Thus, CRC cells overexpressing OPN demonstrated stem-like properties and OPN inhibition is a potential therapeutic approach to combat CRC progression and chemoresistance.

  19. Tumor-derived CXCL5 promotes human colorectal cancer metastasis through activation of the ERK/Elk-1/Snail and AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingkun; Ou, Baochi; Han, Dingpei; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Zong, Yaping; Zhu, Congcong; Liu, Di; Zheng, Minhua; Sun, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lu, Aiguo

    2017-03-29

    Metastasis is a major cause of death in human colorectal cancer patients. However, the contribution of chemokines in the tumor microenvironment to tumor metastasis is not fully understood. Herein, we examinined several chemokines in colorectal cancer patients using chemokine ELISA array. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression of CXCL5 in colorectal cancer patients tissues. Human HCT116 and SW480 cell lines stably transfected with CXCL5, shCXCL5 and shCXCR2 lentivirus plasmids were used in our in vitro study. Immunoblot, immunofluorescence and transwell assay were used to examine the molecular biology and morphological changes in these cells. In addition, we used nude mice to detect the influence of CXCL5 on tumor metastasis in vivo. We found that CXCL5 was overexpressed in tumor tissues and associated with advanced tumor stage as well as poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. We also demonstrated that CXCL5 was primarily expressed in the tumor cell cytoplasm and cell membranes, which may indicate that the CXCL5 was predominantly produced by cancer epithelial cells instead of fibroblasts in the tumor mesenchyme. Additionally, overexpression of CXCL5 enhanced the migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells by inducing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through activation of the ERK/Elk-1/Snail pathway and the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway in a CXCR2-dependent manner. The silencing of Snail and β-catenin attenuated CXCL5/CXCR2-enhanced cell migration and invasion in vitro. The elevated expression of CXCL5 can also potentiate the metastasis of colorectal cancer cells to the liver in vivo in nude mice intrasplenic injection model. In conclusion, our findings support CXCL5 as a promoter of colorectal cancer metastasis and a predictor of poor clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients.

  20. Adiponectin deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis and liver tumor formation induced by azoxymethane in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamao Nishihara; Shinji Tamura; Norio Hayashi; Hiroyasu Iishi; Iichiro Shimornura; Miyako Baba; Morihiro Matsuda; Masahiro Inoue; Yasuko Nishizawa; Atsunori Fukuhara; Hiroshi Arald; Shinji Kihara; Tohru Funahashi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causal relationship between hypoadiponectinemia and colorectal carcinogenesis in in vivo experimental model, and to determine the con-tribution of adiponectin deficiency to colorectal cancer development and proliferation. METHODS: We examined the influence of adiponectin deficiency on colorectal carcinogenesis induced by the administration of azoxymethane (AOM) (7.5 mg/kg, in-traperitoneal injection once a week for 8 wk), by using adiponectin-knockout (KO) mice. RESULTS: At 53 wk after the first AOM treatment, KOmice developed larger and histologically more progres-sive colorectal tumors with greater frequency com-pared with wild-type (WT) mice, although the tumor incidence was not different between WT and KO mice. KO mice showed increased cell proliferation of colorec-tal tumor cells, which correlated with the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the colorectal tumors. In addition, KO mice showed higher incidence and frequency of liver tumors after AOI treatment. Thirteen percent of WT mice developed liver tumors, and these WT mice had only a single tumor. In contrast, 50% of K.O mice developed liver tumors, and 58% of these KO mice had multiple tumors. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis and liver tumor formation induced by AOM in mice. This study strongly suggests that hypoadiponectinemia could be involved in the pathogenesis for colorectal cancer and liver tumor in human subjects.

  1. Pathologic research update of colorectal neuroendocrine tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate from neuroendocrine cells in the intestinal tract, and represent a small area within oncology, but one which has provided increasing new data during the past years. Although the World Health Organization has determined clinical and histological features to predict prognosis for such tumors, they may not be valid on an individual basis. We aim to give an overview of the recent findings with regard to pathology, molecular genetics and diagnosis of NETs.

  2. Frequent alteration of the tumor suppressor gene APC in sporadic canine colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, Lydia; Taylor, Cynthia; Shin, Edwin; Harrell, Adrienne; Ellis, Angela E; Séguin, Bernard; Ji, Xinglai; Zhao, Shaying

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic canine colorectal cancers (CRCs) should make excellent models for studying the corresponding human cancers. To molecularly characterize canine CRC, we investigated exonic sequence mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), the best known tumor suppressor gene of human CRC, in 23 sporadic canine colorectal tumors, including 8 adenomas and 15 adenocarcinomas, via exon-resequencing analysis. As a comparison, we also performed the same sequencing analysis on 10 other genes, either located at human 5q22 (the same locus as APC) or 18q21 (also frequently altered in human CRC), or known to play a role in human carcinogenesis. We noted that APC was the most significantly mutated gene in both canine adenomas and adenocarcinomas among the 11 genes examined. Significantly, we detected large deletions of ≥ 10 bases, many clustered near the mutation cluster region, as well as single or two base deletions in ~70% canine tumors of both subtypes. These observations indicate that like in the human, APC is also frequently altered in sporadic colorectal tumors in the dog and its alteration is an early event in canine colorectal tumorigenesis. Our study provides further evidence demonstrating the molecular similarity in pathogenesis between sporadic human and canine CRCs. This work, along with our previous copy number abnormality study, supports that sporadic canine CRCs are valid models of human CRCs at the molecular level.

  3. Suppression of colorectal tumor growth by regulated survivin targeting.

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    Li, Binghua; Fan, Junkai; Liu, Xinran; Qi, Rong; Bo, Linan; Gu, Jinfa; Qian, Cheng; Liu, Xinyuan

    2006-12-01

    A major goal in cancer gene therapy is to develop efficient gene transfer protocols that allow tissue-specific and tightly regulated expression of therapeutic genes. The ideal vector should efficiently transduce cancer cells with minimal toxicity on normal tissues and persistently express foreign genes. One of the most promising regulatory systems is the mifepristone/RU486-regulated system, which has much lower basal transcriptional activity and high inducibility. In this work, we modified this system by incorporating a cancer-specific promoter, the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. By utilizing hTERT promoter to control the regulator, RU486 could specifically induce the expression of foreign genes in cancer cells but not in normal cells. In the context of this system, a dominant negative mutant of survivin (surDN) was controllably expressed in colorectal tumor cells. The surDN expression induced by RU486 showed a dosage- and time-dependent pattern. Regulated expression of surDN caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells but had little effect on normal cells. Analysis of cell viability showed that RU486-induced expression of surDN suppressed colorectal tumor cell growth and had synergic effect in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. The potential of this system in cancer therapy was evaluated in experimental animals. Tumor xenograft models were established in nude mice with colorectal tumor cells, and RU486 was intraperitoneally administered. The results showed that conditional expression of surDN efficiently inhibited tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the life of tumor-burdened mice. Synergized with the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, regulated surDN expression completely suppressed tumor growth. These results indicated that this modified RU486-regulated system could be useful in cancer-targeting therapy.

  4. ABCB5 identifies a therapy-refractory tumor cell population in colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Gasser, Martin; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R.; Schanche, Robin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gold, Jason S.; Huang, Qin; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.; Frank, Natasha Y.

    2012-01-01

    Identification and reversal of treatment resistance mechanisms of clinically refractory tumor cells is critical for successful cancer therapy. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients following fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy and provide evidence for a functional role of ABCB5 in colorectal cancer 5-FU resistance. Examination of human colon and colorectal cancer specimens revealed ABCB5 to be expressed only on rare cells within healthy intestinal tissue, whereas clinical colorectal cancers exhibited substantially increased levels of ABCB5 expression. Analysis of successive, patient-matched biopsy specimens obtained prior to and following neoadjuvant 5-FU-based chemoradiation therapy in a series of colorectal cancer patients revealed markedly enhanced abundance of ABCB5-positive tumor cells when residual disease was detected. Consistent with this finding, the ABCB5-expressing tumor cell population was also treatment-refractory and exhibited resistance to 5-FU-induced apoptosis in a colorectal cancer xenograft model of 5-FU monotherapy. Mechanistically, shRNA-mediated ABCB5 knockdown significantly inhibited tumorigenic xenograft growth and sensitized colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU-induced cell killing. Our results identify ABCB5 as a novel molecular marker of therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients and point to a need for consistent eradication of ABCB5-positive resistant tumor cell populations for more effective colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:21652540

  5. The study on specific umbilical blood Dc vaccine for Beige nude mice loaded human colorectal carcinoma to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z-X; Han, J-S; Liu, F; Zhao, Z-L; Li, D-B; Shi, L; Dong, J-T; Zhou, Y; Cai, J-H

    2017-05-01

    This study is to observe the immunosuppression of CD137L transfected umbilical blood Dcs (Dendritic cell) vaccine to tumor development of SCID/ Beige nude mice. Samples of umbilical blood in the childbirth pregnant women were collected by density gradient centrifugation. Umbilical cord blood dendritic cells (Dcs) were transfected by specific CD137L via LipofectamineTM method and cells were harvested. Meanwhile, the peripheral blood of volunteers was collected to isolate Dcs, the Dcs were cultured for 5 days and hatched with SW-1116 cells antigen. The mature Dcs were harvested. The male SCID/Beige nude mice were subcutaneously injected with human SW-1116 cells in axillary to build colorectal carcinoma model as blank control (Blank). The naked peripheral blood Dc vaccine group (cPBMCs), the SW-1116 antigen-specific peripheral blood Dc vaccine group (pDcs) and the CD137L specific umbilical blood Dc vaccine group (tuDcs) were injected 24 h before tumor cells injection, respectively to recur the humanized immune reconstruction. The general life, living habits changes, tumor growing time and tumor size were observed. The nude mice were sacrificed 18 days after tumor formation. The tumor size, mice weight, in vitro tumor weight, liver weight and spleen weight of mice were recorded to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of the specific immune cells. The nude mice in pDcs group showed better general living condition, slower tumor growth, smaller tumor volume and no ulceration, necrosis, and death in nude mice. The tumor formation time in different groups was 4.71 ± 0.18 ds (blank), 7.71 ± 0.29 ds (cPBMCs), 7.86 ± 0.26 ds (pDcs) and 8.14 ± 0.69 ds (tuDcs) respectively. There were significant differences between blank and other three groups (F = 40.96, p human colon cancer in nude mice via increasing the number of immune effector cell in tumor microenvironment.

  6. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  7. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestl, Erin E., E-mail: egestl@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Anne Boettger, S., E-mail: aboettger@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  8. Expression of Obesity Hormone Leptin in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-chun Cong; Xian-wei Dai; Ming-yang Shen; Jun-jiang Wang; Chun-sheng Chen; Hong Zhang; Lei Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The obesity hormone, leptin, has been found to participate in the development and proliferation of normal and malignant tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in human colorectal cancer.Methods: Serum leptin levels were measured via ABC-ELLSA in 30 colorectal cancers and 24 normal controls. Leptin concentration in colorectal cancer was analyzed in terms of selected clinicopathological features and some oncogenes.Results: The mean concentration of leptin was significantly higher for colorectal cancers(3.54±1.46 ng/ml) than normal controls(2.27±0.99 ng/ml), no gender difference was observed in this study. Leptin expression in poorly differentiated tumors was obviously lower than those in moderately and well differentiated tumors. There were no statistically significant correlations between leptin and the serum CEA and CA199 in colorectal cancers (P>0.05), and between leptin and the expressions of K-RAS, P53, APC, DCC genes in tumor tissues (P>0.05).Conclusion: Leptin is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer, which is related to the differentiation degrees of the tumor. There is no correlation between leptin expression and chages of oncogenes in colorectal cancers.

  9. MicroRNA-185 is a novel tumor suppressor by negatively modulating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Dong-xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The deregulation of microRNA-185 (miR-185 has been showed to be associated with many cancers and act as a tumor suppressor in many types of human malignancies. We hence tried to find out its role in human colorectal cancer (CRC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: miR-185 expression was investigated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We carried out transfections to overexpress or knockdown of miR-185 by mimics or inhibitor, respectively. Functional study like cell counting kit-8 assay was performed to evaluate the proliferation. For addressing the impact of miR-185 on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, we further applied luciferase reporter assay and Western blotting for specific proteins in this pathway. RESULTS: miR-185 was decreased in CRC cell lines when compared with corresponding control cell line. We also proved that its overexpression in LoVo cells could remarkably suppress cell proliferation whereas knocked it down in SW480 cells has the opposite effect in vitro. Mechanically, we demonstrated that miR-185 could suppress the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and modulate the transcription and translation level of downstream molecules of this pathway, including MYC and CCND1. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these results suggested that miR-185 exerts its tumor suppressor activities probably through a negative modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  10. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R Marchesi

    Full Text Available Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC. To this purpose, the microbiomes colonizing colon tumor tissue and adjacent non-malignant mucosa were compared by deep rRNA sequencing. The results revealed striking differences in microbial colonization patterns between these two sites. Although inter-individual colonization in CRC patients was variable, tumors consistently formed a niche for Coriobacteria and other proposed probiotic bacterial species, while potentially pathogenic Enterobacteria were underrepresented in tumor tissue. As the intestinal microbiota is generally stable during adult life, these findings suggest that CRC-associated physiological and metabolic changes recruit tumor-foraging commensal-like bacteria. These microbes thus have an apparent competitive advantage in the tumor microenvironment and thereby seem to replace pathogenic bacteria that may be implicated in CRC etiology. This first glimpse of the CRC microbiome provides an important step towards full understanding of the dynamic interplay between intestinal microbial ecology and sporadic CRC, which may provide important leads towards novel microbiome-related diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions.

  11. MicroRNAs as Predictive and Prognostic Biomarkers inHuman Neoplasia: With Specific Focus on Colorectal Cancer, Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, and Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Mosakhani, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Recently, discovery of microRNA has provided new insights into cancer research, revealing the role of miRNAs in various biological processes, and evidence shows that their deregulation in many cancers has prognostic and predictive significance. Although specific miRNAs have been discovered in the malignancies studied in this thesis: colorectal cancer (CRC), giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), very little still is known about t...

  12. TUMOR-LOCALIZATION WITH I-131-LABELED HUMAN-IGM MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY 16.88 IN ADVANCED COLORECTAL-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOVEN, E; Haisma, Hidde; BRIL, H; MARTENS, HJM; VANLINGEN, A; DENHOLLANDER, W; KESSEL, MAP; DEJAGER, RL; ROOS, JC

    1991-01-01

    Human IgM monoclonal antibody 16.88 recognised an intracellular antigen strongly expressed in colorectal cancer tissue in 51% of our patients. Tumour localisation was carried out with 185 MBq I-131-16.88 (8 mg) in 20 of these patients with advanced disease. In 16 patients (80%) immunoscintigraphy wa

  13. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  14. Expression of 5-Lipoxygenase in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Labile Togba Soumaoro; Satoru Iida; Hiroyuki Uetake; Megumi Ishiguro; Yoko Takagi; Tetsuro Higuchi; Masamichi Yasuno; Masayuki Enomoto; Kenichi Sugihara

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-lipoxygenases (Loxs) expression level in human colorectal cancer specimens in order to determine its clinicopathologic significance in human tumorigenesis.METHODS: The relative quantity of 5-Lox mRNA in paired 91 colorectal tumor and adjacent normal mucosa samples was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Additionally, the expression of 5-Lox and cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 proteins was also examined using immunohistochemical staining methods.RESULTS: There was a marked increase in 5-Lox mRNA levels in the tumor compared with paired normal mucosa samples (P < 0.0001). Sixty six (72.5%) tumors showed high 5-Lox mRNA levels. The positivity rate of 5-Lox and Cox-2 protein expression was 68.7% and 79.1%respectively. There was a significant association between tumoral 5-Lox mRNA level and tumor size (Rho = 0.392,P = 0.0002), depth or vessel invasion.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that 5-Lox is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and that inhibition of its expression might be valuable in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  15. Increased Tumor Ascorbate is Associated with Extended Disease-Free Survival and Decreased Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Activation in Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Caroline; Dachs, Gabi U; Munn, Delwyn; Currie, Margaret J; Robinson, Bridget A; Pearson, John F; Vissers, Margreet C M

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a co-factor for the hydroxylases that regulate the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, which provides cancer cells with a metabolic and survival advantage in the hypoxic environment of solid tumors. However, whether ascorbate affects tumor development is a highly debated issue. We aimed to determine whether tumor ascorbate was associated with HIF-1 activation and patient disease-free survival. In this study, we undertook a retrospective observational analysis of tissue-banked tumor and paired normal tissue from 49 colorectal cancer patients, measuring ascorbate levels, HIF-1α and its downstream gene products BNIP3, and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). Patient survival was monitored for the first 6 years after surgery. We found that ascorbate levels were lower in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue (p ascorbate content and HIF-1 pathway activation (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.018). Higher tumor ascorbate content was associated with significantly improved disease-free survival in the first 6 years after surgery (p = 0.006), with 141-1,094 additional disease-free days. This was independent of tumor grade and stage. Survival advantage was associated with the amount of ascorbate in the tumor, but not with the amount in adjacent normal tissue. Our results demonstrate that higher tumor ascorbate content is associated with decreased HIF-1 activation, most likely due to the co-factor activity of ascorbate for the regulatory HIF hydroxylases. Our findings support the need for future studies to determine whether raising tumor ascorbate is possible with clinical intervention and whether this results in modification of hydroxylase-dependent pathways in the tumor.

  16. Increased radiosensitivity of colorectal tumors with intra-tumoral injection of low dose of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minghan; Paquette, Benoit; Thippayamontri, Thititip; Gendron, Louis; Guérin, Brigitte; Sanche, Léon

    2016-01-01

    The potential of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as radiosensitizers for the treatment of malignant tumors has been limited by the large quantities of GNPs that must be administered and the requirement for low-energy X-ray irradiation to optimize radiosensitization. In this study, we enhance the radiosensitivity of HCT116 human colorectal cells with tiopronin-coated GNPs (Tio-GNPs) combined with a low-energy X-ray (26 keV effective energy) source, similar to the Papillon 50 clinical irradiator used for topical irradiation of rectal tumors. Sensitizer enhancement ratios of 1.48 and 1.69 were measured in vitro, when the HCT116 cells were incubated with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL of Tio-GNPs, respectively. In nude mice bearing the HCT116 tumor, intra-tumoral (IT) injection of Tio-GNPs allowed a 94 times higher quantity of Tio-GNPs to accumulate than was possible by intravenous injection and facilitated a significant tumor response. The time following irradiation, for tumors growing to four times their initial tumor volume (4Td) was 54 days for the IT injection of 366.3 μg of Tio-GNPs plus 10 Gy, compared to 37 days with radiation alone (P=0.0018). Conversely, no significant improvement was obtained when GNPs were injected intravenously before tumor irradiation (P=0.6547). In conclusion, IT injection of Tio-GNPs combined with low-energy X-rays can significantly reduce the growth of colorectal tumors.

  17. Characterization of azoxymethane-induced colon tumor metastasis to lung in a mouse model relevant to human sporadic colorectal cancer and evaluation of grape seed extract efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-08-01

    The second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (both genders combined) in the United States is colorectal cancer (CRC). This emphasizes the need to develop both effective therapies for CRC patients and pre-clinical models mimicking human disease that carry translational potential in drug-development. Notably, at present there are no in situ models of CRC metastasis to lung. In our azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis study in A/J mice assessing grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy, during necropsy we also found multiple lung nodules suggestive of colon tumor metastasis to lung that were significantly inhibited in GSE fed group. Both histopathological and molecular studies were performed to characterize and establish the origin of these lesions in lung. Histologically these nodules were determined as adenocarcinoma of mucin origin. Molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR revealed strong protein and transcript levels of colon specific markers CDX2 and CK20 in these lung nodules compared to uninvolved control lung tissue. Vis-à-vis, these nodules also showed minimally expressed lung specific biomarkers, specifically surfactant D and TTF-1, in IHC analysis. Additionally, 0.25% GSE supplementation in diet (w/w) decreased the incidence of these lung nodules by 53% and their total number by 66%. Together, the characterization of this unique in situ mouse model of CRC metastasis to lung provides translational opportunities in developing effective therapies to clinically manage and treat CRC at the advanced stage. Moreover, GSE efficacy in inhibiting CRC metastasis to lung in this model further supports its translational potential in controlling CRC growth, progression and metastasis in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Colorectal Mesenchymal Tumor: A Clinicopathologic Study of 25 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hui Lee

    2005-07-01

    Conclusion: Two clinicopathologically different categories were identified from our colorectal mesenchymal tumors: intramural GISTs and polypoid submucosal leiomyomas. Our study suggests that GIST is a better categorization than smooth muscle tumor because of the malignant potential. Prognosis is strictly related to the number of mitoses. However, tumor size, nuclear atypia and tumor necrosis are probably also significant predictive factors of lethality. Future studies with DNA analysis and larger patient numbers are essential to evaluate the prognostic significance of our findings.

  19. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  20. Expression Status of UBE2Q2 in Colorectal Primary Tumors and Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Shafiee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in various malignancies, including colorectal cancer, is established. This pathway mediates the degradation of damaged proteins and regulates growth and stress response. The novel human gene, UBE2Q2, with a putative ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme activity, is reported to be overexpressed in some malignancies. We sought to investigate the expression levels of the UBE2Q2 gene in colorectal cell lines as well as in cancerous and normal tissues from patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Levels of UBE2Q2 mRNA in cell lines were assessed by Real-Time PCR. Western blotting was employed to investigate the levels of the UBE2Q2 protein in 8 colorectal cell lines and 43 colorectal tumor samples. Results: Expression of UBE2Q2 was observed at the level of both mRNA and protein in colorectal cell lines, HT29/219, LS180, SW742, Caco2, HTC116, SW48, SW480, and SW1116. Increased levels of UBE2Q2 immunoreactivity was observed in the 65.11% (28 out of 43 of the colorectal carcinoma tissues when compared with their corresponding normal tissues. Difference between the mean intensities of UBE2Q2 bands from cancerous and normal tissues was statistically significant at P<0.001 (paired t test. Conclusion: We showed the expression pattern of the novel human gene, UBE2Q2, in 8 colorectal cell lines. Overexpression of UBE2Q2 in the majority of the colorectal carcinoma samples denotes that it may have implications for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

  1. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  2. Identification of differentially expressed circular RNAs in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peili; Zuo, Zhigui; Shang, Wenjing; Wu, Aihua; Bi, Ruichun; Wu, Jianbo; Li, Shaotang; Sun, Xuecheng; Jiang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Circular RNA, a class of non-coding RNA, is a new group of RNAs and is related to tumorigenesis. Circular RNAs are suggested to be ideal candidate biomarkers with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. However, little is known about their expression in human colorectal cancer. In our study, differentially expressed circular RNAs were detected using circular RNA array in paired tumor and adjacent non-tumorous tissues from six colorectal cancer patients. Expression levels of selected circular RNAs (hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 170 paired colorectal cancer samples for validation. Statistical analyses were conducted to investigate the association between hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700 expression levels and respective patient clinicopathological features. Receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed to evaluate the diagnostic values. Our results indicated that there were 125 downregulated and 76 upregulated circular RNAs in colorectal cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. We also first demonstrated that the expression levels of hsa_circRNA_103809 ( p colorectal cancer than in normal tissues. The expression level of hsa_circRNA_103809 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.021) and tumor-node-metastasis stage ( p = 0.011), and the expression level of hsa_circRNA_104700 was significantly correlated with distal metastasis ( p = 0.036). The area under receiver operating characteristic curves of hsa_circRNA_103809 and hsa_circRNA_104700 were 0.699 ( p colorectal cancer and serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  3. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells: A Small Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Marrinucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs.

  4. NTRK3 is a potential tumor suppressor gene commonly inactivated by epigenetic mechanisms in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxin Luo

    Full Text Available NTRK3 is a member of the neurotrophin receptor family and regulates cell survival. It appears to be a dependence receptor, and thus has the potential to act as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor gene. NTRK3 is a receptor for NT-3 and when bound to NT-3 it induces cell survival, but when NT-3 free, it induces apoptosis. We identified aberrantly methylated NTRK3 in colorectal cancers through a genome-wide screen for hypermethylated genes. This discovery led us to assess whether NTRK3 could be a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. NTRK3 is methylated in 60% of colon adenomas and 67% of colon adenocarcinomas. NTRK3 methylation suppresses NTRK3 expression. Reconstitution of NTRK3 induces apoptosis in colorectal cancers, if NT-3 is absent. Furthermore, the loss of NTRK3 expression associates with neoplastic transformation in vitro and in vivo. We also found that a naturally occurring mutant NTRK3 found in human colorectal cancer inhibits the tumor suppressor activity of NTRK3. In summary, our findings suggest NTRK3 is a conditional tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in colorectal cancer by both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms whose function in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer depends on the expression status of its ligand, NT-3.

  5. NTRK3 Is a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene Commonly Inactivated by Epigenetic Mechanisms in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Kaz, Andrew M.; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welsch, Piri; Morris, Shelli M.; Wang, Jianping; Lutterbaugh, James D.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Grady, William M.

    2013-01-01

    NTRK3 is a member of the neurotrophin receptor family and regulates cell survival. It appears to be a dependence receptor, and thus has the potential to act as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor gene. NTRK3 is a receptor for NT-3 and when bound to NT-3 it induces cell survival, but when NT-3 free, it induces apoptosis. We identified aberrantly methylated NTRK3 in colorectal cancers through a genome-wide screen for hypermethylated genes. This discovery led us to assess whether NTRK3 could be a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. NTRK3 is methylated in 60% of colon adenomas and 67% of colon adenocarcinomas. NTRK3 methylation suppresses NTRK3 expression. Reconstitution of NTRK3 induces apoptosis in colorectal cancers, if NT-3 is absent. Furthermore, the loss of NTRK3 expression associates with neoplastic transformation in vitro and in vivo. We also found that a naturally occurring mutant NTRK3 found in human colorectal cancer inhibits the tumor suppressor activity of NTRK3. In summary, our findings suggest NTRK3 is a conditional tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in colorectal cancer by both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms whose function in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer depends on the expression status of its ligand, NT-3. PMID:23874207

  6. Comprehensive and Holistic Analysis of HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells and Tumor-Bearing Nude Mouse Model: Interactions Among Fractions Derived From the Chinese Medicine Formula Tian Xian Liquid in Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Annballaw Bridget; Cheung, Ho Pan; Lin, Li-Zhu; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lao, Lixing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing

    2016-06-03

    The Chinese medicine formula Tian Xian Liquid (TXL) has been used clinically for cancer therapy in China for more than 25 years. However, the comprehensive and holistic effects of its bioactive fractions for various antitumor therapeutic effects have not been unraveled. This is the first study to scientifically elucidate the holistic effect of Chinese medicine formula for treating colon cancer, hence allowing a better understanding of the essence of Chinese medicine formula, through the comparison of the actions of TXL and its functional constituent fractions, including ethyl acetate (EA), butanol (BU), and aqueous (WA) fractions. Tissue-specific proliferative/antiproliferative effects of these fractions on human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells and splenocytes were studied by using the MTT assay. Their modulations on the expression of markers of antiproliferation, antimetastasis, reversion of multidrug resistance in treated HT-29 cells were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and their modulations in a xenografted nude mouse model were examined by Western blot analysis. Results revealed that EA fraction slightly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, but tissue-specifically exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on splenocytes. On the contrary, only TXL and BU fraction tissue-specifically contributed to the proliferation of splenocytes, but inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells. WA fraction exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on HT-29 cells and also the strongest inhibitory action on tumor size in the nude mouse model in our previous study. In the HT-29 model, TXL and WA fraction exerted the most pronounced effect on upregulation of p21 mRNA and protein; TXL, and EA and WA fractions exerted the effect on downregulation of G1 phase cell cycle protein, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein; EA and BU fractions exerted the most prominent anti-invasive effect on anti-invasion via downregulation of MMP-1 m

  7. Circulating tumor cells in high-risk nonmetastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gianni, Walter; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Longo, Flavia; Gandini, Orietta; Tomao, Silverio; Frati, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    The identification of patients at higher risk of recurrence after primary colorectal cancer resection is currently one of the challenges facing medical oncologists. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) may represent a surrogate marker of an early spread of disease in patients without overt metastases. Thirty-seven high-risk stages II-III colorectal cancer patients were evaluated for the presence of CTC. Enumeration of CTCs in 7.5 ml of blood was carried out with the FDA-cleared CellSearch system. CTC count was performed after primary tumor resection and before the start of adjuvant therapy. CTC was detected in 22 % of patients with a significant correlation with regional lymph nodes involvement and stage of disease. No significant correlation was found among the presence of CTC and other clinicopathological parameters. These data suggest that CTCs detection might help in the selection of high-risk stage II colorectal cancer patient candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  8. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  9. Identification of a characteristic vascular belt zone in human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, Frank Gerrit; Schad, Lothar R.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Marx, Alexander; Gaiser, Timo; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2017-01-01

    Blood vessels in cancer Intra-tumoral blood vessels are of supreme importance for tumor growth, metastasis and therapy. Yet, little is known about spatial distribution patterns of these vessels. Most experimental or theoretical tumor models implicitly assume that blood vessels are equally abundant in different parts of the tumor, which has far-reaching implications for chemotherapy and tumor metabolism. In contrast, based on histological observations, we hypothesized that blood vessels follow specific spatial distribution patterns in colorectal cancer tissue. We developed and applied a novel computational approach to identify spatial patterns of angiogenesis in histological whole-slide images of human colorectal cancer. A characteristic spatial pattern of blood vessels in colorectal cancer In 33 of 34 (97%) colorectal cancer primary tumors blood vessels were significantly aggregated in a sharply limited belt-like zone at the interface of tumor tissue to the intestinal lumen. In contrast, in 11 of 11 (100%) colorectal cancer liver metastases, a similar hypervascularized zone could be found at the boundary to surrounding liver tissue. Also, in an independent validation cohort, we found this vascular belt zone: 22 of 23 (96%) samples of primary tumors and 15 of 16 (94%) samples of liver metastases exhibited the above-mentioned spatial distribution. Summary and implications We report consistent spatial patterns of tumor vascularization that may have far-reaching implications for models of drug distribution, tumor metabolism and tumor growth: luminal hypervascularization in colorectal cancer primary tumors is a previously overlooked feature of cancer tissue. In colorectal cancer liver metastases, we describe a corresponding pattern at the invasive margin. These findings add another puzzle piece to the complex concept of tumor heterogeneity. PMID:28253263

  10. In vivo and in vitro antitumor activity of oxaliplatin in combination with cetuximab in human colorectal tumor cell lines expressing different level of EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin-Gauthier, Diane; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Rochaix, Philippe; Mallard, Valérie; Thomas, Fabienne; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bugat, Roland; Canal, Pierre; Allal, Cuider

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of cetuximab (C225, Erbitux, a chimeric anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody) in combination with oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo on four colon cancer cell lines (HCT-8; HT-29, SW620, HCT-116) expressing different levels of EGFR. In vitro, cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin significantly decreased the IC50 values of oxaliplatin in HCT-8 (EGF-R moderate) and HT-29 (EGF-R weak) cell lines, while SW620 (EGF-R negative) and HCT-116 (EGFR strong) cell lines remained unresponsive. This combination was synergistic in HCT-8 and HT-29 cell lines while cetuximab induced no major modification of the IC50 of oxaliplatin in HCT-116 or SW620 cell lines. We then determined the effect of cetuximab on the EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation and we highlight a correlation between the basal level of phospho-EGFR and the response to the combination. In vivo, the combination of cetuximab plus oxaliplatin significantly inhibited tumor growth of HCT-8 and HT-29 (tumor delay or Td = 21.6+/-2.9 and 18.0+/-2.9 days respectively, synergistic effect) compared to either oxaliplatin (Td=12.6+/-2.3 and 14.4+/-3.2 days respectively) or cetuximab (Td=13.4+/-2.9 and 14.5+/-2.4 days, respectively) alone in xenograft models. The combination had no effect on HCT-116 and SW-620 cell lines. The observed responses are strictly dependent on the cell type, and are not correlated with the level of EGFR expression but related to the basal level of phospho-EGFR. This study provides promising preclinical results for a possible clinical investigation of the combination of oxaliplatin plus cetuximab in chemorefractory colorectal tumors.

  11. Synchronous resections of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis by laparoscopic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Liver metastasis of colorectal cancer is common. Resection of solitary tumors of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer can have a favorable outcome. Open resection of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis in one operation or in separate operations is currently common practice. Reports have shown that synchronous resections do not jeopardize short or long-term surgical outcomes and that this is a safe and effective approach in open surgery. The development of laparoscopic colorectal...

  12. Epigenomic diversity of colorectal cancer indicated by LINE-1 methylation in a database of 869 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schernhammer Eva S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation plays a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. LINE-1 (L1 retrotransposon constitutes a substantial portion of the human genome, and LINE-1 methylation correlates with global DNA methylation status. LINE-1 hypomethylation in colon cancer has been strongly associated with poor prognosis. However, whether LINE-1 hypomethylators constitute a distinct cancer subtype remains uncertain. Recent evidence for concordant LINE-1 hypomethylation within synchronous colorectal cancer pairs suggests the presence of a non-stochastic mechanism influencing tumor LINE-1 methylation level. Thus, it is of particular interest to examine whether its wide variation can be attributed to clinical, pathologic or molecular features. Design Utilizing a database of 869 colorectal cancers in two prospective cohort studies, we constructed multivariate linear and logistic regression models for LINE-1 methylation (quantified by Pyrosequencing. Variables included age, sex, body mass index, family history of colorectal cancer, smoking status, tumor location, stage, grade, mucinous component, signet ring cells, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, microsatellite instability, expression of TP53 (p53, CDKN1A (p21, CTNNB1 (β-catenin, PTGS2 (cyclooxygenase-2, and FASN, and mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. Results Tumoral LINE-1 methylation ranged from 23.1 to 90.3 of 0-100 scale (mean 61.4; median 62.3; standard deviation 9.6, and distributed approximately normally except for extreme hypomethylators [LINE-1 methylation Conclusions LINE-1 extreme hypomethylators appear to constitute a previously-unrecognized, distinct subtype of colorectal cancers, which needs to be confirmed by additional studies. Our tumor LINE-1 methylation data indicate enormous epigenomic diversity of individual colorectal cancers.

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis.

  14. Tumor suppressor PRSS8 targets Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Zexin; Yang, Yiqiong; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianguo; Zhao, Weixing; Zhang, Huijuan; Chen, Jiwang; Dong, Huali; Shen, Kui; Diamond, Alan M.; Yang, Wancai

    2016-01-01

    PRSS8 is a membrane-anchored serine protease prostasin and has been shown an association with carcinogenesis. Herein we found that PRSS8 expression was significantly reduced in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The decreased PRSS8 was well correlated with clinical stages, poor differentiation and shorter survival time of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, increase of PRSS8 led to the inhibition of colorectal cancer cell proliferation, knockdown of PRSS8 accelerated cell proliferation in vitro, and overexpressing PRSS8 retarded cancer cell growth in nude mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that PRSS8 inhibited Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, in terms of inverse association between PRSS8 and Sphk1 in human colorectal cancers and in Sphk1-/− mice. In conclusion, PRSS8 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting Sphk1/S1P/Stat3/Akt signaling pathway, and could be used as a biomarker to monitor colorectal carcinogenesis and predict outcomes. PMID:27050145

  15. TELOMERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GASTRIC AND COLORECTAL CANCER AND SURROUNDING TISSUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wen; ZHANG Qiao; WAN De-sen; CUN Ling-yun; WU Cheng-qiu; PAN Zhi-zhong

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the telomerase activities in human gastric and colorectal tumors. Methods: The telomerase activity was assayed by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) technique. Forty human tumor samples including 9 colonic, 20 rectal and 11gastric carcinomas and their surrounding tissues were used for the detection. Results: Thirty-six out of 40human tumor samples exhibited telomerase activity regardless of the stages or the differentiation of the tumors. However, only 1 out of 39 tumor surrounding tissues showed telomerase activity. Conclusion: Telomerase may be a good diagnosis biomarker for tumor detection.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis of colorectal adenomas: karyotypic comparisons of synchronous tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, L; Bardi, G; Pandis, N

    1998-01-01

    adenomas. Twenty-four colorectal adenomas from 11 patients were subjected to chromosome banding analysis. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in 20 tumors. Recurrent structural rearrangements involved chromosomes 1, 13, 17, and 18. The most common numerical changes were gain of chromosomes 7, 13, 20......, and 3 and loss of chromosome 18. Eight adenomas had subclones as evidence of clonal evolution. Similar clones in separate polyps were seen in tumors from 6 patients; these adenomas were always located in the same part of the large bowel. In 2 patients, both with one rectal adenoma and one adenoma...

  17. Meat, smoking, alcohol, and colorectal tumors : the role of genetic susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in the Western world and is thought to arise mainly from colorectal adenomas. Red meat and alcohol intake and (long-term) cigarette smoking probably increase colorectal tumor risk. Although risk increase was found to be weak, certain subgroups might

  18. Meat, smoking, alcohol, and colorectal tumors: the role of genetic susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in the Western world and is thought to arise mainly from colorectal adenomas. Red meat and alcohol intake and (long-term) cigarette smoking probably increase colorectal tumor risk. Although risk increase was found to be weak, certain

  19. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 inhibits tumor growth and modifies microRNAs expression profiles in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Sujun [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Wu, Binwen, E-mail: wubinwengd@aliyun.com [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Li, Dongfeng; Zhou, Weihong; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Kaijun; Li, Youjia [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • AEG-1 expression in CRC cell lines and down-regulation or upregulation of AEG-1 in vitro. • Knockdown of AEG-1 inhibits cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • Upregulation of AEG-1 enhances proliferation, invasion and colony formation. • Knockdown of AEG-1 accumulates G0/G1-phase cells and promotes apoptosis in CRC cells. • AEG-1 knockdown increases 5-FU cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 and the relationship between AEG-1 and microRNAs in human CRC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AEG-1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of human CRC and its possible mechanism. We adopted a strategy of ectopic overexpression or RNA interference to upregulate or downregulate expression of AEG-1 in CRC models. Their phenotypic changes were analyzed by Western blot, MTT and transwell matrix penetration assays. MicroRNAs expression profiles were performed using microarray analysis followed by validation using qRT-PCR. Knockdown of AEG-1 could significantly inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of AEG-1 could significantly enhance cell proliferation, invasion and reduced apoptisis. AEG-1 directly contributes to resistance to chemotherapeutic drug. Targeted downregulation of AEG-1 might improve the expression of miR-181a-2{sup ∗}, -193b and -193a, and inversely inhibit miR-31 and -9{sup ∗}. Targeted inhibition of AEG-1 can lead to modification of key elemental characteristics, such as miRNAs, which may become a potential effective therapeutic strategy for CRC.

  20. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashima, Hirosato, E-mail: hmashima1-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Ohno, Hideki [Division of Advanced Medical Science, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide [Department of Gastroenterology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  1. Circulating tumor cells: exploring intratumor heterogeneity of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis of the "liquid biopsy" using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity.

  2. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  3. Antitumor Efficacy of the Dual PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor PF-04691502 in a Human Xenograft Tumor Model Derived from Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells Harboring a PIK3CA Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Fang

    Full Text Available PIK3CA (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide mutations can help predict the antitumor activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway inhibitors in both preclinical and clinical settings. In light of the recent discovery of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs in various tumor types, we developed an in vitro CSC model from xenograft tumors established in mice from a colorectal cancer patient tumor in which the CD133+/EpCAM+ population represented tumor-initiating cells. CD133+/EpCAM+ CSCs were enriched under stem cell culture conditions and formed 3-dimensional tumor spheroids. Tumor spheroid cells exhibited CSC properties, including the capability for differentiation and self-renewal, higher tumorigenic potential and chemo-resistance. Genetic analysis using an OncoCarta™ panel revealed a PIK3CA (H1047R mutation in these cells. Using a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, PF-04691502, we then showed that blockage of the PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibited the in vitro proliferation of CSCs and in vivo xenograft tumor growth with manageable toxicity. Tumor growth inhibition in mice was accompanied by a significant reduction of phosphorylated Akt (pAKT (S473, a well-established surrogate biomarker of PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway inhibition. Collectively, our data suggest that PF-04691502 exhibits potent anticancer activity in colorectal cancer by targeting both PIK3CA (H1047R mutant CSCs and their derivatives. These results may assist in the clinical development of PF-04691502 for the treatment of a subpopulation of colorectal cancer patients with poor outcomes.

  4. Pre-clinical evaluation of a novel CEA-targeting near-infrared fluorescent tracer delineating colorectal and pancreatic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Martin C.; Tolner, Berend; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Boogerd, Leonora S.F.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M; Bhavsar, Guarav; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Chester, Kerry A.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of oncologic therapy with curative intent. However, identification of tumor cells in the resection margins is difficult, resulting in non-radical resections, increased cancer recurrence and subsequent decreased patient survival. Novel imaging techniques that aid in demarcating tumor margins during surgery are needed. Overexpression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is found in the majority of gastro-intestinal carcinomas, including colorectal and pancreas. We developed ssSM3E/800CW, a novel CEA-targeted near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) tracer, based on a disulphide stabilized single-chain antibody fragment (ssScFv), to visualize colorectal and pancreatic tumors in a clinically translatable setting. The applicability of the tracer was tested for cell and tissue binding characteristics and dosing using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, cell-based plate assays and orthotopic colorectal (HT-29, well differentiated) and pancreatic (BXPC-3, poorly differentiated) xenogeneic human-mouse models. NIRF signals were visualized using the clinically compatible FLARE™ imaging system. Calculated clinically relevant doses of ssSM3E/800CW selectively accumulated in colorectal and pancreatic tumors/cells, with highest tumor-to-background ratios of 5.1±0.6 at 72 h post-injection, which proved suitable for intra-operative detection and delineation of tumor boarders and small (residual) tumor-nodules in mice, between 8 h and 96 h post-injection. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging and pathologic examination confirmed tumor-specificity and the distribution of the tracer. Our results indicate that ssSM3E/800CW shows promise as a diagnostic tool to recognize colorectal and pancreatic cancers for fluorescent-guided surgery applications. If successful translated clinically, this tracer could help improve the completeness of surgery and thus survival. PMID:25895046

  5. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  6. Tumor suppressor microRNA-27a in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression by targeting SGPP1 and Smad2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bao

    Full Text Available The aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs is associated with colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. This study showed that the miRNA-27a (miR-27a was significantly reduced in colorectal cancer tissues and colorectal cancer cell lines, and that the reduced miR-27a was associated with distant metastasis and colorectal cancer clinical pathological stages-miR-27a was lower at stages III/IV than that at stage II. Bioinformatic and systemic biological analysis predicted several targets of miR-27a, among them SGPP1 and Smad2 were significantly affected. SGPP1 and Smad2 at mRNA and protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-27a in human colorectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Increased miR-27a significantly repressed SGPP1 and Smad2 at transcriptional and translational levels. Functional studies showed that increasing miR-27a inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis and attenuated cell migration, which were also linked to downregulation of p-STAT3 and upregulation of cleaved caspase 3. In vivo, miR-27a inhibited colon cancer cell growth in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, this study has revealed miR-27a as a tumor suppressor and has identified SGPP1 and Smad2 as novel targets of miR-27a, linking to STAT3 for regulating cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in colorectal cancer. Therefore, miR-27a could be a useful biomarker for monitoring colorectal cancer development and progression, and also could have a therapeutic potential by targeting SGPP1, Smad2 and STAT3 for colorectal cancer therapy.

  7. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator.

  8. Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Elkarim, Rihab; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2014-08-01

    The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

  9. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  10. HUMAN DNA QUANTIFICATION IN THE STOOLS OF PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

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    Yolanda TEIXEIRA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Colorectal cancer is one of the main cause of cancer in the world. Colonoscopy is the best screen method, however the compliance is less than 50%. Quantification of human DNA (hDNA in the feces may be a possible screen non-invasive method that is a consequence of the high proliferation and exfoliation of cancer cells. Objective - To quantify the human DNA in the stools of patients with colorectal cancer or polyps. Methods - Fifty patients with CRC, 26 polyps and 53 with normal colonoscopy were included. Total and human DNA were analyzed from the frozen stools. Results - An increased concentration of hDNA in the stools was observed in colorectal cancer patients compared to controls and polyps. Tumors localized in the left side of the colon had higher concentrations of hDNA. There were no difference between polyps and controls. A cut off of 0.87 ng/mL of human DNA was determined for colorectal cancer patients by the ROC curve, with a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 86.8%. For polyps the cut off was 0.41, the sensitivity was 41% and the specificity 77.4%. Conclusion - A higher concentration of hDNA had been found in colorectal cancer patients The quantification of hDNA from the stools can be a trial method for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  11. Effects of autophagy regulation of tumor-associated macrophages on radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Le-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Song; Xing, Chun-Gen; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Young, Wu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Tumor‑associated macrophages (TAMs), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, are crucial to the processes of tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. The importance of TAMs in radiation resistance of colorectal cancer remains unclear. To investigate the effects of autophagy regulation of TAMs on the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells, the current study induced TAM formation from THP‑1 monocyte cells. Sequential treatment of THP‑1 cells with PMA for 72 h and human recombinant interleukin‑4 for 24 h was used to stimulate THP‑1 differentiation to TAMs. Expression of the cell surface markers CD68, CD204 and CD206, and changes to cell morphology were used to confirm successful differentiation. The TAMs were stimulated to promote or inhibit autophagy during co‑culture with LoVo colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were irradiated, with subsequent measurement of LoVo colony formation and apoptosis. Additionally, the expression of p53, Bcl‑2, survivin and Smac proteins was assessed by western blotting. Monodansylcadaverin staining was used to analyze the presence of autophagic vacuoles in TAM, and western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of Beclin‑1, LC3B I and II, ATG‑3, ‑5 and ‑7. The results demonstrated TAM autophagy to be markedly altered by rapamycin and bafilomycin A1 treatment. Following co‑culture with TAMs, the colony formation rate and survival fraction of LoVo cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (PLoVo colorectal cancer cells. Upregulation of TAM autophagy using rapamycin exhibited more effective inhibition of LoVo colony formation than autophagy downregulation. Notably, apoptosis was significantly increased in LoVo cells when co‑cultured with TAMs only, or with rapamycin‑mediated autophagy upregulated TAMs, compared with LoVo cells cultured alone (PLoVo cells co‑cultured with TAMs, compared with the control group (P<0

  12. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

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    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  13. Expression differences of serum prealbumin in benign and malignant colorectal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunni Xu; Hong Chen; Yan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate the expression dif erences of serum prealbumin in patients with benign and malignant colorectal tumors and its clinical significance. Methods:The concentrations of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, hemoglobin of 113 colorectal cancer patients (cancer group) and 87 colorectal adenomas (adenoma group) were tested in Yixing Hospital Af iliated to Jiangsu University (China) during August 2013 to December 2013. Then the dif erences between the two groups were compared. Results:In colorectal cancer patients, the concentrations of serum prealbumin in 39/113 cases, total protein in 16/113 cases, albumin in 38/113, hemoglobin in 32/113 were lower than normal ranges. While, in colorectal adenoma patients, the concentrations of serum prealbumin in 4/87 cases, total protein in 2/87, albumin in 1/87, hemoglobin in 2/87 were below the detection limit. Comparative analysis showed that, average expression levels of serum prealbumin, albumin, total protein, hemoglobin in colorectal cancer patients were lower than those of colorectal adenoma patients, the dif erence was statistical y significant (P<0.05), and colorectal cancer patients were more likely to have lower levels of above indicators (P<0.05). Conclusion:Compared to colorectal adenoma patients, patients with colorectal cancer have lower average expression levels, and were easier to have lower expression levels of serum albumin, albumin, total protein and hemoglobin, which suggest that colorectal cancer patients are more likely to have metabolic change, and clinic notable.

  14. Synchronous resections of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis by laparoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tan To; Poon, Ronnie Tung Ping

    2013-06-27

    Liver metastasis of colorectal cancer is common. Resection of solitary tumors of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer can have a favorable outcome. Open resection of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis in one operation or in separate operations is currently common practice. Reports have shown that synchronous resections do not jeopardize short or long-term surgical outcomes and that this is a safe and effective approach in open surgery. The development of laparoscopic colorectal surgery and laparoscopic hepatectomy has made a minimally invasive surgical approach to treating colorectal cancer with liver metastasis feasible. Synchronous resections of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis by laparoscopy have recently been reported. The efficacy and safety of laparoscopic colorectal resection and laparoscopic hepatectomy have been proven separately but synchronous resections by laparoscopy are in hot debate. As it has been shown that open resection of primary colorectal tumor and liver metastasis in one operation results in an equally good short-term outcome when compared with that done in separate operations, laparoscopic resection of the same in one single operation seems to be a good option. Recent evidence has shown that this new approach is a safe alternative with a shorter hospital stay. Large scale randomized controlled trials are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this minimally invasive approach.

  15. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

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    Raul D. Bernabe-Dones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC. In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45 and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36 was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2% CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males and in 1 of 36 (2.8% controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49. HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted.

  16. Assessing global transitions in human development and colorectal cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Miranda M; Bray, Freddie; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer incidence has paralleled increases in human development across most countries. Yet, marked decreases in incidence are now observed in countries that have attained very high human development. Thus, in this study, we explored the relationship between human development and colorectal cancer incidence, and in particular assessed whether national transitions to very high human development are linked to temporal patterns in colorectal cancer incidence. For these analyses, we utilized the Human Development Index (HDI) and annual incidence data from regional and national cancer registries. Truncated (30-74 years) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Yearly incidence rate ratios and HDI ratios, before and after transitioning to very high human development, were also estimated. Among the 29 countries investigated, colorectal cancer incidence was observed to decrease after reaching the very high human development threshold for 12 countries; decreases were also observed in a further five countries, but the age-standardized incidence rates remained higher than that observed at the threshold. Such declines or stabilizations are likely due to colorectal cancer screening in some populations, as well as varying levels of exposure to protective factors. In summary, it appears that there is a threshold at which human development predicts a stabilization or decline in colorectal cancer incidence, though this pattern was not observed for all countries assessed. Future cancer planning must consider the increasing colorectal cancer burden expected in countries transitioning towards higher levels of human development, as well as possible declines in incidence among countries reaching the highest development level. © 2017 UICC.

  17. Afatinib and its encapsulated polymeric micelles inhibits HER2-overexpressed colorectal tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Siao-Syun; Chang, Jungshan; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Ho, Ai-Sheng; Wang, Chia-Chi; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2014-07-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is known as a common malignant neoplasm worldwide. The role of EGFR/HER2 in CRC is unclear. Afatinib is an irreversible EGFR/HER2 inhibitor. There were few studies of afatinib on CRC. Here, we investigated the protein levels/expressions of HER2 in sera and tumors from CRC patients and the therapeutic effect of afatinib on HER2-overexpressed CRC in vitro and in vivo. The increased HER2 levels were detected in the collected sera and tumors of patients with CRC. The serological HER2 levels were correlated with the tumor HER2 expressions in patients. Afatinib also inhibited the HER2-positive tumor cell growth and caused apoptosis in HER2-overexpressed human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells but not in low HER2 expressed human gastric cancer MKN45 cells. In vivo study showed that afatinib reduced tumor growth in HER2-overexpressed xenografts. Moreover, afatinib-encapsulated micelles displayed higher cytotoxic activity in HCT-15 cells and were more effective for tumor growth suppression in HCT-15-induced tumor xenografts than afatinib performance alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that higher serum HER2 levels reflect the higher HER2 contents in tumors of CRC patients, and the improved afatinib-encapsulated micelles possess high therapeutic efficacy in HER2-overexpressed CRC in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Magnesium intake and colorectal tumor risk : a case-control study and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Lau, R.; Norat, T.; Kampman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dietary magnesium might be related to colorectal tumor risk through the pivotal roles of magnesium in cellular metabolism, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation. Objective: We evaluated the hypothesis of whether higher dietary magnesium intake is associated with reduced colorecta

  19. Magnesium intake and colorectal tumor risk: a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Lau, R.; Norat, T.; Kampman, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary magnesium might be related to colorectal tumor risk through the pivotal roles of magnesium in cellular metabolism, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the hypothesis of whether higher dietary magnesium intake is associated with reduced colorecta

  20. The prevalence of human papillomavirus in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Louise; Thomsen, Louise T; Olesen, Tina Bech

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal cancer has been widely studied with conflicting results. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in colorectal adenocarcinomas and adenomas, and test the potential association....

  1. Circulating Tumor Cells Versus Circulating Tumor DNA in Colorectal Cancer: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Carlyn Rose C; Zhou, Lanlan; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are emerging noninvasive multifunctional biomarkers in liquid biopsy allowing for early diagnosis, accurate prognosis, therapeutic target selection, spatiotemporal monitoring of metastasis, as well as monitoring response and resistance to treatment. CTCs and ctDNA are released from different tumor types at different stages and contribute complementary information for clinical decision. Although big strides have been taken in technology development for detection, isolation and characterization of CTCs and sensitive and specific detection of ctDNA, CTC-, and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies may not be widely adopted for routine cancer patient care until the suitability, accuracy, and reliability of these tests are validated and more standardized protocols are corroborated in large, independent, prospectively designed trials. This review covers CTC- and ctDNA-related technologies and their application in colorectal cancer. The promise of CTC-and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies is envisioned.

  2. Induction of colorectal cancer in mice and histomorphometric evaluation of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crncec, Ilija; Pathria, Paulina; Svinka, Jasmin; Eferl, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) originates from the epithelial cells lining the colon or rectum of the gastrointestinal tract and represents the third most common form of cancer worldwide. CRC is frequently associated with Colitis Ulcerosa or Crohn's Disease demonstrating the tumor-promoting role of inflammation. Colorectal tumor cells establish heterotypic interactions with inflammatory cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in the tumor stroma that support tumor angiogenesis and are essential for tumor progression. Therefore, establishment of suitable mouse models mimicking the inflammatory etiology of CRC is important. Here we describe methods to induce CRC in mice, to quantify tumor parameters (multiplicity, tumor load, mean tumor size), and to analyze the cellular composition of the CRC tumor stroma.

  3. The distinctive molecular, pathological and clinical characteristics of BRAF-mutant colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartozzi, Mario; Giampieri, Riccardo; Aprile, Giuseppe; Iacono, Donatella; Santini, Daniele; dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Silvestris, Nicola; Gnoni, Antonio; Bonotto, Marta; Puzzoni, Marco; Demurtas, Laura; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical series have demonstrated a notably low overall survival for colorectal cancer patients diagnosed with a BRAF-mutant tumor. A potentially interesting predictive role has also been suggested for BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer receiving anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. Although a global consensus exists in indicating BRAF as a prognostic factor with a possible predictive activity, the clinical use of BRAF mutational status in colorectal tumors is still controversial. This article reviews the current knowledge on the use and implications of BRAF mutational status in colorectal tumors, in order to define its present role in the clinical practice. Also suggested are possible treatment strategies in this prognostically challenging group of patients. Finally, a comprehensive outlook on future developments for specifically directed anti-BRAF therapy is illustrated.

  4. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus and Lactobacillus Casei on the Behavior of Colorectal Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Atapour Mashhad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic microorganisms are living normal flora of human body that have nutritional value and health benefits when administered in adequate amounts. The health benefits include prevention of bacterial diarrhea, skin eczema and recently understood, prevention and control of various cancers, as well. Different mechanisms such as stimulating the immune system, modifying the composition of gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract normal flora and prevention of the carcinogenic activity of fecal enzymes have been identified for their probiotic activity. Due to the high density of the normal flora in the gut and also preferentially sporadic nature of colorectal cancers, these cancers are among the main candidates of treatment trials with probiotics. In this study, direct effects of probiotic lactobacilli on colon cancer tumor cells were studied. Methods: Supernatant fluid and bacterial extracts were prepared and CaCo-2 cells were treated by these materials. Subsequently, the effects of the aforesaid elements were evaluated on cell proliferation, cell necrosis and cell apoptosis by MTT assay, LDH assay and caspase-3 activity. Results: The supernatants of lactobacilli decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis but they did not have any effect on cell necrosis. In contrast, when cancerous cells were treated by lactobacilli extract, it lead to cell necrosis in addition to reduction in cell proliferation and increase in cell apoptosis. Conclusion: The use of lactobacillus probiotics may reduce proliferation of tumor cells in the early stages of colorectal cancers.

  5. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

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    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  6. Methylglyoxal-Mediated Stress Correlates with High Metabolic Activity and Promotes Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarina, Barbara; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Bellier, Justine; Durieux, Florence; Bletard, Noëlla; Sherer, Félicie; Lovinfosse, Pierre; Peulen, Olivier; Verset, Laurine; Dehon, Romain; Demetter, Pieter; Turtoi, Andrei; Uchida, Koji; Goldman, Serge; Hustinx, Roland; Delvenne, Philippe; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely on aerobic glycolysis as a major source of energy. Methylglyoxal (MG), a dicarbonyl compound that is produced as a side product during glycolysis, is highly reactive and induces the formation of advanced glycation end-products that are implicated in several pathologies including cancer. All mammalian cells have an enzymatic defense against MG composed by glyoxalases GLO1 and GLO2 that converts MG to d-lactate. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the level of MG protein adducts, in a series of 102 CRC human tumors divided into four clinical stages. We consistently detected a high level of MG adducts and low GLO1 activity in high stage tumors compared to low stage ones suggesting a pro-tumor role for dicarbonyl stress. Accordingly, GLO1 depletion in CRC cells promoted tumor growth in vivo that was efficiently reversed using carnosine, a potent MG scavenger. Our study represents the first demonstration that MG adducts accumulation is a consistent feature of high stage CRC tumors. Our data point to MG production and detoxification levels as an important molecular link between exacerbated glycolytic activity and CRC progression. PMID:28117708

  7. Tumor budding as a potential histopathological biomarker in colorectal cancer: Hype or hope?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Grizzi; Giuseppe Celesti; Gianluca Basso; Luigi Laghi

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC),the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in men and women worldwide is recognized as a complex multi-pathway disease,an observation sustained by the fact that histologically identical tumors may have different outcome,including various response to therapy.Therefore,particularly in early and intermediate stage (stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ,respectively) CRC,there is a compelling need for biomarkers helpful of selecting patients with aggressive disease that might benefit from adjuvant and targeted therapy.Histopathological examination shows that likely other solid tumors the development and progression of human CRC is not only determined by genetically abnormal cells,but also by intricate interactions between malignant cells and the surrounding microenvironment.This has led to reconsider the features of tumor microenvironment as potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers.Among the histopathological biomarkers,tumor budding (i.e.,the presence of individual cells and small clusters of tumor cells at the tumor invasive front)has received much recent attention,particularly in the setting of CRC.Although its acceptance as a reportable factor has been held back by a lack of uniformity with respect to qualitative and quantitative aspects,tumor budding is now considered as an independent adverse prognostic factor in CRC that may allow for stratification of patients into risk categories more meaningful than those defined by tumor-node-metastasis staging alone,and also potentially guide treatment decisions,especially in T2-T3 NO (stage Ⅱ) CRCs.

  8. Relative Expression of Vitamin D Hydroxylases, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, and of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Heterogeneity of Human Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Age, Gender, Tumor Location, and Malignancy: Results from Factor and Cluster Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.brozek@gmx.at; Manhardt, Teresa; Kállay, Enikö; Peterlik, Meinrad; Cross, Heide S. [Department of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-26

    Previous studies on the significance of vitamin D insufficiency and chronic inflammation in colorectal cancer development clearly indicated that maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the large intestinal epithelium requires balanced interaction of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} and prostaglandin cellular signaling networks. The present study addresses the question how colorectal cancer pathogenesis depends on alterations of activities of vitamin D hydroxylases, i.e., CYP27B1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase and CYP24A1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase, and inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Data from 105 cancer patients on CYP27B1, VDR, CYP24A1, and COX-2 mRNA expression in relation to tumor grade, anatomical location, gender and age were fit into a multivariate model of exploratory factor analysis. Nearly identical results were obtained by the principal factor and the maximum likelihood method, and these were confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis: Within the eight mutually dependent variables studied four independent constellations were found that identify different features of colorectal cancer pathogenesis: (i) Escape of COX-2 activity from restraints by the CYP27B1/VDR system can initiate cancer growth anywhere in the colorectum regardless of age and gender; (ii) variations in COX-2 expression are mainly responsible for differences in cancer incidence in relation to tumor location; (iii) advancing age has a strong gender-specific influence on cancer incidence; (iv) progression from well differentiated to undifferentiated cancer is solely associated with a rise in CYP24A1 expression.

  9. DETECTION OF TUMOR MUTANT DNA IN PLASMA OF PATIENT WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 万文辉; 顾晋

    2002-01-01

    Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are mandatory to prevent colorectal cancer. Detection of free circulating tumor DNA in the serum of the cancer patients provides new possibilities for cancer diagnosis. Several circulating colorectal cancer DNAs have been identified by PCR detection such as the activated K-ras oncogene, inactivated APC, p53 genes, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Circulating tumor DNA was predominantly found in patients with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It was suggested that analysis for circulating tumor DNA might be useful in early diagnosis.

  10. Overexpression of POSTN in Tumor Stroma Is a Poor Prognostic Indicator of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Jeong Oh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Tumor microenvironment has recently drawn attention in that it is related with tumor prognosis. Cancer-associated fibroblast also plays a critical role in cancer invasiveness and progression in colorectal cancers. Periostin (POSTN, originally identified to be expressed in osteoblasts and osteoblast-derived cells, is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts in several tissue types of cancer. Recent studies suggest an association between stromal overexpression of POSTN and poor prognosis of cancer patients. Methods We analyzed colorectal cancer cases for their expression status of POSTN in tumor stroma using immunohistochemistry and correlated the expression status with clinicopathological and molecular features. Results High level of POSTN expression in tumor stroma was closely associated with tumor location in proximal colon, infiltrative growth pattern, undifferentiated histology, tumor budding, luminal necrosis, and higher TNM stage. High expression status of POSTN in tumor stroma was found to be an independent prognostic parameter implicating poor 5-year cancer-specific survival and 5-year progression-free survival. Conclusions Our findings suggest that POSTN overexpression in tumor stroma of colorectal cancers could be a possible candidate marker for predicting poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers.

  11. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  12. Grape seed extract inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjinder; Singh, Rana P; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2006-10-15

    Accumulating evidences suggest the beneficial effects of fruit-and-vegetable consumption in lowering the risk of various cancers, including colorectal cancer. Herein, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects and associated mechanisms of grape seed extract (GSE), a rich source of proanthocyanidins, against colorectal cancer. Effects of GSE were examined on human colorectal cancer HT29 and LoVo cells in culture for proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. The in vivo effect of oral GSE was examined on HT29 tumor xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. Xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for proliferation and apoptosis. The molecular changes associated with the biological effects of GSE were analyzed by Western blot analysis. GSE (25-100 microg/mL) causes a significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth with concomitant increase in cell death. GSE induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest along with a marked increase in Cip1/p21 protein level and a decrease in G1 phase-associated cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. GSE-induced cell death was apoptotic and accompanied by caspase-3 activation. GSE feeding to mice at 200 mg/kg dose showed time-dependent inhibition of tumor growth without any toxicity and accounted for 44% decrease in tumor volume per mouse after 8 weeks of treatment. GSE inhibited cell proliferation but increased apoptotic cell death in tumors. GSE-treated tumors also showed enhanced Cip1/p21 protein levels and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. GSE may be an effective chemopreventive agent against colorectal cancer, and that growth inhibitory and apoptotic effects of GSE against colorectal cancer could be mediated via an up-regulation of Cip1/p21.

  13. Microsatellite instability in tumor and nonneoplastic colorectal cells from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and sporadic high microsatellite-instable tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietmaier, W; Gänsbauer, S; Beyser, K; Renke, B; Hartmann, A; Rümmele, P; Jauch, K W; Hofstädter, F; Rüschoff, J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic alterations such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) have been frequently studied in various tumor types. Genetic heterogeneity of nonneoplastic cells has not yet been sufficiently investigated. However, genomic instability in normal cells could be a potentially important issue, in particular when these cells are used as reference in LOH and MSI analyses of tumor samples. In order to investigate possible genetic abnormalities in normal colorectal cells of tumor patients, MSI analyses of normal colonic mucosa were performed. Up to 15 different laser-microdissected normal regions containing 50-150 cells were investigated in each of 15 individual microsatellite-stable, sporadic high microsatellite-instable (MSI-H) and hereditary non-polyposis coli cancer (HNPCC) colorectal cancer patients. Frequent MSI and heterogeneity in the MSI pattern were found both in normal and tumor cells from 10 HNPCC and sporadic MSI-H tumor patients whose tumors had defect mismatch repair protein expressions. This observation shows that MSI can also occur in nonneoplastic cells which has to be considered in MSI analyses for molecular HNPCC screening. In addition, considerable genetic heterogeneity was detected in all MSI-H (sporadic and HNPCC) tumors when analyzing five different regions with less than 150 cells, respectively. These differences were not detectable in larger tumor regions containing about 10,000 cells. Thus, heterogeneity of the MSI pattern (e.g. intratumoral MSI) is an important feature of tumors with the MSI-H phenotype.

  14. The clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, M; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    with metastatic disease, but the prognostic role of CTC in non-metastatic colorectal cancer is less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the possible clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) with the primary focus on detection methods...... and prognosis. METHODS: The PubMed and Cochrane database and reference lists of relevant articles were searched for scientific literature published in English from January 2000 to June 2010. We included studies with non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) and CTC detected pre- and/or post...

  15. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells:A Small Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Lazar, Daniel; Fisher, Jennifer; Huynh, Edward; Clark, Peter; Bruce, Richard; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs. PMID:20111743

  16. [Expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblast of cancerized or recurrent colorectal adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Zhu, Yin; Li, Changshui; Li, Yinya; Nie, Qianqian; Zhu, Ziling; Deng, Hong

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) in colorectal adenomas and its relation to cancerization and recurrence of adenoma. Methods: Tissue samples of low-grade adenoma (n=50), high-grade adenoma (n=50) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=50) were collected, and tissue samples at the distal margin of corresponding colorectal lesions were taken as controls. The expression of CD10 in the stromal TAFs, and the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemistry (Envision). The correlation of CD10 expression in stromal TAFs with the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells was analyzed by Spearmen. One hundred samples of low-grade colorectal adenoma were collected, including 57 non-recurrent cases and 43 recurrent cases (16 cases of recurrent adenoma and 27 cases of recurrent adenocarcinoma); the expression of stromal TAF CD10 were determined and compared among groups. Results: There was no TAF in normal colorectal mucosa. The expression rates of TAF CD10 in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma were 22%, 50% and 78%, respectively (all P0.05). The expression of p53 in colorectal adenocarcinoma and high-grade adenoma was higher than that in low grade adenoma (all P0.05). The TAF CD10 level was significantly higher in low-grade adenoma with recurrence than that in those without recurrence (Pcancer, indicating that it may play an important role in the canceration of adenoma. Adenomas with high expression of CD10 TAF are likely to be recurrent and cancerized, and detection of TAF CD10 combined with p53, Ki-67 and β-catenin may be of value in predicting canceration or recurrence of colorectal adenoma.

  17. Molecular targeting of carbonic anhydrase IX in mice with hypoxic HT29 colorectal tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a membrane spanning protein involved in the enzymatic regulation of tumor acid-base balance. CAIX has been shown to be elevated in a number of hypoxic tumor types. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of intact and IgG fragments of cG250 to target CAIX in vivo in a hypoxic tumor model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conventional biodistribution studies were performed with (111In-DO3A-cG250, (111In-DO3A-F(ab'(2-cG250 and (111In-DO3A-Fab-cG250. Additional ex vivo analysis of the tumor was performed with markers for tumor hypoxia, blood perfusion and endogenous CAIX expression. All four data sets were digitally correlated to determine the optimal agent for determining hypoxia in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft. The HT29 human colorectal tumor xenografts show strong CAIX expression in hypoxic areas of poor blood perfusion. The intact IgG had an initial high focal uptake at the periphery of these hypoxic regions and penetration into the areas of highest CAIX expression over the 7-day study period. The lower molecular weight antibody fragments had a faster uptake into areas of high CAIX expression, but had a much lower absolute uptake at the optimal imaging times. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the clinical detection of hypoxia induced CAIX using cG250 antibody based agents, imaging with the intact IgG at 7 days post injection would allow for the most sensitive and accurate detection of CAIX.

  18. Reduced fructosamine-3-kinase activity and its mRNA in human distal colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, M; Caruso, Maria G; Tutino, V; Guerra, V; Frisullo, S; Altomare, D F; Misciagna, G

    2010-09-01

    Fructosamine-3-Kinase (FN3K) is an enzyme phosphorilating fructoselysine (FL) residues on glycated proteins, resulting in the production of protein-bound FL-3-phosphate. The pathological role of the non-enzymatic modification of proteins by reducing sugars has become increasingly evident in various types of disorders, including the cancer. In this study, our aim was to study FN3K enzyme activity, as well as its mRNA in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Thirty consecutive CRC patients undergoing surgery of the colon were enrolled in the study. FN3K enzymatic activity and gene expression were analyzed using a radiometric assay and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. FN3K is a functionally active enzyme in human colon tissue, without significant differences between normal mucosa and cancer. The mean level of FN3K mRNA was significantly lower in cancer than in the corresponding normal colorectal mucosa The colorectal tumors located on the left side showed lower levels of both enzymatic activity and mRNA FN3K than tumors located in the right side of colon. This paper is the first studying FN3K enzyme activity in human CRC, showing a significant relationship between enzymatic activity, its mRNA and tumor side.

  19. Study on image feature extraction and classification for human colorectal cancer using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Shan-Yi; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Mo; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. OCT (Optical coherence tomography) has been several advantages including high resolution and non-invasive cross-sectional image in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the B-scan OCT image features and histology of malignant human colorectal tissues, also en-face OCT image and the endoscopic image pattern. The in-vitro experiments were performed by a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system; the swept source has a center wavelength at 1310 nm and 160nm in wavelength scanning range which produced 6 um axial resolution. In the study, the en-face images were reconstructed by integrating the axial values in 3D OCT images. The reconstructed en-face images show the same roundish or gyrus-like pattern with endoscopy images. The pattern of en-face images relate to the stages of colon cancer. Endoscopic OCT technique would provide three-dimensional imaging and rapidly reconstruct en-face images which can increase the speed of colon cancer diagnosis. Our results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas by using the OCT imaging.

  20. Salinomycin inhibits the growth of colorectal carcinoma by targeting tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Tian, Yaping; Song, Feiyu; Fu, Changhao; Han, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Salinomycin is a monocarboxylic polyether antibiotic that has been reported to induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells with specificity for cancer stem cells. However, its anticancer effect in colorectal cancer stem cells has never been reported. In the present study, we examined the ability of salinomycin to induce cell death in the colorectal cancer stem cell line CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116, and we measured its in vivo tumor inhibition capacity. Salinomycin dose-dependently induced cytotoxicity in the CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116 cells and inhibited colony formation. Salinomycin treatment was shown to induce apoptosis, as evidenced by nuclear fragmentation, an increase in the proportion of acridine orange/ethidium bromide-positive cells and an increase in the percentage of Annexin V-positive cells. Apoptosis was induced in colorectal cancer stem cells in a caspase-dependent manner, as shown by an increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3, -8 and -9. JC-1 staining further revealed that salinomycin induced colorectal cancer cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, salinomycin treatment of xenograft mice inhibited the growth of tumors derived from the CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116 cells. The present study demonstrated that the antibiotic salinomycin exerts an anti-colorectal cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, suggesting salinomycin as a potential drug for colorectal cancer therapy.

  1. Expression of Indian hedgehog is negatively correlated with APC gene mutation in colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiangsheng; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Yan; Chen, Xia; Tang, Chuankang; Li, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xian

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanism of Indian hedgehog (IHH) in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. In the current study, the expression of IHH were investigated in 7 digestive tract cancer cell lines, and in 10 normal colorectal mucosas (NCs), 30 hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 35 colorectal adenomas (ADs), and 40 colorectal adenocarcinomas (CAs) by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Moreover, the mutational status of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and β-catenin in these tumors were analyzed by direct sequencing. IHH mRNA was lost in the 4 colon cancer cell lines harboring APC mutation. IHH mRNA was significantly decreased in CAs (0.17 ± 0.22), compared with that in ADs (0.38 ± 0.35) and HPs (0.56 ± 0.38, P 19.47 ± 17.91) and NCs (42.40 ± 13.67, P < 0.05). Moreover, APC mutations were negatively correlated with IHH mRNA expression (Spearman's R = -0.636, P < 0.01) and IHH protein expression (Spearman's R = -0.426, P < 0.01). In conclusion, down-regulation of IHH expression might be an early event during the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. The activation of Wnt signaling by APC mutation might contribute to the down-regulation or loss of IHH expression in colorectal tumors.

  2. Crosstalk between tumor cells and microenvironment via Wnt pathway in colorectal cancer dissemination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Huang; Xiang Du

    2008-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the deadly face of malignant tumors. Considering the high rate of incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is critical to determine the mechanisms of its dissemination. In the parallel investigation of the invasive front and tumor center area of colorectal cancer (CRC), observation of heterogeneous p-catenin distribution and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) at the invasive front suggested that there might be a crosstalk between tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Wnt signaling pathway is also involved in the cancer progression due to its key role in CRC tumorigenesis. Moreover, in recent years, there is increasing evidence that the regulators of microenvironment, including extracellular matrix, growth factors and inflammatory factors, are associated with the activation of Wnt pathway and the mobility of tumor cells. In this review, we will try to explain how these molecules trigger metastasis via the Wnt pathway.

  3. Label-free nanoplasmonic sensing of tumor-associate autoantibodies for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Villar-Vazquez, Roi; Casal, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-08-03

    Colorectal cancer is treatable and curable when detected at early stages. However there is a lack of less invasive and more specific screening and diagnosis methods which would facilitate its prompt identification. Blood circulating autoantibodies which are immediately produced by the immune system at tumor appearance have become valuable biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present the rapid and label-free detection of colorectal cancer autoantibodies directly in blood serum or plasma using a recently developed nanoplasmonic biosensor. Our nanoplasmonic device offers sensitive and real-time quantification of autoantibodies with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection around 1 nM (150-160 ng mL(-1)). A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples of colorectal cancer patients has shown good correlation with ELISA. These results demonstrate the reliability of the nanobiosensor strategy and pave the way towards the achievement of a sensitive diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  4. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2005-01-01

    this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa...

  5. Expressions of Maspin, P53 and Skp2 in Colorectal Tumors and Their Clinicopathological Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-tao Ni; Yong-fen Yi; Hai-peng Shi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of maspin, p53 and Skp2 expressions in the progression of colorectal tumors, and their clinicopathological significance.Methods: The expressions of maspin, p53 and Skp2 in colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=50), adenoma (n=20) and normal tissue (n=20) were detected by immunohistochemistry and compared with the clinicopathological tumor parameters. The relationship among maspin, p53 and Skp2 expression was also analyzed in colorectal tumors. The reverse transcriptase PCR was carried out to detect the level of maspin mRNA from 31 colorectal adenocarcinoma and 10 normal control tissues.Results: Of 50 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma, the positive expression rates for maspin, p53 and Skp2 in colorectal adenocarcinoma were 62% (31 of 50 cases), 50% (25 of 50 cases), 48%( 24 of 50 cases), respectively; The positive expression rates for maspin, p53 and Skp2 in adenoma were 90%, 5%, 5%, respectively; The positive expression rates for maspin, p53 and Skp2 in normal control were 95%, 5%, 5%, respectively. Maspin expression was much lower in colorectal adenocarcinoma than in adenoma and normal tissues (both P<0.05). Maspin expression showed a negative association with lymphatic metastasis and higher Dukes' stage (both P<0.05). Expression of maspin protein was negatively correlated with p53 expression (r =-0.536,P<0.01, in adenocarcinoma; r=-0.668,P<0.01,in adenoma). However, there was no significant correlation between expression of p53 and Skp2 (r=0.000, P>0.05, in adenocarcinoma; r=-0.053,P>0.05, in adenoma).Conclusion: Maspin might play an important role in tumorigenesis and progression (especially in lymph node metastasis) of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Maspin expression was inversely correlated with mutant p53 expression in colorectal tumors, which suggested that maspin expression was regulated by the p53 pathway. Skp2 might serve as an independent factor which participated in multistage process of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  7. DNA Electrochemistry Shows DNMT1 Methyltransferase Hyperactivity in Colorectal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Ariel L; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-07-23

    DNMT1, the most abundant human methyltransferase, is responsible for translating the correct methylation pattern during DNA replication, and aberrant methylation by DNMT1 has been linked to tumorigenesis. We have developed a sensitive signal-on electrochemical assay for the measurement of DNMT1 activity in crude tissue lysates. We have further analyzed ten tumor sets and have found a direct correlation between DNMT1 hyperactivity and tumorous tissue. In the majority of samples analyzed, the tumorous tissue has significantly higher DNMT1 activity than the healthy adjacent tissue. No such correlation is observed in measurements of DNMT1 expression by qPCR, DNMT1 protein abundance by western blotting, or DNMT1 activity using a radiometric DNA labeling assay. DNMT1 hyperactivity can result from both protein overexpression and enzyme hyperactivity. DNMT1 activity measured electrochemically provides a direct measure of activity in cell lysates and, as a result, provides a sensitive and early indication of cancerous transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  10. T-cell factor-4 frameshift mutations occur frequently in human microsatellite instability-high colorectal carcinomas but do not contribute to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Stefan; Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Oswald, Ursula; Beyser, Kurt; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Haynl, Angela; Koch, Claudia; Rüschoff, Josef; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability accumulate errors in short repetitive DNA repeats, especially mono and dinucleotide repeats. One such error-prone A(9) monorepeat is found in exon 17 of the TCF-4 gene. TCF-4 and beta-catenin form a transcription complex, which is important for both maintenance of normal epithelium and development of colorectal tumors. To elucidate the relevance of frameshift mutations in the TCF-4 in colorectal carcinogenesis, a variety of investigations in human tumors and cell lines was performed. It was found that mutations in the TCF-4 A(9) repeat do not contribute to tumorigenesis and seem to be passenger mutations.

  11. High frequency of RPL22 mutations in microsatellite-unstable colorectal and endometrial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana M; Tuominen, Iina; van Dijk-Bos, Krista; Sanjabi, Bahram; van der Sluis, Tineke; van der Zee, Ate G; Hollema, Harry; Zazula, Monika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2014-12-01

    Ribosomal Protein L22 (RPL22) encodes a protein that is a component of the 60S subunit of the ribosome. Variants in this gene have recently been linked to cancer development. Mutations in an A8 repeat in exon 2 were found in a recent study in 52% of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors. These tumors are particularly prone to mutations in repeats due to mismatch repair deficiency. We screened this coding repeat in our collection of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors (EC) and colorectal tumors (CRC). We found 50% mutation frequency for EC and 77% mutation frequency for CRC. These results confirm the previous study on the involvement of RPL22 in EC and, more importantly, reports for the first time such high mutation frequency in this gene in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, considering the high mutation frequency found, our data point toward an important role for RPL22 in microsatellite instability carcinogenesis.

  12. Tumor markers in finding recurrent disease iin colorectal cancer: a diagnostic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verberne, Charlotte; de Jong, W.H.; Grossmann, Irene;

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In the search for evidence-based follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer, numerous tumor markers have been proposed. This review has evaluated these markers and comments on the diagnostic accuracy in finding recurrent disease in relation to Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA...

  13. Prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, S.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Iannotti, N.; Saidman, B.H.; Sabbath, K.D.; Gabrail, N.Y.; Picus, J.; Morse, M.A.; Mitchell, E.; Miller, M.C.; Doyle, G.V.; Tissing, H.; Terstappen, L.W.; Meropol, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We demonstrated that circulating tumor cell (CTC) number at baseline and follow-up is an independent prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This analysis was undertaken to explore whether patient and treatment characteristics impact the prognostic value of CTCs. PATIEN

  14. Primary tumor location and bevacizumab effectiveness in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, M K; Johansen, J S; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is an unmet need for predictive markers for the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to assess whether the location of the primary tumor is associated with bevacizumab effectiveness when combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPEOX...

  15. EGFR in Tumor-Associated Myeloid Cells Promotes Development of Colorectal Cancer in Mice and Associates With Outcomes of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, Sriram; Paul, Mariel C; Cardone, Claudia; Holcmann, Martin; Amberg, Nicole; Pathria, Paulina; Diamanti, Michaela A; Linder, Markus; Timelthaler, Gerald; Dienes, Hans P; Kenner, Lukas; Wrba, Fritz; Prager, Gerald W; Rose-John, Stefan; Eferl, Robert; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Martinelli, Erika; Greten, Florian R; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Sibilia, Maria

    2017-07-01

    Inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are the first-line therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal tumors without RAS mutations. However, EGFR inhibitors are ineffective in these patients, and tumor level of EGFR does not associate with response to therapy. We screened human colorectal tumors for EGFR-positive myeloid cells and investigated their association with patient outcome. We also performed studies in mice to evaluate how EGFR expression in tumor cells and myeloid cells contributes to development of colitis-associated cancer and Apc(Min)-dependent intestinal tumorigenesis. We performed immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses of 116 colorectal tumor biopsies to determine levels of EGFR in tumor and stroma; we also collected information on tumor stage and patient features and outcomes. We used the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests to correlate tumor levels of EGFR with tumor stage, and the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate patients' median survival time. We performed experiments in mice lacking EGFR in intestinal epithelial cells (Villin-Cre; Egfr(f/f) and Villin-CreER(T2); Egfr(f/f) mice) or myeloid cells (LysM-Cre; Egfr(f/f) mice) on a mixed background. These mice were bred with Apc(Min/+) mice; colitis-associated cancer and colitis were induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), with or without azoxymethane (AOM), respectively. Villin-CreER(T2) was activated in developed tumors by administration of tamoxifen to mice. Littermates that expressed full-length EGFR were used as controls. Intestinal tissues were collected; severity of colitis, numbers and size of tumors, and intestinal barrier integrity were assessed by histologic, immunohistochemical, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry analyses. We detected EGFR in myeloid cells in the stroma of human colorectal tumors; myeloid cell expression of EGFR associated with tumor metastasis and shorter patient

  16. Tumor characteristics and metastatic sites may predict bevacizumab efficacy in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varol, Umut; Oktay, Esin; YILDIRIM, Mustafa; SURMELI, ZEKI GOKHAN; Dirican, Ahmet; Meydan, Nezih; KARACA, BURCAK; Karabulut, Bulent; Uslu, Ruchan

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most frequently diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there was an improvement in the time to disease progression (TTP) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line bevacizumab plus chemotherapy, according to tumor characteristics and metastatic sites. Tumor characteristics and tumor burden were considered to be predictive markers of t...

  17. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inti; Zlobec; Francesca; Molinari; Vittoria; Martin; Luca; Mazzucchelli; Piercarlo; Saletti; Rosangela; Trezzi; Sara; De; Dosso; Tatjana; Vlajnic; Milo; Frattini; Alessandro; Lugli

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS:Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had...

  18. Tumor angiogenesis and dynamic CT in colorectal carcinoma: Radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Ping Li; Quan-Fei Meng; Can-Hui Sun; Da-Sheng Xu; Miao Fan; Xu-Feng Yang; Dong-Ying Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between microvessel density and spiral CT perfusion imaging in colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: Thirty-seven patients, with histologically proven colorectal carcinoma, underwent water enema spiral CT scan. The largest axial surface of the primary tumor was searched on unenhanced spiral CT images. At this level, the enhanced dynamic scan series was acquired.Time-density curves (TDC) were created from the region of interest drawn over the tumor, target artery by Toshiba Xpress/SX spiral CT with perfusion functional software.Then the perfusion was calculated. Microvessel density(MVD) was evaluated using immunohistochemical staining of surgical specimens with anti-CD34, and then MVD was correlated with perfusion.RESULTS: MVD of colorectal carcinomas was 33.11-173.44,mean 87.28, and perfusion was 15.60-64.80 mL/min/100 g, mean 39.74 mL/min/100 g. MVD and perfusionwere not associated with invasive depth, metastasis and disease stage, and they all decreased with increasing Dukes' stage, but no significant correlation was found between them (r= 0.L8, P = 0.29).CONCLUSION: There is no significant correlation between MVD and perfusion. Neovascularizaton and perfusion are highly presented in early colorectal carcinoma.CT perfusion imaging may be more suited for assessing tumorigenesis in colorectal carcinoma than histological MVD technique.

  19. Hypoxia-targeted triple suicide gene therapy radiosensitizes human colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HSIAO, HUNG TSUNG; XING, LIGANG; DENG, XUELONG; SUN, XIAORONG; LING, C. CLIFTON; LI, GLORIA C.

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic microenvironment, an important feature of human solid tumors but absent in normal tissue, may provide an opportunity for cancer-specific gene therapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether hypoxia-driven triple suicide gene TK/CD/UPRT expression enhances cytotoxicity to ganciclovir (GCV) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and sensitizes human colorectal cancer to radiation in vitro and in vivo. Stable transfectant of human colorectal HCT8 cells was established which expressed hypoxia-inducible vectors (HRE-TK/eGFP and HRE-CD/UPRT/mDsRed). Hypoxia-induced expression/function of TK, CD and UPRT was verified by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy and cytotoxicity assay of GCV and 5-FC. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC and GCV treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of TK/eGFP and CD/UPRT/mDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC and GCV in mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in tumor regression, as compared with prodrug or radiation treatments alone. Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible TK/GCV+CDUPRT/5-FC triple suicide gene therapy may have the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:24912473

  20. Is Bax/Bcl-2 ratio considered as a prognostic marker with age and tumor location in colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodapasand, Ehsan; Jafarzadeh, Narges; Farrokhi, Farid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Bax and Bcl-2 are the major members of Bcl-2 family whose play a key role in tumor progression or inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic members of this family can determine the cellular fate. In this study, the relative level of mRNA expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes was determined using RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and RT-qPCR technique from 22 tumoral tissues and adjacent non-tumoral tissues from adenocarcinoma colorectal cancer. The potential prognostic and predictive significance of Bax and Bcl-2 gene expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were demonstrated in colorectal cancer. The significant correlation between qPCR data and different clinicopathologic parameters of colorectal carcinoma, including age, gender, tumor size, tumor stage, tumor location, and tumor differentiation was also examined. Interestingly, no significant correlation was seen between Bax and Bcl-2 expressions and clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer. However, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was statistically correlated with age and tumor location. Patients with age above 50 showed decreased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly lower in tumors resected from colon compared to sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid and rectum tumors. This study indicates a significant correlation between age and tumor location with Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio, suggesting predictive value as a potential molecular marker of colorectal cancer.

  1. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine and Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Paraskeva, C. (Univ. of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  2. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zain, Zakiyah, E-mail: zac@uum.edu.my; Ahmad, Yuhaniz, E-mail: yuhaniz@uum.edu.my [School of Quantitative Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok 06010, Kedah (Malaysia); Azwan, Zairul, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Raduan, Farhana, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Sagap, Ismail, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com [Surgery Department, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Bandar Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Aziz, Nazrina, E-mail: nazrina@uum.edu.my

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  3. [Meta-analysis of relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianxiang; Shao, Shihong; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Maoshen; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The literatures on extranodal tumor deposits and postoperative survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer published at home and abroad from 1990 to 2014 were retrieved in 15 English literature databases such as MEDLINE/PubMed, Web of Science, Directory of Open Access Journals(DOAJ), SpringerLink and Chinese literature databases such as Chinese Biomedical Literature Database CD-ROM, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Database with the internet platform of Yonsei University Library. After screening for inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment, meta-analysis was conducted by the Review Manager 5.3 software. There were 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. The total sample size of the studies was 4 068 cases with ENTD(+) 727 cases, while ENTD(-) 3 341 cases. Meta analysis showed that 5-year overall survival rate and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were significantly lower in ENTD(+) group than those in ENTD(-) group (OR 0.27, 0.23; 95% CI:0.18 to 0.43, 0.16 to 0.34 respectively, both P=0.000); the 5-year overall survival rates were both significantly lower in ENTD(+) group as compared to ENTD(-) group for patients with N0 and N(+) colorectal cancer (both P<0.05). Extranodal tumor deposits is a poor prognostic factor of patients with colorectal cancer.

  4. CHIP/Stub1 functions as a tumor suppressor and represses NF-κB-mediated signaling in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangmeng; Ren, Fangli; Wang, Yinyin; Feng, Yarui; Wang, Dianjun; Jia, Baoqing; Qiu, Ying; Wang, Shiyan; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jy; Xu, Jiake; Zeps, Nikolajs; Chang, Zhijie

    2014-05-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP, also named Stub1), a U-box containing E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in degradation of certain oncogenic proteins. Recent studies indicated that CHIP suppresses tumor progression in human cancers by targeting Src-3, hypoxia inducible factor 1α, NF-κB, ErbB2 and c-Myc. Here, we report that CHIP was downregulated, predominantly, in the late stages of human colorectal cancer (CRC), and that the CHIP promoter was hypermethylated in CRC specimens. Overexpression of CHIP in HCT-116 cells resulted in impaired tumor growth in nude mice and decreased abilities of tumor cell migration and invasion. Conversely, depletion of CHIP in HCT-116 cells promoted tumor growth and increased tumor cell migration and invasion. CHIP was further found to negatively regulate NF-κB signaling in HCT-116 cells by promoting ubiquitination and degradation of p65, a subunit of the NF-κB complex. The suppressive effect of CHIP led to decreased expression of NF-κB-targeted oncogenes including Cyclin D1, c-Myc, MMP-2, VEGF and IL-8. We proposed that CHIP inhibits the malignancy of CRC cells, possibly through targeting NF-κB signaling. This study provides functional evidence for CHIP as a potential tumor suppressor in CRC, and CHIP expression may be a marker for stages of CRC.

  5. Epigenetic silencing of NTSR1 is associated with lateral and noninvasive growth of colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinuma, Takeshi; Yamano, Hiro-o; Nojima, Masanori; Yoshikawa, Kennjiro; Kimura, Tomoaki; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Harada, Taku; Maruyama, Reo; Sasaki, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Sugai, Tamotsu; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to identify DNA methylation changes associated with the growth pattern and invasiveness of colorectal cancers (CRCs). Comparison of the methylation statuses of large (≥20 mm in diameter along the colonic surface) noninvasive tumors (NTs) and small (<20 mm in diameter along the colonic surface) invasive tumors (ITs) using CpG island microarray analysis showed neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) to be hypermethylated in large NTs. Quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed that NTSR1 is frequently methylated in colorectal tumors, with large NTs exhibiting the highest methylation levels. The higher NTSR1 methylation levels were associated with better prognoses. By contrast, NTSR1 copy number gains were most frequent among small ITs. Methylation of NTSR1 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC cell lines, whereas ectopic expression of NTSR1 promoted proliferation and invasion by CRC cells. Analysis of primary tumors composed of adenomatous and malignant portions revealed that NTSR1 is frequently methylated in the adenomatous portion, while methylation levels are generally lower in the cancerous portions. These results suggest that NTSR1 methylation is associated with lateral and noninvasive growth of colorectal tumors, while low levels of methylation may contribute to the malignant potential through activation of NTSR1. Our data also indicate that NTSR1 methylation may be a prognostic biomarker in CRC. PMID:26334593

  6. Decision-making in Colorectal Cancer Tumor Board meetings: results of a prospective observational assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S; Arora, S; Atkin, G; Glynne-Jones, R; Mathur, P; Darzi, A; Sevdalis, N

    2014-10-01

    The management of colorectal cancer increasingly involves multidisciplinary tumor boards. In cases where these occur, the quality can be variable. Despite this, there are no uniform measures to evaluate them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of colorectal cancer tumor boards, via real-time prospective observation. An observational tool, termed Colorectal Multidisciplinary Team Metric for Observation of Decision-Making (cMDT-MODe), was used to assess decision-making in 267 cases. The presentation of case history, radiological and pathological information, as well as contributions to decision making of the various team members were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed using intraclasscorrelation coefficients. Tumor board meetings lasted 76 min, were attended by approximately 16 specialists each, and reviewed an average of 24 cancer cases (3 min per case review). Regarding the quality of presented information to the team, case history information was rated the highest (mean 4.57), followed by radiological information (mean 4.22) and pathological information (mean 3.81). Regarding each team-member's contribution to discussion, surgeons were scored the highest (mean 4.81), followed by radiologists (mean 4.41) and meeting chairs (mean 4.13)--all team members except the board coordinators were scored highly. Overall scoring reliability was good (0.79). The cMDT-MODe instrument can be reliably used to prospectively assess decision making in the multidisciplinary management of colorectal patients. By systematically quantifying the quality of a colorectal cancer tumor board, we can identify areas for improving practice so as to optimize decision making for cancer care.

  7. Identification of Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Colorectal Tumors in a Genome-Wide Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ulrike; Jiao, Shuo; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Baron, John A; Berndt, Sonja I; Bézieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Campbell, Peter T; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Lin S; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Coetzee, Simon G; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Edwards, Todd; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Gruber, Stephen B; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian E; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark A; Jia, Wei-Hua; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Lindor, Noralane M; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Matsuo, Keitaro; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Prentice, Ross L; Qu, Conghui; Rohan, Thomas; Rosse, Stephanie A; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shrubsole, Martha; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Taverna, Darin; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ulrich, Cornelia M; White, Emily; Xiang, Yongbing; Zanke, Brent W; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Ben; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Li

    2013-04-01

    Heritable factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer. Identifying the genetic loci associated with colorectal tumor formation could elucidate the mechanisms of pathogenesis. We conducted a genome-wide association study that included 14 studies, 12,696 cases of colorectal tumors (11,870 cancer, 826 adenoma), and 15,113 controls of European descent. The 10 most statistically significant, previously unreported findings were followed up in 6 studies; these included 3056 colorectal tumor cases (2098 cancer, 958 adenoma) and 6658 controls of European and Asian descent. Based on the combined analysis, we identified a locus that reached the conventional genome-wide significance level at less than 5.0 × 10(-8): an intergenic region on chromosome 2q32.3, close to nucleic acid binding protein 1 (most significant single nucleotide polymorphism: rs11903757; odds ratio [OR], 1.15 per risk allele; P = 3.7 × 10(-8)). We also found evidence for 3 additional loci with P values less than 5.0 × 10(-7): a locus within the laminin gamma 1 gene on chromosome 1q25.3 (rs10911251; OR, 1.10 per risk allele; P = 9.5 × 10(-8)), a locus within the cyclin D2 gene on chromosome 12p13.32 (rs3217810 per risk allele; OR, 0.84; P = 5.9 × 10(-8)), and a locus in the T-box 3 gene on chromosome 12q24.21 (rs59336; OR, 0.91 per risk allele; P = 3.7 × 10(-7)). In a large genome-wide association study, we associated polymorphisms close to nucleic acid binding protein 1 (which encodes a DNA-binding protein involved in DNA repair) with colorectal tumor risk. We also provided evidence for an association between colorectal tumor risk and polymorphisms in laminin gamma 1 (this is the second gene in the laminin family to be associated with colorectal cancers), cyclin D2 (which encodes for cyclin D2), and T-box 3 (which encodes a T-box transcription factor and is a target of Wnt signaling to β-catenin). The roles of these genes and their products in cancer pathogenesis warrant further

  8. Morphological and quantitative analysis of BCL6 expression in human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Paola; Mariani, Francesco; Benincasa, Marta; De Leon, Maurizio Ponz; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Mancini, Stefano; Cavani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Palumbo, Carla; Roncucci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether BCL6 is expressed during malignant transformation of the large bowel and to assess whether, and to what extent, immunoreactivity is related to the different stages of neoplastic progression. Samples of normal colorectal mucosa (n=22), microadenomas (n=22) and colorectal cancer (n=22), were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence coupled with confocal microscopy and western blotting. Our results clearly outlined the marked increase occurring in both intensity and density of BCL6 protein expression in the normal mucosa-microadenoma-carcinoma sequence. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses showed that BCL6 is expressed at low levels in normal mucosa and increases in microadenoma and in cancer with statistical significance. These results were confirmed by western blotting data. The increasing expression of BCL6 in human colorectal cancer development suggests the involvement of BCL6 in tumor progression, from the earliest stages of carcinogenesis with significant increase in cancer. The enhanced understanding of the biological role of BCL6, previously shown to exert a key role in lymphomagenesis, may lead to a re-evaluation of this protein and may highlight the importance of performing further studies in order to identify novel therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  9. Tumoral Immune Cell Exploitation in Colorectal Cancer Metastases Can Be Targeted Effectively by Anti-CCR5 Therapy in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, Niels; Zoernig, Inka; Berthel, Anna; Kahlert, Christoph; Klupp, Fee; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Suetterlin, Thomas; Brand, Karsten; Krauss, Juergen; Lasitschka, Felix; Lerchl, Tina; Luckner-Minden, Claudia; Ulrich, Alexis; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Juergen; Schneider, Martin; Buechler, Markus W; Zitvogel, Laurence; Herrmann, Thomas; Benner, Axel; Kunz, Christina; Luecke, Stephan; Springfeld, Christoph; Grabe, Niels; Falk, Christine S; Jaeger, Dirk

    2016-04-11

    The immune response influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Analyzing the invasive margin of human CRC liver metastases, we identified a mechanism of immune cell exploitation by tumor cells. While two distinct subsets of myeloid cells induce an influx of T cells into the invasive margin via CXCL9/CXCL10, CCL5 is produced by these T cells and stimulates pro-tumoral effects via CCR5. CCR5 blockade in patient-derived functional in vitro organotypic culture models showed a macrophage repolarization with anti-tumoral effects. These anti-tumoral effects were then confirmed in a phase I trial with a CCR5 antagonist in patients with liver metastases of advanced refractory CRC. Mitigation of tumor-promoting inflammation within the tumor tissue and objective tumor responses in CRC were observed.

  10. Tumor lysis syndrome following endoscopic radiofrequency interstitial thermal ablation of colorectal liver metastases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, B D

    2012-02-03

    Radiofrequency interstitial thermal ablation (RITA) provides a palliative option for patients suffering from metastatic liver disease. This procedure can be performed using a laparoscopic approach with laparoscopic ultrasound used to position the RITA probe. We describe a case of laparoscopic RITA performed for colorectal liver metastasis that was complicated by tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) following treatment. We consider RITA to be a safe procedure, as supported by the literature, but where intracorporal tumor lysis is the treatment goal we believe that the systemic release of tumor products can overwhelm the excretory capacity; therefore, TLS is an inevitable consequence in some patients.

  11. Specificity of lectin-immobilized fluorescent nanospheres for colorectal tumors in a mouse model which more resembles the clinical disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tokio; Sakuma, Shinji; Shimosato, Moe; Higashino, Haruki; Masaoka, Yoshie; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamashita, Shinji; Hiwatari, Ken-ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Morimoto, Naoki; Koike, Seiji; Tobita, Etsuo; Hoffman, Robert M.; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2014-01-01

    We are investigating an imaging agent that enables real-time and accurate diagnosis of early colorectal cancer at the intestinal mucosa by colonoscopy. The imaging agent is peanut agglutinin-immobilized polystyrene nanospheres with surface poly(N-vinylacetamide) chains encapsulating coumarin 6. Intracolonically-administered lectin-immobilized fluorescent nanospheres detect tumor-derived changes through molecular recognition of lectin for the terminal sugar of cancer-specific antigens on the mucosal surface. The focus of this study was to evaluate imaging abilities of the nanospheres in animal models that reflect clinical environments. We previously developed an orthotopic mouse model with human colorectal tumors growing on the mucosa of the descending colon to more resemble the clinical disease. The entire colon of the mice in the exposed abdomen was monitored in real-time with an in vivo imaging apparatus. Fluorescence from the nanospheres was observed along the entire descending colon after intracolonical administration of them from the anus. When the luminal side of the colon was washed with PBS, most of the nanospheres drained away. However, fluorescence persisted in areas where the cancer cells were implanted. Histological evaluation demonstrated that tumors were present in the mucosal epithelia where the nanospheres fluoresced. In contrast, no fluorescence was observed when control mice without tumors were tested. The lectin-immobilized fluorescent nanospheres were tumor specific and bound to tumors even after vigorously washing. The nanospheres non-specifically bound to normal mucosa were easily removed through mild washing. Results indicate that the nanospheres accompanied by colonoscopy will be a clinically-valuable diagnostic tool for the early stage primary colon carcinoma. PMID:24976331

  12. COL11A1 in FAP polyps and in sporadic colorectal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iselius Lennart

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that the α-1 chain of type 11 collagen (COL11A1, not normally expressed in the colon, was up-regulated in stromal fibroblasts in most sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Patients with germline mutations in the APC gene show, besides colonic polyposis, symptoms of stromal fibroblast involvement, which could be related to COL11A1 expression. Most colorectal carcinomas are suggested to be a result of an activated Wnt- pathway, most often involving an inactivation of the APC gene or activation of β-catenin. Methods We used normal and polyp tissue samples from one FAP patient and a set of 37 sporadic colorectal carcinomas to find out if the up-regulation of COL11A1 was associated with an active APC/β-catenin pathway. Results In this study we found a statistically significant difference in COL11A1 expression between normal tissue and adenomas from one FAP patient, and all adenomas gave evidence for an active APC/β-catenin pathway. An active Wnt pathway has been suggested to involve stromal expression of WISP-1. We found a strong correlation between WISP-1 and COL11A1 expression in sporadic carcinomas. Conclusions Our results suggest that expression of COL11A1 in colorectal tumors could be associated with the APC/β-catenin pathway in FAP and sporadic colorectal cancer.

  13. Expression of components of metabolic syndrome and related diseases in patients with colorectal tumor at different stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静

    2013-01-01

    Objective Through analyzing the expression of components of metabolic syndrome(MS)and related diseases in patients with colorectal tumor at different stages to assess their relationship with the development of

  14. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution.

  15. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Feldman

    Full Text Available Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution.

  16. SMC1A recruits tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) and promotes colorectal cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pengyang; Xiao, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Zhanhuai; Zheng, Shuchun; Shan, Siyang; Wang, Jianping; Du, Jinlin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-28

    Tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) are the most important host cells in the stroma and take part in extracellular matrix construction and cancer colony development. During cancer colonization, seed cells from primary tumor can reconstruct the microenvironment by recruiting circulating cancer cells and TAFs to the metastasis site. Previous studies have established that SMC1A, a subunit of cohesin, is an important trigger signal for liver metastasis in colorectal cancer. We investigated the particular effects as well as the underlying mechanism of SMC1A on TAFs recruitment during liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. Here, We found that: first, the high expression of SMC1A in colorectal cancer cells promotes the invasiveness and the viability of these cells by recruiting circulating TAFs, facilitating early tumor construction and tumorigenesis; second, different expression levels of SMC1A influenced the reformation of fibroblasts, which assisted tumorigenesis, and third, expression of SMC1A stimulated the secretion of the inflammatory mediators of TNF-α and IL-1β, and up-regulated the transcriptional expression of MMP2 and VEGF-β, both of which were involved in the tumor-related gene pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST and colorectal adenocarcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Felekouras

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST represent the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Over the last ten years the management of GISTs has dramatically altered but their coexistence with other gasrointesinal tumors of different histogenesis presents a special interest. The coexistence of GISTs with other primaries is usually discovered incidentally during GI surgery for carcinomas. Case presentation We present here, a case of a 66-year-old patient with intestinal GIST and a synchronous colorectal adenocarcinoma discovered incidentally during surgical treatment of the recurrent GIST. Immunohistochemical examination revealed the concurrence of histologically proved GIST (strongly positive staining for c-kit, vimentin, SMA, and focal positive in S-100, while CD-34 was negative and Dukes Stage C, (T3, N3, M0 according the TNM staging classification of colorectal cancer. Conclusion The coexistence of GIST with either synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancer represents a phenomenon with increasing number of relative reports in the literature the last 5 years. In any case of GIST the surgeon should be alert to recognize a possible coexistent tumor with different histological origin and to perform a thorough preoperative and intraoperative control. The correct diagnosis before and at the time of the surgical procedure is the cornerstone that secures the patients' best prognosis.

  18. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  19. Computer-aided colorectal tumor classification in NBI endoscopy using local features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Toru; Yoshimuta, Junki; Kawakami, Misato; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Takemura, Yoshito; Onji, Keiichi; Miyaki, Rie; Tanaka, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    An early detection of colorectal cancer through colorectal endoscopy is important and widely used in hospitals as a standard medical procedure. During colonoscopy, the lesions of colorectal tumors on the colon surface are visually inspected by a Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) zoom-videoendoscope. By using the visual appearance of colorectal tumors in endoscopic images, histological diagnosis is presumed based on classification schemes for NBI magnification findings. In this paper, we report on the performance of a recognition system for classifying NBI images of colorectal tumors into three types (A, B, and C3) based on the NBI magnification findings. To deal with the problem of computer-aided classification of NBI images, we explore a local feature-based recognition method, bag-of-visual-words (BoW), and provide extensive experiments on a variety of technical aspects. The proposed prototype system, used in the experiments, consists of a bag-of-visual-words representation of local features followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. A number of local features are extracted by using sampling schemes such as Difference-of-Gaussians and grid sampling. In addition, in this paper we propose a new combination of local features and sampling schemes. Extensive experiments with varying the parameters for each component are carried out, for the performance of the system is usually affected by those parameters, e.g. the sampling strategy for the local features, the representation of the local feature histograms, the kernel types of the SVM classifiers, the number of classes to be considered, etc. The recognition results are compared in terms of recognition rates, precision/recall, and F-measure for different numbers of visual words. The proposed system achieves a recognition rate of 96% for 10-fold cross validation on a real dataset of 908 NBI images collected during actual colonoscopy, and 93% for a separate test dataset.

  20. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  1. Using Positron Emission Tomography with [18F]FDG to Predict Tumor Behavior in Experimental Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Burt

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between FDG uptake as determined by positron emission tomography (PET imaging and rates of tumor growth, cellular GLUT1 transporter density, and the activities of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in a solid tumor implant model. Five different human colorectal xenografts of different growth properties were implanted in athymic rats and evaluated by dynamic 18F-FDG-PET. The phosphorylating and dephosphorylating activities of the key glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, were measured in these tumor types by spectrophotometric assays and the expression of GLUT1 glucose transporter protein was determined by immunohistochemistry. Correlations among FDG accumulation, hexokinase activity, and tumor doubling time are reported in these colon xenografts. The results indicate that the activity of tumor hexokinase may be a marker of tumor growth rate that can be determined by 18F-FDG-PET imaging. PET scanning may not only be a useful tool for staging patients for extent of disease, but may provide important prognostic information concerning the proliferative rates of malignancies.

  2. Effect of Yiqi Jianpi plus anticancer herbs on spleen deficiency in colorectal cancer and its anti-tumor role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ran Fu; Sheng-Wei Guo; Xian-Hui Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect ofYiqiJianpi plus anticancer herbs on spleen deficiency in colorectal cancer and its anti-tumor role.Methods:Human intestinal cancer cellHT29 xenograft of nude mice model was established.The expression ofEGF,VEGF, gastric cancer tumor growth in mice were observed.Results:Protein kinaseC expression in in theYiqiJianpi group andYiqi Jianpi anti-tumor group was significantly better than the model group(P<0.01,P<0.05).There was significantly more apoptotic cells inYiqiJianpi anti-tumor group thanYiqiJianpi group and model group(P<0.01).Epidermal growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor expression inYiqiJianpi group was significantly lower thanYiqiJianpi group and model group(P<0.05). Conclusions:Tumor can inhibit the expression ofPKC inhibition.YiqiJianpi and anticancer treatment can reduce this inhibition.Besides this treatment can also inhibit expression of tumor related genes such as epidermal growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor.

  3. Tumor budding is a strong and reproducible prognostic marker in T3N0 colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Lai Mun

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor budding along the advancing front of colorectal adenocarcinoma is an early event in the metastatic process. A reproducible, prognostic budding scoring system based on outcomes in early stage colorectal cancer has not been established. DESIGN: One hundred twenty-eight T3N0M0 colorectal carcinoma patients with known outcome were identified. Tumor budding was defined as isolated tumor cells or clusters of <5 cells at the invasive tumor front. Tumor bud counts were generated in 5 regions at 200x by 2 pathologists (conventional bud count method). The median bud count per case was used to divide cases into low (median=0) and high budding (median > or =1) groups. Forty cases were reevaluated to assess reproducibility using the conventional and a novel rapid bud count method. RESULTS: Fifty-seven (45%) carcinomas had high and 71 (55%) had low budding scores. High budding was associated with an infiltrative growth pattern (P<0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P=0.005). Five-year cancer-specific survival was significantly poorer in high compared with low budding groups: 63% versus 91%, respectively, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis demonstrated tumor budding to be independently prognostic (hazard ratio=4.76, P<0.001). Interobserver agreement was at least equivalent comparing the conventional to the rapid bud count methods: 87.5% agreement (kappa=0.75) versus 92.5% agreement (kappa=0.85), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor budding is a strong, reproducible, and independent prognostic marker of outcome that is easily assessed on hematoxylin and eosin slides. This may be useful for identifying the subset of T3N0M0 patients at high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  4. Safety, tumor trafficking and immunogenicity of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells specific for TAG-72 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Kristen M; Bergsland, Emily K; Fisher, George A; Nemunaitis, John J; Warren, Robert S; McArthur, James G; Lin, Andy A; Schlom, Jeffrey; June, Carl H; Sherwin, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have established efficacy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, but their relevance in solid tumors remains undefined. Here we report results of the first human trials of CAR-T cells in the treatment of solid tumors performed in the 1990s. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) were treated in two phase 1 trials with first-generation retroviral transduced CAR-T cells targeting tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 and including a CD3-zeta intracellular signaling domain (CART72 cells). In trial C-9701 and C-9702, CART72 cells were administered in escalating doses up to 10(10) total cells; in trial C-9701 CART72 cells were administered by intravenous infusion. In trial C-9702, CART72 cells were administered via direct hepatic artery infusion in patients with colorectal liver metastases. In both trials, a brief course of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was given with each CART72 infusion to upregulate expression of TAG-72. Fourteen patients were enrolled in C-9701 and nine in C-9702. CART72 manufacturing success rate was 100% with an average transduction efficiency of 38%. Ten patients were treated in CC-9701 and 6 in CC-9702. Symptoms consistent with low-grade, cytokine release syndrome were observed in both trials without clear evidence of on target/off tumor toxicity. Detectable, but mostly short-term (≤14 weeks), persistence of CART72 cells was observed in blood; one patient had CART72 cells detectable at 48 weeks. Trafficking to tumor tissues was confirmed in a tumor biopsy from one of three patients. A subset of patients had (111)Indium-labeled CART72 cells injected, and trafficking could be detected to liver, but T cells appeared largely excluded from large metastatic deposits. Tumor biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TAG-72 were measured in serum; there was a precipitous decline of TAG-72, but not CEA, in some patients due to induction of an interfering antibody to the TAG

  5. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  6. Right- vs. Left-Sided Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Differences in Tumor Biology and Bevacizumab Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ulivi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence of a different response to treatment with regard to the primary tumor localization (right-sided or left-sided in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. We analyzed the different outcomes and biomolecular characteristics in relation to tumor localization in 122 of the 370 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer enrolled onto the phase III prospective multicenter “Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa”, randomized to receive first-line chemotherapy (CT or CT plus bevacizumab (CT + B. RAS and BRAF mutations; baseline expression levels of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2, ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EPHB4, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP; and inflammatory indexes such as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-lymphocyte rate and systemic immune-inflammation index were evaluated. Patients with right-sided tumors showed a longer median progression-free survival in the CT + B arm than in the CT group (12.6 vs. 9.0 months, respectively, p = 0.017. Baseline inflammatory indexes were significantly higher in left-sided tumors, whereas eNOS and EPHB4 expression was significantly higher and BRAF mutation more frequent in right-sided tumors. Our data suggest a greater efficacy of the CT + B combination in right-sided mCRC, which might be attributable to the lower inflammatory status and higher expression of pro-angiogenic factors that appear to characterize these tumors.

  7. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  8. Marcadores tumorais no câncer colorretal Tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís César Fernandes

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a clinical entity of a persistent relevance in clinical practice and its early diagnosis is a determinant factor to obtain better therapeutic results. Tumor markers are helpful means for a better approach to individuals with such neoplasm. In the present review, the authors analyze the phases in which surgical-clinical treatment markers must be used: diagnosis, determination of tumor stage, establishment of prognosis and detection of recurrence. Current and future markers and the consensus on their use are discussed. Causal factors for errors in diagnosis with markers and perspectives of use are also presented.

  9. Roscovitine synergizes with conventional chemo-therapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Salah I Abaza; Abdul-Majeed A Bahman; Rajaa J Al-Attiyah

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine the ability of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor(CDKI)roscovitine(Rosco)to enhance the antitumor effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents acting by different mechanisms against human colorectal cancer.METHODS:Human colorectal cancer cells were treated,individually and in combination,with Rosco,taxol,5-Fluorouracil(S-FU),doxorubicine or vinblastine.The antiproliferative effects and the type of interaction of Rosco with tested chemotherapeutic drugs were determined.Cell cycle alterations were investigated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter FACS analysis.Apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation assay.RESULTS:Rosco inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner.The efficacies of all tested chemotherapeutic drugs were markedly enhanced 3.0-8.42×103 and 130-5.28×103 fold in combination with 5 and 10 μg/mL Rosco,re-spectively.The combinatiou of Rosco and chemotherapeutic drugs inhibited the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in an additive or synergistic fashion,and in a time and dose dependent manner.Rosco induced apoptosis and synergized with tested chemotherapeutic drugs to induce efficient apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.Sequential,inverted sequential and simultaneous treatment of cancer cells with combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs and Rosco arrested the growth of human colorectal cancer cells at various phases of the cell cycle as follows:Taxol/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases),5-FU/Rosco(S-phase),Dox/Rosco(S-phase)and Vinb/Rosco(G2/M-and S-phases).CONCLUSION:Since the efficacy of many anticancer drugs depends on their ability to induce apoptotic cell death,modulation of this parameter by Cell cycle inhibitors may provide a novel chemo-preventive and chemothempeutic strategy for human colorectal cancer.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  10. Human STEAP3 maintains tumor growth under hypoferric condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Taichi, E-mail: tisobe@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Baba, Eishi, E-mail: e-baba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arita, Shuji, E-mail: arita.s@nk-cc.go.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Komoda, Masato, E-mail: komoda@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tamura, Shingo, E-mail: tamshin@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: t-w-r@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ariyama, Hiroshi, E-mail: hariyama@kyumed.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takaishi, Shigeo, E-mail: takaishi@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kusaba, Hitoshi, E-mail: hkusaba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); and others

    2011-11-01

    Iron is essential in cellular proliferation and survival based on its crucial roles in DNA and ATP synthesis. Tumor cells proliferate rapidly even in patients with low serum iron, although their actual mechanisms are not well known. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of efficient tumor progression under the hypoferric condition, we studied the roles of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate family member 3 (STEAP3), which was reported to facilitate iron uptake. Using Raji cells with low STEAP3 mRNA expression, human STEAP3-overexpressing cells were established. The impact of STEAP3 expression was analyzed about the amount of iron storage, the survival under hypoferric conditions in vitro and the growth of tumor in vivo. STEAP3 overexpression increased ferritin, an indicator of iron storage, in STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells. STEAP3 gave Raji cells the resistance to iron deprivation-induced apoptosis. These STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells preserved efficient growth even in hypoferric mice, while parental Raji cells grew less rapidly. In addition, iron deficiency enhanced STEAP3 mRNA expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, human colorectal cancer tissues exhibited more STEAP3 mRNA expression and iron storage compared with normal colon mucosa. These findings indicate that STEAP3 maintains iron storage in human malignant cells and tumor proliferation under the hypoferric condition. -- Highlights: {yields} STEAP3 expression results in increment of stored intracellular iron. {yields} Iron deprivation induces expression of STEAP3. {yields} Colorectal cancer expresses STEAP3 highly and stores iron much. {yields} STEAP3 expressing tumors preserves growth even in mice being hypoferremia.

  11. Tumor type M2 pyruvate kinase expression in gastric cancer,colorectal cancer and controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhang; Jian-Ying Chen; Dao-Da Chen; Guo-Bin Wang; Ping Shen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Tumor formation is generally linked to an expansion of glycolytic phosphometabolite pools and aerobic glycolytic flux rates. To achieve this, tumor cells generally overexpress a special glycolytic isoenzyme, termed pyruvate kinase type M2. The present study was designed to evaluate the use of a new tumor marker, tumor M2-PK, in discriminating gastrointestinal cancer patients from healthy controls, and to compare with the reference tumor markers CEA and CA72-4.METHODS: The concentration of tumor M2-PK in body fluids could be quantitatively determined by a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-kit (ScheBo(R) Tech, Giessen, Germany). By using this kit, the tumor M2-PK concentration was measured in EDTA-plasma of 108 patients. For the healthy blood donors a cut-off value of 15 U/mL was evaluated, which corresponded to 90% specificity. Overall 108 patients were included in this study, 54 patients had a histological confirmed gastric cancer, 54 patients colorectal cancer, and 20 healthy volunteers served as controls.RESULTS: The cut-off value to discriminate patients from controls was established at 15 U/mL for tumor M2-PK. The mean tumor M2-PK concentration of gastric cancer was 26.937 U/mL. According to the TNM stage system, the mean tumor M2-PK concentration of stage Ⅰ was 16.324 U/mL, of stage Ⅱ 15.290 U/mL, of stage Ⅲ 30.289 U/mL, of stage Ⅳ127.31 U/mL, of non-metastasis 12.854 U/mL and of metastasis 35.711 U/mL. The mean Tumor M2-PK concentration of colorectal cancer was 30.588 U/mL. According to the Dukes stage system, the mean tumor M2-PK concentration of Dukes A was 16.638 U/mL, of Dukes B 22.070 U/mL, and of Dukes C 48.024 U/mL, of non-metastasis 19.501 U/mL, of metastasis 49.437 U/mL. The mean tumor M2-PK concentration allowed a significant discrimination of colorectal cancers (30.588 U/mL) from controls (10.965 U/mL) (P<0.01), and gastric cancer (26.937 U/mL) from controls (10.965 U/mL)(P<0.05). The overall

  12. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Changhua, E-mail: chkoukou@hotmail.com [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Zhou, Tian [Department of Gastroenterology, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Han, Xilin; Zhuang, Huijie [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Qian, Haixin, E-mail: qianhaixin@hotmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer.

  13. Expressional patterns of chaperones in ten human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavc Irene

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperones (CH play an important role in tumor biology but no systematic work on expressional patterns has been reported so far. The aim of the study was therefore to present an analytical method for the concomitant determination of several CH in human tumor cell lines, to generate expressional patterns in the individual cell lines and to search for tumor and non-tumor cell line specific CH expression. Human tumor cell lines of neuroblastoma, colorectal and adenocarcinoma of the ovary, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma, lung, cervical and breast cancer, promyelocytic leukaemia were homogenised, proteins were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of proteins and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis was carried out for the identification of CH. Results A series of CH was identified including the main CH groups as HSP90/HATPas_C, HSP70, Cpn60_TCP1, DnaJ, Thioredoxin, TPR, Pro_isomerase, HSP20, ERP29_C, KE2, Prefoldin, DUF704, BAG, GrpE and DcpS. Conclusions The ten individual tumor cell lines showed different expression patterns, which are important for the design of CH studies in tumor cell lines. The results can serve as a reference map and form the basis of a concomitant determination of CH by a protein chemical rather than an immunochemical method, independent of antibody availability or specificity.

  14. Identification of differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Chen; Yi-Zeng Zhang; Zong-Guang Zhou; Gang Wang; Zeng-Ni Yi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma.METHODS: The integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, high-throughput cDNA array, sequencing,bioinformatics analysis, and reverse transcriptase realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)was carried out. A set of cDNA clones including 1260SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with florescent-labeled probes prepared from RNA of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HCRAC) and normal colorectal tissues.RESULTS: A total of 86 genes were identified, 16 unknown genes and 70 known genes. The transcription factor Sox9 influencing cell differentiation was downregulated. At the same time, Heat shock protein 10 KDis downregulated and Calmoulin is up-regulated.CONCLUSION: Downregulation of heat shock protein 10 KD lost its inhibition of Ras, and then attenuated the Ras GTPase signaling pathway, increased cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. Down-regulated transcription factor Sox9 influences cell differentiation and cell-specific gene expression. Down-regulated Sox9 also decreases its binding to calmodulin, accumulates calmodulin as receptor-activated kinase and phosphorylase kinase due to the activation of PhK.

  15. [Application and prospect of circulating tumor cells detection in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingmin; Tang, Qingchao; Chen, Yinggang; Wang, Xishan

    2016-06-01

    About 30%-50% of colorectal cancer patients would develop recurrence and metastasis. At present, there is still a lack of effective evaluation method for recurrence, metastasis and prognosis. In recent years, a great progress about circulating tumor cells (CTC) in diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer has been made. The most common CTC detection methods include immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, PCR, immunomagnetic separation, optical fiber array scanning and CTC chip. Based on present studies, researchers reach the consensus that CTC is clinically valuable in the following aspects: detection of occult metastasis, monitor of disease progress and evaluation of response to treatment. With recent development of clinical specialization, multi-disciplinary treatment (MDT), gene detection and targeted therapy, individualized treatment may greatly improve overall survive and disease-free survival of colorectal cancer patients. However, the methods above depend on tumor tissues that are always impractical to obtain for late stage and non-surgery patients. Moreover, the size of specimen is always small, making gene expression and mutation detection difficult. CTC detection may solve such problems based on molecular biology with high plausibility and repeatability. Therefore, CTC detection can be used as a new diagnosis tool. It is believed that CTC detection will play an important role in early diagnosis, evaluating recurrence, metastasis, making individualized treatment and predicting prognosis.

  16. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  17. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models

    OpenAIRE

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3?,4?-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vi...

  18. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models

    OpenAIRE

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3′,4′-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vi...

  19. Identification of HNPCC by Molecular Analysis of Colorectal and Endometrial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. A. Vasen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, Lynch syndrome is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and other cancers and the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI in tumors. The Bethesda guidelines have been proposed for the identification of families suspected of HNPCC that require further molecular analysis. We have evaluated the yield of MSI-analysis in a large series of Dutch families suspected of HNPCC. We also analysed whether the loss of mismatch repair (MMR protein detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC of colorectal cancer (CRC and endometrial cancer correlated with the presence of MSI and/or a MMR gene mutation. The results showed that the Bethesda criteria with a few modifications are appropriate to identify families eligible for genetic testing. In addition, we found that MSI and IHC-analysis of CRC using antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 proteins are equally effective for identifying carriers of the known MMR gene defects. However, as long as the role of other putative MMR genes in hereditary CRC has not been elucidated, IHC-analysis cannot completely replace MSI. For this reason, we prefer MSI-analysis as first step in families suspected of HNPCC. On the other hand, in families fulfilling the revised Amsterdam criteria in which the probability of detecting a mutation is relatively high, we would recommend IHC as first diagnostic step because the result might predict the specific underlying MMR gene mutation. MSI or IHC-analysis of endometrial cancer alone was found to be less sensitive compared with these tests performed in colorectal cancer. Therefore, probably the best approach in the analysis of this cancer is to perform both techniques. The identification of HNPCC is important as it makes it possible to target effective preventative measures. Our studies showed that MSI and IHC analysis of colorectal and endometrial cancer, are reliable

  20. Expression and lymphatic microvessel density in primary tumors of node-neagtive colorectal cancer patients predict disease recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doekhie, F.S.; Morreau, H.; de Bock, G.H.; Speetjens, F.M.; Dekker-Ensink, N.G.; Putter, H.; vand e Velde, C.J.H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Kuppen, P.J.K.; Sialyl lewis, X.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 30% of curatively resected colorectal cancer patients with tumor-negative lymph nodes, show disease recurrence. We assessed whether these high-risk patients can be identified by examining primary tumors for the following blood and lymphatic vasculature markers: A) sialyl Lewis X (sLeX),

  1. Effect of dietary fiber on the induction of colorectal tumors and fecal beta-glucuronidase activity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H G; Asp, N G; Oste, R; Dahlqvist, A; Fredlund, P E

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether three different types of dietary fiber, wheat bran, carrot fiber, and citrus pectin, influenced the induction of colorectal tumors produced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. In all groups, the tumor yield was high (87 to 97%). In the wheat bran and carrot fiber groups, the incidence of colorectal tumors was not significantly different from that of the group fed on the fiber-free basic diet. The citrus pectin group, however, had a significantly higher incidence of colorectal tumors (p less than 0.001). An increased number of auditory duct tumors was also noted in this group. In a separate experiment, dietary pectin induced a 10-fold increase in fecal beta-glucuronidase activity but did not alter this activity in the bowel wall. It has been suggested that dietary fiber protects against the induction of colorectal tumors, but this was not the case in the experiment. It is possible that the high tumor yield made the demonstration of a weak protective effect of wheat bran impossible. The reason for the increased occurrence of tumors in the citrus pectin group is obscure and will be subjected to further investigation. Fecal beta-glucuronidase activity might be one factor of importance in the activation of the carcinogen.

  2. Prognostic and predictive value of circulating tumor cell analysis in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Albuquerque Andreia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic and predictive values of circulating tumor cell (CTC analysis in colorectal cancer patients. Patients and methods Presence of CTCs was evaluated in 60 colorectal cancer patients before systemic therapy - from which 33 patients were also evaluable for CTC analysis during the first 3 months of treatment - through immunomagnetic enrichment, using the antibodies BM7 and VU1D9 (targeting mucin 1 and EpCAM, respectively, followed by real-time RT-PCR analysis of the tumor-associated genes KRT19, MUC1, EPCAM, CEACAM5 and BIRC5. Results Patients were stratified into groups according to CTC detection (CTC negative, when all marker genes were negative; and CTC positive when at least one of the marker genes was positive. Patients with CTC positivity at baseline had a significant shorter median progression-free survival (median PFS 181.0 days; 95% CI 146.9-215.1 compared with patients with no CTCs (median PFS 329.0 days; 95% CI 299.6-358.4; Log-rank P Conclusion The present study provides evidence of a strong correlation between CTC detection and radiographic disease progression in patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that in addition to the current prognostic factors, CTC analysis represent a potential complementary tool for prediction of colorectal cancer patients’ outcome. Moreover, the present test allows for molecular characterization of CTCs, which may be of relevance to the creation of personalized therapies.

  3. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  4. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  5. Expression of p21WAF1 is related to acetylation of histone H3 in total chromatin in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xuan Chen; Jing-Yuan Fang; Rong Lu; De-Kai Qiu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between acetylation of histone in total chromatin and p21WAF1 expression regulation in human colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: We analyzed the expression of tumor suppressor gene p21WAF1 mRNA by RT-PCR or realtime PCR in 33 samples of colorectal cancerous tissue,corresponding para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa, and also examined the level of acetylated histone H3 in total chromatin using Western blotting.RESULTS: The expression level of p21WAF1 mRNA was significantly lower in colorectal cancerous tissue from 33 patients than in para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa (2377.95 ± 865.80 vs 3216.58 ±1149.42 and 3541.61 ± 1433.17 respectively, P <0.01). In addition, when p21WAF1 mRNA expression was undectectable or at very low level (50% less than that in adjacent tissue and normal colorectal mucosa) in all tissues, the level of acetylated histone H3 in colorectal cancerous tissue was significantly lower than that in corresponding para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa in five of seven (71.43%) cases. The transcriptional level of p21WAF1 in colorectal carcinoma might not be associated with its biological behaviors.CONCLUSION: The down-regulation of p21WAF1 transcription is involved in the tumorigenesis and development of colorectal carcinoma. The down-expression of p21WAF1 mRNA in colorectal carcinoma might be associated with histone hypoacetylation in chromatin but not with biological behaviors.

  6. Role of tumor-associated antigen expression in radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoglio, S; Percivale, P; Schenone, F; Peressini, A; Murolo, C; Badellino, F

    1998-12-01

    One hundred thirty-six patients with colorectal and breast cancer were enrolled in a retrospective study using radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with Iodine-125 (I125) radiolabeled B72.3 (Group A, 73 patients) and F023C5 (Group B, 63 patients) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The correlation between intraoperative tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) gamma-detecting probe (GDP) counts ratio and the expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 (GroupA patients) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; Group B patients) tumor-associated antigens (TAA) expression of 209 resected or biopsy tumor specimens was assessed. Ex vivo radioimmunolocalization index (R.I.) was carried out on the same specimens as a control of intraoperative GDP ratio values. RIGS positive definition of tumor occurred in 80/113 (70.8%) tumor sites of Group A patients and in 84/96 (87.5%) tumor sites of Group B patients. Mean percent B72.3 TAA expression of 113 tumor sites of Group A patients was 62.74 +/- 28.79% vs. 73.00 +/- 26.28% of 96 tumor sites of Group B patients (P < 0.05). The higher incidence of positive RIGS results was observed in tumor sites with the higher expression of the relative TAA. A statistically significant correlation between RIGS ratios and B72.3 and CEA expression was observed in the 113 tumor sites of Group A (P < 0.05) and in the 96 tumor sites of Group B (P < 0.01), respectively. The role of a preoperative evaluation of TAA expression in patients undergoing RIGS is discussed. Its assessment, whenever possible, may help to select those patients who will benefit more from this immunodiagnostic technique.

  7. Increases in c-Yes expression level and activity promote motility but not proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Jane; Hodgkinson, Cassandra; Hogg, Alison; Dive, Caroline; Welman, Arkadiusz

    2007-09-01

    Increases in the levels and/or activity of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases c-Src and c-Yes are often associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. The physiological consequences of increased c-Yes activity during the early and late stages of tumorigenesis, in addition to the degree of redundancy between c-Yes and c-Src in colorectal cancer cells, remain elusive. To study the consequences of increases in c-Yes levels and activity in later stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, we developed human colorectal cancer cell lines in which c-Yes levels and activity can be inducibly increased by a tightly controlled expression of wild-type c-Yes or by constitutively active mutants of c-Yes, c-YesY537F, and c-Yes Delta t6aa. c-Yes induction resulted in increased cell motility but did not promote proliferation either in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that in later stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, elevations in c-Yes levels/activity may promote cancer spread and metastasis rather than tumor growth.

  8. Targeting the tumor microenvironment as a potential therapeutic approach in colorectal cancer: Rational and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afsane; Khazaei, Majid; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; ShahidSales, Soodabeh; Joudi-Mashhad, Mona; Maftouh, Mina; Jazayeri, Mir Hadi; Parizade, Mohammad Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Avan, Amir

    2017-06-02

    Colorectal cancer (CC) is often diagnosed at a late stage when tumor metastasis may have already occurred. Current treatments are often ineffective in metastatic disease, and consequently late diagnosis is often associated with poor outcomes in CC. Alternative strategies are therefore urgently required. An interaction between epithelial cancer cells and their tissue microenvironment is a contributor to metastasis, and therefore recent studies are beginning to focus on the properties of the tumor microenvironment and the mechanism by which the metastatic cells exploit the tumor microenvironment for survival, immune evasion, and growth. We have reviewed the development of the combined therapeutic approaches that have focused on targeting the microenvironment of CC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Aberrant crypt foci in the colo-rectal mucosa as reliable markers of tumor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Inger

    The aim of the present thesis has been to evaluate a recently developed short term in vivo model, the aberrant crypt foci bioassay (ACF), for its ability to predict the development of colo-rectal tumors. Based on the knowledge obtained during the last decade, it can be stated that no simple...... connection exists between occurrence of ACF (neither qualitatively nor quantita- tively) and later development of tumors. However, the literature has shown that part of the ACF show morphologic and genetic features characteristic for the tumorigenic process and a recent investigation indicate that all ACF...... belong to the same unity with basically the same chances for gradual progressing into tumors. It may be speculated that the progression depends on promo- tional conditions in the environment....

  10. Inducing effects of hepatocyte growth factor on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human colorectal carcinoma cells through MEK and PI3K signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-hua; WEI Wei; XU Hao; WANG Yan-yan; WU Wen-xi

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a key role in human colorectal carcinoma invasion and metastasis. However, the regulation mechanism remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that several cytokines can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor cells. In this study, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Methods Hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in human serum were measured by ELISA.The mRNA level of vascular endothelial growth factor was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. Western blot assay was performed to evaluate levels of c-Met and several other proteins involved in the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in colorectal carcinoma cells.Results Serum hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly increased in colorectal carcinoma subjects. In vitro extraneous hepatocyte growth factor markedly increased protein and mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells. Hepatocyte growth factor induced phosphorylation of c-Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in a dose-dependent manner. Specific inhibitors on MEK and PI3K inhibited the hepatocyte growth factor-induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Conclusion This present study indicates that hepatocyte growth factor upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells via the MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways.

  11. Colorectal carcinoma evaluated by incremental dynamic CT; Comparison of CT density, histology, and tumor size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Hiroyoshi; Hara, Tsuyoshi; Taniguchi, Tetsushi (Shimizu Kosei Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1992-06-01

    Evaluation of incremental dynamic CT scan and histologic findings were compared in order to clarify the cause of the differences in colorectal carcinoma as observed on CT after administration of contrast medium. In 48 cases demonstrated on postcontrast dynamic CT scan, the CT density of the tumor was homogeneous (Type 1) in 26 (54.2%) cases and heterogeneous (Type 2) in 22 (45.8%) cases. Well differentiated adenocarcinoma was seen as Type 1 in 11 of 13 (84.6%) cases while moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma was of Type 1 in 15 of 29 (51.7%) cases. Poorly differentiated and mucinous adenocarcinoma were detected as Type 2 in all cases. A comparison of CT types and tumor size showed that as tumor size increased, the number of Type 1 cases decreased while Type 2 cases increased. Histologically, high density areas consisted mainly of well-developed tubular, branching glands of adenocarcinoma, while low density areas were composed of fibrous or mucinous stroma or necrosis. Dynamic CT scans for colorectal cancer are useful not only for preoperative staging but also for tissue characterization. (author).

  12. Tumor markers in finding recurrent disease in colorectal cancer: a diagnostic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Muller Kobold

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the search for evidence-based follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer, numerous tumor markers have been proposed. This review has evaluated these markers and comments on the diagnostic accuracy in finding recurrent disease in relation to Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA. Methods: A comprehensive literature review (1985-2010 was performed by two independent reviewers. Sensitivity and specificity of markers mentioned in the articles were checked by recalculation. A validated quality score system was used to estimate study quality. Results: Seventeen studies focusing on eight different markers were included. Three markers were shown to have comparable or better accuracy than CEA: TPA, CA 242 and CA 72-4 in at least one study. These three markers, from four independent studies, showed a tumor marker sensitivity of > 60% in combination with an outperformance of CEA in follow-up. These results were not confirmed by six other studies investigating the same markers. Conclusion: This review revealed three tumor markers other than CEA that have been shown to adequately indicate recurrences in colorectal cancer. However, comparability of studies was difficult. Therefore a prospective study of these markers seems necessary to investigate their real value, and to overcome design and inclusion biases.

  13. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Zheng; Li-Xin Jiang; Zhong-Chuan Lv; Da-Peng Li; Chong-Zhi Zhou; Jian-Jun Gao; Lin He; Zhi-Hai Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. METHODS: Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were eletrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by . RESULTS: Data were collected from all informative loci.The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (< 30%) by detailed deletion mapping. Significant opposite difference was observed between LOH frequency and tumor diameter on D4S412 and D4S1546 locus (0% vs 16.67%, P = 0.041; 54.55% vs 11.11%, P = 0.034, respectively). On D4S403 locus, LOH was significantly associated with tumor gross pattern (11.11%, 0, 33.33%, P = 0.030). No relationship was detected on other loci compared with clinicopathologial features. CONCLUSION: By deletion mapping, two obvious high frequency LOH regions spanning D4S3013 (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  14. Tumor suppress genes screening analysis on 4q in sporadic colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Jiang; Jie Xu; Zhao-Wen Wang; Da-Peng Li; Zhi-Hai Peng; Jian-Jun Gao; Lin He; Hai-Tao Zheng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To search candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) on chromosome 4Cl through detecting high loss of heterozygosity (LOH) regions in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients.METHODS: Thirteen fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).PCR products were eletrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer.Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis.Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors were performed by X2 test.RESULTS: Data were collected on all informative loci.The average LOH frequency on 4q was 28.56%,The D4S2915 locus showed highest LOH frequency (36.17%).Two obvious deletion regions were detected: one between D4S3000 and D4S2915 locus (4q12-21.1),another flanked by D4S407 and D4S2939 locus (4q25-31.1).None case showed complete deletion of 4q,most cases displayed interstitial deletion pattern solely.Furthermore,compared with clinicopathological features,a significant relationship was observed between LOH frequencies on D4S3018 locus.In tumors larger than 5 cm in diameter,LOH frequency was significantly higher than tumors that were less than 5 cm (56% vs 13.79%,P=0.01).On D4S1534 locus,LOH was significantly associated with liver metastasis (80% vs 17.25%,P=0.012).No relationship was detected on other locus compared with clinicopathologial features.CONCLUSION: By high resolution deletion mapping,two high frequency regions of LOH (4q12-21.1 and 4q25-31.1) were detected,which may contribute to locate TSGs on chromosome 4q involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) overexpression in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Francisco; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Wang, Shuli; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Lewin, Tal M; Orntoft, Torben F; Coleman, Rosalind A; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The alteration of the choline metabolite profile is a well-established characteristic of cancer cells. In colorectal cancer (CRC), phosphatidylcholine is the most prominent phospholipid. In the present study, we report that lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1; NM_024830.3), the enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine into phosphatidylcholine, was highly overexpressed in colorectal adenocarcinomas when compared to normal mucosas. Our microarray transcription profiling study showed a significant (p mucosas. Immunohistochemical analysis of colon tumors with a polyclonal antibody to LPCAT1 confirmed the upregulation of the LPCAT1 protein. Overexpression of LPCAT1 in COS7 cells localized the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria and increased LPCAT1 specific activity 38-fold. In cultured cells, overexpressed LPCAT1 enhanced the incorporation of [(14)C]palmitate into phosphatidylcholine. COS7 cells transfected with LPCAT1 showed no growth rate alteration, in contrast to the colon cancer cell line SW480, which significantly (p < 10(-5)) increased its growth rate by 17%. We conclude that LPCAT1 may contribute to total choline metabolite accumulation via phosphatidylcholine remodeling, thereby altering the CRC lipid profile, a characteristic of malignancy.

  16. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  17. Expression of Interleukin-11 and Interleukin-11 receptor in human colorectal adenocarcinoma; Immunohistochemical analyses and correlation with clinicopathological factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuyuki Yamazumi; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Takafumi Kusaba; Chun Yang Wen; Ayumi Yoshizaki; Yuichi Yakata; Takeshi Nagayasu; Ichiro Sekine

    2006-01-01

    AIM: There is strong evidence that interleukin-11 (IL-11)is involved in the regulation of tumor progression, cellular growth and differentiation. Recently, interleukin-11receptor (IL-11R) has been detected on some cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of IL-11 and IL-11R in colorectal adenocarcinoma.METHODS: To elucidate the involvement of IL-11 and IL-11Rα in human intestinal adenocarcinomas, we examined 115 cases of surgically resected human colonic adenocarcinoma and 11 cases of adenoma by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.RESULTS: Among 115 cases of adenocarcinoma, 100cases (87.0%) showed positive staining in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells for the IL-11, and 87 cases (75.6%)were positive for the IL-11Rα. Six cases (54.5%) and four cases (36.4%) of 11 adenomas were positive for IL-11 and IL-11Rα, respectively. The expression of IL-11Rα correlated with the histological differentiation (P =0.033503), the depth of tumor invasion (P= 0.006395),Dukes classification (P= 0.015648) and lymphatic invasion (P=0.003865). However, the expression of IL-11Rα was not correlated with the venous invasion and the presence of lymph node metastasis. The expression of IL-11 was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors. In Western blot analysis, two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines and four tissues of surgically resected human carcinoma expressed both IL-11 and IL-11Rαproteins.CONCLUSION: IL-11 and IL-11Rα are highly expressed in human colorectal adenocarcinoma and the IL-11Rα expression is correlated with clinicopathological factors.These findings suggest that the expression of IL-11Rα is an important factor for the invasion of human colorectal adenocarcinoma.

  18. Analysis of factors affecting local tumor progression of colorectal cancer liver metastasis after radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong Hee; Cho, Yun Ku; Choi, Seung A; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Ho Suk [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent predictive factors for local tumor progression (LTP) of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Patients with CRLM were included in the analysis if nodules were up to five in number, each nodule was ≤ 5 cm, and RFA was performed in our center from January 2006 to December 2015. Univariate and multivariate analyses to identify the predictors of LTP were performed by using a Cox proportional hazard model. Overall, 58 tumors from 38 patients were included in this study. LTP occurred in 14 tumors from 9 patients. The overall 1- and 3-year LTP rates were 23.5% and 29.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size > 2 cm and insufficient ablative margin were two independently significant adverse prognostic factors for LTP (p = 0.045 and 0.022, respectively). The 3-year LTP rates for 33 and 25 tumors with and without sufficient ablative margin were 4.5% and 61.2%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The difference in the 3-year LTP rates according to the tumor size was not statistically significant (p = 0.791). Insufficient ablative margin seems to be the most potent predictor of LTP after RFA of CRLM.

  19. Chemotherapy for Liver Metastasis Originating from Colorectal Cancer with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kawasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a male in his 70s with a history of chronic renal failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. In January 2011, he underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum, right hepatic lobectomy, and resection of a portal vein tumor thrombus with a diagnosis of rectal cancer and metastatic liver cancer accompanied by portal vein tumor thrombosis. Although 5-fluorouracil + l-leucovorin therapy (RPMI regimen was carried out as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, the tumor marker (CEA and VA19-9 levels increased 8 months after surgery. Since the functions of major organs were impaired, UFT® + UZEL® therapy was started. The tumor marker levels decreased temporarily, but increased again 12 months after surgery, and so intravenous instillation of panitumumab was initiated. Nine administrations have been performed to date, with no increase in tumor marker levels or exacerbation of the condition. Also, no grade 2 or severer adverse event has been noted according to CTCAE v.4.0. The experience with this patient suggests the possibility that exacerbation of the condition of patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer accompanied by portal vein tumor thrombosis with abnormalities in the functions of major organs can be controlled temporarily by the administration of panitumumab alone.

  20. Prox1 Promotes Expansion of the Colorectal Cancer Stem Cell Population to Fuel Tumor Growth and Ischemia Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Wiener

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC initiation and growth is often attributed to stem cells, yet little is known about the regulation of these cells. We show here that a subpopulation of Prox1-transcription-factor-expressing cells have stem cell activity in intestinal adenomas, but not in the normal intestine. Using in vivo models and 3D ex vivo organoid cultures of mouse adenomas and human CRC, we found that Prox1 deletion reduced the number of stem cells and cell proliferation and decreased intestinal tumor growth via induction of annexin A1 and reduction of the actin-binding protein filamin A, which has been implicated as a prognostic marker in CRC. Loss of Prox1 also decreased autophagy and the survival of hypoxic tumor cells in tumor transplants. Thus, Prox1 is essential for the expansion of the stem cell pool in intestinal adenomas and CRC without being critical for the normal functions of the gut.

  1. Aminopeptidase A initiates tumorigenesis and enhances tumor cell stemness via TWIST1 upregulation in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hui-Yu; Jiang, Jeng-Kae; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Li, Ming-Chun; Tsai, Chan-Yen; Jhang, Yau-Yun; Huang, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis accounts for the high mortality rate associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), but metastasis regulators are not fully understood. To identify a novel gene involved in tumor metastasis, we used oligonucleotide microarrays, transcriptome distance analyses, and machine learning algorithms to determine links between primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. Aminopeptidase A (APA; also known as ENPEP) was selected as our focus because its relationship with colorectal cancer requires clarification. Higher APA mRNA levels were observed in patients in advanced stages of cancer, suggesting a correlation between ENPEP and degree of malignancy. Our data also indicate that APA overexpression in CRC cells induced cell migration, invasion, anchorage-independent capability, and mesenchyme-like characteristics (e.g., EMT markers). We also observed TWIST induction in APA-overexpressing SW480 cells and TWIST down-regulation in HT29 cells knocked down with APA. Both APA silencing and impaired APA activity were found to reduce migratory capacity, cancer anchorage, stemness properties, and drug resistance in vitro and in vivo. We therefore suggest that APA enzymatic activity affects tumor initiation and cancer malignancy in a TWIST-dependent manner. Results from RT-qPCR and the immunohistochemical staining of specimens taken from CRC patients indicate a significant correlation between APA and TWIST. According to data from SurvExpress analyses of TWIST1 and APA mRNA expression profiles, high APA and TWIST expression are positively correlated with poor CRC prognosis. APA may act as a prognostic factor and/or therapeutic target for CRC metastasis and recurrence. PMID:28177885

  2. DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS-induced tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Chou; Wang, Lee; Lee, Huei

    2016-01-01

    DDX3 plays a dual role in colorectal cancer; however, the role and underlying mechanism of DDX3 in colorectal tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS transcription via an increase in SP1 binding to its promoter. Accelerating oncogenic KRAS expression by DDX3 promotes the invasion capability via the ERK/PTEN/AKT/β-catenin cascade. Moreover, the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis is responsible for DDX3-induced cell invasiveness and xenograft lung tumor nodule formation. The xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone were nearly suppressed by the inhibitor of AKT (perifosine) or β-catenin (XAV939). Among patients, high KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin expression and high ZEB1 were more commonly occurred in high-DDX3 tumors than in low-DDX3 tumors. High-DDX3, high-KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin tumors, and high-ZEB1 exhibited worse overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) than their counterparts. In conclusion, DDX3 may play an oncogenic role to promote tumor growth and invasion in colon cancer cells via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis due to increasing KRAS transcription. We therefore suggest that AKT or β-catenin may potentially act as a therapeutic target to improve tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer patients who harbored high-DDX3 tumors. PMID:27007150

  3. Rock2 stabilizes β-catenin to promote tumor invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yumin; Yuan, Rongfa; Zhang, Shouhua; Chen, Leifeng; Huang, Da; Hao, Haibin; Shao, Jianghua

    2015-11-27

    Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (Rock2) is an effector for the small GTPase Rho and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of Rock2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) still remains unclear. In this study, we found that Rock2 expression was markedly increased in clinical CRC tissues compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High expression of Rock2 was correlated with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis in CRC. In addition, the knockdown of Rock2 suppressed the invasion and metastasis of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that the β-catenin/TCF4 pathway contributed to the effects of Rock2 in CRC cells, and Rock2 stabilized β-catenin by preventing its ubiquitination and degradation. Taken together, this novel pathway for β-catenin control plays a biologically relevant role in CRC metastasis.

  4. Frameshift mutation of UVRAG: Switching a tumor suppressor to an oncogene in colorectal cancer.

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    He, Shanshan; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. It has a nearly 50% metastasis rate and only a subset of patients respond to current treatment strategy. UVRAG, a key autophagy effector and a guardian of chromosomal stability, is truncated by a frameshift (FS) mutation in CRC with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the pathological and clinical significance of this UVRAG truncation remains less understood. Our recent study discovered that this FS mutation yields a much shortened form of the UVRAG protein, which counteracts most of the tumor-suppressor functions of wild-type (WT) UVRAG in autophagy, centrosome stability, and DNA repair in a dominant-negative fashion. Whereas this truncated mutation of UVRAG promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis, it appears to sensitize CRC tumors to adjuvant chemotherapy, making it a potential molecular marker to individualize therapeutic approach in CRC.

  5. Changed adipocytokine concentrations in colorectal tumor patients and morbidly obese patients compared to healthy controls

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    Hillenbrand Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been associated with increased incidence of colorectal cancer. Adipose tissue dysfunction accompanied with alterations in the release of adipocytokines has been proposed to contribute to cancer pathogenesis and progression. The aim of this study was to analyze plasma concentrations of several adipose tissue expressed hormones in colorectal cancer patients (CRC and morbidly obese (MO patients and to compare these concentrations to clinicopathological parameters. Methods Plasma concentrations of adiponectin, resistin, leptin, active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-1 alpha, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha were determined in 67 patients operated on for CRC (31 rectal cancers, 36 colon cancers, 37 patients operated on for morbid obesity and 60 healthy blood donors (BD. Results Compared to BD, leptin concentrations were lowered in CRC patients whereas those of MO patients were elevated. Adiponectin concentrations were only lowered in MO patients. Concentrations of MCP-1, PAI-1, and IL-1 alpha were elevated in both CRC and MO patients, while resistin and TNF-alpha were similarly expressed in MO and CRC patients compared to BD. Resistin concentrations positively correlated with tumor staging (p Conclusions The results suggest that both MO and CRC have low-grade inflammation as part of their etiology.

  6. Chlorinated Water Modulates the Development of Colorectal Tumors with Chromosomal Instability and Gut Microbiota in Apc-Deficient Mice.

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    Sasada, Tatsunari; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Takakura, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to a variety of chemicals and commensal bacteria. Recent studies have shown that changes in gut microbial populations caused by chlorine or other chemicals in the drinking water influence the development of human colorectal cancer, although the mechanism of tumorigenesis in the gut epithelium is obfuscated by the diversity of microflora and complexity of the tumor microenvironment. In this regard, mouse models that recapitulate human colorectal cancer are an invaluable tool. In this study, we used two conditional adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) knockout mouse models to investigate the effect of chlorinated water on tumorigenesis in the digestive tract. Mice with colon-specific carcinoma--caused by either chromosomal (CDX2P 9.5-NLS Cre;Apc(+/flox), abbreviated to CPC;Apc) or microsatellite (CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox)) instability, respectively--were administered chlorinated (10.0 mg/L chlorine) or tap (0.7 mg/L chlorine) water and evaluated for colon polyp formation. In CPC;Apc mice given chlorinated drinking water, tumors tended to develop in the colon, whereas in those that drank tap water, tumors were mostly observed in the small intestine. There was no difference in the rate of tumor formation of CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox) mice consuming chlorinated as compared to tap water, suggesting that microsatellite instability in the Apc gene does not significantly affect tumorigenesis. Chlorinated water altered the enteric environment by reducing the fecal populations of the obligatory anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile, as well as species belonging to the Atopobium cluster, including Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus sp., which was associated with colon tumorigenesis in CPC;Apc mice. These results suggest that differences in tumorigenesis among CPC;Apc mice consuming chlorinated versus tap water may be due to differences

  7. Chlorinated Water Modulates the Development of Colorectal Tumors with Chromosomal Instability and Gut Microbiota in Apc-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunari Sasada

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to a variety of chemicals and commensal bacteria. Recent studies have shown that changes in gut microbial populations caused by chlorine or other chemicals in the drinking water influence the development of human colorectal cancer, although the mechanism of tumorigenesis in the gut epithelium is obfuscated by the diversity of microflora and complexity of the tumor microenvironment. In this regard, mouse models that recapitulate human colorectal cancer are an invaluable tool. In this study, we used two conditional adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc knockout mouse models to investigate the effect of chlorinated water on tumorigenesis in the digestive tract. Mice with colon-specific carcinoma--caused by either chromosomal (CDX2P 9.5-NLS Cre;Apc(+/flox, abbreviated to CPC;Apc or microsatellite (CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox instability, respectively--were administered chlorinated (10.0 mg/L chlorine or tap (0.7 mg/L chlorine water and evaluated for colon polyp formation. In CPC;Apc mice given chlorinated drinking water, tumors tended to develop in the colon, whereas in those that drank tap water, tumors were mostly observed in the small intestine. There was no difference in the rate of tumor formation of CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox mice consuming chlorinated as compared to tap water, suggesting that microsatellite instability in the Apc gene does not significantly affect tumorigenesis. Chlorinated water altered the enteric environment by reducing the fecal populations of the obligatory anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile, as well as species belonging to the Atopobium cluster, including Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus sp., which was associated with colon tumorigenesis in CPC;Apc mice. These results suggest that differences in tumorigenesis among CPC;Apc mice consuming chlorinated versus tap water may be due to

  8. DNA Ploidy and p53 Expression Associated with Tumor Site and Lymph Node Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the association of DNA ploidy abnormality and p53 overexpression with the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. Methods: DNA ploidy and p53 expression were measured in a series of 42 colorectal adenocarcinomas by means of flow cytometry and immunohistochemical test. Results: 17 tumors (40%) were diploid and 25 (60%) aneuploid. The aneuploid tumors were significantly more common in the distal colon than in the proximal colon (P<0.01). Aneuploidy was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). There was no correlation between DNA ploidy and the other clinicopathological variables. Of the 22 samples examined, the positive rate of p53 expression was 59% (13/22). P53 expression was more frequently observed in the distal tumors (11/13) than in the proximal tumors (2/9) (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our data support the hypothesis that the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer might differ in proximal and distal tumors. DNA ploidy abnormality and p53 overexpression may play an important role in the development of distal colorectal cancer.

  9. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  10. Tumor deposit is a poor prognostic indicator in patients who underwent simultaneous resection for synchronous colorectal liver metastases

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    Lin Q

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qi Lin,# Ye Wei,# Li Ren,# Yunshi Zhong,# Chunzhi Qin, Peng Zheng, Pingping Xu, Dexiang Zhu, Meiling Ji, Jianmin XuDepartment of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China#These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Tumor deposits are one of the important influencing factors among the different editions of Tumor, Node, Metastasis classification. Incidence and prognosis of tumor deposits in stage I, II, and III colorectal cancer patients has been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of tumor deposits in stage IV colorectal cancer patients who underwent simultaneous resection for synchronous colorectal liver metastases (SCRLM.Methods: Clinicopathological and outcome data of 146 consecutive SCRLM patients who underwent simultaneous R0 resection between July 2003 and July 2013 were collected from our prospectively established SCRLM database. The prognostic value of tumor deposits was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression analysis.Results: Tumor deposits were detected in 41.8% (61/146 of these SCRLM patients. Tumor deposits were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and nerve invasion of the primary tumors (P=0.002, P=0.041; respectively. The Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of SCRLM patients with tumor deposits were significantly poorer than those with no tumor deposits (P=0.039, P=0.001; respectively. And with multivariate analysis, we found that positive tumor deposits were significantly associated with shorter DFS independent of lymph node status (P=0.002. Subgroup analysis found that of the 57 SCRLM patients with negative lymph node status, the OS and DFS of patients with positive tumor deposits were significantly shorter than those with negative tumor deposits (P=0.002 and P=0.031, respectively. Of the 89 patients with positive lymph node status, the OS of

  11. Correlation between metastatic potential and variants from colorectal tumor cell line HT-29

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Ilka Vogel; Holger Kalthoff

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between uPA, PAI-1,CEA, PI3K and metastatic potential in three colorectal tumor cell lines.METHODS: Metastatic model in nude rats was established by variants HT-29c and HT-29d cell lines and the metastatic potential of two tumor cell variants was compared.Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) were determined using ELISA in colorectal carcinoma WiDr, HT29 and HT-29d cell lines with different metastatic potentials.Expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-Kinase) was analyzed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in these cell lines in vitro and in vivo. CEA expression was compared using fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS)in vitro.RESULTS: The number of HT-29d cells arrested in liver dramatically decreased within the initial 24 hours after injection. The taking rate of liver metastases in the variant HT-29d increased as compared with parental HT-29 cells (70 % versus 50 %) and a variant HT-29b cells (70 % versus 60 %), and extensive organs were synchronously involved in metastases. The uPA concentration of variant HT-29d cell line was significantly higher than that of the non-metastatic WiDr and the low metastatic HT-29 cell lines. The variant HT-29d cells produced stronger PI3-kinase expression as compared with the non-metastatic WiDr cells and the low metastatic HT-29 cellsin vivo.CONCLUSION: The selected variant HT-29d cell exhibited an enhanced metastatic potential. The level of uPA and PAI-1 is positively correlated with the metastatic capacity of tumor cells. The expression of PI3-kinase correlates with tumor development and metastasis.

  12. Is there a prognostic value of tumor location among Chinese patients with colorectal cancer?

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    Liu, Fangqi; Li, Cong; Jia, Huixun; Yang, Li; Wu, Yuchen; Zhao, Jiang; Cai, Sanjun; Zhu, Ji; Xu, Ye

    2017-06-13

    Differences in epidemiology, pathological features, and molecular pathogeneses have been observed according to primary tumor location in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, predicting CRC survival by tumor location remains controversial. Therefore, we compared the pathological characteristics, molecular features, and prognoses of right-side colon cancer (RCC), left-side colon cancer (LCC), and rectal cancer (RECC) among Chinese patients with CRC. We evaluated 4,426 patients with stage I-III CRC between January 2008 and July 2014from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. All patients were grouped by the locations of tumors (RCC, LCC, and RECC). Patients with RCC were more likely to be women and older, have poorly differentiated tumors, microsatellite repair deficiency (dMMR), negative p53 expression, and the mucinous subtype. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed survival in RCC than in LCC and RECC. However, there were no significant differences in OS and DFS between LCC and RECC. The same results were observed for each disease stage. Unadjusted models revealed an increased risk of mortality, recurrence, or metastasis for RCC (OS: HR, 1.68, P=0.0002 and DFS: HR, 1.24, P=0.032), compared to LCC (all stages), and a similar result was observed for stage III patients (OS: HR, 1.79, Plocations. Tumor location was not an independent prognostic factor among Chinese patients with stage I-III CRC. But RCCs had a worse prognosis in the dMMR subgroup. The related mechanism remains to be investigated.

  13. Tumor Budding, uPA, and PAI-1 in Colorectal Cancer: Update of a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märkl, Bruno; Hardt, Jochen; Franz, Simon; Schaller, Tina; Schenkirsch, Gerhard; Kriening, Bernadette; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Rüth, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Aims. The prognostic role of the proteases uPA and PAI-1, as well as tumor budding, in colon cancer, has been investigated previously. Methods. We provide 6-year follow-up data and results of the validation set. The initial test set and validation set consisted of 55 colon cancers and 68 colorectal cancers, respectively. Tissue samples were analyzed for uPA and PAI-1 using a commercially available Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Tumor budding was analyzed on cytokeratin-stained slides. Survival analyses were performed using cut-offs that were determined previously. Results. uPA was not prognostic for outcome. PAI-1 showed a trend towards reduced cancer specific survival in PAI-1 high-grade cases (68 versus 83 months; P = 0.091). The combination of high-grade PAI-1 and tumor budding was associated with significantly reduced cancer specific survival (60 versus 83 months; P = 0.021). After pooling the data from both sets, multivariate analyses revealed that the factors pN-stage, V-stage, and a combination of tumor budding and PAI-1 were independently prognostic for the association with distant metastases. Conclusions. A synergistic adverse effect of PAI-1 and tumor budding in uni- and multivariable analyses was found. PAI-1 could serve as a target for anticancer therapy.

  14. KRAS genotypic changes of circulating tumor cells during treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Aristea Kalikaki

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs could represent a non-invasive source of cancer cells used for longitudinal monitoring of the tumoral mutation status throughout the course of the disease. The aims of the present study were to investigate the detection of KRAS mutations in CTCs from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC and to compare their mutation status during treatment or disease progression with that of the corresponding primary tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Identification of the seven most common KRAS mutations on codons 12 and 13 was performed by Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA-based qPCR method. The sensitivity of the assay was determined after isolation of KRAS mutant cancer cells spiked into healthy donors' blood, using the CellSearch Epithelial Cell kit. Consistent detection of KRAS mutations was achieved in samples containing at least 10 tumor cells/7.5 ml of blood. RESULTS: The clinical utility of the assay was assessed in 48 blood samples drawn from 31 patients with mCRC. All patients had PIK3CA and BRAF wild type primary tumors and 14 KRAS mutant tumors. CTCs were detected in 65% of specimens obtained from 74% of patients. KRAS mutation analysis in CTC-enriched specimens showed that 45% and 16.7% of patients with mutant and wild type primary tumors, respectively, had detectable mutations in their CTCs. Assessing KRAS mutations in serial blood samples revealed that individual patient's CTCs exhibited different mutational status of KRAS during treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The current findings support the rationale for using the CTCs as a dynamic source of tumor cells which, by re-evaluating their KRAS mutation status, could predict, perhaps more accurately, the response of mCRC patients to targeted therapy.

  15. Overlapping expression of microRNAs in human embryonic colon and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are essential for regulating cell differentiation and maintaining the pluripotent state of stem cells. Although dysregulation of specific miRNAs has been associated with certain types of cancer, to date no evidence has linked miRNA expression in embryonic and tumor tissues. We assessed the expression of mature miRNAs in human embryonic colon tissue, and in colorectal cancer and paired normal colon tissue. Overlapping miRNA expression was detected between embryonic colonic mucosa and colorectal cancer. We have found that the miR-17-92 cluster and its target, E2F1, exhibit a similar pattern of expression in human colon development and colonic carcinogenesis, regulating cell proliferation in both cases. In situ hybridization confirmed the high level of expression of miR-17-5p in the crypt progenitor compartment. We conclude that miRNA pathways play a major role in both embryonic development and neoplastic transformation of the colonic epithelium.

  16. TRAP1 is involved in BRAF regulation and downstream attenuation of ERK phosphorylation and cell-cycle progression: a novel target for BRAF-mutated colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condelli, Valentina; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Sisinni, Lorenza; Matassa, Danilo Swann; Maddalena, Francesca; Lettini, Giacomo; Simeon, Vittorio; Palladino, Giuseppe; Amoroso, Maria Rosaria; Trino, Stefania; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo

    2014-11-15

    Human BRAF-driven tumors are aggressive malignancies with poor clinical outcome and lack of sensitivity to therapies. TRAP1 is a HSP90 molecular chaperone deregulated in human tumors and responsible for specific features of cancer cells, i.e., protection from apoptosis, drug resistance, metabolic regulation, and protein quality control/ubiquitination. The hypothesis that TRAP1 plays a regulatory function on the BRAF pathway, arising from the observation that BRAF levels are decreased upon TRAP1 interference, was tested in human breast and colorectal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. This study shows that TRAP1 is involved in the regulation of BRAF synthesis/ubiquitination, without affecting its stability. Indeed, BRAF synthesis is facilitated in a TRAP1-rich background, whereas increased ubiquitination occurs upon disruption of the TRAP1 network that correlates with decreased protein levels. Remarkably, BRAF downstream pathway is modulated by TRAP1 regulatory activity: indeed, TRAP1 silencing induces (i) ERK phosphorylation attenuation, (ii) cell-cycle inhibition with cell accumulation in G0-G1 and G2-M transitions, and (iii) extensive reprogramming of gene expression. Interestingly, a genome-wide profiling of TRAP1-knockdown cells identified cell growth and cell-cycle regulation as the most significant biofunctions controlled by the TRAP1 network. It is worth noting that TRAP1 regulation on BRAF is conserved in human colorectal carcinomas, with the two proteins being frequently coexpressed. Finally, the dual HSP90/TRAP1 inhibitor HSP990 showed activity against the TRAP1 network and high cytostatic potential in BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma cells. Therefore, this novel TRAP1 function represents an attractive therapeutic window to target dependency of BRAF-driven tumors on TRAP1 translational/quality control machinery.

  17. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  18. Complementary analysis of microsatellite tumor profile and mismatch repair defects in colorectal carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo Blanes; Salvador J Diaz-Cano

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a prognostic factor and a marker of deficient mismatch repair (MMR) in colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRC). However, a proper application of this marker requires understanding the following: (1)The MSI concept: The PCR approach must amplify the correct locus and accurately identify the microsatellite pattern in the patient's normal tissue. MSI is demonstrated when the length of DNA sequences in a tumor differs from that of nontumor tissue. Any anomalous expansion or reduction of tandem repeats results in extra-bands normally located in the expected size range (100 bp,above or below the expected product), differ from the germline pattern by some multiple of the repeating unit,and must show appropriate stutter. (2) MSI mechanisms:MMR gene inactivation (by either mutation or protein down-regulation as frequently present in deep CRC compartments) leads to mutation accumulation in a cell with every cellular division, resulting in malignant transformation. These mechanisms can express tumor progression and result in a decreased prevalence of aneuploid cells and loss of the physiologic cell kinetic correlations in the deep CRC compartments. MSI molecular mechanisms are not necessarily independent from chromosomal instability and may coexist in a given CRC. (3) Because of intratumoural heterogeneity, at least two samples from each CRC should be screened, preferably from the superficial (tumor cells above the muscularis propria) and deep (tumor cells infiltrating the muscularis propria) CRC compartments to cover the topographic tumor heterogeneity. (4) Pathologists play a critical role in identifying microsatellite-unstable CRC, such as occur in young patients with synchronous or metachronous tumors or with tumors showing classic histologic features. In these cases, MSI testing and/or MMR immunohistochemistry are advisable, along with gene sequencing and genetic counseling if appropriate. MSI is an excellent functional and prognostically

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in colorectal cancer: associations with tumor site and TNM stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Jinga, Viorel; Csiki, Irma Eva; Mates, Dana; Dinu, Daniela; Constantin, Adrian; Jinga, Mariana

    2012-03-01

    Colon tumor carcinogenesis and rectal tumor carcinogenesis have each been associated with different genetic features, but data are still controversial and are insufficient to support their distinct molecular biology. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have also found heterogeneity in colorectal cancer (CRC) risks based on population ethnicity and tumor features. Several single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are described in the literature as having site and/or stage specificity, including rs10795668, rs3802842, rs6983267, and rs4939827. Replication of initial findings in different ethnic groups by independent studies is required to unravel the population-specific differences in risk. We examined whether inherited risk variants at rs10795668, rs3802842, rs6983267, and rs4939827 exerted a differential effect on colon and rectal cancers in a Romanian hospital based series of 153 CRC cases and 182 non-affected control subjects prospectively recruited between 2007 and 2010. Rectal tumors were significantly associated with rs4939827 (OR = 4.85, P = 0.002) and rs6983267 (OR = 3.00, P = 0.036), suggesting that carriers of risk alleles at these loci had increased susceptibility to development of rectal cancer rather than colon cancer. Carrying the C allele at rs3802842 appeared to be associated with a lower risk for rectal tumors in our dataset. We found no association between genotypes and tumor aggressiveness as reflected by TNM staging. The associations between SNPs, and tumor site and staging remain to be further clarified. Our results should be considered cautiously, but may be taken into account in future, larger epidemiological studies.

  20. Relationship of circulating tumor cells to tumor response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, S.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Iannotti, N.; Saidman, B.H.; Sabbath, K.D.; Gabrail, N.Y.; Picus, J.; Morse, M.; Mitchell, E.; Miller, M.C.; Doyle, G.V.; Tissing, H.; Terstappen, L.W.; Meropol, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: As treatment options expand for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), a blood marker with a prognostic and predictive role could guide treatment. We tested the hypothesis that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could predict clinical outcome in patients with mCRC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a pros

  1. Lymph Node Negative Colorectal Cancers with Isolated Tumor Deposits Should Be Classified and Treated As Stage III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, E.J.T.; van Stijn, M.F.M.; Bril, H.; de Lange-de Klerk, E.S.M.; Meijer, G.A.; Meijer, S.; Stockmann, H.B.A.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic role of pericolic or perirectal isolated tumor deposits (ITDs) in node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unclear. Rules to define ITDs as regional lymph node metastases changed in subsequent editions of the TNM staging without substantial evidence. Aim of this

  2. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs.

  3. Early detection of poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: tumor kinetics evaluated by circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza e Silva V

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Virgílio Souza e Silva,1 Ludmilla Thomé Domingos Chinen,2 Emne A Abdallah,2 Aline Damascena,2 Jociana Paludo,3 Rubens Chojniak,3 Aldo Lourenço Abbade Dettino,1 Celso Abdon Lopes de Mello,1 Vanessa S Alves,2 Marcello F Fanelli1 1Department of Clinical Oncology, 2International Research Center, 3Image Department, A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most prevalent cancer worldwide. New prognostic markers are needed to identify patients with poorer prognosis, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs seem to be promising to accomplish this.Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted by blood collection from patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC, three times, every 2 months in conjunction with image examinations for evaluation of therapeutic response. CTC isolation and counting were performed by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET.Results: A total of 54 patients with mCRC with a mean age of 57.3 years (31–82 years were included. Among all patients, 60% (n=32 were carriers of wild-type KRAS (WT KRAS tumors and 90% of them (n=29 were exposed to monoclonal antibodies along with systemic treatment. Evaluating CTC kinetics, when we compared the baseline (pretreatment CTC level (CTC1 with the level at first follow-up (CTC2, we observed that CTC1-positive patients (CTCs above the median, who became negative (CTCs below the median had a favorable evolution (n=14, with a median progression-free survival (PFS of 14.7 months. This was higher than that for patients with an unfavorable evolution (CTC1– that became CTC2+; n=13, 6.9 months; P=0.06. Patients with WT KRAS with favorable kinetics had higher PFS (14.7 months in comparison to those with WT KRAS with unfavorable kinetics (9.4 months; P=0.02. Moreover, patients whose imaging studies showed radiological progression had an increased quantification of CTCs at CTC2 compared to those without progression (P=0.04.Conclusion

  4. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  5. LMO2 attenuates tumor growth by targeting the Wnt signaling pathway in breast and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Huang, Di; Wang, Zhaoyang; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Dan; Li, Zongjin; Zhu, Tianhui; Yang, Shuang; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene LIM-domain only 2 (lmo2) was traditionally considered to be a pivotal transcriptional regulator in hematopoiesis and leukemia. Recently, the cytosolic localization of LMO2 was revealed in multiple epithelial tissues and a variety of solid tumors. However, the function of LMO2 in these epithelia and solid tumors remains largely unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway is a crucial determinant of development, and abnormalities in several key segments of this pathway contribute to oncogenesis. The current study demonstrated that LMO2 participates in the regulation of canonical Wnt signaling in the cytoplasm by binding to Dishevelled-1/2 (DVL-1/2) proteins. These interactions occurred at the PDZ domain of Dishevelled, and LMO2 subsequently attenuated the activation of the key factor β-catenin in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Meanwhile, significantly decreased expression of LMO2 was detected in breast and colorectal cancers, and the downregulation of LMO2 in these cells increased cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Taken together, the data in this study revealed a novel crosstalk between LMO2 and the Wnt signaling pathway during tumorigenesis and suggested that LMO2 might be a tumor suppressor in certain solid tumors, in contrast to its traditional oncogenic role in the hematopoietic system. PMID:27779255

  6. Evaluation of Methylation Biomarkers for Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA and Application to Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors shed DNA into circulation, and there is growing evidence that the detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA has broad clinical utility, including monitoring of disease, prognosis, response to chemotherapy and tracking tumor heterogeneity. The appearance of ctDNA in the circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA isolated from plasma or serum is commonly detected by identifying tumor-specific features such as insertions, deletions, mutations and/or aberrant methylation. Methylation is a normal cell regulatory event, and since the majority of ccfDNA is derived from white blood cells (WBC, it is important that tumour-specific DNA methylation markers show rare to no methylation events in WBC DNA. We have used a novel approach for assessment of low levels of DNA methylation in WBC DNA. DNA methylation in 29 previously identified regions (residing in 17 genes was analyzed in WBC DNA and eight differentially-methylated regions (DMRs were taken through to testing in clinical samples using methylation specific PCR assays. DMRs residing in four genes, BCAT1, GRASP, IKZF1 and IRF4, exhibited low positivity, 3.5% to 7%, in the plasma of colonoscopy-confirmed healthy subjects, with the sensitivity for detection of ctDNA in colonoscopy-confirmed patients with colorectal cancer being 65%, 54.5%, 67.6% and 59% respectively.

  7. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  8. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Daley, George Q

    2015-05-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in Apc(Min/+) mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. © 2015 Tu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Mutations in the human naked cuticle homolog NKD1 found in colorectal cancer alter Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates beta-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd. Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to beta-catenin accumulation and TCF-dependent transcription, but human NKD genes have yet to be directly implicated in cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify for the first time mutations in NKD1--one of two human nkd homologs--in a subset of DNA mismatch repair-deficient colorectal tumors that are not known to harbor mutations in other Wnt-pathway genes. The mutant Nkd1 proteins are defective at inhibiting Wnt signaling; in addition, the mutant Nkd1 proteins stabilize beta-catenin and promote cell proliferation, in part due to a reduced ability of each mutant Nkd1 protein to bind and destabilize Dvl proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data raise the hypothesis that specific NKD1 mutations promote Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis in a subset of DNA mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal adenocarcinomas and possibly other Wnt-signal driven human cancers.

  10. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  11. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC.

  12. Increased levels of circulating and tumor-infiltrating granulocytic myeloid cells in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman M Toor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased levels of myeloid cells, especially myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, have been reported to correlate with bad prognosis and reduced survival in cancer patients. However, limited data are available on their conclusive phenotypes and their correlation with clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate levels and phenotype of myeloid cells in peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, compared to blood from healthy donors (HDs and paired, adjacent non-tumor colon tissue. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the expression of different myeloid markers in fresh peripheral blood samples from CRC patients and HDs, and tissue-infiltrating immune cells from CRC patients. We found significantly higher levels of cells expressing myeloid markers and lacking the expression of MHC class II molecule HLA-DR in blood and tumor of CRC patients. Further analysis revealed that these cells were granulocytic and expressed Arginase 1 (ARG1, indicative of their suppressive phenotype. These expanded cells could be neutrophils or granulocytic MDSCs, and we refer to them as granulocytic myeloid cells (GMCs due to the phenotypical and functional overlap between these cell subsets. Interestingly, the expansion of peripheral GMCs correlated with higher stage and histological grade of cancer, thereby suggesting their role in cancer progression. Furthermore, an increase in CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR-CD14-CD15- immature myeloid cells (IMCs was also observed in CRC tumor tissue. Our work shows that GMCs are expanded in circulation and tumor microenvironment of CRC patients, which provides further insights for developing immunotherapeutic approaches targeting these cell subsets to enhance anti-tumor immune and clinical responses.

  13. Gene methylation profiles of normal mucosa, and benign and malignant colorectal tumors identify early onset markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatn Morten

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple epigenetic and genetic changes have been reported in colorectal tumors, but few of these have clinical impact. This study aims to pinpoint epigenetic markers that can discriminate between non-malignant and malignant tissue from the large bowel, i.e. markers with diagnostic potential. The methylation status of eleven genes (ADAMTS1, CDKN2A, CRABP1, HOXA9, MAL, MGMT, MLH1, NR3C1, PTEN, RUNX3, and SCGB3A1 was determined in 154 tissue samples including normal mucosa, adenomas, and carcinomas of the colorectum. The gene-specific and widespread methylation status among the carcinomas was related to patient gender and age, and microsatellite instability status. Possible CIMP tumors were identified by comparing the methylation profile with microsatellite instability (MSI, BRAF-, KRAS-, and TP53 mutation status. Results The mean number of methylated genes per sample was 0.4 in normal colon mucosa from tumor-free individuals, 1.2 in mucosa from cancerous bowels, 2.2 in adenomas, and 3.9 in carcinomas. Widespread methylation was found in both adenomas and carcinomas. The promoters of ADAMTS1, MAL, and MGMT were frequently methylated in benign samples as well as in malignant tumors, independent of microsatellite instability. In contrast, normal mucosa samples taken from bowels without tumor were rarely methylated for the same genes. Hypermethylated CRABP1, MLH1, NR3C1, RUNX3, and SCGB3A1 were shown to be identifiers of carcinomas with microsatellite instability. In agreement with the CIMP concept, MSI and mutated BRAF were associated with samples harboring hypermethylation of several target genes. Conclusion Methylated ADAMTS1, MGMT, and MAL are suitable as markers for early tumor detection.

  14. Nuclear factor-κB p65 (RelA) transcription factor is constitutively activated in human colorectal carcinoma tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Liang Yu; Hong-Gang Yu; Jie-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo; Xi-Ming Xu; Jun-Hua Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Activation of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation,apoptosis, cytokine production, and oncogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether NF-κB was constitutively activated in human colorectal tumor tissues and, if so, to determine the role of NF-κB in colorectal tumorigenesis, and furthermore, to determine the association of RelA expression with tumor cell apoptosis and the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL.METHODS: Paraffin sections of normal epithelial, adenomatous and adenocarcinoma tissues were analysed immunohistochemically for expression of RelA, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins.Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to confirm the increased nuclear translocation of RelA in colorectal tumor tissues. The mRNA expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Apoptotic cells were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate fluorescence nick end labeling (TUNEL) method.RESULTS: The activity of NF-κB was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma tissue in comparison with that in adenomatous and normal epithelial tissues. The apoptotic index (AI)significantly decreased in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Meanwhile, the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein and their mRNAs were significantly higher in adenocarcinoma tissues than that in adenomatous and normal epithelial tissues.CONCLUSION: NF-κB may inhibit apoptosis via enhancing the expression of the apoptosis genes Bcl-2 and BCl-xL. And the increased expression of RelA/nuclear factor-κB plays an important rote in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Repeated anastomotic recurrence of colorectal tumors: Genetic analysis of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renato Costi; Cinzia Azzoni; Federico Marchesi; Lorena Bottarelli; Vincenzo Violi; Cesare Bordi

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate genetics of two cases of colorectal tumor local recurrence and throw some light on the etiopathogenesis of anastomotic recurrence.METHODS: Two cases are presented: a 65-year-old female receiving two colonic resections for primary anastomotic recurrences within 21 mo, and a 57-year-old female undergoing two local excisions of recurrent anastomotic adenomas within 26 mo. A loss of hetero-zygosity (LOH) study of 25 microsatellite markers and a mutational analysis of genes BRAF , K-RAS and APC were performed in samples of neoplastic and normal colonic mucosa collected over the years.RESULTS: A diffuse genetic instability was present in all samples, including neoplastic and normal colonic mucosa. Two different patterns of genetic alterations (LOH at 5q21 and 18p11.23 in the first case, and LOH at 1p34 and 3p14 in the second) were found to be as-sociated with carcinogenesis over the years. A role for the genes MYC-L (mapping at 1p34) and FIHT (mapping at 3p14.2) is suggested, whereas a role for APC (map-ping at 5q21) is not shown.CONCLUSION: The study challenges the most cred-ited intraluminal implantation and metachronous carci-nogenesis theories, and suggests a persistent, patient-specific alteration as the trigger of colorectal cancer anastomotic recurrence.

  16. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  17. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome : the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Audrey Y.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Botma, Akke; Heine-Broring, Renate C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Harryvan, Jan L.; Winkels, Renate M.; Kampman, Ellen

    Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their high

  18. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome : the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Audrey Y.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Botma, Akke; Heine-Broring, Renate C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Harryvan, Jan L.; Winkels, Renate M.; Kampman, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their high li

  19. DDX3 promotes tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the CK1ε/Dvl2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tsung-Ying; Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Wang, Lee; Huang, Chi-Chou; Chou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Huei

    2016-02-19

    DDX3, a subunit of CK1ε, phosphorylates Dvl2 to promote β-catenin activation. Overexpression of the Dvl2 protein results in potent activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling in colorectal cancer. Therefore, we hypothesized that DDX3 might promote tumor invasion via the CK1ε/Dvl2 axis due to β-catenin/TCF activation. Western blotting showed that β-catenin expression was decreased by DDX3 knockdown and increased by DDX3 overexpression in colorectal cancer cells. The TCF promoter activity and invasion capability were concomitantly increased and decreased by DDX3 manipulation in these cells. The invasion capability in colon cancer cells and xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by a DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone in tail-vein injection model were nearly suppressed by inhibitors of CK1ε (PF4800567) and β-catenin/TCF signaling (XAV939). Among colorectal cancer patients, DDX3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of pDvl2 and nuclear β-catenin in tumor tissues. The expression of pDvl2 occurred more frequently in high-nuclear than in low-nuclear β-catenin tumors. A prognostic significance of DDX3, pDvl2, and nuclear β-catenin on overall survival and relapse free survival was observed in this study population. We therefore suggest CK1ε or β-catenin/TCF signaling as potential targets for improving tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer, particularly tumors with high-DDX3/high-nuclear β-catenin or high-DDX3/high-pDvl2/high-nuclear β-catenin expression.

  20. Dissemination profile of perioperative tumor cells in peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients detected by multiple marker genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes a method to assess the molecular profile of perioperative circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood (PB) of colorectal cancer patients for differentiating the dissemination process of tumor cells. Two-point quantification of multiple marker genes was designed for describing the profile. The expression levels of cytokeratin 20 (CK20),carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and survivin mRNA in PB and tumor tissue samples in 37 colorectal cancer patients from 1 d pre-operation to 2 h postoperation were detected with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. β-Actin mRNA was used as internal control to standardize the results of different mRNA expression levels. The data analysis using Stata statistical packages,Chi-Square test and Mann-Whitney test indicated the expression level of CEA mRNA in PB increased significantly,while those of CK20 and survivin mRNA decreased significantly. Quantitative comparison with tumor tissues indicated that the increase of CEA mRNA level in PB coincided with the decrease of CK20 and survivin mRNA levels in different tumor cells. These results showed surgical manipulation caused tumor cells shedding into blood from primary tumor tissue and significant increase of CEA mRNA level,while occult tumor cells with high expression levels of CK20 and survivin mRNA before surgery decreased after surgery.

  1. Structural Characterization of Mucin O-Glycosylation May Provide Important Information to Help Prevent Colorectal Tumor Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Adriana; Delplanque, Jean-François; Ringot-Destrez, Bélinda; Wavelet, Cindy; Gosset, Pierre; Nunes, Bertrand; Groux-Degroote, Sophie; Léonard, Renaud; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer is a preventable and curable disease if early stage tumors are removed, it still represents the second cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but once operated the patient is either subjected to adjuvant chemotherapy or not, depending on the invasiveness of the cancer and risks of recurrence. In this context, we investigated, by mass spectrometry (MS), alterations in the repertoire of glycosylation of mucins from colorectal tumors of various stages, grades, and recurrence status. Tumors were also compared with their counterparts in resection margins from the same patients and with healthy controls. The obtained data showed an important decrease in the level of expression of sialylated core 3-based O-glycans in tumors correlated with an increase in sialylated core 1 structures. No correlation was established between stages of the tumor samples and mucin O-glycosylation. However, with the notable exception of sialyl Tn antigens, tumors with recurrence presented a milder alteration of glycosylation profile than tumors without recurrence. These results suggest that mucin O-glycans from tumors with recurrence might mimic a healthier physiological situation, hence deceiving the immune defense system.

  2. Activation and dramatically increased cytolytic activity of tumor specific T lymphocytes after radio-frequency ablation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and colorectal liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johannes H(a)nsler; Thadd(a)us Till Wissniowski; Detlef Schuppan; Astrid Witte; Thomas Bernatik; Eckhart Georg Hahn; Deike Strobel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess if a specific cytotoxic T cell response can be induced in patients with malignant liver tumors treated with radio-frequency ablation (RFA).METHODS: Six Patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer and 6 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)underwent RFA. Blood was sampled before, 4 and 8 wk after RFA. Test antigens were autologous liver and tumor lysate obtained from each patient by biopsy. Peripheral T cell activation was assessed by an interferon gamma (IFNγ) secretion assay and flow cytometry. T cells were double-stained for CD4/CD8 and IFNγ to detect cytotoxic T cells. The ratio of IFNγ positive and IFNγ negative T cells was determined as the stimulation index (SI). To assess cytolytic activity, T cells were co-incubated with human CaCo colorectal cancer and HepG2 HCC cells and release of cytosolic adenylate kinase was measured by a luciferase assay.RESULTS: Before RFA SI was 0.021 (±0.006) for CD4+and 0.022 (±0.004) for CD8+T cells against nonmalignant liver tissue and 0.018 (±0.005) for CD4+ and 0.021(±0.004) for CD8+ cells against autologous tumor tissue.Four weeks after RFA SI against tumor tissue increased to 0.109 (±0.005) for CD4+ and 0.11 (±0.012) for CD8+T cells against HCC, and to 0.115 (±0.031) for CD4+ and 0.15 (±0.02) for CD8+ cells for colorectal metastases (P <0.0001). No increased SI was observed with nonmalignant tumor tissue at all time points. Before RFA cytolytic activity against the respective cancer cells was low with 2.62 (±0.37) relative luminescence units (RLU), but rose more than 100 fold 4 and 8 wk after RFA. Spontaneous release was <2% of maximum release in all experiments.CONCLUSION: Patients with primary and secondary tumors of the liver show a significant tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell stimulation with a dramatically increased tumor specific cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells after RFA.

  3. Ese-3在结肠癌组织中的表达及意义%Expression and clinical significance of Ese-3 in human colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂娜; 宋杨; 杨静; 郑蕾; 冯英明; 苏海川

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the expression of Ese-3 and the relation between Ese-3 expression and clini-cal pathological features in human colorectal cancer. Methods:Using immunohistochemical technique,we detected the expression of Ese-3 in tumor tissue and para-tumor tissue in 76 patients with colorectal cancer. The correlation be-tween Ese-3 expression and clinical pathological features was analyzed. Results:We found that Ese-3 protein was expressed in the nucleus. Ese-3 protein expression in para-tumor tissue was significantly higher than tumor tissue in human colorectal cancer. Expression of Ese-3 was associated with clinical TNM stage and tumor differentiation de-gree(p﹤0. 05). Conclusion:The reduced expression of Ese-3 in tumor tissues may play an important role in the occurrence and development of human colorectal cancer.%目的:探讨上皮转录调控因子-3(epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor-3,Ese-3)在结肠癌组织中的表达及与临床病理特征之间的关系。方法:采用免疫组化SP法检测76例结肠癌组织及癌旁组织标本中Ese-3的表达,分析其表达与患者临床病理特征之间的关系。结果:Ese-3表达于细胞核中。Ese-3蛋白在癌旁正常组织中的表达明显高于相应结肠癌中的表达。在结肠癌组织中Ese-3表达与病理分期( p

  4. The diagnostic accuracy of pericolonic fat extension and attenuation for colorectal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeina, Abdel-Rauf, E-mail: raufzeina3@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera (Israel); Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Mahamid, Ahmad [Division of Surgery, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera (Israel); Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Walid, Saliba [Department of Internal Medicine C, Ha’emek Medical Center, Afula (Israel); Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Nachtigal, Alicia; Shapira-Rootman, Mika [Department of Radiology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera (Israel); Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Pericolonic fat extent and attenuation were higher in stage ≥T3 than tumors. • The sensitivity of pericolonic fat infiltration in detecting ≥T3 tumors was 95% and the specificity 20%. • Pericolonic fat extent, pericolonic fat attenuation, and maximal tumor diameter were assessed. • The application of all three parameters achieves 100% specificity. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the utility of quantitative analysis of the extension and attenuation of pericolonic fat in the local staging of colorectal cancer (CRC) using multi detector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study of 110 patients who were operated due to pathologically proven CRC from January 2007 to January 2010, and who underwent preoperative MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis with administration of intravenous contrast material and image acquisition during the portal venous phase. The mean age was 69 years (range of 38–90 years). Pathological reports were reviewed for TNM staging. All MDCT studies were reviewed by two certified radiologists for maximal and minimal tumor diameter, extent of the infiltrated pericolonic fat (measured in mm), attenuation of the infiltrated pericolonic fat (measured in Hounsfield units), and attenuation of normally appearing fat next to the tumor. The sensitivity and specificity of these parameters in detecting patients with ≥ T3 CRC were calculated. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of pericolonic fat infiltration in detecting patients with ≥T3 stage were 95% (95% CI, 89.0–98.7%), 20% (5.8–43.7%), and 81.9% (74.7–89%) respectively. The mean extent and attenuation of the infiltrated pericolonic fat, in addition to the maximal tumor diameter, were higher in the ≥T3 group (p < 0.05). By defining threshold values to these parameters, the positive predictive value for detecting ≥T3 stage tumors approaches 100%. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of pericolonic fat

  5. AXL is an oncotarget in human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; Liguori, Giuseppina; Vitagliano, Donata; Napolitano, Stefania; Morgillo, Floriana; Rinaldi, Barbara; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Liotti, Federica; Nappi, Anna; Bianco, Roberto; Berrino, Liberato; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Ciardiello, Davide; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ferraiolo, Fiorella; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    AXL is a tyrosine kinase receptor activated by GAS6 and regulates cancer cell proliferation migration and angiogenesis. We studied AXL as new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression and activation of AXL and GAS6 were evaluated in a panel of human CRC cell lines. AXL gene silencing or pharmacologic inhibition with foretinib suppressed proliferation, migration and survival in CRC cells. In an orthotopic colon model of human HCT116 CRC cells overexpressing AXL, foretinib treatment caused significant inhibition of tumour growth and peritoneal metastatic spreading. AXL and GAS6 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were found in 76,7% and 73.5%, respectively, of 223 human CRC specimens, correlating with less differentiated histological grading. GAS6 overexpression was associated with nodes involvement and tumour stage. AXL gene was found amplified by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 8/146 cases (5,4%) of CRC samples. Taken together, AXL inhibition could represent a novel therapeutic approach in CRC. PMID:25966280

  6. cis-Expression QTL analysis of established colorectal cancer risk variants in colon tumors and adjacent normal tissue.

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    Lenora W M Loo

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified 19 risk variants associated with colorectal cancer. As most of these risk variants reside outside the coding regions of genes, we conducted cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL analyses to investigate possible regulatory functions on the expression of neighboring genes. Forty microsatellite stable and CpG island methylator phenotype-negative colorectal tumors and paired adjacent normal colon tissues were used for genome-wide SNP and gene expression profiling. We found that three risk variants (rs10795668, rs4444235 and rs9929218, using near perfect proxies rs706771, rs11623717 and rs2059252, respectively were significantly associated (FDR q-value ≤0.05 with expression levels of nearby genes (<2 Mb up- or down-stream. We observed an association between the low colorectal cancer risk allele (A for rs10795668 at 10p14 and increased expression of ATP5C1 (q = 0.024 and between the colorectal cancer high risk allele (C for rs4444235 at 14q22.2 and increased expression of DLGAP5 (q = 0.041, both in tumor samples. The colorectal cancer low risk allele (A for rs9929218 at 16q22.1 was associated with a significant decrease in expression of both NOL3 (q = 0.017 and DDX28 (q = 0.046 in the adjacent normal colon tissue samples. Of the four genes, DLGAP5 and NOL3 have been previously reported to play a role in colon carcinogenesis and ATP5C1 and DDX28 are mitochondrial proteins involved in cellular metabolism and division, respectively. The combination of GWAS findings, prior functional studies, and the cis-eQTL analyses described here suggest putative functional activities for three of the colorectal cancer GWAS identified risk loci as regulating the expression of neighboring genes.

  7. Correlation of intra-tumor 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity indices with perfusion CT derived parameters in colorectal cancer.

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    Florent Tixier

    Full Text Available Thirty patients with proven colorectal cancer prospectively underwent integrated 18F-FDG PET/DCE-CT to assess the metabolic-flow phenotype. Both CT blood flow parametric maps and PET images were analyzed. Correlations between PET heterogeneity and perfusion CT were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Blood flow visualization provided by DCE-CT images was significantly correlated with 18F-FDG PET metabolically active tumor volume as well as with uptake heterogeneity for patients with stage III/IV tumors (|ρ|:0.66 to 0.78; p-value<0.02.The positive correlation found with tumor blood flow indicates that intra-tumor heterogeneity of 18F-FDG PET accumulation reflects to some extent tracer distribution and consequently indicates that 18F-FDG PET intra-tumor heterogeneity may be associated with physiological processes such as tumor vascularization.

  8. Trifluridine/tipiracil increases survival rates in peritoneal dissemination mouse models of human colorectal and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiko; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2017-07-01

    A number of patients exhibit peritoneal dissemination of gastric or colorectal cancer, which is a predominant cause of cancer-associated mortality. Currently, there is no markedly effective treatment available. The present study was designed to determine the efficacy of trifluridine/tipiracil (TFTD), formerly known as TAS-102, which is used for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer refractory to standard therapies. Four colorectal cancer cell lines and one gastric cancer cell line were intraperitoneally inoculated into nude mice, as models of peritoneal dissemination. TFTD (200 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 drug-free days for 6 weeks. The increase in the lifespan (ILS) of the TFTD-treated mice compared with that of the drug-free control mice was 66.7, 43.3, 106.3, 98.3 and 133.3% for DLD-1, DLD-1/5-fluorouracil [5-fluorouracil (5FU)-resistant subline of DLD-1], HT-29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines, and MKN45 gastric cancer cell line, respectively. This ILS was similar to that of the irinotecan-treated mice (ILS, 70-84%), but was significantly (P<0.05) increased compared with that of the 5FU-, tegafur, gimeracil and potassium oxonate- and cisplatin-treated mice (ILS, 1-53%, 0.8-60% and 85%, respectively). No significant increase in body weight loss was observed during the dosing periods with any of the drugs used. The increase in CEA levels with progressive peritoneal dissemination was inhibited by TFTD treatment. TFTD also exhibited marked anticancer effects against Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog-mutated tumors and 5FU-resistant tumors. The results of the present study indicate that TFTD may be a potential drug against peritoneal dissemination of colorectal and/or gastric cancer in humans and may be utilized for chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors following 5FU treatment.

  9. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

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    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  10. Perfusion CT in Colorectal Cancer: Comparison of Perfusion Parameters with Tumor Grade and Microvessel Density

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    Kim, Jin Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chang, Nam Kyu; Heo, Suk Hee; Hur, Young Hoe; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun(Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Soo; Lee, Jae Hyuk [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare pre-operative computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters with tumor grade from colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) and to correlate pre-operative CT perfusion parameters with microvessel density (MVD) to evaluate angiogenesis in CRC. Pre-operative perfusion CTs were performed with a 64-channel multidetector row CT in 27 patients (17 women and 10 men; age range 32-82 years) who were diagnosed with CRC involving the sigmoid and rectum between August 2006 and November 2007. All patients underwent surgery without pre-operative chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Dynamic perfusion CTs were performed for 65 seconds after intravenous injection of contrast medium (100 mL, 300 mg of iodine per mL, 5 mL/sec). Before surgery, blood flow (BF), blood volume, mean transit time (MTT), and permeability-surface area product were measured in the tumor. After surgery, one gastrointestinal pathologist evaluated tumor grade and performed immunohistochemical staining using CD 34 to determine MVD in each tumor. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare CT perfusion parameters with tumor grade, and Pearson's correlation analysis was used to correlate CT perfusion parameters with MVD. In 27 patients with CRC, tumor grading was as follows: well differentiated (n = 8); moderately differentiated (n = 15); and poorly differentiated (n = 4). BF was higher in moderately differentiated CRC than well differentiated and poorly differentiated CRCs (p = 0.14). MTT was shorter in moderately differentiated than well differentiated and poorly differentiated CRCs (p = 0.039). The MVD was greater in poorly differentiated than well differentiated and moderately differentiated CRCs (p = 0.034). There was no significant correlation between other perfusion parameters and tumor grade. There was no significant correlation between CT perfusion parameters and MVD. BF and MTT measurement by perfusion CT is effective in predicting moderately differentiated CRCs

  11. The ING tumor suppressor genes: status in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérillon, Claire; Bigot, Nicolas; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-04-01

    ING genes (ING1-5) were identified has tumor suppressor genes. ING proteins are characterized as Type II TSGs since they are involved in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis and senescence. They may also function as Type I TSGs since they are also involved in DNA replication and repair. Most studies have reported that they are frequently lost in human tumors and epigenetic mechanisms or misregulation of their transcription may be involved. Recently, studies have described that this loss may be caused by microRNA inhibition. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ING functions, their involvement in tumor suppression and, in order to give a full assessment of the current knowledge, we review all the studies that have examined ING status in human cancers.

  12. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuan; Burns, Janine A.; Carol A Cheney; Zhang, Ningyan; Vitelli, Salvatore; Wang, Fubao; Bett, Andrew; Chastain, Michael; Audoly, Laurent P.; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1) whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2) the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prosta...

  13. Human intestinal microbiota: cross-talk with the host and its potential role in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Guidotti, Marco; Fabbri, Alessia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Fiorentini, Carla

    2011-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer. The peculiar metabolism of dietary compounds of the individual microbiota complement, its overall immunostimulation and immunomodulatory activity, and eventually the production of toxins that perturb the regulation of cell growth, define the balance of positive and negative risk factors for colorectal cancer development. Moreover, shaping the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, diet has an indirect impact in determining the balance between health and disease. The integration of diet, microbial, and host factors in a system approach is mandatory to determine the overall balance of risk and protective factors for colorectal cancer onset.

  14. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

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    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  15. FRAGILE HISTIDINE TRIAD GENE EXPRESSION AND ITS CORRALATION WITH MISMATCH REPAIR PROTEIN IN HUMAN SPORADIC COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚成才; 林从尧

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and its correlation with clinicopathological features and correlation with mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2) in human sporadic colorectal carcinoma (SCC). Methods:Immunohistochemistry SP method was used to determine the expression of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein in surgically resected specimens of 84 human SCC. Results:The positive rates of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression were 48.81%, 92.86% and 100% respectively.Loss or reduced expression of FHIT protein was not related with tumors clinicopathological features such as age, gender,tumors site and histological type (P>0.05), but was correlated with tumors invade depth, degree of the differentiation, Ducks' stage and metastasis (P<0.05). There was no relationship between FHIT gene expression and MLH1 protein (r=0.0991, P>0.05) and MSH2 protein (r=0.0000, P=l.00) expression in human SCC. Conclusion:Absent or reduction of FHIT gene expression consists of high proportion and is a frequent event in SCC. FHIT gene is involved in the development and progression of human SCC and may be a candidate tumors suppressor gene. The relationship between alteration of FHIT gene expression and mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2)deserved further study in human SCC.

  16. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

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    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  17. Significance of differential expression of thymidylate synthase in normal and primary tumor tissues from patients with colorectal cancer

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    Hua Yawei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of thymidylate synthase (TS is essential as a key rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. It is the primary target of fluorouracil and its derivates in colorectal cancer. In this study, TS mRNA expression was examined in primary tumor and normal tissues from 76 patients with high- risk stage II/III colorectal cancer by laser capture microdissection and polymerase chain reaction. Thirty (39.47% patients were found to have higher TS expression in primary tumors with earlier stage (P = 0.018, lower histological grades (P = 0.001 and high frequency microsatellite instability (P = 0.000. Multivariate analysis showed that microsatellite instability, histological grade and number of lymph nodes examined are independent prognostic markers.

  18. Up-regulation of 91H promotes tumor metastasis and predicts poor prognosis for patients with colorectal cancer.

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    Qiwen Deng

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play widespread roles in gene regulation and cellular processes. However, the functional roles of lncRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC are not yet well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to measure the levels of lncRNA 91H expression in CRC and evaluate its clinical significance and biological roles in the development and progression of CRC.91H expression and copy number variation (CNV were measured in 72 CRC tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues by real-time PCR. The biological roles of 91H were evaluated by MTT, scratch wound assay, migration and invasion assays, and flow cytometry.91H was significantly overexpressed in cancerous tissue and CRC cell lines compared with adjacent normal tissue and a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line. Moreover, 91H overexpression was closely associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis in patients with CRC, except for CNV of 91H. Multivariate analysis indicated that 91H expression was an independent prognostic indicator, as well as distant metastasis. Our in vitro data indicated that knockdown of 91H inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of CRC cells.91H played an important role in the molecular etiology of CRC and might be regarded as a novel prognosis indicator in patients with CRC.

  19. Human tumor cells segregate into radiosensitivity groups that associate with ATM and TP53 status

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    Williams, Jerry R.; Yonggang Zhang; Russell, James [Radiobiology Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. Baltimore, MD (United States); Koch, Cameron [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Little, John B. [John B. Little Center, Harvard School of Public Health. Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    We seek to determine whether cellular radiosensitivity in nineteen human colorectal tumor cell lines and three human glioblastoma tumor cell lines segregate into statistically distinct groups and whether such groups correlate with gene expression. We measure clonogenic survival in 22 cell lines that vary in radiosensitivity and in expression of selected genes: ATM, TP53, CDKN1A, 14-3-3{sigma}, Ki-ras and DNA mismatch repair genes. We describe and compare radiosensitivity in these cell lines by one-parameter or two parameter analysis. Radiosensitivity varies among and between colorectal tumor cell lines and glioblastoma cell lines. When compared directly using survival, or using two-parameter analysis of radiosensitivity, cell lines distribute into four statistically-significant radiosensitivity groups. These groups associate strongly with the status of two genes, ATM and TP53, but do not associate with CDKN1A, 14-3-3{sigma}, Ki-ras and DNA mismatch repair genes. Intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of 22 colorectal and glioblastoma cell lines fall into four radiosensitivity groups that associate with expression of ATM and TP53. These analyses suggest multiple mechanisms underlay intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity.

  20. Effect of evodiamine and berberine on miR-429 as an oncogene in human colorectal cancer

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    Liu H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu, Chao Huang, Liyun Wu, Bin Wen Institute of Spleen and Stomach, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Loss of epithelial organization and deregulated microRNAs are hallmarks of malignant carcinomas, but the relationship between them has been poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the changes in the expression of E-cadherin, Par3, and miR-429 during the development of human colorectal cancer (CRC. E-cadherin and Par3 levels were quantitatively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. An in vitro culture of colorectal tissue was established to analyze the effect of berberine (BER and evodiamine (EVO on the level of miR-429. Our results suggested that E-cadherin and Par3 were remarkably decreased in tumor tissues compared with those in normal tissues, and miR-429 was upregulated in tumor tissues. After treatment of BER and EVO, the level of miR-429 was lower in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. This study investigated the potential relationship between miR-429, E-cadherin, and Par3 in CRC. The data suggested that BER and EVO can be potential therapeutic agents for CRC, as they downregulated the expression level of miR-429. Keywords: microRNAs, tissue culture

  1. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome

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    Buchanan DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel D Buchanan,1,2 Christophe Rosty,1,3,4 Mark Clendenning,1 Amanda B Spurdle,5 Aung Ko Win2 1Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Herston, QLD, Australia; 4School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia; 5Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Genetics and Computational Biology Division, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome. MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the

  2. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

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    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  3. Differential BCCIP gene expression in primary human ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Lingling; Ni, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoming; Wang, Yanfang; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Lingyao; Wang, Jin; Yue, Ying; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-12-01

    Human BCCIP, a protein which interacts with BRCA2 and CDKN1A (Cip1, p21), has been implicated in many cellular processes including cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and damage repair, telomere maintenance, embryonic development and genomic stability. BCCIP gene expression, which is an important BRCA2 cofactor in tumor suppression, has been identified in some primary cancers. Thus, we investigated the role of BCCIP expression in a large sample of clinically diagnosed primary ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues. Using clinically diagnosed frozen primary cancer tissues, quantitative PCR (qPCR), western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) approaches were used to detect and measure gene expression. Reduced BCCIP gene expression in ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues occurred in 74, 89 and 75% of tissue samples, respectively. qPCR analysis of mRNA expression in 54 ovarian cancer, 50 RCC and 44 CRC samples revealed significant (>2-fold decreased) BCCIP downregulation in 56, 70 and 46% of tissue samples, respectively. Although BCCIP expression in three different tumor tissues decreased, the relationship between BCCIP expression and clinicopathological features of each cancer was distinct. Compared to normal tissues, BCCIP expression in ovarian cancers was significantly downregulated in serous, endometrioid and mucinous carcinomas. Downregulation of BCCIP expression was strongly associated with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and Fuhrman tumor grading, but significant differences in BCCIP expression between CRC and matched normal tissues occurred only in male CRC tissues (ptissue with a T4 tumor stage (ptissue samples (phuman ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues, suggesting a role for the gene in the pathogenesis of these cancers.

  4. The peiminine stimulating autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells via AMPK pathway by SQSTM1

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    Zheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process, which functions in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. The self-eating process engulfs cellular long-lived proteins and organelles with double-membrane vesicles, and forms a so-called autophagosome. Degradation of contents via fusion with lysosome provides recycled building blocks for synthesis of new molecules during stress, e.g. starvation. Peiminine is a steroidal alkaloid extracted from Fritillaria thunbergii which is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Previously, peiminine has been identified to induce autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In this study, we further investigated whether peiminine could induce autophagic cell death via activating autophagy-related signaling pathway AMPK-mTOR-ULK by promoting SQSTM1(P62. Xenograft tumor growth in vivo suggested that both peiminine and starvation inhibit the growth of tumor size and weight, which was prominently enhanced when peiminine and starvation combined. The therapeutical effect of peiminine in cancer treatment is to be expected.

  5. Tumor M2-pyruvate kinase in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis

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    Jin-Xi Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnosis value of tumor M2-pyruvate kinase (M2-PK in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: By searching the databases of Cochrane Library, PubMed, China national knowledge Information and Wanfang, the diagnosis study related to tumor M2-PK in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer were screened and included in this study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR, negative likelihood ratio (−LR and the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC were calculated by stata 11.0 software. Results: According to the including criteria, 14 trials including 1990 subjects were finally included in this meta-analysis. The pooled diagnosis sensitivity, specificity, +LR, −LR and area under curve were 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74-0.81, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.76-0.79, 4.38 (95% CI: 3.27-5.88, 0.28 (95% CI: 0.23-0.34 and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.834-0.89. No statistical publication bias was found in this study. Conclusion: Tumor M2-PK in stool can be a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer with relative high sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Simultaneous laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer and synchronous metastatic liver tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michihiro; Komeda, Koji; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Asakuma, Mitsuhiro; Hirokawa, Fumitoshi; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Kondo, Keisaku; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resection has been applied to advanced colorectal cancer. Synchronous liver metastasis of colorectal cancer would be treated safely and effectively by simultaneous laparoscopic colorectal and hepatic resection. Seven patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastasis treated by simultaneous laparoscopic resection were analyzed retrospectively. Three patients received a hybrid operation using a small skin incision, 2 patients underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery using a small incision produced for colonic anastomosis, and 2 patients were treated with pure laparoscopic resection. The mean total operation duration was 407 minutes, and mean blood loss was 207 mL. Negative surgical margins were achieved in all cases. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 16.4 days. No recurrence at the surgical margin was observed in the liver. For selected patients with synchronous liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, simultaneous laparoscopic resection is useful for minimizing operative invasiveness while maintaining safety and curability, with satisfying short- and long-term results.

  8. Hydrophobic protein in colorectal cancer in relation to tumor stages and grades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin; Yeoh; Chee-Keat; Loh; Boon-Hui; Gooi; Manjit; Singh; Lay-Harn; Gam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed hydrophobic proteins in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Eighteen pairs of colorectal cancerous tissues in addition to tissues from normal mucosa were analysed. Hydrophobic proteins were extracted from the tissues, separated using 2-D gel electrophoresis and analysed using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Statistical analysis of the proteins was carried out in order to determine the significance of each protein to colorectal cancer (CRC) and als...

  9. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  10. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcoholic beverages per day increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Drinking alcohol is also linked to the risk of forming large colorectal adenomas (benign tumors). Cigarette smoking Cigarette smoking is ...

  11. High endothelial venules are rare in colorectal cancers but accumulate in extra-tumoral areas with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Diana Costa; Jones, Emma; Junaid, Syed; Tull, Justyna; Williams, Geraint T; Godkin, Andrew; Ager, Ann; Gallimore, Awen

    2015-03-01

    Prolonged patient survival after surgical resection, is associated with a higher cytotoxic and memory T cell density within colorectal cancers (CRC). High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels present in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO) that allow ingress of naïve and central memory T cells from the blood. It has been proposed that HEVs in tumors might serve as a similar route of entry for lymphocytes into the tumor and result in an improved prognosis. The present study aimed to characterize HEVs and their microenvironment in resected tumors from colorectal cancer patients (n = 62). We observed HEVs in association with lymphoid aggregates in 49 out of 62 patients. However, these HEV(+) lymphoid aggregates were largely at the invasive margin of the tumor and although there was an association with lymphocytes and HEVs at the invasive margin (p = 0.002) there was only a very weak association with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Indeed, lymphoid aggregates were associated with more advanced disease (Dukes' stage C) and did not indicate a favorable prognosis.

  12. Educational level and risk of colorectal cancer in EPIC with specific reference to tumor location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leufkens, Anke M; Van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Siersema, Peter D; Kunst, Anton E; Mouw, Traci; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Morois, Sophie; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Polidoro, Silvia; Palli, Domenico; Kaaks, Rudolf; Teucher, Birgit; Pischon, Tobias; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Orfanos, Philippos; Goufa, Ioulia; Peeters, Petra H M; Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Rodríguez, Laudina; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Sánchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Zackrisson, Sophia; Almquist, Martin; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Gallo, Valentina; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2012-02-01

    Existing evidence is inconclusive on whether socioeconomic status (SES) and educational inequalities influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, and whether low or high SES/educational level is associated with developing CRC. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between educational level and CRC. We studied data from 400,510 participants in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study, of whom 2,447 developed CRC (colon: 1,551, rectum: 896, mean follow-up 8.3 years). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis stratified by age, gender and center, and adjusted for potential confounders were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Relative indices of inequality (RII) for education were estimated using Cox regression models. We conducted separate analyses for tumor location, gender and geographical region. Compared with participants with college/university education, participants with vocational secondary education or less had a nonsignificantly lower risk of developing CRC. When further stratified for tumor location, adjusted risk estimates for the proximal colon were statistically significant for primary education or less (HR 0.73, 95%CI 0.57-0.94) and for vocational secondary education (HR 0.76, 95%CI 0.58-0.98). The inverse association between low education and CRC risk was particularly found in women and Southern Europe. These associations were statistically significant for CRC, for colon cancer and for proximal colon cancer. In conclusion, CRC risk, especially in the proximal colon, is lower in subjects with a lower educational level compared to those with a higher educational level. This association is most pronounced in women and Southern Europe. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  13. Structure-function relationship of thiazolide-induced apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Anette; Strittmatter, Tobias; May, Sarah; Stemmer, Kerstin; Marx, Andreas; Brunner, Thomas

    2014-07-18

    Thiazolides are a novel class of anti-infectious agents against intestinal intracellular and extracellular protozoan parasites, bacteria, and viruses. While the parent compound nitazoxanide (NTZ; 2-(acetolyloxy)-N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)benzamide) has potent antimicrobial activity, the bromo-thiazolide RM4819 (N-(5-bromothiazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-3-methylbenzamide) shows only reduced activity. Interestingly, both molecules are able to induce cell death in colon carcinoma cell lines, indicating that the molecular target in intestinal pathogens and in colon cancer cells is different. The detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase of class Pi 1 (GSTP1) is frequently overexpressed in various tumors, including colon carcinomas, and limits the efficacy of antitumor chemotherapeutic drugs due to its detoxifying activities. In colorectal tumor cells RM4819 has been shown to interact with GSTP1, and GSTP1 enzymatic activity is required for thiazolide-induced apoptosis. At present it is unclear which molecular structures of RM4819 are required to interact with GSTP1 and to induce cell death in colon carcinoma cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that novel thiazolide derivatives with variation in their substituents of the benzene ring do not significantly affect apoptosis induction in Caco-2 cells, whereas removal of the bromide atom on the thiazole ring leads to a strong reduction of cell death induction in colon cancer cells. We further show that active thiazolides require caspase activation and GSTP1 expression in order to induce apoptosis. We demonstrate that increased glutathione (GSH) levels sensitize colon cancer cells to thiazolides, indicating that both GSTP1 enzymatic activity as well as GSH levels are critical factors in thiazolide-induced cell death.

  14. T cell responses against tumor associated antigens and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivoltini Licia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous T cell responses against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAA are frequently detected in peripheral blood of tumor patients of various histiotypes. However, little is known about whether these circulating, spontaneously occurring, TAA-reactive T cells influence the clinical course of disease. Methods Fifty-four HLA-A2 positive colorectal cancer patients had been analyzed for the presence of T cell responses against epitopes derived from the TAA Ep-CAM, her-2/neu, and CEA either by ELISPOT assay or by intracellular cytokine staining. Then, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed comparing T-cell-responders and T-cell-non-responders. For comparison, a group of T-cell-non-responders was compiled stringently matched to T-cell-responders based on clinical criteria and also analyzed for survival. Results Sixteen out of 54 patients had a detectable T cell response against at least one of the three tested TAA. Two out of 21 patients (9.5% with limited stage of disease (UICC I and II and 14 out of 33 patients (42.4% with advanced disease (UICC III and IV were T cell response positive. Comparing all T-cell-responders (n = 16 and all T-cell-non-responders (n = 38, no survival difference was found. In an attempt to reduce the influence of confounding clinical factors, we then compared 16 responders and 16 non-responders in a matched group survival analysis; and again no survival difference was found (p = 0.7. Conclusion In summary, we found no evidence that spontaneous peripheral T cell responses against HLA-A2-binding epitopes of CEA, her-2/neu and Ep-CAM are a strong prognostic factor for survival.

  15. Decellularized matrices as in vitro models of extracellular matrix in tumor tissues at different malignant levels: Mechanism of 5-fluorouracil resistance in colorectal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    Chemoresistance is a major barrier for tumor chemotherapy. It is well-known that chemoresistance increases with tumor progression. Chemoresistance is altered by both genetic mutations and the alteration of extracellular microenvironment. Particularly, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is remodeled during tumor progression. Therefore, ECM remodeling is expected to cause the acquisition of chemoresistance in highly malignant tumor tissue. Here, we prepared cultured cell-derived decellularized matrices that mimic native ECM in tumor tissues at different stages of malignancy, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance was compared among these matrices. 5-FU resistance of colorectal tumor cells increased on the matrices derived from highly malignant tumor HT-29 cells, although the resistance did not increase on the matrices derived from low malignant tumor SW480 cells and normal CCD-841-CoN cells. The resistance on HT-29 cell-derived matrices increased through the activation of Akt and the upregulation of ABCB1 and ABCC1 without cell growth promotion, suggesting that ECM remodeling plays important roles in the acquisition of chemoresistance during tumor progression. It is expected that our decellularized matrices, or "staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices", will become preferred cell culture substrates for in vitro analysis of comprehensive ECM roles in chemoresistance and the screening and pharmacokinetic analysis of anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  17. Down-regulation of KIAA1199/CEMIP by miR-216a suppresses tumor invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhao, Lei; Shen, Qiong; Lv, Qing; Jin, Min; Ma, Hong; Nie, Xiu; Zheng, Xiumei; Huang, Shaoyi; Zhou, Pengfei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Tao

    2017-05-15

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of death from cancer. Metastasis is the leading cause of treatment failure, in which cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells play crucial roles. Identifying the involved metastatic biomarkers and clarifying the regulation mechanisms are of great importance for targeting tumor metastasis. In the current research, we discovered that KIAA1199, a cell-migration inducing protein, showed higher expression in CD44+ cancer cells from metastatic compared with the paired primary tissues, and was upregulated in colorectal cancer and positively correlated with numbers and mesenchymal phenotype of circulating tumor cells, and predicted shorter progress-free survival. Moreover, we indicated that down-regulation of KIAA1199 suppressed migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that KIAA1199 was one of the direct and functional targets of miR-216a, and miR-216a overexpression led to decreased migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Collectively, KIAA1199 plays a critical role in maintaining an aggressive phenotype of tumor cells, and suppression of KIAA1199-related motilities of tumor cells contributes to reduced tumor metastasis in colorectal cancer. © 2017 UICC.

  18. Association of loss of epithelial syndecan-1 with stage and local metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinomas: An immunohistochemical study of clinically annotated tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skacel Marek

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Syndecan-1 is a transmembrane proteoglycan with important roles in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and as a growth factor co-receptor. Syndecan-1 is highly expressed by normal epithelial cells and loss of expression has been associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the transformed phenotype. Loss of epithelial syndecan-1 has been reported in human colorectal adenocarcinomas, but whether this has prognostic significance remains undecided. Here we have examined syndecan-1 expression and its potential prognostic value with reference to a clinically annotated tissue microarray for human colon adenocarcinomas. Methods Syndecan-1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry of a tissue microarray containing cores from 158 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 15 adenomas linked to a Cleveland Clinic, IRB-approved database with a mean clinical follow-up of 38 months. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the relationship between syndecan-1 expression and patient survival. Potential correlations between syndecan-1 expression and the candidate prognostic biomarker fascin were examined. Results Syndecan-1 is expressed at the basolateral borders of normal colonic epithelial cells. On adenocarcinoma cells, syndecan-1 was present around cell membranes and in cytoplasm. In 87% of adenocarcinomas, syndecan-1 was decreased or absent; only 13% of patients had stained for syndecan-1 on more than 75% of tumor cells. Decreased syndecan-1 correlated with a higher TNM stage and lymph node metastasis and was more common in males (p = 0.042, but was not associated with age, tumor location or Ki67 index. Reduced tumor syndecan-1 staining also correlated with upregulation of stromal fascin (p = 0.016. Stromal syndecan-1 was observed in 16.6% of tumors. There was no difference in survival between patients with low or high levels of either tumor or stromal syndecan-1. Conclusion Syndecan-1 immunoreactivity was decreased

  19. Colorectal cancer and the KIR genes in the human genome: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Ghanadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of inflammation-based cancers and is occurred due to growth and spread of cancer cells in colon and/or rectum. Previously genetic association of cell cycle genes, both proto-oncogenes and the tumor suppressors has been proved. But there were few studies about association of immune related genes such as killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs. Thus we intend to perform a meta-analysis to find the association of different genes of KIR and susceptibility to be affected by colorectal cancer. The overall population of the four studies investigated in our meta-analysis was 953 individuals (470 individuals with colorectal cancer and 483 individuals in control groups. After the analyses, we concluded that colorectal cancer is affected by KIR2DS5 and also there were no protecting gene. This result shows the inflammatory basis of this cancer. In other words, in contrast to leukemia and blood cancers, colorectal cancers seem to be affected by hyper activity of natural killer-cells (NKs. Whys and therefore of this paradox, is suggested to be investigated further.

  20. Colorectal cancer and the KIR genes in the human genome: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanadi, Koroush; Shayanrad, Bahareh; Ahmadi, Seyyed Amir Yasin; Shahsavar, Farhad; Eliasy, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of inflammation-based cancers and is occurred due to growth and spread of cancer cells in colon and/or rectum. Previously genetic association of cell cycle genes, both proto-oncogenes and the tumor suppressors has been proved. But there were few studies about association of immune related genes such as killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Thus we intend to perform a meta-analysis to find the association of different genes of KIR and susceptibility to be affected by colorectal cancer. The overall population of the four studies investigated in our meta-analysis was 953 individuals (470 individuals with colorectal cancer and 483 individuals in control groups). After the analyses, we concluded that colorectal cancer is affected by KIR2DS5 and also there were no protecting gene. This result shows the inflammatory basis of this cancer. In other words, in contrast to leukemia and blood cancers, colorectal cancers seem to be affected by hyper activity of natural killer-cells (NKs). Whys and therefore of this paradox, is suggested to be investigated further.

  1. Accuracy of Multi-Slice Spiral Computed Tomography for Preoperative Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) Staging of Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rong-Jie; Ren, Shao-Hua; Jiang, Hui-Jie; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Xue, Li-Ming

    2017-07-17

    BACKGROUND With the advances in imaging technologies, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) has demonstrated superiority in the diagnosis and staging of colorectal carcinoma. In the current study, preoperative TNM staging of colorectal carcinoma by using MSCT was conducted and compared with the corresponding postoperative pathological examination findings, in order to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative MSCT for TNM staging. MATERIAL AND METHODS Combinations of biphasic or triphasic enhanced-phase MSCT scans were obtained for 76 patients with colorectal carcinoma, and the TNM stage was determined based on imaging reconstruction from various angles and perspectives to display the size, location, and affected range of tumors. The preoperative TNM stage was compared with the postoperative pathological stage, and the consistency between the 2 methods was tested by the k test using SPSS 17.0 software. RESULTS Among the different combinations of enhanced-phase MSCT scanning, triphasic MSCT imaging, comprising the arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases, showed the highest accuracy rates, at 81.6% (62/76), 82.89% (63/76), and 96.1% (73/76) for T, N, and M staging, respectively, with k values of 0.72, 0.65, and 0.56, respectively, indicating consistency with the postoperative pathological staging. CONCLUSIONS Combined MSCT scanning comprising the arterial phase, portal venous phase, and delayed phase showed satisfying consistency with the postoperative pathological analysis results for TNM staging of colorectal carcinoma. Thus, MSCT is an important clinical value for improving the accuracy of TNM staging and for planning the appropriate colorectal cancer treatment.

  2. CytoTrack Analysis Reveals Low Presence of Circulating Tumor Cells in the Perioperative Period in Patients with Non-metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gogenur, Mikail; Hillig, Thore; Gogenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    of circulating tumor cells and Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stage and if surgery itself results in the release of circulating tumor cells. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study was conducted including patients with colorectal cancer UICC stage I-III who underwent minimally-invasive surgery...

  3. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...

  4. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Extrahepatic synthesis of coagulation factor Ⅶ by colorectal cancer cells promotes tumor invasion and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jian-qiang; FAN Qing; WU Wen-han; JIA Zhi-chao; LI Hui; YANG Yin-mo; LIU Yu-cun; WAN Yuan-lian

    2010-01-01

    Background Blood coagulation factor Ⅶ (FⅦ) is physiologically synthesized in the liver and released into the blood. Binding of FⅦ to tissue factor (TF) is related to the metastatic potential of tumor cells, also a significant risk factor in the development of hepatic metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been found that some cancer cells can produce FⅦ extrahepatically. However, litte is known about FⅦ and CRC. We therefore hypothesized that CRC cells may synthese FⅦ, leading to tumor invasion and metastasis.Methods We detected the expression of FⅦ protein in 55 CRC specimens by immunohistochemical staining. The FⅦ mRNA in 45 of 55 CRC cases, 6 colon cancer cell lines and one hepatoma cell line was measured by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Transwell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the changes of cell migration and invasion of LoVo cancer cells in vitro. We further observed the likely effectors regulated by the TF/FⅦa complex Western blotting assay.Results Extrahepatic synthesis of FⅦ was detected in the cytoplasm of 32 (58.2%) CRC specimens byimmunohistochemistry, but not in normal mucosa. Liver metastasis (P=0.003) and TNM staging (P=0.005) were significantly correlated with FⅦ antigen expression. The positive ratios in stages Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ were 33.3%, 40.0%,52.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The expression of FⅦ mRNA in CRC with hepatic metastasis was significantly higher than CRC without hepatic metastasis (5.33±2.88 vs. 1.47±0.51, P=0.03). Ectopic FⅦa induced a slight increase (1.34-fold) in the number of migrating cells, which was inhibited by the specific TF antibody. The formation of TF/FⅦacomplex resulted in a marked increase in the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 (3.5-fold) and MMP-9(4.7-fold) in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner.Conclusions Extrahepatic synthesis of FⅦ by CRC cells may promote tumor invasion and metastasis. MMPs, as downstream

  6. MUC5AC/β-catenin expression and KRAS gene alteration in laterally spreading colorectal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kosaburo Nakae; Hiroyuki Mitomi; Tsuyoshi Saito; Michiko Takahashi; Takashi Morimoto; Yasuhiro Hidaka; Naoto Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify differences in mucin phenotype,proliferative activity and oncogenetic alteration among subtypes of colorectal laterally spreading tumor (LST).METHODS:LSTs,defined as superficial elevated lesions greater than 10 mm in diameter with a low vertical axis,were macroscopically classified into two subtypes:(1) a granular type (Gr-LST) composed of superficially spreading aggregates of nodules forming a flat-based lesion with a granulonodular and uneven surface; and (2) a non-granular type (NGr-LST) with a flat smooth surface and an absence of granulonodular formation.A total of 69 LSTs,comprising 36 Gr-LSTs and 33 NGr-LSTs,were immunohistochemically stained with MUC2,MUC5AC,MUC6,CD10 (markers of gastrointestinal cell lineage),p53,β-catenin and Ki-67 antibodies,and examined for alteration in exon 1 of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and exon 15 of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing.RESULTS:Histologically,15 Gr-LST samples were adenomas with low-grade dysplasia (LGD),12 were highgrade dysplasia (HGD) and 9 were adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa (INV),while 12 NGr-LSTs demonstrated LGD,14 HGD and 7 INV.In the proximal colon,MUC5AC expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type than the NGr-type.MUC6 was expressed only in NGr-LST.MUC2 or CD10 did not differ,P53 expression demonstrated a significant stepwise increment in progression through LGD-HGD-INV with both types of LST.Nuclear β-catenin expression was significantly higher in the NGr-type.Ki-67 expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type in the lower one third zone of the tumor.In proximal,but not distal colon tumors,the incidence of KRAS provided mutation was significantly higher in the Gr-type harboring a specific mutational pattern (G12V).BRAF mutations (V600E) were detected only in two Gr-LSTs.CONCLUSION:The two subtypes of LST,especially in the proximal colon,have differing

  7. 双氢青蒿素对人结直肠癌裸鼠移植瘤的抑制作用及机制研究%Antitumor Effect and Mechanism of Dihydroartemisinin on Colorectal Cancer in Nude Mice with Transplanted Tumor of Human Colorectai Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战晓农; 黄燕; 王雷; 梁志; 李智

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究双氢青蒿素( Dihydroartemisinine,DHA)对人结直肠癌LoVo细胞裸鼠移植瘤的抑制作用及可能机制.方法将人结直肠癌LoVo细胞接种于Balb/c裸鼠皮下,建立结直肠癌模型.将造模成功裸鼠随机分为5组,即模型对照组,阳性对照组(5-Fu 20 mg/kg),DHA高、中、低剂量组(120,60,30 mg/kg).观察各组动物肿瘤的重量及抑瘤率;采用免疫组化SABC法测定各组裸鼠肿瘤组织B-cell lymphoma-leukemia-2 gene(Bcl-2)和血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)的表达.结果5-Fu组及DHA高、中剂量组的抑瘤率显著高于模型组(P< 0.01或P<0.05);5-Fu组和DHA高剂量组Bcl-2的阳性表达率显著低于模型对照组(P< 0.01或P<0.05);5-Fu组VEGF的阳性表达率显著低于模型对照组(P<0.05).结论双氢青蒿素具有较强的抗结直肠癌活性,其作用机制可能是抑制抗凋亡基因Bcl-2的表达,从而刺激结直肠癌细胞凋亡.%Objective To observe the antitumor effect and mechanisms of dihydroartemisinin(DHA) on transplanted tumor of colorectal cancer in nude mice. Methods Colorectal cancer animal models were established by subcutaneous injection of colorectal cancer LoVo cells suspension into the specific-pathogen free BALB/c nude mice. Then the BALB/c tumor-bearing nude mice were randomized into 5 groups: model group, 5-FU group (intraperitoneal injec tion of 5-FU 20 mg/kg for 5 days) , and high-, middle-and low-dose DHA groups (gastric gavage of DHA in the dose of 120, 60 and 30 mg/kg respectively for 14 days). The tumor mass weight and tumor-inhibition rate were examined after treatment. And the expression levels of Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) were detected by SABC immunohistochemical assay. Results After treatment, the tumor-inhibition rate were increased in 5-FU group and high-and middle-dose DHA groups(P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 compared with those in the model group). The positive expression rate of bcl-2 in 5-FU group and high

  8. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  9. Telomerase activity and human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Lun Liu; Lian-Ying Ge; Gui-Nian Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the activity of telomerase and the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) in colorectal carcinoma and its adjacent tissues,normal mucosa and adenomatoid polyp, and to evaluate their relation with carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: Telomerase activity and hTERT expression were determined in 30 samples of colorectal carcinoma and its adjacent tissues, normal mucosa and 20samples of adenomatoid polyp by modified telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: Telomerase activity and hTERT expression were 83.33% (25/30) and 76.67% (23/30) respectively in colorectal carcinoma, which were obviously higher than those in paracancerous tissues (13.33%, 16.67%),normal mucosa (3.33%, 3.33%) and adenomatoid polyp(10%, 10%). There was a significant difference between colorectal carcinoma and other tissues (P=0.027). The telomerase activity and hTERT expression were higher in colorectal carcinoma with lymphatic metastasis than in that without lymphatic metastasis (P=0.034). When the histological classification and clinical stage were greater,the telomerase activity and hTERT expression increased,but there was no significant difference between them.In colorectal carcinoma, the telomerase activity was correlated with hTERT expression (positive vs negative expression of telomerase activity and hTERT, P=0.021).CONCLUSION: Telomerase activity is closely correlated with the occurrence, development and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. Overexpression of hTERT may play a critical role in the regulation of telomerase activity.

  10. Portuguese propolis disturbs glycolytic metabolism of human colorectal cancer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Isabel; Morais-Santos, Filipa; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Ferreira, Ana Margarida; Almeida-Aguiar, Cristina; Baltazar, Fátima

    2013-07-19

    Propolis is a resin collected by bees from plant buds and exudates, which is further processed through the activity of bee enzymes. Propolis has been shown to possess many biological and pharmacological properties, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunostimulant and antitumor activities. Due to this bioactivity profile, this resin can become an alternative, economic and safe source of natural bioactive compounds.Antitumor action has been reported in vitro and in vivo for propolis extracts or its isolated compounds; however, Portuguese propolis has been little explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro antitumor activity of Portuguese propolis on the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15, assessing the effect of different fractions (hexane, chloroform and ethanol residual) of a propolis ethanol extract on cell viability, proliferation, metabolism and death. Propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) was extracted with ethanol and sequentially fractionated in solvents with increasing polarity, n-hexane and chloroform. To assess cell viability, cell proliferation and cell death, Sulforhodamine B, BrDU incorporation assay and Anexin V/Propidium iodide were used, respectively. Glycolytic metabolism was estimated using specific kits. All propolis samples exhibited a cytotoxic effect against tumor cells, in a dose- and time-dependent way. Chloroform fraction, the most enriched in phenolic compounds, appears to be the most active, both in terms of inhibition of viability and cell death. Data also show that this cytotoxicity involves disturbance in tumor cell glycolytic metabolism, seen by a decrease in glucose consumption and lactate production. Our results show that Portuguese propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) can be a potential therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer.

  11. Portuguese propolis disturbs glycolytic metabolism of human colorectal cancer in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis is a resin collected by bees from plant buds and exudates, which is further processed through the activity of bee enzymes. Propolis has been shown to possess many biological and pharmacological properties, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunostimulant and antitumor activities. Due to this bioactivity profile, this resin can become an alternative, economic and safe source of natural bioactive compounds. Antitumor action has been reported in vitro and in vivo for propolis extracts or its isolated compounds; however, Portuguese propolis has been little explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro antitumor activity of Portuguese propolis on the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15, assessing the effect of different fractions (hexane, chloroform and ethanol residual) of a propolis ethanol extract on cell viability, proliferation, metabolism and death. Methods Propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) was extracted with ethanol and sequentially fractionated in solvents with increasing polarity, n-hexane and chloroform. To assess cell viability, cell proliferation and cell death, Sulforhodamine B, BrDU incorporation assay and Anexin V/Propidium iodide were used, respectively. Glycolytic metabolism was estimated using specific kits. Results All propolis samples exhibited a cytotoxic effect against tumor cells, in a dose- and time-dependent way. Chloroform fraction, the most enriched in phenolic compounds, appears to be the most active, both in terms of inhibition of viability and cell death. Data also show that this cytotoxicity involves disturbance in tumor cell glycolytic metabolism, seen by a decrease in glucose consumption and lactate production. Conclusion Our results show that Portuguese propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) can be a potential therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer. PMID:23870175

  12. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of rRNA processing genes points towards a coordinated process enabling the overproduction of matured ribosomal structures....

  13. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  14. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM).

  15. Clinical Implications and Future Perspectives of Circulating Tumor Cells and Biomarkers in Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yii Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major public health problem. Early CRC detection, pretherapeutic responsiveness prediction, and postoperative micrometastasis monitoring are the hallmarks for successful CRC treatment. Here, the methodologies used for detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs from CRC are reviewed. In addition to the traditional CRC biomarkers, the persistent presence of posttherapeutic CTCs indicates resistance to adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy; hence, CTCs also play a decisive role in the subsequent relapse of CRC. Moreover, the genetic and phenotypic profiling of CTCs often differs from that of the primary tumor; this difference can be used to select the most effective targeted therapy. Consequently, studying CTCs can potentially individualize treatment strategies for patients with CRC. Therefore, CTC detection and characterization may be valuable tools for refining prognosis, and CTCs can be used in a real-time tumor biopsy for designing individually tailored therapy against CRC.

  16. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Suzuki Sayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS, and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF. Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations (P R2 = 0.80. We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10 by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers.

  17. Exploration of small RNA-seq data for small non-coding RNAs in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Hazard, Sprague W; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improved healthcare and recent breakthroughs in technology have substantially reduced cancer mortality rates worldwide. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have allowed genomic analysis of the human transcriptome. Now, using NGS we can further look into small non-coding regions of RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting-RNAs (piRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs (sn/snoRNAs) among others. Recent studies looking at sncRNAs indicate their role in important biological processes such as cancer progression and predict their role as biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Results: In the present study, we data mined publically available small RNA sequencing data from colorectal tissue samples of eight matched patients (benign, tumor, and metastasis) and remapped the data for various small RNA annotations. We identified aberrant expression of 13 miRNAs in tumor and metastasis specimens [tumor vs benign group (19 miRNAs) and metastasis vs benign group (38 miRNAs)] of which five were upregulated, and eight were downregulated, during disease progression. Pathway analysis of aberrantly expressed miRNAs showed that the majority of miRNAs involved in colon cancer were also involved in other cancers. Analysis of piRNAs revealed six to be over-expressed in the tumor vs benign cohort and 24 in the metastasis vs benign group. Only two piRNAs were shared between the two cohorts. Examining other types of small RNAs [sn/snoRNAs, mt_rRNA, miscRNA, nonsense mediated decay (NMD), and rRNAs] identified 15 sncRNAs in the tumor vs benign group and 104 in the metastasis vs benign group, with only four others being commonly expressed. Conclusion: In summary, our comprehensive analysis on publicly available small RNA-seq data identified multiple differentially expressed sncRNAs during colorectal cancer progression at different stages compared to normal colon tissue. We speculate that

  18. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of lycopene in SW480 human colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae Hoon; Kim, Woo Kyoung; Ha, Ae Wha; Kim, Myung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Although the antioxidative effects of lycopene are generally known, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of lycopene are not fully elucidated. This study aimed to examine the role and mechanism of lycopene as an inhibitor of inflammation. METHODS/MATERIALS Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated SW 480 human colorectal cancer cells were treated with 0, 10, 20, and 30 µM lycopene. The MTT assay was performed to determine the effects of lycopene on cell proliferation. Western blotting was performed to observe the expression of inflammation-related proteins, including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitor kappa B (IκB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 (p38 MAP kinase). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to investigate the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS In cells treated with lycopene and LPS, the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, and COX-2 were decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P cancer cells.

  20. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors.

  1. Expression of p16 in Human Colorectal Cancer and its Clinical Signiifcance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qian-qian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of p16 in human colorectal cancer and its clinical signiifcance. Methods: Neoplastic tissues and autologous non-neoplastic tissues were taken from 30 patients with colorectal cancer immediately after the operation. The expression of p16 in these tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry, and then was conifrmed with HT-29 cell line by Western-blot assay. Results: The positive rate of p16 expression in neoplastic tissues was 23.3%, signiifcantly lower than that in non-neoplastic tissues (P<0.01). p16 expression was closely associated with Dukes’ staging (P<0.01), lymph node metastasis(P<0.05) and histological differentiation degrees (P<0.05). And western-blot assay showed that the p16 expression in HT-29 cells was consistent with that of human colorectal cancer. Conclusion:Abnormal expression of p16 may play an important role in the occurrence and progression of colorectal cancer, and hence, it would be associated with the prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  2. Differences in clinical features between laparoscopy and open resection for primary tumor in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim IY

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ik Yong Kim,1,* Bo Ra Kim,2,* Hyun Soo Kim,2 Young Wan Kim1 1Department of Surgery, Division of Colorectal Surgery, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Gangwon-do, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To identify differences in clinical features between laparoscopy and open resection for primary tumor in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. We also evaluated short-term and oncologic outcomes after laparoscopy and open surgery.Methods: A total of 100 consecutive stage IV patients undergoing open (n=61 or laparoscopic (n=39 major resection were analyzed. There were four cases (10% of conversion to laparotomy in the laparoscopy group.Results: Pathological T4 tumors (56% vs 26%, primary colon cancers (74% vs 51%, and larger tumor diameter (6 vs 5 cm were more commonly managed with open surgery. Right colectomy was more common in the open surgery group (39% and low anterior resection was more common in the laparoscopy group (39%, P=0.002. Hepatic metastases in segments II, III, IVb, V, and VI were more frequently resected with laparoscopy (100% than with open surgery (56%, although the difference was not statistically significant. In colon and rectal cancers, mean operative time and 30-day complication rates of laparoscopy and open surgery did not differ. In both cancers, mean time to soft diet and length of hospital stay were shorter in the laparoscopy group. Mean time from surgery to chemotherapy commencement was significantly shorter with laparoscopy than with open surgery. In colon and rectal cancers, 2-year cancer-specific and progression-free survival rates were similar between the laparoscopy and open surgery groups.Conclusion: Based on our findings, laparoscopy can be selected as an initial approach in patients with a primary tumor without adjacent organ invasion and patients without primary tumor-related symptoms. In selected stage

  3. Silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haibo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RhoA and RhoC have been proved to be over-expressed in many solid cancers, including colorectal cancer. The reduction of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference (RNAi resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells. The present study was to evaluate the effect of silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNAi on growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC in tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Methods To establish HCT116 cell transplantable model, the nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1.0 × 107 HCT116 cells and kept growing till the tumor xenografts reached 5-7 mm in diameter. Then the mice were randomly assigned to three groups(seven mice in each group: (1 normal saline(NS group, (2replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the negative control shRNA (Ad-HK group and (3replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the 4-tandem linked RhoA and RhoC shRNAs (Ad-RhoA-RhoC group. Ad-HK (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse, Ad-RhoA-RhoC (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse or PBS (30 ul/mouse was injected intratumorally four times once every other day. The weight and volumes of tumor xenografts were recorded. The levels of RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts and proteins in tumor xenografts were detected by reverse quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was used to detect the death of cells. Results The xenografts in mice could be seen at 5th day from the implantation of HCT116 cells and all had reached 5-7 mm in size at 9th day. After injection intratumorally, the growth speed of tumor xenografts in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group was significantly delayed compared with those in NS and Ad-HK group(P RhoA and RhoC reduced more in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group than those in NS and Ad-HK group. The relative RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts were decreased to 48% and 43% respectively (P RhoA and Rho

  4. Characterization and propagation of tumor initiating cells derived from colorectal liver metastases: trials, tribulations and a cautionary note.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I James

    Full Text Available Tumor initiating cells (TIC are increasingly being put forward as a potential target for intervention within colorectal cancer. Whilst characterisation and outgrowth of these cells has been extensively undertaken in primary colorectal cancers, few data are available describing characteristics within the metastatic setting. Tissue was obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection for colorectal liver metastases, and processed into single cell suspension for assessment. Tumor initiating cells from liver metastases were characterised using combinations of EPCAM, Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, CD133 and CD26. CD133 expression was significantly lower in patients who had received chemotherapy, but this was accounted for by a decrease observed in the male patient cohort only. ALDHhigh populations were rare (0.4 and 0.3% for EPCAM+/ALDHhigh/CD133- and EPCAM+/ALDHhigh/CD133+ populations respectively and below the limits of detection in 28% of samples. Spheroid outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells across all samples could not be readily achieved using standard spheroid-formation techniques, thus requiring further method validation to reliably propagate cells from the majority of tissues. Spheroid formation was not enhanced using additional growth factors or fibroblast co-culture, but once cells were passaged through NOD-SCID mice, spheroid formation was observed in 82% samples, accompanied by a significant increase in CD26. Order of spheroid forming ability was ALDHhigh>CD133>CD26. Samples sorted by these markers each had the ability to reform ALDHhigh, CD133 and CD26 positive populations to a similar extent, suggestive of a high degree of plasticity for each population. Ex vivo TIC models are increasingly being utilised to assess efficacy of therapeutic interventions. It is therefore essential that such investigations use well-characterised models that are able to sustain TIC populations across a large patient cohort in order that the inherent

  5. Expression of uPAR in tumor-associated stromal cells is associated with colorectal cancer patient prognosis: a TMA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Martin C; Verbeek, Floris P R; Mazar, Andrew P; Prevoo, Hendrica A J M; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Sier, Cornelis F M

    2014-04-17

    The receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is associated with cancer development and progression. Within the tumor microenvironment uPAR is expressed by malignant cells as well as tumor-associated stromal cells. However, the contribution of uPAR expression in these stromal cells to malignancy and patient survival in colorectal cancer is still unclear. This study compares the association of uPAR expression in both colorectal tumor-associated stromal cells and neoplastic cells with clinico-pathological characteristics and patient survival using tissue micro arrays (TMA). Immunohistochemical staining of uPAR expression was performed on tumor tissue from 262 colorectal cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier, log rank, and uni- and multivariate Cox's regression analyses were used to calculate associations between uPAR expression and patient survival. In the colorectal tumor-associated stromal microenvironment, uPAR is expressed in macrophages, (neoangiogenic) endothelial cells and myofibroblasts. uPAR expression in tumor-associated stromal cells and neoplastic cells (and both combined) were negatively associated with overall survival (OS) and Disease Free Survival (DFS). Uni- and multivariate Cox's regression analysis for combined uPAR expression in tumor-associated stromal and neoplastic cells showed significant and independent negative associations with OS and DFS. Only uPAR expression in tumor-associated stromal cells showed independent significance in the uni- and multivariate analysis for DFS. This study demonstrates a significant independent negative association between colorectal cancer patient survival and uPAR expression in especially tumor-associated stromal cells.

  6. The serine protease inhibitor serpinE2 is a novel target of ERK signaling involved in human colorectal tumorigenesis

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    Boucher Marie-Josée

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the most harmful of all genetic abnormalities that appear in colorectal cancer (CRC development are mutations of KRAS and its downstream effector BRAF as they result in abnormal extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK signaling. In a previous report, we had shown that expression of a constitutive active mutant of MEK1 (caMEK in normal rat intestinal epithelial cells (IECs induced morphological transformation associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition, growth in soft agar, invasion and metastases in nude mice. Results from microarrays comparing control to caMEK-expressing IECs identified the gene encoding for serpinE2, a serine protease inhibitor, as a potential target of activated MEK1. Results 1- RT-PCR and western blot analyses confirmed the strong up-regulation of serpinE2 expression and secretion by IECs expressing oncogenic MEK, Ras or BRAF. 2- Interestingly, serpinE2 mRNA and protein were also markedly enhanced in human CRC cells exhibiting mutation in KRAS and BRAF. 3- RNAi directed against serpinE2 in caMEK-transformed rat IECs or in human CRC cell lines HCT116 and LoVo markedly decreased foci formation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose, cell migration and tumor formation in nude mice. 4- Treatment of CRC cell lines with U0126 markedly reduced serpinE2 mRNA levels, indicating that expression of serpinE2 is likely dependent of ERK activity. 5- Finally, Q-PCR analyses demonstrated that mRNA levels of serpinE2 were markedly increased in human adenomas in comparison to healthy adjacent tissues and in colorectal tumors, regardless of tumor stage and grade. Conclusions Our data indicate that serpinE2 is up-regulated by oncogenic activation of Ras, BRAF and MEK1 and contributes to pro-neoplastic actions of ERK signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. Hence, serpinE2 may be a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

  7. MODERATE CYTOTOXICITY OF PROANTHOCYANIDINS TO HUMAN TUMOR-CELL LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOLODZIEJ, H; HABERLAND, C; WOERDENBAG, HJ; KONINGS, AWT

    1995-01-01

    In the present study the cytotoxicity of 16 proanthocyanidins was evaluated in GLC(4), a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, and in COLO 320, a human colorectal cancer cell line, using the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. With IC50 values ranging from 18 to >200 mu m following continuous

  8. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

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    Yuan Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Li1, Janine A Burns1, Carol A Cheney1, Ningyan Zhang1, Salvatore Vitelli1, Fubao Wang1, Andrew Bett2, Michael Chastain2, Laurent P Audoly1, Zhi-Qiang Zhang1,31Department of Biologics Research, 2Department of Vaccine Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, USA; 3Clinical Development Laboratory, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USAAbstract: Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1 whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2 the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers. We found that the expression of Notch-1 protein was overexpressed in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, but not in primary ductal breast carcinoma or prostate adenocarcinoma. Further analysis revealed that higher levels of Notch-1 protein expression were significantly associated with poorer differentiation of breast and prostate tumors. Strikingly, for NSCLC, the expression levels of Notch-1 protein were found to be inversely correlated with tumor differentiation and progression. For colorectal tumors, however, no correlation of Notch-1 protein expression was found with any tumor clinicopathological parameters, in spite of its overexpression in tumor cells. Our data demonstrated the complexity of Notch-1 protein expression in human solid tumors and further supported the notion that the roles of Notch-1 expression in tumorigenesis are highly context-dependent. The findings could provide the basis for development of distinct therapeutic strategies of Notch-1 mAbs for its applications in the treatment of suitable types of human cancers.Keywords: Notch

  9. Comparison of KRAS/BRAF mutations between primary tumors and serum in colorectal cancer: Biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xingxiang; Pan, Zhizhong; Huang, Ying; Tian, Ying; Guo, Hongqiang; Wu, Lin; He, Xuexing; Chen, Xinggui; Zhang, Shaodan; Lin, Tongyu

    2013-01-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), KRAS and BRAF mutations in primary tumors are associated with resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR)-based therapies. However, the correlation between KRAS/BRAF mutation in primary tumors and serum has not been well studied. To evaluate the degree of concordance of KRAS/BRAF mutations between the primary tumors and the matched serum samples in CRC, serum and tumor tissues were collected from 115 patients with CRC and KRAS/BRAF mutations were examined by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing. BRAF mutations were present in 3.5% (4/115) of the primary tumor tissue samples and 0.87% (1/115) of the serum samples. In the 4 primary tumors with BRAF mutations, identical mutations were not observed in the corresponding serum samples (κ=-0.016). KRAS mutations were observed in 32.2% (37/115) of the primary tumors and 11.3% (13/115) of the serum samples. Of the 37 tumor cases with KRAS mutations, 9 had identical mutations in the corresponding serum sample, with a concordance rate of 24.3% (9/37). Discordance was observed in 32 (27.8%) patients. The concordance between KRAS mutations in the primary tumors and KRAS mutations in the matched serums was low (κ=0.231). The results of the present study suggest that the possibility of differences in the mutational status of KRAS/BRAF between primary tumors and matched serum samples should be considered when patients are selected for anti-EGFR-based therapies.

  10. Expression of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and tumor-associated carbonic anhydrases Ⅸ and Ⅻ in normal and neoplastic colorectal mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti J. Kivela; Abdul Waheed; William S. Sly; Hannu Rajaniemi; Silvia Pastorekova; Jaromir Pastorek; Seppo Parkkila; Juha Saarnio; Tuomo J. Karttunen; Jyrki Kivela; Anna-Kaisa Parkkila; Maria Bartosova; Vojtech Mucha; Michal Novak

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze possible relationships between CA Ⅸ/ CA Ⅻ and pVHL expression in normal and neoplastic colorectal mucosa.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of 42 tissue specimens obtained from 17 cancer patients was performed to evaluate the distribution and semi-quantitatively assess the levels of CA Ⅸ, CA Ⅻ and pVHL. VHL mRNAs from 14fresh-frozen tumors was amplified by RT-PCR and subjected to sequencing. CA9 and CA12 mRNA levels were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with VEGF as an indicator of hypoxia that uncouples the pVHL control.RESULTS: Tumor tissues were associated with a borderline increase of CA Ⅸ staining signal and slight but significant decrease of CA Ⅻ immunoreactivity, whereas no association was found for pVHL. Sequence analysis of RT-PCR-amplified VHL mRNAs revealed no deletions/ mutations, suggesting that they were VHL-competent. We did not observe any correlation between pVHL andCA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ proteins as well as between VEGF and CA9mRNAs, but the tumor-associated changes in mRNA levels of VEGF and CA12showed a significant inverse relationship. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that CA9 and CA12 are regulated by different intratumoral factors and that lack of apparent relationship between the levels of CA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ and pVHL cannot be fully assigned to uncoupling of negative regulatory function of pVHL by tumor hypoxia signified by induced VEGF transcription. The interplay between the functional pVHL and CA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ in colorectal tumors seems rather complex and is not evident merely at the expression levels.

  11. Analysis of mitochondrial ND1 gene in human colorectal cancer

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    Mansoureh Akouchekian

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Results showed that a high frequency of somatic alterations of mtDNA occurs during the carcinogenesis and/or the progression of colorectal cancer. Based on the mtDNA mutation pattern observed in this study and other pre-viously studies it is believed that looking for somatic mutations in mtDNA would be one of the diagnostic values in early detection of cancer.

  12. High DNA methylation pattern intratumoral diversity implies weak selection in many human colorectal cancers.

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    Kimberly D Siegmund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is possible to infer the past of populations by comparing genomes between individuals. In general, older populations have more genomic diversity than younger populations. The force of selection can also be inferred from population diversity. If selection is strong and frequently eliminates less fit variants, diversity will be limited because new, initially homogeneous populations constantly emerge. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Here we translate a population genetics approach to human somatic cancer cell populations by measuring genomic diversity within and between small colorectal cancer (CRC glands. Control tissue culture and xenograft experiments demonstrate that the population diversity of certain passenger DNA methylation patterns is reduced after cloning but subsequently increases with time. When measured in CRC gland populations, passenger methylation diversity from different parts of nine CRCs was relatively high and uniform, consistent with older, stable lineages rather than mixtures of younger homogeneous populations arising from frequent cycles of selection. The diversity of six metastases was also high, suggesting dissemination early after transformation. Diversity was lower in DNA mismatch repair deficient CRC glands, possibly suggesting more selection and the elimination of less fit variants when mutation rates are elevated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The many hitchhiking passenger variants observed in primary and metastatic CRC cell populations are consistent with relatively old populations, suggesting that clonal evolution leading to selective sweeps may be rare after transformation. Selection in human cancers appears to be a weaker than presumed force after transformation, consistent with the observed rarity of driver mutations in cancer genomes. Phenotypic plasticity rather than the stepwise acquisition of new driver mutations may better account for the many different phenotypes within human tumors.

  13. The "Fas counterattack" is not an active mode of tumor immune evasion in colorectal cancer with high-level microsatellite instability.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Houston, Aileen M

    2012-02-03

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis. It is found in 10% to 15% of sporadic colorectal neoplasms and is characterized by failure of the DNA mismatch-repair system. High-level MSI (MSI-H) is associated with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and a favorable prognosis. Expression of Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) by cancer cells may mediate tumor immune privilege by inducing apoptosis of antitumor immune cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between FasL expression and MSI status in primary colon tumors. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected FasL expression in 91 colorectal carcinoma specimens, previously classified according to the level of MSI as MSI-H (n = 26), MSI-low (MSI-L) (n = 29), and microsatellite stable (n = 36). Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte density was quantified by immunohistochemical staining for CD3. MSI-H tumors were significantly associated with reduced frequency (P = .04) and intensity (P = .066) of FasL expression relative to non-MSI-H (ie, microsatellite stable and MSI-L) tumors. Higher FasL staining intensity correlated with reduced TIL density (P = .059). Together, these findings suggest that the abundance of TILs found in MSI-H tumors may be due to the failure of these tumor cells to up-regulate FasL and may explain, in part, the improved prognosis associated with these tumors.

  14. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Inhibited Tumor Growth via Preventing the Decrease of Genomic DNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qionglin; Wen, Juan; Chen, Guangzhao; Ge, Miaomiao; Gao, Yihua; Ye, Xiaoxia; Liu, Chunan; Cai, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Omge-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibited significant effect in inhibiting various tumors. However, the mechanisms of its anticancer role have not been fully demonstrated. The declination of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) was closely associated with poor prognosis of tumors. To explore whether omega-3 PUFAs influences on DNA methylation level in tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) rat model were constructed using N-methyl phosphite nitrourea and omega-3 PUFAs were fed to part of the rats during tumor induction. The PUFAs contents in the rats of 3 experimental groups were measured using gas chromatography and 5 mC level were detected by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that tumor incidence in omega-3 treated rats was much lower than in CRC model rats, which confirmed significant antitumor role of omega-3 PUFAs. Six PUFA members categorized to omega-3 and omega-6 families were quantified and the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 PUFAs was remarkably lower in omega-3 PUFAs treatment group than in CRC model group. 5 mC content in omega-3 PUFAs treated rats was higher than in CRC model rats, suggesting omega-3 PUFAs promoted 5 mC synthesis. Therefore, omega-3 PUFAs probably inhibited tumor growth via regulating DNA methylation process, which provided a novel anticancer mechanism of omega-3 PUFAs from epigenetic view.

  15. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses colorectal cancer growth and invasion by inducing G1 arrest, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hui; Yin, Hong; Yan, Su; Tao, Min; Xie, Yufeng; Chen, Weichang

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), a tumor suppressor, is reduced in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and is inversely correlated with clinical Dukes' stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and microvessel density (MVD). However, its underlying mechanism remains undetermined. In the present study, we analyzed ING4 expression in a panel of human CRC cells using low (LS174T and SW480) and high (LoVo and SW620) metastatic cell lines. We demonstrated that both the low and high metastatic CRC cells exhibited a lower level of ING4 compared to the level in normal human colorectal mucous epithelial FHC cells. Furthermore, ING4 expression in high metastatic CRC cells was less than that in low metastatic CRC cells. We then generated a lentivirus construct expressing ING4 and green fluorescent protein (GFP), established a ING4-stably transgenic LoVo CRC cell line, and investigated the effect of lentiviral-mediated ING4 expression on high metastatic LoVo CRC cells. Gain-of-function studies revealed that ING4 significantly inhibited LoVo CRC cell growth and invasion in vitro and induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest. Moreover, ING4 obviously suppressed LoVo CRC subcutaneously xenografted tumor growth and reduced tumor MVD in vivo in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, ING4 markedly upregulated P21 and E-cadherin but downregulated cyclin E, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Snail1, N-cadherin and vimentin in the LoVo CRC cells. Our data provide compelling evidence that i) ING4 suppresses CRC growth possibly via induction of G1 phase arrest through upregulation of P21 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor and downregulation of cyclin E as well as inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through reduction of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF proangiogenic factors; ii) ING4 inhibits CRC invasion and metastasis probably via a switch from mesenchymal marker N-cadherin to epithelial marker E-cadherin through downregulation of

  16. Nampt/PBEF/Visfatin Upregulation in Colorectal Tumors, Mirrored in Normal Tissue and Whole Blood of Colorectal Cancer Patients, Is Associated with Metastasis, Hypoxia, IL1β, and Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Neubauer; Iwona Bednarz Misa; Dorota Diakowska; Bartosz Kapturkiewicz; Andrzej Gamian; Malgorzata Krzystek-Korpacka

    2015-01-01

    Targeting Nampt/PBEF/visfatin is considered a promising anticancer strategy, yet little is known about its association with colorectal cancer (CRC). We quantified Nampt/PBEF/visfatin expression in bowel and blood (mRNA and protein), referring it to CRC advancement and inflammatory, angiogenic, hypoxia, and proliferation indices. Tumor Nampt/PBEF/visfatin upregulation was associated with metastasis, anemia, tumor location, HIF1α, and inflammatory and angiogenic indices, of which HIF1α, IL1...

  17. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Mothes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment.

  18. Localization of human BRCA1 and BRCA2 in non-inherited colorectal carcinomas and matched normal mucosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Gallon, D J; Peffault de Latour, M; Hizel, C; Vissac, C; Cure, H; Pezet, D; Dechelotte, P J; Chipponi, J; Chassagne, J; Bignon, Y J

    2001-01-01

    We characterized the expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 38 sporadic colorectal carcinomas and matched normal mucosas with 9 anti-BRCA1 antibodies and 4 anti-BRCA2 antibodies, raised against several different epitopes, using immunohistochemical technique. We demonstrated an increased BRCA1 and BRCA2 staining in the apical cell pole of epithelial malignant cells and we also revealed a significant increase in BRCA1 and BRCA2 nuclear foci in tumor colorectal specimens in comparison with corresponding normal tissues. These increases in BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression may be explained by the fact that colorectal tissue is subject to very active proliferation and differentiation.

  19. Modification of cyclic NGR tumor neovasculature-homing motif sequence to human plasminogen kringle 5 improves inhibition of tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood vessels in tumors express higher level of aminopeptidase N (APN than normal tissues. Evidence suggests that the CNGRC motif is an APN ligand which targets tumor vasculature. Increased expression of APN in tumor vascular endothelium, therefore, offers an opportunity for targeted delivery of NGR peptide-linked drugs to tumors. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether an additional cyclic CNGRC sequence could improve endothelial cell homing and antitumor effect, human plasminogen kringle 5 (hPK5 was modified genetically to introduce a CNGRC motif (NGR-hPK5 and was subsequently expressed in yeast. The biological activity of NGR-hPK5 was assessed and compared with that of wild-type hPK5, in vitro and in vivo. NGR-hPK5 showed more potent antiangiogenic activity than wild-type hPK5: the former had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and cord formation of vascular endothelial cells, and produced a stronger antiangiogenic response in the CAM assay. To evaluate the tumor-targeting ability, both wild-type hPK5 and NGR-hPK5 were (99 mTc-labeled, for tracking biodistribution in the in vivo tumor model. By planar imaging and biodistribution analyses of major organs, NGR-hPK5 was found localized to tumor tissues at a higher level than wild-type hPK5 (approximately 3-fold. Finally, the effects of wild-type hPK5 and NGR-modified hPK5 on tumor growth were investigated in two tumor model systems. NGR modification improved tumor localization and, as a consequence, effectively inhibited the growth of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205 cells in tumor-bearing mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies indicated that the addition of an APN targeting peptide NGR sequence could improve the ability of hPK5 to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  20. Prognostic value of Annexin A3 in human colorectal cancer and its correlation with hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yong-Qiu; Fu, DI; He, Zheng-Hua; Tan, Qing-Dong

    2013-12-01

    Annexins are a family of intracellular proteins that bind membrane phospholipids in a Ca(2+) concentration-dependent manner and are involved in cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has been hypothesized to be critical in the angiogenesis of tumors. We hypothesized that Annexin A3, a member of the Annexin family, and HIF-1α may be associated with each other in colorectal cancer. The expression of Annexin A3 and HIF-1α in 60 colorectal cancer tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry to statistically analyze the association between the clinicopathological features and survival of these cases. In the present study, 65 and 47% of colorectal cancer specimens were found to show Annexin A3 and HIF-1α immunoreactivity, respectively. Annexin A3 expression was found to significantly correlate with tumor size and Dukes' stage (all PA3 and HIF-1α protein expression exhibited a similar pattern in these samples, and their expression was found to correlate with poor survival in colorectal cancer patients. The results of the current study indicated for the first time that the increased expression of Annexin A3 in colorectal cancer correlates significantly with tumor growth and poor prognosis. Furthermore, Annexin A3 has been found to correlate with HIF-1α expression. These observations highlight an improved understanding of the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer.

  1. Respiration rate in human pituitary tumor explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anniko, M; Bagger-Sjöbäck, D; Hultborn, R

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the respiration rate of human pituitary tumor tissue have so far been lacking in the literature. This study presents the results from four adenomas causing acromegaly, all with different clinical degrees of the disease. Determination of oxygen uptake was performed in vitro with a spectrophotorespirometric system. Pieces of the tumors were explanted to an organ culture system with a high degree of stability. The secretion rate of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) was determined. After 4-8 days in vitro, specimens were analyzed for respiration rate. This was approximately 1-1.5 microliters O2/h/micrograms dry weight. The activity of the pituitary tumor tissue was characterized by both the hormone secretion rate and the respiration rate. Particularly active foci were found to occur in the adenoma tissue. Depending on the individual tumor, the GH secretion rate was approximately 0.1-100 pmol/micrograms dry weight/h and PRL secretion rate approximately 0.4-18 micrograms/micrograms dry weight/h. The respiration rate--as is also the hormone secretion rate--is dependent on the time in vitro prior to analysis. The respiration rate in individual tumors is a parameter which does not reflect GH or PRL serum levels or clinical activity of the disease.

  2. Quantitative analysis of anti-CEA antibody accumulation in human colorectal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Fass, J. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Hauptmann, S. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology); Braun, J. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Grehl, O. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Reinartz, R. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Buell, U. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Schumpelick, V. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Mittermayer, C. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology)

    1993-04-01

    In order to obtain quantitative data on intratumoral anitbody accumulation we analyzed resected colorectal adenocarcinomas of 25 patients who had undergone immunoscintigraphy 4-14 days earlier. All had been injected with 0.5-1.0 mg intact anti-CEA antibody (BW 431/26) labelled with 70-80 MBq [sup 131]I. Correlation of tissue radioactivity concentrations with tumor characteristics revealed significantly higher values in necrotic compared to viable as well as in CEA-positive compared to CEA-negative viable tumor tissue indicating action of both specific and unspecific uptake mechanisms. In contrast, diagnostic results of immunoscintigraphy were influenced by tumor size only. 11 of 12 falsenegative findings were obtained in tumors <4 cm in diameter. Since ex-vivo scintigraphy of resected specimens correctly visualized all but one of these lesions, it is concluded that technical limitations of scintigraphy are the main cause of negative results of radioimmunoimaging with [sup 131]I-labelled antibodies. (orig.)

  3. Effect of a novel oral chemotherapeutic agent containing a combination of trifluridine, tipiracil and the novel triple angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib, on human colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiko; Nakagawa, Fumio; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-12-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (TFTD) is a combination drug that is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and was formerly known as TAS-102. It is a combination of two active pharmaceutical compounds, trifluridine, an antineoplastic thymidine-based nucleoside analog, and tipiracil, which enhances the bioavailability of trifluridine in vivo. TFTD is used for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer that is resistant to standard therapies. In the present study, the anticancer effects of trifluridine in combination with nintedanib, an oral triple angiokinase inhibitor, on human colorectal cancer cell lines were investigated. The cytotoxicity against DLD-1, HT-29, and HCT116 cell lines was determined by the crystal violet staining method. The combination of trifluridine and nintedanib exerted an additive effect on the growth inhibition of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells and a sub-additive effect on HCT116 cells, as determined by isobologram analyses. Subsequently, the human colorectal cancer cell lines were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to allow the evaluation of the in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effects of TFTD and nintedanib combination therapy. TFTD (150 mg/kg/day) and/or nintedanib (40 mg/kg/day) were orally administered to the mice twice daily from day 1 to day 14. The tumor growth inhibition with combination therapy was 61.5, 72.8, 67.6 and 67.5% for the DLD-1, DLD-1/5-FU, HT-29, and HCT116 xenografts, respectively. This was significantly (P<0.05) higher than the effects of monotherapy with either TFTD or nintedanib. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the combination of TFTD and nintedanib in the treatment of colorectal cancer xenografts. The concentration of trifluridine incorporated into DNA in the HT-29 and HCT116 tumors was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The incorporation levels following treatment with TFTD and nintedanib for 14 consecutive days were

  4. Berberine inhibits the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuchen; Xia, Qing; Luo, Rongzhen; Huang, Peiyu; Sun, Yueli; Shi, Yanxia; Jiang, Wenqi

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Huanglian, and has long been used as an antibiotic. Its antineoplastic properties were subsequently discovered in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of berberine on the growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that berberine inhibited human colorectal adenocarcinoma (LoVo) cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A WST-1 assay showed that the IC50 value after 72 h was 40.79 ± 4.11 μM. Cell cycle analysis of 40 μM berberine-treated LoVo cells by flow cytometry showed accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. The inhibition of LoVo cell growth by berberine was associated with the suppression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c proteins. Berberine at a dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1) showed inhibitory rates of 45.3% in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenograft in nude mice. The combination of berberine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) had a higher inhibitory rate (59.8%) than the berberine group (36.4%, P = 0.01), but no significant difference was observed between the 5-FU group (43.0%, P = 0.06) and the combination group. These results support the possibility that berberine may be useful as an alternative therapy for colorectal carcinoma.

  5. DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS‑induced tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the β‑catenin/ZEB1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Chou; Wang, Lee; Lee, Huei

    2016-04-19

    DDX3 plays a dual role in colorectal cancer; however, the role and underlying mechanism of DDX3 in colorectal tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS transcription via an increase in SP1 binding to its promoter. Accelerating oncogenic KRAS expression by DDX3 promotes the invasion capability via the ERK/PTEN/AKT/β-catenin cascade. Moreover, the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis is responsible for DDX3-induced cell invasiveness and xenograft lung tumor nodule formation. The xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone were nearly suppressed by the inhibitor of AKT (perifosine) or β-catenin (XAV939). Among patients, high KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin expression and high ZEB1 were more commonly occurred in high-DDX3 tumors than in low-DDX3 tumors. High-DDX3, high-KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin tumors, and high-ZEB1 exhibited worse overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) than their counterparts. In conclusion, DDX3 may play an oncogenic role to promote tumor growth and invasion in colon cancer cells via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis due to increasing KRAS transcription. We therefore suggest that AKT or β-catenin may potentially act as a therapeutic target to improve tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer patients who harbored high-DDX3 tumors.

  6. Hypermethylation of CpG island in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene was associated with K-rasG to A mutation in colorectal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Qi; You-Qing Zhu; Mei-Fang Huang; Dong Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functions of promoter hypermethylation of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene in colorectal tumorigenesis and progression.METHODS: The promoter hypermethylation of MGMT gene was detected in 27 sporadic colorectal adenomas,62 sporadic colorectal carcinomas and 20 normal colorectal mucosa tissues by methylation-specific PCR. At the same time, the expression of MGMT protein was carried out in the same samples using immunohistochemistry. Mutantallele-specific amplification was used to detect K-rasG to A point mutation in codon 12.RESULTS: None of the normal colorectal mucosa tissues showed methylated bands. Promoter hypermethylation was detected in 40.7% (11 of 27) of adenomas and 43.5% (27 of 62) of carcinomas. MGMT proteins were expressed in nucleus and cytoplasm of normal colorectal mucosa tissues. Loss of MGMT expression was found in 22.2% (6 of 27) of adenomas and 45.2% (28 of 62) of carcinomas. The difference between them was significant (P = 0.041). In the 6 adenomas and 28 carcinomas losing MGMT expression, 5 and 24 cases presented methylation,respectively (P = 0.027, P<0.001). Thirteen of the 19 colorectal tumors with K-rasG to A point mutation in codon 12 had methylated MGMT(P = 0.011). The frequencies of K-rasG to A point mutation were 35.3% (12 of 34) and 12.7% (7 of 55) in tumors losing MGMT expression and with normal expression, respectively.CONCLUSION: Promoter hypermethylation and loss of expression of MGMT gene were common events in colorectal tumorigenesis, and loss of expression of MGMT occurs more frequently in carcinomas than in adenomas in sporadic patients. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of MGMT gene was associated with loss of MGMT expression and K-ras G to A point mutation in colorectal tumor. The frequency of K-ras G to A point mutation was increased in tumors losing MGMT expression. It suggests that epigenetic inactivation of MGMT plays an important role in colorectal neoplasia.

  7. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman H Suleiman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6. NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  8. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Suleiman H; Koko, Mahmoud E; Nasir, Wafaa H; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K; Abdallah, Mohammed O E; Alfarouk, Khalid O; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M A; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Mohamed, Hiba S; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  9. Downregulation of anti-oncomirs miR-143/145 cluster occurs before APC gene aberration in the development of colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatani, Akemi; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Akao, Yukihiro; Maruyama, Naoko; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Hirata, Ichiro

    2013-09-01

    Accumulating data indicate that some microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) can function as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and as such are important in cancer development. We previously reported that miR-143 and -145 are frequently downregulated in colon adenomas and cancers, acting as tumor suppressors. In this present study, we investigated the relationship between the downregulation of the miR-143/145 cluster and genetic aberrations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), which are early genetic events in the development of colorectal tumors. The expression levels of both miRs were determined by performing real-time PCR on tissue samples of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), colorectal adenoma, colorectal cancer, and paired non-tumorous tissues. Also, the expression of C- or N-terminus of the APC protein and that of the p53 protein in these tissues were examined immunohistochemically. Our data clearly indicated that the decreased expression of miR-143 and -145 frequently occurred before APC gene aberrations. The downregulation of miR-143 and -145 is thus an important genetic event for the initiation step in colorectal tumor development.

  10. Characterization of a common antigen of colorectal and mucinous ovarian tumors, COTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Zamora, P O; Rhodes, B A; Sachatello, C R; Hagihara, P F; Griffen, W O; van Nagell, J R; Fulks, R; Ram, M D

    1984-01-01

    A new colon cancer antigen is reported. It is designated as COTA, Colon-Ovarian Tumor Antigen, because it is found in mucins produced by both tissues during malignancy. The new antigen was identified by making antibodies against human colon cancer tissue in goats. The antisera were exhaustively absorbed with lyophilized extracts of normal colon, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, plasma, and the well-known colon tumor antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The new antigen was identified by immunodiffusion. Studies of 28 malignant tissue extracts, 10 ovarian adenocarcinoma cyst fluids, 43 normal tissues, and 5 plasma samples revealed that this antigen is found only in colon tumors and mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas. The antigen was not detected in serous adenocarcinoma of the ovaries, extracts of adenocarcinoma of lung, breast, kidney or stomach nor in the extracts of normal tissues. Other tests show that this antigen is not CEA, Ca 19-9, or CSAp. It is stable to heating at 65 degrees for 5 minutes; it elutes from an ion exchange matrix (DEAE) with 0.3-0.5M NaCl; it migrates to the alpha-2 region on immunoelectrophoresis; and its size, by exclusion chromatography on Sepharose 4B, is 3-15 million daltons. Anti-COTA stains colon cancer tissue sections indicating that COTA is present in goblet-cell mucin.

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation of {sup 111}In-vinorelbine-liposomes in a human colorectal carcinoma HT-29/luc-bearing animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, T.-H.; Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw; Wang, H.-E. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Y.-L. [Taiwan Liposome Company, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang, V.F. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Ting Gann [National Health Research Institute, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2008-07-15

    Colorectal carcinoma is a highly prevalent and common cause of cancer in Taiwan. There is still no available cure for this malignant disease. To address this issue, we applied the multimodality of molecular imaging to explore the efficacy of diagnostic and therapeutic nanoradiopharmaceuticals in an animal model of human colorectal adenocarcinoma [colorectal cancer (CRC)] that stably expresses luciferase (luc) as a reporter. In this study, an in vivo therapeutic efficacy evaluation of dual-nanoliposome (100 nm in diameter) encaged vinorelbine (VNB) and {sup 111}In-oxine on HT-29/luc mouse xenografts was carried out. HT-29/luc tumor cells were transplanted subcutaneously into male SCID mice. Multimodality of molecular imaging approaches including bioluminescence imaging (BLI), gamma scintigraphy, whole-body autoradiography (WBAR) and in vivo tumor growth tracing, histopathology and biochemistry/hematology analyses were applied on xenografted SCID mice to study the treatments with 6% polyethylene glycol (PEG) of {sup 111}In-NanoX/VNB-liposomes. In vivo tumor growth tracing and BLI showed that tumor volume could be completely inhibited by the combination therapy with {sup 111}In-VNB-liposomes and by chemotherapy with NanoX/VNB-liposomes (i.e., without Indium-111) (P<.01). The nuclear medicine images of gamma scintigraphy and WBAR also revealed the conspicuous inhibition of tumor growth by the combination therapy with {sup 111}In-VNB-liposomes. Animal body weights, histopathology and biochemistry/hematology analyses were used to confirm the safety and feasibility of radiopharmaceuticals. A synergistic therapeutic effect on CRC xenografted SCID mice was proven by combining an Auger electron-emitting radioisotope (Indium-111) with an anticancer drug (VNB). This study further demonstrates the beneficial potential applications of multimodality molecular imaging as part of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for the evaluation of new drugs and other strategic

  12. Bone Marrow Suppression by c-Kit Blockade Enhances Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastases through the Action of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1

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    Kathrin Rupertus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mobilization of c-Kit+ hematopoietic cells (HCs contributes to tumor vascularization. Whereas survival and proliferation of HCs are regulated by binding of the stem cell factor to its receptor c-Kit, migration of HCs is directed by stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1. Therefore, targeting migration of HCs provides a promising new strategy of anti-tumor therapy. Methods. BALB/c mice (=16 were pretreated with an anti-c-Kit antibody followed by implantation of CT26.WT-GFP colorectal cancer cells into dorsal skinfold chambers. Animals (=8 additionally received a neutralizing anti-SDF-1 antibody. Animals (=8 treated with a control antibody served as controls. Investigations were performed using intravital fluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and western blot analysis. Results. Blockade of c-Kit significantly enhanced tumor cell engraftment compared to controls due to stimulation of tumor cell proliferation and invasion without markedly affecting tumor vascularization. C-Kit blockade significantly increased VEGF and CXCR4 expression within the growing tumors. Neutralization of SDF-1 completely antagonized this anti-c-Kit-associated tumor growth by suppression of tumor neovascularization, inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and reduction of muscular infiltration. Conclusion. Our study indicates that bone marrow suppression via anti-c-Kit pretreatment enhances tumor cell engraftment of colorectal metastases due to interaction with the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway which is involved in HC-mediated tumor angiogenesis.

  13. 淋巴管生成因子的定量表达与大肠癌转移研究%The quantitative expressions of lymphangiogenic factors and metastasis in human colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianyu He; Yuanfang Lv

    2011-01-01

    .Objective:The purpose of this paper was to study the expression levels of newly described lymphatic endothelial markers – LYVE-1,Prox-1,podoplanin and 5'-nucleotidase,and their correlation with metastasis of human colorectal cancers.Methods:Tumor and corresponding tumor-side normal tissue samples were obtained from resected specimens immediately after operation.Expression level of each factor was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot technique.Results:Expression levels of lymphatic endothelial markers LYVE-1,Prox-1,podoplanin and 5'-nucleotidase were significantly different in tumor and tumor-side normal groups.Expression levels of Prox-1 and podoplanin were higher in patients with positive lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis.LYVE-1,but not 5'-nucleotidase expression level was higher in both cancer and normal groups.Conclusion:These results indicate that combined quantitative analysis of lymphangiogenic markers LYVE-1,Prox-1 and podoplanin in colorectal cancer specimens may be useful in predicting metas-tasis of colorectal cancer to regional lymph nodes.However,the role of 5'-nucleotidase in predicting metastasis of colorectal cancer still remains to be further analyzed.

  14. Combination of NK Cells and Cetuximab to Enhance Anti-Tumor Responses in RAS Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

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    John Pradeep Veluchamy

    Full Text Available The ability of Natural Killer (NK cells to kill tumor targets has been extensively studied in various hematological malignancies. However, NK cell therapy directed against solid tumors is still in early development. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs such as cetuximab and panitumumab are widely used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Still, the clinical efficacy of this treatment is hampered by mutations in RAS gene, allowing tumors to escape from anti-EGFR mAb therapy. It is well established that NK cells kill tumor cells by natural cytotoxicity and can in addition be activated upon binding of IgG1 mAbs through Fc receptors (CD16/FcγRIIIa on their surface, thereby mediating antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. In the current study, activated Peripheral Blood NK cells (PBNK were combined with anti-EGFR mAbs to study their effect on the killing of EGFR+/- cancer cell lines, including those with RAS mutations. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments using colon cancer primary tumors and cell lines COLO320, Caco-2, SW620, SW480 and HT-29, demonstrated that PBNK cells are cytotoxic for a range of tumor cells, regardless of EGFR, RAS or BRAF status and at low E:T ratios. Cetuximab enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on EGFR+ tumor cells (either RASwt, RASmut or BRAFmut in a CD16 dependent manner, whereas it could not increase the killing of EGFR- COLO320. Our study provides a rationale to strengthen NK cell immunotherapy through a combination with cetuximab for RAS and BRAF mutant mCRC patients.

  15. Monitoring changes of tumor microenvironment in colorectal submucosa using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jingting; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, targeting tumor microenvironment has become a novel approach for cancer therapy. Collagen is one of important components of tissue microenvironment, and has been considered as a new visible target for cancer therapy. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. It was found that MPM facilitates imaging of tumor cells and collagen. MPM images in different tumor microenvironment during tumor progression shows obvious increase in cell number and collagen degration. In addition, the quantitative analysis of collagen content and orientation index in tumor microenvironment shows significant alteration during tumor progression. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to monitor the changes of collagen morphology in tumor microenvironment and quantify content and orientation index of collagen during tumor progression. Therefore this technique is a powerful imaging tool for the investigation of targeting tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Educational level and risk of colorectal cancer in EPIC with specific reference to tumor location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leufkens, A.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Sierseman, P.D.; Kunst, A.E.; Mouw, T.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Morois, S.; Krogh, V.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Polidoro, S.; Palli, D.; Kaaks, R.; Teucher, B.; Pischon, T.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Goufa, I.; Peeters, P.H.; Skeie, G.; Braaten, T.; Rodriguez, L.; Lujan-Barroso, L.; Sanchez-Perez, M.J.; Navarro, C.; Barricarte, A.; Zackrisson, S.; Almquist, M.; Hallmans, G.; Palmqvist, R.; Tsilidis, K.K.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Gallo, V.; Jenab, M.; Riboli, E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.

    2012-01-01

    Existing evidence is inconclusive on whether socioeconomic status (SES) and educational inequalities influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, and whether low or high SES/educational level is associated with developing CRC. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between educational

  17. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaojing; Tian, Xiuyun; Wu, Xiaojiang; Xing, Xiaofang; Du, Hong; Zhou, Chunlian; Zhang, Qingyun; Hao, Chunyi; Wen, Xianzi; Ji, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients. Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort), 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model. LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts). LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045). Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS) in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively), but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.243-0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638-1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663-1.530, respectively). These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might be a useful prognostic indicator for patients

  18. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Cheng

    Full Text Available Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients.Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort, 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model.LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts. LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively, but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.243-0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638-1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663-1.530, respectively.These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might be a useful prognostic indicator for

  19. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaofang; Du, Hong; Zhou, Chunlian; Zhang, Qingyun; Hao, Chunyi; Wen, Xianzi; Ji, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients. Method Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort), 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model. Results LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts). LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045). Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS) in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively), but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.243–0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638–1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663–1.530, respectively). Conclusion These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might

  20. Inhibition of cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells by andrographolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Der; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lee, Yi-Che; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lin, Rong-An; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2008-08-11

    In recent years, attention has been focused on the anti-cancer properties of pure components, an important role in the prevention of disease. Andrographolide (Andro), the major constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.) Nees plant, is implicated towards its pharmacological activity. To investigate the mechanism basis for the anti-tumor properties of Andro, Andro was used to examine its effect on cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells. The data from cell growth experiment showed that Andro exhibited the anti-proliferation effect on Lovo cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This event was accompanied the arrest of the cells at the G1-S phase by Andro at the tested concentrations of 0-30 microM. Cellular uptake of Andro and Andro was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis analysis and the intracellular accumulation of Andro (0.61+/-0.07 microM/mg protein) was observed when treatment of Lovo cells with Andro for 12h. In addition, an accumulation of the cells in G1 phase (15% increase for 10 microM of Andro) was observed as well as by the association with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cdk2 and Cdk4. Andro also inducted the content of Cdk inhibitor p21 and p16, and the phosphorylation of p53. Further immunoprecipitation studies found that, in response to the treatment, the formation of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and Cyclin A/Cdk2 complexes had declined, preventing the phosphorylation of Rb and the subsequent dissociation of Rb/E2F complex. These results suggested Andro can inhibit Lovo cell growth by G1-S phase arrest, and was exerted by inducing the expression of p53, p21 and p16 that, in turn, repressed the activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and/or Cyclin A/Cdk2, as well as Rb phosphorylation.

  1. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola H Negm

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19, stage II (n = 40, stage III (n = 34 and stage IV (n = 6 was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively, with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice.

  2. Genotoxicity of Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT on isogenic human colorectal cell lines: potential promoting effects for colorectal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eGraillot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the human microbiota influences tumorigenesis, notably in colorectal cancer (CRC. Pathogenic Escherichia coli possesses a variety of virulent factors, among them the Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT. CDT displays dual DNase and phosphatase activities and induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of mammalian cells. As CDT could promote malignant transformation, we investigated the cellular outcomes induced by acute and chronic exposures to E. coli CDT in normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs. Moreover, we conducted a comparative study between isogenic derivatives cell lines of the normal HCECs in order to mimic the mutation of three major genes found in CRC genetic models: APC, KRAS and TP53. Our results demonstrate that APC and p53 deficient cells showed impaired DNA damage response after CDT exposure, whereas HCECs expressing oncogenic KRASV12 were more resistant to CDT. Compared to normal HCECs, the precancerous derivatives exhibit hallmarks of malignant transformation after a chronic exposure to CDT. HCECs defective in APC and p53 showed enhanced anchorage independent growth and genetic instability, assessed by the micronucleus formation assay. In contrast, the ability to grow independently of anchorage was not impacted by CDT chronic exposure in KRASV12 HCECs, but micronucleus formation is dramatically increased. Thus CDT does not initiate CRC by itself, but may have promoting effects in premalignant HCECs, involving different mechanisms in function of the genetic alterations associated to CRC.

  3. Cross-species analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of MAPK-driven colorectal cancer identifies hallmarks of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Belmont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC are limited, survival rates are poor and this disease continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite being a highly heterogeneous disease, a large subset of individuals with sporadic CRC typically harbor relatively few established ‘driver’ lesions. Here, we describe a collection of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs of sporadic CRC that combine lesions frequently altered in human patients, including well-characterized tumor suppressors and activators of MAPK signaling. Primary tumors from these models were profiled, and individual GEMM tumors segregated into groups based on their genotypes. Unique allelic and genotypic expression signatures were generated from these GEMMs and applied to clinically annotated human CRC patient samples. We provide evidence that a Kras signature derived from these GEMMs is capable of distinguishing human tumors harboring KRAS mutation, and tracks with poor prognosis in two independent human patient cohorts. Furthermore, the analysis of a panel of human CRC cell lines suggests that high expression of the GEMM Kras signature correlates with sensitivity to targeted pathway inhibitors. Together, these findings implicate GEMMs as powerful preclinical tools with the capacity to recapitulate relevant human disease biology, and support the use of genetic signatures generated in these models to facilitate future drug discovery and validation efforts.

  4. Application of Circulating Tumor DNA as a Non-Invasive Tool for Monitoring the Progression of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaolin Zhou

    Full Text Available Liquid biopsy has been proposed to be a promising noninvasive tool to obtain information on tumor progression. Through a clinical observation of a case series of 6 consecutive patients, we aim to determine the value of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA for monitoring the tumor burden during the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC.We used capture sequencing of 545 genes to identify somatic alternations in primary tumor tissues of the six CRC patients who underwent radical surgery and in 23 plasma samples collected at serial time points. We compared the mutation patterns and variant allele frequencies (VAFs between the matched tissue and the plasma samples and evaluated the potential advantage of using ctDNA as a better tumor load indicator to detect disease relapse over carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, cancer antigen (CA 19-9 and imaging studies.We identified low-frequency mutations with a mean VAF of 0.88% (corresponding to a mean tumor burden of 0.20ng/mL in the preoperative plasmas of four patients with locally advanced CRC and a subset of mutations shared by their primary tumors. The tumor loads appeared a sudden decrease upon surgery or other adjuvant treatments and then generally maintained at low levels (0.092ng/mL until disease recurred. ctDNA increased by 13-fold when disease relapsed in one patient while the CEA and CA 19-9 levels remained normal. In this patient, all six somatic mutations identified in the preoperative plasma were detected in the recrudescent plasma again, with five mutations showing allele fraction increase.We described a multi-time-point profile of ctDNA of CRC patients during the course of comprehensive treatment and observed a correlation of ctDNA level with the clinically evaluated tumor progression. This demonstrated a new strategy by analyzing the heterogeneous ctDNA to evaluate and monitor the tumor burden in the treatment and follow-up of CRC patients, with potentially better potency than conventional biomarkers.

  5. HOXB13, a target of DNMT3B, is methylated at an upstream CpG island, and functions as a tumor suppressor in primary colorectal tumors.

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    Kalpana Ghoshal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A hallmark of cancer cells is hypermethylation of CpG islands (CGIs, which probably arises from upregulation of one or more DNA methyltransferases. The purpose of this study was to identify the targets of DNMT3B, an essential DNA methyltransferase in mammals, in colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromatin immunoprecipitation with DNMT3B specific antibody followed by CGI microarray identified genes with or without CGIs, repeat elements and genomic contigs in RKO cells. ChIP-Chop analysis showed that the majority of the target genes including P16, DCC, DISC1, SLIT1, CAVEOLIN1, GNA11, TBX5, TBX18, HOXB13 and some histone variants, that harbor CGI in their promoters, were methylated in multiple colon cancer cell lines but not in normal colon epithelial cells. Further, these genes were reactivated in RKO cells after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent. COBRA showed that the CGIs encompassing the promoter and/or coding region of DCC, TBX5, TBX18, SLIT1 were methylated in primary colorectal tumors but not in matching normal colon tissues whereas GNA11 was methylated in both. MassARRAY analysis demonstrated that the CGI located approximately 4.5 kb upstream of HOXB13 +1 site was tumor-specifically hypermethylated in primary colorectal cancers and cancer cell lines. HOXB13 upstream CGI was partially hypomethylated in DNMT1(-/- HCT cells but was almost methylation free in cells lacking both DNMT1 and DNMT3B. Analysis of tumor suppressor properties of two aberrantly methylated transcription factors, HOXB13 and TBX18, revealed that both inhibited growth and clonogenic survival of colon cancer cells in vitro, but only HOXB13 abolished tumor growth in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that identifies several important tumor suppressors and transcription factors as direct DNMT3B targets in colon cancer and as potential biomarkers for this cancer. Further, this study shows that

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Human Tissue Lymphocytes Unveils Uniqueness of Tumor-Infiltrating T Regulatory Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Simone, M.; Arrigoni, A.; Rossetti, G.; Gruarin, P.; Ranzani, V.; Politano, C.; Bonnal, R.J.; Provasi, E.; Sarnicola, M.L.; Panzeri, I.; Moro, M.; Crosti, M.; Mazzara, S.; Vaira, V.; Bosari, S.; Palleschi, A.; Santambrogio, L.; Bovo, G.; Zucchini, N.; Totis, M.; Gianotti, L.; Cesana, G.; Perego, R.A.; Maroni, N.; Pisani Ceretti, A.; Opocher, E.; De Francesco, R.; Geginat, J.; Stunnenberg, H.; Abrignani, S.; Pagani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) can suppress effector T cells specific for tumor antigens. Deeper molecular definitions of tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes could thus offer therapeutic opportunities. Transcriptomes of T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and Treg cells infiltrating colorectal or

  7. Transcriptional Landscape of Human Tissue Lymphocytes Unveils Uniqueness of Tumor-Infiltrating T Regulatory Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Simone, M.; Arrigoni, A.; Rossetti, G.; Gruarin, P.; Ranzani, V.; Politano, C.; Bonnal, R.J.; Provasi, E.; Sarnicola, M.L.; Panzeri, I.; Moro, M.; Crosti, M.; Mazzara, S.; Vaira, V.; Bosari, S.; Palleschi, A.; Santambrogio, L.; Bovo, G.; Zucchini, N.; Totis, M.; Gianotti, L.; Cesana, G.; Perego, R.A.; Maroni, N.; Pisani Ceretti, A.; Opocher, E.; De Francesco, R.; Geginat, J.; Stunnenberg, H.; Abrignani, S.; Pagani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) can suppress effector T cells specific for tumor antigens. Deeper molecular definitions of tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes could thus offer therapeutic opportunities. Transcriptomes of T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and Treg cells infiltrating colorectal or

  8. Assessment of staging, prognosis and mortality of colorectal cancer by tumor markers: receptor erbB-2 and cadherins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eliane C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic significance and correlation with staging and degree of cell differentiation of the tumoral expression of the proteins c-erbB-2 and E-cadherin, in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: The study included 117 patients with an average age of 63.1 years and an average follow-up duration of 28.1 months. The disease-free interval, survival, incidence of recurrence and specific mortality were evaluated. c-erbB-2 anti-oncoprotein antibodies (Dako were utilized via the streptavidin-biotin technique. Samples were considered to be positive for c-erbB-2 if 10% or more of the tumor cell membranes were stained.The anti-E-cadherin antibodies (Dako, evaluated this protein and is considered positive, if 50% or more of the cell membranes were stained. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier's estimator, the log-rank test and Wilcoxon's test (Breslow version, setting the level of statistical significance at 5% (p<0.05. RESULTS: 52 of 108 patients studied for c-erbB-2 were positive (48,1%, 47 of 93 patients studied for E-cadherin were negative (50,5%. These data do not express any correlation with TNM (tumor, node and metastasis staging and the degree of cell differentiation or with the tumor recurrence rate. The disease-free interval among patients who were positive for c-erbB-2 and negative for E-cadherin was 68.0 months and did not differ from those with c-erbB-2 negative and E-cadherin positive ( 55.0 months - p = 0.5510. The average survival among patients positive for c-erbB-2 and negative for E-cadherin was 75 months without statistical significance difference with the other group ( 61 months - p = 0.5256. Specific mortality occurred in 20.0% of the cases and did not correlate with the expression of c-erbB-2 (p=0,446, E-cadherin (p=0,883. CONCLUSION: The tumoral expression of c-erbB-2 and E-cadherin did not demonstrate a correlation with the

  9. Micro RNA-320 family is downregulated in colorectal adenoma and affects tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Tadano; Yoichi Kakuta; Shin Hamada; Yosuke Shimodaira; Masatake Kuroha; Yoko Kawakami; Tomoya Kimura; Hisashi Shiga; Katsuya Endo; Atsushi Masamune; Seiichi Takahashi; Yoshitaka Kinouchi; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microR NA(miR NA) expression during histological progression from colorectal normal mucosa through adenoma to carcinoma within a lesion. METHODS: Using microarray, the sequential changes in miR NA expression profiles were compared in colonic lesions from matched samples; histologically, nonneoplastic mucosa, adenoma, and submucosal invasive carcinoma were microdissected from a tissue sample. Cell proliferation assay was performed to observe the effect of miR NA, and its target genes were predicted using bioinformatics approaches and the expression profile of SW480 transfected with the miR NA mimics. mR NA and protein levels of the target gene in colon cancer cell lines with a mimic control or miR NA mimics were measured using qR TPCR and Western blotting. The expression levels of miR NA and target gene in colorectal tissue samples were also measured.RESULTS: Microarray analysis identified that the miR-320 family, including miR-320 a, miR-320 b, miR-320 c, miR-320 d and miR-320 e, were differentially expressed in adenomaand submucosal invasive carcinoma. The mi R-320 family, which inhibits cell proliferation, is frequently downregulated in colorectal adenoma and submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues. Seven genes including CDK6 were identified to be common in the results of gene expression array and bioinformatics analyses performed to find the target gene of the miR-320 family. We confirmed that mR NA and protein levels of CDK6 were significantly suppressed in colon cancer cell lines with miR-320 family mimics. CDK6 expression was found to increase from non-neoplastic mucosa through adenoma to submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues and showed an inverse correlation with miR-320 family expression.CONCLUSION: MiR-320 family affects colorectal tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6, plays important role in its growth, and is considered to be a biomarker for its early detection.

  10. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  11. Targeted deletion of Kif18a protects from colitis-associated colorectal (CAC) tumors in mice through impairing Akt phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Houbao; Xu, Wangyang; Zhang, Hongxin; Liu, Jianbing; Xu, Haimin; Lu, Shunyuan; Dang, Suying; Kuang, Ying; Jin, Xiaolong; Wang, Zhugang

    2013-08-16

    Kinesins are a superfamily of molecular motors involved in cell division or intracellular transport. They are becoming important targets for chemotherapeutic intervention of cancer due to their crucial role in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that the kinesin-8 Kif18a is overexpressed in murine CAC and is a crucial promoter during early CAC carcinogenesis. Kif18a-deficient mice are evidently protected from AOM-DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. Kif18A is responsible for proliferation of colonic tumor cells, while Kif18a ablation in mice promotes cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, Kif18a is responsible for induction of Akt phosphorylation, which is known to be associated with cell survival regulation. In conclusion, Kif18a is critical for colorectal carcinogenesis in the setting of inflammation by mechanisms of increased PI3K-AKT signaling. Inhibition of Kif18A activity may be useful in the prevention or chemotherapeutic intervention of CAC.

  12. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Secondary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Early Stage Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saad Usmani; Joel Appel; Zainab Shahid; Husain Saleh

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute tumor lysis syndrome (ATLS) is a well-described oncological emergency that is usually associated with hematological malignan-cies complicated by treatment. It is typically related to a high tumor burden, rapidly growing and chemosensitive malignancies.

  13. SOX7 is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Shu-Yan Huang; Jing-Xin Feng; Yan-Yan Gao; Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Bai-Qu Huang; Yu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the role of sex-determining region Y-box 7 (Sox7) in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of COX-independent human colorectal cancer cells.METHODS: The cell survival percentage was examined by MTT (Moto-nuclear cell direc cytotoxicity) assay.SOX7 expression was assessed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SB203580 was used to inhibit the p38MAPK signal pathway. SOX7 promoter activity was detected by Luciferase reporter assay.RESULTS: SOX7 was upregulated by aspirin and was involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of SW480 human colorectal cancer cells. The p38MAPK pathway played a role in aspirin-induced SOX7 expression, during which the AP1 transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos upregulated SOX7 promoter activities.RESULTS: SOX7 is upregulated by aspirin and is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells.

  14. Colorectal tumors from APC*I1307K carriers principally harbor somatic APC mutations outside the A8 tract.

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    Peter Zauber

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: APC*I1307K (c.3920T>A is an inherited variant associated with colorectal tumour risk found almost exclusively in those of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. A single nucleotide substitution creates an oligo-adenine tract (A8 that appears to be inherently prone to further mis-pairing and slippage. The reported multiple tumor phenotype of carriers is not easily reconciled with molecular and population genetics data. We postulated that some c.3920T>A carriers with multiple adenomas have other unidentified APC germ line or somatic mutations. METHODS: DNA from 82 colonic tumours and accompanying normal tissue collected from 29 carriers with multiple colorectal tumors was directly sequenced between codons 716 and 1604. We also assessed APC gene loss of heterozygosity. RESULTS: One patient (3.4% was found to have an additional APC germ line mutation. Twenty-five of the tumours showed no significant somatic molecular change, 36 showed one change, 20 showed two, and one tumour showed more than 2 changes. Our data suggest a correlation between advancing histology and fewer beta-catenin binding sites remaining in the mutant proteins. CONCLUSIONS: There were no other common germ line variants identified within the region of the APC gene examined, suggesting that any effect from this region on tumour production is attributable to the c.3920T>A allele. Our findings further suggest the only somatic genetic change clearly attributable to the c.3920T>A mutation is the c.3924_3925insA.

  15. Colorectal Tumors from APC*I1307K Carriers Principally Harbor Somatic APC Mutations outside the A8 Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Peter; Bishop, Timothy; Taylor, Claire; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene; Marotta, Stephen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose APC*I1307K (c.3920T>A) is an inherited variant associated with colorectal tumour risk found almost exclusively in those of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. A single nucleotide substitution creates an oligo-adenine tract (A8) that appears to be inherently prone to further mis-pairing and slippage. The reported multiple tumor phenotype of carriers is not easily reconciled with molecular and population genetics data. We postulated that some c.3920T>A carriers with multiple adenomas have other unidentified APC germ line or somatic mutations. Methods DNA from 82 colonic tumours and accompanying normal tissue collected from 29 carriers with multiple colorectal tumors was directly sequenced between codons 716 and 1604. We also assessed APC gene loss of heterozygosity. Results One patient (3.4%) was found to have an additional APC germ line mutation. Twenty-five of the tumours showed no significant somatic molecular change, 36 showed one change, 20 showed two, and one tumour showed more than 2 changes. Our data suggest a correlation between advancing histology and fewer beta-catenin binding sites remaining in the mutant proteins. Conclusions There were no other common germ line variants identified within the region of the APC gene examined, suggesting that any effect from this region on tumour production is attributable to the c.3920T>A allele. Our findings further suggest the only somatic genetic change clearly attributable to the c.3920T>A mutation is the c.3924_3925insA. PMID:24416237

  16. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors γ and β/δ mediate vascular endothelial growth factor production in colorectal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrl, Clemens; Kaindl, Ulrike; Koneczny, Inga; Hudec, Xenia; Baron, David M; König, Jürgen S; Marian, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors for fatty acids and their derivatives. PPAR subtypes PPARγ and PPARβ/δ are suspected to modulate cancer development in the colon, but their exact role is still discussed controversially. The present study investigated the impact of PPARγ and PPARβ/δ on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expressions induced by synthetic and physiological agonists in the colorectal tumor cell lines SW480 and HT29 using reporter gene assays, qRT-PCR and ELISA. Activation of both PPARγ and PPARβ/δ induced expression of VEGF mRNA and protein in a PPAR-dependent way. The PPARγ agonists ciglitazone and PGJ(2) were the most effective inducers with up to ninefold and threefold increases in VEGF mRNA in SW480 and HT29 cultures, respectively. VEGF secretion was doubled in both cell lines. The PPARβ/δ agonists GW501516 and PGI(2) caused stimulations of only 1.5-fold in both cell lines. In addition, all PPAR agonists induced COX-2 mRNA and secretion of the COX-2 product PGE(2) in HT29 cells. However, this effect was not blocked by knock-down of PPAR expression nor was it essential for VEGF expression as shown by the lack of effect of the COX-2 inhibitor SC236. In summary, our results identify both PPARγ and PPARβ/δ as an alternative COX-independent mechanism of VEGF induction in colorectal tumor cells.

  17. Notch receptors in human choroid plexus tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschorner, R; Waidelich, J; Trautmann, K; Psaras, T; Schittenhelm, J

    2013-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a role in development and formation of the normal choroid plexus (nCP), and in formation of various tumors in humans. Activation of Notch3 has been reported to promote tumor growth in invasive gliomas and to initiate formation of choroid plexus tumors (CPT) in mice. We investigated the expression of all currently known Notch receptors (Notch 1-4) in 55 samples of nCP and 88 CPT, including 61 choroid plexus papillomas (CPP), 22 atypical CPP and 5 choroid plexus carcinomas by immunohistochemistry. Notch expression was semiquantitatively evaluated separately for membranous/cytoplasmic and for nuclear staining. In addition, we examined Her2 expression (EGFR2, Her2/neu, ErbB2, CD340) because of its functional link to Notch signaling. All samples were negative for Notch3. Membranous/cytoplasmic expression of Notch1 (pnCP compared to CPT. Nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and -4 was significantly higher in CPT compared to nCP (pnCP to a predominant nuclear expression in CPT. Her2 was weakly expressed in 42/84 CPT but only in 2/53 nCP (p=0.0001) and positively correlated with nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and 4 in CPT. In summary, a shift between membranous/cytoplasmic (non-canonical signaling pathway) and nuclear expression (canonical signaling pathway) of Notch1, -2 and -4 and upregulation of Her2 indicate neoplastic transformation in human CP and may reveal new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  19. Decreased levels of miR-224 and the passenger strand of miR-221 increase MBD2, suppressing maspin and promoting colorectal tumor growth and metastasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer accounts for 130,000 new cancer cases and approximately 56,000 deaths each year in the United States, and it is estimated that half of Western population can expect to develop at least one colorectal tumor by age 70. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules, DNA products, functio...

  20. Molecular detection, quantification, and isolation of Streptococcus gallolyticus bacteria colonizing colorectal tumors: inflammation-driven potential of carcinogenesis via IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulamir Ahmed S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC has long been associated with bacteremia and/or endocarditis by Streptococcus gallolyticus member bacteria (SGMB but the direct colonization of SGMB along with its molecular carcinogenic role, if any, has not been investigated. We assessed the colonization of SGMB in CRC patients with history of bacteremia (CRC-w/bac and without history of bacteremia (CRC-wo/bac by isolating SGMB from feces, mucosal surfaces of colorectum, and colorectal tissues and detecting SGMB DNA, via PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH assays targeting SodA gene in colorectal tissues. Moreover, mRNA of IL1, IL-8, COX-2, IFN-γ, c-Myc, and Bcl-2 in colorectal tissues of studied groups was assessed via ISH and RT-PCR. Results SGMB were found to be remarkably isolated in tumorous (TU and non-tumorous (NTU tissues of CRC-w/bac, 20.5% and 17.3%, and CRC-wo/bac, 12.8% and 11.5%, respectively while only 2% of control tissues revealed SGMB (P 10 CN/g respectively, showed higher colonization in TU than in NTU and in CRC-w/bac than in CRC-wo/bac (P Conclusions The current study indicated that colorectal cancer is remarkably associated with SGMB; moreover, molecular detection of SGMB in CRC was superior to link SGMB with CRC tumors highlighting a possible direct and active role of SGMB in CRC development through most probably inflammation-based sequel of tumor development or propagation via, but not limited to, IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8.

  1. Efecto de la endotelina-1 sobre las arterias tumorales de pacientes con neoplasia colorrectal Effect of endothelin-1 on tumor arteries in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ferrero Herrero

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La endotelina-1 es un péptido vasoconstrictor producido por el endotelio vascular, cuyos niveles plasmáticos están aumentados en los pacientes con cáncer colorrectal y que puede participar en la regulación del flujo sanguíneo tumoral. Para estudiar si la respuesta a este péptido está alterada en las arterias tumorales, se obtuvieron, de 13 pacientes intervenidos quirúrgicamente por cáncer colorrectal, arterias mesentéricas irrigando el tumor y arterias mesentéricas de una región alejada del tumor, y asimismo se obtuvieron arterias mesentéricas de pacientes intervenidos por diverticulitis (n = 4 o enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (n = 3. Las arterias mesentéricas se montaron en una preparación para el registro de la contracción isométrica en un baño de órganos, encontrándose que la endotelina-1 producía contracción en los tres tipos de arterias, pero la sensibilidad a este péptido fue mayor en las arterias irrigando el tumor que en las arterias alejadas del tumor o en las arterias de pacientes sin patología tumoral. Estos resultados indican que la endotelina-1 puede regular el flujo sanguíneo en los tumores colorrectales, produciendo una mayor vasoconstricción en las arterias que irrigan el tumor que en las arterias no tumorales.Endothelin-1 is an endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor peptide whose plasma levels are increased in patients with colorectal cancer, and which may be involved in tumor blood flow regulation. To study whether response to this peptide is altered in tumor arteries, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors, and mesenteric arteries far from said tumors were obtained from 13 patients undergoing colectomy; mesenteric arteries were also obtained from patients with diverticulitis (n = 4 or inflammatory bowel disease (n = 3. Arteries were prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath, and in this preparation it was found that endothelin-1 induced contraction in all three

  2. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Bondarenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  3. Does delay in diagnosing colorectal cancer in symptomatic patients affect tumor stage and survival? A population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Otto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing colorectal cancer (CRC at an early stage improves survival. To what extent any delay affects outcome once patients are symptomatic is still unclear. Our objectives were to evaluate the association between diagnostic delay and survival in symptomatic patients with early stage CRC and late stage CRC. Methods Prospective population-based observational study evaluating daily clinical practice in Northern Holland. Diagnostic delay was determined through questionnaire-interviews. Dukes' stage was classified into two groups: early stage (Dukes A or B and late stage (Dukes C or D cancer. Patients were followed up for 3.5 years after diagnosis. Results In total, 272 patients were available for analysis. Early stage CRC was present in 136 patients while 136 patients had late stage CRC. The mean total diagnostic delay (SE was 31 (1.5 weeks in all CRC patients. No significant difference was observed in the mean total diagnostic delay in early versus late stage CRC (p = 0.27. In early stage CRC, no difference in survival was observed between patients with total diagnostic delay shorter and longer than the median (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank p = 0.93. In late stage CRC, patients with a diagnostic delay shorter than the median had a shorter survival than patients with a diagnostic delay longer than the median (log-rank p = 0.01. In the multivariate Cox regression model with survival as dependent variable and median delay, age, open access endoscopy, number and type of symptoms as independent variables, the odd's ratio for survival in patients with long delay (>median versus short delay (≤median was 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.1 to 3.0; p = 0.01. Tumor-site was not associated with patient survival. When separating late stage CRC in Dukes C and Dukes D tumors, a shorter delay was associated with a shorter survival in Dukes D tumors only and not in Dukes C tumors. Conclusion In symptomatic CRC patients, a longer diagnostic and

  4. Expression of PPARγ and PTEN in human colorectal cancer: An immunohistochemical study using tissue microarray methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mao Song; Huang, Jun Xing; Chen, Wei Chang; Zhang, Bao Feng; Fang, Jing; Zhou, Qiong; Hu, Ying; Gao, Heng Jun

    2011-11-01

    Although aberrations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression have been identified in several other cancer types, certain previous studies have revealed that PPARγ is abundant in normal and malignant tissue in the colon. The question of whether aberrant PTEN is involved in the initial stage or is a later event during colorectal carcinogenesis remains controversial. Relatively few studies have focused on the correlation of expression of PPARγ and PTEN in various tissues. In the present study, paraffin-embedded blocks from 139 patients with CRC, 18 adenomatous polyps and 50 paired paracancerous benign mucosas were selected and analysed in 4 tissue microarray (TMA) blocks comprising 104, 72, 130 and 54 cores, respectively. Expression of PPARγ and PTEN was examined using immunohistochemical staining on TMAs. There were no significant differences in the expression of PPARγ (P=0.055) and PTEN (P=0.100) between the colorectal cancers, adenomas and paracancerous mucosas. However, correlations of PPARγ expression with clinical stage (P=0.004) and PTEN expression with histological grade (P=0.006) and distant metastasis (P=0.015) were demonstrated in the CRC specimens. Although the differences in PPARγ and PTEN protein expression in human colorectal cancer may not be considered as early diagnostic markers, our results indicate that CRCs with a low expression or deletion of PTEN may progress towards invasion and even metastasis; thus, PTEN may have potential as a prognostic marker in human CRC.

  5. Anticancer effects of oligomeric proanthocyanidins on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youn-Jung Kim; Hae-Jeong Park; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Mi-Ja Kim; Kang-Hyun Leem; Joo-Ho Chung; Hye-Kyung Kim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC), natural polyphenolic compounds found in plants, are known to have antioxidant and anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether the anti-cancer effects of the OPC are induced by apoptosis on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4.METHODS: Colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4 was cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The cytotoxic effect of OPC was assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenylt-etrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To find out the apoptotic cell death, 4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining,terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and caspase-3 enzyme assay were performed.RESULTS: In this study, cytotoxic effect of OPC on SNUC4 cells appeared in a dose-dependent manner. OPC treatment (100 μg/mL) revealed typical morphological apoptotic features. Additionally OPC treatment (100 μg/mL)increased level of BAX and CASPASE-3, and decreased level of BCL-2 mRNA expression. Caspase-3 enzyme activity was also significantly increased by treatment of OPC (100 μg/mL) compared with control.CONCLUSION: These data indicate that OPC caused cell death by apoptosis through caspase pathways on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4.

  6. Expression of estrogen receptor β in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Qun Xie; Jie-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of estrogen receptor (ER)β in Chinese colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients.METHODS: Erβ expression in CRC was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 40 CRCs, 10 colonic adenomas,and 10 normal colon mucosa biopsies. The percentage of positive cells was recorded, mRNA expression of Erα and Erβ in 12 CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues were detected by RT-PCR.RESULTS: Positive ER immunoreactivity was present in part of normal epithelium of biopsy (2/10), adenomas (3/10),and the sections of CRC tissue, most of them were nuclear positive. In CRCs, nuclear Erβ immunoreactivity was detected in over 10% of the cancer cells in 57.5% of the cases and was always associated with cytoplasmic immunoreactivity.There was no statistical significance between Erβ positive and negative groups in regard to depth of invasion and nodal metastases. Of the 12 CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues, the expression rate of Erα mRNA in CRC tissue and corresponding normal colon tissue was 25% and 16.6%,respectively. Erβ mRNA was expressed in 83.3% CRC tissue and 91.7% paired normal colon tissue, respectively. Therewas no significant difference in Erβ mRNA level between CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues.CONCLUSION: A large number of CRCs are positive for Erβ, which can also be detected in normal colonic epithelia.There is a different localization of Erβ immunoreactivity among normal colon mucosae, adenomas and CRCs. Erαand Erβ mRNA can be detected both in CRC tissue and in corresponding normal colon tissue. A post-transcriptional mechanism may account for the decrease of Erβ protein expression in CRC tissues.

  7. A comparison of flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Hansen, T P; Nielsen, O

    1998-01-01

    In human colorectal cancer it has been reported that some tumours lack the HLA-ABC antigens. This has been interpreted as reflecting tumour escape from the immune system. Earlier data have been obtained by immunohistochemistry. In this study, we compared the expression of HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, CD80 (B7-1......) and CD54 (ICAM-1) in 20 tumours using both a conventional immunohistochemistry two-layer technique and multiparameter flow cytometry, gating on an epithelial cell marker. Colorectal cancer tissue used in flow cytometry was dissociated with collagenase, deoxyribonuclease and hyaluronidase. The intensity...... was superior to immunohistochemistry in 33 out of 80 cases, and showed that tumours described as HLA-ABC negative by immunohistochemistry were in fact weakly positive for HLA-ABC. We conclude that flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry are complementary, and that flow cytometry is superior...

  8. [The pathomorphology of complicated colorectal cancer and the stages in the development of the tumor process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarŭmov, N; Popkhristova, E; Viiachki, I; Terziev, I; Gachev, N

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive pathomorphological assessment is done in 385 patients presenting complicated colorectal carcinoma, covering the period 1990 through 1995. The patients are distributed in 4 groups according to stage, with those in stage III being the most numerous--141 cases. The growth pattern of the neoplasm is as follows: exophytic growth--110 cases, ulcerous growth--57, cup-like growth--13, and endophytic growth--205 cases. On establishing metastatic lymph nodes within I and II lymph collectors, prophylactic postoperative chemo- and immunotherapy are undertaken. In case of lymph nodes present in III lymph collector, the operation is taken to be relatively radical, and for that reason chemo- and immunotherapy assume a therapeutic character.

  9. Overexpression of snail induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and a cancer stem cell-like phenotype in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Samuel, Shaija; Evans, Kurt W; Lu, Jia; Xia, Ling; Zhou, Yunfei; Sceusi, Eric; Tozzi, Federico; Ye, Xiang-Cang; Mani, Sendurai A; Ellis, Lee M

    2012-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical process providing tumor cells with the ability to migrate and escape from the primary tumor and metastasize to distant sites. Recently, EMT was shown to be associated with the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype in breast cancer. Snail is a transcription factor that mediates EMT in a number of tumor types, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Our study was done to determine the role of Snail in mediating EMT and CSC function in CRC. Human CRC specimens were stained for Snail expression, and human CRC cell lines were transduced with a retroviral Snail construct or vector control. Cell proliferation and chemosensitivity to oxaliplatin of the infected cells were determined by the MTT (colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Migration and invasion were determined in vitro using modified Boyden chamber assays. EMT and putative CSC markers were analyzed using Western blotting. Intravenous injection of tumor cells was done to evaluate their metastatic potential in mice. Snail was overexpressed in human CRC surgical specimens. This overexpression induced EMT and a CSC-like phenotype in human CRC cells and enhanced cell migration and invasion (P Snail overexpression also led to an increase in metastasis formation in vivo (P Snail-overexpressing CRC cells were more chemoresistant to oxaliplatin than control cells. Increased Snail expression induces EMT and the CSC-like phenotype in CRC cells, which enhance cancer cell invasion and chemoresistance. Thus, Snail is a potential therapeutic target in metastatic CRC.

  10. MicroRNA-221 inhibits CDKN1C/p57 expression in human colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai SUN; Wei WANG; Jun-jie ZENG; Cheng-tang WU; Shang-tong LEI; Guo-xin LI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the regulatory effect of microRNA-221 (miR-221) on CDKN1C/p57 expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC).Methods: Thirty four CRC and adjacent non-tumorous tissue samples were collected individually. Total RNA and protein were isolatedand from these samples and four human CRC-derived cell lines (including HT-29, Lovo, SW-480 and Caco2). MiR-221 expression was examined using real-time RT-PCR. CRC cells were treated with or without anti-p57-siRNA prior to the addition of premiR-221 or anti-miR-221. The mRNA and protein levels of CDKN1C/p57 were examined using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. CRC cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively.The CDKN1C/p57 3'-UTR fragment was amplified using PCR from the genomic DNA of human colon cells and inserted into a luciferase reporter construct. The reporter construct was then transfected into CRC cells together with pre-miR-221 or anti-miR-221, and the luciferase activity in the transfected cells was examined.Results: MiR-221 expression was significantly up-regulated in 90% of CRC samples compared to that in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue, and the expression level was positively correlated to an advanced TNM stage and local invasion. There was no significant difference in CDKN1C/p57 mRNA expression between CRC and corresponding non-tumorous tissues, whereas CDKN1C/p57 protein expression was markedly decreased in the CRC samples. A significant inverse correlation between miR-221 and CDKN1C/p57expression was found in CRC cells. Moreover, a miR-221-specific inhibitor significantly increased CDKN1C/p57 protein expression in CRC cells. Anti-miR-221 markedly inhibited CRC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. This inhibitory effect was abolished by pretreatment with a nti-p57-siRNA, suggesting that the inhibition was mediated by CDKN1C/p57. A significant increase of the luciferase activity was observed in CRC cells co-transfected with

  11. Anticancer drug sensitivity by human tumor clonogenic assay.

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    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers was tested by the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA. Of 152 human cancer specimens tested, 63 (41% formed more than 30 tumor cell colonies in control plates and could be used to evaluate the drug sensitivity of tumor cells. In 42 (93% of 45 clinical trials in 24 patients, a parallel correlation was observed between the in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity measured by the HTCA and the clinical response of tumors to anticancer drugs. These results suggest that the HTCA is a good technique for the in vitro test of the anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers.

  12. Clinical impact of different detection methods for disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow of patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases: a prospective follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanke Hans J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large number of patients with colorectal liver metastasis show recurrent disease after curative surgical resection. Identification of these high-risk patients may guide therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow from patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases can predict clinical outcome. Methods Sixty patients with colorectal liver metastases were planned for a curative resection between 2001 and 2007. All patients underwent bone marrow aspiration before surgery. Detection of tumor cells was performed using immunocytochemical staining for cytokeratin (CK-ICC combined with automated microscopy or indirectly using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Disseminated tumor cells were found in 15 of the 46 patients (33% using CK-ICC and in 9 of 44 of the patients (20% using RT-PCR. Patients with negative results for RT-PCR had a significant better disease-free survival after resection of their liver metastases (p = 0.02. This group also showed significant better overall survival (p = 0.002. CK-ICC did not predict a worse clinical outcome. Conclusions The presence of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow detected using RT-PCR did predict a worse clinical outcome. The presence of cells detected with CK-ICC did not correlate with poor prognosis.

  13. Occurrence of BK Virus and Human Papilloma Virus in colorectal cancer

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    Adrian Jarzyński

    2017-09-01

    Developing colorectal cancer can show no symptoms, even for many years. This is why it is so important to become familiar with as many etiological factors as possible. The development of many human neoplasms is often initiated by exposure to infectious agents – such as bacterial or viral infections. Similar to the human papillomavirus, the BK virus was detected in clinical specimens. It seems that HPV and BKV infections can contribute to the neoplastic process, which requires detailed studies on a larger group of patients.

  14. Feasibility of Unbiased RNA Profiling of Colorectal Tumors: A Proof of Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshayoff, Vardit; Faktor, Ouriel; Laghi, Luigi; Celesti, Giuseppe; Peretz, Tamar; Keret, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in molecular profiling of colorectal cancer (CRC), as of yet this has not translated into an unbiased molecular liquid biopsy profile which can accurately screen for early CRC. In this study we depict the profile of early stage CRC as well as for advanced adenomas (AA) by combination of current molecular knowledge with microarray technology, using efficient circulating free plasma RNA purification from blood and RNA amplification technologies. We joined literature search with Affymetrix gene chip experimental procedure to draw the circulating free plasma RNA profile of colorectal cancer disease reflected in blood. The RNA panel was tested by two datasets comparing patients with CRC with healthy subjects and patients with AA to healthy subjects. For the CRC patient cohort (28 CRC cases vs. 41 healthy controls), the ROC analysis of the selected biomarker panel generated a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 93% for the detection of CRC using 8-gene classification model. For the AA patient cohort (28 subjects vs. 46 healthy controls), a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 87% were calculated using a 2-gene classification model. We have identified a panel of 8 plasma RNA markers as a preliminary panel for CRC detection and subset markers suitable for AA detection. Subjected to extensive clinical validation we suggest that this panel represents a feasible approach and a potential strategy for noninvasive early diagnosis, as a first-line screening test for asymptomatic, average-risk population before colonoscopy. PMID:27441409

  15. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simone; Sibio; Cristina; Fiorani; Carmine; Stolfi; Andrea; Divizia; Roberto; Pezzuto; Fabrizio; Montagnese; Giulia; Bagaglini; Paolo; Sammartino; Giuseppe; Sigismondo; Sica

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells(IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  16. 5-FU-hydrogel inhibits colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis and tumor growth in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Huashan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC is a common form of systemic metastasis of intra-abdominal cancers. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a preferable option for colorectal cancer. Here we reported that a new system, 5-FU-loaded hydrogel system, can improve the therapeutic effects of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Methods A biodegradable PEG-PCL-PEG (PECE triblock copolymer was successfully synthesized. The biodegradable and temperature sensitive hydrogel was developed to load 5-FU. Methylene blue-loaded hydrogel were also developed for visible observation of the drug release. The effects and toxicity of the 5-FU-hydrogel system were evaluated in a murine CRPC model. Results The hydrogel system is an injectable flowing solution at ambient temperature and forms a non-flowing gel depot at physiological temperature. 5-FU-hydrogel was subsequently injected into abdominal cavity in mice with CT26 cancer cells peritoneal dissemination. The results showed that the hydrogel delivery system prolonged the release of methylene blue; the 5-FU-hydrogel significantly inhibited the peritoneal dissemination and growth of CT26 cells. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of the 5-FU-hydrogel was well tolerated and showed less hematologic toxicity. Conclusions Our data indicate that the 5-FU-hydrogel system can be considered as a new strategy for peritoneal carcinomatosis, and the hydrogel may provide a potential delivery system to load different chemotherapeutic drugs for peritoneal carcinomatosis of cancers.

  17. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-09-27

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors' belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn't a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  18. Targeted deletion of Kif18a protects from colitis-associated colorectal (CAC) tumors in mice through impairing Akt phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Houbao [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Research Center for Experimental Medicine, Rui-Jin Hospital and Department of Medical Genetics, E-Institutes of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Wangyang [Department of Clinical Laboratories, Ninth People’s Hospital, SJTUSM, Shanghai 200011 (China); Zhang, Hongxin [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Research Center for Experimental Medicine, Rui-Jin Hospital and Department of Medical Genetics, E-Institutes of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Liu, Jianbing [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Research Center for Experimental Medicine, Rui-Jin Hospital and Department of Medical Genetics, E-Institutes of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Shanghai Research Center for Model Organisms, Shanghai 201203 (China); Xu, Haimin [Department of Pathology, Rui-Jin Hospital, SJTUSM, Shanghai 200025 (China); Lu, Shunyuan; Dang, Suying [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Research Center for Experimental Medicine, Rui-Jin Hospital and Department of Medical Genetics, E-Institutes of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Kuang, Ying [Shanghai Research Center for Model Organisms, Shanghai 201203 (China); Jin, Xiaolong [Department of Pathology, Rui-Jin Hospital, SJTUSM, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Zhugang, E-mail: zhugangw@shsmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Research Center for Experimental Medicine, Rui-Jin Hospital and Department of Medical Genetics, E-Institutes of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Shanghai Research Center for Model Organisms, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Kif18A is up-regulated in CAC of mouse model. •Kif18a{sup −/−} mice are protected from CAC. •Tumor cells from Kif18a{sup −/−} mice undergo more apoptosis. •Kif18A deficiency induces poor Atk phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Kinesins are a superfamily of molecular motors involved in cell division or intracellular transport. They are becoming important targets for chemotherapeutic intervention of cancer due to their crucial role in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that the kinesin-8 Kif18a is overexpressed in murine CAC and is a crucial promoter during early CAC carcinogenesis. Kif18a-deficient mice are evidently protected from AOM–DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. Kif18A is responsible for proliferation of colonic tumor cells, while Kif18a ablation in mice promotes cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, Kif18a is responsible for induction of Akt phosphorylation, which is known to be associated with cell survival regulation. In conclusion, Kif18a is critical for colorectal carcinogenesis in the setting of inflammation by mechanisms of increased PI3K-AKT signaling. Inhibition of Kif18A activity may be useful in the prevention or chemotherapeutic intervention of CAC.

  19. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

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    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  20. Analysis of the expression of SDF-1 splicing variants in human colorectal cancer and normal mucosa tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allami, Risala Hussain; Graf, Claudine; Martchenko, Ksenia; Voss, Beatrice; Becker, Marc; Berger, Martin R; Galle, Peter R; Theobald, Matthias; Wehler, Thomas C; Schimanski, Carl C

    2016-03-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), also termed stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a small protein 8-14 kDa in length that is expressed as six isoforms, consisting of SDF-1α, SDF-1β, SDF-1γ, SDF-1δ, SDF-1ε and SDF-1θ. All six isoforms are encoded by the single CXCL12 gene on chromosome 10. This gene regulates leukocyte trafficking and is variably expressed in a number of normal and cancer tissues. The potential role of the novel CXCL12 splice variants as components of the CXCR4 axis in cancer development is not fully understood. The present study aimed to analyze the expression profile of the various SDF-1 isoforms and SDF-1 polymorphisms, and the association with the clinicopathological features and overall survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). SDF-1 polymorphism analysis was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in 73 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples at various stages of disease. The expression pattern of the SDF-1 isoforms was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 40 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples obtained at various stages of disease, as well as in matched adjacent normal mucosa samples. The presence of the CXCL12 gene polymorphism rs1801157 demonstrated an association with local progression of the primary tumor, as indicated by the T stage. The frequency of the GG genotype was slightly increased in patients with stage 3 and 4 tumors (78.0%) compared with the incidence of the GA/AA genotype (69.5%; P=0.067). The expression of SDF-1β was associated with the presence of metastases (P=0.0656) and the expression of SDF-1γ was significantly associated with tumor size (P=0.0423). The present study is the first to analyze the association between the expression profile of the chemokine CXCL12 splice variants in human CRC tissues and their clinical relevance. The present results reveal that the CXCL12 G801A polymorphism is a low

  1. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, Henning; Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Kaufmann, Roland; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Settmacher, Utz

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP) 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment. To further specify the role of α-defensins in tumourigenesis and progression, HNP1–3 were analyzed in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas of 87 patients and quantified in relation to cancer stage and grading. Using the ProteinChip arrays, HNP1–3 were found upregulated in both colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. By combining the array with Laser capture microscopy we were able to confirm that HNP1–3 are expressed by tumour cells but not by neutrophils or other tumour invading cells. These findings suggest that α-defensins are more likely to contribute to tumour growth than they are to mount an effective host anti-tumour response. However, the amount of HNP-expression was not found to be related to tumour stage, grading, and serological tumour markers. PMID:18957723

  2. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype affects promoter methylation of tumor-specific genes in sporadic colorectal cancer through an interaction with folate/vitamin B12 status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooneh Mokarram; Fakhraddin Naghibalhossaini; Mehdi Saberi Firoozi; Seyed Vahid Hosseini; Ahmad Izadpanah; Heshmetalah Salahi; Seyed Ali Malek-Hosseini; Abdoulrasool Talei; Mehra Mojallal

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate joint effects of Methy/entetra-hydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677Tgenotypes, and serum folate/vitamin B12 concentrations on promoter methylation of tumor-associated genes among Iranian colorectal cancer patients.METHODS: We examined the associations between MTHFR C677T genotype, and promoter methylation of P16, Hmlh1, and Hmsh2 tumor-related genes amonq 151 sporadic colorectal cancer patients. The promoter methylation of tumor-related genes was determined by methylation-specific PCR. Eighty six patients from whom fresh tumor samples were obtained and 81 controls were also examined for serum folate and vitamin B12, concentrations by a commercia radioimmunoassay kit.RESULTS: We found 29.1% of cases had tumors with at least one methylated gene promoter. In case-case comparison, we did not find a significant association between methylation in tumors and any single genotype. However, in comparison to controls with the CC genotype, an increased risk of tumor methylation was associated with the CT genotype (OR=2.5;95% CI,1.1-5.6). In case-case comparisons, folate/vitamin B12 levels were positively associated with tumor methylation. Adjusted odds ratios for tumor methylation in cases with high (above median) versus low (below median) serum folate/vitamin B12 levels were 4.9 (95% CI,1.4-17.7), and 3.9 (95% CI,1.1-13.9), respectively. The frequency of methylated tumors was significantly higher in high methyl donor than low methyl donor group, especially in those with MTHFR CT (P=0.01), and CT/TT (P=0.002) genotypes, but not in those with the CC genotype (P=1.0).CONCLUSION: We conclude that high concentrations of serum folate/vitamin B12 levels are associated with the risk of promoter methylation in tumor-specific genes, and this relationship is modified by MTHFR C677T genotypes.

  3. MicroRNA-194 modulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition in human colorectal cancer metastasis

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    Cai H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hong-Ke Cai,1 Xi Chen,2 Yun-Hao Tang,1 Yong-Chuan Deng3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 2Center of Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Surgical Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs, as key regulators of gene expression, are closely related to tumor occurrence and progression. MiR-194 has been proved as a tumor regulatory factor in various cancers; however, the biological function and mechanism of action in colorectal cancer (CRC have not been well explored. In the present study, we found that miR-194 expression is upregulated in CRC clinical specimens, while overexpression of miR-194 promotes cell migration and invasion in CRC cell lines. Besides, miR-194 significantly influenced the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT markers by downregulating E-cadherin expression (P<0.01 and upregulating vimentin and MMP-2 expression (P<0.001, P<0.05. Cell migration is the cell movement related to actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we found miR-194 increased cell polarization in SW480 cells. Moreover, zymography assay showed that miR-194 significantly upregulated the gelatin-degrading activity of MMP-2 (P<0.01. Collectively, our findings suggest that miR-194 functions as a tumor promoter in CRC, which may provide new insights for the study of CRC development and metastasis. Keywords: colorectal cancer, miR-194, epithelial mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion

  4. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt;

    2000-01-01

    that human trials become more directed, with greater chances of success. The orthotopic transplantation of colon cancer cells into the cecum of syngeneic animals or intraportal inoculation appears to resemble the human metastatic disease most closely, providing a model for study of the treatment......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common cancer forms developing in industrialized countries, and its incidence appears to be rising. Studies of human population groups provide insufficient information about carcinogenesis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CRC...... models approximate many of the characteristics of human colonic carcinogenesis and metastasis. So far few comparative evaluations of the various animal models of CRC have been made. CONCLUSION: Animal studies cannot replace human clinical trials, but they can be used as a pre-screening tool, so...

  5. 大肠癌与抑癌基因相关性的研究现状%Association between colorectal cancer and tumor suppressor genes: recent research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项芳芳; 毛高平

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common high-risk gastrointestinal cancer, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are diagnosed each year worldwide. In recent years, due to the improvement of people's living standards and changes in dietary habits and structure, the incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer increase rapidly in China. Moreover, patients have a significantly earlier age of onset. At present, the median age of colorectal cancer onset in China is 58 years old, 12 to 18 years earlier than other countries in Europe and America. The development of colorectal cancer is a complex multi-stage process involving multiple genetic alterations. Many studies have shown that colorectal carcinogenesis involves activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Tumor suppressor genes associated with colorectal carcinogenesis include p53, APC, DCC, and MMR, and proto-oncogenes include K-ras andc-myc. In this paper, we discuss the association between tumor suppressor genes and colorectal carcinogenesis.%大肠癌是常见的高危害消化系恶性肿瘤,全球每年新发病例约为120万例.近年来,随着人们生活水平的提高,饮食习惯和结构的改变,我国大肠癌的发病率和死亡率增长迅速,而且,发病年龄明显提前,目前,我国大肠癌中位发病年龄为58岁,比欧美等国家提前12-18年.大肠癌的发生是一个多阶段多步骤的、涉及多个基因改变的复杂过程.许多研究表明,结直肠癌变是一个涉及原癌基因激活、抑癌基因失活等多基因、多阶段、多步骤渐进演化的积累过程.与结直肠癌相关的抑癌基因有P53、APC、DCC、MMR等,原癌基因k-ras、c-myc等.本文就以上基因改变与大肠癌的发生发展相关性的研究现状作一简单复习.

  6. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF TUMORAL PROCESS IN PATIENTS WITH DISSEMINATED COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Yu. Zorina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New prognostic factors for disseminated colorectal cancer (dCRC are being investigated in this article.Subjects and methods. In this study we have analyzed three clinical groups. First group – 60 patients with dCRC had not specifical therapy. Second group – 200 patients had specifical therapy, but without identification of prognostic and predictive markers. And third group – 93 patients had individual therapy which was based on prognostic and predictive markers of each patient.Results. Definition of prognostic factors (TS, TP, DPD, Ercc-1, СОХ-2, MSI, KRAS in patients with dCRC allowed to prescribe optimal specific therapy and improve results of treatment.Conclusion. Investigation of prognostic markers allowed to differentiate prognostic groups among dCRC patients. Investigation of prognostic factors in patients with intermediate prognosis allows to improve treatment outcome and improve number of liver surgery.

  7. The TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangement is a recurring event in colorectal carcinoma and is associated with tumor sensitivity to TRKA kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardini, Elena; Bosotti, Roberta; Borgia, Andrea Lombardi; De Ponti, Cristina; Somaschini, Alessio; Cammarota, Rosaria; Amboldi, Nadia; Raddrizzani, Laura; Milani, Andrea; Magnaghi, Paola; Ballinari, Dario; Casero, Daniele; Gasparri, Fabio; Banfi, Patrizia; Avanzi, Nilla; Saccardo, Maria B; Alzani, Rachele; Bandiera, Tiziano; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Pesenti, Enrico; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Gambacorta, Marcello; Pierotti, Marco A; Siena, Salvatore; Veronese, Silvio; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    The NTRK1 gene encodes Tropomyosin-related kinase A (TRKA), the high-affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor. NTRK1 was originally isolated from a colorectal carcinoma (CRC) sample as component of a somatic rearrangement (TPM3-NTRK1) resulting in expression of the oncogenic chimeric protein TPM3-TRKA, but there has been no subsequent report regarding the relevance of this oncogene in CRC. The KM12 human CRC cell line expresses the chimeric TPM3-TRKA protein and is hypersensitive to TRKA kinase inhibition. We report the detailed characterization of the TPM3-NTRK1 genomic rearrangement in KM12 cells and through a cellular screening approach, the identification of NMS-P626, a novel highly potent and selective TRKA inhibitor. NMS-P626 suppressed TPM3-TRKA phosphorylation and downstream signaling in KM12 cells and showed remarkable antitumor activity in mice bearing KM12 tumors. Finally, using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we identified the TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangement in a CRC clinical sample, therefore suggesting that this chromosomal translocation is indeed a low frequency recurring event in CRC and that such patients might benefit from therapy with TRKA kinase inhibitors.

  8. Polymorphic expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGTlA gene in human colorectal cancer.

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    Min Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphism of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes is known to play an important role in increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. UGT1A gene locus has been suggested to define tissue-specific glucuronidation activity. Reduced capacity of glucuronidation is correlated with the development of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we sought to explore polymorphism of UGTlA gene in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Cancerous and healthy tissues were obtained from selectedpatients. Blood samples were collected and UGTlA mRNA transcriptions were analyzed. Genomic DNA was prepared and UGTlA8 exon-1 sequences were amplified, visualized and purified. The extracted DNA was subcloned and sequenced. Two-tailed Fisher's exact test, Odds ratios (ORs, confidence interval (CIs and Logistics Regression Analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: UGTlA mRNA expression was reduced in cancerous tissues compared with healthy tissues from the same patient . The UGTlA mRNA expression of healthy tissue in study patients was lower than control . The mRNA expression of cancerous tissue was down-regulated in UGTlAl, 1A3, 1A4, lA6, 1A9 and up-regulated in UGTlA8 and UGTlAl0 UGT1A5 and UGT1A7 were not expressed in colonic tissue of either group. The allele frequency of WT UGTlA8*1 was higher (p = 0.000, frequency of UGTlA8*3 was lowered in control group (p = 0.000. The expression of homozygous UGTlA8*1 was higher in control group (p = 0.000. Higher frequency of both heterozygous UGTlA8*1/*3 and UGTlA8*2/*3 were found in study group (p = 0.000; p = 0.000. The occurrence of colorectal cancer was mainly related to the presence of polymorphic UGTlA8*3 alleles (p = 0.000. CONCLUSION: Regulation of human UGT1A genes is tissue-specific. Individual variation in polymorphic expressions of UGTlA gene locus was noted in all types of colonic tissue tested, whereas hepatic tissue expression was uniform. The high incidence of UGTlA8

  9. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Impacts MSI-Driven Carcinogenesis and Anti-Tumor Immunity in Colorectal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bchiri, Jamila; Guilloux, Agathe; Dartigues, Peggy; Loire, Etienne; Mercier, Dominique; Buhard, Olivier; Sobhani, Iradj; de la Grange, Pierre; Auboeuf, Didier; Praz, Françoise; Fléjou, Jean-François; Duval, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) degrades mutant mRNAs containing premature termination codon (PTC-mRNAs). Here we evaluate the consequence of NMD activity in colorectal cancers (CRCs) showing microsatellite instability (MSI) whose progression is associated with the accumulation of PTC-mRNAs encoding immunogenic proteins due to frameshift mutations in coding repeat sequences. Inhibition of UPF1, one of the major NMD factors, was achieved by siRNA in the HCT116 MSI CRC cell line and the resulting changes in gene expression were studied using expression microarrays. The impact of NMD activity was also investigated in primary MSI CRCs by quantifying the expression of several mRNAs relative to their mutational status and to endogenous UPF1 and UPF2 expression. Host immunity developed against MSI cancer cells was appreciated by quantifying the number of CD3ε-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). UPF1 silencing led to the up-regulation of 1251 genes in HCT116, among which a proportion of them (i.e. 38%) significantly higher than expected by chance contained a coding microsatellite (P<2×10−16). In MSI primary CRCs, UPF1 was significantly over-expressed compared to normal adjacent mucosa (P<0.002). Our data provided evidence for differential decay of PTC-mRNAs compared to wild-type that was positively correlated to UPF1 endogenous expression level (P = 0.02). A negative effect of UPF1 and UPF2 expression on the host's anti-tumor response was observed (P<0.01). Overall, our results show that NMD deeply influences MSI-driven tumorigenesis at the molecular level and indicate a functional negative impact of this system on anti-tumor immunity whose intensity has been recurrently shown to be an independent factor of favorable outcome in CRCs. PMID:18612427

  10. Analysis of the mRNA Expression of Chemotherapy-Related Genes in Colorectal Carcinoma Using the Danenberg Tumor Profile Method

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    Shin Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of individualized chemotherapy for colorectal carcinoma based on the expression of genes involved in chemotherapeutic sensitivity or prognosis is necessary. To achieve this, the expression profiles of genes within tumors and their relationship to clinicopathological factors must be elucidated. Here, we selected 10 genes (TS, DPD, TP, FPGS, GGH, DHFR, ERCC1, TOPO-1, VEGF, and EGFR, examined differences in their mRNA expression between the upper and lower thirds of tumors by laser-captured microdissection and real-time RT-PCR (the Danenberg tumor profile, and analyzed the relationships between their expression profiles and clinicopathological factors. Interestingly, the mRNA expression of DPD, TP, and VEGF was significantly higher in the lower third than in the upper third of tumors (P=0.044, 0.023, and 0.013, resp.. Furthermore, increased ERCC1 mRNA expression in the lower third of tumors correlated with recurrence (P=0.049, and VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher in cases with recurrence than in cases without recurrence, both in the upper and lower thirds of tumors (P=0.018 and 0.036, resp.. These results implied that heterogeneity in DPD, TP, and VEGF expression may exist in colorectal carcinoma and that ERCC-1 and VEGF may be markers predicting recurrence after curative operation.

  11. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MULTIPLE GENETIC TUMOR MARKER ASSAY BY QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME PCR TO PREDICT RECURRENCE IN COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe correlation between multiple genetic tumor markers,carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),cytokeratin 20 (CK20),and Survivin,and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to assess prognostic diagnosis value in cancer recurrence and metastasis.Methods A total of 92 patients with CRC,68 patients with precancerous lesions,and 29 control volunteers were collected for the detection of CEA,CK20,and Survivin expressions by using quantitative Real-Time PCR technology.Associations am...

  12. Sorbitol induces apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells via p38 MAPK signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue; Li, Chun; Wang, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Kun; Gai, Xiao-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Sorbitol has been reported to have anticancer effects in several tumor models, however its effects on colorectal cancer remain elusive. In the present study, the effects of sorbitol on growth inhibition and apoptosis in the colorectal cancer HCT116 cell line were evaluated and its mechanism of action was examined. An MTT assay was utilized to determine the effect of sorbitol on HCT116 cell proliferation at different time points and variable doses. Western blot analysis was used to examine the effect of sorbitol on apoptosis-related protein expression and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results revealed that sorbitol may inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Following treatment with sorbitol for 3 h, western blotting demonstrated cleavage of the caspase-3 zymogen protein and a cleavage product of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a known substrate of caspase-3, was also evident. During sorbitol-induced apoptosis, the mitochondrial pathway was activated by a dose-dependent increase in Bax expression and cytochrome c release, while the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The investigation for the downstream signal pathway revealed that sorbitol-induced apoptosis was mediated by an increase in phosphorylated p38 MAPK expression. Overall, the observations from the present study imply that sorbitol causes increased levels of Bax in response to p38 MAPK signaling, which results in the initiation of the mitochondrial death cascade. Therefore, sorbitol is a promising candidate as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer HCT116 cells.

  13. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response.

  14. Establishment of highly tumorigenic human colorectal cancer cell line (CR4 with properties of putative cancer stem cells.

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    Rebecca A Rowehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC has the third highest mortality rates among the US population. According to the most recent concept of carcinogenesis, human tumors are organized hierarchically, and the top of it is occupied by malignant stem cells (cancer stem cells, CSCs, or cancer-initiating cells, CICs, which possess unlimited self-renewal and tumor-initiating capacities and high resistance to conventional therapies. To reflect the complexity and diversity of human tumors and to provide clinically and physiologically relevant cancer models, large banks of characterized patient-derived low-passage cell lines, and especially CIC-enriched cell lines, are urgently needed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the establishment of a novel CIC-enriched, highly tumorigenic and clonogenic colon cancer cell line, CR4, derived from liver metastasis. This stable cell line was established by combining 3D culturing and 2D culturing in stem cell media, subcloning of cells with particular morphology, co-culture with carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs and serial transplantation to NOD/SCID mice. Using RNA-Seq complete transcriptome profiling of the tumorigenic fraction of the CR4 cells in comparison to the bulk tumor cells, we have identified about 360 differentially expressed transcripts, many of which represent stemness, pluripotency and resistance to treatment. Majority of the established CR4 cells express common markers of stemness, including CD133, CD44, CD166, EpCAM, CD24 and Lgr5. Using immunocytochemical, FACS and western blot analyses, we have shown that a significant ratio of the CR4 cells express key markers of pluripotency markers, including Sox-2, Oct3/4 and c-Myc. Constitutive overactivation of ABC transporters and NF-kB and absence of tumor suppressors p53 and p21 may partially explain exceptional drug resistance of the CR4 cells. CONCLUSIONS: The highly tumorigenic and clonogenic CIC-enriched CR4 cell line may provide an important new

  15. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on malignant molecule levels in tumor tissue and serum of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Huang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on malignant molecule levels in tumor tissue and serum of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer. Methods:A total of 86 cases of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer were selected and randomly divided into observation group and control group. Control group of patients received traditional postoperative chemotherapy and observation group of patients received preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy and traditional postoperative chemotherapy. After one cycle, two cycles and three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, serum samples were collected to determine the levels of malignant molecules; after surgical resection, the tumor tissues were collected to determine the expression levels of malignant molecules. Results:After one cycle, two cycles and three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, serum VEGF, Cath-D, MCP-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, sIL-2R and IL-18 levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group; after surgical resection, Beclin-1 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels in tumor tissue of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, and mTOR, Livin and MTA1 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group.Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can effectively inhibit the malignant degree of locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer and inhibit the expression of malignant molecules, and it is of positive significance in terms of improving overall treatment effect.

  16. Effect of chronic restraint stress on human colorectal carcinoma growth in mice.

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    Qiang Lin

    Full Text Available Stress alters immunological and neuroendocrinological functions. An increasing number of studies indicate that chronic stress can accelerate tumor growth, but its role in colorectal carcinoma (CRC progression is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS on CRC cell growth in nude mice and the possible underlying mechanisms. In this study, we showed that CRS increased the levels of plasma catecholamines including epinephrine (E and norepinephrine (NE, and stimulated the growth of CRC cell-derived tumors in vivo. Treatment with the adrenoceptor (AR antagonists phentolamine (PHE, α-AR antagonist and propranolol (PRO, β-AR antagonist significantly inhibited the CRS-enhanced CRC cell growth in nude mice. In addition, the stress hormones E and NE remarkably enhanced CRC cell proliferation and viability in culture, as well as tumor growth in vivo. These effects were antagonized by the AR antagonists PHE and PRO, indicating that the stress hormone-induced CRC cell proliferation is AR dependent. We also observed that the β-AR antagonists atenolol (ATE, β1- AR antagonist and ICI 118,551 (ICI, β2- AR antagonist inhibited tumor cell proliferation and decreased the stress hormone-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2 in vitro and in vivo. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also blocked the function of the stress hormone, suggesting the involvement of ERK1/2 in the tumor-promoting effect of CRS. We conclude that CRS promotes CRC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice by stimulating CRC cell proliferation through the AR signaling-dependent activation of ERK1/2.

  17. Andrographolide reversed 5-FU resistance in human colorectal cancer by elevating BAX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weicheng; Guo, Wenjie; Li, Lele; Fu, Zan; Liu, Wen; Gao, Jian; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-12-01

    5-FU is the first line therapy for colorectal cancer, however, treatment effect is often hampered by the development of drug resistance or toxicity at high doses. Andrographolide is a natural diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata which has anti-bacterial, anti-antiviral and anti-inflammation activities. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that Andrographolide reverses 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer and examine the underlying mechanism. In vitro and vivo studies indicated that Andrographolide treatment significantly re-sensitizes HCT116/5-FUR cells (HCT116 cells which are 5-FU resistant) to cytotoxicity of 5-FU. Mechanism analysis showed that Andrographolide/5-FU co-treatment elevated apoptosis level of HCT116/5-FUR cells with highly increased level of BAX. By using biotin-Andrographolide pull down and cellular thermal shift assay, we found out that Andrographolide can directly target to BAX. Andrographolide-BAX interaction prevented BAX degradation, enhancing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis thus reversed 5-FU resistance while BAX silence diminished this effect. Further, by analyzing patient samples who received 5-FU involved chemotherapy, we found that expression level of BAX is correlated with PFS. Our results here provide a novel combination treatment strategy, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing low level of BAX. Meanwhile, we also proposed that BAX expression may be a predicted and prognosis marker of 5-FU involved chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  19. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative (occult disease) CT scans.

  20. From reverse transcription to human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrenko V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase from avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV was the subject of the study, from which the investi- gations of the Department of biosynthesis of nucleic acids were started. Production of AMV in grams quantities and isolation of AMV reverse transcriptase were established in the laboratory during the seventies of the past cen- tury and this initiated research on the cDNA synthesis, cloning and investigation of the structure and functions of the eukaryotic genes. Structures of salmon insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF family genes and their transcripts were determined during long-term investigations. Results of two modern techniques, microarray-ba- sed hybridization and SAGE, were used for the identification of the genes differentially expressed in astrocytic gliomas and human normal brain. Comparison of SAGE results on the genes overexpressed in glioblastoma with the results of microarray analysis revealed a limited number of common genes. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of glioblastoma. The first experiments on the classification of glioblastomas based on the data of the 20 genes expression were conducted by using of artificial neural network analysis. The results of these experiments showed that the expression profiles of these genes in 224 glioblastoma samples and 74 normal brain samples could be according to the Koho- nen’s maps. The CHI3L1 and CHI3L2 genes of chitinase-like cartilage protein were revealed among the most overexpressed genes in glioblastoma, which could have prognostic and diagnostic potential. Results of in vitro experiments demonstrated that both proteins, CHI3L1 and CHI3L2, may initiate the phosphorylation of ERK1/ ERK2 and AKT kinases leading to the activation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling cascades in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human glioblastoma U87MG, and U373 cells. The new human cell line

  1. RAGE mediates S100A4-induced cell motility via MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling and is a prognostic biomarker for human colorectal cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Mathias; Okhrimenko, Anna; Marcinkowski, Patrick; Osterland, Marc; Herrmann, Pia; Smith, Janice; Heizmann, Claus W.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Survival of colorectal cancer patients is strongly dependent on development of distant metastases. S100A4 is a prognostic biomarker and inducer for colorectal cancer metastasis. Besides exerting intracellular functions, S100A4 is secreted extracellularly. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one of its interaction partners. The impact of the S100A4-RAGE interaction for cell motility and metastasis formation in colorectal cancer has not been elucidated so far. Here we demonstrate the RAGE-dependent increase in migratory and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells via binding to extracellular S100A4. We show the direct interaction of S100A4 and RAGE, leading to hyperactivated MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling. The S100A4-RAGE axis increased cell migration (PRAGE and RAGE-specific antibodies. In colorectal cancer patients, not distantly metastasized at surgery, high RAGE expression in primary tumors correlated with metachronous metastasis, reduced overall (P=0.022) and metastasis-free survival (P=0.021). In summary, interaction of S100A4-RAGE mediates S100A4-induced colorectal cancer cell motility. RAGE by itself represents a biomarker for prognosis of colorectal cancer. Thus, therapeutic approaches targeting RAGE or intervening in S100A4-RAGE-dependent signaling early in tumor progression might represent alternative strategies restricting S100A4-induced colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:24952599

  2. Lactate promotes PGE2 synthesis and gluconeogenesis in monocytes to benefit the growth of inflammation-associated colorectal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Libin; Zhou, Yuxin; Yao, Jing; Qiao, Chen; Ni, Ting; Guo, Ruichen; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming energy metabolism, such as enhanced glycolysis, is an Achilles' heel in cancer treatment. Most studies have been performed on isolated cancer cells. Here, we studied the energy-transfer mechanism in inflammatory tumor microenvironment. We found that human THP-1 monocytes took up lactate secreted from tumor cells through monocarboxylate transporter 1. In THP-1 monocytes, the oxidation product of lactate, pyruvate competed with the substrate of proline hydroxylase and inhibited its activity, resulting in the stabilization of HIF-1α under normoxia. Mechanistically, activated hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α in THP-1 monocytes promoted the transcriptions of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, which were the key enzyme of prostaglandin E2 synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively, and promote the growth of human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Interestingly, lactate could not accelerate the growth of colon cancer directly in vivo. Instead, the human monocytic cells affected by lactate would play critical roles to ‘feed’ the colon cancer cells. Thus, recycling of lactate for glucose regeneration was reported in cancer metabolism. The anabolic metabolism of monocytes in inflammatory tumor microenvironment may be a critical event during tumor development, allowing accelerated tumor growth. PMID:25938544

  3. The immune landscape of human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindea, Gabriela; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Angell, Helen K; Galon, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spontaneous immune response of cancer patients is critical for the design of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. The power of integrative tumor immunology approaches allowed for a comprehensive view of the immune system evolution in the course of tumor progression and recurrence. We have demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating immune cells are spatiotemporally regulated, a finding that has profound implications for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:24800163

  4. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  5. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  6. Cancer driver-passenger distinction via sporadic human and dog cancer comparison: a proof-of-principle study with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Li, Y; Lyon, K; Camps, J; Dalton, S; Ried, T; Zhao, S

    2014-02-13

    Herein we report a proof-of-principle study illustrating a novel dog-human comparison strategy that addresses a central aim of cancer research, namely cancer driver-passenger distinction. We previously demonstrated that sporadic canine colorectal cancers (CRCs) share similar molecular pathogenesis mechanisms as their human counterparts. In this study, we compared the genome-wide copy number abnormalities between 29 human and 10 canine sporadic CRCs. This led to the identification of 73 driver candidate genes (DCGs), altered in both species, and with 27 from the whole genome and 46 from dog-human genomic rearrangement breakpoint (GRB) regions, as well as 38 passenger candidate genes (PCGs), altered in humans only and located in GRB regions. We noted that DCGs significantly differ from PCGs in every analysis conducted to assess their cancer relevance and biological functions. Importantly, although PCGs are not enriched in any specific functions, DCGs possess significantly enhanced functionality closely associated with cell proliferation and death regulation, as well as with epithelial cell apicobasal polarity establishment/maintenance. These observations support the notion that, in sporadic CRCs of both species, cell polarity genes not only contribute in preventing cancer cell invasion and spreading, but also likely serve as tumor suppressors by modulating cell growth. This pilot study validates our novel strategy and has uncovered four new potential cell polarity and colorectal tumor suppressor genes (RASA3, NUPL1, DENND5A and AVL9). Expansion of this study would make more driver-passenger distinctions for cancers with large genomic amplifications or deletions, and address key questions regarding the relationship between cancer pathogenesis and epithelial cell polarity control in mammals.

  7. Pretreatment with VEGF(R)-inhibitors reduces interstitial fluid pressure, increases intraperitoneal chemotherapy drug penetration, and impedes tumor growth in a mouse colorectal carcinomatosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremonprez, Félix; Descamps, Benedicte; Izmer, Andrei; Vanhove, Christian; Vanhaecke, Frank; De Wever, Olivier; Ceelen, Wim

    2015-10-06

    Cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) is currently the standard treatment for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer. However, especially after incomplete cytoreduction, disease progression is common and this is likely due to limited tissue penetration and efficacy of intraperitoneal cytotoxic drugs. Tumor microenvironment-targeting drugs, such as VEGF(R) and PDGFR inhibitors, can lower the heightened interstitial fluid pressure in tumors, a barrier to drug delivery. Here, we investigated whether tumor microenvironment-targeting drugs enhance the effectiveness of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. A mouse xenograft model with two large peritoneal implants of colorectal cancer cells was developed to study drug distribution and tumor physiology during intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin perfusion. Mice were treated for six days with either Placebo, Imatinib (anti-PDGFR, daily), Bevacizumab (anti-VEGF, twice) or Pazopanib (anti-PDGFR, -VEGFR; daily) followed by intraperitoneal oxaliplatin chemotherapy. Bevacizumab and Pazopanib significantly lowered interstitial fluid pressure, increased Oxaliplatin penetration (assessed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and delayed tumor growth of peritoneal implants (assessed by MRI). Our findings suggest that VEGF(R)-inhibition may improve the efficacy of IPC, particularly for patients for whom a complete cytoreduction might not be feasible.

  8. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  9. Calvatia lilacina protein-extract induces apoptosis through glutathione depletion in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Jwu-Guh; Chung, King-Thom; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wan-Ling; Chen, Chi-Hung; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2009-02-25

    This paper reports that a novel protein extract isolated from Calvatia lilacina (CL) can induce cell death against four types of human colorectal cancer cells. Importantly, CL was shown to be free of apoptotic effects against normal rat liver cells. We have also identified that CL-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion is the major contributor responsible for the apoptotic cell death induction of SW 480 cells, as evidenced by the observation that exogenously added N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or GSH, but not vitamin C, could offer a near complete protection of CL-treated cells against apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) evoked a drop in the transmembrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) in the CL-induced apoptotic cell death. This observation can only be deemed as a minor pathway due to the fact that cyclosporine A (CyA) could only partially rescue the CL-treated cells from apoptotic cell death. Likewise, despite the fact that CL could induce the upregulation of Bax, its knockdown via siRNA (48 h) failed to completely mitigate apoptotic cell death, indicating that its role in this apoptotic process was insignificant. To further explore the possible underlying mechanism associated with CL-induced GSH depletion, we proceeded to determine the effect of CL on the cellular gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), a rate-limiting enzyme responsible for GSH biosynthesis, and demonstrated that indeed gamma-GCS could be repressed by CL. Taken together, we report here for the first time that the anticancer effect of CL on human colorectal cancer cells is mediated through GSH depletion mechanism rather than a ROS-mediated killing process. This functional attribute of CL can thus provide the basis for the strategic design of a treatment of colorectal cancer.

  10. High expression of GPR116 indicates poor survival outcome and promotes tumor progression in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Lin, Xiao-Lu; Liang, Wei; Fu, Seng-Wang; Lin, Wen-Feng; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Gao, Yun-Jie; Chen, Hao-Yan; Dai, Jun; Ge, Zhi-Zheng

    2017-07-18

    Previous studies have found that G-protein-coupled receptor 116 (GPR116) is a regulator of breast cancer metastasis. However, the role of GPR116 in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) carcinogenesis and progression is unknown. In this study, We found GPR116 expression was significantly up-regulated in CRC specimens compared with corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Increased GPR116 expression in CRC was correlated with histological differentiation and distant metastasis. In addition, high expression of GPR116 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of CRC patients, which was also confirmed by GSE14333, GSE17536 and GSE33113 datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the ability of proliferation and invasion of CRC cell lines HCT116 and LOVO was markedly reduced after transfected with siRNA-GPR116. Meanwhile, GPR116 may drive EMT in CRC cells through AKT/EKR signaling pathway, resulting in metastasis. Thus, GPR116 may be a novel reliable prognostic indicator and a risk factor in CRC progression.

  11. Targeting solid tumors : advances in treatment strategies for glioma and colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Curative treatment of most solid tumors includes surgical interference. However, the incidence of local recurrence or distant micrometastases is significantly lower when patients are treated with systemic or locally administered chemo- or targeted therapy. In the last decade, many novel targeting st

  12. Alcohol, one-carbon nutrient intake, and risk of colorectal cancer according to tumor methylation level of IGF2 differentially methylated region123456

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Reiko; Wang, Molin; Qian, Zhi Rong; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mai; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although a higher consumption of alcohol, which is a methyl-group antagonist, was previously associated with colorectal cancer risk, mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective: We hypothesized that excess alcohol consumption might increase risk of colorectal carcinoma with hypomethylation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) differentially methylated region-0 (DMR0), which was previously associated with a worse prognosis. Design: With the use of a molecular pathologic epidemiology database in 2 prospective cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we examined the association between alcohol intake and incident colorectal cancer according to the tumor methylation level of IGF2 DMR0. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression for competing risk data were used to compute HRs and 95% CIs. In addition, we investigated intakes of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, methionine, and folate as exposures. Results: During 3,206,985 person-years of follow-up, we identified 993 rectal and colon cancer cases with an available tumor DNA methylation status. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the consumption of ≥15 g alcohol/d was associated with elevated risk of colorectal cancer with lower levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation [within the first and second quartiles: HRs of 1.55 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.24) and 2.11 (95% CI: 1.44, 3.07), respectively]. By contrast, alcohol consumption was not associated with cancer with higher levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol and cancer risk differed significantly by IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity = 0.006). The association of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and folate intakes with cancer risk did not significantly differ according to IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity > 0.2). Conclusions: Higher alcohol consumption was associated with risk of colorectal cancer with IGF2 DMR0 hypomethylation but not risk of cancer with high

  13. Alcohol, one-carbon nutrient intake, and risk of colorectal cancer according to tumor methylation level of IGF2 differentially methylated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Reiko; Wang, Molin; Qian, Zhi Rong; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mai; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2014-12-01

    Although a higher consumption of alcohol, which is a methyl-group antagonist, was previously associated with colorectal cancer risk, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that excess alcohol consumption might increase risk of colorectal carcinoma with hypomethylation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) differentially methylated region-0 (DMR0), which was previously associated with a worse prognosis. With the use of a molecular pathologic epidemiology database in 2 prospective cohort studies, the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we examined the association between alcohol intake and incident colorectal cancer according to the tumor methylation level of IGF2 DMR0. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression for competing risk data were used to compute HRs and 95% CIs. In addition, we investigated intakes of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, methionine, and folate as exposures. During 3,206,985 person-years of follow-up, we identified 993 rectal and colon cancer cases with an available tumor DNA methylation status. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the consumption of ≥15 g alcohol/d was associated with elevated risk of colorectal cancer with lower levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation [within the first and second quartiles: HRs of 1.55 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.24) and 2.11 (95% CI: 1.44, 3.07), respectively]. By contrast, alcohol consumption was not associated with cancer with higher levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol and cancer risk differed significantly by IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity = 0.006). The association of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and folate intakes with cancer risk did not significantly differ according to IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity > 0.2). Higher alcohol consumption was associated with risk of colorectal cancer with IGF2 DMR0 hypomethylation but not risk of cancer with high-level IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol

  14. Effectiveness of circulating tumor DNA for detection of KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer patients: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yi-Xin; Fu, Qiang; Guo, Yan-Yan; Ye, Ming; Zhao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Qi; Peng, Xiu-Mei; Li, Qiu-Wen; Wang, Ru-Liang; Xiao, Wen-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can be identified in the peripheral blood of patients and harbors the genomic alterations found in tumor tissues, which provides a noninvasive approach for detection of gene mutations. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate whether ctDNA can be used for monitoring KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched for the included eligible studies in English, and data were extracted for statistical analysis according to the numbers of true-positive (TP), true-negative (TN), false-positive (FP) and false-negative (FN) cases. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. After independent searching and reviewing, 21 studies involving 1,812 cancer patients were analyzed. The overall sensitivity, specificity and DOR were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.55–0.78), 0.96 (95% CI =0.93–0.98) and 53.95 (95% CI =26.24–110.92), respectively. The AUROC was 0.95 (95% CI =0.92–0.96), which indicated the high diagnostic accuracy of ctDNA. After stratified analysis, we found the higher diagnostic accuracy in subgroup of patients detected in blood sample of plasma. The ctDNA may be an ideal source for detection of KRAS gene mutations in CRC patients with high specificity and diagnostic value. PMID:28243130

  15. Impact of third-line treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab on non-tumor standardized uptake values in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of metabolic response in cancer cells to therapy requires knowledge of how tumor-free tissue responds to the same treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate standardized uptake values (SUVs) in tumor-free regions of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer prior...... to and following therapy, via the use of 18-fluoride fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). On baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT scans (n=51), volumes of interest (VOI) were obtained from tumor-free tissue (aortic arch, liver and spleen) and SUVs normalized to total...... body mass were registered. The procedure was repeated for a follow-up scan two weeks following a single administration of the third-line treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab. The mean differences in SUV prior to and following therapy were non-significant (P>0.05) in all the registered tumor...

  16. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  18. Over-expression of GAPDH in human colorectal carcinoma as a preferred target of 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shuqiang; Hu, Yumin; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Wenjing; Zeng, Zhaolei; Yang, Jing; Yun, Jingping; Xu, Ruihua; Huang, Peng

    2012-02-01

    It has long been observed that many cancer cells exhibit increased aerobic glycolysis and rely more on this pathway to generate ATP and metabolic intermediates for cell proliferation. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key enzyme in glycolysis and has been known as a housekeeping molecule. In the present study, we found that GAPDH expression was significantly up-regulated in human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues, and also increased in colon cancer cell lines compared to the non-tumor colon mucosa cells in culture. The expression of GAPDH was further elevated in the liver metastatic tissues compared to the original colon cancer tissue of the same patients, suggesting that high expression of GAPDH might play an important role in colon cancer development and metastasis. Importantly, we found that 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester (3-BrOP) preferentially inhibited GAPDH and exhibited potent activity in inducing colon cancer cell death by causing severe depletion of ATP. 3-BrOP at low concentrations (1-10 μM) inhibited GAPDH and a much higher concentration (300 μM) was required to inhibit hexokinase-2. The cytotoxic effect of 3-BrOP was associated with its inhibition of GAPDH, and colon cancer cells with loss of p53 were more sensitive to this compound. Our study suggests that GAPDH may be a potential target for colon cancer therapy.

  19. Andrographolide sensitizes the cytotoxicity of human colorectal carcinoma cells toward cisplatin via enhancing apoptosis pathways in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Shi, Ming-Der; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to suppress the growth and invasion of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) Lovo cells, and trigger apoptosis in vitro. The potential of Andro as a chemotherapeutic agent in CRC was evaluated by investigating its cytotoxic effects as a single agent or in coadministration with cisplatin (CDDP). Andro potentiated the cytotoxic effect of CDDP in Lovo cells through apoptosis. The molecular mechanism for these favorable cellular response was further investigated by analyzing the apoptotic profiles, protein levels, and mRNA expression patterns of several key genes after treatments of Andro or/and CDDP. Molecular results indicated that the effect of Andro alone might be mediated via both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in Lovo cells. The addition of Andro to CDDP induced synergistic apoptosis, which could be corroborated to the changes in protein and mRNA levels of Bax and Bcl-2, and the increased Fas/FasL association in these cells, resulting in increased release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspases. Pretreatment of Nok-1 monoclonal antibody, a Fas signaling inhibitor, or Bax inhibitor peptide V5 repressed the Andro-induced cleavage of procaspase and the sensitization to CDDP-induced apoptosis. Finally, the combination therapy of Andro with CDDP was evidenced by its synergistic inhibition on the growth of Lovo cells in xenograft tumor studies. The results indicate that Andro, in combination with chemotherapeutics, is likely to represent a potential therapeutic strategy for CRC.

  20. Chromosomal Instability, Aneuploidy, and Gene Mutations in Human Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giaretti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether in vivo specific gene mutations lead to chromosomal instability (CIN and aneuploidy or viceversa is so far not proven. We hypothesized that aneuploidy among human sporadic colorectal adenomas and KRAS2 and APC mutations were not independent. Additionally, we investigated if 1p34–36 deletions by dual target FISH were associated with aneuploidy. Among 116 adenomas, 29 were DNA aneuploid by flow cytometry (25% and 29 were KRAS2 mutated (25%. KRAS2 mutations were associated with aneuploidy (P=0.02. However, while G–C and G–T transversions were strongly associated with DNA aneuploidy (P=0.007, G–A transitions were not. Within a second series of 61 adenomas, we found, instead, that APC mutational status and aneuploidy by flow cytometry were not associated. However, a statistically significant association was found with specific APC mutations, i.e., occurring in the mutation cluster region (MCR, codons 1200–1500 or downstream (P=0.016. Finally, the correlation of 1p34–36 deletions with flow cytometric and FISH detected aneuploidy was also significant (P=0.01. Specific KRAS2 and APC mutations and loss of genes in the 1p34–36 region appear associated with aneuploidy suggesting that these events are not independent and may cooperate in inducing human sporadic colorectal adenomas. A cause effect relationship between gene mutations and aneuploidy remains, however, to be demonstrated.

  1. Profiling cancer gene mutations in clinical formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tumor specimens using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangxuan; Chen, Liangjing; Sah, Sachin; Latham, Gary J; Patel, Rajesh; Song, Qinghua; Koeppen, Hartmut; Tam, Rachel; Schleifman, Erica; Mashhedi, Haider; Chalasani, Sreedevi; Fu, Ling; Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Raja, Rajiv; Forrest, William; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R; Hegde, Priti; Jia, Shidong

    2014-04-01

    The success of precision oncology relies on accurate and sensitive molecular profiling. The Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel, a targeted enrichment method for next-generation sequencing (NGS) using the Ion Torrent platform, provides a fast, easy, and cost-effective sequencing workflow for detecting genomic "hotspot" regions that are frequently mutated in human cancer genes. Most recently, the U.K. has launched the AmpliSeq sequencing test in its National Health Service. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical application of the AmpliSeq methodology. We used 10 ng of genomic DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor specimens to sequence 46 cancer genes using the AmpliSeq platform. In a validation study, we developed an orthogonal NGS-based resequencing approach (SimpliSeq) to assess the AmpliSeq variant calls. Validated mutational analyses revealed that AmpliSeq was effective in profiling gene mutations, and that the method correctly pinpointed "true-positive" gene mutations with variant frequency >5% and demonstrated high-level molecular heterogeneity in CRC. However, AmpliSeq enrichment and NGS also produced several recurrent "false-positive" calls in clinically druggable oncogenes such as PIK3CA. AmpliSeq provided highly sensitive and quantitative mutation detection for most of the genes on its cancer panel using limited DNA quantities from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. For those genes with recurrent "false-positive" variant calls, caution should be used in data interpretation, and orthogonal verification of mutations is recommended for clinical decision making.

  2. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  3. Recombination Mutant Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Combined with Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXing; ZHANGXiangfu; ZHENGZhiweng; LUHuishan; WUXinyuan; HUANGChangmin; WANGChuan; GUANGuoxian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Past studies showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) assisted anti-tumor treatment and intensified the sensitivity of chemotherapy. However its clinical application has been curbed because of its low purity, high dosage, and strong toxicity. The objective of present study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects and adverse reactions of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor (rmhTNF) combined with chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignant tumor. Methods: 105 patients with advanced malignant tumor were randomly divided into trial group, 69 patients, and control group, 36 patients.rm hTNF was injected intramuscularly to the trial group at a dose of 4×106 U/m2, from the 1st to 7th days, the llth to 17th days combined with chemotherapy course. The chemotherapy plan was as follows:CAP for patients with the NSCLC; FAM for patients with gastric cancer; FC for patients with colorectal cancer. One treatment cycle lasted for 21 days and two cycles were scheduled. The control group was given only the same chemotherapy as the trial group. Results: In the trial group there was 1 CR case and 12 PR cases, and the response rate was 13/69 (18.84%); in the control group 1 PR case, the response rate 1/36 (2.78%). The response rate in the trial group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P=0.022). The response rate for NSCLC in the trial group was 8/17 (47.06%), and 1/6 (16.67%) in the control group. The response rates for gastric cancer and colorectal cancer in the trial groups also were higher than those in the control groups. After the treatment the KPS was 89.00+9.92 in the trial group,and 84.17±8.84 in the control group, with a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.028). The adverse reactions of rmhTNF injection included: pain in the injection area, chill, hardening and swelling and redness in the injection area, fever, ostealgia and myosalgia, and cold-like symptoms. All these adverse reactions were mild and bearable

  4. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  5. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  6. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α is Associated with Positive Lymph Node Status in Patients with Recurrence of Colorectal Cancer – Indications for Anti-TNF-α Agents in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grimm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The progressive growth of malignancies is accompanied by a decline in the immune response through mechanisms which are poorly understood. Apoptosis and induction of inflammation by tumor released cytokines as tumor escape mechanisms have been proposed to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  8. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Tung, Shui-Yi; Shen, Chien-Heng; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Teng, Chih-Chuan; Lee, Kam-Fai; Chen, Te-Chuan; Lee, Ko-Chao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA) and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model) with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC’s resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27668882

  9. Effectiveness of circulating tumor DNA for detection of KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer patients: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Y

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Xin Hao,1,* Qiang Fu,2,* Yan-Yan Guo,1 Ming Ye,1 Hui-Xia Zhao,1 Qi Wang,1 Xiu-Mei Peng,1 Qiu-Wen Li,1 Ru-Liang Wang,1 Wen-Hua Xiao1 1Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA can be identified in the peripheral blood of patients and harbors the genomic alterations found in tumor tissues, which provides a noninvasive approach for detection of gene mutations. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate whether ctDNA can be used for monitoring KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC patients. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched for the included eligible studies in English, and data were extracted for statistical analysis according to the numbers of true-positive (TP, true-negative (TN, false-positive (FP and false-negative (FN cases. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR were calculated, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. After independent searching and reviewing, 21 studies involving 1,812 cancer patients were analyzed. The overall sensitivity, specificity and DOR were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.55–0.78, 0.96 (95% CI =0.93–0.98 and 53.95 (95% CI =26.24–110.92, respectively. The AUROC was 0.95 (95% CI =0.92–0.96, which indicated the high diagnostic accuracy of ctDNA. After stratified analysis, we found the higher diagnostic accuracy in subgroup of patients detected in blood sample of plasma. The ctDNA may be an ideal source for detection of KRAS gene mutations in CRC patients with high specificity and diagnostic value. Keywords: cancer, KRAS, mutation, circulating tumor DNA

  10. HER-2 Expression in Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer and Corresponding Primary Tumors: A Case Cohort Series

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    Gianpiero Fasola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BM from colorectal cancer (CRC are a rare but increasing event. Surgical resection of oligometastatic disease, including BM, may produce a survival benefit in selected patients. Previous studies described the HER-2 expression patterns in CRC patients, but its prognostic role still remains controversial. Information on the HER-2 expression in BM from CRC is currently lacking. Among the over 500 patients treated at our Department of Neurosurgery in the last 13 years (1999–2012, we identified a cohort of 50 consecutive CRC patients resected for BM. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed using electronic hospital charts and surgical notes. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples were retrieved and histologically reviewed. HER-2 status was assessed on 4-μm sections by HerceptTest™, and scored by two pathologists according to gastric cancer HER-2 status guidelines. In score 2+ cases HER-2 gene copy number was analyzed by FISH, performed using the PathVysion HER-2 DNA Probe Kit. Median age at time of BM resection was 65 years (35–82; most patients were males (60% with a good performance status. The majority of the BM were single (74% and sited in the supratentorial area (64%; 2–4 lesions were diagnosed in 9 patients (18%, and >4 in 3 patients (6%. The rate of HER-2 positivity (defined as IHC score 3+ or IHC score 2+ and FISH gene amplification was 8.1% for the primary CRC tumors and 12% for their corresponding BM. The concordance rate between primary tumors and matched BM was 89%. Median overall survival after neurosurgery was 6.5 months for HER-2 IHC score 0 vs. 4.6 months for HER-2 IHC score 1+/2+/3+; the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.01, Log-rank test. HER-2 positivity of our case cohort was low but comparable to literature. Concordance rate of HER-2 expression between BM and corresponding primary tumors is high and similar to those reported for breast and gastric cancers. Our data suggest a

  11. KRAS discordance between primary and metastatic tumor in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyar Ekinci, Ahmet; Demirci, Umut; Cakmak Oksuzoglu, Berna; Ozturk, Ayse; Esbah, Onur; Ozatli, Tahsin; Celik, Burcin; Budakoglu, Burcin; Turker, Ibrahim; Bal, Oznur; Turan, Nedim

    2015-01-01

    Adding targeted therapies to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) improves response rates and survival. KRAS is a predictive indicator for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) treatments. The most important reasons for KRAS discordance are intratumoral heterogeneity and incorrect mutation analysis. Evaluating the status of KRAS in primary and metastatic lesions becomes even more crucial to ensure efficient usage of anti-EGFR treatments. Patients with metastatic CRC, whose primary disease and liver and/or lung metastases were operated, were retrospectively evaluated, and KRAS assessment was performed on 31 patients who were suitable for DNA analysis. Pyrosequencing with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for KRAS analysis. The median age of 31 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer (N=13) and colon cancer (N=18) was 63 years (range 33-73). Metastasectomy locations included the liver (N=27), lung (N=3), and both lung and liver (N=1). KRAS discordance was detected in 22% (7/31) of the patients. While 3 patients with detected discordance had mutated KRAS in the primary material, wild type KRAS was detected in their liver or lung lesions. On the other hand, while 4 patients had wild type KRAS in the primary material, mutated KRAS was determined in their liver or lung lesions. The McNemar test revealed no significant discordance between primary and metastatic disease (p=1.00). No progression free survival (PFS) difference was detected between patients with determined discordance and patients with undetermined discordance (10.6 vs 14.7 months, p=0.719). This is the first study to evaluate KRAS discordance between primary and metastasis in CRC patients, who underwent metastasectomy, together with survival data. In the literature and recent studies with large patient numbers in which modern KRAS tests were used, the KRAS discordance rate varies between 3-12%. In our study, a higher KRAS discordance (22%) was detected, and no survival difference

  12. Interaction between the cytostatic effects of quercetin and 5-fluorouracil in two human colorectal cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, H H; Woerdenbag, H J; Bauer, Joseph; Scheithauer, W; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1994-01-01

    Therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a single agent has only limited success in palliative treatment of cancer of the large bowel. In the current study, the effect of quercetin on the action of 5-FU in the human colorectal cancer cell lines COLO 320 DM and COLO 205 was evaluated using the MTT and

  13. Interaction between the cytostatic effects of quercetin and 5-fluorouracil in two human colorectal cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, H H; Woerdenbag, H J; Bauer, Joseph; Scheithauer, W; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1994-01-01

    Therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a single agent has only limited success in palliative treatment of cancer of the large bowel. In the current study, the effect of quercetin on the action of 5-FU in the human colorectal cancer cell lines COLO 320 DM and COLO 205 was evaluated using the MTT and c

  14. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  15. Lobaplatin suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in the human colorectal carcinoma cell Line LOVO in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hong-yu; Liu, Lin; Qin, Shu-kui; He, Xiang-ming; Li, Su-yi

    2011-06-01

    Lobaplatin, as the third-generation platinum antineoplastic agent, showed promising antineoplastic effects in variety of preclinical test tumor models. We investigated the inhibition effect of lobaplatin on the colorectal carcinoma cell line LOVO in vitro, and explored its mechanism of action. The MTT assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect and inhibition ratio of lobaplatin on LOVO at various lobaplatin concentrations (500 μM, 1000 μM, 2000 μM). Apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nickend labelling (TUNEL). The cell cycle and apoptotic rate were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) and the expression of caspase-3,8,9 in cells was detected by chromometry. The results of MTT assay showed that proliferation of LOVO cells was inhibited by lobaplatin in a concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis was detected in LOVO cells by TUNEL. The FCM assay indicated that lobaplatin altered the cell cycle and induced apoptosis of the LOVO cells when treated for 24h, the percentages of cells in the S phase transition were increased, whereas the percentages of cells in the G(2) transition were decreased. The expressions of caspase-389 is higher than the control group after LOVO cells were treated by lobaplatin. Lobaplatin can inhibit the proliferation of colorectal carcinoma cell line LOVO by inducing apoptosis in vitro. The mechanism may be related to the "S" cycle arrest in cell cycle distribution and the up-regulated expression of caspase-8 and caspase-9 which up-regulated the expression of caspase-3.

  16. 4-Hydroxylation of estrogens as marker of human mammary tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Liehr, J G; Ricci, M J

    1996-01-01

    Estrogen is a known risk factor in human breast cancer. In rodent models, estradiol has been shown to induce tumors in those tissues in which this hormone is predominantly converted to the catechol metabolite 4-hydroxyestradiol by a specific 4-hydroxylase enzyme, whereas tumors fail to develop in organs in which 2-hydroxylation predominates. We have now found that microsomes prepared from human mammary adenocarcinoma and fibroadenoma predominantly catalyze the metabolic 4-hydroxylation of est...

  17. Recombinant lentivirus with enhanced expression of caudal-related homeobox protein 2 inhibits human colorectal cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sai; Sun, Xue-Jun; Zheng, Jian-Bao; Qi, Jie; Chen, Nan-Zheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Guang-Bing; Liu, Dong; Yu, Jun-Hui; Lu, Shao-Ying; Wang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Caudal-related homeobox protein 2 (CDX2), a tumor suppressor in the adult colon, is overexpressed under a non-cancer specific cytomegalovirus promoter in certain tumor cells; furthermore, non-specific expression of CDX2 may result in aberrant side effects in normal cells. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter is active in the majority of cancer cells but not in normal cells. Hypoxia is a key feature of solid tumors, and targeted genes may be significantly upregulated by five copies of hypoxia-response elements (HREs) under hypoxic conditions. However, the effect of CDX2 overexpression, as controlled by five copies of HREs and the hTERT promoter, on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, a recombinant lentivirus containing the CDX2 gene under the control of five HREs and the hTERT promoter was generated. An immunofluorescence assay was used to detect CDX2 expression by the 5 HhC lentivirus, whereas an MTT assay was used to detect the effects of CoCl2 on the viability of LoVo cells. Western blot analysis was conducted in order to determine the relative ratios of recombinant CDX2 protein to the internal control β-actin, following 5 HhC/LoVo cell culture under normoxic and hypoxic conditions (100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 µmol/l CoCl2) for 24 h, then for 12, 24 or 36 h with the optimal concentration (300 µmol/l) of CoCl2. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the transcription of recombinant CDX2 mRNA following culture of 5 HhC/LoVo cells under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Finally, a cloning assay was used to detect the proliferative ability of 5 HhC/LoVo and 5 Hh cells. High CDX2 expression was observed in hTERT-positive LoVo cells under hypoxic conditions, an effect which was mimicked by treatment with CoCl2 to inhibit LoVo cell proliferation in vitro. High expression of CDX2 therefore provides a promising strategy for the

  18. SKLB-287, a novel oral multikinase inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR2, exhibits potent antitumor activity in LoVo colorectal tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Liu, Y; Yang, H-W; Zhou, S; Cheng, C; Zheng, M-W; Zhong, L; Fu, X-Y; Pan, Y-L; Ma, S; Tang, Y; Chen, Y-Z; Li, L-L; Yang, S-Y

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third common cancer and most of the chemotherapies of CRC currently used often suffer limited efficacy and large side effects. Targeted small-molecule by anti-tumor drugs are thought a promising strategy for improving the efficacy and reducing the side effects. In this investigation, we report a novel multikinase inhibitor, termed SKLB-287, which was discovered by us recently. SKLB-287 could efficiently inhibit the activation of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). It displayed very good anti-proliferative activity against LoVo CRC cells and considerable antiangiogenic potency in transgenic zebrafish embryos. Oral administration of SKLB-287 resulted in dose-dependent suppression of tumor growth in LoVo xenograft mouse model. Immunohistochemistry was adopted to examine the in vivo anti-tumor mechanism of action of SKLB-287.

  19. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier Simone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery, and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN, non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68% with colon and 381 (32% with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location; whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care

  20. Evaluation of new morphometric parameters of neoangiogenesis in human colorectal cancer using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and targeted panendothelial markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciocâlteu, Adriana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Cârţână, Tatiana;

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microcirculation is characterized by an abnormal vascular network with dilated, tortuous and saccular vessels. Therefore, imaging the tumor vasculature and determining its morphometric characteristics represent a critical goal for optimizing the cancer treatment that targets the blood...... vessels (i.e. antiangiogenesis therapy). The aim of this study was to evaluate new vascular morphometric parameters in colorectal cancer, difficult to achieve through conventional immunohistochemistry, by using the confocal laser endomicroscopy method. Fresh biopsies from tumor and normal tissue were...... measurements were expressed as the mean ± standard error. The mean diameter of tumor vessels was significantly larger than the normal vessels (9.46±0.4 µm vs. 7.60±0.3 µm, p = 0.0166). The vessel density was also significantly higher in the cancer vs. normal tissue samples (5541.05±262.81 vs. 3755...

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Hagio, Masahito; Seya, Tomoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    A high percentage of colorectal carcinomas overexpress a lot of growth factors and their receptors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor (FGFR). We previously reported that FGFR2 overexpression was associated with distant metastasis and that FGFR2 inhibition suppressed cell growth, migration, and invasion. The FGFR2 splicing isoform FGFR2IIIb is associated with well-differentiated histologic type, tumor angiogenesis, and adhesion to extracellular matrices. Another isoform, FGFR2IIIc, correlates with the aggressiveness of various types of cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression and roles of FGFR2IIIc in colorectal carcinoma to determine the effectiveness of FGFR2IIIc-targeting therapy. In normal colorectal tissues, FGFR2IIIc expression was weakly detected in superficial colorectal epithelial cells and was not detected in proliferative zone cells. FGFR2IIIc-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the following lesions, listed in the order of increasing percentage: hyperplastic polyps growth, soft agar colony formation, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased adhesion to extracellular matrices. Furthermore, FGFR2IIIc-transfected colorectal carcinoma cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous tissues and the cecum of nude mice. Fully human anti-FGFR2IIIc monoclonal antibody inhibited the growth and migration of colorectal carcinoma cells through alterations in cell migration, cell death, and development-related genes. In conclusion, FGFR2IIIc plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Monoclonal antibody against FGFR2IIIc has promising potential in colorectal carcinoma therapy.

  2. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Structure of the gut microbiome following colonization with human feces determines colonic tumor burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Nielson T; Zackular, Joseph P; Chen, Grace Y; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the gut microbiome plays a role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with CRC harbor gut microbiomes that are structurally distinct from those of healthy individuals; however, without the ability to track individuals during disease progression, it has not been possible to observe changes in the microbiome over the course of tumorigenesis. Mouse models have demonstrated that these changes can further promote colonic tumorigenesis. However, these models have relied upon mouse-adapted bacterial populations and so it remains unclear which human-adapted bacterial populations are responsible for modulating tumorigenesis. We transplanted fecal microbiota from three CRC patients and three healthy individuals into germ-free mice, resulting in six structurally distinct microbial communities. Subjecting these mice to a chemically induced model of CRC resulted in different levels of tumorigenesis between mice. Differences in the number of tumors were strongly associated with the baseline microbiome structure in mice, but not with the cancer status of the human donors. Partitioning of baseline communities into enterotypes by Dirichlet multinomial mixture modeling resulted in three enterotypes that corresponded with tumor burden. The taxa most strongly positively correlated with increased tumor burden were members of the Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Alistipes, and Akkermansia, all of which are Gram-negative. Members of the Gram-positive Clostridiales, including multiple members of Clostridium Group XIVa, were strongly negatively correlated with tumors. Analysis of the inferred metagenome of each community revealed a negative correlation between tumor count and the potential for butyrate production, and a positive correlation between tumor count and the capacity for host glycan degradation. Despite harboring distinct gut communities, all mice underwent conserved structural changes over the course of the model. The

  4. In Vivo Time-Course Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Colorectal Liver Metastases in the Same Living Mice Using Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo real-time visualization of the process of angiogenesis in secondary tumors in the same living animals presents a major challenge in metastasis research. We developed a technique for intravital imaging of colorectal liver metastasis development in live mice using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM. We also developed time-series TPLSM in which intravital TPLSM procedures were performed several times over periods of days to months. Red fluorescent protein-expressing colorectal cancer cells were inoculated into the spleens of green fluorescent protein-expressing mice. First- and second-round intravital TPLSM allowed visualization of viable cancer cells (red in hepatic sinusoids or the space of Disse. Third-round intravital TPLSM demonstrated liver metastatic colonies consisting of viable cancer cells and surrounding stroma with tumor vessels (green. In vivo time-course imaging of tumor angiogenesis in the same living mice using time-series TPLSM could be an ideal tool for antiangiogenic drug evaluation, reducing the effects of interindividual variation.

  5. Value of diffusion weighted MR imaging as an early surrogate parameter for evaluation of tumor response to high-dose-rate brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röhl Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI as an early surrogate parameter for treatment response of colorectal liver metastases to image-guided single-fraction 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Methods Thirty patients with a total of 43 metastases underwent CT- or MRI-guided HDR-BT. In 13 of these patients a total of 15 additional lesions were identified, which were not treated at the initial session and served for comparison. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI including breathhold echoplanar DWI sequences was performed prior to therapy (baseline MRI, 2 days after HDR-BT (early MRI as well as after 3 months (follow-up MRI. Tumor volume (TV and intratumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were measured independently by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate comparison, ANOVA and paired t test as well as Pearson's correlation. Results At early MRI no changes of TV and ADC were found for non-treated colorectal liver metastases. In contrast, mean TV of liver lesions treated with HDR-BT increased by 8.8% (p = 0.054 while mean tumor ADC decreased significantly by 11.4% (p p = 0.027 without significant change of mean ADC values. In contrast, mean TV of treated lesions decreased by 47.0% (p = 0.026 while the mean ADC increased inversely by 28.6% compared to baseline values (p Conclusions DWI is a promising imaging biomarker for early prediction of tumor response in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with HDR-BT, yet the optimal interval between therapy and early follow-up needs to be elucidated.

  6. Maintenance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-mutant colorectal cancer is dependent on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Schlabach, Michael R; Loo, Alice; Bagdasarian, Linda; Meyer, Ronald; Guo, Ribo; Woolfenden, Steve; Yu, Kristine K; Markovits, Judit; Killary, Karen; Sonkin, Dmitry; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Stegmeier, Frank; Mosher, Rebecca E; McLaughlin, Margaret E

    2011-10-11

    Persistent expression of certain oncogenes is required for tumor maintenance. This phenotype is referred to as oncogene addiction and has been clinically validated by anticancer therapies that specifically inhibit oncoproteins such as BCR-ABL, c-Kit, HER2, PDGFR, and EGFR. Identifying additional genes that are required for tumor maintenance may lead to new targets for anticancer drugs. Although the role of aberrant Wnt pathway activation in the initiation of colorectal cancer has been clearly established, it remains unclear whether sustained Wnt pathway activation is required for colorectal tumor maintenance. To address this question, we used inducible β-catenin shRNAs to temporally control Wnt pathway activation in vivo. Here, we show that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of colorectal tumor xenografts harboring APC mutations. Reduced tumor growth upon β-catenin inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Upon reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway colorectal cancer cells resumed proliferation and reacquired a crypt progenitor phenotype. In human colonic adenocarcinomas, high levels of nuclear β-catenin correlated with crypt progenitor but not differentiation markers, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may also control colorectal tumor cell fate during the maintenance phase of tumors in patients. These results support efforts to treat human colorectal cancer by pharmacological inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  7. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  8. Flow cytometric investigation of immune-response-related surface molecules on human colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Stenholm, A C; Kronborg, O;

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was to clarify whether human colorectal cancer cells are equipped to present tumour-associated-antigens to the immune system, and whether this ability correlates with lymphoid infiltration, the Dukes' stage and Jass classification. Enzymatically dissociated tumour cells from 70...... molecules, but not the class II, was correlated with lymphoid infiltration and the Jass classification. Expression of these surface molecules was not correlated with the Dukes' stage. The tumour cells were generally equipped to present antigens to the effector arm of the immune system since HLA class I...... is expressed, but the tumour cells were not optimal in stimulating an immune response, since HLA class II and CD58 were only marginally expressed and CD80 and CD54 were absent....

  9. Peptide Agonists of Vasopressin V2 Receptor Reduce Expression of Neuroendocrine Markers and Tumor Growth in Human Lung and Prostate Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifano, Marina; Garona, Juan; Capobianco, Carla S.; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Alonso, Daniel F.; Ripoll, Giselle V.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies that express neuropeptides as synaptophysin, chromogranin A (CgA), and specific neuronal enolase (NSE), among others. Vasopressin (AVP) is a neuropeptide with an endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine effect in normal and pathological tissues. AVP receptors are present in human lung, breast, pancreatic, colorectal, and gastrointestinal tumors. While AVP V1 receptors are associated with stimulation of cellular proliferation, AVP V2 receptor (V2r) is related to antiproliferative effects. Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a synthetic analog of AVP that acts as a selective agonist for the V2r, which shows antitumor properties in breast and colorectal cancer models. Recently, we developed a derivative of dDAVP named [V4Q5]dDAVP, which presents higher antitumor effects in a breast cancer model compared to the parental compound. The goal of present work was to explore the antitumor properties of the V2r agonist dDAVP and its novel analog [V4Q5]dDAVP on aggressive human lung (NCI-H82) and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell lines with neuroendocrine (NE) characteristics. We study the presence of specific NE markers (CgA and NSE) and V2r expression in NCI-H82 and PC-3. Both cell lines express high levels of NE markers NSE and CgA but then incubation with dDAVP diminished expression levels of both markers. DDAVP and [V4Q5]dDAVP significantly reduced proliferation, doubling time, and migration in both tumor cell cultures. [V4Q5]dDAVP analog showed a higher cytostatic effect than dDAVP, on cellular proliferation in the NCI-H82 cell line. Silencing of V2r using small interfering RNA significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP on NCI-H82 cell proliferation. We, preliminarily, explored the in vivo effect of dDAVP and [V4Q5]dDAVP on NCI-H82 small cell lung cancer xenografts. Treated tumors (0.3 μg kg−1, thrice a week) grew slower in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. In this work, we demonstrated

  10. 6-Bromoisatin Found in Muricid Mollusc Extracts Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis, Preventing Early Stage Tumor Formation in a Colorectal Cancer Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Esmaeelian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muricid molluscs are a natural source of brominated isatin with anticancer activity. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of synthetic 6-bromoisatin for reducing the risk of early stage colorectal tumor formation. The purity of 6-bromoisatin was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy, then tested for in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. A mouse model for colorectal cancer was utilized whereby colonic apoptosis and cell proliferation was measured 6 h after azoxymethane treatment by hematoxylin and immunohistochemical staining. Liver enzymes and other biochemistry parameters were measured in plasma and haematological assessment of the blood was conducted to assess potential toxic side-effects. 6-Bromoisatin inhibited proliferation of HT29 cells at IC50 223 μM (0.05 mg/mL and induced apoptosis without increasing caspase 3/7 activity. In vivo 6-bromoisatin (0.05 mg/g was found to significantly enhance the apoptotic index (p ≤ 0.001 and reduced cell proliferation (p ≤ 0.01 in the distal colon. There were no significant effects on mouse body weight, liver enzymes, biochemical