WorldWideScience

Sample records for human colonic cells

  1. Isolation and in vitro expansion of human colonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, P.; Sato, T.; Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Iglesias, M.; Rossell, D.; Auer, H.; Gallardo, M.; Blasco, M.A.; Sancho, E.; Clevers, H.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation of stem cells of the human colonic epithelium. Differential cell surface abundance of ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EPHB2) allows the purification of different cell types from human colon mucosa biopsies. The highest EPHB2 surface levels correspond to epithelial colonic

  2. Analysis of enteroendocrine cell populations in the human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Patricia; Fakhry, Josiane; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that patterns of colocalisation of hormones in enteroendocrine cells are more complex than previously appreciated and that the patterns differ substantially between species. In this study, the human sigmoid colon is investigated by immunohistochemistry for the presence o...

  3. Different molecular organization of two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in human colon epithelial cells and colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinski, Wojciech; Piet, Mateusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Paduch, Roman; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.

    2018-01-01

    Two cell lines, human normal colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) and human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) were cultured in the presence of exogenous carotenoids, either zeaxanthin or lutein. Both carotenoids demonstrated cytotoxicity with respect to cancer cells but not to normal cells. Cells from both the cell lines were analyzed with application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Raman scattering microscopy. Both imaging techniques show effective incorporation of carotenoid molecules into growing cells. Comparison of the Raman scattering and fluorescence lifetime characteristics reveals different molecular organization of carotenoids in the carcinoma and normal cells. The main difference consists in a carotenoid aggregation level which is substantially lower in the carcinoma cells as compared to the normal cells. Different molecular organization of carotenoids was interpreted in terms of a different metabolism of normal and carcinoma cells and has been concluded to provide a possibility of cancer diagnosis based on spectroscopic analyses.

  4. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells in subserosa of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hansen, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    vesicles) were prominent. The IC-SS ultrastructure was different from that of FLC in the longitudinal layer, which had no caveolae and fewer intermediate filaments. Peg-and-socket junctions between IC-SS and between IC-SS and muscle cells were present, and IC-SS processes had close, selective appositions...... to muscle cells. Gap junctions were not observed. Small nerve bundles were abundant, but close contacts (......We studied the ultrastructure of interstitial cells in the subserosal/adventitial layer in human colon. An interstitial cell type with an ultrastructure intermediate between fibroblast-like cells (FLC) and interstitial cells of Cajal was identified (IC-SS). IC-SS had thin and flattened branching...

  5. Effects of adrenaline in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Helen P S; Ho, Judy W C; Koo, Marcel W L; Yu, Le; Wu, William K K; Lam, Emily K Y; Tai, Emily K K; Ko, Joshua K S; Shin, Vivian Y; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, Chi Hin

    2011-06-20

    Stress has been implicated in the development of cancers. Adrenaline levels are increased in response to stress. The effects of adrenaline on colon cancer are largely unknown. The aims of the study are to determine the effects of adrenaline in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells and the possible underlying mechanisms involved. The effect of adrenaline on HT-29 cell proliferation was determined by [(3)H] thymidine incorporation assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were detected by Western blot. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release were determined by zymography and enzyme immunoassay, respectively. Adrenaline stimulated HT-29 cell proliferation. This was accompanied by the enhanced expression of COX-2 and VEGF in HT-29 cells. Adrenaline also upregulated MMP-9 activity and PGE(2) release. Adrenaline stimulated HT-29 cell proliferation which was reversed by COX-2 inhibitor sc-236. COX-2 inhibitor also reverted the action of adrenaline on VEGF expression and MMP-9 activity. Further study was performed to determine the involvement of β-adrenoceptors. The stimulatory action of adrenaline on colon cancer growth was blocked by atenolol and ICI 118,551, a β(1)- and β(2)-selective antagonist, respectively. This signified the role of β-adrenoceptors in this process. In addition, both antagonists also abrogated the stimulating actions of adrenaline on COX-2, VEGF expression, MMP-9 activity and PGE(2) release in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that adrenaline stimulates cell proliferation of HT-29 cells via both β(1)- and β(2)-adrenoceptors by a COX-2 dependent pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  7. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Rogers; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Walker, Alice M.; Barbara Graham; Jacqueline J. Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various do...

  8. Trolox induces inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Guang Yang; Xiang-An Tian; Xiao-Yan Li; Jian-Guo Huang; Nai-Qing Liu; Qin-Li Sun

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of trolox on human colon cancer cell lines was investigated. The results revealed that trolox treatment caused inhibition of cell growth in T84 and HCT-15 colon cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was significant at 50 µM of trolox after 48 hours in both cell lines. Trolox treatment promoted expression of p38 and inhibited expression of survivin and Akt. It also induced cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 and ultimately induced apoptosis in...

  9. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  10. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  11. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  12. Rhein induces apoptosis of HCT-116 human colon cancer cells via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhein, a major compound in rhubarb, has been found to have anti-tumor properties in many human cancer cells. However, the details about rhein suppressing the growth of human colon cancer cells remained elusive. In this paper, we explored the potential of rhein as a chemotherapeutic agent on HCT- 116 cells and ...

  13. Light- and electron microscopical studies of interstitial cells of Cajal and muscle cells at the submucosal border of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Peters, S; Thuneberg, L

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submucosal border of the colonic circular muscle are pacemaker cells. We studied smooth muscle cells and ICC at the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer of the normal human colon....

  14. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  15. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, prespiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  16. Induction of retinoic acid receptor β mediates growth inhibition in retinoid resistant human colon carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nicke, B; Riecken, E; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The molecular mechanisms underlying the differential sensitivity of human colon carcinoma cells to retinoid mediated growth inhibition are poorly understood.
AIM—To identify the intracellular mechanisms responsible for resistance against retinoid mediated growth inhibition in human colon carcinoma cells.
METHODS—Anchorage independent growth of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT29 and LoVo was determined by a human tumour clonogenic assay. Retinoid receptor expression was evalu...

  17. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human colon and in Hirschsprung's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    Subpopulations of interstitial cells of Cajal are regarded as the source of spontaneous slow waves of the gut musculature (pacemaker cells). Their ontogeny remains unclear, but a role of the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit in their development has recently been recognized. This study examined the ...... the interstitial cells in the human colon and in Hirschsprung's disease (aganglionosis)....

  18. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  19. Resveratrol Treatment Inhibits Proliferation of and Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Miao; Zhong, Lu-Xing; Zhan, Zheng-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Hao; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-04-04

    Resveratrol, a natural isolate from plant sources, has a long and important history in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study we investigated the effect of resveratrol on human colon cancer cell lines. We used the Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for determination of colon cancer cell viability. Apoptosis induction was analyzed using the DeadEnd™ Colorimetric TUNEL System (Promega, Madison, WI, USA). The siRNA Transfection Reagent kit (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc.) was used for the administration of COX-2 silencer RNA (siRNA) into the colon cancer cells. Primer Express® software for Real-Time PCR ver. 3.0 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) was used to prepare the primers for RT-PCR. The results revealed that exposure of colon cancer cells to resveratrol inhibited cell viability. Resveratrol exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on cell viability at 30 μM concentration after 48 h of exposure. We observed that 30-μM doses of resveratrol for 72 h led to 18, 29, and 34% reduction in the viability of HCA-17, SW480, and HT29 cells, respectively. It also significantly induced apoptosis in both of the tested carcinoma cell lines. The population of apoptotic cells in HCA-17 and SW480 cell lines after 48 h of resveratrol treatment was 59.8±4 and 67.2±4%, respectively, compared to 2.3±1% in the control cells. The colon cancer cells exposed to resveratrol showed significantly lower cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin receptor expression. Treatment of colon cancer cells with the inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, indomethacin, and administration of silencer RNA for cyclooxygenase-2 also produced similar results. These findings suggest that resveratrol treatment can be a promising strategy for the treatment of colon cancer.

  20. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  2. The effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and genotoxicity in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jacqueline J; Graham, Barbara; Walker, Alice M; Tchounwou, Paul B; Rogers, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 microg/mL) of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis) to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 microg/mL) followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 microg/mL). The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells.

  3. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogers

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29, lung (A549 and breast (MCF-7 carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μg/mL of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 µg/mL followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 µg/mL. The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [3H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells.

  4. A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Chidamide induces apoptosis of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lin [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Baoan, E-mail: wenyu811@126.com [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qin, Shukui [Chinese PLA Cancer Center, The 81st PLA Hospital, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Li, Suyi; He, Xiangming [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qiu, Shaomin; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Hong [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210003, Jiangsu (China)

    2010-02-05

    Many studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce various tumor cells to undergo apoptosis, and such inhibitors have been used in different clinical trials against different human cancers. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel HDAC inhibitor, Chidamide. We showed that Chidamide was able to increase the acetylation levels of histone H3 and to inhibit the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Ras signaling pathways, which resulted in arresting colon cancer cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and promoting apoptosis. As a result, the proliferation of colon cancer cells was suppressed in vitro. Our data support the potential application of Chidamide as an anticancer agent in treating colon cancer. Future studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy.

  5. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drosten Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. Results 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2 replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2. CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. Conclusion CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  6. Explant cultures of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    . The ability to maintain colonic mucosa in culture was subject to both intra- and interindividual variation. Cultured human colonic mucosa also activated a chemical procarcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, into metabolites which bound to cellular DNA. A 100-fold interindividual variation in this binding was observed.......Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors...... into cellular DNA and protein. A progressive decrease in the number of goblet cells, decrease in the depth of the crypts, and a change from a columnar to a cuboidal epithelium were observed. After 20 days in culture the colonic mucosa consisted of a single layer of cuboidal epithelial cells and a few glands...

  7. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  8. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  9. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, van B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  10. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erk, Marjan J; Teuling, Eva; Staal, Yvonne C. M.; Huybers, Sylvie; Van Bladeren, Peter J; Aarts, Jac MMJG; Van Ommen, Ben

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  11. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  12. The cardiac glycoside oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Yuming; Zhao, Wanlu; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Chunxia; Deng, Fan

    2017-07-01

    Evidence indicates that the cardiac glycoside oleandrin exhibits cytotoxic activity against several different types of cancer. However, the specific mechanisms underlying oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unknown. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect and underlying mechanism of oleandrin on human colon cancer cells. The cytotoxicity and IC50 of five small molecule compounds (oleandrin, neriifolin, strophanthidin, gitoxigenin, and convallatoxin) in human colon cancer cell line SW480 cells and normal human colon cell line NCM460 cells were determined by cell counting and MTT assays, respectively. Apoptosis was determined by staining cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometry. Intracellular Ca2+ was determined using Fluo-3 AM,glutathione (GSH) levels were measured using a GSH detection kit,and the activity of caspase-3, -9 was measured using a peptide substrate. BAX, pro-caspase-3, -9, cytochrome C and BCL-2 expression were determined by Western blotting. Oleandrin significantly decreased cell viabilities in SW480, HCT116 and RKO cells. The IC50 for SW480 cells was 0.02 µM, whereas for NCM460 cells 0.56 µM. More interestingly, the results of flow cytometry showed that oleandrin potently induced apoptosis in SW480 and RKO cells. Oleandrin downregulated protein expression of pro-caspase-3, -9, but enhanced caspase-3, -9 activities. These effects were accompanied by upregulation of protein expression of cytochrome C and BAX, and downregulation of BCL-2 protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, oleandrin increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but decreased GSH concentration in the cells. The present results suggest that oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of anti-cancer property of oleandrin.

  13. PKH26 staining defines distinct subsets of normal human colon epithelial cells at different maturation stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pastò

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Colon crypts are characterized by a hierarchy of cells distributed along the crypt axis. Aim of this paper was to develop an in vitro system for separation of epithelial cell subsets in different maturation stages from normal human colon. METHODOLOGY AND MAJOR FINDINGS: Dissociated colonic epithelial cells were stained with PKH26, which allows identification of distinct populations based on their proliferation rate, and cultured in vitro in the absence of serum. The cytofluorimetric expression of CK20, Msi-1 and Lgr5 was studied. The mRNA levels of several stemness-associated genes were also compared in cultured cell populations and in three colon crypt populations isolated by microdissection. A PKH(pos population survived in culture and formed spheroids; this population included subsets with slow (PKH(high and rapid (PKH(low replicative rates. Molecular analysis revealed higher mRNA levels of both Msi-1 and Lgr-5 in PKH(high cells; by cytofluorimetric analysis, Msi-1(+/Lgr5(+ cells were only found within PKH(high cells, whereas Msi-1(+/Lgr5(- cells were also observed in the PKH(low population. As judged by qRT-PCR analysis, the expression of several stemness-associated markers (Bmi-1, EphB2, EpCAM, ALDH1 was highly enriched in Msi-1(+/Lgr5(+ cells. While CK20 expression was mainly found in PKH(low and PKH(neg cells, a small PKH(high subset co-expressed both CK20 and Msi-1, but not Lgr5; cells with these properties also expressed Mucin, and could be identified in vivo in colon crypts. These results mirrored those found in cells isolated from different crypt portions by microdissection, and based on proliferation rates and marker expression they allowed to define several subsets at different maturation stages: PKH(high/Lgr5(+/Msi-1(+/CK20(-, PKH(high/Lgr5(-/Msi-1(+/CK20(+, PKH(low/Lgr5(-/Msi-1(+/Ck20(-, and PKH(low/Lgr5(-/Msi-1(-/CK20(+ cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show the possibility of deriving in vitro, without any

  14. Galectin-8 expression decreases in cancer compared with normal and dysplastic human colon tissue and acts significantly on human colon cancer cell migration as a suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, N; Bronckart, Y; Camby, I; Legendre, H; Lahm, H; Kaltner, H; Hadari, Y; Van Ham, P; Yeaton, P; Pector, J-C; Zick, Y; Salmon, I; Danguy, A; Kiss, R; Gabius, H-J

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins. This ability may have a bearing on cell adhesion and migration/proliferation in human colon cancer cells. In addition to galectins-1 and -3 studied to date, other members of this family not investigated in detail may contribute to modulation of tumour cell features. This evident gap has prompted us to extend galectin analysis beyond the two prototypes. The present study deals with the quantitative determination of immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 in normal, benign, and malignant human colon tissue samples and in four human colon cancer models (HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1) maintained both in vitro as permanent cell lines and in vivo as nude mice xenografts. The role of galectin-8 (and its neutralising antibody) in cell migration was investigated in HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cell lines. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 and its overall ability to bind to sugar ligands (revealed glycohistochemically by means of biotinylated histochemically inert carrier bovine serum albumin with α- and β-d-galactose, α-d-glucose, and lactose derivatives as ligands) were quantitatively determined using computer assisted microscopy. The presence of galectin-8 mRNA in the four human colon cancer cell lines was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, cellular localisation of exogenously added galectin-8 in the culture media of these colon cancer cells was visualised by fluorescence microscopy. In vitro galectin-8 mediated effects (and the influence of its neutralising antibody) on migration levels of living HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cells were quantitatively determined by computer assisted phase contrast microscopy. Results: A marked decrease in immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 occurred with malignancy development in human colon tissue. Malignant colon tissue exhibited a significantly lower galectin-8 level than normal or

  15. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  16. Superoxide production and expression of NAD(P)H oxidases by transformed and primary human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, Lars; Pedersen, G

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells.......Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells....

  17. Human colonic fibroblasts regulate stemness and chemotherapy resistance of colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, S.; Medema, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that cancers are heterogeneous and contain a hierarchical organization consisting of cancer stem cells and their differentiated cell progeny. These cancer stem cells are at the core of the tumor as they represent the clonogenic cells within a tumor. Moreover, these cells

  18. Effect of essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line SW742.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Fayazfar, Setareh; Heydari-Keshel, Saeid; Rezaee, Mohamad Bagher; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the effect of the essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line (SW742) and human fibroblast cells. Colon cancer is the second most common fatal malignancy. Owing to the existence of many side effects and problems related to common treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, alternative treatments are being investigated. Some herbal medicines have shown promising results against different types of cancers. Herbal medicines used have included the use naturally occurring essential oils. The essential oil of Rosa Damascena was obtained by distillation and its effect on SW742 cell-line and fibroblast cells were investigated with cell culture. The cells were cultured and different volumes of essential oil were induced to the cells. After48hincubation, cell survival was measured and using statistical analysis, the findings were evaluated and reported. This study showed that soluble part of Rosa Damascena oil increases cell proliferation in high volumes and the non-soluble component decreases cell proliferation. The effects of essential oils, such as Rosa Damascena, on cell proliferation require more thorough investigation.

  19. Effect of essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line SW742

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Heydari-Keshel, Saeid; Rezaee, Mohamad Bagher; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Aim In this study, we report the effect of the essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line (SW742) and human fibroblast cells. Background Colon cancer is the second most common fatal malignancy. Owing to the existence of many side effects and problems related to common treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, alternative treatments are being investigated. Some herbal medicines have shown promising results against different types of cancers. Herbal medicines used have included the use naturally occurring essential oils. Patients and methods The essential oil of Rosa Damascena was obtained by distillation and its effect on SW742 cell-line and fibroblast cells were investigated with cell culture. The cells were cultured and different volumes of essential oil were induced to the cells. After48hincubation, cell survival was measured and using statistical analysis, the findings were evaluated and reported. Results This study showed that soluble part of Rosa Damascena oil increases cell proliferation in high volumes and the non-soluble component decreases cell proliferation. Conclusion The effects of essential oils, such as Rosa Damascena, on cell proliferation require more thorough investigation. PMID:24834241

  20. MicroRNA profiling in human colon cancer cells during 5-fluorouracil-induced autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hou

    Full Text Available Autophagy modulation is now recognized as a potential therapeutic approach for cancer (including colorectal cancer, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating autophagy in response to cellular stress are still not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been found to play important roles in controlling many cellular functions, including growth, metabolism and stress response. The physiological importance of the miRNA-autophagy interconnection is only beginning to be elucidated. MiRNA microarray technology facilitates analysis of global miRNA expression in certain situations. In this study, we explored the expression profile of miRNAs during the response of human colon cancer cells (HT29s to 5-FU treatment and nutrient starvation using miRNA microarray analysis. The alteration of miRNA expression showed the same pattern under both conditions was further testified by qRT-PCR in three human colon cancer cell lines. In addition, bioinformatic prediction of target genes, pathway analysis and gene network analysis were performed to better understand the roles of these miRNAs in the regulation of autophagy. We identified and selected four downregulated miRNAs including hsa-miR-302a-3p and 27 upregulated miRNAs under these two conditions as having the potential to target genes involved in the regulation of autophagy in human colon cancer cells. They have the potential to modulate autophagy in 5-FU-based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

  1. Increased carnitine-dependent fatty acid uptake into mitochondria of human colon cancer cells induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Uwe; Nickel, Alexander; Daniel, Hannelore

    2005-06-01

    Carnitine-dependent fatty acid import into mitochondria and beta-oxidation seem to be impaired in tumor cells. In the present study we show that a supply of palmitoylcarnitine together with L-carnitine potently induces apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells as a consequence of accelerated fatty acid oxidation. Caspase-3-like activities, measured by the cleavage rate of a fluorogenic tetrapeptide substrate and nuclear fragmentation determined after DNA labeling in fixed cells by fluorescence microscopy, served as indicators of apoptosis. Neither L-carnitine nor palmitoylcarnitine alone were able to increase caspase-3-like activities and DNA fragmentation, but when provided together, apoptosis occurred. That exogenous carnitine was indeed able to enhance fatty acid uptake into mitochondria was demonstrated by an increased influx of a fluorescent palmitic acid analog. Enhanced fatty acid availability in mitochondria led to an increased generation of O*2-, as detected by a O*2- -sensitive fluorogenic dye, indicating oxidation of delivered substrates. Benzoquinone, an O*2- scavenger, blocked O*2- generation and prevented apoptosis as initiated by the combination of palmitoylcarnitine and carnitine. The lack of effect of the ceramide synthesis inhibitor fumonisin on palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine-induced apoptosis further supports the notion that apoptotic cell death is specifically due to fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to HT-29 cells, nontransformed human colonocytes did not respond to exogenous palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine and no apoptosis was observed. In conclusion, our studies provide evidence that a limited mitochondrial fatty acid import in human colon cancer cells prevents high rates of mitochondrial O*2- production and protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis that can be overcome by an exogenous carnitine supply.

  2. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C.; Sainio, Annele O.; Pennanen, Mirka M.; Lund, Riikka J.; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T. T.

    2015-01-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. PMID:26001829

  3. MSH3-deficiency initiates EMAST without oncogenic transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Campregher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Elevated microsatellite instability at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST is a genetic signature in certain cases of sporadic colorectal cancer and has been linked to MSH3-deficiency. It is currently controversial whether EMAST is associated with oncogenic properties in humans, specifically as cancer development in Msh3-deficient mice is not enhanced. However, a mutator phenotype is different between species as the genetic positions of repetitive sequences are not conserved. Here we studied the molecular effects of human MSH3-deficiency. METHODS: HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 (both MSH3-deficient and primary human colon epithelial cells (HCEC, MSH3-wildtype were stably transfected with an EGFP-based reporter plasmid for the detection of frameshift mutations within an [AAAG]17 repeat. MSH3 was silenced by shRNA and changes in protein expression were analyzed by shotgun proteomics. Colony forming assay was used to determine oncogenic transformation and double strand breaks (DSBs were assessed by Comet assay. RESULTS: Despite differential MLH1 expression, both HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 cells displayed comparable high mutation rates (about 4×10(-4 at [AAAG]17 repeats. Silencing of MSH3 in HCECs leads to a remarkable increased frameshift mutations in [AAAG]17 repeats whereas [CA]13 repeats were less affected. Upon MSH3-silencing, significant changes in the expression of 202 proteins were detected. Pathway analysis revealed overexpression of proteins involved in double strand break repair (MRE11 and RAD50, apoptosis, L1 recycling, and repression of proteins involved in metabolism, tRNA aminoacylation, and gene expression. MSH3-silencing did not induce oncogenic transformation and DSBs increased 2-fold. CONCLUSIONS: MSH3-deficiency in human colon epithelial cells results in EMAST, formation of DSBs and significant changes of the proteome but lacks oncogenic transformation. Thus, MSH3-deficiency alone is unlikely to drive human colon

  4. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  5. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  6. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  7. Shiga Toxin Glycosphingolipid Receptors in Human Caco-2 and HCT-8 Colon Epithelial Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzel, Ivan U; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Schmitz, Julia S; Steil, Daniel; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    2017-10-25

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) released by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) into the human colon are the causative agents for fatal outcome of EHEC infections. Colon epithelial Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells are widely used for investigating Stx-mediated intestinal cytotoxicity. Only limited data are available regarding precise structures of their Stx receptor glycosphingolipids (GSLs) globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer) and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4Cer), and lipid raft association. In this study we identified Gb3Cer and Gb4Cer lipoforms of serum-free cultivated Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells, chiefly harboring ceramide moieties composed of sphingosine (d18:1) and C16:0, C22:0 or C24:0/C24:1 fatty acid. The most significant difference between the two cell lines was the prevalence of Gb3Cer with C16 fatty acid in HCT-8 and Gb4Cer with C22-C24 fatty acids in Caco-2 cells. Lipid compositional analysis of detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), which were used as lipid raft-equivalents, indicated slightly higher relative content of Stx receptor Gb3Cer in DRMs of HCT-8 cells when compared to Caco-2 cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed substantial sensitivity towards Stx2a for both cell lines, evidencing little higher susceptibility of Caco-2 cells versus HCT-8 cells. Collectively, Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells express a plethora of different receptor lipoforms and are susceptible towards Stx2a exhibiting somewhat lower sensitivity when compared to Vero cells.

  8. Transcriptomic responses of cancerous and noncancerous human colon cells to sulforaphane and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Simona; Hecht, Katrin; Sobotzki, Nadine; Erzinger, Melanie M; Bovet, Cédric; Shay, Jerry W; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J; Marra, Giancarlo; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2014-03-17

    Diets enriched with bioactive food components trigger molecular changes in cells that may contribute to either health-promoting or adverse effects. Recent technological advances in high-throughput data generation allow for observing systems-wide molecular responses to cellular perturbations with nontoxic and dietary-relevant doses while considering the intrinsic differences between cancerous and noncancerous cells. In this chemical profile, we compared molecular responses of the colon cancer cell line HT29 and a noncancerous colon epithelial cell line (HCEC) to two widely encountered food components, sulforaphane and selenium. We conducted this comparison by generating new transcriptome data by microarray gene-expression profiling, analyzing them statistically on the single gene, network, and functional pathway levels, and integrating them with protein expression data. Sulforaphane and selenium, at doses that did not inhibit the growth of the tested cells, induced or repressed the transcription of a limited number of genes in a manner distinctly dependent on the chemical and the cell type. The genes that most strongly responded in cancer cells were observed after treatment with sulforaphane and were members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. These genes were in high agreement in terms of fold change with their corresponding proteins (correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.98, p = 0.01). Conversely, selenium had little influence on the cancer cells. In contrast, in noncancerous cells, selenium induced numerous genes involved in apoptotic, angiogenic, or tumor proliferation pathways, whereas the influence of sulforaphane was very limited. These findings contribute to defining the significance of cell type in interpreting human cellular transcriptome-level responses to exposures to natural components of the diet.

  9. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of chalcone derivatives of 2-acetyl thiophene on human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Alana; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Nedel, Fernanda; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Dellagostin, Odir A; Smith, Kevin R; de Pereira, Cláudio Martin Pereira; Stefanello, Francieli Moro; Collares, Tiago; Barschak, Alethéa Gatto

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies report that chalcones exhibit cytotoxicity to human cancer cell lines. Typically, the form of cell death induced by these compounds is apoptosis. In the context of the discovery of new anticancer agents and in light of the antitumour potential of several chalcone derivatives, in the present study, we synthesized and tested the cytotoxicity of six chalcone derivatives on human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Six derivatives of 3-phenyl-1-(thiophen-2-yl) prop-2-en-1-one were prepared and characterized on the basis of their (1) H and (13) C NMR spectra. HT-29 cells were treated with synthesized chalcones on two concentrations by three different incubation times. Cells were evaluated by cell morphology, Tetrazolium dye (MTT) colorimetric assay, live/dead, flow cytometry (annexin V) and gene expression analyses to determine the cytotoxic way. Chalcones 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(thiophen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (C06) and 3-(2-nitrophenyl)-1-(thiophen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (C09) demonstrated higher cytotoxicity than other chalcones as shown by cell morphology, live/dead and MTT assays. In addition, C06 induced apoptosis on flow cytometry annexin V assay. These data were confirmed by a decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes and increased pro-apoptotic genes. Our findings indicate in summary that the cytotoxic activity of chalcone C06 on colorectal carcinoma cells occurs by apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Efficient Adenovirus Gene Transfer Methods in Human Colonic Caco-2 Epithelial Cells Using Capric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Naoya; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takamasa; Fujii, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used in gene therapy and in vitro/in vivo gene transfer. However, Ad-mediated gene transfer in epithelial cells shows low efficiency, because Ad fiber cannot bind to the primary receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), present in tight junctions. Caco-2 monolayer cells cultured on Transwell-chamber plates for approximately 2 weeks are widely used for drug membrane permeation studies, but Ad-mediated gene transfer is difficult in Caco-2 monolayer cells. First, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer into Caco-2 monolayer cells. Luciferase production in cultured Caco-2 cells transduced with Ad vectors was 20-fold lower on day 12 than on day 1. In contrast, the expression of CAR protein in Caco-2 cells gradually increased along with the duration of culture. For efficient gene transfer into Caco-2 monolayer cells, the binding ability of Ad vectors with CAR was found to be important. Capric acid (C10), a medium-chain fatty acid is a tight-junction modulator used as a pharmaceutical agent. We found that a novel gene transfer method using transduction with Ad vectors in the presence of C10 led more efficiently to LacZ expression in Caco-2 monolayer cells than Ad vectors alone. The results of the present study indicate that C10 could be very useful for Ad-mediated gene transfer in human colonic Caco-2 epithelial cells.

  11. Microbiota source impact in vitro metabolite colonic production and anti-proliferative effect of spent coffee grounds on human colon cancer cells (HT-29).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arriaga, Angélica María; Dave Oomah, B; Campos-Vega, Rocio

    2017-07-01

    Human gut flora-mediated non-digestible fraction of spent coffee grounds (hgf-NDSCG) was evaluated for its chemopreventive effect and molecular mechanisms involved on human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell survival using two different microbiota source [lean (L) and overweight (OW)]. The source of human gut flora (hgf) (L or OW) affected the pH of hgf-NDSCG only minimally, but linearly reduced those of hgf-inulin. The variability between lean and overweight microbiota was characterized by the metabolism and/or bioaccessibility of different phenolic metabolites, their intermediate and end products as well as by variable time courses. Apoptosis of colon cancer HT-29 cells depended on the microbiota source with the lean microbiota expressing a low lethal concentration 50 (LC50/L-hgf-NDSCG=13.5%). We demonstrate that NDSCG and its colonic metabolite from lean microbiota induced HT-29 cell apoptosis by reducing catalase and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α as biomarkers of in vivo oxidative stress as the primary mechanism underlying its overall chemoprotection against colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DHA-induced stress response in human colon cancer cells - Focus on oxidative stress and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Kristine; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Hakvåg Pettersen, Caroline Hild; Overland, Hilde Bremseth; Pettersen, Grete; Samdal, Helle; Tesfahun, Almaz Nigatu; Lundemo, Anne Gøril; Bjørkøy, Geir; Schønberg, Svanhild A

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important constituents of the diet and health benefits of omega-3/n-3 PUFAs, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) have been well documented in relation to several diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that n-3 PUFAs may have anticancer activity and improve the effect of conventional cancer therapy. The mechanisms behind these effects are still unclear and need to be elucidated. We have examined the DHA-induced stress response in two human colon cancer cell lines, SW620 and Caco-2. SW620 cells are growth-inhibited at early time points by DHA, while the growth of Caco-2 cells almost remains unaffected by the same treatment. Gene expression analysis of SW620 cells treated with DHA revealed changes at early time points; transcripts involved in oxidative stress and autophagy were among the first to be differentially expressed. We find that oxidative stress is induced in both cell lines, although at different time points and to different extent. DHA induced nuclear translocation of the oxidative stress sensor NFE2L2 in both cell lines, indicating an induction of an anti-oxidative response. However, vitamin E did not counteract ROS-production or the translocation of NFE2L2 to the nucleus. Neither vitamin E nor the antioxidants butylated hydoxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydoxytoluene (BHT) did affect the growth inhibition in SW620 cells after DHA-treatment. Also, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of NFE2L2 did not sensitize SW620 and Caco-2 cells to DHA. These results indicate that oxidative stress response is not the cause of DHA-induced cytotoxicity in SW620 cells. Using biochemical and imaging based functional assays, we found a low basal level of autophagy and no increase in autophagic flux after adding DHA to the SW620 cells. However, Caco-2 cells displayed a higher level of autophagy, both in the absence and presence of DHA. Inhibition of autophagy by siRNA mediated knock down

  13. Ketogenic HMGCS2 Is a c-Myc target gene expressed in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium and down-regulated in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Nuria; Mascaró, Cristina; Mayordomo, Cristina; Vilardell, Felip; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F

    2006-09-01

    HMGCS2, the gene that regulates ketone body production, is expressed in liver and several extrahepatic tissues, such as the colon. In CaCo-2 colonic epithelial cells, the expression of this gene increases with cell differentiation. Accordingly, immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies shows that HMGCS2 is expressed mainly in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium. Here, we used a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to study the molecular mechanism responsible for this expression pattern. The assay revealed that HMGCS2 is a direct target of c-Myc, which represses HMGCS2 transcriptional activity. c-Myc transrepression is mediated by blockade of the transactivating activity of Miz-1, which occurs mainly through a Sp1-binding site in the proximal promoter of the gene. Accordingly, the expression of human HMGCS2 is down-regulated in 90% of Myc-dependent colon and rectum tumors. HMGCS2 protein expression is down-regulated preferentially in moderately and poorly differentiated carcinomas. In addition, it is also down-regulated in 80% of small intestine Myc-independent tumors. Based on these findings, we propose that ketogenesis is an undesirable metabolic characteristic of the proliferating cell, which is down-regulated through c-Myc-mediated repression of the key metabolic gene HMGCS2.

  14. L-Ascorbic acid can abrogate SVCT-2-dependent cetuximab resistance mediated by mutant KRAS in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-A; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hong, Seung-Woo; Shin, Jae-Sik; Hwang, Ih Yeon; Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Kim, Seung-Mi; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon; Lee, Wang Jae

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer patients with mutant KRAS are resistant to cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is an effective clinical therapy for patients with wild-type KRAS. Numerous combinatorial therapies have been tested to overcome the resistance to cetuximab. However, no combinations have been found that can be used as effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that L-ascorbic acid partners with cetuximab to induce killing effects, which are influenced by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) in human colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS. L-Ascorbic acid treatment of human colon cancer cells that express a mutant KRAS differentially and synergistically induced cell death with cetuximab in a SVCT-2-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of SVCT-2 induced sensitivity to L-ascorbic acid treatment in human colon cancer cells that do not express SVCT-2, whereas the knockdown of endogenous SVCT-2 induced resistance to L-ascorbic acid treatment in SVCT-2-positive cells. Moreover, tumor regression via the administration of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab in mice bearing tumor cell xenografts corresponded to SVCT-2 protein levels. Interestingly, cell death induced by the combination of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. These cell death mechanisms were related to a disruption of the ERK pathway and were represented by the impaired activation of RAFs and the activation of the ASK-1-p38 pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that resistance to cetuximab in human colon cancer patients with a mutant KRAS can be bypassed by L-ascorbic acid in an SVCT-2-dependent manner. Furthermore, SVCT-2 in mutant KRAS colon cancer may act as a potent marker for potentiating L-ascorbic acid co-treatment with cetuximab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Lai

    Full Text Available Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus on the Growth of Human Colonic Carcinoma Cell Line HT-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhung-Yuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus cells and supernatants on the growth of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Our study results indicated that the PM153 strain exhibits the best adhesion ability and the highest survival in the gastrointestinal tract simulation experiment. Furthermore, after an 8-h co-culture of PM153 and HT-29 cells, the PM153 strain can induce the secretion of nitric oxide from the HT-29 cells. In addition, after the co-culture of the BCRC17010 strain (109 cfu/mL and HT-29 cells, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the HT-29 cells was 1.19, which showed a significant difference from the other control and LAB groups (p < 0.05, which therefore led to the inference that the BCRC17010 strain exerts a pro-apoptotic effect on the HT-29 cells. Upon co-culture with HT-29 cells for 4, 8 and 12 h, the BCRC14625 strain (109 cfu/mL demonstrated a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity (p < 0.05, causing harm to the HT-29 cell membrane; further, after an 8-h co-culture with the HT-29 cells, it induced the secretion of nitric oxide (NO from the HT-29 cells. Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains have ability to inhibit the growth of the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29 Bax/Bcl-2 pathway or NO production. In summary, we demonstrated that the BCRC17010 strain, good abilities of adhesion and increased LDH release, was the best probiotic potential for inhibition of HT-29 growth amongst the seven LAB strains tested in vitro.

  17. DTNQ-Pro, a Mimetic Dipeptide, Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells to 5-Fluorouracil Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gomez-Monterrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of growing human colon cancer cells to chemotherapy agents has been correlated to endogenous overexpression of stress proteins including the family of heat shock proteins (HSPs. Previously, we have demonstrated that a quinone-based mimetic dipeptide, named DTNQ-Pro, induced differentiation of growing Caco-2 cells through inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90. In addition, our product induced a HSP27 and vimentin intracellular redistribution. In the present study, we have evaluated whether a decrease of stress proteins induced by DTNQ-Pro in Caco-2 cells could sensitize these cells to treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU cytotoxicity. The pretreatment of Caco-2 with 500 nM of DTNQ-Pro increases lipid peroxidation and decreases expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and FOXO3a. At the same experimental conditions, an increase of the 5-FU-induced growth inhibition of Caco-2 cells was recorded. These effects could be due to enhanced DTNQ-Pro-induced membrane lipid peroxidation that, in turn, causes the sensitization of cancer cells to the cytotoxicity mediated by 5-FU.

  18. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  19. Antiproliferative Effects of Tetrabuthylammonium Chloride Ionic Liquid on HCT 8 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Dumitrescu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ionic liquids have attracted a great of attention in the scientific community due to their potential pharmaceutical such as antimicrobial. In this paper, the main objective was the assessment of the cytotoxic effect of tetrabutylammonium chloride against HCT 8 human colon carcinoma cell line. The cells were cultured in 75 cm2 culture flasks  using RPMI medium supplemented with 10% inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS, penicillin (100 IU/mL and streptomycin (100 μg/mL and maintained at 37 °C and 5% CO2. Before achieving viability test, the cells were harvested using trypsin solution (0.25%. Then, the cells were seeded in 24 – well plates at a density of 5 x 105 cells/mL in 100 µL medium/well in order to reach confluence. After 24 h, the medium was replaced with fresh medium containing different concentrations of ionic liquid, respectively, 0.085, 0.17, 0.34, 0.68 and 1.36 mg /mL. Control group contained cells without treatment. Cell proliferation kinetics have been studied at 24 and 48 h after IL treatment, following trypsinization and counting total cells per plate by using a Trypan blue dye and a hemocytometer. Data obtained from the growth kinetics assay shows that the tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC had an inhibitory effect on the growth of cells in a concentration dependent manner. The maximum inhibitory effect on HCT 8 cells it was obtained at 1.36 mg TBAC/mL.

  20. Laminarin Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer LOVO Cells through a Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many scientific studies have shown that laminarin has anti-tumor effects, but the anti-tumor mechanism was unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of laminarin on the induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer LOVO cells and the molecular mechanism involved. LOVO cells were treated with different concentrations of laminarin at different times. Morphology observations were performed to determine the effects of laminarin on apoptosis of LOVO cells. Flow cytometry (FCM was used to detect the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and pH. Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM was used to analyze intracellular calcium ion concentration, mitochondrion permeability transition pore (MPTP and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Western blotd were performed to analyze the expressions of Cyt-C, Caspase-9 and -3. The results showed the apoptosis morphology, which showed cell protuberance, concentrated cytoplasm and apoptotic bodies, was obvious after 72 h treatment. Laminarin treatment for 24 h increased the intracellular level of ROS and Ca2+; decreased pH value; activated intracellular MPTP and decreased MMP in dose-dependent manners. It also induced the release of Cyt-C and the activation of Caspase-9 and -3. In conclusion, laminarin induces LOVO cell apoptosis through a mitochondrial pathway, suggesting that it could be a potent agent for cancer prevention and treatment.

  1. A Potential Daidzein Derivative Enhances Cytotoxicity of Epirubicin on Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Lo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the effects of 8-hydroxydaidzein (8HD, an isoflavone isolated from fermented soy germ koji, and epirubicin (Epi, an antineoplastic agent, on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. We subsequently correlated the ROS levels to the anticancer mechanisms of Epi and 8HD in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. 8HD enhanced cytotoxicity of Epi and generated a synergistic effect. Epi and/or 8HD treatments increased the hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels. Combined treatment markedly decreased mRNA expression levels of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2. 8HD significantly intensified Epi intracellular accumulation in Caco-2 cells. 8HD and/or Epi-induced apoptosis, as indicated by the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased sub-G1 phase in cell cycle. Moreover, 8HD and Epi significantly enhanced the mRNA expressions of Bax, p53, caspases-3, -8, and -9. To our best knowledge, this study verifies for the first time that 8HD effectively circumvents MDR in Caco-2 cells through the ROS-dependent inhibition of efflux transporters and p53-mediated activation of both death receptor and mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Our findings of 8HD shed light on the future search for potential biotransformed isoflavones to intensify the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs through simultaneous reversal of pump and nonpump resistance.

  2. Euphorbia Species-derived Diterpenes and Coumarins as Multidrug Resistance Modulators in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Jerzy; Wesołowska, Olga; Środa-Pomianek, Kamila; Paprocka, Maria; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Duarte, Noelia; Ferreira, Maria-José U; Duś, Danuta; Michalak, Krystyna

    2016-05-01

    Recently, many new potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agents have been discovered, among them lathyrane and jatrophane diterpenes isolated from various Euphorbia species. In the present study, the cytotoxicity, P-glycoprotein inhibition activity, and MDR reversal potency of six diterpenes and two coumarins from two Euphorbia species were studied in human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, and doxorubicin-resistant, LoVo/Dx cells. Cytotoxicity of the studied compounds (alone and in combination with doxorubicin) was investigated. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein transport activity was monitored by flow cytometry. Changes in intracellular doxorubicin accumulation were observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. Latilagascene B was demonstrated to be an effective P-glycoprotein inhibitor, able to increase doxorubicin accumulation in resistant cells, however not able to restore doxorubicin cytotoxicity in LoVo/Dx cells. The structure of latilagascene B seems to be an interesting candidate for further synthesis of new derivatives of reduced cytotoxicity and high anti-MDR potency. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Down-regulation of liver-intestine cadherin enhances noscapine-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xia; Liu, Meng; Zhu, Qingxi; Tan, Jie; Liu, Weijie; Wang, Yanfen; Chen, Wei; Zou, Yanli; Cai, Yishan; Han, Zheng; Huang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathway of noscapine which induces apoptosis by blocking liver-intestine cadherin (CDH17) gene in colon cancer SW480 cells. Human colon cancer SW480 cells were transfected with CDH17 interference vector and treatment with 10 µmol/L noscapine. The proliferation and apoptosis of SW480 cells were detected by MTT assay and AnnexinV-FITC/PI flow cytometry kit (BD), respectively. Cell invasion were assessed by transwell assays. Apoptosis related proteins (Cyt-c, Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) levels were evaluated by western blot. Compared to the noscapine group, the proliferation was decreased significantly and the apoptosis was increased significantly in SW480 cells of the siCDH17+noscapine group. Cyt-c and Bax protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group was higher than that of the noscapine group, but Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group were lower than that of the noscapine group. Moreover, up-expression of CDH17 inhibited the efficacy of noscapine-induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. We inferred that down-expression of extrinsic CDH17 gene can conspicuously promote apoptosis-inducing effects of noscapine on human colon cancer SW480 cells, which is a novel strategy to improve chemotherapeutic effects on colon cancer.

  4. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  5. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  6. Antiproliferative effect of chitosan-added kimchi in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang-Suk; Bahn, Young-Eun; Kim, Boh-Kyung; Lee, Kang-Yoon; Park, Kun-Young

    2010-02-01

    The anticancer effects of chitosan-added kimchi were investigated by using an in vitro cellular system with HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells. Two different kinds of chitosan-soluble chitosan with a 90% degree of deacetylation and 3 cps viscosity and nonsoluble chitosan with a 95% degree of deacetylation and 22 cps viscosity-were used as sub-ingredients to increase anticancer effects of kimchi. The soluble chitosan-added kimchi (SK) and nonsoluble chitosan-added kimchi (NK) were stronger growth inhibitors in HT-29 cells than the control kimchi (CK) according to the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and the growth inhibition test. Treatment with SK and NK induced apoptosis, as determined by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and resulted in the up-regulation of Bax expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2, cIAP-1, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-2, cyclooxygenase-2, inhibitory nitric oxide synthase, and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) expressions when compared to CK. The antiproliferative and anti-apoptotic effects appeared to be more pronounced in the cells treated with NK. The antiproliferative effects of the chitosan-added kimchi appeared to be associated with the induction of apoptosis through NF-kappaB or an NF-kappaB-dependent pathway. These results suggest that chitosan has potential to be a valuable active ingredient in functional kimchi products with anticancer effects.

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles activate IL8-related inflammatory pathways in human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Kristin; Cossais, François; Neve, Horst; Klempt, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are widely used as food additive or coating material in products of the food and pharmaceutical industry. Studies on various cell lines have shown that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) induced the inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. However, the influences of TiO2 NPs' exposure on inflammatory pathways in intestinal epithelial cells and their differentiation have not been investigated so far. This study demonstrates that TiO2 NPs with particle sizes ranging between 5 and 10 nm do not affect enterocyte differentiation but cause an activation of inflammatory pathways in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. 5 and 10 nm NPs' exposures transiently induce the expression of ICAM1, CCL20, COX2 and IL8, as determined by quantitative PCR, whereas larger particles (490 nm) do not. Further, using nuclear factor (NF)-κB reporter gene assays, we show that NP-induced IL8 mRNA expression occurs, in part, through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  8. Sulforaphane inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression and migration of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Im, Eunok; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-12-01

    The effects of sulforaphane (a natural product commonly found in broccoli) was investigated on hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in HCT116 human colon cancer cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells. We found that hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein expression in HCT116 and AGS cells, while treatment with sulforaphane markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited HIF-1α expression in both cell lines. Treatment with sulforaphane inhibited hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCT116 cells. Treatment with sulforaphane modulated the effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α stability. However, degradation of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through the 26S proteasome pathway. We also found that the inhibition of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation under hypoxic conditions. Finally, hypoxia-induced HCT116 cell migration was inhibited by sulforaphane. These data suggest that sulforaphane may inhibit human colon cancer progression and cancer cell angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Taken together, these results indicate that sulforaphane is a new and potent chemopreventive drug candidate for treating patients with human colon cancer.

  9. In vitro effects of extracts of extra virgin olive oil on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Mavilia, Carmelo; Fabbri, Sergio; Romani, Annalisa; Ieri, Francesca; Tanini, Annalisa; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and some types of cancer. Recent interest has been focused on the biological activity of phenolic compounds present in extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that EVOO components have positive effects on metabolic parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet function, and antimicrobial activity. We have investigated the possible interactions between 2 extracts of extra virgin olive oil and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in an in vitro model of colon cancer. The qualification and quantification of the components of the 2 samples tested showed that phenolic compounds-hydroxytyrosol, secoiridoids, and lignans-are the major represented compounds. EVOO extracts were tested on a colon cancer cell line engineered to overexpress ERβ (HCT8-β8). By using custom made Oligo microarray, gene expression profiles of colon cancer cells challenged with EVOO-T extracts when compared with those of cells exposed to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2). This study demonstrated that the EVOO extracts tested showed an antiproliferative effect on colon cancer cells through the interaction with estrogen-dependent signals involved in tumor cell growth. Specifically, the ability of EVOO extracts to inhibit cell proliferation was superimposable to the activation of the ERβ receptor, similar to what was observed after 17β-E2 challenge.

  10. Interactions of cisplatin and the copper transporter CTR1 in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerfeldt, Mia C; Tran, Carmen M-N; Shen, Clara; Hambley, Trevor W; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-07-01

    There is much interest in understanding the mechanisms by which platinum-based anticancer agents enter cells, and the copper transporter CTR1 has been the focus of many recent studies. While there is a clinical correlation between CTR1 levels and platinum efficacy, cellular studies have provided conflicting evidence relating to the relationship between cisplatin and CTR1. We report here our studies of the relationship between cisplatin and copper homeostasis in human colon cancer cells. While the accumulation of copper and platinum do not appear to compete with each other, we did observe that cisplatin perturbs CTR1 distribution within 10 min, a far shorter incubation time than commonly employed in cellular studies of cisplatin. Furthermore, on these short time-scales, cisplatin caused an increase in the cytoplasmic labile copper pool. While the predominant focus of studies to date has been on CTR1, these studies highlight the importance of investigating the interaction of cisplatin with other copper proteins.

  11. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  12. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  13. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  14. Lectins from the Red Marine Algal Species Bryothamnion seaforthii and Bryothamnion triquetrum as Tools to Differentiate Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente P. T. Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbohydrate-binding activity of the algal lectins from the closely related red marine algal species Bryothamnion triquetrum (BTL and Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL was used to differentiate human colon carcinoma cell variants with respect to their cell membrane glyco-receptors. These lectins interacted with the cells tested in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the fluorescence spectra of both lectins clearly differentiated the cells used as shown by FACS profiles. Furthermore, as observed by confocal microscopy, BTL and BSL bound to cell surface glycoproteins underwent intense internalization, which makes them possible tools in targeting strategies.

  15. High expression of the DNA methyltransferase gene characterizes human neoplastic cells and progression stages of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Deiry, W.S.; Nelkin, B.D.; Celano, P.; Ray-Whay Chiu Yen; Falco, J.P.; Hamilton, S.R.; Baylin, S.B. (Johns Hopkins Medical Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1991-04-15

    DNA methylation abnormalities occur consistently in human neoplasia including widespread hypomethylation and more recently recognized local increases in DNA methylation that hold potential for gene inactivation events. To study this imbalance further, the authors have localized to chromosome 19 a portion of the human DNA methyltransferase gene that codes for the enzyme catalyzing DNA methylation. Expression of this gene is low in normal human cells, significantly increased (30- to 50-fold by PCR analysis) in virally transformed cells, and strikingly elevated in human cancer cells (several hundredfold). In comparison to colon mucosa from patients without neoplasia, median levels of DNA methyltransferase transcripts are 15-fold increased in histologically normal mucosa from patients with cancers or the benign polyps that can precede cancers, 60-fold increased in the premalignant polyps, and >200-fold increased in the cancers. Thus, increases in DNA methyltransferase gene expression precede development of colonic neoplasia and continue during progression of colonic neoplasms. These increases may play a role in the genetic instability of cancer and mark early events in cell transformation.

  16. HPV16-E7 Expression Causes Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated Radiosensitization in SW620 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Axelson

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that HT29 colon cancer cells, which are radiosensitized by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd, exhibit a greater increase in cyclin E—dependent kinase activity and progress further into S phase in the presence of FdUrd than do SW620 colon cancer cells, which are only minimally sensitized by this drug (Cancer Res 56: 3203, 1996. Although these findings suggested that the ability to progress into S phase in the presence of FdUrd permits cells to be radiosensitized, we wished to test this hypothesis by attempting to drive SW620 human colon cells into S phase by transducing them with the HPV16-E7 gene. Two-parameter flow cytometry showed that E7-transduced cells progressed through S phase after radiation and FdUrd treatment more rapidly than SW620 parental cells. We found that E7-transduced SW620 cells were significantly radiosensitized by FdUrd (100 nmol/L, 14 hours with an enhancement ratio for 2 clones of 1.47±0.03 and 1.51±0.14, compared with 1.24±0.04 in SW620 parental cells. These data strongly support the hypothesis that dysregulation of S-phase progression is an important factor in FdUrd-mediated radiosensitization.

  17. The Cinnamon-derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T.; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Bause, Alexandra S.; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Donna D.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA), the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE) prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC), CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit). CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:20657484

  18. The Cinnamon-Derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Thomas Wondrak

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA, the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29 and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC, CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit. CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis.

  19. Anticancer effect of dentatin and dentatin-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex on human colon cancer (HT-29) cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Abboodi, Ashwaq Shakir; Rasedee, Abdullah; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Alkaby, Wafaa Abd Alwahed; Ghaji, Mostafa Saddam; Waziri, Peter M; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dentatin (DEN) (5-methoxy-2, 2-dimethyl-10-(1, 1-dimethyl-2propenyl) dipyran-2-one), a natural compound present in the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f, possesses pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects in various cancer cells. Because of its hydrophobicity, it is believed that its complexation with hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) will make it a potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth. In the current work, the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex were demonstrated in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. Materials and methods After the human colon HT-29 cancer cells were treated with DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex, their effects on the expression of apoptotic-regulated gene markers in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic and death receptor pathways were detected by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These markers included caspases-9, 3, and 8, cytochrome c, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, p21, cyclin A as well as the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Results At 3, 6, 12, and 24 µg/mL exposure, DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex significantly affected apoptosis in HT-29 cells through the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and cyclin A in turn, and up-regulation of Bax, p53, p21, cytochrome c at both protein and mRNA levels. DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex also decreased cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and induced caspases-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion Results of this study indicate that the apoptotic pathway caused by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex are mediated by the regulation of caspases and Bcl-2 families in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. The results also suggest that DEN-HPβCD complex may have chemotherapeutic benefits for colon cancer patients. PMID:29200826

  20. Characterizations of irofulven cytotoxicity in combination with cisplatin and oxaliplatin in human colon, breast, and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, Maria; Calvo, Fabien; Lokiec, François; Koeppel, Florence; Poindessous, Virginie; Larsen, Annette K; Laar, Emily S Van; Waters, Stephen J; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Raymond, Eric

    2006-04-01

    This study assessed the cytotoxic effects of irofulven in combination with oxaliplatin and cisplatin in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Growth inhibition studies were performed using the human HT29 colon cancer cell line, irofulven-resistant derivative HT29/IF2, breast cancer cell line MCF7, and ovarian cancer line CAOV3. Irofulven-oxaliplatin combinations were compared with irofulven-cisplatin combinations in the same cell lines using similar experimental settings. Cells were exposed for 1 h to irofulven and then for 24 h to oxaliplatin or cisplatin and vice versa. Single agent irofulven displayed cytotoxic effects against human colon HT29 cells, human breast cancer cell lines including MCF7, SKBR3, and ZR-75-1, and human ovarian cancer cell lines CAOV3, OVCAR3, and IGROV1, with OVCAR3 being the most sensitive cancer cell line (IC50: 2.4 microM). In all tested cell lines the oxaliplatin-irofulven combination led to clear evidence of synergistic activity. In HT29 and HT29/IF2, the sequence oxaliplatin followed by irofulven appears to be the most effective whereas in MCF7 cells, irofulven given prior to or simultaneously with oxaliplatin is more effective than the other schedule. The combination displays additive activity toward CAOV3 ovarian cells when irofulven was administered prior to or simultaneously with oxaliplatin and partially synergistic when oxaliplatin was followed by irofulven. In most of the cell lines, the sequence oxaliplatin followed by irofulven appears to be the most effective as compared to other schedules. A combination of irofulven with cisplatin has the same efficacy as with oxaliplatin for the same cell lines. Cell cycle studies show that irofulven increases the proportion of cells in the S phase. Cisplatin-irofulven and oxaliplatin-irofulven combinations block cells in G1/S and potently induce apoptosis. Irofulven displays synergistic antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects when combined with oxaliplatin over a broad range of

  1. A bipartite butyrate-responsive element in the human calretinin (CALB2) promoter acts as a repressor in colon carcinoma cells but not in mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häner, Katrin; Henzi, Thomas; Pfefferli, Martine; Künzli, Esther; Salicio, Valerie; Schwaller, Beat

    2010-02-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate plays an essential role in colonic mucosa homeostasis through the capacity to block the cell cycle, regulate differentiation and to induce apoptosis. The beneficial effect of dietary fibers on preventing colon cancer is essentially mediated through butyrate, derived from luminal fermentation of fibers by intestinal bacteria. In epithelial cells of the colon, both in normal and colon cancer cells, the expression of several genes is positively or negatively regulated by butyrate likely through modulation of histone acetylation and thereby affecting the transcriptional activity of genes. Calretinin (CALB2) is a member of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins and is expressed in a majority of poorly differentiated colon carcinoma and additionally in mesothelioma of the epithelioid and mixed type. Since CALB2 is one of the genes negatively regulated by butyrate in colon cancer cells and butyrate decreases calretinin protein expression levels in those cells, we investigated whether expression is regulated via putative butyrate-responsive elements (BRE) in the human CALB2 promoter. We identified two elements that act as butyrate-sensitive repressors in all colon cancer cell lines tested (CaCo-2, HT-29, Co-115/3). In contrast, in cells of mesothelial origin, MeT-5A and ZL34, the same two elements do not operate as butyrate-sensitive repressors and calretinin expression levels are insensitive to butyrate indicative of cell type-specific regulation of the CALB2 promoter. Calretinin expression in colon cancer cells is negatively regulated by butyrate via a bipartite BRE flanking the TATA box and this may be linked to butyrate's chemopreventive activity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Nano-engineering of biomedical prednisolone liposomes: evaluation of the cytotoxic effect on human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Cristina; Arias, José L; Cabeza, Laura; Ortiz, Raúl; Prados, José C; Melguizo, Consolación; Delgado, Ángel V; Clares-Naveros, Beatriz

    2018-01-30

    Liposomes have attracted the attention of researchers due to their potential to act as drug delivery systems for cancer treatment. The present investigation aimed to develop liposomes loaded with prednisolone base and the evaluation of the antiproliferative effect on human colon carcinoma cell lines. Liposomes were elaborated by following a reproducible thin film hydration technique. The physicochemical characterization of liposomes included photon correlation spectroscopy, microscopy analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, rheological behaviour and electrophoresis. On the basis of these data and drug loading values, the best formulation was selected. Stability and drug release properties were also tested. Resulting liposomes exhibited optimal physicochemical and stability properties, an excellent haemocompatibility and direct antiproliferative effect on human colon carcinoma T-84 cell lines. This study shows direct antitumour effect of prednisolone liposomal formulation, which opens the door for liposomal glucocorticoids as novel antitumour agents. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Subcellular distribution and expression of cofilin and ezrin in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nowak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated by a number of actin binding proteins (ABPs. Four human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines – parental and three selected sublines, which differ in motility and metastatic potential, were used to investigate the expression level and subcellular localization of selected ABPs. Our interest was focused on cofilin and ezrin. These proteins are essential for cell migration and adhesion. The data received for the three more motile adenocarcinoma sublines (EB3, 3LNLN, 5W were compared with those obtained for the parental LS180 adenocarcinoma cells and fibroblastic NRK cells. Quantitative densitometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the expression levels and subcellular distribution of the selected ABPs. Our data show distinct increase in the level of cofilin in adenocarcinoma cells accompanied by the reduction of inactive phosphorylated form of cofilin. In more motile cells, cofilin was accumulated at cellular periphery in co-localization with actin filaments. Furthemore, we indicated translocation of ezrin towards the cell periphery within more motile cells in comparison with NRK and parental adenocarcinoma cells. In summary, our data indicate the correlation between migration ability of selected human colon adenocarcinoma sublines and subcellular distribution as well as the level of cofilin and ezrin. Therefore these proteins might be essential for the higher migratory activity of invasive tumor cells.

  4. CELLULAR BASIS FOR DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY TO CISPLATIN IN HUMAN GERM-CELL TUMOR AND COLON-CARCINOMA CELL-LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARK, MWJ; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; MEIJER, C; UGES, DRA; SLUITER, WJ; PETERS, WHM; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance mechanisms were studied in a model of three germ cell tumour and three colon carcinoma cell lines representing intrinsically CDDP-sensitive and -resistant tumours respectively. The CDDP sensitivity of the cell lines mimicked the clinical situation. The glutathione levels

  5. miR-320 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro by targeting FOXM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Lu-Ying; Deng, Jun; Xiang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Ling; Yu, Feng; Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhe; Feng, Miao; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • miR-320 plays a significant role in chemoresistance. • This role might be attribute to targeting FOXM1. • The Wnt/β-catenin pathway also involves in this chemotherapy sensitivity. - Abstract: miR-320 expression level is found to be down-regulated in human colon cancer. To date, however, its underlying mechanisms in the chemo-resistance remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-320 led to inhibit HCT-116 cell proliferation, invasion and hypersensitivity to 5-Fu and Oxaliplatin. Also, knockdown of miR-320 reversed these effects in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, we identified an oncogene, FOXM1, as a direct target of miR-320. In addition, miR-320 could inactive the activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Finally, we found that miR-320 and FOXM1 protein had a negative correlation in colon cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. These findings implied that miR-320–FOXM1 axis may overcome chemo-resistance of colon cancer cells and provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer.

  6. Antioxidant activity and growth inhibition of human colon cancer cells by crude and purified fucoidan preparations extracted from Sargassum cristaefolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides, also termed “fucoidans”, which are known to possess antioxidant, anticoagulant, anticancer, antiviral, and immunomodulating properties, are normally isolated from brown algae via various extraction techniques. In the present study, two methods (SC1 and SC2 for isolation of fucoidan from Sargassum cristaefolium were compared, with regard to the extraction yields, antioxidant activity, and inhibition of growth of human colon cancer cells exhibited by the respective extracts. SC1 and SC2 differ in the number of extraction steps and concentration of ethanol used, as well as the obtained sulfated polysaccharide extracts, namely, crude fucoidan preparation (CFP and purified fucoidan preparation (PFP, respectively. Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared analysis, and measurements of fucose and sulfate contents revealed that the extracts were fucoidan. There was a higher extraction yield for CFP, which contained less fucose and sulfate but more uronic acid, and had weaker antioxidant activity and inhibition of growth in human colon cancer cells. In contrast, there was a lower extraction yield for PFP, which contained more fucose and sulfate but less uronic acid, and had stronger antioxidant activity and inhibition of growth in human colon cancer cells. Thus, since the difference in bioactive activities between CFP and PFP was not remarkable, the high extraction yield of SC1 might be favored as a method in industrial usage for extracting fucoidan.

  7. Normalizing genes for quantitative RT-PCR in differentiating human intestinal epithelial cells and adenocarcinomas of the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydensborg, Anders Bondo; Herring, Elizabeth; Auclair, Joëlle; Tremblay, Eric; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-05-01

    As for other mRNA measurement methods, quantitative RT-PCR results need to be normalized relative to stably expressed genes. Widely used normalizing genes include beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It has, however, become clear that these and other normalizing genes can display modulated patterns of expression across tissue types and during complex cellular processes such as cell differentiation and cancer progression. Our objective was to set the basis for identifying normalizing genes that displayed stable expression during enterocytic differentiation and between healthy tissue and adenocarcinomas of the human colon. We thus identified novel potential normalizing genes using previously generated cDNA microarray data and examined the alterations of expression of two of these genes as well as seven commonly used normalizing genes during the enterocytic differentiation process and between matched pairs of resection margins and primary carcinomas of the human colon using real-time RT-PCR. We found that ribosomal phosphoprotein P0 was particularly stable in all intestinal epithelial cell extracts, thereby representing a particularly robust housekeeping reference gene for the assessment of gene expression during the human enterocytic differentiation process. On the other hand, beta-2-microglobulin generated the best score as a normalizing gene for comparing human colon primary carcinomas with their corresponding normal mucosa of the resection margin, although others were found to represent acceptable alternatives. In conclusion, we identified and characterized specific normalizing genes that should significantly improve quantitative mRNA studies related to both the differentiation process of the human intestinal epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the human colon. This approach should also be useful to validate normalizing genes in other intestinal contexts.

  8. Cytotoxic activity of two natural sesquiterpene lactones, isobutyroylplenolin and arnicolide D, on human colon cancer cell line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuedan; Awano, Yurika; Maeda, Eri; Asada, Yoshihisa; Takemoto, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Takashi; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we found that two sesquiterpene lactones, isobutyroylplenolin and arnicolide D, from Centipeda minima L. (Compositae) exerted stronger cytotoxic activity than cisplatin on the human colon carcinoma HT-29 cell line. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of these two compounds on normal cells was weaker than that of cisplatin. Treatment with isobutyroylplenolin and arnicolide D increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and decreased the levels of nuclear factor-κB protein, resulting in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis. We also discuss the difference in structure and activity between these two compounds.

  9. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  10. Cytotoxicity effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss. on two human colon carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharififar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Natural products are one of the major sources for investigations of novel medicines. Zataria multiflora Boiss (ZM has shown pharmacological activities especially in gastrointestinal tract; however, there are limited studies about its cytotoxicity effects. In this study, the effect of Zataria multiflora was examined on two colon cancer cell lines (SW-48 and HT-29. Methods: Hydro-alcoholic extract of ZM and its fractions including chloroform, petroleum ether and methanol extract were prepared by warm maceration method. Different concentrations were prepared and examined on SW-48 and HT-29 cell lines using 2-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl 2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results: The results of the present study have shown the cytotoxic effect of some fractions of ZM. The most considerable cytotoxic effect was shown against HT-29 cell line. Also, total ZM extract and the petroleum ether fraction demonstrated cytotoxic effects with IC50 values of 44.22 and 33.42 µg/ml on SW-48 and HT-29 cell lines, respectively. Conclusion: Zataria multiflora was cytotoxic to against colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and SW-48.

  11. Delineating the effect of demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine on human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiumei; Qin, Bingzhao; Liu, B O

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic changes are known to contribute to various phases of tumor development. The gene function loss caused by aberrant methylation is analogous to genetic mutations. Unlike genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations can be reversed. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as MDS and leukemia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-aza-CdR has the potential to be used in the treatment of colon cancer using a human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cell line. The effect of 5-aza-CdR on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and reversal of aberrant methylation of the Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A) gene was also examined. The 5-aza-CdR was prepared at different concentrations in sterile tri-distilled water at 0.4, 1.6, 6.4, 25.6 and 102.4 µmol/l and employed to treat the human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cells. An MTT assay was used to detect the effect of 5-aza-CdR on cell proliferation. Flow cytometry was used to examine the cell cycle and apoptosis. The RASSF1A mRNA transcript level was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that 5-aza-CdR inhibited the proliferation of Caco-2 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (pCaco-2 cells. In conclusion, 5-aza-CdR inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by upregulating the epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor RASSF1A gene.

  12. Cyclic AMP-independent secretion of mucin by SW1116 human colon carcinoma cells. Differential control by Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yedgar, S; Eidelman, O; Malden, E; Roberts, D; Etcheberrigaray, R; Goping, G; Fox, C; Pollard, H B

    1992-01-01

    The regulation of mucin secretion by SW1116 human colon carcinoma cells has been studied using monoclonal antibody 19-9, which has previously been used to detect mucin in the serum of cancer and cystic fibrosis patients...

  13. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis of HT-29 human colon cancer cells via the regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-9-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Sik; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Taek Rim; Kim, Hyung Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sanguinarine is an alkaloid obtained from the bloodroot plant Sanguinaria canadensis and has beneficial effects on oxidative stress and inflammatory disorders. Previous reports have demonstrated that sanguinarine also exhibit anticancer properties. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sanguinarine on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. It was observed that sanguinarine treatment induces a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis of human colon cancer cells. We also investigated the effects of sanguinarine on the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, and the results revealed that there was an increase in Bax and a decrease in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein levels. Moreover, sanguinarine treatment significantly increases the activation of caspases 3 and 9 that are the key executioners in apoptosis. Our results suggest that sanguinarine induces apoptosis of HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may have a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of human colon cancer.

  14. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Stimulate Angiopoietin-Like 4 Synthesis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells by Activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alex, Sheril; Lange, Katja; Amolo, Tom

    2013-01-01

    with the notion that fermentation leads to PPAR activation in vivo, feeding mice a diet rich in inulin induced PPAR target genes and pathways in the colon. We conclude that (i) SCFA potently stimulate ANGPTL4 synthesis in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and (ii) SCFA transactivate and bind to PPARγ. Our data...

  15. Gossypol sensitizes the antitumor activity of 5-FU through down-regulation of thymidylate synthase in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Qu, Jinglei; Qu, Xiujuan; Cao, Yubo; Xu, Ling; Hou, Kezuo; Feng, Wanyu; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the basic chemotherapeutic agent used to treat colon cancer. However, the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to 5-FU is limited. Gossypol is a polyphenolic extract of cottonseeds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activities and related mechanism of gossypol alone or in combination with 5-FU against human colon carcinoma cells. The IC50 of gossypol or/and 5-FU in vitro was tested by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the drug interaction was analyzed using the CalcuSyn method. Cell apoptosis was determined using presidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of proteins. Transient transfection method was used to silence protein. The IC₅₀ at 48 h of gossypol in colon cancer cells was 26.11 ± 1.04 μmol/L in HT-29 cells, 14.11 ± 1.08 μmol/L in HCT116 cells, and 21.83 ± 1.05 μmol/L in RKO cells. When gossypol was combined with 5-FU, a synergistic cytotoxic effect was observed in HT-29 cells, HCT116 cells, and RKO cells compared with treatment with gossypol or 5-FU alone. The Western blotting results indicated that gossypol down-regulated thymidylate synthase (TS) rather than thymidine phosphorylase protein expression. Furthermore, the mTOR/p70S6K1 signaling pathway was inhibited in gossypol-treated colon cancer cells, and consequently, cyclin D1 expression was decreased, suggesting an additional mechanism of the observed antiproliferative synergistic interactions. All the observation was confirmed by silencing TS and inactivating the mTOR/p70S6K1 signaling pathway by rapamycin, both of which increased the chemo-sensitizing efficacy of 5-FU. These findings suggest that gossypol-mediated down-regulation of TS, cyclin D1, and the mTOR/p70S6K1 signaling pathways enhances the anti-tumor effect of 5-FU. Ultimately, our data exposed a new action for gossypol as an enhancer of 5-FU-induced cell growth suppression.

  16. Cyclic AMP-dependent secretion of Ca 19-9 by LS174T human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Maria; Terracciano, Daniela; Di Carlo, Angelina; Mariano, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in culture medium of a human colon cancer cell (LS174T) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates Ca 19-9 expression. The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by forskolin an agent acting at the level of cAMP generation. Both these agents in a range of concentration between 10(-3)-10(-5) M have an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in Ca 19-9 expression was observed and it appears that cyclic nucleotides have at least two effects: the first to cause rapid release of already synthesized Ca 19-9 and second to stimulate new antigen synthesis. The findings of the present study demonstrated that LS174T cells are unable to proliferate upon sustained accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP suggesting the use of strategies able to increase cAMP levels for therapy of colon cancer. Furthermore, the finding that cAMP may also be a regulator of Ca 19-9 synthesis and release indicates the utility of cell line LS174T as a model for studies on the mechanism of synthesis and secretion of specific tumoral markers in colon cancer.

  17. Arsenic trioxide causes redistribution of cell cycle, caspase activation, and GADD expression in human colonic, breast, and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinquan; Ding, Xianzhong; Adrian, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is valuable for treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, but less attention has been paid to its therapeutic potential for other cancers. In this study, the effects of arsenic trioxide were tested in human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colonic (HT-29), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. In all three cancer cell lines, arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation and cell counting. Coincident with inhibition of growth, arsenic trioxide induced marked morphologic changes, including reduced cytoplasmic volume, membrane blebbing, and nuclear condensation consistent with apoptosis. Propidium iodide DNA staining at 24 hours revealed cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and an increase in the S phase, while at 72 hr there was G2/M phase arrest with a marked increase in the sub-G0/G1, apoptotic cell population. The DNA fragmentation induced by arsenic trioxide was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay in all cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed activation of caspase -3, -7, and -9 by arsenic trioxide. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by demonstrating cleavage of its downstream target, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Expression of the antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2, was time-dependently decreased. In contrast, arsenic trioxide markedly enhanced the expression of the p21 protein, GADD45 and GADD153, in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that arsenic trioxide has potential as a therapeutic agent for these cancers.

  18. Curcumin conjugated with PLGA potentiates sustainability, anti-proliferative activity and apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav N Waghela

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, exhibits a variety of biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-metastatic. It is a highly pleiotropic molecule that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Despite its imperative biological activities, chemical instability, photo-instability and poor bioavailability limits its utilization as an effective therapeutic agent. Therefore, enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin may improve its therapeutic index for clinical setting. In the present study, we have conjugated curcumin with a biodegradable polymer Poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid and evaluated its apoptotic potential in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116. The results show that curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently inhibits cell proliferation and cell survival in human colon carcinoma cells as compared to native curcumin. Additionally, curcumin conjugated with PLGA shows improved cellular uptake and exhibits controlled release at physiological pH as compared to native curcumin. The curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently activates the cascade of caspases and promotes intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, the results suggest that conjugation potentiates the sustainability, anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of curcumin. This approach could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic index of cancer therapy.

  19. Apple polyphenols affect protein kinase C activity and the onset of apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Balavenkatraman, Kamal Kumar; Böhmer, Frank D; Marko, Doris

    2007-06-27

    Polyphenol-rich apple extracts have been reported to suppress human colon cancer cell growth in vitro. The protein kinase C (PKC) is among the signaling elements known to play an important role in colon carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether apple polyphenols affect PKC activity and induce apoptosis in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. A polyphenol-rich apple juice extract (AE02) was shown to inhibit cytosolic PKC activity in a cell-free system. In contrast, incubation of HT29 cells for 1 or 3 h with AE02 up to 2 mg/mL did not affect the cytosolic PKC activity. After prolonged incubation (24 h), cytosolic PKC activity was modulated, albeit a u-shaped curve of effectiveness was observed, with an initial inhibitory effect followed by the recurrence and even induction of enzyme activity. Concomitantly, in the cytosol, a significant decrease of the protein levels of PKCalpha, PKCbetaII, and PKCgamma together with a significant increase of a proapoptotic PKCdelta fragment was observed. However, the effects on the protein levels of these PKC isoforms in the cytosol were not associated with translocation between the different cellular compartments but might instead result from the onset of apoptosis. Indeed, the treatment with AE02 was shown to induce apoptosis by the activation of caspase-3, DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase. So far, identified and available constituents of the apple extract did not contribute substantially to the observed effects on PKC and apoptosis induction. In summary, apple polyphenols were found to inhibit PKC activity in a cell-free system. However, our results indicate that within intact cells PKC does not represent the primary target of apple polyphenols but appears to be affected in the course of apoptosis induction.

  20. [10]-Gingerol induces mitochondrial apoptosis through activation of MAPK pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Min Ju; Chung, Ha Sook

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of [10]-gingerol activity against HCT116 human colon cancer cells. [10]-Gingerol inhibited the proliferation of HCT116 cells by 50% at a concentration of 30 μM, and this inhibition was dose-dependent accompanied by the morphological changes indicative of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis showed that [10]-gingerol increased DNA in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, and the extent of apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin V and PI double staining. Analysis of the mechanism of these events indicated that [10]-gingerol-treated cells exhibited an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, resulting in the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in a dose-dependent manner, which are hallmarks of apoptosis. Moreover, [10]-gingerol-induced apoptosis was accompanied by phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) family, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 MAPK (p38), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). This is the first report to demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of [10]-gingerol on human colon cancer cells, as well as the first to describe its possible chemotherapeutic potentials.

  1. Metabolic effects of novel N-1-sulfonylpyrimidine derivatives on human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavas-Obrovac, Ljubica; Karner, Ivan; Stefanić, Mario; Kasnar-Samprec, Jelena; Zinić, Biserka

    2005-01-01

    Novel N-1-sulfonylpyrimidine derivatives have a strong antiproliferative activity and an ability to induce apoptosis in treated tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of two N-1-sulfonylpyrimidine nucleobases on catalytic activity of tumor cells' enzymes involved in DNA and RNA synthesis, and in de novo and salvage pyrimidine and purine syntheses. Investigations were performed in vitro on colon carcinoma cells (Caco2). The biosynthetic activity of the tumor cells' enzymes was determined using sensitive radio-assays. Enzyme activity in treated cells was calculated relative to untreated control cells. Both of the investigated compounds, 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl) cytosine (TsC) and 5-bromo-1-(methanesulfonyl) uracil (BMsU) inhibited activities of specific enzymes involved in nucleic acid synthesis. BMsU strongly inhibited activities of DNA polymerase alpha (53%), thymidine kinase (68%), thymidilate synthase (43%), and ribonucleotide reductase (46%). De novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine and purine was reduced by 20%. TsC was able to inhibit RNA polymerase (37%), orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (39%), uridine kinase (44%), ribonucleotid reductase (47%), and de novo purine synthesis (61%). Antitumor activity of 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl) cytosine (TsC) and 5-bromo-1-(methanesulfonyl) uracil (BMsU) is closely associated with their inhibitory activity on enzymes that play an important role in the metabolism of tumor cells.

  2. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21Cip1/Waf1, downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  3. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Curcumin inhibits growth potential by G1 cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in p53-mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasiram, Jade Dhananjay; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Kannan, Janani; Kotteeswaran, Venkatesan; Sivalingam, Nageswaran

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound and it is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, have been reported to possess anticancer effect against stage I and II colon cancer. However, the effect of curcumin on colon cancer at Dukes' type C metastatic stage III remains still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of curcumin on p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage. The cellular viability and proliferation were assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity effect was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle distribution was performed by flow cytometry analysis. Here we have observed that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited the cellular viability and proliferation potential of p53 mutated COLO 320DM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin treatment showed no cytotoxic effects to the COLO 320DM cells. DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that curcumin treatment induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM cells. Furthermore, curcumin caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, decreased the cell population in the S phase and induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM colon adenocarcinoma cells. Together, these data suggest that curcumin exerts anticancer effects and induces apoptosis in p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Binase Immobilized on Halloysite Nanotubes Exerts Enhanced Cytotoxicity toward Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Khodzhaeva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many ribonucleases (RNases are considered as promising tools for antitumor therapy because of their selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. Binase, the RNase from Bacillus pumilus, triggers apoptotic response in cancer cells expressing RAS oncogene which is mutated in a large percentage of prevalent and deadly malignancies including colorectal cancer. The specific antitumor effect of binase toward RAS-transformed cells is due to its direct binding of RAS protein and inhibition of downstream signaling. However, the delivery of proteins to the intestine is complicated by their degradation in the digestive tract and subsequent loss of therapeutic activity. Therefore, the search of new systems for effective delivery of therapeutic proteins is an actual task. This study is aimed to the investigation of antitumor effect of binase immobilized on natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs. Here, we have developed the method of binase immobilization on HNTs and optimized the conditions for the enzyme loading and release (i; we have found the non-toxic concentration of pure HNTs which allows to distinguish HNTs- and binase-induced cytotoxic effects (ii; using dark-field and fluorescent microscopy we have proved the absorption of binase-loaded HNTs on the cell surface (iii and demonstrated that binase-halloysite nanoformulations possessed twice enhanced cytotoxicity toward tumor colon cells as compared to the cytotoxicity of binase itself (iv. The enhanced antitumor activity of biocompatible binase-HNTs complex confirms the advisability of its future development for clinical practice.

  6. Galectin-3-independent Down-regulation of GABABR1 due to Treatment with Korean Herbal Extract HAD-B Reduces Proliferation of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-Hee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Many efforts have shown multi-oncologic roles of galectin-3 for cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. However, the mechanisms by which galectin-3 is involved in cell proliferation are not yet fully understood, especially in human colon cancer cells. Methods: To cluster genes showing positively or negatively correlated expression with galectin-3, we employed human colon cancer cell lines, SNU-61, SNU-81, SNU-769B, SNU-C4 and SNU-C5 in high-throughput gene expression profiling. Gene and protein expression levels were determined by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The proliferation rate of human colon cancer cells was measured by using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results: Expression of γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABABR1 showed a positive correlation with galectin-3 at both the transcriptional and the translational levels. Downregulation of galectin-3 decreased not only GABABR1 expression but also the proliferation rate of human colon cancer cells. However, Korean herbal extract, HangAmDan-B (HAD-B, decreased expression of GABABR1 without any expressional change of galectin-3, and offset γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-enhanced human colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions: Our present study confirmed that GABABR1 expression was regulated by galectin-3. HAD-B induced galectin-3-independent down-regulation of GABABR1, which resulted in a decreased proliferation of human colon cancer cells. The therapeutic effect of HAD-B for the treatment of human colon cancer needs to be further validated.

  7. DNA alterations in Cd133+ and Cd133- tumour cells enriched from intra-operative human colon tumour biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Madrid, Diana; Wettergren, Yvonne; Falk, Peter; Lundholm, Kent; Asting, Annika G

    2017-03-27

    Tumour stem cells are considered important to promote disease progression, recurrence and treatment resistance following chemotherapy in colon cancer. However, genomic analyses of colorectal cancer have mainly been performed on integrated tumour tissue consisting of several different cell types in addition to differentiated tumour cells. The purpose of the present study was to compare genomic alterations in two cell fractions enriched of CD133+ and CD133-/EpCAM+ cells, respectively, obtained from fresh intraoperative human tumour biopsies. The tumour biopsies were fractionated into CD133+ and CD133-/EpCAM+ cells by immunomagnetic separation, confirmed by immunocytochemistry and Q-PCR. DNA were extracted and used for array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) after whole genome amplification. Frozen tumour tissue biopsies were used for DNA/RNA extraction and Q-PCR analyses to check for DNA alterations detected in the cell fractions. The number and size of DNA alterations were equally distributed across the cell fractions; however, large deletions were detected on chromosome 1, 7 and 19 in CD133-/EpCAM+ cells. Deletions were frequent in both cell fractions and a deletion on chromosome 19p was confirmed in 90% of the patients. Isolation of enriched cells derived from tumour tissue revealed mainly genomic deletions, which were not observed in tumour tissue DNA analyses. CD133+ cells were genetically heterogeneous among patients without any defined profile compared to CD133-/EpCAM+ cells.

  8. Early apoptosis and cell death induced by ATX-S10Na (II)-mediated photodynamic therapy are Bax- and p53-dependent in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, Makoto; Tsubota, Akihito; Nariai, Kohichi; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Sumi, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Fujise, Kiyotaka

    2007-02-07

    To investigate the roles of Bax and p53 proteins in photosensitivity of human colon cancer cells by using lysosome-localizing photosensitizer, ATX-S10Na (II). HCT116 human colon cancer cells and Bax-null or p53-null isogenic derivatives were irradiated with a diode laser. Early apoptosis and cell death in response to photodynamic therapy were determined by MTT assays, annexin V assays, transmission electron microscopy assays, caspase assays and western blotting. Induction of early apoptosis and cell death was Bax- and p53-dependent. Bax and p53 were required for caspase-dependent apoptosis. The levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L), were decreased in Bax- and p53-independent manner. Our results indicate that early apoptosis and cell death of human colon cancer cells induced by photodynamic therapy with lysosome-localizing photosensitizer ATX-S10Na (II) are mediated by p53-Bax network and low levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) proteins. Our results might help in formulating new therapeutic approaches in photodynamic therapy.

  9. Gastrin: growth enhancing effects on human gastric and colonic tumour cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, S.; Durrant, L.; Morris, D.

    1989-01-01

    Two colorectal (HT29, LoVo) and one gastric (MKN45) human tumour cell lines were examined for their in vitro trophic response to human gastrin-17. MKN45 and HT29 responded by increased 75Se selenomethionine uptake to exogenous gastrin (139 +/- 5.5% and 123 +/- 3% of control values respectively) whereas LoVo showed no significant response to this hormone. When these same cell lines were grown as xenografts in nude mice, similar responses were seen to exogenously administered human gastrin-17 (...

  10. Establishment and Analysis of Cancer Stem-Like and Non-Cancer Stem-Like Clone Cells from the Human Colon Cancer Cell Line SW480.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akari Takaya

    Full Text Available Human cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiating cells (CICs can be isolated as side population (SP cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDHhigh cells or cell surface marker-positive cells including CD44+ cells and CD133+ cells. CSCs/CICs and non-CSCs/CICs are unstable in in vitro culture, and CSCs/CICs can differentiate into non-CSCs/CICs and some non-CSCs/CICs can dedifferentiate into CSCs/CICs. Therefore, experiments using a large amount of CSCs/CICs are technically very difficult. In this study, we isolated single cell clones from SP cells and main population (MP cells derived from the human colon cancer cell line SW480. SP analysis revealed that SP clone cells had relatively high percentages of SP cells, whereas MP clone cells showed very few SP cells, and the phenotypes were sustainable for more than 2 months of in vitro culture. Xenograft transplantation revealed that SP clone cells have higher tumor-initiating ability than that of MP clone cells and SP clone cell showed higher chemo-resistance compared with MP clone cells. These results indicate that SP clone cells derived from SW480 cells are enriched with CSCs/CICs, whereas MP clone cells are pure non-CSCs/CICs. SP clone cells and MP clone cells are a very stable in vitro CSC/CIC-enriched and non-CSC/CIC model for further analysis.

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of NCX 4040 cytotoxic activity in human colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupi Gabriella

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs are reported to be safer than NSAIDs because of their lower gastric toxicity. We compared the effect of a novel NO-releasing derivate, NCX 4040, with that of aspirin and its denitrated analog, NCX 4042, in in vitro and in vivo human colon cancer models and investigated the mechanisms of action underlying its antitumor activity. Methods In vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated on a panel of colon cancer lines (LoVo, LoVo Dx, WiDr and LRWZ by sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle perturbations and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by Western blot. In the in vivo experiments, tumor-bearing mice were treated with NCX 4040, five times a week, for six consecutive weeks. Results In the in vitro studies, aspirin and NCX 4042 did not induce an effect on any of the cell lines, whereas NCX 4040 produced a marked cytostatic dose-related effect, indicating a pivotal role of the -NO2 group. Furthermore, in LoVo and LRWZ cell lines, we observed caspase-9 and -3-mediated apoptosis, whereas no apoptotic effect was observed after drug exposure in WiDr or LoVo Dx cell lines. In in vivo studies, both NCX 4040 and its parental compound were administered per os. NCX 4040 induced a 40% reduction in tumor weight. Conversely, aspirin did not influence tumor growth at all. Conclusions NCX 4040, but not its parental compound, aspirin, showed an in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, indicating its potential usefulness to treat colon cancer.

  12. N-Hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole presenting genotoxicity and cytotoxicity against human colon adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling-Yu; Huang, Wei-Jan; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2013-11-18

    Osthole is extracted from the Chinese herbs Cnidium monnieri and Angelica pubescens, and it was found to have antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. A series of osthole derivatives have been synthesized, and the N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole, WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 were found to have the greatest potential against human colon adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast to the parental osthole, both WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 were found to induce multinucleation and polyploidy by microscopic observation and flow cytometry. WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 significantly activated ataxia telangiectasia and rad3 related (ATR) kinase, which triggered activation of the checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) signaling pathway and then down regulated Cdc25 phosphatase and Cdc2/cyclin B kinase activities. WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 also inhibited the phosphorylation of Aurora A kinase, which is associated with important processes during mitosis. The presence of a "comet" DNA fragment and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser 15 clearly indicated that DNA damage occurred with WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 treatment. WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 ultimately induced apoptosis as evidenced by the upregulation of Bad and activation of caspases-3, -7, and -9. Furthermore, WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 also showed a great effect in attenuating tumor growth without affecting the body weight of xenograft nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the toxic activities of WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 were dissimilar to that of the parental osthole, which can induce cell polyploidy and G2/M cell cycle arrest in colon adenocarcinoma cells and may provide a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer treatment in the future.

  13. Biosynthesis and characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles and its anticancer activity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanavel, V; Palanichamy, V; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana

    2017-06-01

    The eco-friendly synthesis of nanoparticles through green route from plant extracts have renowned a wide range of application in the field of modern science, due to increased drug efficacy and less toxicity in the nanosized mediated drug delivery model. In the present study, our research groups have biosynthesized the stable and cost effective copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) from the leaves of (Ormocarpum cochinchinense) O. cochinchinense. The synthesis of crystalline CuO NPs from the leaf extract of O. cochinchinense were confirmed by various analytical techniques like UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) pattern. Further the synthesized CuO NPs were screened for anticancer activity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116) by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-tiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The obtained result inferred that the synthesized CuO NPs demonstrated high anticancer cytotoxicity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116) with IC50 value of 40μgmL(-1) were discussed briefly in this manuscript. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Resveratrol Modulates the Topoisomerase Inhibitory Potential of Doxorubicin in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Schroeter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RSV is currently being widely discussed as potentially useful for anticancer therapy in combination with classical chemotherapeutics, e.g., the topoisomerase II (TOP II poison doxorubicin (DOX. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of possible interference at the target enzyme, especially since RSV itself has recently been described to act as a TOP poison. We therefore sought to address the question whether RSV affects DOX-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects with special emphasis on TOP II in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. RSV was found to counteract DOX-induced formation of DNA-TOP-intermediates at ≥100 µM for TOP IIα and at 250 µM for TOP IIβ. As a consequence, RSV modulated the DNA-strand breaking potential of DOX by mediating protective effects with an apparent maximum at 100 µM. At higher concentration ranges (≥200 µM RSV diminished the intracellular concentrations of DOX. Nevertheless, the presence of RSV slightly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DOX after 1.5 h and 24 h of incubation. Taken together, at least in cell culture RSV was found to affect the TOP-poisoning potential of DOX and to modulate its cytotoxic effectiveness. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the impact of RSV on the therapeutic effectiveness of DOX under in vivo conditions.

  15. Association of Ozone with 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin in Regulation of Human Colon Cancer Cell Viability: In Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Ozone in Colon Cancer Cells Exposed to Lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Simonetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ozone therapy is an effective medical treatment for different diseases like mucositis, psoriasis, acute pain, neurovascular diseases, and cancer. The aim of this study is based on the association of different ozone concentration with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in human colon cancer cell (HT29 cell line in order to investigate possible anticancer synergistic effects. Methods. HT29 cells were incubated with ozone at different concentration ranging from 10 up to 50 μg/ml at different incubation time alone or in combination with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Cell viability was performed by using a modified MTT method. Anti-inflammatory studies were conducted incubating HT29 with or without 20, 30, or 50 μg/ml of ozone before exposure to lipopolysaccharides. Results. Ozone alone has a time and concentration dependent cytotoxicity against HT29 cells (IC50 at 24 h: 30 μg/ml. Association of ozone with drugs increases cytotoxicity by 15–20%. Preincubation of ozone at 50 μg/ml decreases IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β production by 50, 56, and 70%, respectively, compared to untreated cells. Conclusion. These results indicated that ozone could be useful in colon cancer management in combination with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with significant inhibition of cytokines having a central role in colon cancer cell survival and chemoresistance.

  16. Activation by zinc of the human gastrin gene promoter in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Laval, Marie; Estacio, Ortis; Hudson, Damien F; Kalitsis, Paul; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2015-10-01

    Over-expression of growth factors can contribute to the development and progression of cancer, and gastrins in particular have been implicated in accelerating the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Previously our group showed that hypoxia, cobalt chloride (a hypoxia mimetic) and zinc chloride could activate the expression of the gastrin gene in vitro. To characterise activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions further in vivo, TALEN technology was used to engineer a luciferase reporter construct into the endogenous human gastrin gene promoter in SW480 colon cancer cells. Gastrin promoter activity in the resultant Gast(luc) SW480 colon cancer cells was then measured by bioluminescence in cell culture and in tumour xenografts in SCID mice. Activation of intracellular signalling pathways was assessed by Western blotting. Activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions was concentration dependent in vitro and in vivo. Zinc ions significantly stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (MAPK pathway) but not of Akt (PI3K pathway). We conclude that the endogenous gastrin promoter is responsive to zinc ions, likely via activation of the MAPK pathway.

  17. Visualization and targeting of LGR5(+) human colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Mariko; Ohta, Yuki; Nishikori, Shingo; Matano, Mami; Takano, Ai; Fujii, Masayuki; Date, Shoichi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro

    2017-05-11

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory highlights a self-renewing subpopulation of cancer cells that fuels tumour growth. The existence of human CSCs is mainly supported by xenotransplantation of prospectively isolated cells, but their clonal dynamics and plasticity remain unclear. Here, we show that human LGR5(+) colorectal cancer cells serve as CSCs in growing cancer tissues. Lineage-tracing experiments with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre knock-in allele of LGR5 reveal the self-renewal and differentiation capacity of LGR5(+) tumour cells. Selective ablation of LGR5(+) CSCs in LGR5-iCaspase9 knock-in organoids leads to tumour regression, followed by tumour regrowth driven by re-emerging LGR5(+) CSCs. KRT20 knock-in reporter marks differentiated cancer cells that constantly diminish in tumour tissues, while reverting to LGR5(+) CSCs and contributing to tumour regrowth after LGR5(+) CSC ablation. We also show that combined chemotherapy potentiates targeting of LGR5(+) CSCs. These data provide insights into the plasticity of CSCs and their potential as a therapeutic target in human colorectal cancer.

  18. Inhibition by human recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases of human amnion invasion and lung colonization by murine B16-F10 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, R M; Silberman, S; Persky, B; Bajkowski, A S; Carmichael, D F

    1988-10-01

    The human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 28,000. It appears to be ubiquitous in human mesoderm tissues and has previously been shown to be identical to the collagenase inhibitor isolated from human skin fibroblasts. TIMP inhibits type I- and IV-specific collagenases and other neutral metalloendoproteinases that may be responsible for the degradation of extracellular matrix in tumor cell metastasis. In this work we have utilized recombinant human TIMP (rTIMP) obtained by expression of its cDNA gene (Carmichael et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:2407, 1986). The rTIMP is shown to have similar inhibition properties as natural TIMP against human skin fibroblast collagenase. In an in vitro amnion invasion assay system, rTIMP inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 murine melanoma cells through the human amniotic membrane at an identical concentration to that reported previously for natural TIMP. The mechanism by which rTIMP inhibits amniotic membrane invasion was compared to the mechanism by which the fibronectin receptor binding peptide RGDS and the aminin receptor binding peptide YIGSR inhibit amnion invasion. RGDS and YIGSR inhibited strong binding of the tumor cells to the amniotic membrane. In contrast rTIMP did not inhibit the cell adhesion step in amnion invasion, but actually increased the number of tumor cells that were tightly bound to the amnion. Thus rTIMP appears to inhibit a later step in the amnion invasion process, following B16-F10 cell adhesion. C57BL/6 mice treated with i.p. injections of rTIMP every 12 h for 6.5 days showed a significant inhibition of metastatic lung colonization by B16-F10 murine melanoma cells. While the rTIMP inhibited the number of metastatic lung tumors formed, it had no significant effect on the size of the lung tumors. Furthermore, tumors grown s.c. in mice receiving 12-h i.p. injections of rTIMP for 6.5 days, as in the in vivo colonization assay, showed no difference

  19. A metabolite of nobiletin, 4'-demethylnobiletin and atorvastatin synergistically inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Li, Fang; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Qi; Xu, Fei; Xiao, Hang

    2018-01-24

    Combining different chemopreventive agents is a promising strategy to reduce cancer incidence and mortality due to potential synergistic interactions between these agents. Previously, we demonstrated that oral administration of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus flavonoid) at 0.05% (w/w, in diet) together with atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) at 0.02% (w/w, in diet) produced much stronger inhibition against colon carcinogenesis in rats in comparison with that produced by NBT (at 0.1% w/w in diet) or ATST (at 0.04% w/w in diet) alone at higher doses. To further elucidate the mechanism of this promising synergy between NBT and ATST, herein, we measured the levels of NBT, its major metabolites and ATST in the colonic tissue of rats fed NBT (0.05% w/w, in diet) + ATST (0.02% w/w, in diet), and determined the mode of interaction between the major NBT metabolite and ATST in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth. HPLC-MS analysis showed that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN) is the most abundant metabolite of NBT with a level about 5-fold as high as that of NBT in the colonic tissue, which indicated the potential significance of 4DN in mediating the biological effects of NBT in the colon. We found that co-treatments of 4DN/ATST at 2 : 1 concentration ratio produced much stronger growth inhibitory effects on human colon cancer HT-29 cells than 4DN or ATST alone, and isobologram analysis confirmed that this enhanced inhibitory effect by the 4DN/ATST combination was highly synergistic. The co-treatment of 4DN/ATST led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced extensive apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, the 4DN/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key signaling proteins related to the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results demonstrated a strong synergy produced by the 4DN/ATST co-treatment in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, which provided a novel mechanism by which NBT/ATST in combination synergistically inhibit colon carcinogenesis.

  20. Glycoalkaloids and metabolites inhibit the growth of human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kap-Rang; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Han, Jae-Sook; Park, Joon-Hong; Chang, Eun-Young; Baek, Eun-Jung; Chang, Jong-Sun; Friedman, Mendel

    2004-05-19

    As part of an effort to improve plant-derived foods such as potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes, the antiproliferative activities against human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells of a series of structurally related individual compounds were examined using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The objective was to assess the roles of the carbohydrate side chain and aglycon part of Solanum glycosides in influencing inhibitory activities of these compounds. Evaluations were carried out with four concentrations each (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 microg/mL) of the the potato trisaccharide glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine; the disaccharides beta(1)-chaconine, beta(2)-chaconine, and beta(2)-solanine; the monosaccharide gamma-chaconine and their common aglycon solanidine; the tetrasaccharide potato glycoalkaloid dehydrocommersonine; the potato aglycon demissidine; the tetrasaccharide tomato glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine, the trisaccharide beta(1)-tomatine, the disaccharide gamma-tomatine, the monosaccharide delta-tomatine, and their common aglycon tomatidine; the eggplant glycoalkaloids solamargine and solasonine and their common aglycon solasodine; and the nonsteroidal alkaloid jervine. All compounds were active in the assay, with the glycoalkaloids being the most active and the hydrolysis products less so. The effectiveness against the liver cells was greater than against the colon cells. Potencies of alpha-tomatine and alpha-chaconine at a concentration of 1 microg/mL against the liver carcinoma cells were higher than those observed with the anticancer drugs doxorubicin and camptothecin. Because alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and alpha-tomatine also inhibited normal human liver HeLa (Chang) cells, safety considerations should guide the use of these compounds as preventative or therapeutic treatments against carcinomas.

  1. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  2. Iron overload of human colon adenocarcinoma cells studied by synchrotron-based X-ray techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Meirer, Florian; Polgári, Zsófia; Réti, Andrea; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Ingerle, Dieter; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Streli, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Fast- and slow-proliferating human adenocarcinoma colorectal cells, HT-29 and HCA-7, respectively, overloaded with transferrin (Tf), Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III) chloride and Fe(II) sulfate were studied by synchrotron radiation total-reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF), TXRF-X-ray absorption near edge

  3. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  4. Gastrin: growth enhancing effects on human gastric and colonic tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S.; Durrant, L.; Morris, D.

    1989-01-01

    Two colorectal (HT29, LoVo) and one gastric (MKN45) human tumour cell lines were examined for their in vitro trophic response to human gastrin-17. MKN45 and HT29 responded by increased 75Se selenomethionine uptake to exogenous gastrin (139 +/- 5.5% and 123 +/- 3% of control values respectively) whereas LoVo showed no significant response to this hormone. When these same cell lines were grown as xenografts in nude mice, similar responses were seen to exogenously administered human gastrin-17 (10 micrograms mouse-1 day-1, subcutaneous injection). MKN45 xenografts showed a greater response to continuously administered gastrin (osmotic mini-pumps, (10 micrograms mouse-1 day-1) when compared to the same dose given via a subcutaneous bolus injection. The hormone-treated xenografts had a two-fold increase in tumour cross-sectional area and growth rate when compared to saline-treated controls. Dose-response studies revealed that 0.4 micrograms gastrin mouse-1 day-1 appeared to be the minimally effective dose. As gastric and colorectal tumour cells show a trophic response to gastrin, antagonists of the gastrin receptor may prevent this effect causing tumour stasis. The gastric tumour cell line, MKN45, is gastrin-responsive and would be an ideal model for screening potent receptor antagonists. PMID:2713241

  5. Effects of Simulated Human Gastrointestinal Digestion of Two Purple-Fleshed Potato Cultivars on Anthocyanin Composition and Cytotoxicity in Colonic Cancer and Non-Tumorigenic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubow, Stan; Iskandar, Michèle M; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Sleno, Lekha; Sabally, Kebba; Azadi, Behnam; How, Emily; Prakash, Satya; Burgos, Gabriela; Felde, Thomas Zum

    2017-08-29

    A dynamic human gastrointestinal (GI) model was used to digest cooked tubers from purple-fleshed Amachi and Leona potato cultivars to study anthocyanin biotransformation in the stomach, small intestine and colonic vessels. Colonic Caco-2 cancer cells and non-tumorigenic colonic CCD-112CoN cells were tested for cytotoxicity and cell viability after 24 h exposure to colonic fecal water (FW) digests (0%, 10%, 25%, 75% and 100% FW in culture media). After 24 h digestion, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 36 and 15 anthocyanin species throughout the GI vessels for Amachi and Leona, respectively. The total anthocyanin concentration was over thirty-fold higher in Amachi compared to Leona digests but seven-fold higher anthocyanin concentrations were noted for Leona versus Amachi in descending colon digests. Leona FW showed greater potency to induce cytotoxicity and decrease viability of Caco-2 cells than observed with FW from Amachi. Amachi FW at 100% caused cytotoxicity in non-tumorigenic cells while FW from Leona showed no effect. The present findings indicate major variations in the pattern of anthocyanin breakdown and release during digestion of purple-fleshed cultivars. The differing microbial anthocyanin metabolite profiles in colonic vessels between cultivars could play a significant role in the impact of FW toxicity on tumor and non-tumorigenic cells.

  6. Uptake and cytotoxicity of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsikari, A. [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Department of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Patronidou, Chr.; Kiparissides, C. [Section of Analysis, Design and Control of Chemical Processes and Plants, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Arsenakis, M., E-mail: arsenaki@bio.auth.g [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Department of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    The main objectives of the present study were to evaluate the cytotoxicity and the mechanisms of uptake of biodegradable lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) nanoparticle carrier systems in vitro using the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco2. Nanoparticles (NPs) (PLGA 75:25) with an average diameter of 299.5 nm containing bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC) as a fluorescent model protein marker were formulated by the double emulsion technique. Various parameters influencing the internalization process by Caco2 cells including concentration of NPs, duration of contact time and cell culture conditions were studied. After overnight exposure of NPs to cells at 37 deg. C, the cell uptake capacity varied in accord with NP concentration, over the 25-800 mug/ml concentration range tested. Maximal uptake of nanoparticles at 37 deg. C occurred at 4 h and was inhibited significantly at 4 deg. C. The extent of NPs internalization was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Potential NP toxicity evaluated by modified MTS and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) colorimetric cytotoxicity tests, measuring mitochondrial activity and membrane integrity respectively, showed that cell viability is significantly reduced at PLGA nanoparticle concentrations greater than 700 mug/ml after 24 and 48 h respectively. The results obtained in vitro for BSA-FITC loaded PLGA nanoparticles underline their potential as carriers for peptide delivery and their utility for the study of NP cell transport and trafficking mechanisms.

  7. Redox-active nanoceria depolarize mitochondrial membrane of human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat Kumar; Banerjee, Priyanka; Das, Soumen; Seal, Sudipta; Chaudhury, Koel

    2014-06-01

    Nanotherapeutics is emerging as a promising option to the various limitations and side effects associated with conventional chemotherapy. The present study investigates the cytotoxic effect of redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) on human colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line (HCT 15). Exposure of these cells to nanoceria for 24 h with concentration ranging between 10 and 100 μM resulted in a significant reduction of cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Further, at a concentration of 10 µM, nanoceria exhibited time-dependent cytotoxic effect when exposed to the cells for 24, 48, and 72 h. Upon treatment of the cells with nanoceria, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation which are indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity increased significantly, in a dose-dependent manner. Nanoceria was also found to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane, thereby collapsing the membrane potential and leading to initiation of apoptosis. Scanning electron microscopic study of nanoceria-treated HCT 15 cells showed morphological changes and loss of filopodia and lamellipodia, indicating arrest of metastatic spread. Summarizing, when cultured HCT 15 cells are exposed to nanoceria, a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect mediated by ROS generation is observed.

  8. Characterization of the N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C)–Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neave, Antje S.; Sarup, Sussi; Seidelin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    of cellular proliferation, NI3C caused an accumulation of HCT-116 cells in the G2/M phase, in contrast to I3C, which led to an accumulation of the colon cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, NI3C delays the G1-S phase transition of synchronized HCT-116 cells. The indole-mediated cell-cycle arrest may be related......Recent results have shown that indole-3-carbinol (I3C) inhibits the cellular growth of human cancer cell lines. In some cruciferous vegetables, another indole, N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C), is found beside I3C. Knowledge about the biological effects of NI3C is limited. The aim of the present...... study was to show the effect of NI3C on cell growth of two human colon cancer cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT-116. For the first time it is shown that NI3C inhibits cellular growth of DLD-1 and HCT-116 and that NI3C is a more potent inhibitor of cell proliferation than I3C. In addition to the inhibition...

  9. Anticancer effect of dentatin and dentatin-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex on human colon cancer (HT-29 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL-Abboodi AS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ashwaq Shakir AL-Abboodi,1,2 Abdullah Rasedee,3 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,1,4 Yun Hin Taufiq-Yap,5 Wafaa Abd Alwahed Alkaby,6 Mostafa Saddam Ghaji,7 Peter M Waziri,1,8 Mothanna Sadiq Al-Qubaisi1 1MAKNA-UPM, Cancer Research Laboratory, Institute of Bioscience, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 2Basic Science Branch, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Al-Qadisiyah, Al Diwaniyah, Iraq; 3Department of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosis, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 4Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 5Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 6Department of Biomedical, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of AL-Qadisiyah, Al Diwaniyah, Iraq; 7Department of Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Basrah, Basrah, Iraq; 8Department of Biochemistry, Kaduna State University, Main Campus,  Kaduna, Nigeria Introduction: Dentatin (DEN (5-methoxy-2, 2-dimethyl-10-(1, 1-dimethyl-2propenyl dipyran-2-one, a natural compound present in the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f, possesses pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects in various cancer cells. Because of its hydrophobicity, it is believed that its complexation with hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD will make it a potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth. In the current work, the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex were demonstrated in human colon HT-29 cancer cells.Materials and methods: After the human colon HT-29 cancer cells were treated with DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex, their effects on the expression of apoptotic-regulated gene markers in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic and death receptor pathways were detected by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These markers included caspases-9, 3, and 8, cytochrome c, poly (ADP

  10. Taiwanin E inhibits cell migration in human LoVo colon cancer cells by suppressing MMP-2/9 expression via p38 MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Li, Shin-Yi; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Hui-Nung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Taiwanin E is a natural compound which is structurally analogous to estrogen II and is abundantly found in Taiwania cryptomerioides. It has been previously reported for its anticancer effects; however, the pharmaceutical effect of Taiwanin E on Human LoVo colon cancer cells is not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Taiwanin E on metastasis and the associated mechanism of action on Human LoVo colon cancer cells with respect to the modulations in their cell migration and signaling pathways associated with migration. The results showed that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration ability correlated with reduced expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In addition, Taiwanin E induced activation of p38 through phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38α/β significantly abolished the effect of Taiwanin E on cell migration and MMP-2/-9 activity. Our results conclude that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration chiefly via p38α MAPK pathway and in a lesser extend via p38β MAPK. The results elucidate the potential of the phytoestrogen natural compound Taiwanin E as a cancer therapeutic agent in inhibiting the cell migration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 2021-2031, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Harris, C.C.; Stoner, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein...

  12. Oxidative stress and inhibition of nitric oxide generation underlie methotrexate-induced senescence in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Magdalena; Uram, Lukasz; Zielinski, Zbigniew; Rode, Wojciech; Sikora, Ewa

    2017-07-21

    The response of human colon cancer C85 cells to methotrexate takes the form of reversible growth arrest of the type of stress-induced senescence. In the present study it is shown that during C85 cell progression into methotrexate-induced senescence, dihydrofolate reductase, the primary intracellular target for the drug, is stabilized at the protein level and its enzymatic activity, assayed in crude cellular extracts, decreases by 2-fold. Dihydrofolate reductase inhibition results in an increase in dihydrobiopterin level and an ultimate decrease in the tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio in senescent cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression declines. Despite concomitant upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, no nitric oxide generation in senescent cells is detected. Progressing oxidative stress accompanies establishment of the state of senescence. DNA damage, in the form of double strand-breaks, occurs at the highest level at the senescence initiation phase and decreases as cells progress into the senescence maintenance phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Up-regulation of CIT promotes the growth of colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zehua; Zhu, Xiangying; Xu, Wendi; Zhang,Yu; Chen, Lin; Qiu, Fabo; Zhang, Binyuan; Wu, Liqun; Peng, Zhihai; Tang, Huamei

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism and therapeutic targets of colon cancer have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that citron rho-interacting, serine/threonine kinase 21 (CIT) promotes the growth of human colon cancer cells. CIT is overexpressed in human colon cancer tissues and cell lines. High expression of CIT predicts poor survival for patients with colon cancer. In colon cancer cells, ...

  14. The dietary hydrolysable tannin punicalagin releases ellagic acid that induces apoptosis in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells by using the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, Mar; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Polyphenol-rich dietary foodstuffs have attracted attention due to their cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties. Ellagitannins (ETs) belong to the so-called hydrolysable tannins found in strawberries, raspberries, walnuts, pomegranate, oak-aged red wine, etc. Both ETs and their hydrolysis product, ellagic acid (EA), have been reported to induce apoptosis in tumour cells. Ellagitannins are not absorbed in vivo but reach the colon and release EA that is metabolised by the human microflora. Our aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary ET [pomegranate punicalagin (PUNI)] and EA on human colon cancer Caco-2 and colon normal CCD-112CoN cells. Both PUNI and EA provoked the same effects on Caco-2 cells: down-regulation of cyclins A and B1 and upregulation of cyclin E, cell-cycle arrest in S phase, induction of apoptosis via intrinsic pathway (FAS-independent, caspase 8-independent) through bcl-XL down-regulation with mitochondrial release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, activation of initiator caspase 9 and effector caspase 3. Neither EA nor PUNI induced apoptosis in normal colon CCD-112CoN cells (no chromatin condensation and no activation of caspases 3 and 9 were detected). In the case of Caco-2 cells, no specific effect can be attributed to PUNI since it was hydrolysed in the medium to yield EA, which entered into the cells and was metabolised to produce dimethyl-EA derivatives. Our study suggests that the anticarcinogenic effect of dietary ETs could be mainly due to their hydrolysis product, EA, which induced apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway in colon cancer Caco-2 cells but not in normal colon cells.

  15. Rapid effects of 17beta-estradiol on epithelial TRPV6 Ca2+ channel in human T84 colonic cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Irnaten, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    The control of calcium homeostasis is essential for cell survival and is of crucial importance for several physiological functions. The discovery of the epithelial calcium channel Transient Receptor Potential Vaniloid (TRPV6) in intestine has uncovered important Ca(2+) absorptive pathways involved in the regulation of whole body Ca(2+) homeostasis. The role of steroid hormone 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), in [Ca(2+)](i) regulation involving TRPV6 has been only limited at the protein expression levels in over-expressing heterologous systems. In the present study, using a combination of calcium-imaging, whole-cell patch-clamp techniques and siRNA technology to specifically knockdown TRPV6 protein expression, we were able to (i) show that TRPV6 is natively, rather than exogenously, expressed at mRNA and protein levels in human T84 colonic cells, (ii) characterize functional TRPV6 channels and (iii) demonstrate, for the first time, the rapid effects of E(2) in [Ca(2+)](i) regulation involving directly TRPV6 channels in T84 cells. Treatment with E(2) rapidly (<5 min) enhanced [Ca(2+)](i) and this increase was partially but significantly prevented when cells were pre-treated with ruthenium red and completely abolished in cells treated with siRNA specifically targeting TRPV6 protein expression. These results indicate that when cells are stimulated by E(2), Ca(2+) enters the cell through TRPV6 channels. TRPV6 channels in T84 cells contribute to the Ca(2+) entry\\/signalling pathway that is sensitive to 17beta-estradiol.

  16. Antioxidant potential of buffalo and cow milk Cheddar cheeses to tackle human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuzhat Huma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of present study was to assess the anti-oxidant potential of water-soluble peptides (WSPs extract derived from buffalo and cow milk Cheddar cheeses at different stages of ripening. Methods The antioxidant potential of WSPs extract was assessed through 2,2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6sulfonic acid (ABTS-radical scavenging activity. In addition, impact of WSPs extract on cell viability and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 (tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced cell lines was also evaluated. Results The ABTS-radical scavenging activity increased progressively with ripening period and dose-dependently in both cheeses. However, peptide extract from buffalo milk Cheddar cheese demonstrated relatively higher activity due to higher contents of water-soluble nitrogen. Intracellular ROS production in Caco-2 cells decreased significantly (p<0.05 till 150th day of cheese ripening and remained constant thereafter. Additionally, dose-dependent response of WSPs extract on antioxidant activity was noticed in the Caco-2 cell line. Conclusion On the basis of current in vitro study, the Cheddar cheese WSPs extract can protect intestinal epithelium against oxidative stress due to their antioxidant activity.

  17. Efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy using light-emitting diodes in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomoya; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Ochiai, Toshiya; Kokuba, Yukihito; Inoue, Katsushi; Nakajima, Motowo; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) (ALA-PDT) is a highly selective treatment for malignant cells. ALA-PDT has the potential to develop into a novel therapeutic strategy for various types of cancer. Recently, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which are inexpensive, stable and easier to handle compared to lasers, have been used in PDT as a light source. However, in colorectal cancer (CRC), the efficacy of ALA-PDT in combination with LEDs has not been fully assessed. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the antitumor effect of ALA-PDT using various LEDs in colon cancer cells. The HT-29 human colon cancer cell line was used both in vitro and in vivo. HT-29 cells were seeded in 96-well plates. Following 5-ALA administration, cells were irradiated using LEDs at different wavelengths. Three types of LEDs, blue (peak wavelength, 456 nm), white (broad-band) and red (635 nm) were used. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, the cytotoxic effects of ALA-PDT were measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In order to evaluate the antitumor effect of ALA-PDT in vivo, nude mice were inoculated with HT-29 cells. Xenograft mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5-ALA and irradiated with 3 types of LEDs at a measured fluence rate of 96 mW/cm2 and fluence of 32 J/cm2. Each group comprised 6 mice. ALA-PDT was repeated 3 times at weekly intervals. Tumor weights were measured. Compared to the controls, ALA-PDT using LEDs showed significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. The blue and white LEDs demonstrated greater antitumor effects compared to the red LEDs in vitro and in vivo. In particular, tumor inhibition rates in the blue and white LED groups were approximately 88% to those of the control group in the mouse models. In conclusion, ALA-PDT using LEDs is effective and useful in the treatment of CRC cells. This method could be a novel treatment modality for CRC.

  18. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-03-01

    Because of unsatisfactory treatment options for colon cancer, there is a need to develop novel preventive approaches for this malignancy. One such strategy is through chemoprevention by the use of non-toxic dietary substances and botanical products. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, possesses strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties of delphinidin in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. We found that treatment of cells with delphinidin (30-240 microM; 48 h) resulted in (i) decrease in cell viability (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) cleavage of PARP, (iv) activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, (v) increase in Bax with a concomitant decrease in Bcl-2 protein, and (vi) G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. NF-kappaB provides a mechanistic link between inflammation and cancer, and is a major factor controlling the ability of both pre-neoplastic and malignant cells to resist apoptosis-based tumor surveillance mechanisms. We therefore, determined the effect of delphinidin on NF-kappaB signaling pathway. The immunoblot, ELISA and EMSA analysis demonstrated that the treatment of HCT116 cells with delphinidin resulted in the inhibition of (i) IKKalpha, (ii) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, (iii) phosphorylation of NF-kappaB/p65 at Ser(536), (iv) nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB/p65, (v) NF-kappaB/p65 DNA binding activity, and (vi) transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that delphinidin treatment of HCT116 cells suppressed NF-kappaB pathway, resulting in G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. We suggest that delphinidin could have potential in inhibiting colon cancer growth. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Neurotensin Phosphorylates GSK-3α/β through the Activation of PKC in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurotensin (NT, a gastrointestinal hormone, binds its receptor [neurotensin receptor (NTR] to regulate the growth of normal and neoplastic intestinal cells; molecular mechanisms remain largely undefined. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 regulates diverse cellular processes, including cell growth and apoptosis. Here, we show that NT induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3α/β in the human colon cancer cell line HT29, HCT116, or SW480, which possesses high-affinity NTR. The effect of NT was blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC, but not by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK1 or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, suggesting a predominant role for PKC in GSK-3β phosphorylation by NT. Pretreatment with Gö6976 (which inhibits PKCα and PKCβ1 or downregulation of endogenous PKCα or PKCβ1 blocked NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation. Moreover, a selective PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196, reduced NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation, suggesting a role for PKCbβ in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β and an undefined kinase in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Treatment with NT or the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 increased the expression of cyclin D1, a downstream effector protein of GSK-3 and a critical protein for the proliferation of various cells. Our results indicate that NT uses PKC-dependent pathways to modulate GSK-3, which may play a role in the NT regulation of intestinal cell growth.

  1. Chemical synthesis, docking studies and biological effects of functionalized 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones on human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Min Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1, 3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones was synthesised in order to obtain a new type of anticancer drug, designed with hybrid features to inhibit colon cancer activated receptor. Based on computational modelling and docking studies, potential inhibitors were synthesised and their biological activity evaluated. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by 1HNMR, 13CNMR and Mass spectrometry. All analogues were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against human colon (caco-2 cancer cell lines. Compounds 1b, 1f-1h, and 2i showed significant cytotoxicity. Chalcones 1b, 1f and 1g were identified as the most potent and selective anticancer agents with IC50 values <1 µg/mL and 1.5 µg/mL, against caco-2 cell line, respectively. In conclusion, this finding confirms the suitability of indolyl chalcone analogues as candidates for further investigation towards the management of colon cancer related diseases.

  2. A calibrated agent-based computer model of stochastic cell dynamics in normal human colon crypts useful for in silico experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Rafael; Axelrod, David E

    2013-11-18

    Normal colon crypts consist of stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiated cells. Abnormal rates of proliferation and differentiation can initiate colon cancer. We have measured the variation in the number of each of these cell types in multiple crypts in normal human biopsy specimens. This has provided the opportunity to produce a calibrated computational model that simulates cell dynamics in normal human crypts, and by changing model parameter values, to simulate the initiation and treatment of colon cancer. An agent-based model of stochastic cell dynamics in human colon crypts was developed in the multi-platform open-source application NetLogo. It was assumed that each cell's probability of proliferation and probability of death is determined by its position in two gradients along the crypt axis, a divide gradient and in a die gradient. A cell's type is not intrinsic, but rather is determined by its position in the divide gradient. Cell types are dynamic, plastic, and inter-convertible. Parameter values were determined for the shape of each of the gradients, and for a cell's response to the gradients. This was done by parameter sweeps that indicated the values that reproduced the measured number and variation of each cell type, and produced quasi-stationary stochastic dynamics. The behavior of the model was verified by its ability to reproduce the experimentally observed monocolonal conversion by neutral drift, the formation of adenomas resulting from mutations either at the top or bottom of the crypt, and by the robust ability of crypts to recover from perturbation by cytotoxic agents. One use of the virtual crypt model was demonstrated by evaluating different cancer chemotherapy and radiation scheduling protocols. A virtual crypt has been developed that simulates the quasi-stationary stochastic cell dynamics of normal human colon crypts. It is unique in that it has been calibrated with measurements of human biopsy specimens, and it can simulate the

  3. WISP genes are members of the connective tissue growth factor family that are up-regulated in wnt-1-transformed cells and aberrantly expressed in human colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennica, D; Swanson, T A; Welsh, J W; Roy, M A; Lawrence, D A; Lee, J; Brush, J; Taneyhill, L A; Deuel, B; Lew, M; Watanabe, C; Cohen, R L; Melhem, M F; Finley, G G; Quirke, P; Goddard, A D; Hillan, K J; Gurney, A L; Botstein, D; Levine, A J

    1998-12-08

    Wnt family members are critical to many developmental processes, and components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been linked to tumorigenesis in familial and sporadic colon carcinomas. Here we report the identification of two genes, WISP-1 and WISP-2, that are up-regulated in the mouse mammary epithelial cell line C57MG transformed by Wnt-1, but not by Wnt-4. Together with a third related gene, WISP-3, these proteins define a subfamily of the connective tissue growth factor family. Two distinct systems demonstrated WISP induction to be associated with the expression of Wnt-1. These included (i) C57MG cells infected with a Wnt-1 retroviral vector or expressing Wnt-1 under the control of a tetracyline repressible promoter, and (ii) Wnt-1 transgenic mice. The WISP-1 gene was localized to human chromosome 8q24.1-8q24.3. WISP-1 genomic DNA was amplified in colon cancer cell lines and in human colon tumors and its RNA overexpressed (2- to >30-fold) in 84% of the tumors examined compared with patient-matched normal mucosa. WISP-3 mapped to chromosome 6q22-6q23 and also was overexpressed (4- to >40-fold) in 63% of the colon tumors analyzed. In contrast, WISP-2 mapped to human chromosome 20q12-20q13 and its DNA was amplified, but RNA expression was reduced (2- to >30-fold) in 79% of the tumors. These results suggest that the WISP genes may be downstream of Wnt-1 signaling and that aberrant levels of WISP expression in colon cancer may play a role in colon tumorigenesis.

  4. Thermostable direct hemolysin downregulates human colon carcinoma cell proliferation with the involvement of E-cadherin, and β-catenin/Tcf-4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinki Chowdhury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancers are the frequent causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Recently bacterial toxins have received marked attention as promising approaches in the treatment of colon cancer. Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH secreted by Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes influx of extracellular calcium with the subsequent rise in intracellular calcium level in intestinal epithelial cells and it is known that calcium has antiproliferative activity against colon cancer. KEY RESULTS: In the present study it has been shown that TDH, a well-known traditional virulent factor inhibits proliferation of human colon carcinoma cells through the involvement of CaSR in its mechanism. TDH treatment does not induce DNA fragmentation, nor causes the release of lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, apoptosis and cytotoxicity are not contributing to the TDH-mediated reduction of proliferation rate, and hence the reduction appears to be caused by decrease in cell proliferation. The elevation of E-cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule and suppression of β-catenin, a proto-oncogene have been observed in presence of CaSR agonists whereas reverse effect has been seen in presence of CaSR antagonist as well as si-RNA in TDH treated cells. TDH also triggers a significant reduction of Cyclin-D and cdk2, two important cell cycle regulatory proteins along with an up regulation of cell cycle inhibitory protein p27(Kip1 in presence of CaSR agonists. CONCLUSION: Therefore TDH can downregulate colonic carcinoma cell proliferation and involves CaSR in its mechanism of action. The downregulation occurs mainly through the involvement of E-cadherin-β-catenin mediated pathway and the inhibition of cell cycle regulators as well as upregulation of cell cycle inhibitors.

  5. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer cells treated in vitro with constituents of a product derived from Pistacia lentiscus L. var. chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K V; Prince, J; Han, Z; Dimas, K; Cladaras, M; Wyche, J H; Sitaras, N M; Pantazis, P

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that a 50% ethanol extract of the plant-derived product, Chios mastic gum (CMG), contains compounds which inhibit proliferation and induce death of HCT116 human colon cancer cells in vitro. CMG-treatment induces cell arrest at G(1), detachment of the cells from the substrate, activation of pro-caspases-8, -9 and -3, and causes several morphological changes typical of apoptosis in cell organelles. These events, furthermore, are time- and dose-dependent, but p53- and p21-independent. Apoptosis induction by CMG is not inhibited in HCT116 cell clones expressing high levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, or dominant-negative FADD, thereby indicating that CMG induces cell death via a yet-to-be identified pathway, unrelated to the death receptor- and mitochondrion-dependent pathways. The findings presented here suggest that CMG (a) induces an anoikis form of cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells that includes events associated with caspase-dependent pathways; and (b) might be developed into a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon and other cancers.

  7. CRH promotes human colon cancer cell proliferation via IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xianjun; Hong, Yali; Dai, Li; Qian, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Chao; Wu, Biao; Li, Shengnan

    2017-11-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been demonstrated to participate in various diseases. Our previous study showed that its receptor CRHR1 mediated the development of colitis-associated cancer in mouse model. However, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we explored the oncogenetic role of CRH/CRHR1 signaling in colon cancer cells. Cell proliferation and colony formation assays revealed that CRH contributed to cell proliferation. Moreover, tube formation assay showed that CRH-treated colon cancer cell supernatant significantly promoted tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). And these effects could be reversed by the CRHR1 specific antagonist Antalarmin. Further investigation showed that CRH significantly upregulated the expressions of interlukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). The CRH-induced IL-6 promoted phosphorylation of janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). STAT3 inhibition by Stattic significantly inhibited the CRH-induced cell proliferation. In addition, silence of VEGF resulted in declined tube formation induced by CRH. Taken together, CRH/CRHR1 signaling promoted human colon cancer cell proliferation via NF-κB/IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and tumor angiogenesis via NF-κB/VEGF signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence to support a critical role for the CRH/CRHR1 signaling in colon cancer progression and suggest its potential utility as a new therapeutic target for colon cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Enhanced X ray sensitivity of human colon tumor cells by combination of N-methylformamide with chemotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.; Lee, E.S.; Leite, D.V.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1986-08-01

    The responses of human colon tumor cells (clone A) to graded doses of x-irradiation were studied in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs (bleomycin and 5-fluorouracil) after induction of commitment to differentiation by chronic exposure to N-methylformamide (NMF). NMF treated cells show increased radiation sensitivity, particularly in the low dose region of the survival curve. When doses of bleomycin (Bleo) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were used that were subtoxic, both agents enhanced the cytotoxicity of x-irradiation by factors of about 1.25 and 1.10, respectively (at the 10% level of survival), and little sequence dependence was seen. However, in NMF treated cells, the combination of these drugs produced enhancement of X ray killing by factors of about 1.6 (x + bleo), 2.5 (bleo + x), 1.4 (x + 5-FU), and 1.6 (5-FU + x). Drug exposures were for 1 hr duration at 37/sup 0/C; 0.05 microgram/ml for Bleo, and 20 micrograms/ml for 5-FU. Since the X ray dose enhancement factor for NMF alone was about 1.3, the increased toxicity seen is probably additive in nature for the NMF + 5-FU + x experiments, but more than additive for the NMF + Bleo + x experiments. Also, complete removal of the shoulder was seen in the NMF + Bleo + X ray experiments. These data indicate that the use of differentiation-inducing agents in combination with other cytotoxic therapies might be important in yielding major decreases in the neoplastic cell burden, while avoiding the major morbidity seen in aggressive cancer therapy.

  9. Activation of Adenosine A3 Receptor Alleviates TNF-α-Induced Inflammation through Inhibition of the NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the expression of adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR in human colonic epithelial cells and the effects of A3AR activation on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α- induced inflammation in order to determine its mechanism of action in human colonic epithelial cells, human colonic epithelial cells (HT-29 cells were treated with different concentrations of 2-Cl-IB-MECA prior to TNF-α stimulation, followed by analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway activation and downstream IL-8 and IL-1β production. A3AR mRNA and protein were expressed in HT-29 cells and not altered by changes in TNF-α or 2-Cl-IB-MECA. Pretreatment with 2-Cl-IB-MECA prior to stimulation with TNF-α attenuated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation as p65 protein decreased in the nucleus of cells and increased in the cytoplasm, inhibited the degradation of IκB-α, and reduced phosphorylated-IκB-α level significantly, compared to TNF-α-only-treated groups. Furthermore, 2-Cl-IB-MECA significantly decreased TNF-α-stimulated IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA expression and secretion, compared to the TNF-α-only treated group. These results confirm that A3AR is expressed in human colonic epithelial cells and demonstrate that its activation has an anti-inflammatory effect, through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway, which leads to inhibition of downstream IL-8 and IL-1β expression. Therefore, A3AR activation may be a potential treatment for gut inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. The ganglioside GM3 is associated with cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Wook Chung

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP is a well-known chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several cancers. However, the precise mechanism underlying apoptosis of cancer cells induced by CDDP remains unclear. In this study, we show mechanistically that CDDP induces GM3-mediated apoptosis of HCT116 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation, and increasing DNA fragmentation and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis signals. CDDP induced apoptosis within cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, regulated the ROS-mediated expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and p53, and induced the degradation of the poly (ADP-ribosyl polymerase (PARP. We also checked expression levels of different gangliosides in HCT116 cells in the presence or absence of CDDP. Interestingly, among the gangliosides, CDDP augmented the expression of only GM3 synthase and its product GM3. Reduction of the GM3 synthase level through ectopic expression of GM3 small interfering RNA (siRNA rescued HCT116 cells from CDDP-induced apoptosis. This was evidenced by inhibition of apoptotic signals by reducing ROS production through the regulation of 12-lipoxigenase activity. Furthermore, the apoptotic sensitivity to CDDP was remarkably increased in GM3 synthase-transfected HCT116 cells compared to that in controls. In addition, GM3 synthase-transfected cells treated with CDDP exhibited an increased accumulation of intracellular ROS. These results suggest the CDDP-induced oxidative apoptosis of HCT116 cells is mediated by GM3.

  11. The TF-antigen binding lectin from Sclerotium rolfsii inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Chen, Chen; Barclays, Monica; Ingle, Aravind; Mahajan, Praveen; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2012-09-01

    Glycan array analysis of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) revealed its exquisite binding specificity to the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF) antigen and its derivatives. This study shows that SRL strongly inhibits the growth of human colon cancer HT29 and DLD-1 cells by binding to cell surface glycans and induction of apoptosis through both the caspase-8 and -9 mediated signaling. SRL showed no or very weak binding to normal human colon tissues but strong binding to cancerous and metastatic tissues. Intratumor injection of SRL at subtoxic concentrations in NOD-SCID mice bearing HT29 xenografts resulted in total tumor regression in 9 days and no subsequent tumor recurrence. As the increased expression of TF-associated glycans is commonly seen in human cancers, SRL has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Kaempferol in HT-29 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sook Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously noted that kaempferol, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, reduced cell cycle progression of HT-29 cells. To examine whether kaempferol induces apoptosis of HT-29 cells and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, cells were treated with various concentrations (0–60 μmol/L of kaempferol and analyzed by Hoechst staining, Annexin V staining, JC-1 labeling of the mitochondria, immunoprecipitation, in vitro kinase assays, Western blot analyses, and caspase-8 assays. Kaempferol increased chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and the number of early apoptotic cells in HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, kaempferol increased the levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and caspase-7 as well as those of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, it increased mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytosolic cytochrome c concentrations. Further, kaempferol decreased the levels of Bcl-xL proteins, but increased those of Bik. It also induced a reduction in Akt activation and Akt activity and an increase in mitochondrial Bad. Additionally, kaempferol increased the levels of membrane-bound FAS ligand, decreased those of uncleaved caspase-8 and intact Bid and increased caspase-8 activity. These results indicate that kaempferol induces the apoptosis of HT-29 cells via events associated with the activation of cell surface death receptors and the mitochondrial pathway.

  13. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    , and HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins...

  14. Sulforaphane down-regulates SKP2 to stabilize p27(KIP1) for inducing antiproliferation in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yuan-Kai; Chi-Hung Or, Richard; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Ouyang, Wei-Ting; Yang, Shu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Che

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a cruciferous vegetable-derived isothiocyanate with promising chemopreventive and therapeutic activities. Induction of proliferation arrest and apoptosis principally contribute to sulforaphane's anticancer activity, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The oncoprotein SKP2 is a key component of the SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF) E3 ligase complex and is responsible for directing SCF-mediated degradation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) to promote cell proliferation. We herein provide the first evidence supporting the critical involvement of the SKP2-p27(KIP1) axis in sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation in various human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Specifically, sulforaphane markedly suppressed the levels of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and clonogenicity in all tested cell lines, illustrating the antiproliferative effect of sulforaphane. Of note, sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation was accompanied with down-regulation of SKP2, leading to the stabilization and thus up-regulation of p27(KIP1). Additionally, sulforaphane was found to down-regulate SKP2 mainly through transcriptional repression, as sulforaphane lowered SKP2 mRNA expression and the SKP2 promoter activity. Furthermore, sulforaphane treatment led to the activation of both AKT and ERK, thus ruling out the possibility that sulforaphane down-regulates SKP2 by inhibiting AKT or ERK. Notably, sulforaphane-elicited suppression of BrdU incorporation and clonogenicity were significantly rescued in the context of SKP2 overexpression or p27(KIP1) depletion, therefore highlighting the important role of SKP2 down-regulation and the ensuing stabilization of p27(KIP1) in sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation. Collectively, these data expand our molecular understanding about how sulforaphane elicits proliferation arrest, but also implicate the application of sulforaphane in therapeutic modalities targeting SKP2. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology

  15. Caveolin-1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA FELLEY-BOSCO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are now widely recognized as important players contributing both to cell homeostasis and the development of disease. In this respect nitric oxide (NO is no exception. The discussion here will center on regulation of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS for two reasons. First, only iNOS produces micromolar NO concentrations, amounts that are high by comparison with the picomolar to nanomolar concentrations resulting from Ca2+-controlled NO production by endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS. Second, iNOS is not constitutively expressed in cells and regulation of this isoenzyme, in contrast to endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS, is widely considered to occur at the transcriptional level only. In particular, we were interested in the possibility that caveolin-1, a protein that functions as a tumor suppressor in colon carcinoma cells (Bender et al., 2002; this issue, might regulate iNOS activity. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a post-transcriptional mechanism controlling iNOS protein levels that involves caveolin-1-dependent sequestration of iNOS within a detergent-insoluble compartment. Interestingly, despite the high degree of conservation of the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain binding motif within all NOS enzymes, the interaction detected between caveolin-1 and iNOS in vitro is crucially dependent on presence of a caveolin-1 sequence element immediately adjacent to the scaffolding domain. A model is presented summarizing the salient aspects of these results. These observations are important in the context of tumor biology, since down-regulation of caveolin-1 is predicted to promote uncontrolled iNOS activity, genotoxic damage and thereby facilitate tumor development in humans

  16. Strawberry-Tree Honey Induces Growth Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Cells and Increases ROS Generation: A Comparison with Manuka Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Sadia; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L; Sanna, Gavino; Spano, Nadia; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2017-03-11

    Honey is a natural product known to modulate several biological activities including cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the phytochemical content and the antioxidant activity of Strawberry tree ( Arbutus unedo ) honey (STH) and its cytotoxic properties against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-116) and metastatic (LoVo) cell lines in comparison with Manuka ( Leptospermum scoparium ) honey (MH). Several unifloral STH and MH were analyzed for their phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein contents, as well as their radical scavenging activities. STH from the Berchidda area showed the highest amount of phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein content, and antioxidant capacity compared to MH. Both STH and MH induced cytotoxicity and cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCT-116 and LoVo cells, with less toxicity on non-cancer cells. Compared to MH, STH showed more effect at lower concentrations on HCT-116 and LoVo cells. In addition, both honeys increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In HCT-116 cells, STH and MH induced similar ROS production but in LoVo cells STH induced a higher percentage of ROS compared to MH. Our results indicate that STH and MH can induce cell growth inhibition and ROS generation in colon adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells, which could be due to the presence of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. These preliminary results are interesting and suggest a potential chemopreventive action which could be useful for further studies in order to develop chemopreventive agents for colon cancer.

  17. Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Ayako; Okamura, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Yoko; Narukawa, Yuji; Takeda, Tadahiro; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2008-12-01

    Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value calculated at 2.7% (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC(50) of 45 microM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.

  18. Integrins are not essential for entry of coxsackievirus A9 into SW480 human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Outi; Merilahti, Pirjo; Hakanen, Marika; Karelehto, Eveliina; Alanko, Jonna; Sukki, Maria; Kiljunen, Saija; Susi, Petri

    2016-10-18

    Coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9) is a pathogenic enterovirus type within the family Picornaviridae. CV-A9 infects A549 human epithelial lung carcinoma cells by attaching to the αVβ6 integrin receptor through a highly conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, which is located at the exposed carboxy-terminus of the capsid protein VP1 detected in all studied clinical isolates. However, genetically-modified CV-A9 that lacks the RGD motif (CV-A9-RGDdel) has been shown to be infectious in some cell lines but not in A549, suggesting that RGD-mediated integrin binding is not always essential for efficient entry of CV-A9. Two cell lines, A549 and SW480, were used in the study. SW480 was the study object for the integrin-independent entry and A549 was used as the control for integrin-dependent entry. Receptor levels were quantitated by cell sorting and quantitative PCR. Antibody blocking assay and siRNA silencing of receptor-encoding genes were used to block virus infection. Peptide phage display library was used to identify peptide binders to CV-A9. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used to visualize the virus infection in the cells. We investigated the receptor use and early stages of CV-A9 internalization to SW480 human epithelial colon adenocarcinoma cells. Contrary to A549 infection, we showed that both CV-A9 and CV-A9-RGDdel internalized into SW480 cells and that function-blocking anti-αV integrin antibodies had no effect on the binding and entry of CV-A9. Whereas siRNA silencing of β6 integrin subunit had no influence on virus infection in SW480, silencing of β2-microglobulin (β2M) inhibited the virus infection in both cell lines. By using a peptide phage display screening, the virus-binding peptide identical to the N-terminal sequence of HSPA5 protein was identified and shown to block the virus infection in both A549 and SW480 cell lines. HSPA5 was also found to co-localize with CV-A9 at the SW480 cell periphery during the early stages of infection by confocal

  19. Pathogenic bacteria prime the induction of Toll-like receptor signalling in human colonic cells by the Gal/GalNAc lectin Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Del Carmen Domínguez-Robles, M; Meza, Isaura

    2011-08-15

    In mixed intestinal infections with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites and enteropathogenic bacteria, which are wide-spread in areas of endemic amoebiasis, interaction between the pathogens could be an important factor in the occurrence of invasive disease. It has been reported that exposure of human colonic cells to enteropathogenic bacteria increased trophozoite adherence to the cells and their subsequent damage. We report here that the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) of the amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin binds to Toll-like receptors TLR-2 and TLR-4 in human colonic cells, activating the "classic" signalling pathway of these receptors. Activation induced expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 mRNAs and the mRNAs of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as an increase in the corresponding proteins. Direct correlation was observed between the increased expression of TLRs and pro-inflammatory cytokines, the enhanced adhesion of trophozoites to the cells and the inflicted cell damage. When cells were exposed to pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (Gram⁺) or Shigella dysenteriae (Gram⁻), elements of an innate immune response were induced. CRD by itself elicited a similar cell response, while exposure to a commensal Escherichia coli had a null effect. Pre-exposure of the cells to pathogenic bacteria and then to CRD rendered an inflammatory-like microenvironment that after addition of trophozoites facilitated greater cell destruction. Our results suggest that CRD is recognised by human colonic cells as a pathogen-associated-molecular-pattern-like molecule and as such can induce the expression of elements of an innate immune response. In the human host, an exacerbated inflammatory environment, derived from pathogen interplay, may be an important factor for development of invasive disease. Copyright © 2011 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in myenteric plexus of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Rasmussen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    and had myoid features such as scattered caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, and cytoplasmic dense bodies. We found characteristic dense membrane-associated bands with a patchy basal lamina, invaginating cellular protrusions (peg and socket junctions) between ICC and between ICC and muscle cells......, and close contacts (lamina, and peg and socket...

  1. Activity and expression of human telomerase in normal and malignant cells in gastric and colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Pernak, Monika; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Tomasz; Wysocki, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The reactivation of telomerase is believed to play an important role in immortalization and carcinogenesis. To investigate the expression of three components of the telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT and TP1), along with telomerase activity in malignant and normal cells. Cells were isolated from gastric and colon cancer, and from normal mucosa from the stomach and colon of participating patients. Expression of hTERT, hTR and TP1 has been studied by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The telomerase repeat amplification protocol and PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for analysis of telomerase activity. All telomerase components were consistently expressed in colon and gastric cancer cells. Neoplastic RNA produced consistently very strong amplification signals either for hTR, hTERT or TP1. The expression of hTR was observed in RNA isolated from all normal mucosa samples and from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The expression of TP1 and hTERT has been found in the majority of normal cells; however, the amplification signals produced were usually much weaker than in malignant cells. The limiting dilution experiments indicated that the cancer cells have at least 100-fold higher telomerase activity and at least 25-fold higher TP1 and hTERT expression in comparison to normal cells. It can be concluded that all the cancer cells tested have higher telomerase expression and activity than normal cells. Therefore, telomerase can be a good cancer marker, provided that quantitative analysis is carried out. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  2. Up-regulation of MUC2 and IL-1β expression in human colonic epithelial cells by Shigella and its interaction with mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Radhakrishnan; Bharathi Raja, Subramaniya; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2011-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae into human colonic epithelial cells.

  3. BRAFV600E Efficient Transformation and Induction of Microsatellite Instability Versus KRASG12V Induction of Senescence Markers in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftychia Oikonomou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In colorectal cancer, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are mutated in about 15% and 35% respectively at approximately the same stage of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Since these two mutations rarely coexist, further analysis to dissect their function of transformation in colon cancer is required. Caco-2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were stably transfected with BRAFV600E (Caco-BR cells or KRASG12V (Caco-K cells oncogenes. BRAFV600E is more efficient in transforming Caco-2 cells and altering their morphology. The dominant nature of BRAFV600E is evident by its ability to render Caco-2 cells tumorigenic in vivo all be it through selective extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK 2 phosphorylation and high levels of cyclin D1. As a consequence, the cell cycle distribution of parental cells is altered and microsatellite instability is introduced. Attenuated ERK activation observed correlated with KSR downregulation by BRAFV600E without further implications to signaling. Highly activated ERK in case of KRASG12V (Caco-K cells leads to mild transformation causing Caco-K cells to express premature senescence-related markers and acquire growth factor-dependent viability. Interestingly, BRAFWTgets equally activated by upstream KRAS mutations present in colon adenocarcinoma cells such as DLD-1 and SW620. Taken together, these results suggest that the two oncogenes have different transforming capability in colon cancer, although they both use the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway to carry out their effect. In general, BRAFV600E presents greater potential in mediating tumorigenic effect as compared to KRASG12V both in vivo and in vitro. These findings may have implications in personalised diagnosis and targeted therapeutics.

  4. Up-regulation of MUC2 and IL-1β expression in human colonic epithelial cells by Shigella and its interaction with mucins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Prakash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The entire gastrointestinal tract is protected by a mucous layer, which contains complex glycoproteins called mucins. MUC2 is one such mucin that protects the colonic mucosa from invading microbes. The initial interaction between microbes and mucins is an important step for microbial pathogenesis. Hence, it was of interest to investigate the relationship between host (mucin and pathogen interaction, including Shigella induced expression of MUC2 and IL-1β during shigellosis. METHODS: The mucin-Shigella interaction was revealed by an in vitro mucin-binding assay. Invasion of Shigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells was analyzed by Transmission electron microscopy. Shigella induced mucin and IL-1β expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and Immunofluorescence. RESULTS: The clinical isolates of Shigella were found to be virulent by a congo-red binding assay. The in vitro mucin-binding assay revealed both Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri have binding affinity in the increasing order of: guinea pig small intestinal mucincolonic mucin< Human colonic mucin. Invasion of Shigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells occurs within 2 hours. Interestingly, in Shigella dysenteriae infected conditions, significant increases in mRNA expression of MUC2 and IL-1β were observed in a time dependent manner. Further, immunofluorescence analysis of MUC2 shows more positive cells in Shigella dysenteriae treated cells than untreated cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our study concludes that the Shigella species specifically binds to guinea pig colonic mucin, but not to guinea pig small intestinal mucin. The guinea pig colonic mucin showed a greater binding parameter (R, and more saturable binding, suggesting the presence of a finite number of receptor binding sites in the colonic mucin of the host. In addition, modification of mucins with TFMS and sodium metaperiodate significantly reduced mucin-bacterial binding; suggesting that the mucin-Shigella interaction

  5. Luffa echinata Roxb. Induces Human Colon Cancer Cell (HT-29 Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The antiproliferative properties and cell death mechanism induced by the extract of the fruits of Luffa echinata Roxb. (LER were investigated. The methanolic extract of LER inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 in both dose-dependent and time-dependent manners and caused a significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells. In addition, obvious shrinkage and destruction of the monolayer were observed in LER-treated cells, but not in untreated cells. Analysis of the cell cycle after treatment of HT-29 cells with various concentrations indicated that LER extracts inhibited the cellular proliferation of HT-29 cells via G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle. The Reactive oxygen species (ROS level determination revealed that LER extracts induced apoptotic cell death via ROS generation. In addition, LER treatment led to a rapid drop in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP as a decrease in fluorescence. The transcripts of several apoptosis-related genes were investigated by RT-PCR analysis. The caspase-3 transcripts of HT-29 cells significantly accumulated and the level of Bcl-XL mRNA was decreased after treatment with LER extract. Furthermore, the ratio of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis genes (Bax and Bcl-2 was sharply increased from 1.6 to 54.1. These experiments suggest that LER has anticancer properties via inducing the apoptosis in colon cancer cells, which provided the impetus for further studies on the therapeutic potential of LER against human colon carcinoma.

  6. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Weng Phang

    Full Text Available Flavokawain C (FKC is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki, with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak and death receptors (DR5, while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin, resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4, consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, and hypophosphorylation of Rb.

  7. Gamma-Mangostin, a Micronutrient of Mangosteen Fruit, Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Chang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently colorectal cancer rates have increased rapidly in Taiwan. The treatment of colorectal cancer includes surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana is a famous Asian tropical fruit. γ-Mangostin is a xanthone derivative isolated from the fruit hull. In previous studies, we found evidence of anti-inflammatory and anti-brain tumor activities in γ-mangostin. In this study, we performed further studies to assess the apoptotic effects of γ-mangostin on colorectal adenocarcinoma cells HT29. γ-Mangostin showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxic effects on HT29 cells. Microscopic observation under Giemsa staining showed that γ-mangostin induced cellular swelling and the appearance of apoptotic bodies, characteristic of apoptosis in HT29 cells. In addition, flow cytometry analysis showed an increase of hypodiploid cells in γ-mangostin-treated HT29 cells, while enhancement of intracellular peroxide production was detected in the same γ-mangostin-treated cells by DCHDA assay and DiOC6(3 staining. In view of the above results, γ-mangostin has demonstrated anticancer activity and induces apoptosis in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The evidence suggests that γ-mangostin could serve as a micronutrient for colon cancer prevention and is a potential lead compound for the development of anti-colon cancer agents.

  8. Direct Measurements of Human Colon Crypt Stem Cell Niche Genetic Fidelity: The Role of Chance in Non-Darwinian Mutation Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeyoun eKang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perfect human stem cell genetic fidelity would prevent aging and cancer. However, perfection would be difficult to achieve, and aging is universal and cancers common. A hypothesis is that because mutations are inevitable over a human lifetime, downstream mechanisms have evolved to manage the deleterious effects of beneficial and lethal mutations. In the colon, a crypt stem cell architecture reduces the number of mitotic cells at risk for mutation accumulation, and multiple niche stem cells ensure that a lethal mutation within any single stem cell does not lead to crypt death. In addition, the architecture of the colon crypt stem cell niche may harness probability or chance to randomly discard many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer. An analysis of somatic chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs reveals a lack of perfect fidelity in individual normal human crypts, with age-related increases and higher frequencies in ulcerative colitis, a proliferative, inflammatory disease. The age-related increase in somatic CNAs appears consistent with relatively normal replication error and cell division rates. Surprisingly, and similar to point mutations in cancer genomes, the types of crypt mutations were more consistent with random fixation rather than selection. In theory, a simple non-Darwinian way to nullify selection is to reduce the size of the reproducing population. Fates are more determined by chance rather than selection in very small populations, and therefore selection may be minimized within small crypt niches. The desired effect is that many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer are randomly lost by drift rather than fixed by selection. The subdivision of the colon into multiple very small stem cell niches may trade Darwinian evolution for non-Darwinian somatic cell evolution, capitulating to aging but reducing cancer risks.

  9. Direct measurements of human colon crypt stem cell niche genetic fidelity: the role of chance in non-darwinian mutation selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haeyoun; Shibata, Darryl

    2013-10-14

    Perfect human stem cell genetic fidelity would prevent aging and cancer. However, perfection would be difficult to achieve, and aging is universal and cancers common. A hypothesis is that because mutations are inevitable over a human lifetime, downstream mechanisms have evolved to manage the deleterious effects of beneficial and lethal mutations. In the colon, a crypt stem cell architecture reduces the number of mitotic cells at risk for mutation accumulation, and multiple niche stem cells ensure that a lethal mutation within any single stem cell does not lead to crypt death. In addition, the architecture of the colon crypt stem cell niche may harness probability or chance to randomly discard many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer. An analysis of somatic chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs) reveals a lack of perfect fidelity in individual normal human crypts, with age-related increases and higher frequencies in ulcerative colitis, a proliferative, inflammatory disease. The age-related increase in somatic CNAs appears consistent with relatively normal replication error and cell division rates. Surprisingly, and similar to point mutations in cancer genomes, the types of crypt mutations were more consistent with random fixation rather than selection. In theory, a simple "non-Darwinian" way to nullify selection is to reduce the size of the reproducing population. Fates are more determined by chance rather than selection in very small populations, and therefore selection may be minimized within small crypt niches. The desired effect is that many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer are randomly lost by drift rather than fixed by selection. The subdivision of the colon into multiple very small stem cell niches may trade Darwinian evolution for non-Darwinian somatic cell evolution, capitulating to aging but reducing cancer risks.

  10. Upregulation of Yes-associated protein and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif influences the behavior of LOVO human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Li, Lan; Zhu, Min; Ye, Limin; Yang, Qian

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) in the LOVO human colon adenocarcinoma cell line and explore the underlying mechanisms. First, the expression levels of YAP and TAZ were detected in LOVO cells using reverse-transcription quantitative PCR, and the results suggested that YAP and TAZ were faintly expressed in LOVO cells. To investigate the exact role of YAP and TAZ in LOVO cells, stable YAP- and/or TAZ-overexpressing LOVO cell lines were established using YAP and/or TAZ expression plasmids. An MTT assay and flow cytometry were used to assess cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The results indicated that compared with the control, YAP or TAZ overexpression significantly increased the proliferation ability of LOVO cells, while apoptosis was significantly decreased. Furthermore, the expression of the tumor-associated proteins connective tissue growth factor and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61, which have critical roles in facilitating cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion, were found to be upregulated following upregulation of YAP and TAZ. In addition, the expression of cell apoptosis-associated protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was significantly increased, while Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase-3 were inhibited by YAP or TAZ overexpression. All of these effects were amplified when YAP and TAZ were co-overexpressed. In conclusion, YAP and TAZ function as tumor promoters in human colon carcinoma, and upregulation of YAP and TAZ influences the behavior of LOVO colon adenocarcinoma cells via regulating tumor-associated gene expression.

  11. MicroRNA-184 inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of human colon cancer SW480 and HCT116 cells by downregulating C-MYC and BCL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Bing; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Li, Gang; Zheng, Jun-Hua; Qiu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of microRNA-184 (miR-184) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human colon cancer cells through the regulation of C-MYC and BCL-2. Human colon cancer tissues were selected as case group, and adjacent normal tissues were as control group. Human colon cancer SW480 and HCT116 cells were allocated into blank, miR-184 mimic negative control (mimic-NC), miR-184 inhibitor NC (inhibitor-NC), miR-184 mimic, and miR-184 inhibitor groups. Flow cytometry, Annexin V/PI and MTT assay were used to examine the cell cycle, apoptosis and viability. The expressions of C-MYC, BCL-2 and miR-184 were detected via immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). C-MYC and BCL-2 were direct targets to miR-184. The growth of colon cancer cells in the miR-184 mimic group was inhibited and exhibited an increase in apoptosis. Cell growth in the miR-184 mimic group was increased in addition to the inhibition of apoptosis. Compared with miR-184 mimic group, the expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2 in miR-184 inhibitor group were increased. The expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2 in colon cancer tissues exhibited high levels of expression, while miR-184 displayed relatively low levels in comparison to the adjacent normal tissues. An association was detected regarding the expressions of miR-184, C-MYC and BCL-2 with the differentiation, invasion depth and lymph node metastasis. MiR-184 expression was negatively related to C-MYC and BCL-2 expressions. Our study suggested that miR-184 could inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of colon cancer cells by down-regulating expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Expression of matrix metalloprotease-2, -7 and -9 on human colon, liver and bile duct cell lines by enteric and gastric Helicobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Naoko; Geironson, Linda; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Ljungh, Sa

    2005-05-01

    Gastric and enteric Helicobacter species have been associated with malignant and inflammatory diseases of the stomach, liver, gall bladder and intestine. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) participate in degradation of extracellular matrix, which allows bacteria to come in contact with and interact with the cells. Enhanced level of MMPs facilitates metastasis and cell invasion of tumor cells by removal of physical barriers, as well as modulation of biologic activities of the proteins residing in the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gastric and enteric Helicobacter on induction of MMPs in hepatocytes and epithelial cells of gall bladder and colon. Human hepatocytes HepG2, gall bladder epithelial cells TFK-1, and colon epithelial cells HT29 were infected with strains of H. pylori cagA+, cagE+, H. pylori cagA-, cagE-, H. pullorum, H. cholecystus, H. bilis and H. hepaticus. Protein levels of MMPs were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to study mRNA levels. Increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was observed on HepG2, TFK-1 and HT29 infected with H. pylori cagA+, cagE+ and H. cholecystus strains. H. pylori cagA+, cagE+, H. cholecystus, H. pullorum, H. bilis and H. hepaticus strains increased expression of MMP-7 on HT29, compared to uninfected control cells. The effect of MMP upregulation on HepG2, TFK-1 and HT29 was bacterial dose dependent. H. pylori cagA-, cagE- strain did not increase expression of MMPs. Inducible MMPs on colon and bile duct epithelial cells as well as hepatocytes may play an important role in facilitating invasion and progression of cancer by Helicobacter species colonizing the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Chemokine (C-C Motif Receptor 2 Mediates Dendritic Cell Recruitment to the Human Colon but Is Not Responsible for Differences Observed in Dendritic Cell Subsets, Phenotype, and Function Between the Proximal and Distal ColonSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Most knowledge about gastrointestinal (GI-tract dendritic cells (DC relies on murine studies where CD103+ DC specialize in generating immune tolerance with the functionality of CD11b+/− subsets being unclear. Information about human GI-DC is scarce, especially regarding regional specifications. Here, we characterized human DC properties throughout the human colon. Methods: Paired proximal (right/ascending and distal (left/descending human colonic biopsies from 95 healthy subjects were taken; DC were assessed by flow cytometry and microbiota composition assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Colonic DC identified were myeloid (mDC, CD11c+CD123− and further divided based on CD103 and SIRPα (human analog of murine CD11b expression. CD103-SIRPα+ DC were the major population and with CD103+SIRPα+ DC were CD1c+ILT3+CCR2+ (although CCR2 was not expressed on all CD103+SIRPα+ DC. CD103+SIRPα- DC constituted a minor subset that were CD141+ILT3−CCR2−. Proximal colon samples had higher total DC counts and fewer CD103+SIRPα+ cells. Proximal colon DC were more mature than distal DC with higher stimulatory capacity for CD4+CD45RA+ T-cells. However, DC and DC-invoked T-cell expression of mucosal homing markers (β7, CCR9 was lower for proximal DC. CCR2 was expressed on circulating CD1c+, but not CD141+ mDC, and mediated DC recruitment by colonic culture supernatants in transwell assays. Proximal colon DC produced higher levels of cytokines. Mucosal microbiota profiling showed a lower microbiota load in the proximal colon, but with no differences in microbiota composition between compartments. Conclusions: Proximal colonic DC subsets differ from those in distal colon and are more mature. Targeted immunotherapy using DC in T-cell mediated GI tract inflammation may therefore need to reflect this immune compartmentalization. Keywords: CCR2, Dendritic Cells, Distal Colon, Human Gastrointestinal Tract

  14. Resveratrol suppresses IGF-1 induced human colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis via suppression of IGF-1R/Wnt and activation of p53 signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Sridhar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a global phenomenon and is associated with various types of cancer, including colon cancer. There is a growing interest for safe and effective bioactive compounds that suppress the risk for obesity-promoted colon cancer. Resveratrol (trans-3, 4', 5,-trihydroxystilbene, a stilbenoid found in the skin of red grapes and peanuts suppresses many types of cancers by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis through a variety of mechanisms, however, resveratrol effects on obesity-promoted colon cancer are not clearly established. Methods We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol on HT-29 and SW480 human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; elevated during obesity and elucidated the mechanisms of action using IGF-1R siRNA in HT-29 cells which represents advanced colon carcinogenesis. Results Resveratrol (100-150 μM exhibited anti-proliferative properties in HT-29 cells even after IGF-1 exposure by arresting G0/G1-S phase cell cycle progression through p27 stimulation and cyclin D1 suppression. Treatment with resveratrol suppressed IGF-1R protein levels and concurrently attenuated the downstream Akt/Wnt signaling pathways that play a critical role in cell proliferation. Targeted suppression of IGF-1R using IGF-1R siRNA also affected these signaling pathways in a similar manner. Resveratrol treatment induced apoptosis by activating tumor suppressor p53 protein, whereas IGF-1R siRNA treatment did not affect apoptosis. Our data suggests that resveratrol not only suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways similar to that of IGF-1R siRNA but also enhances apoptosis via activation of the p53 pathway. Conclusions For the first time, we report that resveratrol suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis even in the presence of IGF-1 via suppression of IGF-1R/Akt/Wnt signaling pathways and

  15. Induction of G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrests by the dietary compound 3,3'-diindolylmethane in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Hyun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM, an indole derivative produced in the stomach after the consumption of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been demonstrated to exert anti-cancer effects in both in vivo and in vitro models. We have previously determined that DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon cancer cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DIM on cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. Methods HT-29 cells were cultured with various concentrations of DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L and the DNA was stained with propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis. [3H]Thymidine incorporation assays, Western blot analyses, immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays for cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK and cell division cycle (CDC2 were conducted. Results The percentages of cells in the G1 and G2/M phases were dose-dependently increased and the percentages of cells in S phase were reduced within 12 h in DIM-treated cells. DIM also reduced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. DIM markedly reduced CDK2 activity and the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (Rb and E2F-1, and also increased the levels of hypophosphorylated Rb. DIM reduced the protein levels of cyclin A, D1, and CDK4. DIM also increased the protein levels of CDK inhibitors, p21CIP1/WAF1 and p27KIPI. In addition, DIM reduced the activity of CDC2 and the levels of CDC25C phosphatase and cyclin B1. Conclusion Here, we have demonstrated that DIM induces G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells, and this effect may be mediated by reduced CDK activity.

  16. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  17. Colon cancer stem cells dictate tumor growth and resist cell death by production of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Di Stefano, Anna B.; Cammareri, Patrizia; Vermeulen, Louis; Iovino, Flora; Tripodo, Claudio; Russo, Antonio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that cancer growth is driven by stem-like cells within a tumor. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of such cells from colon carcinomas using the stem cell marker CD133 that accounts around 2% of the cells in human colon cancer. The

  18. SILENCING THE NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC O-GLCNAC TRANSFERASE REDUCES PROLIFERATION, ADHESION AND MIGRATION OF CANCER AND FETAL HUMAN COLON CELL LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGATA eSTEENACKERS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The post-translational modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc is regulated by a unique couple of enzymes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT transfers the GlcNAc residue from UDP-GlcNAc, the final product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP, whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA removes it. This study and others show that OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels are increased in cancer cell lines. In that context we studied the effect of OGT silencing in the colon cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116 and the primary colon cell line CCD841CoN. Herein we report that OGT silencing diminished proliferation, in vitro cell survival and adhesion of primary and cancer cell lines. SiOGT dramatically de-creased HT29 and CCD841CoN migration, CCD841CoN harboring high capabilities of mi-gration in Boyden chamber system when compared to HT29 and HCT116. The expression levels of actin and tubulin were unaffected by OGT knockdown but siOGT seemed to disor-ganize microfilament, microtubule and vinculin networks in CCD841CoN. While cancer cell lines harbor higher levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation to fulfill their proliferative and migra-tory properties, in agreement with their higher consumption of HBP main substrates glucose and glutamine, our data demonstrate that OGT expression is not only necessary for the biolog-ical properties of cancer cell lines but also for normal cells.

  19. Leptin counteracts sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HT-29 cells via NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet-Benzineb, Patricia; Aparicio, Thomas; Guilmeau, Sandra; Pouzet, Cécile; Descatoire, Véronique; Buyse, Marion; Bado, André

    2004-04-16

    This study shows that leptin induced a rapid phosphorylation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, an enhancement of both NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and a concentration-dependent increase of HT-29 cell proliferation. These effects are consistent with the presence of leptin receptors on cell membranes. The leptin induction of cell growth was associated with an increase of cell population in S and G2/M phase compared with control cells found in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, cyclin D1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in leptin-treated HT-29 cells and this increase was essentially associated with cell population in G0/G1 phase. On the other hand, we observed that sodium butyrate inhibited cell proliferation by blocking HT-29 cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, at physiological concentration, leptin prevented sodium butyrate-induced morphological nucleus changes, DNA laddering and suppressed butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. This anti-apoptotic effect of leptin was associated with HT-29 cell proliferation and activation NF-kappaB pathways. However, the phosphorylation of p42/44 MAP kinase in response to leptin was reduced in butyrate-treated cells. These data demonstrated that leptin is a potent mitogenic factor for intestinal epithelial cells through the MAP kinase and NF-kappaB pathways. They also showed, for the first time, that leptin promotes colon cancer HT-29 cell survival upon butyrate challenge by counteracting the apoptotic programs initiated by this short chain fatty acid probably through the NF-kappaB pathways. Although further studies are required to unravel the precise mechanism, these data may have significance in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and ulcerative colitis diseases.

  20. Resveratrol suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via targeting the pentose phosphate and the talin-FAK signaling pathways-A proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddivari Lavanya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have previously reported that resveratrol (RSV suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis in vitro and/or in vivo, however molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Particularly, little information is available on RSV's effects on metabolic pathways and the cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM communication that are critical for cancer cell growth. To identify important targets of RSV, we analyzed whole protein fractions from HT-29 advanced human colon cancer cell line treated with solvent control, IGF-1 (10 nM and RSV (150 μM using LC/MS/MS-Mud PIT (Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology. Results Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, a vital metabolic pathway for cell cycle progression, was elevated and suppressed by IGF-1 and RSV, respectively in the HT-29 cell line. Enzymatic assays confirmed RSV suppression of glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (rate limiting and transketolase, key enzymes of the PPP. RSV (150 μM suppressed, whereas IGF-1 (10 nM elevated focal adhesion complex (FAC proteins, talin and pFAK, critical for the cell-ECM communication. Western blotting analyses confirmed the suppression or elevation of these proteins in HT-29 cancer cells treated with RSV or IGF-1, respectively. Conclusions Proteomic analysis enabled us to establish PPP and the talin-pFAK as targets of RSV which suppress cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in the colon cancer cell line HT-29. RSV (150 μM suppressed these pathways in the presence and absence of IGF-1, suggesting its role as a chemo-preventive agent even in obese condition.

  1. Cytokine-induced impairment of short-chain fatty acid oxidation and viability in human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Horn, T

    2000-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines may directly influence the viability and metabolic function of colonic epithelial cells (CEC) as an early event in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. We report here that TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma induced a synergistic, concentration-dependent decline in butyrate o...... was independent on NO formation and involved the IFN-gamma signalling pathway as well as induction of apoptosis. If cytokines have similar effects in vivo, these may lead to energy deficiency and thus contribute to CEC damage and disturbance of the epithelial integrity....

  2. Sorbus rufopilosa Extract Exhibits Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities by Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT29 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, You Na; Jin, Soojung; Park, Hyun-Jin; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sorbus rufopilosa, a tsema rowan, is a species of the small ornamental trees in the genus Sorbus and the family Rosaceae found in East Asia. The bioactivities of S. rufopilosa have not yet been fully determined. The objective of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant and anticancer effects of ethanol extract of S. rufopilosa (EESR) and to determine the molecular mechanism of its anticancer activity in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells. Methods To examine the antioxidant activity of EESR, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity assay was performed. Inhibitory effect of EESR on cancer cell growth and proliferation was determined by water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. To investigate the mechanism of EESR-mediated cytotoxicity, HT29 cells were treated with various concentrations of EESR and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and Western blot analysis. Results EESR showed significant antioxidant activity and inhibitory effect on HT29 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. EESR induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner by modulating cyclin B, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), and CDK inhibitor p21 expression. EESR-induced apoptosis was associated with the upregulation of p53, a death receptor Fas, and a pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the activation of caspase 3, 8, and 9, resulting in the degradation of PARP. Conclusions EESR possessing antioxidant activity efficiently inhibits proliferation of HT29 cells by inducing both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. EESR may be a possible candidate for the anticancer drug development. PMID:28053959

  3. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  4. Dichloromethane-methanol extract from Borassus aethiopumn mart. (Arecaceae) induces apoptosis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakandé, J; Rouet-benzineb, P; Devaud, H; Nikiema, J B; Lompo, M; Nacoulma, O G; Guissou, I P; Bado, A

    2011-05-15

    Borassus aetihiopum MART (Arecaceae) is a plant used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of various diseases (bronchitis, laryngitis, antiseptic). In particular, their male inflorcscences were reported to exhibit cicatrizing, antiseptic and fungicidal properties. In the present study, the biological activity of E2F2, an apolar extract from Borassus aethiopum male inflorescence was investigated on colon cancer HT29 cells. Phytochemical screening was carried according to methodology for chemical analysis for vegetable drugs. Cells proliferation was determined by the MTT assay and cells cycle distribution was analysed by using laser flow cytometer (Beckman coulter). The cytoskeleton organisation was examined under a laser scanning confocal microscope (Zess). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of E2F2 extract revealed the presence of sterols, triterpenes and saponosids. E2F2 extract (1 microg and 100 microg mL(-1)) significantly inhibited cell proliferation by blocking cell population in G0/G1 phase. Flow Cytometric analysis of E2F2-treated HT29 cells showed that hypoploïd cell population (sub G1 phase) increased with processing time exposures. Immunofluorescence confocal analysis revealed a disrupt actin microfilaments network in E2F2 treated-cells with a significant reduction in actin stress fibres and appearance of a random, non-oriented distribution of focal adhesion sites. These data indicate that E2F2 extract has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Further studies are required to unravel the mechanisms of action of E2F2 extract.

  5. In Vitro Evaluation of the Impact of the Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 on Campylobacter jejuni’s Invasion and Intracellular Survival in Human Colonic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra A. Helmy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial food poisoning in humans. Due to the rise in antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, there exists a need to develop antibiotic-independent interventions to control infections in humans. Here, we evaluated the impact of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN, a probiotic strain, on C. jejuni’s invasion and intracellular survival in polarized human colonic cells (HT-29. To further understand how EcN mediates its impact, the expression of 84 genes associated with tight junctions and cell adhesion was profiled in HT-29 cells after treatment with EcN and challenge with C. jejuni. The pre-treatment of polarized HT-29 cells with EcN for 4 h showed a significant effect on C. jejuni’s invasion (∼2 log reduction of the colonic cells. Furthermore, no intracellular C. jejuni were recovered from EcN pre-treated HT-29 cells at 24 h post-infection. Other probiotic strains tested had no significant impact on C. jejuni invasion and intracellular survival. C. jejuni decreased the expression of genes associated with epithelial cells permeability and barrier function in untreated HT-29 cells. However, EcN positively affected the expression of genes that are involved in enhanced intestinal barrier function, decreased cell permeability, and increased tight junction integrity. The results suggest that EcN impedes C. jejuni invasion and subsequent intracellular survival by affecting HT-29 cells barrier function and tight junction integrity. We conclude that EcN might be a viable alternative for controlling C. jejuni infections.

  6. Enhanced antitumor activity of irofulven in combination with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in human colon and ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindessous, Virginie; Koeppel, Florence; Raymond, Eric; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Waters, Stephen J; Larsen, Annette K

    2003-11-01

    Irofulven (6-hydroxymethylacylfulvene, MGI-114, NSC 683863) is a semisynthetic derivative of illudin S, a natural product obtained from the Omphalotus mushroom. Irofulven has demonstrated potent activity against a broad range of solid tumors in both cellular and xenograft models and has shown promising activity in clinical trials. To guide the clinical use of irofulven, the present study used the MTT viability assay to examine the cytotoxic effects obtained by combining irofulven with two other anticancer agents: cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The study was carried out with HT-29 and HCT-116 colorectal and A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells as well as with their irofulven- (HT-29/IF2, HCT-116/IF27) or cisplatin-resistant (A2780/CP70) variants. The combinations showed strong sequence specificity. Simultaneous exposure to cisplatin and irofulven was at least additive for four cell lines including the cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP70 ovarian cells which exhibit a multifactorial resistance phenotype. Cisplatin followed by irofulven was additive for parental HCT-116 and A2780 cells whereas irofulven followed by cisplatin was antagonistic in all cellular models. Simultaneous exposure to 5-FU and irofulven was at least additive for all six cell lines. 5-FU followed by irofulven was additive for the parental HT-29 and A2780 cells and synergistic for the irofulven-resistant HCT-116 cell line. Irofulven followed by 5-FU was synergistic for the two ovarian cell lines and additive for the two parental colon cell lines. These studies demonstrate that simultaneous exposure to irofulven and cisplatin is at least additive for most cell lines whereas simultaneous exposure to irofulven and 5-FU is additive to synergistic for all the cell lines tested, including the irofulven- and cisplatin-resistant variants. The enhanced cytotoxicity of irofulven in combination with cisplatin and 5-FU support the clinical application of these regimens.

  7. Identification of a Novel Substance P–Neurokinin-1 Receptor MicroRNA-221-5p Inflammatory Network in Human Colonic Epithelial CellsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Substance P (SP, a neuropeptide member of the tachykinin family, plays a critical role in colitis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. We examined whether SP modulates expression of microRNAs in human colonic epithelial cells. Methods: We performed microRNA profiling analysis of SP-stimulated human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing neurokinin-1 receptor (NCM460-NK-1R. Targets of SP-regulated microRNAs were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Functions of miRNAs were tested in NCM460-NK-1R cells and the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS models of colitis. Results: SP stimulated differential expression of 29 microRNAs, including miR-221-5p, the highest up-regulated miR (by 12.6-fold upon SP stimulation. Bioinformatic and luciferase reporter analyses identified interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R mRNA as a direct target of miR-221-5p in NCM460 cells. Accordingly, SP exposure of NCM460-NK-1R cells increased IL-6R mRNA expression, and overexpression of miR-221-5p reduced IL-6R expression. Nuclear factor κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition decreased SP-induced miR-221-5p expression. MiR-221-5p expression was increased in both TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis and in colonic biopsy samples from ulcerative colitis but not Crohn’s disease patients compared with controls. In mice, intracolonic administration of a miR-221-5p chemical inhibitor exacerbated TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis and increased colonic tumor necrosis factor-α, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (Cxcl10, and collagen, type II, α 1 (Col2α1 mRNA expression. In situ hybridization in TNBS- and DSS-exposed colons revealed increased miR-221-5p expression primarily in colonocytes. Conclusions: Our results reveal a novel NK-1R-miR-221-5p-IL-6R network that protects from colitis. The use of miR-221-5p mimics may be a promising approach for colitis

  8. Malignant transformation of human colon epithelial cells by benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiolepoxides as well as 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Uta; Fuchs, Judith Iris; Teubner, Wera; Steinberg, Pablo

    2006-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) ingested with food have repeatedly been suggested to be involved in the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells. In order to test this hypothesis, HCEC cells (SV40 large T antigen-immortalized human colon epithelial cells) were incubated with a racemic mixture of benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiol epoxides (B[c]PhDE), extremely potent carcinogenic PAH metabolites in vivo, or with 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-OH-PhIP), the N-hydroxylated metabolite of the most abundant HCA in cooked meat. First, it was shown that HCEC cells express sulfotransferase 1A1, which is needed to metabolize N-OH-PhIP to the corresponding N-sulfonyloxy derivative, the direct precursor molecule of genotoxic nitrenium ions. Thereafter, exponentially growing HCEC cells were exposed five times to 0.1 microg (0.37 nmol) B[c]PhDE/ml for 30 min or 0.72 microg (3 nmol) N-OH-PhIP/ml for 24 h. Chemically treated HCEC cells showed an enhanced saturation density and grew faster than the corresponding solvent-treated cell cultures. After five treatment cycles, HCEC(B[c]PhDE) as well as HCEC(N-OH-PhIP) cells lost cell-cell contact inhibition and started piling up and forming foci in the culture flasks. Furthermore, HCEC(B[c]PhDE) and HCEC(N-OH-PhIP) cells were injected i.m. into SCID mice. Within 6 weeks after injection, eight animals out of eight injected with HCEC(B[c]PhDE) or HCEC(N-OH-PhIP) cells developed tumors at the site of injection, thus demonstrating the high tumorigenic potential of the HCEC(B[c]PhDE) and HCEC(N-OH-PhIP) cell cultures. Taken together, we show for the first time that the abovementioned active PAH metabolites as well as N-OH-PhIP are indeed able to malignantly transform human colon epithelial cells in vitro.

  9. Comparison of growth inhibition profiles and mechanisms of apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cell lines by isothiocyanates and indoles from Brassicaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappa, Gerlinde [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lichtenberg, Maike [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Iori, Renato [Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Istituto Sperimentale Colture Industriali, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Barillari, Jessica [Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Istituto Sperimentale Colture Industriali, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Bartsch, Helmut [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gerhaeuser, Clarissa [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: c.gerhauser@dkfz.de

    2006-07-25

    The isothiocyanates sulforaphane and PEITC ({beta}-phenethyl isothiocyanate) as well as the indoles indole-3-carbinol and its condensation product 3,3'-diindolylmethane are known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. In this study, we compared the cell growth inhibitory potential of the four compounds on the p53 wild type human colon cancer cell line 40-16 (p53{sup +/+}) and its p53 knockout derivative 379.2 (p53{sup -/-}) (both derived from HCT116). Using sulforhodamin B staining to assess cell proliferation, we found that the isothiocyanates were strongly cytotoxic, whereas the indoles inhibited cell growth in a cytostatic manner. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of all four compounds in both cell lines ranged from 5-15 {mu}M after 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment. Apoptosis induction was analyzed by immunoblotting of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP). Treatment with sulforaphane (15 {mu}M), PEITC (10 {mu}M), indole-3-carbinol (10 {mu}M) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (10 {mu}M) induced PARP cleavage after 24 and 48 h in both 40-16 and the 379.2 cell lines, suggestive of a p53-independent mechanism of apoptosis induction. In cultured 40-16 cells, activation of caspase-9 and -7 detected by Western blotting indicated involvement of the mitochondrial pathway. We detected time- and concentration-dependent changes in protein expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-x{sub L} as well as pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins. Of note is that for sulforaphane only, ratios of pro- to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein levels directly correlated with apoptosis induction measured by PARP cleavage. Taken together, we demonstrated that the glucosinolate breakdown products investigated in this study have distinct profiles of cell growth inhibition, potential to induce p53-independent apoptosis and to modulate Bcl-2 family protein expression in human colon cancer cell lines.

  10. Comparison of intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in human colon carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Karin; Knobloch, Thomas; Wagner, Sylvia; Wiehe, Arno; Engel, Andrea; Langer, Klaus; von Briesen, Hagen

    2011-06-01

    The second generation photosensitizer mTHPC was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the palliative treatment of advanced head and neck cancer in October 2001. It is known that mTHPC possesses a significant phototoxicity against a variety of human cancer cells in vitro but also exhibits dark toxicity and can cause adverse effects (especially skin photosensitization). Due to its poor water solubility, the administration of hydrophobic photosensitizer still presents several difficulties. To overcome the administration problems, the use of nanoparticles as drug carrier systems is much investigated. Nanoparticles based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been extensively studied as delivery systems into tumours due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. The goal of this study was the comparison of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles concerning cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation in human colon carcinoma cells (HT29). The nanoparticles delivered the photosensitizer to the colon carcinoma cells and enabled drug release without losing its activity. The cytotoxicity assays showed a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and viability after illumination. However, first and foremost mTHPC lost its dark toxic effects using the PLGA nanoparticles as a drug carrier system. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticles are a promising drug carrier system for the hydrophobic photosensitizer mTHPC.

  11. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pimpinella anisum seeds: antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity on human neonatal skin stromal cells and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalhi, Mohamad S; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Alfuraydi, Akram A; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Munusamy, Murugan A; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    The present study focused on a simple and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with multipurpose anticancer and antimicrobial activities. We studied a green synthesis route to produce AgNPs by using an aqueous extract of Pimpinella anisum seeds (3 mM). Their antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity on human neonatal skin stromal cells (hSSCs) and colon cancer cells (HT115) were assessed. A biophysical characterization of the synthesized AgNPs was realized: the morphology of AgNPs was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and ultraviolet-vis absorption spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed spherical shapes of AgNPs of P. anisum seed extracts with a 3.2 nm minimum diameter and average diameter ranging from 3.2 to 16 nm. X-ray powder diffraction highlighted the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles, ultraviolet-vis absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor their synthesis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the main reducing groups from the seed extract. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of elemental silver. We evaluated the antimicrobial potential of green-synthesized AgNPs against five infectious bacteria: Staphylococcus pyogenes (29213), Acinetobacter baumannii (4436), Klebsiella pneumoniae (G455), Salmonella typhi, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we focused on the toxicological effects of AgNPs against hSSC cells and HT115 cells by using in vitro proliferation tests and cell viability assays. Among the different tested concentrations of nanoparticles, doses 10 µg led to increased cytotoxicity. Overall, our results highlighted the capacity of P. anisum-synthesized AgNPs as novel and cheap bioreducing agents for eco-friendly nanosynthetical routes. The data confirm the multipurpose potential of plant-borne reducing and stabilizing agents in nanotechnology.

  12. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  13. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  14. Induction of calcium sensing receptor in human colon cancer cells by calcium, vitamin D and aquamin: Promotion of a more differentiated, less malignant and indolent phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navneet; Aslam, Muhammad N; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2015-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a robust promoter of differentiation in colonic epithelial cells and functions as a tumor suppressor. Cancer cells that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null) are highly malignant while acquisition of CaSR expression in these cells circumvents the malignant phenotype. We hypothesize that chemopreventive agents mediate their action through the induction of CaSR. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Ca(2+), vitamin D, and Aquamin (a marine algae product containing Ca(2+), magnesium and detectable levels of 72 additional minerals) on the induction of CaSR in the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and the corresponding CaSR null cells isolated from these lines. All three agonists induced CaSR mRNA and protein expression and inhibited cellular proliferation in the parental and CaSR null cells. Aquamin was found to be most potent in this regard. Induction of CaSR expression by these agonists resulted in demethylation of the CaSR gene promoter with a concurrent increase in CaSR promoter reporter activity. However, demethylation per se did not induce CaSR transcription. Induction of CaSR expression resulted in a down-regulated expression of tumor inducers and up-regulated expression of tumor suppressors. Again, Aquamin was found to be most potent in these biologic effects. This study provides a rationale for the use of a multi-mineral approach in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and suggests that induction of CaSR may be a measure of the effectiveness of chemopreventive agents. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  16. 6,7,4′-Trihydroxyisoflavone inhibits HCT-116 human colon cancer cell proliferation by targeting CDK1 and CDK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Won; Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Eun Jung; Hwang, Jung A.; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Hyong Joo; Dong, Zigang

    2011-01-01

    Colon cancer is a common epithelial malignancies worldwide. Epidemiologic evidence has shown that nutrition and dietary components are important environmental factors involved in the development of this disease. We investigated the biological activity of 6,7,4′-trihydroxyisoflavone (6,7,4′-THIF, a metabolite of daidzein) in in vitro and in vivo models of human colon cancer. 6,7,4′-THIF suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of HCT-116 and DLD1 human colon cancer cells more effectively than daidzein. In addition, 6,7,4′-THIF induced cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. Western blot analysis revealed that 6,7,4′-THIF effectively suppressed the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, but had no effect on other S- or G2/M-phase regulatory proteins such as cyclin A, cyclin B1 or CDK1. Daidzein did not affect the expression of any of these proteins. In kinase and pull-down assays, 6,7,4′-THIF, but not daidzein, inhibited CDK1 and CDK2 activities in HCT-116 cells by directly interacting with CDK1 and CDK2. In a xenograft mouse model, 6,7,4′-THIF significantly decreased tumor growth, volume and weight of HCT-116 xenografts. 6,7,4′-THIF bound directly to CDK1 and CDK2 in vivo, resulting in the suppression of CDK1 and CDK2 activity in tumors corresponding with our in vitro results. Collectively, these results suggest that CDK1 and CDK2 are potential molecular targets of 6,7,4′-THIF to suppress HCT-116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide insight into the biological actions of 6,7,4′-THIF and might establish a molecular basis for the development of new cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:21258042

  17. Water extract of Galla Rhois with steaming process enhances apoptotic cell death in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hui Yim

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Compared with GRE, AGRE is more potent in its ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 cells; therefore, we suggest that the steaming process may be useful as a feasible method for improving the anticancer effect of GRE.

  18. Assessment of Culture Condition and In Vitro Colonization Ability of Human Spermatogonial Stem Cells: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mahal Dashtian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a highly complex and regulated process in which germ stem cells differentiate into spermatozoa. These stem cells, called spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs, are in the base of seminiferous tubules and have the ability of self-renewal and differentiation into functional germ cells. Due to this ability, SSCs can restore spermatogenesis after testicular damage caused by cytotoxic materials or following transplantation into an infertile recipient. Therefore, self-renewal of these cells is critical for the preservation of SSC populations and restoration of fertility. While previous studies have shown that the SSCs of mice and other species can survive and proliferate for long periods of time, little information is available about suitable culture media for the growth of human SSCs. Identification of SSC markers allows for the isolation of these populations of cells. The isolated cell can be expanded in culture and transplanted into infertile recipients. Consequently, the recognition of markers and the establishment of long-term culture systems for human SSCs will be essential for using the potential of these cells in a clinical setting. In this article, we focus on the markers that have been identified for human SSCs and in vitro culture techniques used for human SSCs proliferation.

  19. Antioxidant Activity of Inulin and Its Role in the Prevention of Human Colonic Muscle Cell Impairment Induced by Lipopolysaccharide Mucosal Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Locato, Vittoria; Cocca, Silvia; Cimini, Sara; Palma, Rossella; Alloni, Rossana; De Gara, Laura; Cicala, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Background Fructans, such as inulin, are dietary fibers which stimulate gastro-intestinal (GI) function acting as prebiotics. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) impairs GI motility, through production of reactive oxygen species. The antioxidant activity of various fructans was tested and the protective effect of inulin on colonic smooth muscle cell (SMC) impairment, induced by exposure of human mucosa to LPS, was assessed in an ex vivo experimental model. Methods The antioxidant capacity of fructans was measured in an in vitro system that simulates cooking and digestion processes. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa, obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer, were sealed between two chambers, with the mucosal side facing upwards with Krebs solution with or without purified LPS from a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (O111:B4) and inulin (Frutafit IQ), and the submucosal side facing downwards into Krebs solution. The solutions on the submucosal side were collected following mucosal exposure to Krebs in the absence (N-undernatant) or presence of LPS (LPS-undernatant) or LPS+inulin (LPS+INU-undernatant). Undernatants were tested for their antioxidant activity and the effects on SMCs contractility. Inulin protective effects on mucosa and submucosa layers were assessed measuring the protein oxidation level in the experimental conditions analyzed. Results Antioxidant activity of inulin, which was significantly higher compared to simple sugars, remained unaltered despite cooking and digestion processes. Inulin protected the mucosal and submucosal layers against protein oxidation. Following exposure to LPS-undernatant, a significant decrease in maximal acetylcholine (Ach)-induced contraction was observed when compared to the contraction induced in cells incubated with the N-undernatant (4±1% vs 25±5% respectively, PInulin (35±5%). Conclusions Inulin protects the human colon mucosa from LPS-induced damage and this effect appears to be related to the

  20. Cultures of human colonic epithelial cells isolated from endoscopical biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Effect of IFNgamma, TNFalpha and IL-1beta on viability, butyrate oxidation and IL-8 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Bendtzen, K

    2000-01-01

    Cytokine-mediated impairment of viability and metabolic function of epithelial cells has been suggested as a possible early pathogenic event in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is currently unknown whether pro-inflammatory cytokines have a direct effect on human...... nontransformed colonic epithelial cells. We investigated the effects of TNFalpha, IFNgamma and IL-1beta on viability, short chain fatty acid (butyrate) oxidation and IL-8 secretion in human colonic epithelial cell cultures in vitro obtained from macroscopically normal mucosa from IBD patients and controls...... decreased to median 68% of unexposed cultures (P Cells from IBD patients were significantly less sensitive...

  1. DHA induces ER stress and growth arrest in human colon cancer cells: associations with cholesterol and calcium homeostasis *s⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Caroline Hild; Størvold, Gro Leite; Bremseth, Hilde; Follestad, Turid; Sand, Kristin; Mack, Merete; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lundemo, Anne Gøril; Iversen, Jens Gustav; Krokan, Hans Einar; Schønberg, Svanhild Arentz

    2008-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are normal constituents of the diet, but have properties different from other fatty acids (e.g., through generation of signaling molecules). N-3 PUFAs reduce cancer cell growth, but no unified mechanism has been identified. We show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) causes extensive changes in gene expression patterns at mRNA level in the colon cancer cell line SW620. Early changes include unfolded protein response (UPR) and increased levels of phosphorylated eIF2α as verified at protein level. The latter is considered a hallmark of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and is abundantly present already after 3 h. It may coordinate many of the downstream changes observed, including signaling pathways for cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, cholesterol metabolism, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation. Also, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), but not oleic acid (OA), induced key mediators of ER stress and UPR at protein level. Accumulation of esterified cholesterol was not compensated for by increased total levels of cholesterol, and mRNAs for cholesterol biosynthesis as well as de novo synthesis of cholesterol were reduced. These results suggest that cytotoxic effects of DHA are associated with signaling pathways involving lipid metabolism and ER stress. PMID:18566476

  2. Functional identification of a novel transcript variant of INPP4B in human colon and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Amanda; Guo, Su Tang; Sherwin, Simonne; Farrelly, Margaret; Yan, Xu Guang; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2017-03-25

    The 4-phosphatase Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B) is a regulator of the PI3K signalling pathway and functions to suppress or promote activation of downstream kinases depending on cell type and context. Here we report the identification of a novel small transcript variant of INPP4B (INPP4B-S) that has a role in promoting proliferation of colon and breast cancer cells. INPP4B-S differed from full length INPP4B (INPP4B-FL) by the insertion of a small exon between exons 15 and 16 and the deletion of exons 20-24. Nevertheless, INPP4B-S retained all the functional domains of INPP4B-FL and was similarly located to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of INPP4B-S increased, whereas selective knockdown of INPP4B-S reduced the rate of proliferation in HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. These results warrant further investigation of the role INPP4B-S in activation of downstream kinases and in regulation of cancer pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytotoxic effects of Urtica dioica radix on human colon (HT29) and gastric (MKN45) cancer cells mediated through oxidative and apoptotic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, S; Moradzadeh, M; Mousavi, S H; Sadeghnia, H R

    2016-10-15

    Defects in the apoptotic pathways are responsible for both the colorectal cancer pathogenesis and resistance to therapy. In this study, we examined the level of cellular oxidants, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by hydroalcoholic extract of U. dioica radix (0-2000 µg/mL) and oxaliplatin (0-1000 µg/mL, as positive control) in human gastric (MKN45) and colon (HT29) cancer, as well as normal human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Exposure to U. dioica or oxaliplatin showed a concentration dependent suppression in cell survival with IC50 values of 24.7, 249.9 and 857.5 µg/mL for HT29, MKN45 and HFF cells after 72 h treatment, respectively. ROS formation and lipid peroxidation were also concentration-dependently increased following treatment with U. dioica, similar to oxaliplatin. In addition, the number of apoptotic cells significantly increased concomitantly with concentration of U. dioica as compared with control cells, which is similar to oxaliplatin and serum-deprived cancer cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that U. dioica inhibited proliferation of gastric and colorectal cancer cells while posing no significant toxic effect on normal cells. U. dioica not only increased levels of oxidants, but also induced concomitant increase of apoptosis. The precise signaling pathway by which U. dioica induce apoptosis needs further research.

  4. Berberine Reduces cAMP-Induced Chloride Secretion in T84 Human Colonic Carcinoma Cells through Inhibition of Basolateral KCNQ1 Channels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl(-) secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) 80 +\\/- 8 muM). In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K(+) current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K(+) channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl(-) conductance or basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKCalpha and PKA, but had no effect on p42\\/p44 MAPK and PKCdelta. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42\\/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl(-) secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE ( approximately 65%), an inhibitor of PKCalpha and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 ( approximately 15%). Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKCalpha and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl(-) secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K(+) recycling via a PKCalpha-dependent pathway.

  5. Berberine Reduces cAMP-Induced Chloride Secretion in T84 Human Colonic Carcinoma Cells through Inhibition of Basolateral KCNQ1 Channels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl(-) secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) 80 ± 8 μM). In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K(+) current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K(+) channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl(-) conductance or basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKCα and PKA, but had no effect on p42\\/p44 MAPK and PKCδ. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42\\/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl(-) secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE (∼65%), an inhibitor of PKCα and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 (∼15%). Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKCα and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl(-) secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K(+) recycling via a PKCα-dependent pathway.

  6. Berberine reduces cAMP-induced chloride secretion in T84 human colonic carcinoma cells through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eAlzamora

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl- secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signalling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl- secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 80  8 M. In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K+ current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K+ channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl- conductance or basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKC and PKA, but had no effect on p42/p44 MAPK and PKC. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl- secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE (65 %, an inhibitor of PKC and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 (15 %. Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKC and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl- secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K+ recycling via a PKC-dependent pathway.

  7. Differential expression proteomics of human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Roberto; Solazzo, Michela; Fantappié, Ornella; Elfering, Sarah; Pantaleo, Pietro; Bechi, Paolo; Cianchi, Fabio; Ettl, Adam; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    The focus of this study was to use differential protein expression to investigate operative pathways in early stages of human colon cancer. Colorectal cancer represents an ideal model system to study the development and progression of human tumors, and the proteomic approach avoids overlooking posttranslational modifications not detected by microarray analyses and the limited correlation between transcript and protein levels. Colon cancer samples, confined to the intestinal wall, were analyzed by expression proteomics and compared with matched samples from normal colon tissue. Samples were processed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and spots differentially expressed and consistent across all patients were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses and by Western blot analyses. After differentially expressed proteins and their metabolic pathways were analyzed, the following main conclusions were achieved for tumor tissue: 1) a shift from beta-oxidation, as the main source of energy, to anaerobic glycolysis was observed owed to the alteration of nuclear- versus mitochondrial-encoded proteins and other proteins related to fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism; 2) lower capacity for Na(+) and K(+) cycling; and 3) operativity of the apoptosis pathway, especially the mitochondrial one. This study of the human colon cancer proteome represents a step toward a better understanding of the metabolomics of colon cancer at early stages confined to the intestinal wall.

  8. Protein-bound polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis and alters Wnt/β-catenin in SW480 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hae-Duck

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polysaccharides extracted from the Phellinus linteus (PL mushroom are known to possess anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PL remain to be explored. Experiments were carried out to unravel the anticancer effects of PL. Methods The anti-cancer effects of PL were examined in SW480 colon cancer cells by evaluating cell proliferation, invasion and matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP activity. The anti-angiogenic effects of PL were examined by assessing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. The in vivo effect of PL was evaluated in an athymic nude mouse SW480 tumor engraft model. Results PL (125-1000 μg/mL significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased β-catenin expression in SW480 cells. Expression of cyclin D1, one of the downstream-regulated genes of β-catenin, and T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF transcription activity were also significantly reduced by PL treatment. PL inhibited in vitro invasion and motility as well as the activity of MMP-9. In addition, PL treatment inhibited HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. Tumor growth of SW480 cells implanted into nude mice was significantly decreased as a consequence of PL treatment, and tumor tissues from treated animals showed an increase in the apoptotic index and a decrease in β-catenin expression. Moreover, the proliferation index and microvessel density were significantly decreased. Conclusions These data suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in certain colon cancer cells.

  9. EphB3-targeted regulation of miR-149 in the migration and invasion of human colonic carcinoma HCT116 and SW620 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Liu, Xiaozhu; Li, Yinfeng; Wang, Yan; Liang, Huankun; Li, Kangyan; Li, Laiqing; Chen, Cuicui; Sun, Wenqiao; Ren, Shoulei; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Licheng

    2017-03-01

    microRNAs play key roles during various crucial cell processes such as proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Also, microRNAs have been shown to possess oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions in human cancers. Here, we describe the regulation and function of miR-149 in colorectal cancer cell lines. miR-149 expression patterns were detected in human colorectal cell lines and tissue samples, and then focused on its role in regulation of cell growth, migration, invasion, and its target gene identification. Furthermore, the function of the target gene of miR-149 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. miR-149 expression was downregulated in human colorectal cancer HCT116 and SW620 cell lines compared to the normal colon epithelial NCM460 cell line using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction methods. Further studies indicated that introduction of miR-149 was able to suppress cell migration and invasion. Then, EphB3 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-149 in colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, experiments in vitro showed that knockdown expression of EphB3 could suppress cell proliferation and invasion, and ectopic expression of EphB3 restored the phenotypes of CRC cell lines transfected with miR149. In addition, silencing of EphB3 significantly affected cycle progression distribution and increased apoptosis in CRC cell lines. Finally, in vivo results demonstrated that knockdown of EphB3 by siRNA inhibited tumor growth. In conclusion,the important role of miR-149 in colorectal cancer progression suggesting that miR-149 may serve as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Overexpression of MT1-MMP is insufficient to increase experimental liver metastasis of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Noura, Shingo; Okami, Jiro; Uemura, Mamoru; Takemasa, Ichiro; Ikeda, Masataka; Ishii, Hideshi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Matsuura, Nariaki; Monden, Morito; Mori, Masaki

    2008-12-01

    The expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by tumor cells is correlated with invasive and metastatic potential. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of increased membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) expression on liver metastatic potential utilizing human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three human CRC cell lines, DLD1, HCT116 and HT29, were stably transfected with the MT1-MMP cDNA, and experimental liver metastasis was established by injecting the cells into the spleens of nude mice. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed increased expression of MT1-MMP mRNA in the stable tranfectants. In vitro analysis by gelatin zymography and morphological survey demonstrated that MT1-MMP transfectants displayed a matured gelatinolytic activity and invasive properties when cultured in 3D collagen gel, indicating that transduced MT1-MMP cDNA was functional. Although there was no difference in cell proliferation rate between MT1-MMP overexpressing cells and the Mock control cells, in vivo experiments indicated that the liver metastatic ability was not affected by MT1-MMP overexpression. Our findings indicated that conditional MT1-MMP overexpression was insufficient to increase experimental liver metastasis, suggesting a more complicated mechanism may be involved in the activation and regulation of MMPs cascades in vivo.

  11. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  12. Integrins are not essential for entry of coxsackievirus A9 into SW480 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkilä, Outi; Merilahti, Pirjo; Hakanen, Marika; Karelehto, Eveliina; Alanko, Jonna; Sukki, Maria; Kiljunen, Saija; Susi, Petri

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9) is a pathogenic enterovirus type within the family Picornaviridae. CV-A9 infects A549 human epithelial lung carcinoma cells by attaching to the αVβ6 integrin receptor through a highly conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, which is located at the exposed carboxy-terminus of the

  13. Antigenotoxic effect of kefir and ayran supernatants on fecal water-induced DNA damage in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, Anna; Kulikova, Irina; Alieva, Ludmila; Dodson, Andrew; Rowland, Ian; Jin, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Fermented dairy products and their component bacteria have been shown to possess health-promoting functions in consumers and recently have been suggested to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Kefir and ayran are two popular fermented milk drinks that have their origins in the Caucasus region of Russia. The present study aimed to evaluate their potential anticancer properties in colon cells in vitro. The comet assay and transepithelial resistance assay were used to assess the effect of kefir and ayran supernatants on genotoxicity of fecal water samples and on intestinal tight junction integrity. Their antioxidant capacity was measured by trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay and compared with that of unfermented milk. The results showed that DNA damage induced by 2 of 4 fecal water samples was significantly decreased by kefir and ayran supernatants and with ayran the effect was dose-dependent. However no effect on intestinal tight junctions was observed. The supernatants of kefir and ayran contained high amounts of acetic and lactic acid but only a very small quantity of caproic and butyric acid, and they showed significantly greater antioxidant capacity than milk. These findings suggest kefir and ayran can reduce DNA damage, which might be due to their antioxidant capacities.

  14. The importance of the stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 in the uptake of transferrin and in iron metabolism in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Bourseau-Guilmain

    Full Text Available As the pentaspan stem cell marker CD133 was shown to bind cholesterol and to localize in plasma membrane protrusions, we investigated a possible function for CD133 in endocytosis. Using the CD133 siRNA knockdown strategy and non-differentiated human colon cancer Caco-2 cells that constitutively over-expressed CD133, we provide for the first time direct evidence for a role of CD133 in the intracellular accumulation of fluorescently labeled extracellular compounds. Assessed using AC133 monoclonal antibody, CD133 knockdown was shown to improve Alexa488-transferrin (Tf uptake in Caco-2 cells but had no impact on FITC-dextran or FITC-cholera-toxin. Absence of effect of the CD133 knockdown on Tf recycling established a role for CD133 in inhibiting Tf endocytosis rather than in stimulating Tf exocytosis. Use of previously identified inhibitors of known endocytic pathways and the positive impact of CD133 knockdown on cellular uptake of clathrin-endocytosed synthetic lipid nanocapsules supported that CD133 impact on endocytosis was primarily ascribed to the clathrin pathway. Also, cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrine up regulated Tf uptake at greater intensity in the CD133(high situation than in the CD133(low situation, thus suggesting a role for cholesterol in the inhibitory effect of CD133 on endocytosis. Interestingly, cell treatment with the AC133 antibody down regulated Tf uptake, thus demonstrating that direct extracellular binding to CD133 could affect endocytosis. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy established that down regulation of CD133 improved the accessibility to the TfR from the extracellular space, providing a mechanism by which CD133 inhibited Tf uptake. As Tf is involved in supplying iron to the cell, effects of iron supplementation and deprivation on CD133/AC133 expression were investigated. Both demonstrated a dose-dependent down regulation here discussed to the light of transcriptional and post

  15. Effects of the differentiating agents sodium butyrate and N-methylformamide on the oxygen enhancement ratio of human colon tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallows, K.R.; Bliven, S.F.; Leith, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that chronic adaptation of human tumor cells to the differentiation-inducing agents N-methylformamide (NMF) and sodium butyrate (NAB) increases the sensitivity of oxic cells to graded single doses of X rays. These studies were carried out to define the sensitivity of hypoxic cells after adaptation. Clone A colon tumor cells were grown for three passages in medium containing 170 mM NMF or 2 mM NAB and irradiated in suspension culture, after gassing with either oxygen (60 min) or ultrapure nitrogen (90 min), and complete survival curves were generated. Using the linear-quadratic equation to describe the data, it was found that NMF and NAB produced increased X-ray killing of hypoxic cells. At the 10% level of survival, the dose-modifying factors were about 1.20 and 1.25 for NMF- and NAB-adapted hypoxic cells, respectively, as compared to hypoxic control cells. However, since both oxic and hypoxic cells exhibited increased sensitivity after NMF and NAB adaptation, there was no major change in the oxygen enhancement ratio.

  16. The lectin Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GS I-A4) specifically recognizes terminal alpha-linked N-acetylgalactosaminyl groups and is cytotoxic to the human colon cancer cell lines LS174t and SW1116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y F; Boland, C R; Kraus, E R; Goldstein, I J

    1994-05-15

    The lectin GS I-A4 binds to terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminyl (GalNAc) groups (which include the Tn antigen), but not to the closely related tumor-associated epitope, sialylated Tn antigen. The lectin also precipitates asialo OSM, but not its native sialylated form. Lectin histochemistry with human colonic tissues showed that GS I-A4 specifically stained specimens of colon cancer and colonic tissues from individuals with FAP; however, normal colonic tissues from patients without colonic disease were rarely stained with this lectin. Glycoconjugates bound by GS I-A4 were observed on the surface membranes of 2 human colon cancer cell lines, LS174t and SW1116, when fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated GS I-A4 was used. GS I-A4 was toxic to these 2 human colon cancer cell lines in monolayer culture. A dose-response study conducted using 10-160 micrograms/ml, of GS I-A4 demonstrated significant dose-related toxicity against LS174t and SW1116 cells. At concentrations > 80 micrograms/ml, > 99% of LS174t and > 90% of SW1116 cells were killed. Four mM GalNAc specifically inhibited the cytotoxic effect of GS I-A4 (p < 0.001), whereas 4mM N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) had no effect. Two other lectins that recognize terminal alpha-GalNAc residues, DBA and LBL, were significantly less cytotoxic to the colon cancer cells than GS I-A4. In the light of these findings, we speculate that GS I-A4 may have potential use as a diagnostic agent against colorectal cancer.

  17. Extract of bulbus Fritillaria cirrhosa perturbs spindle assembly checkpoint, induces mitotic aberrations and genomic instability in human colon epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xihan; Ni, Juan; Xue, Jinglun; Wang, Xu

    2017-03-02

    Bulbus Fritillaria cirrhosa D. Don (BFC) has been used in China as a folk medicine for the treatment of cough and asthma for more than 2000 years. The antitussive and antiasthmatic effects of BFC have been reported before, nevertheless its toxicity and safety have not been documented. This study investigated the possible effects of BFC on spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic fidelity and genomic stability in human NCM460 colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with BFC (0, 20, 40, 80 and 160μg/ml) for 24, 48 and 72h and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment (CMA), chromosome lagging (CL) and chromatin bridge (CB). Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of genomic instability (GIN). SAC activity was determined by anaphase to metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of several SAC genes, including CENP-E, Mps1, Bub1, Mad-1, BubR1 and Mad-2. Compared with the control, cells in BFC treated groups (80 and 160μg/ml) showed: 1) increased AMR (pMps1, Bub1 and Mad-1 (p<0.05) and down-regulated expression of CENP-E, BubR1 and Mad-2 (p<0.05); 2) increased frequencies of CMA, CL and CB (p<0.01); 3) increased incidences of MN and NB (p<0.01). This study revealed for the first time that BFC causes mitotic aberrations and GIN in human colon epithelial cells and these effects maybe the result of SAC dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The mycotoxin patulin decreases expression of density-enhanced phosphatase-1 by down-regulating PPARγ in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Akihiro; Konno, Tomomi; Shimoyama, Shuji; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2014-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin that is found mainly in apple products and causes symptoms such as bleeding from the digestive tract and diarrhea. Efforts to elucidate the mechanism of its toxicity have focused on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which regulate the function of tight junctions (TJs) in colon epithelial cells. Patulin reacts with the conserved cysteine residues in the catalytic domains of PTP isoforms. Treatment of Caco-2 human colon cancer cells, used as a colon epithelial model, with 50 µM patulin decreased the level of density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) protein to 30% of the control level after 6 h. The level of DEP-1 mRNA was also decreased during 24 h after treatment with patulin. Moreover, knockdown of DEP-1 increased the level of phosphorylated claudin-4. Destruction of TJs by patulin treatment was observed by immunostaining with an antibody against zonula occludens (ZO)-1. To better understand the mechanistic basis of the decrease in DEP-1 mRNA levels, we searched for a cis-element upstream of the DEP-1 gene and found an element responsive to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) protein. Using a PPARγ-specific antibody, we showed a decrease in PPARγ abundance to 42% of the control level within 6 h after treatment with patulin. PPARγ has four cysteine residues that are involved in zinc finger formation. Our data suggest that DEP-1 affects TJ function and that PPARγ might control DEP-1 expression. Therefore, the toxicity of patulin to cellular functions might be attributable to its ability to down-regulate the expression of DEP-1 and PPARγ.

  19. Evaluation of antioxidative and antitumor activities of extracted flavonoids from Pink Lady apples in human colon and breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shufang; Zhang, Haisheng; Yang, Xingbin; Zhu, Yilin; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-01

    The antioxidative and anticancer effects of extracted flavonoids from Pink Lady apples on human colon cancer LoVo cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells were evaluated. It was found that the antioxidative property of the peel-flavonoids (Peel-F) was more effective than that of the flesh-flavonoids (Flesh-F). Meanwhile, both the Peel-F and Flesh-F can inhibit cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, with the IC50 values of 110.33 ± 2.52 mg mL(-1) and 378.14 ± 1.64 mg mL(-1) for LoVo cells and 58.42 ± 1.39 mg mL(-1) and 296.06 ± 3.71 mg mL(-1) for MCF-7 cells. This led to the conclusion that the Peel-F were more effective against cancer cells than the Flesh-F, and that the scavenging ROS effects were significantly higher in the Peel-F in vitro. Moreover, we also found that the generation of ROS is a critical mediator in apple flavonoid-induced cell apoptosis and the induction effect of the Peel-F was significantly higher than that of the Flesh-F.

  20. Prehistoric human colonization of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    versatile hand, and an unusually powerful brain, cultu- rally they differ in their ability to manufacture and ..... The explanation for this dramatic increase in human settlements lies in the increased rainfall and its effect on .... agriculture repertoire oats and another variety of wheat were added. There is evidence of stone bead ...

  1. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  2. CXC chemokine ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 regulates cell adhesion in human colon cancer cells by induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Shui-Yi; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chou, Ming-Hui; Huang, Wen-Shih; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Shen, Chien-Heng; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan

    2012-10-25

    The CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis is involved in human colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis and can promote the progression of CRC. Interaction between CRC cells and endothelium is a key event in tumor progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SDF-1 on the adhesion of CRC cells. Human CRC DLD-1 cells were used to study the effect of SDF-1 on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and cell adhesion to endothelium. SDF-1 treatment induced adhesion of DLD-1 cells to the endothelium and increased the expression level of the ICAM-1. Inhibition of ICAM-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and neutralizing antibody inhibited SDF-1-induced cell adhesion. By using specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we demonstrated that the activation of ERK, JNK and p38 pathways is critical for SDF-1-induced ICAM-1 expression and cell adhesion. Promoter activity and transcription factor ELISA assays showed that SDF-1 increased Sp1-, C/EBP-β- and NF-κB-DNA binding activities in DLD-1 cells. Inhibition of Sp1, C/EBP-β and NF-κB activations by specific siRNA blocked the SDF-1-induced ICAM-1 promoter activity and expression. The effect of SDF-1 on cell adhesion was mediated by the CXCR4. Our findings support the hypothesis that ICAM-1 up-regulation stimulated by SDF-1 may play an active role in CRC cell adhesion.

  3. Evidence for two modes of synergistic induction of apoptosis by mapatumumab and oxaliplatin in combination with hyperthermia in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Seog-Young; Lee, Yong J

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world--the main cause of death from colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP). Searching for the most clinically relevant approaches for treating colorectal metastatic disease by isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP), we developed the application of oxaliplatin concomitantly with hyperthermia and humanized death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa), and investigated the molecular mechanisms of this multimodality treatment in human colon cancer cell lines CX-1 and HCT116 as well as human colon cancer stem cells Tu-12, Tu-21 and Tu-22. We showed here, in this study, that the synergistic effect of the multimodality treatment-induced apoptosis was caspase dependent and activated death signaling via both the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and the intrinsic pathway. Death signaling was activated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling which led to Bcl-xL phosphorylation at serine 62, decreasing the anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-xL, which contributed to the intrinsic pathway. The downregulation of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein long isoform (c-FLIPL) in the extrinsic pathway was accomplished through ubiquitination at lysine residue (K) 195 and protein synthesis inhibition. Overexpression of c-FLIPL mutant (K195R) and Bcl-xL mutant (S62A) completely abrogated the synergistic effect. The successful outcome of this study supports the application of multimodality strategy to patients with colorectal hepatic metastases who fail to respond to standard chemoradiotherapy that predominantly targets the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  4. Evidence for two modes of synergistic induction of apoptosis by mapatumumab and oxaliplatin in combination with hyperthermia in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Song

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world--the main cause of death from colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP. Searching for the most clinically relevant approaches for treating colorectal metastatic disease by isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP, we developed the application of oxaliplatin concomitantly with hyperthermia and humanized death receptor 4 (DR4 antibody mapatumumab (Mapa, and investigated the molecular mechanisms of this multimodality treatment in human colon cancer cell lines CX-1 and HCT116 as well as human colon cancer stem cells Tu-12, Tu-21 and Tu-22. We showed here, in this study, that the synergistic effect of the multimodality treatment-induced apoptosis was caspase dependent and activated death signaling via both the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and the intrinsic pathway. Death signaling was activated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling which led to Bcl-xL phosphorylation at serine 62, decreasing the anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-xL, which contributed to the intrinsic pathway. The downregulation of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein long isoform (c-FLIPL in the extrinsic pathway was accomplished through ubiquitination at lysine residue (K 195 and protein synthesis inhibition. Overexpression of c-FLIPL mutant (K195R and Bcl-xL mutant (S62A completely abrogated the synergistic effect. The successful outcome of this study supports the application of multimodality strategy to patients with colorectal hepatic metastases who fail to respond to standard chemoradiotherapy that predominantly targets the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  5. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hernández

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral. Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10 with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12. Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  6. Pleurotus ostreatus inhibits proliferation of human breast and colon cancer cells through p53-dependent as well as p53-independent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    JEDINAK, ANDREJ; SLIVA, DANIEL

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the global consumption of mushrooms, only two epidemiological studies demonstrated an inverse correlation between mushroom intake and the risk of cancer. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated whether extracts from edible mushrooms Agaricus bisporus (portabella), Flammulina velutipes (enoki), Lentinula edodes (shiitake) and Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster) affect the growth of breast and colon cancer cells. Here, we identified as the most potent, P. ostreatus (oyster mushroom) which suppressed proliferation of breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-116) cells, without affecting proliferation of epithelial mammary MCF-10A and normal colon FHC cells. Flow cytometry revealed that the inhibition of cell proliferation by P. ostreatus was associated with the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, P. ostreatus induced the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1), whereas inhibited the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma Rb protein in MCF-7 cells. In addition, P. ostreatus also up-regulated expression of p21 and inhibited Rb phosphorylation in HT-29 cells, suggesting that that P. ostreatus suppresses the proliferation of breast and colon cancer cells via p53-dependent as well as p53-independent pathway. In conclusion, our results indicated that the edible oyster mushroom has potential therapeutic/preventive effects on breast and colon cancer. PMID:19020765

  7. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation orchestrates the tumor microenvironment and is strongly associated with cancer. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. This process is defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal traits. The mechanisms of TNFα-induced EMT in cancer cells have been well studied. However, mechanical properties have not yet been probed. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to investigate the morphology and mechanical properties of EMT in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. A remarkable morphological change from cobblestone shape to spindle-like morphology was observed. In parallel, AFM images showed that the cellular cytoskeleton was rearranged from a cortical to a stress-fiber pattern. Moreover, cell stiffness measurements indicated that Young’s modulus of cells gradually reduced from 1 to 3 days with TNFα-treatment, but it has an apparent increase after 4 days of treatment compared with that for 3 days. Additionally, Young’s modulus of the cells treated with TNFα for 4 days is slightly larger than that for 1 or 2 days, but still less than that of the untreated cells. Our work contributes to a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis induced by inflammation.

  8. Grape waste extract obtained by supercritical fluid extraction contains bioactive antioxidant molecules and induces antiproliferative effects in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzè, Maria Claudia; Pizzala, Roberto; Gutiérrez Pecharromán, Francisco Javier; Gatòn Garnica, Paloma; Antolín Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Fabris, Nicola; Bianchi, Livia

    2009-06-01

    Grape waste management is one of the main problems of winery industries, but, conversely, grape waste contains a high amount of polyphenols that might protect against human diseases related to oxidative stress, such as colorectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of a grape waste extract obtained by supercritical fluid extraction. Because the beneficial effect of grape is related to its content of polyphenolic molecules, the extract was chemically characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography in order to assess its major bioactive components. The antioxidant activity of the grape extract was determined. The results showed that the grape extract presents a strong antiradical activity in the in vitro 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical assay and protects against reactive oxygen species production in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). In contrast, the extract did not protect in the citronellal thermooxidation system and showed a weak protective action against lipid peroxidation in Caco-2 cells. The clonogenic assay and the cell cycle distribution analysis showed that the grape extract has a significant antiproliferative effect in a tumor cell line. These data indicate that grape extract is a promising product to be used as an anti-free radical agent and could exert a chemopreventive action.

  9. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  10. Extracellular Disposal of Tumor-Suppressor miRs-145 and -34a via Microvesicles and 5-FU Resistance of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Akao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA expression causes various kinds of diseases. Especially, alterations in miRNA expression levels are frequently observed in human tumor cells and are associated with cancer pathogenesis. Earlier we established Fluorouracil (5-FU-resistant human colon cancer DLD-1 cells (DLD-1/5FU from parental 5-FU- sensitive DLD-1 cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of miRNA in each cell line and in its extracellular microvesicles (MVs before and after treatment with 5-FU. The nascent RNAs of anti-oncogenic miR-34a and -145 labeled with EU in both cells were proved to be transferred into MVs in both cell lines. The levels of miR-34a and -145 in the cells and in their MVs were not largely different in the two cell lines, and a substantial amount of both miRNAs was secreted by both cell lines even in the steady-state condition. The exposure of both cell lines to 5-FU significantly increased the intracellular levels of miR-145 and miR-34a in the 5-FU-sensitive DLD-1 cells, whereas the level of neither miR was elevated in the DLD-1/5FU cells. Interestingly, the amount of miR-145 detected in the small MVs shed into the medium of the parental cells was reduced after the treatment with 5-FU. On the other hand, the intracellular expression of miR-34a in the DLD-1/5FU cells was down-regulated compared with that in the parental DLD-1 cells even in the steady-state condition. As to the miR-34a secreted into MVs, the increase in the level in DLD-1/5FU cells was greater than that in the parental DLD-1 cells after the treatment with 5-FU. Thus, the intra- and extracellular miR-145 and -34a were closely associated with 5-FU resistance, and the resistance was in part due to the enhanced secretion of miR-145 and -34a via MVs, resulting in low intracellular levels of both miRNAs.

  11. Annona muricata leaves induce G₁ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway in human HCT-116 and HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Karimian, Hamed; Rouhollahi, Elham; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2014-10-28

    Annona muricata known as "the cancer killer" has been widely used in the traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anticancer properties of ethyl acetate extract of Annona muricata leaves (EEAM) on HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of EEAM on the cell proliferation of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells was analyzed by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium) assay. High content screening system (HCS) was applied to investigate the cell membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), nuclear condensation and cytochrome c translocation from mitochondria to cytosol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and activation of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 were measured while treatment. Flow cytometric analysis was used to determine the cell cycle distribution and phosphatidylserine externalization. The protein expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was determined using immunofluorescence analysis. In addition, the potential of EEAM to suppress the migration and invasion of colon cancer cells was also examined. EEAM exerted significant cytotoxic effects on HCT-116 and HT-29 cells as determined by MTT and LDH assays. After 24 h treatment, EEAM exhibited the IC₅₀ value of 11.43 ± 1.87 µg/ml and 8.98 ± 1.24 µg/ml against HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization confirming the induction of apoptosis. EEAM treatment caused excessive accumulation of ROS followed by disruption of MMP, cytochrome c leakage and activation of the initiator and executioner caspases in both colon cancer cells. Immunofluorescence analysis depicted the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 proteins while treated with EEAM. Furthermore, EEAM conspicuously blocked the migration and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. These

  12. Anti Proliferative and Pro Apoptotic Effects of Flavonoid Quercetin Are Mediated by CB1 Receptor in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refolo, Maria Grazia; D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Malerba, Natascia; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Messa, Caterina; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Tutino, Valeria

    2015-12-01

    Quercetin, the major constituent of flavonoid and widely present in fruits and vegetables, is an attractive compound for cancer prevention due to its beneficial anti proliferative effects, showing a crucial role in the regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle signaling. In vitro studies have demonstrated that quercetin specifically influences colon cancer cell proliferation. Our experiments, using human colon adenocarcinoma cells, confirmed the anti proliferative effect of quercetin and gave intriguing new insight in to the knowledge of the mechanisms involved. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the endocannabinoids receptor (CB1-R) after quercetin treatment. CB1-R can be considered an estrogen responsive receptor and quercetin, having a structure similar to that of the estrogens, can interact with CB1-R leading to the regulation of cell growth. In order to clarify the contribution of the CB1-R to the quercetin action, we investigated some of the principal molecular pathways that are inhibited or activated by this natural compound. In particular we detected the inhibition of the major survival signals like the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and an induction of the pro apoptotic JNK/JUN pathways. Interestingly, the metabolism of β-catenin was modified by flavonoid both directly and through activated CB1-R. In all the experiments done, the quercetin action has proven to be reinforced by anandamide (Met-F-AEA), a CB1-R agonist, and partially counteracted by SR141716, a CB1-R antagonist. These findings open new perspectives for anticancer therapeutic strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enteric Neural Cells From Hirschsprung Disease Patients Form Ganglia in Autologous Aneuronal ColonSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N. Rollo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is caused by failure of cells derived from the neural crest (NC to colonize the distal bowel in early embryogenesis, resulting in absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS and failure of intestinal transit postnatally. Treatment is by distal bowel resection, but neural cell replacement may be an alternative. We tested whether aneuronal (aganglionic colon tissue from patients may be colonized by autologous ENS-derived cells. Methods: Cells were obtained and cryopreserved from 31 HSCR patients from the proximal resection margin of colon, and ENS cells were isolated using flow cytometry for the NC marker p75 (nine patients. Aneuronal colon tissue was obtained from the distal resection margin (23 patients. ENS cells were assessed for NC markers immunohistologically and by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mitosis was detected by ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine labeling. The ability of human HSCR postnatal ENS-derived cells to colonize the embryonic intestine was demonstrated by organ coculture with avian embryo gut, and the ability of human postnatal HSCR aneuronal colon muscle to support ENS formation was tested by organ coculture with embryonic mouse ENS cells. Finally, the ability of HSCR patient ENS cells to colonize autologous aneuronal colon muscle tissue was assessed. Results: ENS-derived p75-sorted cells from patients expressed multiple NC progenitor and differentiation markers and proliferated in culture under conditions simulating Wnt signaling. In organ culture, patient ENS cells migrated appropriately in aneural quail embryo gut, and mouse embryo ENS cells rapidly spread, differentiated, and extended axons in patient aneuronal colon muscle tissue. Postnatal ENS cells derived from HSCR patients colonized autologous aneuronal colon tissue in cocultures, proliferating and differentiating as neurons and glia. Conclusions: NC-lineage cells can be obtained from HSCR

  14. Antioxidant activity of inulin and its role in the prevention of human colonic muscle cell impairment induced by lipopolysaccharide mucosal exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pasqualetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fructans, such as inulin, are dietary fibers which stimulate gastro-intestinal (GI function acting as prebiotics. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS impairs GI motility, through production of reactive oxygen species. The antioxidant activity of various fructans was tested and the protective effect of inulin on colonic smooth muscle cell (SMC impairment, induced by exposure of human mucosa to LPS, was assessed in an ex vivo experimental model. METHODS: The antioxidant capacity of fructans was measured in an in vitro system that simulates cooking and digestion processes. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa, obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer, were sealed between two chambers, with the mucosal side facing upwards with Krebs solution with or without purified LPS from a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (O111:B4 and inulin (Frutafit IQ, and the submucosal side facing downwards into Krebs solution. The solutions on the submucosal side were collected following mucosal exposure to Krebs in the absence (N-undernatant or presence of LPS (LPS-undernatant or LPS+inulin (LPS+INU-undernatant. Undernatants were tested for their antioxidant activity and the effects on SMCs contractility. Inulin protective effects on mucosa and submucosa layers were assessed measuring the protein oxidation level in the experimental conditions analyzed. RESULTS: Antioxidant activity of inulin, which was significantly higher compared to simple sugars, remained unaltered despite cooking and digestion processes. Inulin protected the mucosal and submucosal layers against protein oxidation. Following exposure to LPS-undernatant, a significant decrease in maximal acetylcholine (Ach-induced contraction was observed when compared to the contraction induced in cells incubated with the N-undernatant (4±1% vs 25±5% respectively, P<0.005 and this effect was completely prevented by pre-incubation of LPS with Inulin (35±5%. CONCLUSIONS: Inulin protects

  15. X ray responses of a human colon tumor cell line after exposure to the differentiation-inducing agent N-methylformamide: concentration dependence and reversibility characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.; Bliven, S.F.

    1988-06-01

    The combination of differentiation-inducing agents with conventional cytotoxic agents has been suggested as a potential cancer therapeutic strategy. In this regard, we have chronically exposed (3 passages) a human colon tumor line (clone A) to varying concentrations (0-170 mM) of N-methylformamide and examined the change in sensitivity to ionizing radiation in vitro. The linear-quadratic formalism of survival was used to characterize the single graded dose survival curves. This equation yields two constants (alpha and beta) relating to cellular inactivation produced by either single events (alpha) or by the combination of two events (beta). As the N-methylformamide concentration increased, the alpha parameter increased while the beta parameter concomitantly decreased, yielding a concentration dependent radiosensitization which was most marked in the low dose region of the survival curve. Upon removal of NMF, the original radiation resistance was regained within 2-3 cell culture doubling times.

  16. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nucleotide selectivity defect and mutator phenotype conferred by a colon cancer-associated DNA polymerase δ mutation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, T M; Baranovskiy, A G; Wang, J; Tahirov, T H; Shcherbakova, P V

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in the POLD1 and POLE genes encoding DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ɛ (Polɛ) cause hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and have been found in many sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. Much attention has been focused on POLE exonuclease domain mutations, which occur frequently in hypermutated DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-proficient tumors and appear to be responsible for the bulk of genomic instability in these tumors. In contrast, somatic POLD1 mutations are seen less frequently and typically occur in MMR-deficient tumors. Their functional significance is often unclear. Here we demonstrate that expression of the cancer-associated POLD1-R689W allele is strongly mutagenic in human cells. The mutation rate increased synergistically when the POLD1-R689W expression was combined with a MMR defect, indicating that the mutator effect of POLD1-R689W results from a high rate of replication errors. Purified human Polδ-R689W has normal exonuclease activity, but the nucleotide selectivity of the enzyme is severely impaired, providing a mechanistic explanation for the increased mutation rate in the POLD1-R689W-expressing cells. The vast majority of mutations induced by the POLD1-R689W are GC→︀TA transversions and GC→︀AT transitions, with transversions showing a strong strand bias and a remarkable preference for polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences. The mutational specificity of the Polδ variant matches that of the hypermutated CRC cell line, HCT15, in which this variant was first identified. The results provide compelling evidence for the pathogenic role of the POLD1-R689W mutation in the development of the human tumor and emphasize the need to experimentally determine the significance of Polδ variants present in sporadic tumors.

  18. Apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways triggered by different grape seed extracts on human colon cancer cell line Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, Simona; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; Proietti, Sara; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Pasqua, Gabriella; Santamaria, Anna Rita; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Laganà, Aldo; Antonacci, Donato; Giuliani, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    Consumption of grape seed extract (GSE) is widely marketed as a dietary supplement and is considered safe for human health. Nevertheless, the analytical composition of GSE from different grape cultivars, growing in special agronomic constraints, differs greatly in flavan-3-ols content. The major concern with GSE studies is a lack of availability of uniformly standardised preparations, which raises an important question whether different GSE samples have comparable activity and trigger the same mechanisms of action on a given biological system. Therefore, it is tempting to speculate that GSE, obtained from different cultivars, could exert differentiated anticancer effects. The focus of the present study is to determine the selective biological efficacy of GSE obtained from three different sources on the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Irrespective of its source, high doses of GSE induced a significant inhibition on Caco-2 cell growth. Moreover, apoptosis was enhanced through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mechanisms, leading to an early apoptosis-inducing factor release and, further, to a dramatic increase in caspase 7 and 3 activity. However, a significant difference in apoptotic rates induced by the three grape sources clearly emerged when treating cancer cells with low and intermediate GSE concentrations (25 and 50 microg/ml).

  19. Methanolic extract of Boswellia serrata exhibits anti-cancer activities by targeting microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarnejad, Tayebeh; Saidijam, Massoud; Moradkhani, Shirin; Najafi, Rezvan

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer. A proper method to reduce mortality of CRC is chemoprevention to prevent initiation and promotion of intestinal tumorgenesis. One of the promising and developing chemopreventive agents is natural compounds found in plants. Frankincense, the resin extract from the Boswellia specious, has been used in traditional and modern medicine for treating various diseases with very minimal side effects. In the current study, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of methanolic extract of Boswellia serrata (B. serrata) on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with different concentrations of B. serrata and cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. mRNA expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) were examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Apoptosis was evaluated by the proportion of sub-G1 cells. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level and caspase 3 activity were determined by ELISA assay. Tube formation potential and HT-29 cells migration were assessed using three-dimensional vessel formation assay and scratch test. B. serrata extract considerably decreased the expression of mPGES-1, VEGF, CXCR4, MMP-2, MMP-9 and HIF-1. The caspase 3 activity and percent of cells in sub-G1 phase were increased by B. serrata extract. Cell viability, PGE2 generation, in vitro tube formation and cell migration were decreased significantly in B. serrata-treated HT-29 compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that B. serrata extract inhibits proliferation, angiogenesis and migration and induces apoptosis in HT-29 cells by inhibiting of mPGES-1 and decreasing the PGE2 level and its downstream targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between the destruction of tight junction by patulin treatment and increase of phosphorylation of ZO-1 in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchiya, Tomoko; Takumi, Ryo; Kudo, Yukako; Takamori, Akiko; Sasagawa, Tatuya; Takahashi, Kohei; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2011-08-28

    Patulin is a mycotoxin and its contamination of food has been reported to cause gastrointestinal inflammation, ulcers, and bleeding. The toxicity of patulin is thought to be due to the destruction of tight junctions (TJs) in gastrointestinal tissues. However, the precise mechanism has not been clarified. Here, we investigated the phosphorylation of TJ components. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 human colon cancer cells decreased gradually during the first 24h of treatment with 50μM patulin. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the TJ proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4, but not occludin, had decreased after 24h and decreased from the cell-cell contact regions of TJs after 48h of patulin treatment. Western blotting showed that the level of ZO-1 decreased after 48h of patulin treatment, but the levels of claudin-4 and occludin remained at the initial level until 72h. Phosphorylation of ZO-1 was detected by 24h and increased markedly after 72h of patulin treatment. However, phosphorylation of claudin-4 and occludin was not detected by probing with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Immunoprecipitation showed that interaction of ZO-1 with claudin-4 had decreased after 48h and was completely absent after 72h. These results suggest that phosphorylation caused the degradation of ZO-1 protein and the decrease in TER induced by patulin treatment of Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative effects of RRR-alpha- and RRR-gamma-tocopherol on proliferation and apoptosis in human colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Devin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mediterranean societies, with diets rich in vitamin E isoforms, have a lower risk for colon cancer than those of northern Europe and the Americas. Vitamin E rich diets may neutralize free radicals generated by fecal bacteria in the gut and prevent DNA damage, but signal transduction activities can occur independent of the antioxidant function. The term vitamin E represents eight structurally related compounds, each differing in their potency and mechanisms of chemoprevention. The RRR-γ-tocopherol isoform is found primarily in the US diet, while RRR-α-tocopherol is highest in the plasma. Methods The effectiveness of RRR-α- and RRR-γ-tocopherol at inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines with varying molecular characteristics (SW480, HCT-15, HCT-116 and HT-29 and primary colon cells (CCD-112CoN, nontransformed normal phenotype was studied. Colon cells were treated with and without RRR-α- or RRR-γ-tocopherol using varying tocopherol concentrations and time intervals. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured using the trypan blue assay, annexin V staining, DNA laddering and caspase activation. Results Treatment with RRR-γ-tocopherol resulted in significant cell death for all cancer cell lines tested, while RRR-α-tocopherol did not. Further, RRR-γ-tocopherol treatment showed no cytotoxicity to normal colon cells CCD-112CoN at the highest concentration and time point tested. RRR-γ-tocopherol treatment resulted in cleavage of PARP, caspase 3, 7, and 8, but not caspase 9. Differences in the percentage cell death and apoptosis were observed in different cell lines suggesting that molecular differences in these cell lines may influence the ability of RRR-γ-tocopherol to induce cell death. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate that multiple colon cancer cell lines containing varying genetic alterations will under go growth reduction and apoptosis in the presence of RRR

  2. In vivo production of novel vitamin D2 hydroxy-derivatives by human placentas, epidermal keratinocytes, Caco-2 colon cells and the adrenal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Kim, Tae-Kang; Shehabi, Haleem Z.; Tang, Edith; Benson, Heather A. E.; Semak, Igor; Lin, Zongtao; Yates, Charles R.; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of vitamin D2 to hydroxyvitamin D2 metabolites ((OH)D2) by human placentas ex-utero, adrenal glands ex-vivo and cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and colonic Caco-2 cells, and identified 20(OH)D2, 17,20(OH)2D2, 1,20(OH)2D2, 25(OH)D2 and 1,25(OH)2D2 as products. Inhibition of product formation by 22R-hydroxycholesterol indicated involvement of CYP11A1 in 20- and 17-hydroxylation of vitamin D2, while use of ketoconazole indicated involvement of CYP27B1 in 1α-hydroxylation of products. Studies with purified human CYP11A1 confirmed the ability of this enzyme to convert vitamin D2 to 20(OH)D2 and 17,20(OH)2D2. In placentas and Caco-2 cells, production of 20(OH)D2 was higher than 25(OH)D2 while in human keratinocytes the production of 20(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D2 were comparable. HaCaT keratinocytes showed high accumulation of 1,20(OH)2D2 relative to 20(OH)D2 indicating substantial CYP27B1 activity. This is the first in vivo evidence for a novel pathway of vitamin D2 metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and modified by CYP27B1, with the product profile showing tissue- and cell-type specificity. PMID:24382416

  3. Inflammatory cytokines IL-17 and TNF-α up-regulate PD-L1 expression in human prostate and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Yang, Lingyun; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ma, Lin; You, Zongbing

    2017-04-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) acts on PD-1 ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2) to suppress activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are co-expressed by T helper 17 (T H 17) cells in many tumors. The purpose of this study was to test if IL-17 and TNF-α may synergistically induce PD-L1 expression in human prostate cancer LNCaP and human colon cancer HCT116 cell lines. We found that IL-17 did not induce PD-L1 mRNA expression, but up-regulated PD-L1 protein expression in HCT116 and LNCaP cells. TNF-α induced PD-L1 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines. Neither IL-17 nor TNF-α induced PD-L2 mRNA or protein expression. IL-17 and TNF-α acted individually rather than cooperatively in induction of PD-L1 expression. IL-17 and/or TNF-α activated AKT, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways in HCT116 cells, whereas only NF-κB signaling was activated in LNCaP cells. NF-κB inhibitor could diminish PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in both HCT116 and LNCaP cell lines. ERK1/2 inhibitor could also reduce PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in HCT116 cells, while AKT inhibitor could abolish PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in LNCaP cells. These results suggest that IL-17 and TNF-α act individually rather than cooperatively through activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling to up-regulate PD-L1 expression in HCT116 cells, while the two inflammatory cytokines act through activation of NF-κB signaling, in the presence of AKT activity, to up-regulate PD-L1 expression in LNCaP cells. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pro-apoptotic activities of polyphenolics from açai (Euterpe oleracea Martius) in human SW-480 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Manoela Maciel dos Santos; Noratto, Giuliana; Martino, Hercia Stampini Duarte; Arbizu, Shirley; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Talcott, Stephen; Ramos, Afonso Mota; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cell growth inhibition activity of açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) polyphenolic extract against colon cancer HT-29 and SW-480 cells and the nonmalignant CCD-18Co colon fibroblast cells. Results showed that açai polyphenolic extract (5-20 mg/L) inhibited preferentially the growth of SW-480 cells with no toxicity in CCD-18Co cells, and this was accompanied by reduction of H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The mechanisms involved in SW-480 cell growth-inhibition by açai polyphenolic extract included the downregulation of NF-κB proinflammatory transcription factor and the nuclear factor-kappa B targets intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Furthermore, prooncogenic specificity proteins (Sp) were downregulated as well as Sp-targets Bcl-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and survivin. This was accompanied by activation of mitochondrial proapoptotic pathway involving increase of cytochrome c, cleavage of caspase-3, and decrease of PARP-1. Results strongly suggest that açai polyphenolic extract has antiinflammatory and cytotoxic activities in colon cancer cells and can be effective as natural colon cancer chemopreventive agents.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-rich multinucleated giant cells in the colon: a case report with transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin-Smith, M; Wahl, S M; Orenstein, J M

    1999-01-01

    Multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) expressing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are characteristically found in hyperplastic tonsils and adenoids, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis, vacuolar myelopathy, and lymph nodes coinfected with opportunistic pathogens. We identified similar polykaryons in the hyperplastic gut-associated immune system of an HIV-infected patient. Colonic biopsy specimens from this patient with heme-positive stools were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization for HIV-specific RNA. No bleeding source was identified by endoscopic or light microscopic examination of the biopsied tissues. There was diffuse and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia with germinal centers. HIV RNA-positive and p24 gag-positive Langhans'-type MNGCs and mononuclear cells (MNCs) were present within the lamina propria The MNGCs and MNCs were identified as macrophages on the basis of TEM and expression of CD68, HAM56, and lysozyme markers. They also expressed S100 protein, a marker of dendritic/Langerhans' cells, but they lacked Birbeck granules by TEM. In situ hybridization demonstrated RNA expression by MNGCs, MNCs, and follicular dendritic cells. TEM revealed budding and mature HIV particles on the plasma membranes of MNGCs, MNCs, and follicular dendritic cells. We conclude, therefore, that hyperplastic gut-associated immune systems can contain HIV-positive MNGCs and MNCs of the type seen in tonsils and adenoids and opportunistic pathogen-infected lymph nodes. Associated with immune activation, macrophages can express markers of dendritic/Langerhans' cells, cell types derived from the same CD34-positive bone marrow progenitor.

  6. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity in metastatic potential and survival signaling between iso-clonal HCT116 and HCT116b human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC metastasis is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The molecular mechanisms underlying this complex, multi-step pathway are yet to be completely elucidated. Recent reports have stressed the importance of intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the development of a metastatic phenotype. The purpose of this study was to characterize the intra-tumoral phenotypic heterogeneity between two iso-clonal human colon cancer sublines HCT116 and HCT116b on their ability to undergo metastatic colonization and survive under growth factor deprivation stress (GFDS.HCT116 and HCT116b cells were transfected with green fluorescence protein and subcutaneously injected into BALB/c nude male mice. Once xenografts were established, they were excised and orthotopically implanted into other male BALB/c nude mice using microsurgical techniques. Animal tissues were studied for metastases using histochemical techniques. Microarray analysis was performed to generate gene signatures associated with each subline. In vitro assessment of growth factor signaling pathway was performed under GFDS for 3 and 5 days.Both HCT116 and HCT116b iso-clonal variants demonstrated 100% primary tumor growth, invasion and peritoneal spread. However, HCT116 was highly metastatic with 68% metastasis observed in liver and/or lungs compared to 4% in HCT116b. Microarray analysis revealed an upregulation of survival and metastatic genes in HCT116 cells compared to HCT116b cells. In vitro analysis showed that HCT116 upregulated survival and migratory signaling proteins and downregulated apoptotic agents under GFDS. However, HCT116b cells effectively showed the opposite response under stress inducing cell death.We demonstrate the importance of clonal variation in determining metastatic potential of colorectal cancer cells using the HCT116/HCT116b iso-clonal variants in an orthotopic metastatic mouse model. Determination of clonal heterogeneity in patient tumors

  7. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  8. Grape compounds suppress colon cancer stem cells in vitro and in a rodent model of colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddivari, Lavanya; Charepalli, Venkata; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Elias, Ryan J; Lambert, Joshua D; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-08-09

    We have previously shown that the grape bioactive compound resveratrol (RSV) potentiates grape seed extract (GSE)-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis at physiologically relevant concentrations. However, RSV-GSE combination efficacy against colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), which play a key role in chemotherapy and radiation resistance, is not known. We tested the anti-cancer efficacy of the RSV-GSE against colon CSCs using isolated human colon CSCs in vitro and an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis in vivo. RSV-GSE suppressed tumor incidence similar to sulindac, without any gastrointestinal toxicity. Additionally, RSV-GSE treatment reduced the number of crypts containing cells with nuclear β-catenin (an indicator of colon CSCs) via induction of apoptosis. In vitro, RSV-GSE suppressed - proliferation, sphere formation, nuclear translocation of β-catenin (a critical regulator of CSC proliferation) similar to sulindac in isolated human colon CSCs. RSV-GSE, but not sulindac, suppressed downstream protein levels of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, c-Myc and cyclin D1. RSV-GSE also induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs characterized by elevated p53, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved PARP. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated knockdown of p53, a tumor suppressor gene, in colon CSCs did not alter efficacy of RSV-GSE. The suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs support potential clinical testing/application of grape bioactives for colon cancer prevention and/or therapy.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of herbal preparations STW5 and STW5-II in cytokine-challenged normal human colon cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Schneider

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are chronic relapsing intestinal disorders characterized by up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines followed by invasion of immune cells to the intestinal lamina propria. Standard therapies consist of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs. Since clinical efficiency is not satisfactory and the established drugs have massive side effects, new strategies to treat IBD are required. Herein, we investigate the protective effect of the fixed combination herbal preparations STW5 and STW5-II and the contribution of the corresponding single components in an in vitro inflammation model. The normal human colon epithelial cell line, NCM460, was treated with STW5, STW5-II or their single components for 4 h followed by experimental conditions comparable to induction of colitis. A pro-inflammatory cytokine cocktail consisting of TNFα, IL-β and IFNγ was used to simulate inflammatory stimuli normally caused by immune cells. The effects on NCM460 cells were investigated by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA and Proteome Profiler®. Levels of IP-10, MCP-1, I-TAC, Groα and IL-8 were elevated in chemokine-treated cells compared to untreated cells, but significantly reduced upon pretreatment with STW5 or STW5-II. However, the single compounds revealed only little effects on protein expression. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of both combination preparations on pro-inflammatory transcription factors of the STAT family using Western blot. In addition, we tested the effects on upstream MAPK p38. Both, STW5 and STW5-II did not show any effect on MAPK p38, but were effective in reducing phosphorylated levels of STAT1.In conclusion, both combination preparations act in an anti-inflammatory manner by influencing cytokine secretion via reduced activity of the JAK/STAT1 pathway. Relevant differences between STW5 and STW5-II were not found indicating similar efficacies.

  10. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative effects of ellagic acid and its colonic metabolite, urolithins, on human bladder cancer T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Benhong; Jin, Long; Yu, Honglian; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Youyi; Qin, Chengchen; Xie, Shuixiang; Zhu, Fan

    2013-09-01

    Urolithins were the metabolites of ellagic acid by intestinal flora in gastrointestinal tract. In previous research, it was found that urolithins could mainly inhibit prostate cancer and colon cancer cell growth. However, there is no report about bladder cancer therapy of urolithins. In this paper, three urolithin-type compounds (urolithin A, urolithin B, 8-OMe-urolithin A) and ellagic acid were evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against human bladder cancer cell lines T24. The IC₅₀ values for T24 cell inhibition were 43.9, 35.2, 46.3 and 33.7 μM for urolithin A, urolithin B, 8-OMe-urolithin A and ellagic acid, respectively. After the administration of urolithins and ellagic acid, we found these compounds could increase mRNA and protein expression of Phospho-p38 MAPK, and decrease mRNA and protein expression of MEKK1 and Phospho-c-Jun in T24 cells. Caspase-3 was also activated and PPAR-γ protein expression increased in drug-induced apoptosis. And what's more, the antioxidant assay afforded by three urolithins and EA treatments were associated with decreases in the intracellular ROS and MDA levels, and increased SOD activity in H₂O₂-treated T24 cells. The results suggested that these compounds could inhibit cell proliferation by p38-MAPK and/or c-Jun medicated caspase-3 activation and reduce the oxidative stress status in bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Phosphorylation on Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Leads to Treatment of Orthotopic Human Colon Cancer in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu Sasaki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to determine whether the dual inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR signaling pathways in tumor-associated endothelial cells can inhibit the progressive growth of human colon carcinoma in the cecum of nude mice. SW620CE2 human colon cancer cells growing in culture and orthotopically in the cecum of nude mice expressed a high level of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF but were negative for EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, VEGFR. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumorassociated endothelial cells expressed EGFR, VEGFR2, phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, phosphorylated VEGFR (pVEGFR. Treatment of mice with either 7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]-pyrimidine lead scaffold (AEE788; an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase or CPT-11 as single agents significantly inhibited the growth of cecal tumors (P < .01; this decrease was even more pronounced with AEE788 combined with CPT-11 (P < .001. AEE788 alone or combined with CPT-11 also inhibited the expression of pEGFR and pVEGFR on tumor-associated endothelial cells, significantly decreased vascularization and tumor cell proliferation, increased the level of apoptosis in both tumorassociated endothelial cells and tumor cells. These data demonstrate that targeting EGFR and VEGFR signaling on tumor-associated endothelial cells provides a viable approach for the treatment of colon cancer.

  12. Cytotoxic effects of palladium (II) and platinum (II) complexes with O,O'-dialkyl esters of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-2-(4-methyl) pentanoic acid on human colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volarevic, V; Vujic, J M; Milovanovic, M; Kanjevac, T; Volarevic, A; Trifunovic, S R; Arsenijevic, N

    2013-01-01

    As novel therapeutic agents relevant to colon cancer therapy are explored continuously, we tested 4 R2edda-type ligand precursors O,O'-dialkyl esters of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-2-(4-methyl)pentanoic acid (L1.2HCl-L4.2HCl) and corresponding palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against the human colon cancer cell lines CaCo-2, SW480 and HCT116. The effects of the tested compounds on cell viability were determined using MTT colorimetric technique. Analysis of cancer cell viability showed that all tested ligand precursors, palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes were cytotoxic on human colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxic activity of all palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes toward selected cancer cells was significantly higher in comparison to cisplatin. Among the tested platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes the lowest activity was observed for the compounds with the shortest ester chain and the highest activity was noted for palladium(II) complex No.2 with the n-Pr group in ester chain and for platinum(II) complex No.7 with the n-Bu group in ester chain. Palladium(II) complex No.2 and platinum(II) complex No.7 seem to be good candidates for future pharmacological evaluation in the field of colon cancer research and treatment.

  13. Cytosolic calcium mediates RIP1/RIP3 complex-dependent necroptosis through JNK activation and mitochondrial ROS production in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Wu, Xiaxia; Gao, Hongwei; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Wenwen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Jinhua; Du, Guanhua; Chen, Xiuping

    2017-07-01

    accumulation is a critical mediator in MAM-induced necroptosis through sustained JNK activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Our study also provided new insights into the molecular regulation of necroptosis in human colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential control of growth, apoptotic activity and gene expression in human colon cancer cells by extracts derived from medicinal herbs, Rhazya stricta and Zingiber officinale and their combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkady, Ayman I; Hussein, Rania Abd El Hamid; Abu-Zinadah, Osama A

    2014-11-07

    To investigate the effects of extracts from Rhazya stricta (R. stricta) and Zingiber officinale (Z. officinale) on human colorectal cancer cells. Human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) were subjected to increasing doses of crude alkaloid extracts from R. stricta (CAERS) and crude flavonoid extracts from Z. officinale (CFEZO). Cells were then harvested after 24, 48 or 72 h and cell viability was examined by trypan blue exclusion dye test; clonogenicity and soft agar colony-forming assays were also carried out. Nuclear stain (Hoechst 33342), acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining, agarose gel electrophoresis and comet assays were performed to assess pro-apoptotic potentiality of the extracts. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), using gene-specific primers and Western blot analyses were performed to assess the impact of CAERS and CFEZO on the expression levels of key regulatory proteins in HCT116 cells. Treatment with a combination of CAERS and CFEZO synergistically suppressed the proliferation, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth of HCT116 cells. Calculated IC50, after 24, 48 and 72 h, were 70, 90 and 130 μg/mL for CAERS, 65, 85 and 120 μg/mL for CFEZO and 20, 25 and 45 μg/mL for both agents, respectively. CAERS- and CFEZO-treated cells exhibited morphologic and biochemical features of apoptotic cell death. The induction of apoptosis was associated with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspases 3 and 9 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase. CAERS and CFEZO treatments downregulated expression levels of anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2, Bcl-X, Mcl-1, survivin and XIAP, and upregulated expression levels of proapoptotic proteins such as Bad and Noxa. CAERS and CFEZO treatments elevated expression levels of the oncosuppressor proteins, p53, p21 and p27, and reduced levels of the oncoproteins, cyclin D1, cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase-4 and

  15. Maintenance of the stemness in CD44+ HCT-15 and HCT-116 human colon cancer cells requires miR-203 suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sy-Yeuan Ju

    2014-01-01

    Taken together, CD44 is a critical molecule for modulating stemness in CSCs. More importantly, we show for the first time that the downregulation of miR-203 by HA/CD44 signaling is the main reason for stemness-maintenance in colon cancer cells.

  16. Oropharyngeal perinatal colonization by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torices, María Soledad; Corrales-Millan, Rocío; Hijona-Elosegui, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common human sexually transmitted disease. It is clinically relevant because this condition is necessary for the development of epithelial cervical cancer, and it is also a factor closely associated with the occurrence of diverse tumours and various benign and malignant lesions of the head and neck area. The infective mechanism in most of these cases is associated with sexual intercourse, but there is recent scientific evidence suggesting that HPV infection may also be acquired by other routes of infection not necessarily linked to sexual contact. One of them is vertical transmission from mother to child, either during pregnancy or at the time of delivery. The aim of our research was to study maternal-foetal HPV transmission during childbirth in detail, establishing the rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV in vaginal deliveries. The presence and type of HPV viral DNA at the time of delivery in samples of maternal cervical secretions, amniotic fluid, venous cord blood samples and neonatal oropharynx in pregnant women (and their babies) were determined. The rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV colonization in vaginal deliveries was 58.24%. The maternal and neonatal HPV colonization mechanism is essentially, but not exclusively, transvaginal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  17. Colon cancer cell treatment with rose bengal generates a protective immune response via immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianzhong; Kunda, Nicholas; Qiao, Guilin; Calata, Jed F; Pardiwala, Krunal; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2017-02-02

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to manage patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies are desired; however, mechanisms to incite tumor-specific immune responses remain to be elucidated. Rose bengal (RB) is toxic at low concentrations to malignant cells and may induce damage-associated molecular patterns; therefore, we investigated its potential as an immunomodulator in colon cancer. Murine and human colon cancer lines were treated with RB (10% in saline/PV-10) for cell cycle, cell death, and apoptosis assays. Damage-associated molecular patterns were assessed with western blot, ELISA, and flow cytometry. In an immunocompetent murine model of colon cancer, we demonstrate that tumors regress upon RB treatment, and that RB induces cell death in colon cancer cells through G2/M growth arrest and predominantly necrosis. RB-treated colon cancer cells expressed distinct hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including enhanced expression of calreticulin and heat-shock protein 90 on the cell surface, a decrease in intracellular ATP, and the release of HMGB1. To confirm the ICD phenotype, we vaccinated immunocompetent animals with syngeneic colon cancer cells treated with RB. RB-treated tumors served as a vaccine against subsequent challenge with the same CT26 colon cancer tumor cells, and vaccination with in vitro RB-treated cells resulted in slower tumor growth following inoculation with colon cancer cells, but not with syngeneic non-CT26 cancer cells, suggesting a specific antitumor immune response. In conclusion, RB serves as an inducer of ICD that contributes to enhanced specific antitumor immunity in colorectal cancer.

  18. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R F; Tranter, Michael M; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Michael, Gregory J; Baker, Mark D; Knowles, Charles H; Winchester, Wendy J; Bulmer, David C

    2016-02-24

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Na(v)1.9(-/-) mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. Copyright © 2016 Hockley et al.

  19. 1-(2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl Ethanone-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in G1/G0 in HT-29 Cells Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ma Lay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-(2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl ethanone (DMHE was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff. Boerl fruits and the structure confirmed by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. This compound was tested on the HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line using MTT (method of transcriptional and translational cell proliferation assay. The results of MTT assay showed that DMHE exhibited good cytotoxic effect on HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner but no cytotoxic effect on the MRC-5 cell line after 72 h incubation. Morphological features of apoptotic cells upon treatment by DMHE, e.g., cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing, were examined by an inverted and phase microscope. Other features, such as chromatin condension and nuclear fragmentation were studied using acridine orange and propidium iodide staining under the fluorescence microscope. Future evidence of apoptosis/necrosis was provided by result fromannexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining revealed the percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, necrotic and live cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner using flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis showed G0/G1 arrest in a time-dependent manner. A western blot analysis indicated that cell death might be associated with the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax PUMA. However, the anit-apotptic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 were also found to increase in a time-dependent manner. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bak was not observed.

  20. A CASE REPORT OF MULTIPLE PRIMARY SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS OF THE OVARY AND SIGMOID COLON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Villert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas are extremely rare malignancies. Because of their rarity, it is difficult to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with theses malignancies, and therefore, the increased interest in each clinical case report is highly relevant. Multiple primary squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas are the subject of discussion and differential diagnosis of sigmoid colon cancer with secondary ovarian cancer. Histopathological and clinical characteristics of the tumors were present and evidences in favor of the multiple primary malignancies were given. The association of squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas with human papilloma virus type 16 was shown.

  1. Characterization of side population cells isolated from the colon cancer cell line SW480.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Binghong; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Caiquan; Cheng, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many types of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including colon cancer cell lines. This study aimed to identify cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the SP of the colon cancer cell line SW480. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), followed by serum-free medium (SFM) culture. The self-renewal, differentiated progeny, clone formation, proliferation, invasion ability, cell cycle, chemosensitivity and tumorigenic properties in SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were investigated through in vitro culture and in vivo serial transplantation. The expression profiles of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein transporters and stem cell-related genes were examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The human colon cancer cell lines SW480, Lovo and HCT116 contain 1.1 ± 0.10, 0.93 ± 0.11 and 1.33 ± 0.05% SP cells, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that SP cells could differentiate into SP and NSP cells. SP cells had a higher proliferation potency and CFE than NSP cells. Compared to NSP cells, SP cells were also more resistant to CDDP and 5-FU, and were more invasive and displayed increased tumorigenic ability. Moreover, SP cells showed higher mRNA and protein expression of ABCG2, MDR1, OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, CD44 and CD133. SP cells isolated from human colon cancer cell lines harbor CSC properties that may be related to the invasive potential and therapeutic resistance of colon cancer.

  2. Identification of genes associated with the penetration activity of the human type of Edwardsiella tarda EdwGII through human colon epithelial cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suezawa, Chigusa; Yasuda, Masashi; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Kameyama, Taeko; Hirauchi, Misato; Nakai, Toshihiro; Okuda, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative pathogen with a broad host range including fish and humans. E. tarda causes gastrointestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. In present study, the penetration activities of 22 strains of E. tarda, including 10 human isolates and 12 diseased fish isolates, through Caco-2 cell monolayers were evaluated. All the human isolates exhibited penetration activity in contrast to the fish isolates, which did not. In order to identify genes responsible for penetration activity, we screened transposon (Tn) insertion mutants for reduced penetration activity. Two Tn insertion mutants showed markedly reduced penetration activity, and we identified the wecC and fliF genes as Tn insertion sites. The wecC and fliF genes encode UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase, which is involved in synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen and flagellar basal body M-ring protein, respectively. Motility activity, including swarming and swimming, by the wecC mutant was weaker than that by the wild-type strain, while the fliF mutant was immotile. These results indicated that the swarming and swimming abilities mediated by the wecC and fliF genes appeared to be essential for penetration activity of E. tarda through Caco-2 cell monolayers. We also demonstrated that it was possible to group E. tarda strains into two types of human isolates and diseased fish isolates based on distribution of the wecC gene, type III and type VI secretion system genes. PCR detection of the wecC gene may represent a useful method for detecting the human type of E. tarda, which may have the ability to cause human infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MSH3 mismatch repair protein regulates sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and a histone deacetylase inhibitor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available MSH3 is a DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene that undergoes frequent somatic mutation in colorectal cancers (CRCs with MMR deficiency. MSH3, together with MSH2, forms the MutSβ heteroduplex that interacts with interstrand cross-links induced by drugs such as cisplatin. To date, the impact of MSH3 on chemosensitivity is unknown.We utilized isogenic HCT116 (MLH1-/MSH3- cells where MLH1 is restored by transfer of chromosome 3 (HCT116+ch3 and also MSH3 by chromosome 5 (HCT116+3+5. We generated HCT116+3+5, SW480 (MLH1+/MSH3+ and SW48 (MLH1-/MSH3+ cells with shRNA knockdown of MSH3. Cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, SN-38, oxaliplatin, or the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor PCI-24781 and cell viability, clonogenic survival, DNA damage and apoptosis were analyzed.MSH3-deficient vs proficient CRC cells showed increased sensitivity to the irinotecan metabolite SN-38 and to oxaliplatin, but not 5-FU, as shown in assays for apoptosis and clonogenic survival. In contrast, suppression of MLH1 attenuated the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, but did not alter sensitivity to SN-38 or oxaliplatin. The impact of MSH3 knockdown on chemosensitivity to SN-38 and oxaliplatin was maintained independent of MLH1 status. In MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells, SN-38 and oxaliplatin induced higher levels of phosphorylated histone H2AX and Chk2, and similar results were found in MLH1-proficient SW480 cells. MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells showed increased 53BP1 nuclear foci after irradiation, suggesting that MSH3 can regulate DNA double strand break (DSB repair. We then utilized PCI-24781 that interferes with homologous recombination (HR indicated by a reduction in Rad51 expression. The addition of PCI-24781 to oxaliplatin enhanced cytotoxicity to a greater extent compared to either drug alone.MSH3 status can regulate the DNA damage response and extent of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. The ability of MSH3 to regulate chemosensitivity was independent of MLH1

  4. Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells via G1 arrest and apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Paul B; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Doucette, Carolyn D; Walsh, Mark; Hoskin, David W

    2015-10-01

    Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid present in black pepper, inhibits the growth of cancer cells, although the mechanism of action is not well understood. In this study, we show that piperine (75-150 µM) inhibited the growth of several colon cancer cell lines but had little effect on the growth of normal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Piperine inhibited HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation by causing G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with decreased expression of cyclins D1 and D3 and their activating partner cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, as well as reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein and up-regulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 expression. In addition, piperine caused hydroxyl radical production and apoptosis that was partially dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species. Piperine-treated HT-29 cells showed loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, as well as caspase activation and reduced apoptosis in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK. Increased expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins inositol-requiring 1α protein, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein, and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as decreased phosphorylation of Akt and reduced survivin expression were also observed in piperine-treated HT-29 cells. Furthermore, piperine inhibited colony formation by HT-29 cells, as well as the growth of HT-29 spheroids. Cell cycle arrest and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis following piperine treatment of HT-29 cells provides the first evidence that piperine may be useful in the treatment of colon cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion.

  6. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Iovine

    Full Text Available In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively. Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia

  7. Human wound colonization by Lucilia eximia and Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae): myiasis, perimortem, or postmortem colonization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R; Whitworth, Terry L; Phatak, Darshan R

    2014-05-01

    The infestation of human or animal tissues by fly larvae has been given distinctive terminology depending on the timing and location of colonization. Wounds and orifices colonized by Diptera in a living human or animal are typically referred to as myiasis. When the colonization occurs after death, it is referred to as postmortem colonization and can be used to estimate the minimum postmortem interval. What happens when the human, as in the case presented here, has a necrotic limb while the human remains alive, at least for a short period of time? The case presented here documents perimortem wound colonization by Lucilia eximia (Wiedemann) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) and the considerations for approximating development temperatures and estimating the time of colonization (TOC). This represents the first record of L. eximia in human myiasis in the United States and the first record of the co-occurrence of L. eximia and C. rufifacies in human myiasis in the United States. The TOC was estimated using both ambient and body temperature. Insect colonization before death complicates the estimation of TOC and minimum postmortem interval and illustrates the problem of temperature approximation in forensic entomology casework.

  8. Deep sequencing of RNA from three different extracellular vesicle (EV subtypes released from the human LIM1863 colon cancer cell line uncovers distinct miRNA-enrichment signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ji

    Full Text Available Secreted microRNAs (miRNAs enclosed within extracellular vesicles (EVs play a pivotal role in intercellular communication by regulating recipient cell gene expression and affecting target cell function. Here, we report the isolation of three distinct EV subtypes from the human colon carcinoma cell line LIM1863--shed microvesicles (sMVs and two exosome populations (immunoaffinity isolated A33-exosomes and EpCAM-exosomes. Deep sequencing of miRNA libraries prepared from parental LIM1863 cells/derived EV subtype RNA yielded 254 miRNA identifications, of which 63 are selectively enriched in the EVs--miR-19a/b-3p, miR-378a/c/d, and miR-577 and members of the let-7 and miR-8 families being the most prominent. Let-7a-3p*, let-7f-1-3p*, miR-451a, miR-574-5p*, miR-4454 and miR-7641 are common to all EV subtypes, and 6 miRNAs (miR-320a/b/c/d, miR-221-3p, and miR-200c-3p discern LIM1863 exosomes from sMVs; miR-98-5p was selectively represented only in sMVs. Notably, A33-Exos contained the largest number (32 of exclusively-enriched miRNAs; 14 of these miRNAs have not been reported in the context of CRC tissue/biofluid analyses and warrant further examination as potential diagnostic markers of CRC. Surprisingly, miRNA passenger strands (star miRNAs for miR-3613-3p*, -362-3p*, -625-3p*, -6842-3p* were the dominant strand in A33-Exos, the converse to that observed in parental cells. This finding suggests miRNA biogenesis may be interlinked with endosomal/exosomal processing.

  9. Sp1 and Sp3 Are the Transcription Activators of Human ek1 Promoter in TSA-Treated Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; See Too, Wei Cun; Few, Ling Ling

    2016-01-01

    Ethanolamine kinase (EK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of ethanolamine, the first step in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Human EK exists as EK1, EK2α and EK2β isoforms, encoded by two separate genes, named ek1 and ek2. EK activity is stimulated by carcinogens and oncogenes, suggesting the involvement of EK in carcinogenesis. Currently, little is known about EK transcriptional regulation by endogenous or exogenous signals, and the ek gene promoter has never been studied. In this report, we mapped the important regulatory regions in the human ek1 promoter. 5' deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified a Sp site at position (-40/-31) that was essential for the basal transcription of this gene. Treatment of HCT116 cells with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, significantly upregulated the ek1 promoter activity through the Sp(-40/-31) site and increased the endogenous expression of ek1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that TSA increased the binding of Sp1, Sp3 and RNA polymerase II to the ek1 promoter in HCT116 cells. The effect of TSA on ek1 promoter activity was cell-line specific as TSA treatment did not affect ek1 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we showed that Sp1 and Sp3 are not only essential for the basal transcription of the ek1 gene, their accessibility to the target site on the ek1 promoter is regulated by histone protein modification in a cell line dependent manner.

  10. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Ginger Extract Suppresses Inflammatory Response and Maintains Barrier Function in Human Colonic Epithelial Caco-2 Cells Exposed to Inflammatory Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunyoung; Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2017-05-01

    The beneficial effects of ginger in the management of gastrointestinal disturbances have been reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory potential of ginger extract was assessed in a cellular model of gut inflammation. In addition, the effects of ginger extract and its major active compounds on intestinal barrier function were evaluated. The response of Caco-2 cells following exposure to a mixture of inflammatory mediators [interleukin [IL]-1β, 25 ng/mL; lipopolysaccharides [LPS], 10 ng/mL; tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, 50 ng/mL; and interferon [INF]-γ, 50 ng/mL] were assessed by measuring the levels of secreted IL-6 and IL-8. In addition, the mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase were measured. Moreover, the degree of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibition was examined, and the intestinal barrier function was determined by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran transfer. It was observed that ginger extract and its constituents improved inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of nitrite, PGE2, IL-6, and IL-8 via NF-κB inhibition. The ginger extract also increased the TEER and decreased the transfer of FITC-dextran from the apical side of the epithelium to the basolateral side. Taken together, these results show that ginger extract may be developed as a functional food for the maintenance of gastrointestinal health. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Novel roles of DC-SIGNR in colon cancer cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Heya; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhaohui; Yuan, Menglang; Zhang, Yu; Ren, Shuangyi; Zuo, Yunfei

    2017-01-21

    Tumor metastasis is an essential cause of the poor prognosis of colon cancer. DC-SIGNR is a C-type lectin that is frequently found on human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. LSECtin, which is a homologue of DC-SIGNR, has been demonstrated to participate in colon cancer liver metastasis. Due to the similarities in the expression pattern and structure of the two proteins, we speculated that DC-SIGNR could also be involved in this process. Colon cancer cells were treated with the DC-SIGNR protein or control IgG, after which cell migration, invasion, and morphology were assayed. Xenograft mouse models were used to determine the role of DC-SIGNR in colon cancer liver metastasis in vivo. In addition, a human gene expression array was used to detect differential gene expression in colon cancer cells stimulated with the DC-SIGNR protein. The serum level of DC-SIGNR was examined in colon cancer patients by ELISA, and the significance of DC-SIGNR was determined. In our research, we investigated whether DC-SIGNR promotes colon cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knocking down mouse DC-SIGNR decreased the liver metastatic potency of colon cancer cells and increased survival time. Expressing human DC-SIGNR enhanced colon cancer liver metastasis. Furthermore, DC-SIGNR conferred metastatic capability on cancer cells by upregulating various metallothionein isoforms. To validate the above results, we also found that the serum DC-SIGNR level was statistically higher in colon cancer patients with liver metastasis compared with those without metastasis. These results imply that DC-SIGNR may promote colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis and could serve as a promising therapeutic target for anticancer treatment.

  13. Converging signals synergistically activate the LAMC2 promoter and lead to accumulation of the laminin gamma 2 chain in human colon carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørgen; Kirkeby, Lene T; Brorsson, Marianne M

    2003-01-01

    The trimeric extracellular matrix molecule laminin-5 and its constituent chains (alpha 3, beta 3, gamma 2) are normally not detectable intracellularly in intestinal epithelial cells but the laminin gamma 2 chain can be detected in cancer cells at the invasive front of a subset of colon carcinomas....... These cells are subjected to cytokines such as transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), produced by the tumour cells or by the surrounding stromal cells. The purpose of the present work was to investigate whether TGF-beta 1 and HGF, known to stimulate the LAMC2 gene...... encoding the laminin gamma 2 chain, might synergize to activate the LAMC2 promoter, and to identify the promoter elements involved. We find evidence for synergy between TGF-beta and HGF with respect to laminin gamma 2 chain expression and promoter activation and demonstrate that this requires the 5...

  14. Heat-killed probiotic bacteria differentially regulate colonic epithelial cell production of human β-defensin-2: dependence on inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habil, N; Abate, W; Beal, J; Foey, A D

    2014-12-01

    The inducible antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial products is essential to antipathogen responses of gut epithelial cells. Commensal and probiotic bacteria can augment such mucosal defences. Probiotic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, however, may have adverse effects, boosting inflammatory responses. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of selected probiotic strains on hBD-2 production by epithelial cells induced by pathologically relevant pro-inflammatory cytokines and the role of cytokine modulators in controlling hBD-2. Caco-2 colonic intestinal epithelial cells were pre-incubated with heat-killed probiotics, i.e. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) or Lactobacillus fermentum strain MS15 (LF), followed by stimulation of hBD-2 by interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the absence or presence of exogenous IL-10 or anti-IL-10 neutralising antibody. Cytokines and hBD-2 mRNA and protein were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LcS augmented IL-1β-induced hBD-2, whereas LF enhanced TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. LF enhanced TNF-α-induced TNF-α and suppressed IL-10, whereas augmented IL-1β-induced IL-10. LcS upregulated IL-1β-induced TNF-α mRNA and suppressed IL-10. Endogenous IL-10 differentially regulated hBD-2; neutralisation of IL-10 augmented TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. Exogenous IL-10, however, suppressed both TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced hBD-2; LcS partially rescued suppression in TNF-α- and IL-1β-stimulation, whereas LF further suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. It can be concluded that probiotic strains differentially regulate hBD-2 mRNA expression and protein secretion, modulation being dictated by inflammatory stimulus and resulting cytokine environment.

  15. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  16. Diallyl sulfide, diallyl disulfide, and diallyl trisulfide inhibit migration and invasion in human colon cancer colo 205 cells through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2, -7, and -9 expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Ma, Chia-Yu; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Hsia, Te-Chun; Ho, Heng-Chien; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-09-01

    Diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), and diallyl trisulfide (DATS) are major organosulfur compounds exiting in garlic (Allium sativum). These compounds are reported to exhibit various pharmacological properties such as antibacteria, antiangiogenesis, anticancer, and anticoagulation, and they also induce cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Although these compounds show wide spectrum of biological activities, there are no reports to show that DAS, DADS, and DATS affected migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells, and their exact molecular mechanisms are not well investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether DAS, DADS, and DATS affected the invasion and migration abilities of colo 205 human colon cancer cells. The results indicate that DAS, DADS, and DATS at 10 and 25 μM inhibited the migration and invasion of colo 205 cells in the order of DATS < DADS < DAS. DATS is the highest for inhibition of migration and invasion of colo 205 cells. DAS, DADS, and DATS induce downregulation expression of PI3K, Ras, MEKK3, MKK7, ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 and then lead to the inhibition of MMP-2, -7, and -9. DAS, DADS, and DATS inhibited NF-κB and COX-2 for leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that application of DAS, DADS, and DATS might serve as potential antimetastatic drugs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  17. Quercetin potentiates the effect of γδ T cells via modulating the expressions of Granzyme B, perforin and IFN-γ and also regulates the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer accounts as one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies focus on the efficiency of phytochemicals in cancer therapy. Influence of quercetin, a flavonoid on the effect of γδ T cells and Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway in human colon cancer cells (HT55 and HCT116 was investigated. Quercetin at 15-120 µM was observed to markedly reduce the viability of HT55 and HCT116 cells. Quercetin exposure significantly increased γδ T cell proliferation and also raised the expressions of granzyme B (Gra B, perforin (PFP, and interferon- γ (IFN-γ in γδ T cells. Reduced β-catenin expression with increased expressions of phosphorylated- β-catenin, axin1 and 2 were observed in HT55 and HCT116 cells on exposure to quercetin. However β-actin expression was found to be not much altered. The results suggest that quercetin was able to efficiently potentiate the effect of γδ T cells and modulate Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway.

  18. WNT Inhibitory Activity of Malus Pumila miller cv Annurca and Malus domestica cv Limoncella Apple Extracts on Human Colon-Rectal Cells Carrying Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Riccio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of the Wingless-related Integration site (WNT/β-catenin pathway have recently been under consideration as potential chemopreventive agents against Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP. This autosomal-dominant syndrome is caused by germline mutations in the gene coding for the protein APC and leads to hyperactivation of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, uncontrolled intestinal cell proliferation and formation of adenocarcinomas. The aim of the present work was to: (i test, on in vitro cultures of cells carrying FAP mutations and on ex vivo biopsies of FAP patients, the WNT inhibitory activity of extracts from two common southern Italian apples, Malus pumila Miller cv. ‘Annurca’ and Malus domestica cv ‘Limoncella’; (ii identify the mechanisms underpinning their activities and; (iii evaluate their potency upon gastrointestinal digestion. We here show that both Annurca and Limoncella apple extracts act as WNT inhibitors, mostly thanks to their polyphenolic contents. They inhibit the pathway in colon cells carrying FAP mutations with active dilutions falling in ranges close to consumer-relevant concentrations. Food-grade manufacturing of apple extracts increases their WNT inhibitory activity as result of the conversion of quercetin glycosides into the aglycone quercetin, a potent WNT inhibitor absent in the fresh fruit extract. However, in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion severely affected WNT inhibitory activity of apple extracts, as result of a loss of polyphenols. In conclusion, our results show that apple extracts inhibit the WNT pathway in colon cells carrying FAP mutations and represent a potential nutraceutical alternative for the treatment of this pathology. Enteric coating is advisable to preserve the activity of the extracts in the colon-rectal section of the digestive tract.

  19. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  20. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Bindon, Keren A; Kennedy, James A; Bastian, Susan E P

    2014-01-01

    Grape seed procyanidins (PC) are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE) have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP) combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2). SixPC fractions (F1-F6) were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature) and ripe (mature), utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (PCaco-2 cells. When combined with 5-FU, immature fractions F1-F3 enhanced the cell toxicity effects of 5-FU by 27-73% (PCaco-2 cells (PCaco-2 cells (PCaco-2 cells, but also surpassed standard 5-FU chemotherapy as an anti-cancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  1. Echoendoscopic characterization of the human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M. Castro-Poças

    Full Text Available Purpose: To characterize colon and rectum walls, pericolic and perirectal spaces, using endoscopic ultrasonography miniprobes. Methods: Sixty individuals (50% males, aged 18-80, were included. Using 12 and 20 MHz endoscopic ultrasonography miniprobes, all different colon segments (ascending, transverse, descending, sigmoid and rectum were evaluated according to the number and thickness of the different layers in intestinal wall, to the presence and (largest diameter of vessels in the submucosa and of peri-intestinal nodes. Results: The 20 MHz miniprobe identified a higher number of layers than the 12 MHz miniprobe, with medians of 7 and 5 respectively (p < 0.001. The rectal wall (p = 0.001, its muscularis propria (p < 0.001 and mucosa (p = 0.01 were significantly thicker than the different segments of the colon, which had no significant differences between them. Patients aged 41-60 presented thicker colonic wall and muscularis propria in descending (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004 and rectum (p=0.01 and p=0.01. Submucosal vessels were identified in 30% of individuals in descending and rectum, and in 12% in ascending. Adenopathies were observed in 9% of the colon segments and 5% in rectum. Conclusions: A higher frequency enabled the identification of a higher number of layers. Rectal wall is thicker than the one from all the segments of the colon and there are no differences between these, namely in the ascending colon. Moreover, peri-intestinal adenopathies were rarely identified but present in asymptomatic individuals. All together, these results describe for the first time features which are relevant during staging and therapeutic management of colonic lesions.

  2. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  3. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting c...

  4. LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells via modulating DAP5 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Wang, Peng; Feng, Fan; Li, Ming-Yang

    2017-10-01

    The p53 protein plays a critical role in suppression of tumour growth; its regulation is not fully understood. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) promotes tumour cell growth. This study tests a hypothesis that LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell lines, LIM1215 and HCT116 cells, were used. The expression of LRF and p53 in the cells was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. We observed that the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) was detected in both LIM1215 and HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Activation of PAR2 increased the expression of LRF and inhibited the p53 expression in the cancer cells. We also detected a complex of LRF and DAP5, one of the p53 gene transcription factors. The interaction of LRF and DAP5 resulted in the repression of p53 expression in the colon cancer cells. In conclusion, PAR2 activation increases the expression of LRF in colon cancer cells, which interacts with DAP5 to repress the p53 expression. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor may be a novel target in the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase in the human colon carcinoma cell-line Caco-2: secretion from the apical surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Fransen, J.A.; Boekestijn, J.C.; Oude Elferink, R.P.; Matter, K.; Hauri, H.P.; Tager, J.M.; Ginsel, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 was used for studies on the biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase in polarized epithelial cells. Metabolic labelling revealed that in Caco-2 cells alpha-glucosidase is synthesized as a precursor form of 110 x 10(3) Mr. This form is

  6. Biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2: secretion from the apical surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Fransen, J. A.; Boekestijn, T. C.; Oude Elferink, R. P.; Matter, K.; Hauri, H. P.; Tager, J. M.; Ginsel, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 was used for studies on the biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase in polarized epithelial cells. Metabolic labelling revealed that in Caco-2 cells alpha-glucosidase is synthesized as a precursor form of 110 x 10(3) Mr. This form is

  7. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  8. CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihong Zhai

    Full Text Available CacyBP/SIP is a component of the ubiquitin pathway and is overexpressed in several transformed tumor tissues, including colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers worldwide. It is unknown whether CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This study examined the expression level, subcellular localization, and binding activity of CacyBP/SIP in human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the hormone gastrin. We found that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in a high percentage of colon cancer cells, but not in normal colonic surface epithelium. CacyBP/SIP promoted the cell proliferation of colon cancer cells under both basal and gastrin stimulated conditions as shown by knockdown studies. Gastrin stimulation triggered the translocation of CacyBP/SIP to the nucleus, and enhanced interaction between CacyBP/SIP and SKP1, a key component of ubiquitination pathway which further mediated the proteasome-dependent degradation of p27kip1 protein. The gastrin induced reduction in p27kip1 was prevented when cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that CacyBP/SIP may be promoting growth of colon cancer cells by enhancing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27kip1.

  9. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 colon carcinoma cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: Phase-contrast microscopy was used for the examination of morphological changes while flow cytometry was employed for the analysis of cell cycle distribution, ...

  10. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  11. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium....

  12. A new stochastic and state space model of human colon cancer incorporating multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wai Y; Yan, Xiao W

    2010-04-20

    Studies by molecular biologists and geneticists have shown that tumors of human colon cancer are developed from colon stem cells through two mechanisms: The chromosomal instability and the micro-satellite instability. The purpose of this paper is therefore to develop a new stochastic and state space model for carcinogenesis of human colon cancer incorporating these biological mechanisms. Based on recent biological studies, in this paper we have developed a state space model for human colon cancer. In this state space model, the stochastic system is represented by a stochastic model, involving 2 different pathways-the chromosomal instability pathway and the micro-satellite instability pathway; the observation, cancer incidence data, is represented by a statistical model. Based on this model we have developed a generalized Bayesian approach to estimate the parameters through the posterior modes of the parameters via Gibbs sampling procedures. We have applied this model to fit and analyze the SEER data of human colon cancers from NCI/NIH. Our results indicate that the model not only provides a logical avenue to incorporate biological information but also fits the data much better than other models including the 4-stage single pathway model. This model not only would provide more insights into human colon cancer but also would provide useful guidance for its prevention and control and for prediction of future cancer cases.

  13. Effects of anti-miR-182 on TSP-1 expression in human colon cancer cells: there is a sense in antisense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Valeria; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Insalaco, Lavinia; Caruso, Stefano; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bronte, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Santini, Daniele; Russo, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    miRNAs are attractive molecules for cancer treatment, including colon rectal cancer (CRC). We investigate on the molecular mechanism by which miR-182 could regulate thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression, a protein downregulated in CRC and inversely correlated with tumor vascularity and metastasis. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of different genes, involved in cancer progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. miR-182, over-expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), has like predictive target thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a protein inversely correlated with tumor vascularity and metastasis that results downregulated in different types of cancer including CRC. We found that TSP-1 increased after transfection with anti-miR-182 and we showed that miR-182 targets TSP-1 3'UTR-mRNA in both cells. Moreover, we observed that anti-miR-182 did not induce significant variation of Egr-1 expression, but affected the nuclear translocation and its binding on tsp-1 promoter in HCT-116. Equally, Sp-1 was slightly increased as total protein, rather we found a nuclear accumulation and its loading on the TSP-1 promoter in HT-29 transfected with anti-miR-182. Our data suggest that miR-182 targets the anti-angiogenic factor TSP-1 and that anti-miR-182 determines an upregulation of TSP-1 expression in colon cancer cells. Moreover, anti-miR-182 exerts a transcriptional regulatory mechanism of tsp-1 modulating Egr-1 and Sp-1 function. Anti-miR-182 could be used to restore TSP-1 expression in order to contrast angiogenic and invasive events in CRC.

  14. Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-2-binding glycoprotein as a novel carbohydrate antigen of human colonic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, J; Okano, A; Maeda, H; Miyachi, M; Ota, H; Katsuyama, T; Kanai, M

    1990-04-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-2-binding glycoprotein (GBG) in human colonic carcinoma was examined immunochemically and histochemically, GBG was extracted from colonic carcinoma as a serum-type glycoprotein of 160 kilodaltons. GBG was not identical with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), since its molecular weight and localization in tissue sections were different from those of CEA. The non-reducing terminals of GBG probably carry N-acetylglucosamine, but not blood group determinants. Furthermore, GBG was released by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from cell membrane. GBG was suggested to be anchored to the membrane via linkage to a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol molecule. Among colonic carcinoma-associated antigens, serum-type glycoproteins having N-acetylglucosamine at non-reducing terminals have not previously been reported. GBG is a novel carbohydrate antigen of human colonic carcinoma.

  15. The Effect of Analogues of 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 on the Regrowth and Gene Expression of Human Colon Cancer Cells Refractory to 5-Fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Neska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of hypocalcemic analogues of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2 and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3 to inhibit regrowth and regulate the stemness-related gene expression in colon cancer cells undergoing renewal after exposure to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. All of the tested analogues of 1,25D2 equally potently decreased the clonogenicity and the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells which survived the exposure to 5-FU, but differently regulated gene expression of these cells during their renewal. 1,25D2 and analogues (PRI-1907 and PRI-1917, as well as 1,25D3 and analogue PRI-2191, decreased the relative expression level of several stemness-related genes, such as NANOG, OCT3/4, PROM1, SOX2, ALDHA1, CXCR4, in HT-29/5-FU cells during their renewal, in comparison to untreated HT-29/5-FU cells. The other 1,25D2 analogues (PRI-1906 and PRI-1916 were not capable of downregulating the expression of these stemness-related genes as the analogues PRI-1907 and PRI-1917 did. All of the tested vitamin D analogues upregulated CDH1, the gene encoding E-cadherin associated with epithelial phenotype. Out of the series of analogues studied, side-chain branched analogues of 1,25D2 (PRI-1907, PRI-1917 and the analogue of 1,25D3 (PRI-2191 might be used to target cancer cells with stem-like phenotypes that survive conventional chemotherapy.

  16. Growth of human colon cancer cells in nude mice is delayed by ketogenic diet with or without omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guang-Wei; Chen, Yu-Sheng; He, De-Ming; Wang, Hai-Yu; Wu, Guo-Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are largely unable to metabolize ketone bodies for energy due to various deficiencies in one or both of the key mitochondrial enzymes, which may provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies that inhibit tumor growth by administration of a ketogenic diet with average protein but low in carbohydrates and high in fat. Thirty-six male BALB/C nude mice were injected subcutaneously with tumor cells of the colon cancer cell line HCT116. The animals were then randomly split into three feeding groups and fed either a ketogenic diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids and MCT (MKD group; n=12) or lard only (LKD group; n=12) or a standard diet (SD group; n=12) ad libitum. Experiments were ended upon attainment of the target tumor volume of 600 mm3 to 700 mm3. The three diets were compared for tumor growth and survival time (interval between tumor cell injection and attainment of target tumor volume). The tumor growth in the MKD and LKD groups was significantly delayed compared to that in the SD group. Application of an unrestricted ketogenic diet delayed tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Further studies are needed to address the mechanism of this diet intervention and the impact on other tumor-relevant parameters such as invasion and metastasis.

  17. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sangeeta; Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in; Balla, Vamsi Krishna

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder.

  18. Mertensene, a Halogenated Monoterpene, Induces G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase Dependent Apoptosis of Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT29 Cell Line through the Modulation of ERK-1/-2, AKT and NF-κB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Tarhouni-Jabberi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional treatment of advanced colorectal cancer is associated with tumor resistance and toxicity towards normal tissues. Therefore, development of effective anticancer therapeutic alternatives is still urgently required. Nowadays, marine secondary metabolites have been extensively investigated due to the fact that they frequently exhibit anti-tumor properties. However, little attention has been given to terpenoids isolated from seaweeds. In this study, we isolated the halogenated monoterpene mertensene from the red alga Pterocladiella capillacea (S.G. Gmelin Santelices and Hommersand and we highlight its inhibitory effect on the viability of two human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines HT29 and LS174. Interestingly, exposure of HT29 cells to different concentrations of mertensene correlated with the activation of MAPK ERK-1/-2, Akt and NF-κB pathways. Moreover, mertensene-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylated forms of the anti-tumor transcription factor p53, retinoblastoma protein (Rb, cdc2 and chkp2. Indeed, a reduction of the cellular level of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2 and CDK4 was observed in mertensene-treated cells. We also demonstrated that mertensene triggers a caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT29 cancer cells characterized by the activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Besides, the level of death receptor-associated protein TRADD increased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of mertensene as a drug candidate for the treatment of colon cancer.

  19. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan on modulation of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase I expression and cell cycle regulation in human colon cancer LoVo cells: clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Ming; Azzariti, Amalia; Tommasi, Stefania; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Colucci, Giuseppe; Johnston, Patrick G; Church, Stewart W; Paradiso, Angelo

    2002-11-01

    This study was designed to explore the possible interaction of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) in vitro. Human colon cancer LoVo cells were treated in both a dose- and time-dependent manner using clinically relevant concentrations of and exposure to 5-FU and/or SN-38. The expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), topoisomerase I, and cell cycle kinetics were evaluated by Western blot analysis and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. The cytotoxic effects of combination treatment were determined by median effect analysis. Topoisomerase I expression was downregulated following 12 hours of exposure to treatment, and topoisomerase I expression recovered 8 hours after SN-38 was removed. The TS expression was decreased following 24 hours of 5-FU and it remained at reduced levels for > 24 hours after removal of 5-FU. SN-38 induced an arrest at S/G2/M phase, reaching its maximum effect at 12 hours. This cell cycle arrest was reversed 24 hours after SN-38 was removed. 5-FU induced an arrest at the S phase, and maximum arrest occurred at 12 hours and lasted for > 48 hours. After 12 hours of sequential SN-38, LoVo cells were arrested in S phase, thereby potentiating the effect of 5-FU. Cytotoxicity studies confirmed the synergistic interaction between 5-FU and irinotecan. These findings suggest that the proper sequencing of 5-FU/irinotecan depends on regulation of topoisomerase I, and cell cycle kinetics

  20. Insulin, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins and lactate regulate the human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 gene expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Andrieu

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29 at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon.

  1. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker Y Cheah

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Grape seed procyanidins (PC are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2. DESIGN: SixPC fractions (F1-F6 were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature and ripe (mature, utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. RESULTS: All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (P<0.05, but F2 and F3 (mDP 2-6 were the most active fractions (immature F2 = 32% mDP 2.4, F3 = 35% mDP 5.8 and mature F2 = 13% mDP 3.6 and F3 = 17% mDP 5.9; percentage of viable cells remaining on Caco-2 cells. When combined with 5-FU, immature fractions F1-F3 enhanced the cell toxicity effects of 5-FU by 27-73% (P<0.05. Mature seed PC fractions (F1-F4 significantly enhanced the toxicity of 5-FU by 60-83% against Caco-2 cells (P<0.05. Moreover, some fractions alone were more potent at decreasing viability in Caco-2 cells (P<0.05; immature fractions = 65-68% and mature fractions = 83-87% compared to 5-FU alone (37%. CONCLUSIONS: PCs of mDP 2-6 (immature F1-F3 and mature F1 and F4not only enhanced the impact of 5-FU in killing Caco-2 cells, but also surpassed standard 5-FU chemotherapy as an anti-cancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  2. Toll-like receptor signaling activation by Entamoeba histolytica induces beta defensin 2 in human colonic epithelial cells: its possible role as an element of the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M; Domínguez-Robles, M del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed.

  3. Conserved POU-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within FZD5 promoter: Transcriptional mechanisms of FZD5 in undifferentiated human ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    Canonical WNT signals are transduced through Frizzled (FZD) family receptor and LRP5/LRP6 co-receptor to upregulate FGF20, JAG1, DKK1, WISP1, CCND1 and MYC genes for cell-fate determination, while non-canonical WNT signals are transduced through FZD family receptor and ROR2/PTK7/RYK co-receptor to activate RHOA/RHOU/RAC/CDC42, JNK, PKC, NLK and NFAT signaling cascades for the regulation of tissue polarity, cell movement, and adhesion. We previously reported molecular cloning and characterization of human FZD5, which showed six amino-acid substitutions with human Hfz5. FZD5, functioning as WNT5A receptor, is the key molecule in the fields of oncology, regenerative medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, diabetology, and gastroenterology. Here, comparative integromics analyses on FZD5 orthologs were performed by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee FZD5 and cow Fzd5 genes were identified within NW_104292.1 and AC166656.2 genome sequences, respectively. FZD5 orthologs were seven-transmembrane proteins with extracellular Frizzled domain, leucine zipper motif around the 5th transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic DVL- and PDZ-binding motifs. Ser523 and Ser529 around the DVL-binding motif of FZD5 orthologs were putative aPKC phosphorylation sites. POU5F1 (OCT4)-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within the 5'-promoter region of human FZD5 gene was evolutionarily conserved among mammalian FZD5 orthologs. POU5F1 was more related to POU2F and POU3F subfamily members. POU5F1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer. POU2F1 (OCT1) was expressed in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, POU2F2 in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, and POU2F3 in diffuse-type gastric cancer. Multiple SP1/KLF family members, other than KLF2 or KLF4, were expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Together, these facts indicate that POU5F1 and POU2F subfamily members

  4. Down-regulation of GPR137 expression inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Liang, Xianjun; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tiejun; Jiang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) are highly related to oncogenesis and cancer metastasis. G protein-coupled receptor 137 (GPR137) was initially reported as a novel orphan GPR about 10 years ago. Some orphan GPRs have been implicated in human cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of GPR137 in human colon cancer. Expression levels of GRP137 were analyzed in different colon cancer cell lines by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA was specifically designed to knock down GPR137 expression in colon cancer cells. Cell viability was measured by methylthiazoletetrazolium and colony formation assays. In addition, cell cycle characteristic was investigated by flow cytometry. GRP137 expression was observed in all seven colon cancer cell lines at different levels. The mRNA and protein levels of GPR137 were down-regulated in both HCT116 and RKO cells after lentivirus infection. Lentivirus-mediated silencing of GPR137 reduced the proliferation rate and colonies numbers. Knockdown of GPR137 in both cell lines led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. These results indicated that GPR137 plays an important role in colon cancer cell proliferation. A better understanding of GPR137's effects on signal transduction pathways in colon cancer cells may provide insights into the novel gene therapy of colon cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. EZH2 depletion blocks the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Fussbroich

    Full Text Available The Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 protein has been reported to stimulate cell growth in some cancers and is therefore considered to represent an interesting new target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated a possible role of EZH2 for the growth control of colon cancer cells. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated intracellular EZH2 depletion led to cell cycle arrest of colon carcinoma cells at the G1/S transition. This was associated with a reduction of cell numbers upon transient transfection of synthetic EZH2-targeting siRNAs and with inhibition of their colony formation capacity upon stable expression of vector-borne siRNAs. We furthermore tested whether EZH2 may repress the growth-inhibitory p27 gene, as reported for pancreatic cancer. However, expression analyses of colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer biopsies did not reveal a consistent correlation between EZH2 and p27 levels. Moreover, EZH2 depletion did not re-induce p27 expression in colon cancer cells, indicating that p27 repression by EZH2 may be cell- or tissue-specific. Whole genome transcriptome analyses identified cellular genes affected by EZH2 depletion in colon cancer cell lines. They included several cancer-associated genes linked to cellular proliferation or invasion, such as Dag1, MageD1, SDC1, Timp2, and Tob1. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EZH2 depletion blocks the growth of colon cancer cells. These findings might provide benefits for the treatment of colon cancer.

  6. Cannabidiol and palmitoylethanolamide are anti-inflammatory in the acutely inflamed human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Daniel G; Tasker, Chris; Theophilidou, Elena; Lund, Jonathan N; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2017-11-01

    We sought to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of two cannabinoid drugs, cannabidiol (CBD) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in cultured cell lines and compared this effect with experimentally inflamed explant human colonic tissue. These effects were explored in acutely and chronically inflamed colon, using inflammatory bowel disease and appendicitis explants. Caco-2 cells and human colonic explants collected from elective bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or acute appendicitis resections, and were treated with the following drug treatments: vehicle, an inflammatory protocol of interferon γ (IFNγ) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα; 10 ng/ml), inflammation and PEA (10 µM), inflammation and CBD (10 µM), and PEA or CBD alone, CBD or vehicle were added simultaneously with IFNγ. Nine intracellular signalling phosphoproteins were determined by multiplex. Inflammatory cytokine secretion was determined using ELISA. Receptor mechanisms were investigated using antagonists for CB1, CB2, PPARα, PPARγ, TRPV1 and GPR55. IFNγ and TNFα treatment increased phosphoprotein and cytokine levels in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants. Phosphoprotein levels were significantly reduced by PEA or CBD in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants. CBD and PEA prevented increases in cytokine production in explant colon, but not in Caco-2 cells. CBD effects were blocked by the CB2 antagonist AM630 and TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. PEA effects were blocked by the PPARα antagonist GW6471. PEA and CBD were anti-inflammatory in IBD and appendicitis explants. PEA and CBD are anti-inflammatory in the human colon. This effect is not seen in cultured epithelial cells. Appropriately sized clinical trials should assess their efficacy. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya C Wu

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116 were exposed to H(2S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2S was accompanied by G(1-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip. Moreover, exposure to H(2S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+ autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway.

  8. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  9. Flagellin Induces β-Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Ex vivo Infection with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Steven B; Prior, Alison; Ellis, Samuel J; Cook, Vivienne; Chan, Simon S M; Gelson, William; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen in the developed world and can cause life-threatening disease particularly in children. EHEC persists in the human gut by adhering intimately to colonic epithelium and forming characteristic attaching/effacing lesions. In this study, we investigated the innate immune response to EHEC infection with particular focus on antimicrobial peptide and protein expression by colonic epithelium. Using a novel human colonic biopsy model and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells, we found that EHEC infection induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), whereas hBD1, hBD3, LL-37, and lysozyme remained unchanged. Infection with specific EHEC deletion mutants demonstrated that this was dependent on flagellin, and apical exposure to purified flagellin was sufficient to stimulate hBD2 and also interleukin (IL)-8 expression ex vivo and in vitro. Flagellin-mediated hBD2 induction was significantly reduced by inhibitors of NF-κB, MAP kinase p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, IL-8 secretion by polarized T84 cells was vectorial depending on the side of stimulation, and apical exposure to EHEC or flagellin resulted in apical IL-8 release. Our results demonstrate that EHEC only induces a modest immune response in human colonic epithelium characterized by flagellin-dependent induction of hBD2 and low levels of IL-8.

  10. Potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria of human origin induce antiproliferation of colon cancer cells via synergic actions in adhesion to cancer cells and short-chain fatty acid bioproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Hongwittayakorn, Penrat

    2013-01-01

    The activities and modes of probiotic action of lactic acid bacteria isolated from infant feces were investigated for alternative application in the prevention and biotherapy of colon cancer. From a total of 81 isolates of Gram-positive rod and cocci bacteria obtained from healthy infants, only 15 isolates had the probiotic criteria which included growth inhibition against eight food-borne pathogens, no blood hemolysis, and tolerance to gastrointestinal tract properties such as pH 2.5 and 0.3 % bile salt. Four probiotic bacteria showed antiproliferation of colon cancer cells with the use of MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assay at the rates of 17-35 %. Through comparison of probiotic 16S rRNA sequences, they were identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus FP3, Lactobacillus salivarius FP25, L. salivarius FP35, and Enterococcus faecium FP51. Finding the mechanism of proliferative inhibition of colon cancer cells in this study indicated synergic induction by probiotic bacteria directly adhered to these cancer cells and triggered the bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric and propionic acids. This study suggested that the use of these probiotics may be suitable as an alternative bioprophylactic and biotherapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  11. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pimpinella anisum seeds: antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity on human neonatal skin stromal cells and colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    AlSalhi MS; Devanesan S; Alfuraydi AA; Vishnubalaji R; Munusamy MA; Murugan K; Nicoletti M; Benelli G

    2016-01-01

    Mohamad S AlSalhi,1,2 Sandhanasamy Devanesan,1,2 Akram A Alfuraydi,3 Radhakrishnan Vishnubalaji,4 Murugan A Munusamy,3 Kadarkarai Murugan,5 Marcello Nicoletti,6 Giovanni Benelli7 1Research Chair in Laser Diagnosis of Cancers, 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, 4Stem Cell Unit, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Entomology, Department of Zoology, School o...

  12. trans-10,cis-12 Conjugated linoleic acid induces depolarization of mitochondrial membranes in HT-29 human colon cancer cells: a possible mechanism for induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han Jin; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-10-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which is naturally present in a variety of foods such as milk fat and the meat of ruminant animals, has been demonstrated to exert chemoprotective effects in several tissues in experimental animals. CLA is a collective term, which denotes one or more positional and geometric isomers of octadecadienoic acid, with cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10,cis-12 CLA (t10c12) being the principal isomers in commercial preparations. We observed previously that physiological levels of CLA inhibited HT-29 cell growth, and the growth inhibitory effects of CLA were attributed to the effect of t10c12, but not c9t11. In the present study, we assessed the mechanisms by which physiological levels of CLA and t10c12 induce apoptosis in HT-29 cells. HT-29 cells were cultured for 3 days in serum-free medium in the presence of various concentrations of CLA (0-20 micromol/L) or t10c12 (0-4 micromol/L). Addition of CLA or t10c12 to culture medium resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the numbers of apoptotic cells. The results of western blot analysis of total cell lysates showed that CLA and t10c12 increased the levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase but did not alter the levels of Bcl-2 family member proteins. However, these fatty acids were shown to increase the translocation of Bad and Bax to the mitochondria, increase mitochondrial membrane permeability, and induce the release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo from the mitochondria. In addition, CLA and t10c12 diminished Akt content and Akt phosphorylation. These findings indicate that physiological levels of t10c12 induce apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells, which is mediated via mitochondrion-mediated events associated with a decline in Akt activity, an increase in the translocation of the pro-apototic Bad and Bax to the mitochondria, and the subsequent disruption of normal mitochondrial membrane potential.

  13. T-Cell Lymphomas Presenting as Colon Ulcers and Eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphoma is an uncommon entity and primary colon T-cell lymphoma is even rarer. The majority of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas present predominantly as ulcers or strictures in the endoscopic examinations, while primary B-cell lymphomas commonly present as exophytic lesions. Ulcerative colon T-cell lymphoma may mimic Crohn's disease (CD, which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines with ulcer and fistula formations difficult for clinicians to diagnose based on endoscopic observations alone. Like CD, T-cell lymphoma may be characterized by the presence of multiple skipped ulcers distributed from the terminal ileum to the descending colon. Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose this unusual lymphoma by a single endoscopic biopsy. Typically, the histological composition of T-cell lymphoma is made of medium to large atypical cells located in the base of the ulcer with extension to the muscle layer and the adjacent mucosa. However, it is common that biopsy specimens show only mixed inflammatory changes where the lymphoma cells are hard to be identified. The differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma must be considered when clinically diagnosed CD is refractory to the medical treatment or when its clinical behavior becomes aggressive. The current study presents a rare case of primary colon T-cell lymphoma in a 56-year-old male with marked recent weight loss, watery diarrhea and bilateral neck lymphadenopathy, who received a laboratory checkup and endoscopic workup for colon biopsy. The initial pathological report was consistent with mucosal inflammation and benign colon ulcers. Interestingly, the blood test showed a prominent eosinophilia. A biopsy of the enlarged neck lymph nodes done approximately 1 month after the colon biopsy unexpectedly showed T-cell lymphoma, which led to a review of the initial colonic biopsy specimens. Additional immunohistochemical stains were used accordingly, which

  14. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5-2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing...... to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM....... In this study, we aimed to systematically analyze the expression of AQPs in colonic epithelia from rat, mouse, and human and determine whether their expression is altered in a rat model of BAM. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, RT-PCR, and western blotting identified various AQPs in isolated colonic...

  15. FXR silencing in human colon cancer by DNA methylation and KRAS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ann M; Zhan, Le; Maru, Dipen; Shureiqi, Imad; Pickering, Curtis R; Kiriakova, Galina; Izzo, Julie; He, Nan; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Liang, Han; Kopetz, Scott; Powis, Garth; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid nuclear receptor described through mouse knockout studies as a tumor suppressor for the development of colon adenocarcinomas. This study investigates the regulation of FXR in the development of human colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry of FXR in normal tissue (n = 238), polyps (n = 32), and adenocarcinomas, staged I-IV (n = 43, 39, 68, and 9), of the colon; RT-quantitative PCR, reverse-phase protein array, and Western blot analysis in 15 colon cancer cell lines; NR1H4 promoter methylation and mRNA expression in colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas; DNA methyltransferase inhibition; methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP); bisulfite sequencing; and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) knockdown assessment to investigate FXR regulation in colon cancer development. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression and function of FXR was reduced in precancerous lesions and silenced in a majority of stage I-IV tumors. FXR expression negatively correlated with phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate 3 kinase signaling and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The NR1H4 promoter is methylated in ~12% colon cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, and methylation patterns segregate with tumor subtypes. Inhibition of DNA methylation and KRAS silencing both increased FXR expression. FXR expression is decreased early in human colon cancer progression, and both DNA methylation and KRAS signaling may be contributing factors to FXR silencing. FXR potentially suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other oncogenic signaling cascades, and restoration of FXR activity, by blocking silencing mechanisms or increasing residual FXR activity, represents promising therapeutic options for the treatment of colon cancer.

  16. TfR2 expression in human colon carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Alessia; Deaglio, Silvia; Maldi, Elena; Cassoni, Paola; Malavasi, Fabio; Testa, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Different proteins regulate iron metabolism at the level of various tissues. Among these is a second transferrin receptor (TfR2) that seems to play a key role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Although TfR2 expression in normal tissues is restricted at the level of the liver, we observed that TfR2 is frequently expressed in cancer cell lines. Taking advantage of this observation we investigated TfR2 expression in primary colon cancers, and showed that this receptor is expressed in about 26% of cases. TfR2 expression in colon cancer is not related to histological grade, but is preferentially associated with mucinous tumors. In colon cancer cell lines, TfR2 is localized in membrane lipid rafts, induces ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation, when activated by its ligand transferring, and is preferentially expressed during S-M phases of the cell cycle. The presence of TfR2 on the membrane of colon cancer cells may contribute the growth advantage to these cells.

  17. A stochastic model for cancer stem cell origin in metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W; Gollin, Susanne M; Gamblin, T Clark; Geller, David A; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here, we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal) along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability.

  18. Mutants of human colon adenocarcinoma, selected for thymidylate synthase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, P.J.; Germain, G.S.; Hazelton, B.J.; Pennington, J.W.; Houghton, J.A. (Saint Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1989-02-01

    GC{sub 3}/c1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were treated with the mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate, and three clones deficient in thymidylate synthase activity were selected and characterized. Growth in medium deficient in thymidine caused cell death in two clones (TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 1} and TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 3}), whereas one clone (TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 2}) showed limited growth. Growth correlated with thymidine synthase activity and 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine 5{prime}-monophosphate-binding capacity and with incorporation of 2{prime}-deoxy(6-{sup 3}H)uridine into DNA. In the presence of optimal thymidine, growth rates were only 5-18% that of the parental clone (GC{sub 3}/c1), which grew equally well in thymidine-deficient or -replete medium. Analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA showed normal levels of a 1.6-kilobase transcript in TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 1} and TS{sup minus}c{sub 2} but decreased levels in TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 3}. Clone TS{sup minus}c{sub 3} was 32-, 750-, and >100,000-fold more resistant than the parental clone to 5-fluorouracil, 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine, and methotrexate, respectively. When inoculated into athymic nude mice, each TS{sup {minus}} clone produced tumors, demonstrating continued ability to proliferate in vivo.

  19. Carcino-embryonic antigen in monitoring the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma tumour cells SK-CO-1 and HT-29 in vitro and in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Fogh, J M; Sehested-Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    A set of experimental model systems were designed to investigate (a) the inter-relationship between growth of two human cancer cell lines (SK-CO-1, HT-29) and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) kinetics; and (b) whether neoplastic growth or CEA concentration is modulated by human growth hormone (h....... In conclusion, our results suggest that experimental models may be useful for investigating the role of serological markers as monitors of increasing tumour burden. It will be of interest to investigate the performance of those model systems in examining the effect of cytotoxic agents in neoplastic growth....

  20. Colonic epithelial cell expression of ICAM-1 relates to loss of surface continuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Horn, Thomas; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2006-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to assess the ICAM-1 expression in human colonic tissue representing UC, Crohn's disease (CD), adenomas, and adenocarcinomas, with special attention to the epithelium. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue from the archives of the Department...... and the nature of inflammation, the data indicate increased susceptibility of cancer cells to express ICAM-1. Epithelial and macrophage ICAM-1 might be involved in the immune surveillance and the first-line defense of the diseased colon.......OBJECTIVE: Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is important in ulcerative colitis (UC) by mediating the arrest and further migration of neutrophils. In vitro studies have shown that colonocytes from chronically inflamed colon and cultured colon cancer cells are capable of expressing ICAM-1...

  1. Pomegranate juice, total pomegranate ellagitannins, and punicalagin suppress inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lynn S; Seeram, Navindra P; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Takada, Yasunari; Sand, Daniel; Heber, David

    2006-02-08

    Phytochemicals from fruits such as the pomegranate (Punica granatum L) may inhibit cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the modulation of cellular transcription factors and signaling proteins. In previous studies, pomegranate juice (PJ) and its ellagitannins inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of PJ on inflammatory cell signaling proteins in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. At a concentration of 50 mg/L PJ significantly suppressed TNFalpha-induced COX-2 protein expression by 79% (SE = 0.042), total pomegranate tannin extract (TPT) 55% (SE = 0.049), and punicalagin 48% (SE = 0.022). Additionally, PJ reduced phosphorylation of the p65 subunit and binding to the NFkappaB response element 6.4-fold. TPT suppressed NFkappaB binding 10-fold, punicalagin 3.6-fold, whereas ellagic acid (EA) (another pomegranate polyphenol) was ineffective. PJ also abolished TNFalpha-induced AKT activation, needed for NFkappaB activity. Therefore, the polyphenolic phytochemicals in the pomegranate can play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

  2. Polystyrene nanoparticles facilitate the internalization of impermeable biomolecules in non-tumour and tumour cells from colon epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, Laura [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Rodríguez, María J. [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Vélez, Celia; Melguizo, Consolación, E-mail: melguizo@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M., E-mail: rmsanchez@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Prados, Jose [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced colon cancer has a poor prognosis due to the limited effectiveness of current chemotherapies. Treatment failures may be avoided by the utilization of nanoparticles, which can enhance the effects of antitumor drugs, reduce their side effects and increase their directionality. Polystyrene nanoparticles have shown high biocompatibility and appropriate physicochemical properties and may represent a novel and more effective approach against colon cancer. In the present study, polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized and fluorescently labelled, analyzing their cell internalization, intracellular localization and capacity to release transported molecules in tumour and non-tumour human colon cell lines (T84 and CCD-18). Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that polystyrene nanoparticles are an effective vehicle for the intracellular delivery of small molecules into colon epithelium cells. The percentage cell uptake was around 100 % in both T84 and CCD-18 cell lines after only 24 h of exposure and was cell confluence-independent. The polystyrene nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity in either colon cell line. It was found that small molecules can be efficiently delivered into colon cells by using a disulphide bridge as release strategy. Analysis of the influence of the functionalization of the polystyrene nanoparticles surface on the internalization efficiency revealed some morphological changes in these cells. These results demonstrate that polystyrene nanoparticles may improve the transport of biomolecules into colon cells which could have a potential application in chemotherapeutic treatment against colon cancer.

  3. Negligible colon cancer risk from food-borne acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats and nude (nu/nu mice-bearing human colon tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev Raju

    Full Text Available Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a "complete carcinogen", but acts as a "co-carcinogen" by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters.

  4. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  5. Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest by Flavokawain C on HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma via Enhancement of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Upregulation of p21, p27, and GADD153, and Inactivation of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2017-07-01

    Chalcones have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer properties by targeting multiple molecular pathways. It was, therefore, of interest to investigate flavokawain C (FKC), a naturally occurring chalcone, which can be isolated from Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root extract. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of FKC on the growth of HT-29 cells and its underlying mechanism of action. Cell viability of HT-29 cells was assessed by Sulforhodamine B assay after FKC treatment. Induction of apoptosis was examined by established morphological and biochemical assays. ROS generation was determined by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence staining, and superoxide dismutase activity was measured using the spectrophotometric method. Western blotting was used to examine the changes in the protein levels. FKC markedly decreased the cell viability of HT-29 cells and the cells showed dramatic changes in cellular and nuclear morphologies with typical apoptotic features. The induction of apoptosis correlated well with the externalization of phosphatidylserine, DNA fragmentation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspases, and PARP cleavage. This was associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in SOD activity. The protein levels of XIAP, c-IAP1, and c-IAP2 were downregulated, whereas the GADD153 was upregulated after FKC treatment. FKC induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 and G2/M phases via upregulation of p21 and p27 in a p53-independent manner. Our results provide evidence that FKC has the potential to be developed into chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of colon adenocarcinoma. Flavokawain C inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cellsFlavokawain C induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells, associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in SOD activityFlavokawain C induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 and G2/M phases via upregulation of p21 and p27 in HT-29 cellsHT-29 cells

  6. Differential DNA methylation patterns of homeobox genes in proximal and distal colon epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicle, Alan; Seoighe, Cathal; Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Region and cell-type specific differences in the molecular make up of colon epithelial cells have been reported. Those differences may underlie the region-specific characteristics of common colon epithelial diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation is a cell-type specific epigenetic mark, essential for transcriptional regulation, silencing of repetitive DNA and genomic imprinting. Little is known about any region-specific variations in methylation patterns in human colon epithelial cells. Using purified epithelial cells and whole biopsies (n = 19) from human subjects, we generated epigenome-wide DNA methylation data (using the HELP-tagging assay), comparing the methylation signatures of the proximal and distal colon. We identified a total of 125 differentially methylated sites (DMS) mapping to transcription start sites of protein-coding genes, most notably several members of the homeobox (HOX) family of genes. Patterns of differential methylation were validated with MassArray EpiTYPER. We also examined DNA methylation in whole biopsies, applying a computational technique to deconvolve variation in methylation within cell types and variation in cell-type composition across biopsies. Including inferred epithelial proportions as a covariate in differential methylation analysis applied to the whole biopsies resulted in greater overlap with the results obtained from purified epithelial cells compared with when the covariate was not included. Results obtained from both approaches highlight region-specific methylation patterns of HOX genes in colonic epithelium. Regional variation in methylation patterns has implications for the study of diseases that exhibit regional expression patterns in the human colon, such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PMID:26812987

  7. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Microbial contact during pregnancy, intestinal colonization and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautava, Samuli; Luoto, Raakel; Salminen, Seppo; Isolauri, Erika

    2012-10-01

    Interaction with colonizing intestinal bacteria is essential for healthy intestinal and immunological development in infancy. Advances in understanding early host-microbe interactions indicate that this early microbial programming begins in utero and is substantially modulated by mode of birth, perinatal antibiotics and breastfeeding. Furthermore, it has become evident that this stepwise microbial colonization process, as well as immune and metabolic programming by the microbiota, might have a long-lasting influence on the risk of not only gastrointestinal disease, but also allergic, autoimmune and metabolic disease, in later life. Modulating early host-microbe interaction by maternal probiotic intervention during pregnancy and breastfeeding offers a promising novel tool to reduce the risk of disease. In this Review, we describe the current body of knowledge regarding perinatal microbial contact, initial intestinal colonization and its association with human disease, as well as means of modulating early host-microbe interaction to reduce the risk of disease in the child.

  9. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie, E-mail: tongrensj163@163.com [Department of Administrative, Tongren Hospital, No. 786 Yuyuan Road, Changning District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  10. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  11. Toll-like receptor signaling activation by Entamoeba histolytica induces beta defensin 2 in human colonic epithelial cells: its possible role as an element of the innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge-Tonatiuh Ayala-Sumuano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2 mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed.

  12. Toll-like Receptor Signaling Activation by Entamoeba histolytica Induces Beta Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells: Its Possible Role as an Element of the Innate Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M.; Domínguez-Robles, M. del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Conclusions/Significance Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed. PMID:23469306

  13. Sex difference in cellular retinol- and retinoic acid-binding proteins in human colon adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Duttagupta, C; Romney, S L

    1980-12-01

    Human colon adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous, normal colon from the same patient were assayed for the presence and amounts of cellular binding proteins for retinol (CRBP) and retinoic acid (CRABP) by sucrose gradient analysis. In male patients, the mean concentrations of both CRBP and CRABP in the colon cancers were statistically significantly higher than in the adjacent normal colon. By contrast, in female colon cancers, the mean levels for both binding proteins were reduced approximately 2-fold, compared to the concentrations in the adjacent normal colon. These findings reveal an unexpected sex difference in the binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid in human colon malignancies.

  14. Human bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip for studying metastatic colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano-Kruik, Alessandro; Nava, Michele Maria; Yeager, Keith; Chramiec, Alan; Hao, Luke; Robinson, Samuel; Guo, Edward; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2018-02-06

    Eight out of 10 breast cancer patients die within 5 years after the primary tumor has spread to the bones. Tumor cells disseminated from the breast roam the vasculature, colonizing perivascular niches around blood capillaries. Slow flows support the niche maintenance by driving the oxygen, nutrients, and signaling factors from the blood into the interstitial tissue, while extracellular matrix, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal stem cells regulate metastatic homing. Here, we show the feasibility of developing a perfused bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip to investigate the progression and drug resistance of breast cancer cells colonizing the bone. The model is a functional human triculture with stable vascular networks within a 3D native bone matrix cultured on a microfluidic chip. Providing the niche-on-a-chip with controlled flow velocities, shear stresses, and oxygen gradients, we established a long-lasting, self-assembled vascular network without supplementation of angiogenic factors. We further show that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have undergone phenotypical transition toward perivascular cell lineages, support the formation of capillary-like structures lining the vascular lumen. Finally, breast cancer cells exposed to interstitial flow within the bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip persist in a slow-proliferative state associated with increased drug resistance. We propose that the bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip with interstitial flow promotes the formation of stable vasculature and mediates cancer cell colonization.

  15. Humans, water, and the colonization of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, Damien

    2016-01-01

    The Pleistocene global dispersal of modern humans required the transit of arid and semiarid regions where the distribution of potable water provided a primary constraint on dispersal pathways. Here, we provide a spatially explicit continental-scale assessment of the opportunities for Pleistocene human occupation of Australia, the driest inhabited continent on Earth. We establish the location and connectedness of persistent water in the landscape using the Australian Water Observations from Space dataset combined with the distribution of small permanent water bodies (springs, gnammas, native wells, waterholes, and rockholes). Results demonstrate a high degree of directed landscape connectivity during wet periods and a high density of permanent water points widely but unevenly distributed across the continental interior. A connected network representing the least-cost distance between water bodies and graded according to terrain cost shows that 84% of archaeological sites >30,000 y old are within 20 km of modern permanent water. We further show that multiple, well-watered routes into the semiarid and arid continental interior were available throughout the period of early human occupation. Depletion of high-ranked resources over time in these paleohydrological corridors potentially drove a wave of dispersal farther along well-watered routes to patches with higher foraging returns. PMID:27671630

  16. Development of an Optimized Protocol for NMR Metabolomics Studies of Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines and First Insight from Testing of the Protocol Using DNA G-Quadruplex Ligands as Novel Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cell lines by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy metabolomics represents a powerful tool to understand how the local metabolism and biochemical pathways are influenced by external or internal stimuli. In particular, the use of adherent mammalian cells is emerging in the metabolomics field in order to understand the molecular mechanism of disease progression or, for example, the cellular response to drug treatments. Hereto metabolomics investigations for this kind of cells have generally been limited to mass spectrometry studies. This study proposes an optimized protocol for the analysis of the endo-metabolome of human colon cancer cells (HCT116 by NMR. The protocol includes experimental conditions such as washing, quenching and extraction. In order to test the proposed protocol, it was applied to an exploratory study of cancer cells with and without treatment by anti-cancer drugs, such as DNA G-quadruplex binders and Adriamycin (a traditional anti-cancer drug. The exploratory NMR metabolomics analysis resulted in NMR assignment of all endo-metabolites that could be detected and provided preliminary insights about the biological behavior of the drugs tested.

  17. Development of an Optimized Protocol for NMR Metabolomics Studies of Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines and First Insight from Testing of the Protocol Using DNA G-Quadruplex Ligands as Novel Anti-Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Ilaria; Savorani, Francesco; Iaccarino, Nunzia; Zizza, Pasquale; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Novellino, Ettore; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Randazzo, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    The study of cell lines by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy metabolomics represents a powerful tool to understand how the local metabolism and biochemical pathways are influenced by external or internal stimuli. In particular, the use of adherent mammalian cells is emerging in the metabolomics field in order to understand the molecular mechanism of disease progression or, for example, the cellular response to drug treatments. Hereto metabolomics investigations for this kind of cells have generally been limited to mass spectrometry studies. This study proposes an optimized protocol for the analysis of the endo-metabolome of human colon cancer cells (HCT116) by NMR. The protocol includes experimental conditions such as washing, quenching and extraction. In order to test the proposed protocol, it was applied to an exploratory study of cancer cells with and without treatment by anti-cancer drugs, such as DNA G-quadruplex binders and Adriamycin (a traditional anti-cancer drug). The exploratory NMR metabolomics analysis resulted in NMR assignment of all endo-metabolites that could be detected and provided preliminary insights about the biological behavior of the drugs tested.

  18. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  19. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  20. On the relationship between sialomucin and sulfomucin expression and hydrogenotrophic microbes in the human colonic mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Croix

    Full Text Available The colonic mucus layer is comprised primarily of acidomucins, which provide viscous properties and can be broadly classified into sialomucins or sulfomucins based on the presence of terminating sialic acid or sulfate groups. Differences in acidomucin chemotypes have been observed in diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, and variation in sialo- and sulfomucin content may influence microbial colonization. For example, sulfate derived from sulfomucin degradation may promote the colonization of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, which through sulfate respiration generate the genotoxic gas hydrogen sulfide. Here, paired biopsies from right colon, left colon, and rectum of 20 subjects undergoing routine screening colonoscopies were collected to enable parallel histochemical and microbiological studies. Goblet cell sialo- and sulfomucins in each biopsy were distinguished histochemically and quantified. Quantitative PCR and multivariate analyses were used to examine the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microbial groups and SRB genera relative to acidomucin profiles. Regional variation was observed in sialomucins and sulfomucins with the greatest abundance of each found in the rectum. Mucin composition did not appear to influence the abundance of SRB or other hydrogenotrophic microbiota but correlated with the composition of different SRB genera. A higher sulfomucin proportion correlated with higher quantities of Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus and Desulfotomaculum, relative to the predominant Desulfovibrio genus. Thus, acidomucin composition may influence bacterial sulfate respiration in the human colon, which may in turn impact mucosal homeostasis. These results stress the need to consider mucus characteristics in the context of studies of the microbiome that target intestinal diseases.

  1. Regulation of norrin receptor frizzled-4 by Wnt2 in colon-derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Cherlyn A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norrin is a potent Wnt pathway ligand. Aberrant activation of this signaling pathway can result in colon tumors but the role of norrin-based signaling in the genesis of colon cancer, and its relationship to activation of the pathway by traditional Wnt ligands, is not defined. Results Fresh normal human colon tissue and all the cell lines studied expressed mRNA for Fz4, LRP5 and norrin, except Colo205 which lacked Fz4 expression. Canonical Wnt pathway throughput was increased slightly in NCM460 following treatment with Wnt3a CM but was inhibited by Wnt2 and Wnt1. The colon cancer cell line, RKO, responded to Wnt3a CM, Wnt2 and Wnt1 by increasing canonical Wnt pathway throughput. Wnt5a did not affect Wnt pathway throughput in either cell line. Wnt2, but not Wnt3a, abrogated Fz4 expression in NCM460, but not in RKO or another colon cancer cell line, HCT116. This effect on Fz4 was confirmed at both the RNA and protein levels via RT-PCR and a norrin binding assay. The expression of all others 9 Fz receptors did not change after treatment of NCM460 cells with Wnt2. Conclusion The data suggests that colonic mucosa and colon tumors may possess two autoregulatory positive Wnt feedback loops, one through canonical signals induced by Wnt:Fz interactions and one through signals resulting from norrin:Fz4 interactions. The latter interactions may be modulated via regulation of Fz4 expression by Wnt2. Retention of Fz4 by cancers, in contrast to the loss of Fz4 by normal mucosal cells, could provide a selective advantage to the tumor cells. Fz4 expression may play a critical role in responses to Wnt signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Emigrating Beyond Earth Human Adaptation and Space Colonization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Cameron M

    2012-01-01

    For four million years humankind has been actively expanding geographically and in doing so has adapted to a wide variety of hostile environments. Now we are looking towards the ultimate adaptation - the colonization of space. Emigrating Beyond Earth illustrates that this is not a technocratic endeavor, but a natural continuation of human evolution; a journey not just for the engineer and rocket scientist, but for everyman. Based on the most current understanding of our universe, human adaptation and evolution, the authors explain why space colonization must be planned as an adaptation to, rather than the conquest of, space. Emigrating Beyond Earth argues that space colonization is an insurance policy for our species, and that it isn't about rockets and robots, it's about humans doing what we've been doing for four million years: finding new places and new ways to live. Applying a unique anthropological approach, the authors outline a framework for continued human space exploration and offer a glimpse of a po...

  3. Promoter hypermethylation mediated downregulation of FBP1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma and colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingquan Chen

    Full Text Available FBP1, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1, a gluconeogenesis regulatory enzyme, catalyzes the hydrolysis of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. The mechanism that it functions to antagonize glycolysis and was epigenetically inactivated through NF-kappaB pathway in gastric cancer has been reported. However, its role in the liver carcinogenesis still remains unknown. Here, we investigated the expression and DNA methylation of FBP1 in primary HCC and colon tumor. FBP1 was lowly expressed in 80% (8/10 human hepatocellular carcinoma, 66.7% (6/9 liver cancer cell lines and 100% (6/6 colon cancer cell lines, but was higher in paired adjacent non-tumor tissues and immortalized normal cell lines, which was well correlated with its promoter methylation status. Methylation was further detected in primary HCCs, gastric and colon tumor tissues, but none or occasionally in paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Detailed methylation analysis of 29 CpG sites at a 327-bp promoter region by bisulfite genomic sequencing confirmed its methylation. FBP1 silencing could be reversed by chemical demethylation treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza, indicating direct epigenetic silencing. Restoring FBP1 expression in low expressed cells significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation ability through the induction of G2-M phase cell cycle arrest. Moreover, the observed effects coincided with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. In summary, epigenetic inactivation of FBP1 is also common in human liver and colon cancer. FBP1 appears to be a functional tumor suppressor involved in the liver and colon carcinogenesis.

  4. GM-CSF produced by nonhematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2013-02-15

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, as well as dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn's disease in humans and colitis in murine models has mainly been considered to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF-deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type mice, caused marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF(-/-) mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Nonhematopoietic cells, and not myeloid cells, produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury, as revealed by bone marrow chimera and dendritic cell-depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell-produced GM-CSF has a novel nonredundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium.

  5. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Xu, Yonghong [Institute of Ophthalmological Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 430060 Wuhan (China); Meng, Xiangning [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  6. Sequence of the 5'-flanking region and promoter activity of the human mucin gene MUC5B in different phenotypes of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Seuningen, I; Perrais, M; Pigny, P; Porchet, N; Aubert, J P

    2000-06-15

    Control of gene expression in intestinal cells is poorly understood. Molecular mechanisms that regulate transcription of cellular genes are the foundation for understanding developmental and differentiation events. Mucin gene expression has been shown to be altered in many intestinal diseases and especially cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. Towards understanding the transcriptional regulation of a member of the 11p15.5 human mucin gene cluster, we have characterized 3.55 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the human mucin gene MUC5B, including the promoter, the first two exons and the first intron. We report here the promoter activity of successively 5'-truncated sections of 956 bases of this region by fusing it to the coding region of a luciferase reporter gene. The transcription start site was determined by primer-extension analysis. The region upstream of the transcription start site is characterized by the presence of a TATA box at bases -32/-26, DNA-binding elements for transcription factors c-Myc, N-Myc, Sp1 and nuclear factor kappaB as well as putative activator protein (AP)-1-, cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1-, HNF-3-, TGT3-, gut-enriched Krüppel factor (GKLF)-, thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1- and glucocorticoid receptor element (GRE)-binding sites. Intron 1 of MUC5B was also characterized, it is 2511 nucleotides long and contains a DNA segment of 259 bp in which are clustered eight tandemly repeated GA boxes and a CACCC box that bind Sp1. AP-2alpha and GATA-1 nuclear factors were also shown to bind to their respective cognate elements in intron 1. In transfection studies the MUC5B promoter showed a cell-specific activity as it is very active in mucus-secreting LS174T cells, whereas it is inactive in Caco-2 enterocytes and HT-29 STD (standard) undifferentiated cells. Within the promoter, maximal transcription activity was found in a segment covering the first 223 bp upstream of the transcription start

  7. [Cytotoxic effect in human colon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from calves with bloody diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone Creydt, V; Venzano, A; Vilte, D A; Mercado, E C; Ibarra, C

    2005-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is one of the most important emergent pathogen in foods, being its main reservoir bovine cattle. STEC can cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The present work have studied the cytotoxic action in human colon of cultures of two STEC strains isolated from faeces of calves with bloody diarrhea. Colonic mucosa was mounted as a diaphragm in a Ussing chamber and incubated with the cultures of pathogenic strains. Net water flow (Jw) decreased and the short-circuit current (Isc) increased significantly (p < 0.01) compared to negative control. Tissues showed an erosion of the mucose, epithelial exfoliation, and presence of pseudo-membranes in the lumen. Mild circulatory lesions were observed in the lamina propia. A moderate neutrophils infiltration was observed in the lumen and into the epithelial cells. Colonic crypts were not disrupted. Both experimental strains caused a similar lesion on colon tissues. This is the first study that shows that cultures of STEC strains isolated from bovine cattle produce cytotoxic effects in vitro in human colon.

  8. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-05-05

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  10. Role and species–specific expression of colon T cell homing receptor GPR15 in colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Pan, Junliang; Dinh, Theresa Thanh; Hadeiba, Husein; O’Hara, Edward; Ebtikar, Ahmad; Hertweck, Arnulf; Gökmen, M. Refik; Lord, Graham M.; Jenner, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte recruitment maintains intestinal immune homeostasis but also contributes to inflammation. The orphan chemoattractant receptor GPR15 mediates regulatory T cell homing and immunosuppression in the mouse colon. We show that GPR15 is also expressed by mouse TH17 and TH1 effector cells, and is required for colitis in a model that depends on their trafficking to the colon. In humans GPR15 is expressed by effector cells including pathogenic TH2 cells in ulcerative colitis, but is not expressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells. The TH2 transcriptional activator GATA-3 and the Treg–associated transcriptional repressor FOXP3 robustly bind human, but not mouse, GPR15 enhancer sequences, correlating with expression. Our results highlight species differences in GPR15 regulation, and suggest it as a potential therapeutic target for colitis. PMID:25531831

  11. Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae triggers dendritic cell dependent antibody responses against invasive disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Anne; Ding, Nadine; Tort Tarres, Meritxell; Bittersohl, Lara F; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Braubach, Peter; Lippmann, Torsten; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A

    2017-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) is an important precondition for the development of pneumococcal pneumonia. At the same time, nasopharyngeal colonization with Spn has been shown to mount adaptive immune responses against Spn in mice and humans. Cellular responses of the nasopharyngeal compartment, including the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, to pneumococcal colonization and their importance for developing adaptive immune responses are poorly defined. We show that nasopharyngeal colonization with S. pneumoniae led to substantial expansion of dendritic cells (DCs) both in nasopharyngeal tissue and nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of mice. Depletion of DCs achieved by either diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment of chimeric zDC+/DTR mice, or by use of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) KO mice exhibiting congenitally reduced DC pool sizes, significantly diminished antibody responses after colonization with Spn, along with impaired protective immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease. Collectively, the data show that classical DCs contribute to pneumococcal colonization induced adaptive immune responses against invasive pneumococcal disease in two different mouse models. These data may be useful for future nasopharyngeal vaccination strategies against pneumococcal diseases in humans. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Self-renewing Monolayer of Primary Colonic or Rectal Epithelial CellsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Three-dimensional organoid culture has fundamentally changed the in vitro study of intestinal biology enabling novel assays; however, its use is limited because of an inaccessible luminal compartment and challenges to data gathering in a three-dimensional hydrogel matrix. Long-lived, self-renewing 2-dimensional (2-D tissue cultured from primary colon cells has not been accomplished. Methods: The surface matrix and chemical factors that sustain 2-D mouse colonic and human rectal epithelial cell monolayers with cell repertoires comparable to that in vivo were identified. Results: The monolayers formed organoids or colonoids when placed in standard Matrigel culture. As with the colonoids, the monolayers exhibited compartmentalization of proliferative and differentiated cells, with proliferative cells located near the peripheral edges of growing monolayers and differentiated cells predominated in the central regions. Screening of 77 dietary compounds and metabolites revealed altered proliferation or differentiation of the murine colonic epithelium. When exposed to a subset of the compound library, murine organoids exhibited similar responses to that of the monolayer but with differences that were likely attributable to the inaccessible organoid lumen. The response of the human primary epithelium to a compound subset was distinct from that of both the murine primary epithelium and human tumor cells. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a self-renewing 2-D murine and human monolayer derived from primary cells can serve as a physiologically relevant assay system for study of stem cell renewal and differentiation and for compound screening. The platform holds transformative potential for personalized and precision medicine and can be applied to emerging areas of disease modeling and microbiome studies. Keywords: Colonic Epithelial Cells, Monolayer, Organoids, Compound Screening

  13. Valproic acid enhances bosutinib cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mologni, Luca; Cleris, Loredana; Magistroni, Vera; Piazza, Rocco; Boschelli, Frank; Formelli, Franca; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2009-04-15

    Unbalanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) hyperactivity is a common feature of tumor cells. Inhibition of HDAC activity is often associated with cancer cell growth impairment and death. Valproic acid (VPA) is a HDAC inhibitor used for the treatment of epilepsy. It has recently been recognized as a promising anticancer drug. We investigated the effects of VPA on growth and survival of colon cancer cells. VPA caused growth inhibition and programmed cell death that correlated with histone hyperacetylation. VPA modulated the expression of various factors involved in cell cycle control and apoptosis and induced caspase activation. Interestingly, VPA induced downregulation of c-Src and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of the c-Src inhibitor bosutinib, both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of sublethal doses of VPA and bosutinib led to massive apoptosis of colon cancer cells, irrespective of their genetic background. These results suggest that VPA may be employed as a positive modulator of bosutinib antitumor activity in colorectal cancer.

  14. Using Oral and Colon Cancer Cells for Studying the Anticancer Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpornsuwan, Teerakul; Sriwai, Wimolpak; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of importance in defense mechanism of many organisms and are potential candidate for treatment of infections in animals and humans. AMPs exhibit a wide range of immunomodulatory activities related to innate immunity, wound healing, and inflammation. AMPs also serve as drug delivery vectors, antitumor agents, and mitogenic agents. Here, we describe the investigation of anticancer and cytotoxic activities of antimicrobial peptides by colorimetric MTT assay using smooth muscle, dental pulp stem cell, human colon cancer cell line (SW620), and human oral squamous carcinoma cell line (HSC4).

  15. Induction of Colonic Regulatory T Cells by Indigenous Clostridium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Imaoka, Akemi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Momose, Yoshika; Cheng, Genhong; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Ohba, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Hori, Shohei; Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kikuji; Honda, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs), which express the Foxp3 transcription factor, play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we show that in mice, Tregs were most abundant in the colonic mucosa. The spore-forming component of indigenous intestinal microbiota, particularly clusters IV and XIVa of the genus Clostridium, promoted Treg cell accumulation. Colonization of mice by a defined mix of Clostridium strains provided an environment rich in transforming growth factor–β and affected Foxp3+ Treg number and function in the colon. Oral inoculation of Clostridium during the early life of conventionally reared mice resulted in resistance to colitis and systemic immunoglobulin E responses in adult mice, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to autoimmunity and allergy. PMID:21205640

  16. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Redal, María Ana [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas y Medicina Experimental, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alghamdi, Mansour A. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Muñoz, Manuel J., E-mail: mmunoz@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  17. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    by inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS). NO as well as other ROS are potential DNA damaging agents. The aim was to determine the effect of long-term cytokine exposure on NO formation and DNA damage in epithelial cells. METHODS: A colonic cell line (HT29) was stimulated for 1-10 weeks with interferon...... stimulated cells had increased DNA instability (Pcytokine exposure induces an iNOS dependent up-regulation of ROS production and DNA instability. This mechanism...

  18. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116 with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin. Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  19. Inferring human colonization history using a copying model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Hellenthal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scans of genetic variation can potentially provide detailed information on how modern humans colonized the world but require new methods of analysis. We introduce a statistical approach that uses Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP data to identify sharing of chromosomal segments between populations and uses the pattern of sharing to reconstruct a detailed colonization scenario. We apply our model to the SNP data for the 53 populations of the Human Genome Diversity Project described in Conrad et al. (Nature Genetics 38,1251-60, 2006. Our results are consistent with the consensus view of a single "Out-of-Africa" bottleneck and serial dilution of diversity during global colonization, including a prominent East Asian bottleneck. They also suggest novel details including: (1 the most northerly East Asian population in the sample (Yakut has received a significant genetic contribution from the ancestors of the most northerly European one (Orcadian. (2 Native North [corrected] Americans have received ancestry from a source closely related to modern North-East Asians (Mongolians and Oroquen that is distinct from the sources for native South [corrected] Americans, implying multiple waves of migration into the Americas. A detailed depiction of the peopling of the world is available in animated form.

  20. Attenuation of cell mechanosensitivity in colon cancer cells during in vitro metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tang

    Full Text Available Human colon carcinoma (HCT-8 cells show a stable transition from low to high metastatic state when cultured on appropriately soft substrates (21 kPa. Initially epithelial (E in nature, the HCT-8 cells become rounded (R after seven days of culture on soft substrate. R cells show a number of metastatic hallmarks [1]. Here, we use gradient stiffness substrates, a bio-MEMS force sensor, and Coulter counter assays to study mechanosensitivity and adhesion of E and R cells. We find that HCT-8 cells lose mechanosensitivity as they undergo E-to-R transition. HCT-8 R cells' stiffness, spread area, proliferation and migration become insensitive to substrate stiffness in contrast to their epithelial counterpart. They are softer, proliferative and migratory on all substrates. R cells show negligible cell-cell homotypic adhesion, as well as non-specific cell-substrate adhesion. Consequently they show the same spread area on all substrates in contrast to E cells. Taken together, these results indicate that R cells acquire autonomy and anchorage independence, and are thus potentially more invasive than E cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of quantitative data relating changes in cancer cell adhesion and stiffness during the expression of an in vitro metastasis-like phenotype.

  1. Accidental endoscopic finding of Anisakis simplex in human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Aloia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anisakidosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the ingestion of nematodes belonging to the family of Anisakidae. Human infection is caused by intake of raw or undercooked sea fish and cephalopods infested by Anisakis larvae. We present a case of accidental endoscopic finding of an alive nematode adhering to distal ascending colon in a 32 years old man, submitted to colonoscopy owing to recent onsets of rectal bleeding of likely hemorrhoidal origin. The nematode, removed from colon by means of biopsy forceps, has been identified as L3 larvae of A. simplex by a light microscope. Histological examination of intestinal mucosa showed a mild fibrosis of lamina propria, characterized by focal lymphocytic inflammation and scattered infiltration of eosinophils. The patient reported the intake of marinated anchovies 3 days before endoscopic examination.

  2. Coordinate late expression of trefoil peptide genes (pS2/TFF1 and ITF/TFF3) in human breast, colon, and gastric tumor cells exposed to X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, Elizabeth K.; Harrison, George H.; Xu, Jing-Fan; Gutierrez, Peter L.

    2002-01-01

    The trefoil factors (TFFs) are pleiotropic factors involved in organization and homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract, estrogen responsiveness, inflammatory disorders, and carcinogenesis. In an earlier study using cDNA array technologies to identify new genes expressed in irradiated cell survivors, we isolated a cDNA clone corresponding to the reported human TFF1 gene (E. K. Balcer-Kubiczek et al., Int. J. Radiat. Biol., 75: 529-541, 1999). To determine whether expression of other TFFs is altered by ionizing radiation, we quantified changes in expression of TFF3 as well as TFF1 in RNA samples obtained from irradiated and control human tumor breast, colon, and gastric tumor cells and examined expression kinetics up to 2 weeks after irradiation. X-ray-induced TFF1 and TFF3 expression profiles were compared with those induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or 17beta-estradiol (ES). The results revealed that TFF1 and TFF3 mRNA are coinduced by X-irradiation in a subset of the lines, but substantial heterogeneity in their responses was observed in cells derived from a single cell type. TFF1 and TFF3 transcriptional response to X-irradiation differed from that to H2O2 or ES in the timing of their induction as well as tissue-type dependence, i.e., their induction pattern after X-irradiation was late and sustained, whereas their induction by H2O2 or ES was early and transient. TFF1 mRNA, protein production in the cytoplasm, and secretion in the culture supernatant were coordinately regulated after X-irradiation. There was no requirement for TP53 in this induction. These results demonstrate the existence of a novel class of radiation-responsive genes that might be involved in bystander effects.

  3. Leptin is a growth factor for colonic epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, J. C.; van den Brink, G. R.; Offerhaus, G. J.; van Deventer, S. J.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of colon cancer, whereas physical activity reduces the risk. Plasma levels of leptin increase in proportion to the level of obesity and are reduced by physical activity. Leptin acts as a growth factor for several cell types and thus may provide a biological explanation for

  4. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of. HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Thus ... extraction of distant metastases from various organs such as liver ...

  5. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. Mingli Li1*, Na Zhang2 and Mingxuan Li3. 1Biology and Medicine, 2Pharmaceutics, Shandong University, Shandong 250100, 3Department of Nursing, Affiliated Hospital of. Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong ...

  6. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...

  7. Colon Cancer Stem Cells: Promise of Targeted Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor

  8. Coaction of Spheroid-Derived Stem-Like Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promotes Development of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Shi; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Huang, Yong; Chen, Tu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although some studies described the characteristics of colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in neovascularization, it is still controversial whether an interaction exists or not between CSCs and EPCs. In the present study, HCT116 and HT29 sphere models, which are known to be the cells enriching CSCs, were established to investigate the roles of this interaction in development and metastasis of colon cancer. Compared with their parental counterparts, spheroid cells demonstrated higher capacity of invasion, higher tumorigenic and metastatic potential. Then the in vitro and in vivo relationship between CSCs and EPCs were studied by using capillary tube formation assay and xenograft models. Our results showed that spheroid cells could promote the proliferation, migration and tube formation of EPCs through secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Meanwhile, the EPCs could increase tumorigenic capacity of spheroid cells through angiogenesis. Furthermore, higher microvessel density was detected in the area enriching cancer stem cells in human colon cancer tissue. Our findings indicate that spheroid cells possess the characteristics of cancer stem cells, and the coaction of CSCs and EPCs may play an important role in the development of colon cancer. PMID:22745705

  9. Study of the Ability of Bifidobacteria of Human Origin to Prevent and Treat Rotavirus Infection Using Colonic Cell and Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveau, André; Fliss, Ismaïl

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Despite effective vaccines, inexpensive alternatives such as probiotics are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 to inhibit rotavirus infection. Bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells and interference with viral attachment were evaluated in vitro. B. thermophilum RBL67 displayed adhesion indexes of 625 ± 84 and 1958 ± 318 on Caco-2 and HT-29 cells respectively and was comparable or superior to four other bifidobacteria, including B. longum ATCC 15707 and B. pseudolongum ATCC 25526 strains. Incubation of B. thermophilum RBL67 for 30 min before (exclusion) and simultaneously (competition) with human rotavirus strain Wa decreased virus attachment by 2.0 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0.1 log10 (by 99.0% and 96.8% respectively). Displacement of virus already present was negligible. In CD-1 suckling mice fed B. thermophilum RBL67 challenged with simian rotavirus SA-11, pre-infection feeding with RBL 67 was more effective than post-infection feeding, reducing the duration of diarrhea, limiting epithelial lesions, reducing viral replication in the intestine, accelerating recovery, and stimulating the humoral specific IgG and IgM response, without inducing any adverse effect. B. thermophilum RBL67 had little effect on intestinal IgA titer. These results suggest that humoral immunoglobulin might provide protection against the virus and that B. thermophilum RBL67 has potential as a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection and ultimately reduce its spread. PMID:27727323

  10. Modification of the hypoxic fraction of a xenografted human colon tumor by differentiation-inducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.

    1988-05-18

    Xenografted tumors were produced in nude mice by injection of HCT-15 human colon tumor cells. The hypoxic fractions of control tumors as determined from x-ray survival curves were approximately 18%. Other tumors were treated (every day X 9) with daily injections of N-methylformamide (150 mg/kg) or sodium butyrate (2,000 mg/kg). For both agents, it was found that the hypoxic fractions were less than 0.05% and less than 1.7%, respectively. These data indicate that selected differentiation-inducing agents could be of value for treatment of human solid tumors that contain hypoxic cells.

  11. Induction of farnesoid X receptor signaling in germ-free mice colonized with a human microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Annika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    signaling in colonized mice. We colonized germ-free mice with cecal content from a mouse donor or feces from a human donor and euthanized the mice after short-term (2 weeks) or long-term (15 weeks) colonization. We analyzed the gut microbiota and BA composition and expression of FXR target genes in ileum...... and liver. We found that cecal microbiota composition differed between mice colonized with mouse and human microbiota and was stable over time. Human and mouse microbiota reduced total BA levels similarly, but the humanized mice produced less secondary BAs. The human microbiota was able to reduce the levels...... of tauro-β-muricholic acid and induce expression of FXR target genes Fgf15 and Shp in ileum after long-term colonization. We show that a human microbiota can change BA composition and induce FXR signaling in colonized mice, but the levels of secondary BAs produced are lower than in mice colonized...

  12. Colon stem cell and crypt dynamics exposed by cell lineage reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitzhak Reizel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell dynamics in vivo are often being studied by lineage tracing methods. Our laboratory has previously developed a retrospective method for reconstructing cell lineage trees from somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites. This method was applied here to explore different aspects of stem cell dynamics in the mouse colon without the use of stem cell markers. We first demonstrated the reliability of our method for the study of stem cells by confirming previously established facts, and then we addressed open questions. Our findings confirmed that colon crypts are monoclonal and that, throughout adulthood, the process of monoclonal conversion plays a major role in the maintenance of crypts. The absence of immortal strand mechanism in crypts stem cells was validated by the age-dependent accumulation of microsatellite mutations. In addition, we confirmed the positive correlation between physical and lineage proximity of crypts, by showing that the colon is separated into small domains that share a common ancestor. We gained new data demonstrating that colon epithelium is clustered separately from hematopoietic and other cell types, indicating that the colon is constituted of few progenitors and ruling out significant renewal of colonic epithelium from hematopoietic cells during adulthood. Overall, our study demonstrates the reliability of cell lineage reconstruction for the study of stem cell dynamics, and it further addresses open questions in colon stem cells. In addition, this method can be applied to study stem cell dynamics in other systems.

  13. The Histone Acetyltransferase GCN5 Expression Is Elevated and Regulated by c-Myc and E2F1 Transcription Factors in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yan-Wei; Jin, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Wenjing; Gao, Beixue; Fang, Jiangao; Wei, Junmin; Zhang, Donna D.; Zhang, Jianing; Fang, Deyu

    2017-01-01

    The histone acetyltransferase GCN5 has been suggested to be involved in promoting cancer cell growth. But its role in human colon cancer development remains unknown. Herein we discovered that GCN5 expression is significantly upregulated in human colon adenocarcinoma tissues. We further demonstrate that GCN5 is upregulated in human colon cancer at the mRNA level. Surprisingly, two transcription factors, the oncogenic c-Myc and the proapoptotic E2F1, are responsible for GCN5 mRNA transcription. Knockdown of c-Myc inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation largely through downregulating GCN5 transcription, which can be fully rescued by the ectopic GCN5 expression. In contrast, E2F1 expression induced human colon cancer cell death, and suppression of GCN5 expression in cells with E2F1 overexpression further facilitated cell apoptosis, suggesting that GCN5 expression is induced by E2F1 as a possible negative feedback in suppressing E2F1-mediated cell apoptosis. In addition, suppression of GCN5 with its specific inhibitor CPTH2 inhibited human colon cancer cell growth. Our studies reveal that GCN5 plays a positive role in human colon cancer development, and its suppression holds a great therapeutic potential in antitumor therapy. PMID:26637399

  14. CUB domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1) modulates adhesion and motility in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard-Webb, David J; Lee, Thong Chuan; Cook, Graham P; Blair, G Eric

    2014-10-09

    Deregulated expression of the transmembrane glycoprotein CDCP1 (CUB domain-containing protein-1) has been detected in several cancers including colon, lung, gastric, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. CDCP1 has been proposed to either positively or negatively regulate tumour metastasis. In this study we assessed the role of CDCP1 in properties of cells that are directly relevant to metastasis, namely adhesion and motility. In addition, association between CDCP1 and the tetraspanin protein CD9 was investigated. CDCP1 and CD9 protein expression was measured in a series of colon cancer cell lines by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Adhesion of Colo320 and SW480 cells was determined using a Matrigel adhesion assay. The chemotactic motility of SW480 cells in which CDCP1 expression had been reduced by RNA interference was analysed using the xCELLigence system Real-Time Cell Analyzer Dual Plates combined with 8 μm pore filters. Detergent-resistant membrane fractions were generated following density gradient centrifugation and the CDCP1 and CD9 protein composition of these fractions was determined by Western blotting. The potential association of the CDCP1 and CD9 proteins was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. Engineered CDCP1 expression in Colo320 cells resulted in a reduction in cell adhesion to Matrigel. Treatment of SW480 cells with CDCP1 siRNA reduced serum-induced chemotaxis. CDCP1 and CD9 cell-surface protein and mRNA levels showed a positive correlation in colon cancer cell lines and the proteins formed a low-level, but detectable complex as judged by co-sedimentation of detergent lysates of HT-29 cells in sucrose gradients as well as by co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 cell lysates. A number of recent studies have assigned a potentially important role for the cell-surface protein CDCP1 in invasion and metastasis of a several types of human cancer cells. In this study, CDCP1 was shown to modulate cell-substratum adhesion and motility in colon cancer cell

  15. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase as a marker in colon carcinogenesis: analysis of the prostaglandin pathway in human colonic tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGEs-1 regulate prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂ expression and are involved in colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the expression of PGE₂ and its regulating genes in sporadic human colon tumors and matched normal tissues.Methods: Twenty colonic adenomas and 27 colonic adenocarcinomas were evaluated. COX-2 and 15-PGDH expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of PGE₂ and mPGEs-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively.Results: The expression of COX-2, mPGEs-1, and PGE₂ did not differ between the adenomas and matched distant normal tissues. 15-PGDH expression was lower in adenomas than in the matched normal colonic tissues (P<0.001. In adenocarcinomas, mPGEs-1 and PGE₂ expression was significantly higher (P<0.001 and P=0.020, respectively, and COX-2 expression did not differ from that in normal tissues (P=0.207. 15-PGDH expression was significantly lower in the normal colonic mucosa from adenocarcinoma patients than in the normal mucosa from adenoma patients (P=0.018.Conclusions: Early inactivation of 15-PGDH, followed by activation of COX-2 and mPGEs-1, contributes to PGE₂ production, leading to colon carcinogenesis. 15-PGDH might be a novel candidate marker for early detection of field defects in colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Betulinic Acid Kills Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Lisette; Di Franco, Simone; Kessler, Jan H.; Stassi, Giorgio; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the origin of cancer and it is suggested that they are resistant to chemotherapy. Current therapies fail to eradicate CSCs and therefore selecting a resistant cell subset that is able to facilitate tumor recurrences. Betulinic acid (BetA) is a broad

  17. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through ROS/p38MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-chun; Liang, Yun; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Guang-rui

    2016-01-01

    In the current study the antiproliferative effect of arctigenin, plant lignin, was evaluated on human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Furthermore, attempts were made to explore the signaling mechanism which may be responsible for its effect. Cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT and LDH assays. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to determine cell arrest in the cell cycle phase and apoptosis. Furthermore, to confirm the apoptotic activity of arctigenin, caspase-9 and -3 activities analysis was performed. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) were investigated to determine their role in inducing apoptosis in arctigenin-treated HT-29 colon cancer cell line. MTT and LDH results demonstrated significant cell growth inhibitory effect of arctigenin on HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increase in cell number arrested at G2/M phase was observed in flow cytometric analysis upon arctigenin treatment. In addition, arctigenin increased the apoptotic ratio in a dose-dependent manner. The involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway was indicated by the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Moreover, increased ROS production, activation of p38 MAPK and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) also revealed the role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in cell growth inhibition after arctigenin exposure. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells by regulating ROS and p38 MAPK pathways.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  19. Caveolin-1-Mediated Expression and Secretion of Kallikrein 6 in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Henkhaus

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted proteases that may play a functional role and/or serve as a serum biomarker for the presence or progression of certain types of cancers. Kallikrein 6 (KLK6 has been shown to be upregulated in several types of cancers, including colon. The aims of this study were to elucidate pathways that influence KLK6 gene expression and KLK6 protein secretion in the HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Our data indicate a central role for caveolin-1 (CAV-1, the main structural protein of caveolae, in both KLK6 gene expression and protein secretion. Sucrose gradient subcellular fractionation reveals that CAV-1 and KLK6 colocalize to lipid raft domains in the plasma membrane of HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we show that CAV-1, although it does not directly interact with the KLK6 molecule, enhances KLK6 secretion from the cells. Deactivation of CAV-1, through SRC-mediated phosphorylation, decreased KLK6 secretion. We also demonstrate that, in colon cancer cells, CAV-1 increased the amount of phosphorylated AKT in cells by inhibiting the activity of the AKT-negative regulators PP1 and PP2A. This study demonstrates that proteins such as CAV-1 and AKT, which are known to be altered in colon cancer, affect KLK6 expression and KLK6 secretion.

  20. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Bähr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity.

  1. Variational image segmentation for endoscopic human colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Isabel N; Figueiredo, Pedro N; Stadler, Georg; Ghattas, Omar; Araujo, Adérito

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a variational image segmentation method for assessing the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the human colon captured in vivo by endoscopy. ACF are thought to be precursors for colorectal cancer, and therefore their early detection may play an important clinical role. We enhance the active contours without edges model of Chan and Vese to account for the ACF's particular structure. We employ level sets to represent the segmentation boundaries and discretize in space by finite elements and in (artificial) time by finite differences. The approach is able to identify the ACF, their boundaries, and some of the internal crypts' orifices.

  2. CCR1-mediated accumulation of myeloid cells in the liver microenvironment promoting mouse colon cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hideyo; Fujishita, Teruaki; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Inamoto, Susumu; Itatani, Yoshiro; Saitou, Mitinori; Maekawa, Taira; Taketo, M Mark

    2014-12-01

    To understand colon cancer metastasis, we earlier analyzed a mouse model that developed liver metastasis of cancer cells disseminated from the spleen. We suggested that CCR1(+) bone marrow (BM)-derived cells are recruited to the microenvironment of disseminated colon cancer cells, and produce metalloproteinases MMP9 and MMP2, helping metastatic colonization. In the present study, we have examined these myeloid cells expressing CCR1 and/or MMPs in detail. To this end, we have established bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based transgenic mouse lines in which membrane-targeted Venus fluorescent protein (mVenus) was expressed under the control of Ccr1 gene promoter. Then, myeloid cells obtained from the BM and liver metastatic foci were analyzed by the combination of flow cytometry and cytology/immunohistochemistry, in situ RNA hybridization, or quantitative RT-PCR. We have found four distinct types of myeloid cells recruited to the metastatic foci; neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and fibrocytes. These cell types exhibited distinct expression patterns for CCR1, MMP2 and MMP9. Namely, neutrophils found in the early phase of cancer cell dissemination expressed CCR1 exclusively and MMP9 preferentially, whereas fibrocytes accumulated in later phase expressed MMP2 exclusively. Either genetic inactivation of Ccr1 or antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion reduced subsequent recruitment of fibrocytes. The recruitment of CCR1(+) neutrophils in early phase of colon cancer dissemination appears to cause that of fibrocytes in late phase. These results implicate the key role of CCR1 in colon cancer metastasis in this mouse model, and explain why both MMP9 and MMP2 are essential as genetically demonstrated previously. The results also suggest relevant mechanisms in humans.

  3. Acetoxyroyleanone exhibits selective anti-cancer effects and induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells through the mediation of NF-κB and caspase-3 signalling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jun Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and apoptotic activities of acetoxyroyleanone against various cancer cells along with studying its effect on chromatin condensation, NF-κB and caspase-3 expressions and cell migration. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate cell viability while as fluorescence microscopy revealed the effects of acetoxyroyleanone on cellular morphology of Colo-205 cells. Western blotting revealed effects on NF-κB and caspase-3 expressions. The results revealed that acetoxyroyleanone induced potent and dose-dependent antiproliferative effects against a range of cancer cell lines with Colo-205 being the most susceptible cell line. However, it required six to eight times higher concentration of acetoxyroyleanone to induce 50% cell death in normal epithelial (fR-2 cell line. Further, following acetoxyroyleanone treatment to Colo-205, it was observed that acetoxy-royleanone induced substantial down-regulation of NF-κB and up-regulation of caspase-3 expressions. In addition, acetoxyroyleanone impairs cell migration, chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing.

  4. Dietary pectic glycans are degraded by coordinated enzyme pathways in human colonic Bacteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis, Ana S.; Briggs, Jonathon; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2018-01-01

    utilization loci (PULs). In Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a human colonic bacterium, the PULs activated by different pectin domains have been identified; however, the mechanism by which these loci contribute to the degradation of these GalA-containing polysaccharides is poorly understood. Here we show......The major nutrients available to human colonic Bacteroides species are glycans, exemplified by pectins, a network of covalently linked plant cell wall polysaccharides containing galacturonic acid (GalA). Metabolism of complex carbohydrates by the Bacteroides genus is orchestrated by polysaccharide...... PULs ensuring a continuous supply of inducing molecules throughout growth. The contribution of Bacteroides spp. to metabolism of the pectic network is illustrated by cross-feeding between organisms....

  5. Factors that mediate colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Ciara; Dolan, Brendan; Clyne, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic infection. The majority of bacteria live in the mucus layer overlying the gastric epithelial cells and only a small proportion of bacteria are found interacting with the epithelial cells. The bacteria living in the gastric mucus may act as a reservoir of infection for the underlying cells which is essential for the development of disease. Colonization of gastric mucus is likely to be key to the establishment of chronic infection. How H. pylori manages to colonise and survive in the hostile environment of the human stomach and avoid removal by mucus flow and killing by gastric acid is the subject of this review. We also discuss how bacterial and host factors may together go some way to explaining the susceptibility to colonization and the outcome of infection in different individuals. H. pylori infection of the gastric mucosa has become a paradigm for chronic infection. Understanding of why H. pylori is such a successful pathogen may help us understand how other bacterial species colonise mucosal surfaces and cause disease. PMID:24914320

  6. Age-associated mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to small but significant changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colonic crypts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, M.; Johnson, R.; Taylor, R.W.; Wright, N.A.; Lightowlers, R.N.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Mathers, J.C.; Turnbull, D.M.; Greaves, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are a cause of human disease and are proposed to have a role in human aging. Clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations have been detected in replicating tissues and have been shown to cause respiratory chain (RC) defects. The effect of these mutations on other

  7. Rutamarin, an Active Constituent from Ruta angustifolia Pers., Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in the HT29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaimi, Shafinah Ahmad; Hong, Sok Lai; Abdul Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2017-07-01

    Ruta angustifolia Pers. is a perennial herb that is cultivated worldwide, including Southeast Asia, for the treatment of various diseases as traditional medicine. The purpose of the study was to identify an active principle of R. angustifolia and to investigate its effect on the HT29 cell death. The methanol and fractionated extracts (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and water) of R. angustifolia Pers. were initially investigated for their cytotoxic activity against two human carcinoma cell lines (MCF7 and HT29) and a normal human colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co) using sulforhodamine B cytotoxicity assay. Eight compounds including rutamarin were isolated from the active chloroform extract and evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HT29 human colon carcinoma cell line and CCD-18Co noncancer cells. Further studies on the induction of apoptosis such as morphological examinations, biochemical analyses, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activation assay were conducted in rutamarin-treated HT29 cells. Rutamarin exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activity against HT29 cells (IC50 value of 5.6 μM) but was not toxic to CCD-18Co cells. The morphological and biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis including activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 were observed in rutamarin-treated HT29 cells. These may be associated with cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M checkpoints, which was also observed in HT29 cells. The present study describes rutamarin-induced apoptosis in the HT29 cell line for the first time and suggests that rutamarin has the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Rutamarin was cytotoxic to HT29 colon cancer cells but exerted no damage to normal colon cellsRutamarin induced morphological and biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis in HT29 cellsRutamarin induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M checkpoints in a dose-dependent manner in HT29 cellsRutamarin activated caspases 3, 8, and 9 in a dose-dependent manner in HT29 cells. Abbreviations used

  8. Crohn's disease of the colon: ultrastructural changes in submuscular interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the submuscular plexus were often empty and dilated. Fibroblast-like cells selectively encased macrophages and mast cells. The cytological changes in ICC-SMP in CD are thus similar to changes seen in ulcerative colitis and may be of pathophysiological significance with regard to the motility and sensory......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submuscular border of the human colon (ICC-SMP) are the proposed pacemaker cells of the musculature. In patients with Crohn's disease (CD) of the colon, ICC-SMP showed characteristic cytological changes from controls. The changes comprised secondary...... lysosomes in connection with lipid droplets and cytoplasmic vacuoles or multiple empty, confluent and often outbulging vacuoles merging with cisterns of granular endoplasmic reticulum and clusters of glycogen granules. These changes were most pronounced in patients with macroscopical mucosal inflammation...

  9. In Vitro Collapsing Colon Cancer Cells by Selectivity of Disulfiram-Loaded Charge Switchable Nanoparticles Against Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Serie, Marwa M; El-Rashidy, Fatma H

    2017-01-01

    Different strategies against colon cancer are accompanied by treatment failure, because of drug toxicity toward normal cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs) resistance. However, previous patent evaluated liposome that encapsulated inhibitor of CSCs' aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)1; disulfiram, for targeting breast CSCs. Liposome has disadvantages due to its hydrophobicity. Designing hydrophilic nanoparticles has selectivity to release disulfiram in CC cells rather than in normal colonocytes based on variation in microenvironment between normal and cancer cells. Disulfiram was nanoformulated by its loading into cationic chitosan and coating with anionic albumin. Their selectivity and targeting were investigated using murine and human colon cancer cells compared to normal mice colon cells. Zeta potential of the coated nanoparticles confirmed that albumin-layering confers negative charge (-10.3mv) for disulfiram-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (52.9mv). In slightly acidic medium of tumor, the ionic bond between albumin and chitosan hydrolyzed then the positive charge was reversed (47.6mv). Thus coated nanoparticles showed higher sustain release for disulfiram in tumor microenvironment than neutral pH and their uptake was higher in cancer cells than normal cells. This interpreted the highest selectivity of coated nanoparticles for enhancing apoptosis and eliminating CSCs in cancer cells. These patented coated nanoparticles were the most effective and selective for eradicating colon CSCs without insulting normal stem cells in comparison with disulfiram which was toxic to both normal and CSCs. This novel study that used charge switchable (hydrophilic) nanoparticles for targeting colon CSCs may represent a basis for future in vivo studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. TNF-α promotes colon cancer cell migration and invasion by upregulating TROP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2018-03-01

    High levels of tumor-associated calcium signal transduction protein (TROP)-2 have been demonstrated to be strongly associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in colon cancer. In the present study, the effect of TNF-α on the regulation of TROP-2 expression and its effect in colon cancer cell migration and invasion were investigated in vitro . TROP-2 protein levels were evaluated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α using western blot analysis. Changes in the migratory and invasive potential of the cells were evaluated using a wound healing and transwell assay, respectively. Then, TROP-2 expression was downregulated in cells by use of siRNA, and TROP-2 knockdown was confirmed at the mRNA and protein level by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. The migration and invasion potential of cells transfected with TROP-2 siRNA was also evaluated. Levels of several mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins, namely p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), were detected in cells treated with TNF-α using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that TROP-2 protein levels increased in cells treated with lower concentrations of TNF-α, but decreased in cells treated with higher concentrations of TNF-α, compared with untreated control. Maximum TROP-2 levels were observed in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. Migration and invasion were enhanced in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. When TROP-2 was silenced in colon cancer cells by siRNA, migration and invasion were significantly decreased compared with control cells. TNF-α stimulation activated the ERK1/2 pathway, but did not significantly affect p38 and JNK phosphorylation levels. Treatment with a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor suppressed the TNF-α-induced upregulation of TROP-2 and the TNF-α-induced colon cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, the

  11. Anticancer effect of linalool via cancer-specific hydroxyl radical generation in human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Murata, Soichiro; Ito, Hiromu; Nakayama, Ken; Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Sano, Naoki; Nowatari, Takeshi; Villareal, Myra O; Nagano, Yumiko N; Isoda, Hiroko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-28

    To investigate the anticancer mechanisms of the monoterpenoid alcohol linalool in human colon cancer cells. The cytotoxic effect of linalool on the human colon cancer cell lines and a human fibroblast cell line was examined using the WST-8 assay. The apoptosis-inducing effect of linalool was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry with Annexin V. Oxidative stress was investigated by staining for diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine, which is a cellular lipid peroxidation marker, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Sixteen SCID mice xenografted with human cancer cells were randomized into 3 groups for in vivo analysis: control and low-dose and high-dose linalool groups. The control group was administered tap water orally every 3 d. The linalool treatment groups were administered 100 or 200 μg/kg linalool solution orally for the same period. All mice were sacrificed under anesthesia 21 d after tumor inoculation, and tumors and organs were collected for immunohistochemistry using an anti-4-hydroxynonenal antibody. Tumor weights were measured and compared between groups. Linalool induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro, following the cancer-specific induction of oxidative stress, which was measured based on spontaneous hydroxyl radical production and delayed lipid peroxidation. Mice in the high-dose linalool group exhibited a 55% reduction in mean xenograft tumor weight compared with mice in the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor-specific lipid peroxidation was observed in the in vivo model. Linalool exhibited an anticancer effect via cancer-specific oxidative stress, and this agent has potential for application in colon cancer therapy.

  12. Identification of the Virulence Landscape Essential for Entamoeba histolytica Invasion of the Human Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Chung-Chau; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Avé, Patrick; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Labruyère, Elisabeth; Guillén, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the pathogenic amoeba responsible for amoebiasis, an infectious disease targeting human tissues. Amoebiasis arises when virulent trophozoites start to destroy the muco-epithelial barrier by first crossing the mucus, then killing host cells, triggering inflammation and subsequently causing dysentery. The main goal of this study was to analyse pathophysiology and gene expression changes related to virulent (i.e. HM1:IMSS) and non-virulent (i.e. Rahman) strains when they are in contact with the human colon. Transcriptome comparisons between the two strains, both in culture conditions and upon contact with human colon explants, provide a global view of gene expression changes that might contribute to the observed phenotypic differences. The most remarkable feature of the virulent phenotype resides in the up-regulation of genes implicated in carbohydrate metabolism and processing of glycosylated residues. Consequently, inhibition of gene expression by RNA interference of a glycoside hydrolase (β-amylase absent from humans) abolishes mucus depletion and tissue invasion by HM1:IMSS. In summary, our data suggest a potential role of carbohydrate metabolism in colon invasion by virulent E. histolytica. PMID:24385905

  13. Human Colon Tumors Express a Dominant-Negative Form of SIGIRR That Promotes Inflammation and Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjie; Bulek, Katarzyna; Gulen, Muhammet F; Zepp, Jarod A; Karagkounis, Georgio; Martin, Bradley N; Zhou, Hao; Yu, Minjia; Liu, Xiuli; Huang, Emina; Fox, Paul L; Kalady, Matthew F; Markowitz, Sanford D; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-12-01

    Single immunoglobulin and toll-interleukin 1 receptor (SIGIRR), a negative regulator of the Toll-like and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathways, controls intestinal inflammation and suppresses colon tumorigenesis in mice. However, the importance of SIGIRR in human colorectal cancer development has not been determined. We investigated the role of SIGIRR in development of human colorectal cancer. We performed RNA sequence analyses of pairs of colon tumor and nontumor tissues, each collected from 68 patients. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine levels of SIGIRR protein in primary human colonic epithelial cells, tumor tissues, and colon cancer cell lines. We expressed SIGIRR and mutant forms of the protein in Vaco cell lines. We created and analyzed mice that expressed full-length (control) or a mutant form of Sigirr (encoding SIGIRR(N86/102S), which is not glycosylated) specifically in the intestinal epithelium. Some mice were given azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis-associated cancer. Intestinal tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemical and gene expression profile analyses. RNA sequence analyses revealed increased expression of a SIGIRR mRNA isoform, SIGIRR(ΔE8), in colorectal cancer tissues compared to paired nontumor tissues. SIGIRR(ΔE8) is not modified by complex glycans and is therefore retained in the cytoplasm-it cannot localize to the cell membrane or reduce IL1R signaling. SIGIRR(ΔE8) interacts with and has a dominant-negative effect on SIGIRR, reducing its glycosylation, localization to the cell surface, and function. Most SIGIRR detected in human colon cancer tissues was cytoplasmic, whereas in nontumor tissues it was found at the cell membrane. Mice that expressed SIGIRR(N86/102S) developed more inflammation and formed larger tumors after administration of azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium than control mice; colon tissues from these mutant mice expressed

  14. Modulation of mRNA expression and activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, GPx and GSTP1 by the Salicornia freitagii extract in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I-II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the detoxification and elimination of activated carcinogens, acting as important biomarkers for chemoprevention. Among them, cytochrome P450s plays a prominent role in the metabolic activation of xenobiotics. The herb Salicornia freitagii (SF (Amaranthaceae is known for its anticancer, antioxidant, antidiabetic and antiinflammatory activities. In this study, we determined the bioactive phenolics in the SF methanol extract and investigated its antiproliferative potential in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated the modulation of some phase I and II enzyme (CYP 1A1, 1A2, 2E1, GSTP1 and GPx mRNA expression and enzymatic activities by the SF extract and its major bioactive phenolic compounds. LC/MS-MS analysis showed that the main phenolic compounds of the methanolic SF extract are vanillic acid (48 μg/100g and p-coumaric acid (10.8 μg/100g. SF extract, vanillic acid and p-coumaric acid exhibited high antiproliferative activities in HT-29 cells, with IC50 values of 81.79μg/mL, 98.8 μM and 221.6 μM, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 were decreased, while those of GSTP1 and GPx in HT-29 cells were increased after application of either the SF extract or vanillic acid. The SF extract by itself also increased the activities of GPx and GSTP1 enzymes 1.68- and 1.49-fold, respectively. Our data indicate that the SF extract and its major bioactive compound, vanillic acid, could exert a modulatory effect on the expression of enzymes that are involved in xenobiotic activation and detoxification pathways in the gastrointestinal tract. For this reason, SF can be considered as a natural source of chemopreventive agents.

  15. Leptin and insulin up-regulate miR-4443 to suppress NCOA1 and TRAF4, and decrease the invasiveness of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Ari; Yehuda, Hila

    2016-11-14

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Normal and tumor cells respond to metabolic hormones, such as leptin and insulin. Thus, obesity-associated resistance to these hormones likely leads to changes in gene expression and behavior of tumor cells. However, the mechanisms affected by leptin and insulin signaling in CRC cells remain mostly unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis-related gene expression in CRC cells by leptin and insulin. To test this hypothesis, miRNA levels in the CRC-derived cell lines HCT-116, HT-29 and DLD-1 were profiled, following leptin and insulin treatment. Candidate miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR. Predicted miRNA targets with known roles in cancer, were validated by immunoblots and reporter assays in HCT-116 cells. Transfection of HCT-116 cells with candidate miRNA mimic was used to test in vitro effects on proliferation and invasion. Of ~800 miRNAs profiled, miR-4443 was consistently up-regulated by leptin and insulin in HCT-116 and HT-29, but not in DLD-1, which lacked normal leptin receptor expression. Dose response experiments showed that leptin at 100 ng/ml consistently up-regulated miR-4443 in HCT-116 cells, concomitantly with a significant decrease in cell invasion ability. Transfection with miR-4443 mimic decreased invasion and proliferation of HCT-116 cells. Moreover, leptin and miR-4443 transfection significantly down-regulated endogenous NCOA1 and TRAF4, both predicted targets of miR-4443 with known roles in cancer metastasis. miR-4443 was found to directly regulate TRAF4 and NCOA1, as validated by a reporter assay. The up-regulation of miR-4443 by leptin or insulin was attenuated by the inhibition of MEK1/2. Our findings suggest that miR-4443 acts in a tumor-suppressive manner by down-regulating TRAF4 and NCOA1 downstream of MEK-C/EBP-mediated leptin and insulin signaling, and that insulin and/or leptin resistance (e.g. in obesity) may suppress this

  16. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I in three SN-38 resistant human colon cancer cell lines reveals a new pair of resistance-associated mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Agama, Keli; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    generated and compared to wildtype parental cells with regards to: TOP1 gene copy number and gene sequence, Top1 expression (mRNA and protein), Top1 enzymatic activity in the absence and presence of drug, and Top1-DNA cleavage complexes in drug treated cells. TOP1 mutations were validated by PCR using......Background: DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) is a DNA unwinding protein and the specific target of the camptothecin class of chemotherapeutic drugs. One of these, irinotecan, acting through its active metabolite SN-38, is used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resistance...... gene copy gain and a loss of chromosome 20, respectively. One resistant cell line harbored a pair of yet unreported TOP1 mutations (R364K and G717R) in close proximity to the drug binding site. Mutant TOP1 was expressed at a markedly higher level than wild-type TOP1. None or very small reductions were...

  17. c-Myb is required for progenitor cell homeostasis in colonic crypts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malaterre, J.; Carpinelli, M.; Ernst, M.; Alexander, W.; Cooke, M.; Sutton, S.; Dworkin, S.; Heakth, J.K.; Frampton, J.; McArthur, G.; Clevers, J.C.; Hilton, D.; Mantamadiotis, Th.; Ramsay, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    The colonic crypt is the functional unit of the colon mucosa with a central role in ion and water reabsorption. Under steady-state conditions, the distal colonic crypt harbors a single stem cell at its base that gives rise to highly proliferative progenitor cells that differentiate into columnar,

  18. Lubiprostone activates Cl- secretion via cAMP signaling and increases membrane CFTR in the human colon carcinoma cell line, T84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mei; Venkatasubramanian, Jayashree; Boonkaewwan, Chaiwat; Ganesan, Nivetha; Syed, Asma; Benya, Richard V; Rao, Mrinalini C

    2011-02-01

    Lubiprostone, used clinically (b.i.d.) to treat constipation, has been reported to increase transepithelial Cl(-) transport in T84 cells by activating ClC-2 channels. To identify the underlying signaling pathway, we explored the effects of short-term and overnight lubiprostone treatment on second messenger signaling and Cl(-) transport. Cl(-) transport was assessed either as I(sc) across T84 monolayers grown on Transwells and mounted in Ussing chambers or by the iodide efflux assay. [cAMP](i) was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and [Ca(2+)](i) by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Quantitation of apical cell surface CFTR protein levels was assessed by Western blotting and biotinylation with the EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-LC-LC-Biotin. ClC-2 mRNA level was studied by RT-PCR. Lubiprostone and the cAMP stimulator, forskolin, caused comparable and maximal increases of I(sc) in T84 cells. The I(sc) effects of lubiprostone and forskolin were each suppressed if the tissue had previously been treated with the other agent. These responses were unaltered even if the monolayers were treated with lubiprostone overnight. Lubiprostone-induced increases in iodide efflux were ~80% of those obtained with forskolin. Lubiprostone increased [cAMP](i). H89, bumetanide, or CFTR(inh)-172 greatly attenuated lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) secretion, whereas the ClC-2 inhibitor CdCl(2) did not. Compared to controls, FSK-treatment increased membrane-associated CFTR by 1.9 fold, and lubiprostone caused a 2.6-fold increase in apical membrane CFTR as seen by immunoblotting following cell surface biotinylation. Lubiprostone activates Cl(-) secretion in T84 cells via cAMP, protein kinase A, and by increasing apical membrane CFTR protein.

  19. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...

  1. Colonic inflammation in mice is improved by cigarette smoke through iNKT cells recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Montbarbon

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS protects against intestinal inflammation during ulcerative colitis. Immunoregulatory mechanisms sustaining this effect remain unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of CS on experimental colitis and to characterize the intestinal inflammatory response at the cellular and molecular levels. Using the InExpose® System, a smoking device accurately reproducing human smoking habit, we pre-exposed C57BL/6 mice for 2 weeks to CS, and then we induced colitis by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. This system allowed us to demonstrate that CS exposure improved colonic inflammation (significant decrease in clinical score, body weight loss and weight/length colonic ratio. This improvement was associated with a significant decrease in colonic proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cytokine expression, as compared to unexposed mice (TNF (p=0.0169, IFNγ (p<0.0001, and IL-17 (p=0.0008. Smoke exposure also induced an increased expression of IL-10 mRNA (p=0.0035 and a marked recruitment of iNKT (invariant Natural Killer T; CD45+ TCRβ+ CD1d tetramer+ cells in the colon of DSS-untreated mice. Demonstration of the role of iNKT cells in CS-dependent colitis improvement was performed using two different strains of NKT cells deficient mice. Indeed, in Jα18KO and CD1dKO animals, CS exposure failed to induce significant regulation of DSS-induced colitis both at the clinical and molecular levels. Thus, our study demonstrates that iNKT cells are pivotal actors in the CS-dependent protection of the colon. These results highlight the role of intestinal iNKT lymphocytes and their responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Targeting iNKT cells would represent a new therapeutic way for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  2. The modern human colonization of western Eurasia: when and where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Dating the timing of the replacement of local Neandertal populations by modern humans in western Eurasia at the dawn of the Upper Palaeolithic remains challenging due to the scarcity of the palaeontological evidence and to the complexity of the archaeological record. Furthermore, key specimens have been discovered in the course of excavations that unfortunately did not meet today's archaeological standards. The importance of site-formation processes in the considered time period makes it sometimes difficult to precisely assign fragmentary remains a posteriori to distinct techno-complexes. The improvements in dating methods have however allowed for the clarification of many chronological issues in the past decade. Archaeological and palaeontological evidence strongly suggest that the initial modern colonization of eastern Europe and central Asia should be related to the spread of techno-complexes assigned to the Initial Upper Palaeolithic. This first expansion may have started as early as 48 ka cal BP. The earliest phases of the Aurignacian complex (Protoaurignacian and Early Aurignacian) seem to represent another modern wave of migrations, starting in the Levant area. The expansion of this techno-complex throughout Europe completed the modern colonization of the continent. The interpretation of a third group of industries referred to as "transitional assemblages" in western and central Europe is much debated. At least in part, these assemblages might have been produced by Neandertal groups that may have survived until c. 41 ka cal BP, according to the directly dated Neandertal specimens of Saint-Césaire (France) and Spy (Belgium).

  3. Effect of Maillard reaction on biochemical properties of peanut 7S globulin (Ara h 1) and its interaction with a human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Kostyra, Henryk; Wichers, Harry; Kostyra, Elżbieta

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Maillard reaction (MR, glycation) on biochemical and biological properties of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1. Three different time/temperature conditions of treatment were applied (37, 60, and 145 °C). The extent of MR was assessed by SDS-PAGE, loss of free amino groups, fluorescence intensity, content of bound sugar and fructosamine. The Caco-2 model system was applied to study effects of hydrolysed and non-hydrolysed Ara h 1 on proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from Caco-2 cells. We demonstrated significant differences in the biochemical properties of Ara h 1 glycated at different time/temperature conditions. Glycation of Ara h 1 at 37 °C was shown to cause least biochemical changes, not limiting pepsin hydrolysis. Loss of free amino groups, increase of fluorescence and brown colour of Ara h 1 glycated at 60 and 145 °C indicated advanced and final stages of MR. Non-treated Ara h 1 inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation and stimulated IL-8 secretion. This effect was less pronounced for glycated Ara h 1. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with non-hydrolysed Ara h 1, glycated at the temperature of 37 and 60 °C, did not stimulate IL-8 secretion. Each applied time/temperature-treatment combination caused different biochemical changes of Ara h 1, underlining diversity of formed MRPs. MR, independently of temperature/time conditions, reduced the pro-inflammatory properties of native Ara h 1, reflected in stimulation of IL-8 secretion from intestinal epithelial cells.

  4. Physico-chemical characteristics and cyto-genotoxic potential of ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles on human colon carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; De Berardis, B.; Bizzarri, L.; Degan, P.; Andreoli, C.; Zijno, A.; De Angelis, I.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of the physico-chemical properties of ZnO and TiO2 NPs in the potential cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage induction on Caco-2 cell line. As negative control, fine TiO2 particles were used. The characterization of particles was carried out by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) using a Soft Imaging System. To evaluate the effects of ZnO and TiO2 NPs induced on Caco-2 viability, Neutral Red assay was performed after treatment with different particle concentrations. Our results showed a significant dose and time dependent effect after treatment with ZnO NPs. On the contrary, no effect was observed on Caco-2 cells exposed to TiO2 particles either in micro-and in nano-size. The role of surface in the cytotoxicity induced on Caco-2 was also considered. The levels of DNA 8-oxodG, as the main marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC). A significant increase in the 8-oxodG levels was observed after 6 h exposure for both NPs. The estimation of the potential genotoxicity of the two NPs is ongoing by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Our preliminary results showed that a slight micronucleus increase in binucleated cells was detected in the dose range applied only for ZnO.

  5. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sofía; Berois, Nora; Fernández, Gabriel; Freire, Teresa; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF) in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P = 0.01). In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P = 0.05). This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF) and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines. PMID:24023528

  6. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Berriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P=0.01. In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P=0.05. This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines.

  7. Novel snail1 target proteins in human colon cancer identified by proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Larriba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT.We identified by proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF and ESI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry a number of proteins with variable functions whose expression is modulated by Snail1 in SW480-ADH human colon cancer cells. Validation was performed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Snail1 repressed several members of the 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine binding proteins and also the expression of the Proliferation-associated protein 2G4 (PA2G4 that was mainly localized at the nuclear Cajal bodies. In contrast, the expression of two proteins involved in RNA processing, the Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6 and the Splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ, was higher in Snail1-expressing cells than in controls. The regulation of 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3tau, 14-3-3zeta and PA2G4 by Snail1 was reproduced in HT29 colon cancer cells. In addition, we found an inverse correlation between 14-3-3sigma and Snail1 expression in human colorectal tumors.We have identified a set of novel Snail1 target proteins in colon cancer that expand the cellular processes affected by Snail1 and thus its relevance for cell function and phenotype.

  8. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  9. Transcriptome and long noncoding RNA sequencing of three extracellular vesicle subtypes released from the human colon cancer LIM1863 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maoshan; Xu, Rong; Ji, Hong; Greening, David W.; Rai, Alin; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Previously we reported that LIM1863 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells secrete three distinct extracellular vesicle subtypes – two subpopulations of exosomes (apical EpCAM-Exos and basolateral A33-Exos) and shed microvesicles (sMVs) – with distinct protein and miRNA signatures. Here, we extend our omics approach to understand the fundamental role of LIM1863-derived EVs by performing a comprehensive analysis of their mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) using RNA-Seq. We show that 2,389 mRNAs, 317 pseudogene transcripts, 1,028 lncRNAs and 206 short non-coding RNAs selectively distributed to (i.e., are enriched in) LIM1863 EVs, relative to the parent cell. An Ensembl/UniProtKB analysis revealed 1,937 mRNAs encode canonical proteins, 348 isoforms (including splice-variant proteins), and 119 ‘missing proteins’ (i.e., annotated in Ensembl but not UniProtKB). Further dissection of our protein/RNA data revealed that 6/151 observed RNA binding proteins have the potential to interact with ~75% of EV-enriched RNAs. Intriguingly, the co-existence of U1 and U2 ribonucleoproteins and their cognate snRNAs in LIM1863 EVs suggests a possible association of CRC EVs with recipient cell splicing events. Our data reveal several potential lncRNA CRC biomarkers and novel splicing/fusion genes that, collectively, will advance our understanding of EV biology in CRC and accelerate the development of EV-based diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27917920

  10. Polyamine and methionine adenosyltransferase 2A crosstalk in human colon and liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); The Southern California Research Center for Alcoholic and Pancreatic Diseases and Cirrhosis, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Ryoo, Minjung; Skay, Anna [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Whipps Cross University Hospital, London E11 1NR (United Kingdom); Mato, José M. [CIC bioGUNE, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (Ciberehd), Technology Park of Bizkaia, 48160 Derio, Bizkaia (Spain); Lu, Shelly C., E-mail: shellylu@usc.edu [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); The Southern California Research Center for Alcoholic and Pancreatic Diseases and Cirrhosis, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an essential enzyme that is responsible for the biosynthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal methyl donor and precursor of polyamines. MAT1A is expressed in normal liver and MAT2A is expressed in all extrahepatic tissues. MAT2A expression is increased in human colon cancer and in colon cancer cells treated with mitogens, whereas silencing MAT2A resulted in apoptosis. The aim of the current work was to examine the mechanism responsible for MAT2A-dependent growth and apoptosis. We found that in RKO (human adenocarcinoma cell line) cells, MAT2A siRNA treatment lowered cellular SAMe and putrescine levels by 70–75%, increased apoptosis and inhibited growth. Putrescine supplementation blunted significantly MAT2A siRNA-induced apoptosis and growth suppression. Putrescine treatment (100 pmol/L) raised MAT2A mRNA level to 4.3-fold of control, increased the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos and binding to an AP-1 site in the human MAT2A promoter and the promoter activity. In human colon cancer specimens, the expression levels of MAT2A, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), c-Jun and c-Fos are all elevated as compared to adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Overexpression of ODC in RKO cells also raised MAT2A mRNA level and MAT2A promoter activity. ODC and MAT2A are also overexpressed in liver cancer and consistently, similar MAT2A-ODC-putrescine interactions and effects on growth and apoptosis were observed in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, there is a crosstalk between polyamines and MAT2A. Increased MAT2A expression provides more SAMe for polyamines biosynthesis; increased polyamine (putrescine in this case) can activate MAT2A at the transcriptional level. This along with increased ODC expression in cancer all feed forward to further enhance the proliferative capacity of the cancer cell. -- Highlights: • MAT2A knockdown depletes putrescine and leads to apoptosis. • Putrescine attenuates MAT2A knockdown-induced apoptosis and growth

  11. Effect of light irradiation by light emitting diode on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Iwata, Takashi; Higashijima, Jun; Chikakiyo, Motoya; Nishi, Masaaki; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Takahashi, Akira; Akutagawa, Masatake; Emoto, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation from light emitting diodes (LED) for wound healing, anti-inflammation and anticancer therapies. However, little is known about the effects of visible light in colon cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological response (including gene expression changes) of human colon cancer cells to different wavelengths of LED irradiation. Human colon cancer cells (HT29 or HCT116) were seeded onto laboratory dishes that were then put on LED irradiation equipment with a 465 nm-, 525 nm-, or 635 nm-LED. Irradiation at 15 or 30 mW was performed 10 min/day, each day for 5 days. The cell counting kit8 was then used to measure cell viability. Apoptosis and expression of several mRNAs (caspase, MAPK and autophagy pathway) in HT29 cultures irradiated with 465 nm LED were evaluated via AnnexinV/PI and RT-PCR, respectively. Viability of HT29 and HCT116 cells was lower in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, but viability of HT29 cells did not differ between control cultures and 525 nm-LED or 635 nm-LED irradiated cultures. Moreover, the expression of FAS, caspase-3, capase-8, and JUK were significantly higher in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, and expression of ERK1/2 and LC3 was lower in blue-irradiated cells. LED irradiation at 465 nm inhibited the proliferation of HT29 cells and of HCT116 cells. Notably, LED irradiation at 465 nm promoted apoptosis inHT29 cultures via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and the MAPK pathway. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Induction of cytotoxicity of Pelagia noctiluca venom causes reactive oxygen species generation, lipid peroxydation induction and DNA damage in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed Yosra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long-lasting and abundant blooming of Pelagia noctiluca in Tunisian coastal waters compromises both touristic and fishing activities and causes substantial economic losses. Determining their molecular mode of action is, important in order to limit or prevent the subsequent damages. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the propensity of Pelagia noctiluca venom to cause oxidative damage in HCT 116 cells and its associated genotoxic effects. Results Our results indicated an overproduction of ROS, an induction of catalase activity and an increase of MDA generation. We looked for DNA fragmentation by means of the comet assay. Results indicated that venom of Pelagia noctiluca induced DNA fragmentation. SDS-PAGE analysis of Pelagia noctiluca venom revealed at least 15 protein bands of molecular weights ranging from 4 to 120 kDa. Conclusion Oxidative damage may be an initiating event and contributes, in part, to the mechanism of toxicity of Pelagia noctiluca venom.

  13. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  14. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  15. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi