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Sample records for human cerebral neuropathology

  1. Neuropathological approaches to cerebral aging and neuroplasticity

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    Jellinger, Kurt A.; Attems, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aging is a complex and heterogenous process related to a large variety of molecular changes involving multiple neuronal networks, due to alterations of neurons (synapses, axons, dendrites, etc), particularly affecting strategically important regions, such as hippocampus and prefrontal areas. A substantial proportion of nondemented, cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects show at least mild to moderate, and rarely even severe, Alzheimer-related lesions, probably representing asymptomatic preclinical Alzheimer's disease, and/or mixed pathologies. While the substrate of resilience to cognitive decline in the presence of abundant pathologies has been unclear, recent research has strengthened the concept of cognitive or brain reserve, based on neuroplasticity or the ability of the brain to manage or counteract age-related changes or pathologies by reorganizing its structure, connections, and functions via complex molecular pathways and mechanisms that are becoming increasingly better understood. Part of neuroplasticity is adult neurogenesis in specific areas of the brain, in particular the hippocampal formation important for memory function, the decline of which is common even in “healthy” aging. To obtain further insights into the mechanisms of brain plasticity and adult neurogenesis, as the basis for prevention and potential therapeutic options, is a major challenge of modern neurosciences. PMID:23576887

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

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    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  3. [Physiopathological and neuropathological study of a cerebral decortication syndrome].

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    Autret, A; Carrier, H; Tommasi, M; Jouvet, M; Schott, B

    1975-07-01

    Detailed observation of a case of laminar necrosis of almost the whole of the cerebral cortex has led to several deductions concerning the physiology of the cortex in man. It suggests that the cortex has a limited influence on sleep, interfering particularly in the electro-encephalographic translation of slow sleep and, curiously, in the organisation of sleep, paradoxical sleep is hardly affected at all. It confirms the importance of the human cortex in the acquisition of elementary skills and describes a new oculomotor pattern in a decorticate man.

  4. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  5. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke lesions in a dog brain: neuropathological characterisation and comparison to human ischaemic stroke.

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    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Gredal, Hanne; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Larsen, Anders Elm; Finsen, Bente; Berendt, Mette; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2017-01-13

    Dogs develop spontaneous ischaemic stroke with a clinical picture closely resembling human ischaemic stroke patients. Animal stroke models have been developed, but it has proved difficult to translate results obtained from such models into successful therapeutic strategies in human stroke patients. In order to face this apparent translational gap within stroke research, dogs with ischaemic stroke constitute an opportunity to study the neuropathology of ischaemic stroke in an animal species. A 7 years and 8 months old female neutered Rottweiler dog suffered a middle cerebral artery infarct and was euthanized 3 days after onset of neurological signs. The brain was subjected to histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Neuropathological changes were characterised by a pan-necrotic infarct surrounded by peri-infarct injured neurons and reactive microglia/macrophages and astrocytes. The neuropathological changes reported in the present study were similar to findings in human patients with ischaemic stroke. The dog with spontaneous ischaemic stroke is of interest as a complementary spontaneous animal model for further neuropathological studies.

  6. Etiology, timing of insult, and neuropathology of cerebral palsy evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Jaw, T S; Jong, Y J; Sheu, R S; Liu, G C; Chou, M S; Yang, R C

    1998-04-01

    To define the patterns of pathologic changes in cerebral palsy (CP) and to assess the etiology and time of brain damage, we reviewed the magnetic resonance images and clinical records of 86 pediatric CP patients seen over 8 years. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the gestational age at birth. The majority of CP patients (69) had spasticity. In the premature group ( or = 37 wk gestational age) ( n = 59), spastic hemiplegia (23) and quadriplegia (12) were most common. The other main clinical manifestations in the two groups were seizures (36) and mental retardation (15). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provided significant findings in 82 patients (95%). In the 27 patients born prematurely, MR imaging revealed periventricular leukomalacia (17), multicystic encephalomalacia (3), cortical and subcortical atrophy (4), migration disorders (2), and basal ganglia injury (1). Among the patients born at term, the MR imaging findings were more heterogeneous; they included cortical and subcortical atrophy (17), brain malformations (17), periventricular leukomalacia (6), multicystic encephalomalacia (5), porencephaly (4), hemiatrophy (3), delayed myelination (3), and none (4). MR imaging alone could define the time of brain insults in 73 of our 86 CP patients. Combined with clinical histories, MR imaging could help assess the time of insult in 93% of patients. The brain insults occurred prenatally in 34 of our patients, perinatally in 37, and postnatally in eight. The time of insult could not be determined in six patients. In the premature patients, the insult occurred most frequently perinatally (74%), whereas in the term group it occurred most frequently prenatally (54%). MR imaging was found to be very helpful in the evaluation of the various neuropathologic changes in CP, in the depiction of the etiology, and in the determination of the time of brain injury.

  7. [The neuropathology of sleep in human neurodegenerative diseases].

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    Hauw, J-J; Hausser-Hauw, C; Hasboun, D; Seilhean, D

    2008-01-01

    The neuropathology of human sleep remains an ill-defined issue. The data concerning the main structures of human brain areas involved, or supposed to be implicated, in sleep organisation are reviewed. Five levels of organisation can be schematically recognized: (i) the ascending arousal system, (ii) the non REM and REM systems (iii) regulated by hypothalamic areas, (iv) and the biological clock, (v) modulated by a number of "allostatic" influences. These are briefly described, with emphasis on the location of structures involved in humans, and on the recently revised concepts. Current knowledge on the topography of lesions associated with the main sleep disorders in degenerative diseases is recalled, including REM sleep behavior disorders, restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements, sleep apneas, insomnia, excessive daily sleepiness, secondary narcolepsy and disturbed sleep-wake rhythms. The lesions of sleep related structures observed in early and late stages of four degenerative diseases are then reviewed. Two synucleinopathies (Lewy lesions associated disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies, and Multiple System Atrophy) and two tauopathies (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Alzheimer's disease) are dealt with. The distribution of lesions usually found in affected patients fit with that expected from the prevalence of different sleep disorders in these diseases. This confirms the current opinion that these disorders depend on the distribution of lesions rather than on their biochemical nature. Further studies might throw insight on the mechanism of normal and pathological sleep in humans, counterpart of the increasing knowledge provided by animal models. Specially designed prospective clinicopathological studies including peculiar attention to sleep are urgently needed.

  8. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke lesions in a dog brain: neuropathological characterisation and comparison to human ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Gredal, Hanne; Wirenfeldt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Dogs develop spontaneous ischaemic stroke with a clinical picture closely resembling human ischaemic stroke patients. Animal stroke models have been developed, but it has proved difficult to translate results obtained from such models into successful therapeutic strategies in human...... stroke patients. In order to face this apparent translational gap within stroke research, dogs with ischaemic stroke constitute an opportunity to study the neuropathology of ischaemic stroke in an animal species. Case presentation A 7 years and 8 months old female neutered Rottweiler dog suffered....../macrophages and astrocytes. Conclusions The neuropathological changes reported in the present study were similar to findings in human patients with ischaemic stroke. The dog with spontaneous ischaemic stroke is of interest as a complementary spontaneous animal model for further neuropathological studies....

  9. A rodent model of human organophosphate exposure producing status epilepticus and neuropathology.

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    Pouliot, W; Bealer, S L; Roach, B; Dudek, F E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to organophosphates (OPs) often results in seizures and/or status epilepticus (SE) that produce neural damage within the central nervous system (CNS). Early control of SE is imperative for minimizing seizure-related CNS neuropathology. Although standard therapies exist, more effective agents are needed to reduce OP-induced SE and neuronal loss, particularly therapies with efficacy when administered 10's of minutes after the onset of SE. To evaluate novel antiseizure compounds, animal models should simulate the CNS effects of OP exposure observed in humans. We characterized in rats the effects of the OP, diisopropyl flourophosphate (DFP) as a function of dose and route of administration of supporting agents (pyridostigmine, 2-PAM, atropine); outcome measures were mortality, electrographic seizure activity during SE, and subsequent CNS neuropathology. Doses of DFP between 3 and 7mg/kg consistently caused SE, and the latency to behavioral tremors and to subsequent initiation of SE were dose related. In distinction, all doses of DFP that resulted in electrographic SE (3-7mg/kg) produced seizures of similar intensity and duration, and similar CNS neuropathology (i.e., the effects were all-or-none). Although SE was similar across doses, mortality progressively increased with higher doses of DFP. Mortality was significantly lower when the route of administration of therapeutic agents was intramuscular compared to intraperitoneal. This rodent model of OP poisoning demonstrates pathological characteristics similar to those observed in humans, and thus begins to validate this model for investigating potential new therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropathological sequelae of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and apathy: A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Rosselli, Monica; Uddin, Lucina Q; Antoni, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Apathy remains a common neuropsychiatric disturbance in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) despite advances in anti-retroviral treatment (ART). The goal of the current review is to recapitulate findings relating apathy to the deleterious biobehavioral effects of HIV-1 in the post-ART era. Available literatures demonstrate that the emergence of apathy with other neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms may be attributed to neurotoxic effects of viral proliferation, e.g., aggregative effect of Tat and gp120 on apoptosis, transport and other enzymatic reactions amongst dopaminergic neurons and neuroglia. An assortment of neuroimaging modalities converge on the severity of apathy symptoms associated with the propensity of the virus to replicate within frontal-striatal brain circuits that facilitate emotional processing. Burgeoning research into functional brain connectivity also supports the effects of microvascular and neuro-inflammatory injury linked to aging with HIV-1 on the presentation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Summarizing these findings, we review domains of HIV-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric impairment linked to apathy in HIV. Taken together, these lines of research suggest that loss of affective, cognitive and behavioral inertia is commensurate with the neuropathology of HIV-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alzheimer’s disease is not “brain aging”: neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies

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    Head, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Davis, Paulina R.; Neltner, Janna H.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Abner, Erin L.; Smith, Charles D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Human studies are reviewed concerning whether “aging”-related mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. AD is defined by specific neuropathology: neuritic amyloid plaques and neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. AD pathology is driven by genetic factors related not to aging per se, but instead to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In contrast to genes involved in APP-related mechanisms, there is no firm connection between genes implicated in human “accelerated aging” diseases (progerias) and AD. The epidemiology of AD in advanced age is highly relevant but deceptively challenging to address given the low autopsy rates in most countries. In extreme old age, brain diseases other than AD approximate AD prevalence while the impact of AD pathology appears to peak by age 95 and decline thereafter. Many distinct brain diseases other than AD afflict older human brains and contribute to cognitive impairment. Additional prevalent pathologies include cerebrovascular disease and hippocampal sclerosis, both high-morbidity brain diseases that appear to peak in incidence later than AD chronologically. Because of these common brain diseases of extreme old age, the epidemiology differs between clinical “dementia” and the subset of dementia cases with AD pathology. Additional aging-associated mechanisms for cognitive decline such as diabetes and synapse loss have been linked to AD and these hypotheses are discussed. Criteria are proposed to define an “aging-linked” disease, and AD fails all of these criteria. In conclusion, it may be most fruitful to focus attention on specific pathways involved in AD rather than attributing it to an inevitable consequence of aging. PMID:21516511

  12. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development.

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    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, much genomic data and a novel body of knowledge, including the identification of microRNAs, are being increasingly accumulated for the development of laboratory testing cassettes for cerebral malaria prevention. Therefore, understanding of the underlying complex molecular basis of cerebral malaria is important for the design of strategy for cerebral malaria treatment and control.

  13. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development

    OpenAIRE

    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, m...

  14. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

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    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  15. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

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    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-03

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors.

  16. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

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    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  17. Neuropathological Alterations in Alzheimer Disease

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    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) include “positive” lesions such as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neurofibrillary tangles, and glial responses, and “negative” lesions such as neuronal and synaptic loss. Despite their inherently cross-sectional nature, postmortem studies have enabled the staging of the progression of both amyloid and tangle pathologies, and, consequently, the development of diagnostic criteria that are now used worldwide. In addition, clinicopathological correlation studies have been crucial to generate hypotheses about the pathophysiology of the disease, by establishing that there is a continuum between “normal” aging and AD dementia, and that the amyloid plaque build-up occurs primarily before the onset of cognitive deficits, while neurofibrillary tangles, neuron loss, and particularly synaptic loss, parallel the progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, these cross-sectional neuropathological data have been largely validated by longitudinal in vivo studies using modern imaging biomarkers such as amyloid PET and volumetric MRI. PMID:22229116

  18. Optoacoustic mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans

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    Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive, transcranial mapping, monitoring, and imaging are highly important for detection and management of cerebral abnormalities and neuroscience research. Mapping, imaging, and monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation are necessary for diagnostics and management of patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other neurological conditions. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for noninvasive, transcranial monitoring and imaging. In this work, we developed optoacoustic systems for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans and tested them in adults and neonates. The systems provide noninvasive, transcranial optoacoustic measurements in the transmission (forward) and reflection (backward) modes in the near infrared spectral range. Novel, ultra-sensitive probes were built for detection of optoacoustic signals and measurement of blood oxygenation in neonates and adults. Cerebral oxygenation was measured at different lateral sites from the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein, located immediately beneath the midline of the human skull. In neonates, cerebral oxygenation was measured through open anterior and posterior fontanelles. Optoacoustic signal detection at different locations allowed for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation. Our future studies will be focused on 3D mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation.

  19. Digital stereology in neuropathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Sarah Line Brøgger; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional structural knowledge. Accordingly, stereology is a science based on statistical sampling principles and geometric measures. The application of stereology to neuropathological studies allows the researcher to efficiently obtain a precise estimate of various structural quantities. This neuropathological review...... will therefore present the relevant stereological estimators for obtaining reliable quantitative structural data from brains and peripheral nerves when using digital light microscopy. It is discussed how to obtain brain and nerve fibre samples to fulfil the requirements for the estimators. A presentation...

  20. Neuropathology of Cervical Dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Prudente, C.N.; Pardo, C. A.; Xiao, J; Hanfelt, J.; Hess, E J; LeDoux, M S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for neuropathological changes in postmortem brain tissue of individuals with cervical dystonia (CD). Multiple regions of formalin-preserved brains were collected from patients with CD and controls and examined with an extensive battery of histopathological stains in a two-stage study design. In stage one, 4 CD brains underwent a broad screening neuropathological examination. In stage two, these 4 CD brains were combined with 2 additional CD brains, and the ...

  1. Neuropathology of cervical dystonia.

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    Prudente, C N; Pardo, C A; Xiao, J; Hanfelt, J; Hess, E J; Ledoux, M S; Jinnah, H A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to search for neuropathological changes in postmortem brain tissue of individuals with cervical dystonia (CD). Multiple regions of formalin-preserved brains were collected from patients with CD and controls and examined with an extensive battery of histopathological stains in a two-stage study design. In stage one, 4 CD brains underwent a broad screening neuropathological examination. In stage two, these 4 CD brains were combined with 2 additional CD brains, and the subjective findings were quantified and compared to 16 age-matched controls. The initial subjective neuropathological assessment revealed only two regions with relatively consistent changes. The substantia nigra had frequent ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions known as Marinesco bodies. Additionally, the cerebellum showed patchy loss of Purkinje cells, areas of focal gliosis and torpedo bodies. Other brain regions showed minor or inconsistent changes. In the second stage of the analysis, quantitative studies failed to reveal significant differences in the numbers of Marinesco bodies in CD versus controls, but confirmed a significantly lower Purkinje cell density in CD. Molecular investigations revealed 4 of the CD cases and 2 controls to harbor sequence variants in non-coding regions of THAP1, and these cases had lower Purkinje cell densities regardless of whether they had CD. The findings suggest that subtle neuropathological changes such as lower Purkinje cell density may be found in primary CD when relevant brain regions are investigated with appropriate methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo expression of neuroglobin in reactive astrocytes during neuropathology in murine models of traumatic brain injury, cerebral malaria, and autoimmune encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Hempel, Casper; Kurtzhals, Jørgen AL

    2010-01-01

    and the astroglial scar. This is the first report of Ngb present in reactive astroglia and in scar-forming astrocytes in response to different pathological conditions relevant to human disease. In light of previously reported cyto-protective properties of Ngb, further insight may result in therapeutic ramifications....

  3. Neuropathology of cerebrovascular diseases.

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    Ferrer, Isidro; Vidal, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    The chapter describes the epidemiology of cerebrovascular diseases, anatomy of the cerebral blood vessels, pathophysiology of ischemia, hypoxia, hypoxemia, anemic hypoxia, histotoxic hypoxia, carbon monoxide damage, hyperoxid brain damage and decompression sickness, and selective cell and regional vulnerability; diseases of the blood vessels including atherosclerosis, hypertensive angiopathy, small vessel disease, inflammatory vascular diseases, cerebral amyloid angiopathies, CADASIL, CARASIL and other diseases that can lead to cerebrovascular occlusion; intracranial and intraspinal aneurysms and vascular malformations; hematologic disorders that can cause cerebral infarct or hemorrhage; brain ischemic damage; and spontaneous intracranial bleeding. Within ischemic brain damage, focal cerebral ischemia, hemorrhagic infarct, brain edema, penumbra, global cerebral ischemia, venous thrombosis, lacunas and lacunar state, status cribosus, granular atrophy of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal sclerosis, vascular leukoencephalopathy Binswanger type and multi-infarct encephalopathy are discussed in detail. Cognitive impairment of vascular origin deserves an individual section. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer’s-type neuropathology in the precuneus is not increased relative to other areas of neocortex across a range of cognitive impairment☆

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Peter T.; Abner, Erin L.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Smith, Charles D.; Patel, Ela; Markesbery, William R.

    2008-01-01

    We studied Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology in the precuneus and surrounding brain areas. Anatomically, the precuneus corresponds to the medial portion of human cerebral cortical Brodmann Area 7. This study utilized patients from the University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center autopsy cohort. Data from 47 brains were used comprising patients of differing antemortem cognitive impairment severities, each with longitudinal clinical data and extensive neuropathological data. We assessed w...

  5. High membrane protein oxidation in the human cerebral cortex.

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    Granold, Matthias; Moosmann, Bernd; Staib-Lasarzik, Irina; Arendt, Thomas; Del Rey, Adriana; Engelhard, Kristin; Behl, Christian; Hajieva, Parvana

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main mediators of neuronal damage in human neurodegenerative disease. Still, the dissection of causal relationships has turned out to be remarkably difficult. Here, we have analyzed global protein oxidation in terms of carbonylation of membrane proteins and cytoplasmic proteins in three different mammalian species: aged human cortex and cerebellum from patients with or without Alzheimer's disease, mouse cortex and cerebellum from young and old animals, and adult rat hippocampus and cortex subjected or not subjected to cerebral ischemia. Most tissues showed relatively similar levels of protein oxidation. However, human cortex was affected by severe membrane protein oxidation, while exhibiting lower than average cytoplasmic protein oxidation. In contrast, ex vivo autooxidation of murine cortical tissue primarily induced aqueous protein oxidation, while in vivo biological aging or cerebral ischemia had no major effect on brain protein oxidation. The unusually high levels of membrane protein oxidation in the human cortex were also not predicted by lipid peroxidation, as the levels of isoprostane immunoreactivity in human samples were considerably lower than in rodent tissues. Our results indicate that the aged human cortex is under steady pressure from specific and potentially detrimental membrane protein oxidation. The pronounced difference between humans, mice and rats regarding the primary site of cortical oxidation might have contributed to the unresolved difficulties in translating into therapies the wealth of data describing successful antioxidant neuroprotection in rodents. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High membrane protein oxidation in the human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Granold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main mediators of neuronal damage in human neurodegenerative disease. Still, the dissection of causal relationships has turned out to be remarkably difficult. Here, we have analyzed global protein oxidation in terms of carbonylation of membrane proteins and cytoplasmic proteins in three different mammalian species: aged human cortex and cerebellum from patients with or without Alzheimer's disease, mouse cortex and cerebellum from young and old animals, and adult rat hippocampus and cortex subjected or not subjected to cerebral ischemia. Most tissues showed relatively similar levels of protein oxidation. However, human cortex was affected by severe membrane protein oxidation, while exhibiting lower than average cytoplasmic protein oxidation. In contrast, ex vivo autooxidation of murine cortical tissue primarily induced aqueous protein oxidation, while in vivo biological aging or cerebral ischemia had no major effect on brain protein oxidation. The unusually high levels of membrane protein oxidation in the human cortex were also not predicted by lipid peroxidation, as the levels of isoprostane immunoreactivity in human samples were considerably lower than in rodent tissues. Our results indicate that the aged human cortex is under steady pressure from specific and potentially detrimental membrane protein oxidation. The pronounced difference between humans, mice and rats regarding the primary site of cortical oxidation might have contributed to the unresolved difficulties in translating into therapies the wealth of data describing successful antioxidant neuroprotection in rodents.

  7. The Neuropathology of Huntington´s disease: classical findings, recent developments and correlation to functional neuroanatomy.

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    Rüb, Udo; Vonsattel, Jean Paul V; Heinsen, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a severe, autosomal dominantly inherited, gradually worsening neurological disorder, the clinical features of which were first described in 1863 by Irving W. Lyon and with additional details, in 1872, by George Huntington. Progress in molecular biological research has shown that HD is caused by meiotically unstable CAG-repeats in the mutated HD gene (the so-called IT 15 gene) on chromosome 4p16.3, which encodes the mutated protein huntingtin (Htt). This monograph provides a survey of the stepwise progress in neuropathological HD research made during a time period of more than hundred years, the currently known neuropathological hallmarks of HD, as well as their pathogenic and clinical relevance. Starting with the initial descriptions of the progressive degeneration of the neostriatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) as one of the key events in HD, the worldwide practiced Vonsattel HD grading system of striatal neurodegeneration will be outlined. Correlating qualitative and quantitative neuropathological data with characteristics pertaining to the functional neuroanatomy of the human brain, subsequent chapters will highlight the latest neuropathological HD findings: the area- and layer-specifi c neuronal loss in the cerebral neo- and allocortex, the neurodegeneration of select thalamic nuclei, the affection of the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei, the involvement of distinct brainstem nuclei, and the pathophysiological relevance of these pathologies for the clinical phenotype of HD. Finally, the potential pathophysiological role of axonal transport deficit

  8. Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Fleisher, Adam; Chen, Kewei; Rogers, Joseph; Berk, Camryn; Reiman, Eric; Pontecorvo, Michael; Mintun, Mark; Skovronsky, Daniel; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sue, Lucia I.; Liebsack, Carolyn; Charney, Albert S.; Cole, Lauren; Belden, Christine; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Down syndrome appears to be associated with a virtually certain risk of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology by the age of 40 and a very high risk of dementia at older ages. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand florbetapir F18 has been shown to characterize fibrillar Aβ in the living human brain and to provide a close correlation with subsequent Aβ neuropathology in individuals proximate to and after the end of life. The extent to which the most frequently used PET ligands can be used to detect fibrillar Aβ in patients with Down syndrome remains to be determined. Objectives To characterize PET estimates of fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient very close to the end of life and to compare them with neuropathologic assessment made after his death. Design/Methods With the family’s informed consent, florbetapir PET was used to study a 55-year-old Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease near the end of life; his brain was donated for neuropathologic assessment when he died 14 days later. Visual ratings of cerebral florbetapir uptake were performed by trained readers who were masked to the patient’s diagnosis as part of a larger study, and an automated algorithm was used to characterize regional-to-cerebellar standard uptake value ratios in 6 cerebral regions of interest. Neuropathologic assessments were performed masked to the patient’s diagnosis or PET measurements. Results Visual ratings and automated analyses of the PET image revealed a heavy fibrillar Aβ burden in cortical, striatal, and thalamic regions, similar to that reported for patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. This matched neuropathologic findings of frequent neuritic and diffuse plaques, as well as frequent amyloid angiopathy, except for neuropathologically demonstrated frequent cerebellar diffuse plaques and amyloid angiopathy that were not detected by the PET scan. Conclusions Florbetapir PET can be used to detect increased cerebral

  9. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  10. Linear and nonlinear analysis of human dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, R B; Dawson, S L; Potter, J F

    1999-09-01

    The linear dynamic relationship between systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was studied by time- and frequency-domain analysis methods. A nonlinear moving-average approach was also implemented using Volterra-Wiener kernels. In 47 normal subjects, ABP was measured with Finapres and CBFV was recorded with Doppler ultrasound in both middle cerebral arteries at rest in the supine position and also during ABP drops induced by the sudden deflation of thigh cuffs. Impulse response functions estimated by Fourier transfer function analysis, a second-order mathematical model proposed by Tiecks, and the linear kernel of the Volterra-Wiener moving-average representation provided reconstructed velocity model responses, for the same segment of data, with significant correlations to CBFV recordings corresponding to r = 0.52 +/- 0.19, 0.53 +/- 0.16, and 0.67 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD), respectively. The correlation coefficient for the linear plus quadratic kernels was 0.82 +/- 0.08, significantly superior to that for the linear models (P linear impulse responses were also used to predict the velocity transient of a different baseline segment of data and of the thigh cuff velocity response with significant correlations. In both cases, the three linear methods provided equivalent model performances, but the correlation coefficient for the nonlinear model dropped to 0.26 +/- 0.25 for the baseline test set of data and to 0.21 +/- 0.42 for the thigh cuff data. Whereas it is possible to model dynamic cerebral autoregulation in humans with different linear methods, in the supine position a second-order nonlinear component contributes significantly to improve model accuracy for the same segment of data used to estimate model parameters, but it cannot be automatically extended to represent the nonlinear component of velocity responses of different segments of data or transient changes induced by the thigh cuff test.

  11. Cerebral Organoids Recapitulate Epigenomic Signatures of the Human Fetal Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chongyuan; Lancaster, Madeline A; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Knoblich, Juergen A; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-12-20

    Organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells recapitulate the early three-dimensional organization of the human brain, but whether they establish the epigenomic and transcriptional programs essential for brain development is unknown. We compared epigenomic and regulatory features in cerebral organoids and human fetal brain, using genome-wide, base resolution DNA methylome and transcriptome sequencing. Transcriptomic dynamics in organoids faithfully modeled gene expression trajectories in early-to-mid human fetal brains. We found that early non-CG methylation accumulation at super-enhancers in both fetal brain and organoids marks forthcoming transcriptional repression in the fully developed brain. Demethylated regions (74% of 35,627) identified during organoid differentiation overlapped with fetal brain regulatory elements. Interestingly, pericentromeric repeats showed widespread demethylation in multiple types of in vitro human neural differentiation models but not in fetal brain. Our study reveals that organoids recapitulate many epigenomic features of mid-fetal human brain and also identified novel non-CG methylation signatures of brain development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral Organoids Recapitulate Epigenomic Signatures of the Human Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyuan Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells recapitulate the early three-dimensional organization of the human brain, but whether they establish the epigenomic and transcriptional programs essential for brain development is unknown. We compared epigenomic and regulatory features in cerebral organoids and human fetal brain, using genome-wide, base resolution DNA methylome and transcriptome sequencing. Transcriptomic dynamics in organoids faithfully modeled gene expression trajectories in early-to-mid human fetal brains. We found that early non-CG methylation accumulation at super-enhancers in both fetal brain and organoids marks forthcoming transcriptional repression in the fully developed brain. Demethylated regions (74% of 35,627 identified during organoid differentiation overlapped with fetal brain regulatory elements. Interestingly, pericentromeric repeats showed widespread demethylation in multiple types of in vitro human neural differentiation models but not in fetal brain. Our study reveals that organoids recapitulate many epigenomic features of mid-fetal human brain and also identified novel non-CG methylation signatures of brain development.

  13. MAPK signaling pathway regulates cerebrovascular receptor expression in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldsee, Roya

    2013-01-01

    if the upregulation of contractile cerebrovascular receptors after 48 h of organ culture of human cerebral arteries involves MAPK pathways and if it can be prevented by a MEK1/2 inhibitor. Human cerebral arteries were obtained from patients undergoing intracranial tumor surgery. The vessels were divided into ring...

  14. The future of human cerebral cartography: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackowiak, Richard; Markram, Henry

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography can be understood in a limited, static, neuroanatomical sense. Temporal information from electrical recordings contributes information on regional interactions adding a functional dimension. Selective tagging and imaging of molecules adds biochemical contributions. Cartographic detail can also be correlated with normal or abnormal psychological or behavioural data. Modern cerebral cartography is assimilating all these elements. Cartographers continue to collect ever more precise data in the hope that general principles of organization will emerge. However, even detailed cartographic data cannot generate knowledge without a multi-scale framework making it possible to relate individual observations and discoveries. We propose that, in the next quarter century, advances in cartography will result in progressively more accurate drafts of a data-led, multi-scale model of human brain structure and function. These blueprints will result from analysis of large volumes of neuroscientific and clinical data, by a process of reconstruction, modelling and simulation. This strategy will capitalize on remarkable recent developments in informatics and computer science and on the existence of much existing, addressable data and prior, though fragmented, knowledge. The models will instantiate principles that govern how the brain is organized at different levels and how different spatio-temporal scales relate to each other in an organ-centred context.

  15. Cerebral blood flow during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, H B; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1990-01-01

    resistance increased from 1.5 (1.0-2.2) to 2.4 (1.4-3.0) mmHg. 100 g.min.ml-1 (P less than 0.025) at 32% of MVC. There was no difference in CBF between the two hemispheres at rest or during exercise. In contrast to dynamic leg exercise, static leg exercise is not associated with an increase in global CBF......Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined in humans at rest and during four consecutive unilateral static contractions of the knee extensors. Each contraction was maintained for 3 min 15 s with the subjects in a semisupine position. The contractions corresponded to 8, 16, 24, and 32% of the maximal...... (102-146) mmHg, respectively (P less than 0.0005), during the contraction at 32% MVC. Arterial PCO2 and central venous pressure did not change. Corrected to the average resting PCO2, CBF during control was 55 (35-73) ml.100 g-1.min-1 and remained constant during contractions. Cerebral vascular...

  16. The neuropathology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  17. The neuropathology of sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Stein, Thor D.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  18. Kuru: genes, cannibals and neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberski, Pawel P; Sikorska, Beata; Lindenbaum, Shirley; Goldfarb, Lev G; McLean, Catriona; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Brown, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Kuru was the first human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) or prion disease identified, occurring in the Fore linguistic group of Papua New Guinea. Kuru was a uniformly fatal cerebellar ataxic syndrome, usually followed by choreiform and athetoid movements. Kuru imposed a strong balancing selection on the Fore population, with individuals homozygous for the 129 Met allele of the gene (PRNP) encoding for prion protein (PrP) being the most susceptible. The decline in the incidence of kuru in the Fore has been attributed to the exhaustion of the susceptible genotype and ultimately by discontinuation of exposure via cannibalism. Neuropathologically, kuru-affected brains were characterized by widespread degeneration of neurons, astroglial and microglial proliferation, and the presence of amyloid plaques. These early findings have been confirmed and extended by recent immunohistochemical studies for the detection of the TSE-specific PrP (PrP). Confocal laser microscopy also showed the concentration of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytic processes at the plaque periphery. The fine structure of plaques corresponds to that described earlier by light microscopy. The successful experimental transmission of kuru led to the awareness of its similarity to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease and formed a background against which the recent epidemics of iatrogenic and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease could be studied.

  19. Understanding the Dorsal and Ventral Systems of the Human Cerebral Cortex: Beyond Dichotomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Gregoire; Thompson, William L.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, characterizations of the macrolevel functional organization of the human cerebral cortex have focused on the left and right cerebral hemispheres. However, the idea of left brain versus right brain functions has been shown to be an oversimplification. We argue here that a top-bottom divide, rather than a left-right divide, is a more…

  20. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF......-oxidative carbohydrate uptake during exercise. Adrenaline appears to accelerate cerebral glycolysis through a beta2-adrenergic receptor mechanism since noradrenaline is without such an effect. In addition, the exercise-induced cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake is blocked by combined beta 1/2-adrenergic blockade......, but not by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Furthermore, endurance training appears to lower the cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake and preserve cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. This is possibly related to an attenuated catecholamine response. Finally, exercise promotes brain health as evidenced...

  1. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  2. Dopamine-dependent changes in the functional connectivity between basal ganglia and cerebral cortex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, D; Tijssen, M; van Bruggen, G; Bosch, A; Insola, A; Di Lazzaro, V; Mazzone, P; Oliviero, A; Quartarone, A; Speelman, H; Brown, P

    2002-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that interaction between the human basal ganglia and cerebral cortex involves activity in multiple functional circuits characterized by their frequency of oscillation, phase characteristics, dopamine dependency and topography. To this end we took recordings from

  3. Functional involvement of cerebral cortex in human narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, A; Della Marca, G; Tonali, P A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Versace, V; Mennuni, G; Di Lazzaro, V

    2005-01-01

    The pathophysiology of human narcolepsy is still poorly understood. The hypoactivity of some neurotransmitter systems has been hypothesised on the basis of the canine model. To determine whether narcolepsy is associated with changes in excitability of the cerebral cortex, we assessed the excitability of the motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 13 patients with narcolepsy and in 12 control subjects. We used several TMS paradigms that can provide information on the excitability of the motor cortex. Resting and active motor thresholds were higher in narcoleptic patients than in controls and intracortical inhibition was more pronounced in narcoleptic patients. No changes in the other evaluated measures were detected. These results are consistent with an impaired balance between excitatory and inhibitory intracortical circuits in narcolepsy that leads to cortical hypoexcitability. We hypothesise that the deficiency of the excitatory hypocretin/orexin-neurotransmitter-system in narcolepsy is reflected in changes of cortical excitability since circuits originating in the lateral hypothalamus and in the basal forebrain project widely to the neocortex, including motor cortex. This abnormal excitability of cortical networks could be the physiological correlate of excessive daytime sleepiness and it could be the substrate for allowing dissociated states of wakefulness and sleep to emerge suddenly while patients are awake, which constitute the symptoms of narcolepsy.

  4. Proteomic Studies on Human and Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    KAUST Repository

    Moussa, Ehab

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection that results from interrelated pathologies. Despite extensive research efforts, the mechanism of the disease is not completely understood. Clinical studies, postmortem analysis, and animal models have been the main research arenas in CM. In this thesis, shotgun proteomics approach was used to further understand the pathology of human and experimental CM. The mechanism by which CM turns fatal is yet to be identified. A clinical proteomics study was conducted on pooled plasma samples from children with reversible or fatal CM from the Gambia. The results show that depletion of coagulation factors and increased levels of circulating proteasomes are associated with fatal pediatric CM. This data suggests that the ongoing coagulation during CM might be a disseminated intravascular coagulation state that eventually causes depletion of the coagulation factors leading to petechial hemorrhages. In addition, the mechanism(s) by which blood transfusion benefits CM in children was investigated. To that end, the concentration and multimerization pattern of von-willebrand factor, and the concentration of haptoglobin in the plasma of children with CM who received blood transfusions were measured. In addition to clinical studies, experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in mice has been long used as a model for the disease. A shotgun proteomics workflow was optimized to identify the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with ECM.Because of the utmost importance of membrane proteins in the pathology of the disease, sample fractionation and filter aided sample preparation were used to recover them. The proteomic signature of the brains of mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome, mice infected with P. berghei NK56 that developed severe malaria but without neurological signs, and non-infected mice, were compared to identify CM specific proteins. Among the differentially

  5. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    as evidenced by pharmacological manipulation of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Cholinergic blockade by glycopyrrolate blocks the exercise-induced increase in the transcranial Doppler determined mean flow velocity (MCA Vmean). Conversely, alpha-adrenergic activation increases that expression of cerebral......This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... perfusion and reduces the near-infrared determined cerebral oxygenation at rest, but not during exercise associated with an increased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)), suggesting competition between CMRO(2) and sympathetic control of CBF. CMRO(2) does not change during even intense handgrip...

  6. MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: neuropathological, biochemical and transmission studies identify a distinctive prion strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio; Suardi, Silvia; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Indaco, Antonio; Limido, Lucia; Vimercati, Chiara; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Langeveld, Jan; Terruzzi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Antonio; Zerbi, Pietro; Fociani, Paolo; Bishop, Matthew T; Will, Robert G; Manson, Jean C; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    In Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD patients are characterized by cerebral deposition of type 1 PrP(Sc) and correspond to the classic clinical CJD phenotype. The rare 129MM CJD patients with type 2 PrP(Sc) are further subdivided in a cortical and a thalamic form also indicated as sporadic fatal insomnia. We observed two young patients with MM2-thalamic CJD. Main neuropathological features were diffuse, synaptic PrP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex and severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the thalamus and olivary nucleus. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 2A PrP(Sc) . Challenge of transgenic mice expressing 129MM human PrP showed that MM2-thalamic sporadic CJD (sCJD) was able to transmit the disease, at variance with MM2-cortical sCJD. The affected mice showed deposition of type 2A PrP(Sc) , a scenario that is unprecedented in this mouse line. These data indicate that MM2-thalamic sCJD is caused by a prion strain distinct from the other sCJD subtypes including the MM2-cortical form. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  7. Cerebral oxygenation is reduced during hyperthermic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Volianitis, S.

    2010-01-01

    .4 degrees C). In contrast, when hyperthermia was provoked by dressing the subjects in watertight clothing during exercise (core temperature 39.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), P(mito)O(2) declined by 4.8 +/- 3.8 mmHg (P ...Abstract Aim: Cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension (P(mito)O(2)) is elevated during moderate exercise, while it is reduced when exercise becomes strenuous, reflecting an elevated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)) combined with hyperventilation-induced attenuation of cerebral blood flow...... (CBF). Heat stress challenges exercise capacity as expressed by increased rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Methods: This study evaluated the effect of heat stress during exercise on P(mito)O(2) calculated based on a Kety-Schmidt-determined CBF and the arterial-to-jugular venous oxygen differences...

  8. Cerebral carbohydrate cost of physical exertion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Dawson, Ellen A

    2004-01-01

    performed exhaustive exercise. The arterial-venous differences over the brain for O(2), glucose, and lactate were integrated to calculate the surplus cerebral uptake of glucose equivalents. To evaluate whether the amount of glucose equivalents depends on the time to exhaustion, exercise was also performed...... and, consequently, exhaustive exercise involves a brain surplus carbohydrate uptake of a magnitude comparable with its glycogen content.......Above a certain level of cerebral activation the brain increases its uptake of glucose more than that of O(2), i.e., the cerebral metabolic ratio of O(2)/(glucose + 12 lactate) decreases. This study quantified such surplus brain uptake of carbohydrate relative to O(2) in eight healthy males who...

  9. Nitrite and S-Nitrosohemoglobin Exchange Across the Human Cerebral and Femoral Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Peter, Rasmussen; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    their relative contribution in vivo, we quantified arterial-venous concentration gradients across the human cerebral and femoral circulation at rest and during exercise, an ideal model system characterized by physiological extremes of O2 tension and blood flow. METHODS: Ten healthy participants (5 men, 5 women...... flow) with net exchange calculated via the Fick principle. RESULTS: Hypoxia was associated with a mild increase in both cerebral blood flow and femoral blood flow (P

  10. Cerebral blood flow decreases with time whereas cerebral oxygen consumption remains stable during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prough, D.S.; Rogers, A.T.; Stump, D.A.; Roy, R.C.; Cordell, A.R.; Phipps, J.; Taylor, C.L. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrate that cerebral blood flow (CBF) progressively declines during hypothermic, nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). If CBF declines because of brain cooling, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) should decline in parallel with the reduction in CBF. Therefore we studied the response of CBF, the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-VDcereO2) and CMRO2 as a function of the duration of CPB in humans. To do this, we compared the cerebrovascular response to changes in the PaCO2. Because sequential CBF measurements using xenon 133 (133Xe) clearance must be separated by 15-25 min, we hypothesized that a time-dependent decline in CBF would accentuate the CBF reduction caused by a decrease in PaCO2, but would blunt the CBF increase associated with a rise in PaCO2. We measured CBF in 25 patients and calculated the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference using radial arterial and jugular venous bulb blood samples. Patients were randomly assigned to management within either a lower (32-48 mm Hg) or higher (50-71 mm Hg) range of PaCO2 uncorrected for temperature. Each patient underwent two randomly ordered sets of measurements, one at a lower PaCO2 and the other at a higher PaCO2 within the respective ranges. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to changes in PaCO2 was calculated as specific reactivity (SR), the change in CBF divided by the change in PaCO2, expressed in mL.100 g-1.min-1.mm Hg-1.

  11. Cockayne syndrome: unusual neuropathological findings and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, D; Grotsky, H W; Rapin, I; Suzuki, K

    1979-10-01

    Two siblings with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are described and the literature on the subject is briefly reviewed. Of particular interest were the unusual neuropathological findings in 1 of the patients. These included microcephaly, white matter atrophy with patchy loss of myelinated fibers, calcifications of the basal ganglia, occasional ferrugination of cerebral and cerebellar neurons, and severe cerebellar degeneration. Findings not previously reported in CS were proliferation of extremely bizarre astrocytes, neurofibrillary tnagles, and pigmentation of the globus pallidus. We conclude that brain involvement in CS is a result of primary degeneration in the central nervous system rather than being secondary to angiopathy or normal pressure hydrocephalus, as previously suggested.

  12. The relationship between cerebral blood flow and volume in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Knudsen, Gitte M; Law, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the relationship between regional CBF and CBV at normal, resting cerebral metabolic rates. Eleven healthy volunteers were investigated with PET during baseline conditions, and during hyper- and hypocapnia. Values for rCBF and rCBV were obtained using (15...

  13. Cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Qvist, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    and catecholamines was investigated in eight healthy young volunteers. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique at baseline (during normocapnia and voluntary hyperventilation for calculation of subject-specific cerebrovascular CO reactivity), and 90 minutes after an intravenous bolus...

  14. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Reifenberger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  15. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus B; Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    both circumstances. No cerebral net exchange of Na(+) or K(+) was evident. Likewise, no significant net-exchange of water over the brain was demonstrated and the arterial and jugular venous hemoglobin concentrations were similar. CONCLUSION: Challenging exercise in hypoxia for 30 min affected muscle......Avnstorp, Magnus B., Peter Rasmussen, Patrice Brassard, Thomas Seifert, Morten Overgaard, Peter Krustrup, Niels H. Secher, and Nikolai B. Nordsborg. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise. High Alt Med Biol 16:000-000, 2015.-Background......: Intense physical activity increases the prevalence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) that can occur within 10 h after ascent to altitudes above 1500 m and is likely related to development of cerebral edema. This study evaluated whether disturbed cerebral water and ion homeostasis can be detected when...

  16. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic hand movement increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the contralateral motor sensory cortex (MS1). This increase is eliminated by regional anesthesia of the working arm, indicating the importance of afferent neural input. The purpose of this study was to determine the specific...... type of afferent input required for this cerebral activation. The rCBF was measured at +5.0 and +9.0 cm above the orbitomeatal (OM) plane in 13 subjects during 1) rest; 2) dynamic left-hand contractions; 3) postcontraction ischemia (metaboreceptor afferents); and 4) biceps brachii tendon vibration...... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P neural input from muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  17. Noninvasive MRI measurement of the absolute cerebral blood volume-cerebral blood flow relationship during visual stimulation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Qiu, Maolin; Constable, R Todd

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) underlies blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI signal. This study investigates the potential for improved characterization of the CBV-CBF relationship in humans, and examines sex effects as well as spatial variations in the CBV-CBF relationship. Healthy subjects were imaged noninvasively at rest and during visual stimulation, constituting the first MRI measurement of the absolute CBV-CBF relationship in humans with complete coverage of the functional areas of interest. CBV and CBF estimates were consistent with the literature, and their relationship varied both spatially and with sex. In a region of interest with stimulus-induced activation in CBV and CBF at a significance level of the P < 0.05, a power function fit resulted in CBV = 2.1 CBF(0.32) across all subjects, CBV = 0.8 CBF(0.51) in females and CBV = 4.4 CBF(0.15) in males. Exponents decreased in both sexes as ROIs were expanded to include less significantly activated regions. Consideration for potential sex-related differences, as well as regional variations under a range of physiological states, may reconcile some of the variation across literature and advance our understanding of the underlying cerebrovascular physiology. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, A.; Juge, O.; Morel, D.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension.

  19. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jones

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children. Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress. This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress. Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  20. Human cerebral hemispheres develop at different rates and ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, R W; Walker, R A; Giudice, S

    1987-05-29

    The development of the cerebral hemispheres was assessed by using measures of electroencephalographic coherence and phase in 577 children ranging in age from 2 months to early adulthood. Two categories of age-dependent change in electroencephalographic coherence and phase were noted: continuous growth processes that were described best by an exponential growth function, and discrete growth spurts that appeared in specific anatomical locations at specific postnatal periods. The left and right hemispheres developed at different rates and with different postnatal onset times with the timing of growth spurts overlapping the timing of the major developmental stages described by Piaget.

  1. Dissecting human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex using single-cell RNAseq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Barbara

    Cerebral organoids - three-dimensional cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells - have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and novel interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages, and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue in order to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures.

  2. A New Presentation and Exploration of Human Cerebral Vasculature Correlated with Surface and Sectional Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G.; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables…

  3. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C......The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle......; control) or when severe hyperthermia had developed (core temperature = 39.5 degrees C; hyperthermia). The gCBF was similar after 15 min in the two trials, and it remained stable throughout control. In contrast, during hyperthermia gCBF decreased by 18% and was therefore lower in hyperthermia compared...

  4. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  5. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  6. Male-female differences in upregulation of vasoconstrictor responses in human cerebral arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Ahnstedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Male-female differences may significantly impact stroke prevention and treatment in men and women, however underlying mechanisms for sexual dimorphism in stroke are not understood. We previously found in males that cerebral ischemia upregulates contractile receptors in cerebral arteries, which is associated with lower blood flow. The present study investigates if cerebral arteries from men and women differ in cerebrovascular receptor upregulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Freshly obtained human cerebral arteries were placed in organ culture, an established model for studying receptor upregulation. 5-hydroxtryptamine type 1B (5-HT1B, angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 and endothelin-1 type A and B (ETA and ETB receptors were evaluated using wire myograph for contractile responses, real-time PCR for mRNA and immunohistochemistry for receptor expression. KEY RESULTS: Vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and endothelin-1 was markedly lower in cultured cerebral arteries from women as compared to men. ETB receptor-mediated contraction occurred in male but not female arteries. Interestingly, there were similar upregulation in mRNA and expression of 5-HT1B, AT1, and ETB receptors and in local expression of Ang II after organ culture. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: In spite of receptor upregulation after organ culture in both sexes, cerebral arteries from women were significantly less responsive to vasoconstrictors angiotensin II and endothelin-1 as compared to arteries from men. This suggests receptor coupling and/or signal transduction mechanisms involved in cerebrovascular contractility may be suppressed in females. This is the first study to demonstrate sex differences in the vascular function of human brain arteries.

  7. Cerebral metabolic effects of exogenous lactate supplementation on the injured human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Feihl, François; Bloch, Jocelyne; Messerer, Mahmoud; Levivier, Marc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that lactate is neuroprotective after acute brain injury; however, data in humans are lacking. We examined whether exogenous lactate supplementation improves cerebral energy metabolism in humans with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We prospectively studied 15 consecutive patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD), brain tissue PO2 (PbtO2), and intracranial pressure (ICP). Intervention consisted of a 3-h intravenous infusion of hypertonic sodium lactate (aiming to increase systemic lactate to ca. 5 mmol/L), administered in the early phase following TBI. We examined the effect of sodium lactate on neurochemistry (CMD lactate, pyruvate, glucose, and glutamate), PbtO2, and ICP. Treatment was started on average 33 ± 16 h after TBI. A mixed-effects multilevel regression model revealed that sodium lactate therapy was associated with a significant increase in CMD concentrations of lactate [coefficient 0.47 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.63 mmol/L], pyruvate [13.1 (8.78-17.4) μmol/L], and glucose [0.1 (0.04-0.16) mmol/L; all p < 0.01]. A concomitant reduction of CMD glutamate [-0.95 (-1.94 to 0.06) mmol/L, p = 0.06] and ICP [-0.86 (-1.47 to -0.24) mmHg, p < 0.01] was also observed. Exogenous supplemental lactate can be utilized aerobically as a preferential energy substrate by the injured human brain, with sparing of cerebral glucose. Increased availability of cerebral extracellular pyruvate and glucose, coupled with a reduction of brain glutamate and ICP, suggests that hypertonic lactate therapy has beneficial cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic effects after TBI.

  8. Effect of generalised sympathetic activation by cold pressor test on cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Micieli, G; Bosone, D; Losano, G; Bini, R; Cavallini, A; Passatore, M

    1998-07-15

    There is no general agreement regarding several aspects of the role of the sympathetic system on cerebral haemodynamics such as extent of effectiveness, operational range and site of action. This study was planned to identify the effect of a generalised sympathetic activation on the cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans before it is masked by secondary corrections, metabolic or myogenic in nature. A total of 35 healthy volunteers aged 20-35 underwent a 5 min lasting cold pressor test (CPT) performed on their left hand. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in the middle cerebral arteries and arterial blood pressure were recorded with transcranial Doppler sonography and with a non-invasive finger-cuff method, respectively. The ratio of arterial blood pressure to mean blood velocity (ABP/Vm) and Pulsatility Index (PI) were calculated throughout each trial. CPT induced an increase in mean ABP (range 2-54 mmHg depending on the subject) and only a slight, though significant, increase in blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (+2.4 and +4.4% on ipsi- and contralateral side, respectively). During CPT, the ratio ABP/Vm increased and PI decreased in all subjects on both sides. These changes began simultaneously with the increase in blood pressure. The increase in ABP/Vm ratio is attributed to an increase in the cerebrovascular resistance, while the concomitant reduction in PI is interpreted as due to the reduction in the compliance of the middle cerebral artery. The results suggest that generalised increases in the sympathetic discharge, causing increases in ABP, can prevent concomitant increases in CBF by acting on both small resistance and large compliant vessels. This effect is also present when a slight increase in blood pressure occurs, which suggests a moderate increase in the sympathetic discharge, i.e. when ABP remains far below the upper limit of CBF autoregulation.

  9. High membrane protein oxidation in the human cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Granold, Matthias; Moosmann, Bernd; Staib-Lasarzik, Irina; Arendt, Thomas; del Rey, Adriana; Engelhard, Kristin; Behl, Christian; Hajieva, Parvana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main mediators of neuronal damage in human neurodegenerative disease. Still, the dissection of causal relationships has turned out to be remarkably difficult. Here, we have analyzed global protein oxidation in terms of carbonylation of membrane proteins and cytoplasmic proteins in three different mammalian species: aged human cortex and cerebellum from patients with or without Alzheimer's disease, mouse cortex and cerebellum from young and old anim...

  10. Differential Representation of Speech Sounds in the Human Cerebral Hemispheres

    OpenAIRE

    Firszt, Jill B.; Ulmer, John L.; Gaggl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Various methods in auditory neuroscience have been used to gain knowledge about the structure and function of the human auditory cortical system. Regardless of method, hemispheric differences are evident in the normal processing of speech sounds. This review manuscript, augmented by the authors’ own work, provides evidence that asymmetries exist in both cortical and subcortical structures of the human auditory system. Asymmetries are affected by stimulus type, for example hemispheric activati...

  11. Neuropathology in Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knerr, I.; Gibson, K.M.; Murdoch, G.; Salomons, G.S.; Jakobs, C.; Combs, S.; Pearl, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is the novel finding of neuropathology in a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, an inherited disorder of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism characterized by intellectual deficiency, hypotonia, and epilepsy, with 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria and abnormalities of the

  12. Hypothalamic hamartoma: Neuropathology and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, John F; Parsons, Angela; Tsang, Candy; Simeone, Kristina; Coons, Stephen; Wu, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital malformations of the ventral hypothalamus resulting in treatment-resistant epilepsy and are intrinsically epileptogenic for the gelastic seizures that are the hallmark symptom of this disorder. This paper reviews the neuropathologic features of HHs associated with epilepsy, with an emphasis on characterizing neuron phenotypes and an ultimate goal of understanding the cellular model of ictogenesis occurring locally within this tissue. We also present previously unpublished findings on Golgi staining of HH. The microarchitecture of HH is relatively simple, with nodular clusters of neurons that vary in size and abundance with poorly defined boundaries. Approximately 80-90% of HH neurons have an interneuron-like phenotype with small, round soma and short, unbranched processes that lack spines. These neurons express glutamic acid decarboxylase and likely utilize γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their primary neurotransmitter. They have intrinsic membrane properties that lead to spontaneous pacemaker-like firing activity. The remaining HH neurons are large cells with pleomorphic, often pyramidal, soma and dendrites that are more likely to be branched and have spines. These neurons appear to be excitatory, projection-type neurons, and have the functionally immature behavior of depolarizing and firing in response to GABA ligands. We hypothesize that the irregular neuronal clusters are the functional unit for ictogenesis. Further research to define and characterize these local networks is required to fully understand the cellular mechanisms responsible for gelastic seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Neuropathological diagnosis of brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Bianca

    2011-11-01

    With recent progress in radiological, pathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and genetic diagnoses, the characterisation of brain tumours has improved. The last World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System was done in 2007, based on morphological features, growth pattern and molecular profile of neoplastic cells, defined malignancy grade. The neuropathological diagnosis and the grading of each histotype are based on identification of histopathological criteria and immunohistochemical data. Molecular and genetic profiles may identify different tumour subtypes varying in biological and clinical behaviour, indicating prognostic and predictive factors. In order to investigate new therapeutic approaches, it is important to study the molecular pathways responsible for proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and anaplastic transformation. Different prognostic and predictive factors for glioma patients were identified by genetic studies, such as the loss of heterozygosis on chromosome 1p and 19q for oligodendrogliomas, proangiogenic factors such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for glioblastomas and the methylation status of gene promoter of MethylGuanine-MethylTransferase. In conclusion, the prognostic evaluation and the therapeutic strategies for patients depend on the synthesis of histological diagnosis, malignancy grade, gene-molecular profile, radiological images, surgical resection and clinical findings (age, tumour location, and "performance status").

  14. Adaptive evolution of ASPM, a major determinant of cerebral cortical size in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Patrick D; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Vallender, Eric J; Gilbert, Sandra L; Malcom, Christine M; Dorus, Steve; Lahn, Bruce T

    2004-03-01

    A prominent trend in the evolution of humans is the progressive enlargement of the cerebral cortex. The ASPM (Abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) gene has the potential to play a role in this evolutionary process, because mutations in this gene cause severe reductions in the cerebral cortical size of affected humans. Here, we show that the evolution of ASPM is significantly accelerated in great apes, especially along the ape lineages leading to humans. Additionally, the lineage from the last human/chimpanzee ancestor to humans shows an excess of non-synonymous over synonymous substitutions, which is a signature of positive Darwinian selection. A comparison of polymorphism and divergence using the McDonald-Kreitman test confirms that ASPM has indeed experienced intense positive selection during recent human evolution. This test also reveals that, on average, ASPM fixed one advantageous amino acid change in every 300,000-400,000 years since the human lineage diverged from chimpanzees some 5-6 million years ago. We therefore conclude that ASPM underwent strong adaptive evolution in the descent of Homo sapiens, which is consistent with its putative role in the evolutionary enlargement of the human brain.

  15. Cerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids after lipopolysaccharide infusion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Taudorf, Sarah; Bailey, Damian M

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in circulating large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), leading to a decrease in the plasma ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAA/AAA ratio), may be involved in sepsis-associated encephalopathy. We hypothesised that a decrease in the BCAA/AAA ratio occurs along...... with a net cerebral influx of the neurotoxic AAA phenylalanine in a human experimental model of systemic inflammation....

  16. The history of neuropathology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, D

    2010-01-01

    The history of Italian Neuropathology begins in the XIX century with Lombroso with his studies of criminal and prostitutes, inspired by the positivism of the era, and on the brain of epileptic patients. It reached its peak at the beginning of XX century with Camillo Golgi, Nobel laureate for his impregnation of neurons and the theory of the diffuse neuronal net. Neuropathology was then cultivated in Asylums and Universities where the main subject of interest were dementias and degenerative diseases, followed by vascular and inflammatory diseases. Some Laboratories arose in the country, especially in neurological institutes and some people later began to emigrate, especially to France and Germany and then to USA in order to improve their Neuropathology. Starting in the late fifties of the 20th century there was a progressive enrichment of Neuropathology with histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and then molecular biology and the number of Laboratories increased consistently. As in other developed countries, Neuropathology with the enlargement of its scientific fields, began to split in sub-disciplines. It remained as a wide spectrum of knowledge, but neuropathologists were obliged to specialize in specific areas of the discipline. The continuous change of the set up of the university studies in the country in the last 20 years did not favor Neuropathology from which, moreover, some new independent disciplines originated.

  17. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...... on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...

  18. The neuropathology of morality: Germany 1930-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmann, Felix

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes brain scientists' attempts to trace morality in the brain in Germany from 1930 to 1960. The debate around Karl Kleist's localization of the Gemeinschafts-Ich [community-I] in the 1930s is depicted in order to illustrate the central arguments for and against localizations of morality. The focus of this article is on the period 1936-1960 in which experts put forth specific ideas on morality's cerebral underpinnings that mirror the larger theoretical shift from strict localization doctrine to a more holistic understanding of the brain. As a result of this shift, experts avoided exact localizations of morality. Instead, they posited correlations between brain areas and morality. The analysis illustrates the dependence of neuropathological research on morality on general theories of brain functioning and marks a first contribution to the history of the neuroscience of morality for the time after 1930.

  19. Estimation of cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S F; Stadeager, Carsten Preben; Siemkowicz, E

    1990-01-01

    /kg/min). The cortical CBF was found between 14 and 211 ml 100 g-1.min-1 with mean 42 ml 100 g-1.min-1 and mean white matter CBF equal to 27 ml 100 g-1.min-1. It is suggested that the external cardiac massage in humans may be of poor efficacy in terms of brain revival. Cortical CBF after long-lasting cardiopulmonary...

  20. Differential representation of speech sounds in the human cerebral hemispheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Jill B; Ulmer, John L; Gaggl, Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    Various methods in auditory neuroscience have been used to gain knowledge about the structure and function of the human auditory cortical system. Regardless of method, hemispheric differences are evident in the normal processing of speech sounds. This review article, augmented by the authors' own work, provides evidence that asymmetries exist in both cortical and subcortical structures of the human auditory system. Asymmetries are affected by stimulus type, for example, hemispheric activation patterns have been shown to change from right to left cortex as stimuli change from speech to nonspeech. In addition, the presence of noise has differential effects on the contribution of the two hemispheres. Modifications of typical asymmetric cortical patterns occur when pathology is present, as in hearing loss or tinnitus. We show that in response to speech sounds, individuals with unilateral hearing loss lose the normal asymmetric pattern due to both a decrease in contralateral hemispheric activity and an increase in the ipsilateral hemisphere. These studies demonstrate the utility of modern neuroimaging techniques in functional investigations of the human auditory system. Neuroimaging techniques may provide additional insight as to how the cortical auditory pathways change with experience, including sound deprivation (e.g., hearing loss) and sound experience (e.g., training). Such investigations may explain why some populations appear to be more vulnerable to changes in hemispheric symmetry such as children with learning problems and the elderly. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Development and function of human cerebral cortex neural networks from pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Peter; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Peter, Manuel; Momoh, Ayiba; Arambepola, Devika; Robinson, Hugh P C; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-09-15

    A key aspect of nervous system development, including that of the cerebral cortex, is the formation of higher-order neural networks. Developing neural networks undergo several phases with distinct activity patterns in vivo, which are thought to prune and fine-tune network connectivity. We report here that human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cerebral cortex neurons form large-scale networks that reflect those found in the developing cerebral cortex in vivo. Synchronised oscillatory networks develop in a highly stereotyped pattern over several weeks in culture. An initial phase of increasing frequency of oscillations is followed by a phase of decreasing frequency, before giving rise to non-synchronous, ordered activity patterns. hPSC-derived cortical neural networks are excitatory, driven by activation of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and can undergo NMDA-receptor-mediated plasticity. Investigating single neuron connectivity within PSC-derived cultures, using rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing, we found two broad classes of neuronal connectivity: most neurons have small numbers (40). These data demonstrate that the formation of hPSC-derived cortical networks mimics in vivo cortical network development and function, demonstrating the utility of in vitro systems for mechanistic studies of human forebrain neural network biology. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Multimodal imaging in cerebral gliomas and its neuropathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gempt, Jens, E-mail: jens.gempt@lrz.tum.de [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Soehngen, Eric [Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Förster, Stefan [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Ryang, Yu-Mi [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Schlegel, Jürgen [Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Concerning the preoperative clinical diagnostic work-up of glioma patients, tumor heterogeneity challenges the oncological therapy. The current study assesses the performance of a multimodal imaging approach to differentiate between areas in malignant gliomas and to investigate the extent to which such a combinatorial imaging approach might predict the underlying histology. Methods: Prior to surgical resection, patients harboring intracranial gliomas underwent MRIs (MR-S, PWI) and {sup 18}F-FET-PETs. Intratumoral and peritumoral biopsy targets were defined, by MRI only, by FET-PET only, and by MRI and FET-PET combined, and biopsied prior to surgical resection and which then received separate histopathological examinations. Results: In total, 38 tissue samples were acquired (seven glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma, one diffuse astrocytoma, and one oligoastrocytoma) and underwent histopathological analysis. The highest mean values of Mib1 and CD31 were found in the target point “T’ defined by MRI and FET-PET combined. A significant correlation between NAA/Cr and PET tracer uptake (−0.845, p < 0.05) as well as Cho/Cr ratio and cell density (0.742, p < 0.05) and NAA/Cr ratio and MIB-1 (−0761, p < 0.05) was disclosed for this target point, though not for target points defined by MRI and FET-PET alone. Conclusion: Multimodal-imaging-guided stereotactic biopsy correlated more with histological malignancy indices, such as cell density and MIB-1 labeling, than targets that were based solely on the highest amino acid uptake or contrast enhancement on MRI. The results of our study indicate that a combined PET-MR multimodal imaging approach bears potential benefits in detecting glioma heterogeneity.

  3. Neuropathological comparisons of amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Brittany N; Davis, Kathryn; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Hentz, Joseph G; Sandhu, Shawn; Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Caselli, Richard J; Johnson, Travis A; Serrano, Geidy E; Shill, Holly A; Belden, Christine; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Caviness, John N; Sue, Lucia I; Jacobson, Sandra; Powell, Jessica; Sabbagh, Marwan N

    2015-08-20

    Although there are studies investigating the pathologic origins of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), they have revolved around comparisons to normal elderly individuals or those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other dementias. There are few studies directly comparing the comprehensive neuropathology of amnestic (aMCI) and nonamnestic (naMCI) MCI. The database of the Brain and Body Donation Program ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ), a longitudinal clinicopathological study of normal aging and neurodegenerative disorders, was queried for subjects who were carrying a diagnosis of aMCI or naMCI at the time of autopsy. Neuropathological lesions, including neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), Lewy bodies (LBs), infarcts, cerebral white matter rarefaction (CWMR), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and concurrent major clinicopathological diagnoses, including Parkinson's disease (PD) were analyzed. Thirty four subjects with aMCI and 15 naMCI met study criteria. Subjects with aMCI were older at death (88 vs. 83 years of age, p = 0.03). Individuals with naMCI had higher densities of LBs within the temporal lobe (p = 0.04) while subjects with aMCI had a propensity for increased NFTs in parietal and temporal lobes (p values = 0.07). After adjusting for age at death, the only significant difference was greater densities of temporal lobe NFTs within the aMCI group. Other regional pathology scores for plaques, NFTs, and LBs were similar between groups. Subjects met clinico-pathological criteria for co-existent PD in 24 % aMCI and 47 % naMCI while neuropathological criteria for AD were met in equal percentages of aMCI and of naMCI cases (53 %); these proportional differences were not significant (p values > 0.35). Furthermore, regardless of amnestic status, there was a greater presence of CAA (71 % of MCI with executive dysfunction vs. 39 % without p = 0.03) and a greater presence of CWMR (81 % of MCI with executive dysfunction and 54

  4. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation to induced blood pressure changes in human experimental and clinical sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that dynamic cerebral autoregulation to spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure is enhanced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion, a human experimental model of early sepsis, whereas by contrast it is impaired in patients with severe sepsis or septic......R). This was performed before and after LPS infusion in healthy volunteers, and within 72 h following clinical diagnosis of sepsis in patients. In healthy volunteers, thigh-cuff deflation caused a MAP reduction of 16 (13-20) % at baseline and 18 (16-20) % after LPS, while the MAP reduction was 12 (11-13) % in patients......(-1) ; P = 0·91 versus baseline; P = 0·14 versus LPS]. While our findings support the concept that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is enhanced during the very early stages of sepsis, they remain inconclusive with regard to more advanced stages of disease, because thigh-cuff deflation failed to induce...

  5. Cerebral temperature varies across circadian phases in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Philippe; Shechter, Ari; Dittmar, Andre; Gehin, Claudine; Delhomme, Georges; Nocua, Ronald; Dumont, Guy; Boivin, Diane B

    2008-01-01

    The 24-hour rhythm of core body temperature (CBT) is commonly used in humans as a tool to assess the oscillation of the central endogenous circadian pacemaker. The invasive nature of the rectal sensor used to collect CBT makes it difficult to use in ambulatory conditions. Here we validate the use of a newly developed brain temperature (BT) sensor against that of a standard rectal temperature sensor using a 72-hour ultra-rapid sleep-wake (URSW) cycle procedure. A significant circadian variation of both body temperature recordings was observed from which a phase and amplitude was reliably determined. These results indicate that BT can be refined as a non-invasive alternative to CBT measurements in the evaluation of circadian phase in field conditions.

  6. APP Metabolism Regulates Tau Proteostasis in Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons.

  7. A study of small RNAs from cerebral neocortex of pathology-verified Alzheimer's disease, dementia with lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar dementia, and non-demented human controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Sébastien S; Wang, Wang-Xia; Zhu, Qi; Nelson, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-22 nucleotides) regulatory non-coding RNAs that strongly influence gene expression. Most prior studies addressing the role of miRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have focused on individual diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), making disease-to-disease comparisons impossible. Using RNA deep sequencing, we sought to analyze in detail the small RNAs (including miRNAs) in the temporal neocortex gray matter from non-demented controls (n = 2), AD (n = 5), dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 4), hippocampal sclerosis of aging (n = 4), and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) (n = 5) cases, together accounting for the most prevalent ND subtypes. All cases had short postmortem intervals, relatively high-quality RNA, and state-of-the-art neuropathological diagnoses. The resulting data (over 113 million reads in total, averaging 5.6 million reads per sample) and secondary expression analyses constitute an unprecedented look into the human cerebral cortical miRNome at a nucleotide resolution. While we find no apparent changes in isomiR or miRNA editing patterns in correlation with ND pathology, our results validate and extend previous miRNA profiling studies with regard to quantitative changes in NDs. In agreement with this idea, we provide independent cohort validation for changes in miR-132 expression levels in AD (n = 8) and FTLD (n = 14) cases when compared to controls (n = 8). The identification of common and ND-specific putative novel brain miRNAs and/or short-hairpin molecules is also presented. The challenge now is to better understand the impact of these and other alterations on neuronal gene expression networks and neuropathologies.

  8. Arterial input function in a dedicated slice for cerebral perfusion measurements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elias; Mader, Irina; Reisert, Marco; Urbach, Horst; Kiselev, Valerij Gennadevic

    2017-12-09

    We aimed to modify our previously published method for arterial input function measurements for evaluation of cerebral perfusion (dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI) such that it can be applied in humans in a clinical setting. Similarly to our previous work, a conventional measurement sequence for dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI is extended with an additional measurement slice at the neck. Measurement parameters at this slice were optimized for the blood signal (short echo time, background suppression, magnitude and phase images). Phase-based evaluation of the signal in the carotid arteries is used to obtain quantitative arterial input functions. In all pilot measurements, quantitative arterial input functions were obtained. The resulting absolute perfusion parameters agree well with literature values (gray and white matter mean values of 46 and 24 mL/100 g/min, respectively, for cerebral blood flow and 3.0% and 1.6%, respectively, for cerebral blood volume). The proposed method has the potential to quantify arterial input functions in the carotid arteries from a direct measurement without any additional normalization.

  9. Correlation between cerebral hemodynamic and perfusion pressure changes in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, A.; Smith, M. A.; Wollstein, G.; Sigal, I. A.; Nelson, S.; Kainerstorfer, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism that maintains a stable blood flow in the brain despite changes in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and therefore guaranties a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients to the neurons, is known as cerebral auto-regulation (CA). In a certain range of CPP, blood flow is mediated by a vasomotor adjustment in vascular resistance through dilation of blood vessels. CA is known to be impaired in diseases like traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, stroke, hydrocephalus and others. If CA is impaired, blood flow and pressure changes are coupled and thee oxygen supply might be unstable. Lassen's blood flow auto-regulation curve describes this mechanism, where a plateau of stable blood flow in a specific range of CPP corresponds to intact auto-regulation. Knowing the limits of this plateau and maintaining CPP within these limits can improve patient outcome. Since CPP is influenced by both intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure, long term changes in either can lead to auto-regulation impairment. Non-invasive methods for monitoring blood flow auto-regulation are therefore needed. We propose too use Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) too fill this need. NIRS is an optical technique, which measures microvascular changes in cerebral hemoglobin concentration. We performed experiments on non-human primates during exsanguination to demonstrate that thee limits of blood flow auto-regulation can be accessed with NIRS.

  10. [Neuropathological diagnosis of neurodegenerative and dementia diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, H A; Neumann, M

    2000-09-01

    Neurodegenerative and dementing disorders such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease are among the most common diseases of advanced age. Despite progress in the clinical diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, definite diagnosis for most of these disorders is still possible only by neuropathological examination of the brain. The neuropathological diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative disorders has made clear advances in recent years, particularly due to the results of genetic and biochemical studies, resulting in the development of new disease-specific antibodies. Internationally recognized consensus criteria for most neurodegenerative disorders allow a definite and standardized diagnosis to be made. To obtain further knowledge about the etiopathogenesis, particularly with regard to new therapeutic strategies, studies with clinically and neuropathologically well-documented cases are needed. The project "Brain-Net" has therefore been established with the aim of setting up a German Brain and Tissue Bank for Diseases of the Central Nervous System. The project is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

  11. The effects of intracisternal enzyme replacement versus sham treatment on central neuropathology in preclinical canine fucosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondagari, Gauthami Sudhamayee; Fletcher, Jessica Louise; Cruz, Rachel; Williamson, Peter; Hopwood, John J; Taylor, Rosanne Maree

    2015-11-04

    Fucosidosis results from lack of α-L-fucosidase activity, with accumulation of fucose-linked substrates in the nervous system and viscera leading to progressive motor and mental deterioration, and death. The naturally occurring dog model of fucosidosis was used to evaluate the neuropathological responses to partial enzyme replacement, and substrate reduction in early disease following treatment with recombinant canine α-L-fucosidase delivered through cerebrospinal fluid. Neuropathology in both treated (n = 3) and untreated fucosidosis-affected (n = 3) animals was evaluated with immunohistochemistry, image analysis, manual quantification and gene expression analysis and compared with unaffected age-matched controls (n = 3) in an extension of our previous biochemical report on the same cohort. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Quantification demonstrated a consistent trend to reduction in vacuolation, pyramidal neuron loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis, perivascular storage, apoptosis, oligodendrocyte loss, and hypomyelination throughout the central nervous system of enzyme treated animals compared to placebo-treated, age-matched affected controls. Key lesions including lysosomal expansion in neurons of deep cortex, astrocytosis in cerebral cortex and medulla, and increased lysosomal membrane associated protein-1 (LAMP-1) gene expression were ameliorated in treated animals. There was no change in spheroid formation and loss of Purkinje cells, but Purkinje cell vulnerability to apoptosis was reduced with treatment. Despite reduced severity of fucosidosis neuropathology with partial enzyme replacement, more complete and sustained biochemical correction is required to halt neuropathological processes in this large animal model of lysosomal storage disease.

  12. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral...

  13. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebr...

  14. The phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol dilates large cerebral arteries in humans without affecting regional cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Steffen; Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Petersen, Kenneth A

    2004-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries (VMCA) was measured with transcranial Doppler, and the superficial temporal and radial arteries diameters were measured with ultrasonography. During the 4-hour observation period, there was no effect on systolic blood pressure (P = 0.28), but diastolic blood pressure decreased...

  15. Retinoblastoma protein controls growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Schneider, Jay W; Hsieh, Jenny

    2017-03-15

    The tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB) regulates S-phase cell cycle entry via E2F transcription factors. Knockout (KO) mice have shown that RB plays roles in cell migration, differentiation and apoptosis, in developing and adult brain. In addition, the RB family is required for self-renewal and survival of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Since little is known about the role of RB in human brain development, we investigated its function in cerebral organoids differentiated from gene-edited hESCs lacking RB. We show that RB is abundantly expressed in neural stem and progenitor cells in organoids at 15 and 28 days of culture. RB loss promoted S-phase entry in DCX + cells and increased apoptosis in Sox2 + neural stem and progenitor cells, and in DCX + and Tuj1 + neurons. Associated with these cell cycle and pro-apoptotic effects, we observed increased CCNA2 and BAX gene expression, respectively. Moreover, we observed aberrant Tuj1 + neuronal migration in RB-KO organoids and upregulation of the gene encoding VLDLR, a receptor important in reelin signaling. Corroborating the results in RB-KO organoids in vitro , we observed ectopically localized Tuj1 + cells in RB-KO teratomas grown in vivo Taken together, these results identify crucial functions for RB in the cerebral organoid model of human brain development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Misdiagnosis of cerebral malaria initially as acute psychotic disorder and later as human rabies: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudiyanselage, Meththananda Herath Herath; Weerasinghe, Nayani Prasangika; Pathirana, Kithsiri; Dias, Hasini

    2016-08-11

    Cerebral malaria is arguably one of the most common non-traumatic encephalopathies in the developing world. Unless the diagnosis of cerebral malaria is made promptly, the consequence could be disastrous. Even though the diagnosis of cerebral malaria can be made relatively easily in majority of cases atypical presentation can often lead to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. We report a case of an uncommon presentation of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a 17-year-old school girl with altered sensorium, seizures and phobic spasms. A previously healthy 17-year-old school girl was admitted to our hospital with acute condition characterised by comatose state, recurrent seizures and phobic spasms. She initially presented to a local hospital with agitation and over talkativeness and was diagnosed as having an acute psychotic state. Few days later she became drowsy and developed recurrent seizures and marked phobic spasms which prompted the treating physician to diagnose human rabies. However, further investigations carried out in our unit (including rapid antigenic test for P. falciparum and peripheral blood smear) were positive for P. falciparum. She was treated as for cerebral malaria with intravenous quinine and discharge from hospital with no residual neurological deficit. Atypical presentation of cerebral malaria can often lead to misdiagnosis. This patient presented with encephalopathic illness with phobic spasms was initially misdiagnosed as human rabies. Therefore, the physicians in malarial endemic areas should be vigilant of similar presentations and should consider cerebral malaria as a possibility.

  17. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin [Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  18. Isolated homonymous hemianopsia due to presumptive cerebral tubercular abscess as the initial manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Gharai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of isolated homonymous hemianopsia due to presumptive cerebral tubercular abscess as the initial manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. A 30-year-old man presented to our outpatient department with sudden loss of visibility in his left visual field. He had no other systemic symptoms. Perimetry showed left-sided incongruous homonymous hemianopsia denser above the horizontal meridian. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed irregular well-marginated lobulated lesions right temporo-occipital cerebral hemisphere and left high fronto-parietal cerebral hemisphere suggestive of brain tubercular abscess. Serological tests for HIV were reactive, and the patient was started only on anti-tubercular drugs with the presumptive diagnosis of cerebral tubercular abscess. Therapeutic response confirmed the diagnosis. Atypical ophthalmic manifestations may be the initial presenting feature in patients with HIV infection. This highlights the need for increased index of suspicion for HIV infection in young patients with atypical ophthalmic manifestations.

  19. Cerebral and myocardial blood flow responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Andrew E; Brugniaux, Julien V; Vöhringer, Matthias; Flewitt, Jacqueline; Green, Jordin D; Friedrich, Matthias G; Poulin, Marc J

    2011-10-01

    In humans, cerebrovascular responses to alterations in arterial Pco(2) and Po(2) are well documented. However, few studies have investigated human coronary vascular responses to alterations in blood gases. This study investigated the extent to which the cerebral and coronary vasculatures differ in their responses to euoxic hypercapnia and isocapnic hypoxia in healthy volunteers. Participants (n = 15) were tested at rest on two occasions. On the first visit, middle cerebral artery blood velocity (V(P)) was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. On the second visit, coronary sinus blood flow (CSBF) was measured using cardiac MRI. For comparison with V(P), CSBF was normalized to the rate pressure product [an index of myocardial oxygen consumption; normalized (n)CSBF]. Both testing sessions began with 5 min of euoxic [end-tidal Po(2) (Pet(O(2))) = 88 Torr] isocapnia [end-tidal Pco(2) (Pet(CO(2))) = +1 Torr above resting values]. Pet(O(2)) was next held at 88 Torr, and Pet(CO(2)) was increased to 40 and 45 Torr in 5-min increments. Participants were then returned to euoxic isocapnia for 5 min, after which Pet(O(2)) was decreased from 88 to 60, 52 and 45 Torr in 5-min decrements. Changes in V(P) and nCSBF were normalized to isocapnic euoxic conditions and indexed against Pet(CO(2)) and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. The V(P) gain for euoxic hypercapnia (%/Torr) was significantly higher than nCSBF (P = 0.030). Conversely, the V(P) gain for isocapnic hypoxia (%/%desaturation) was not different from nCSBF (P = 0.518). These findings demonstrate, compared with coronary circulation, that the cerebral circulation is more sensitive to hypercapnia but similarly sensitive to hypoxia.

  20. 40 CFR 79.66 - Neuropathology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that can be achieved while maintaining a particle size distribution with a mass median aerodynamic... shall be recorded. (iv) Specimen storage. Tissue samples from both the central and peripheral nervous... statistical method must be presented. The evaluation of neuropathology data shall include, where applicable...

  1. Short term changes in the proteome of human cerebral organoids induced by 5-MeO-DMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakic, Vanja; Minardi Nascimento, Juliana; Costa Sartore, Rafaela; Maciel, Renata de Moraes; de Araujo, Draulio B; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Rehen, Stevens K

    2017-10-09

    Dimethyltryptamines are entheogenic serotonin-like molecules present in traditional Amerindian medicine recently associated with cognitive gains, antidepressant effects, and changes in brain areas related to attention. Legal restrictions and the lack of adequate experimental models have limited the understanding of how such substances impact human brain metabolism. Here we used shotgun mass spectrometry to explore proteomic differences induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) on human cerebral organoids. Out of the 6,728 identified proteins, 934 were found differentially expressed in 5-MeO-DMT-treated cerebral organoids. In silico analysis reinforced previously reported anti-inflammatory actions of 5-MeO-DMT and revealed modulatory effects on proteins associated with long-term potentiation, the formation of dendritic spines, including those involved in cellular protrusion formation, microtubule dynamics, and cytoskeletal reorganization. Our data offer the first insight about molecular alterations caused by 5-MeO-DMT in human cerebral organoids.

  2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy with severe secondary vascular pathology : a histopathological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Horssen, Jack; de Jong, Danielle; de Waal, Robert M W; Maass, Cathy; Otte-Holler, Irene; Kremer, Berry; Verbeek, Marcel M; Wesseling, Pieter

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common neuropathological finding and is characterized by deposition of fibrillar amyloid in cortical and leptomeningeal vessels. In this study we describe the macroscopic and microscopic neuropathological findings of 5 patients with severe CAA-associated

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy with severe secondary vascular pathology: a histopathological study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, J. van; Jong, D. de; Waal, R.M.W. de; Maass, C.N.; Otte-Holler, I.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.; Wesseling, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common neuropathological finding and is characterized by deposition of fibrillar amyloid in cortical and leptomeningeal vessels. In this study we describe the macroscopic and microscopic neuropathological findings of 5 patients with severe CAA-associated

  4. Expression of sarcoglycans in the human cerebral cortex: an immunohistochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Tomasello, Francesco; Di Mauro, Debora; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Conti, Alfredo; Ruggeri, Alessia; Rinaldi, Carmela; Trimarchi, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The sarcoglycan (SG) complex (SGC) is a subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) and is composed of several transmembrane proteins (α, β, δ, γ, ε and ζ). The DGC supplies a transmembranous connection between the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton networks and the basal lamina in order to protect the lipid bilayer and to provide a scaffold for signaling molecules in all muscle cells. In addition to its role in muscle tissue, dystrophin and some DGC components are expressed in neurons and glia. Very little is known about the SG subunits in the central nervous system (CNS) and some data suggested the presence of ε and ζ subunits only. In fact, mutations in the ε-SG gene cause myoclonus-dystonia, indicating its importance for brain function. To determine the presence and localization of SGC in the human cerebral cortex, we performed an investigation using immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that all SG subunits are expressed in the human cerebral cortex, particularly in large neurons but also in astrocytes. These data suggest that the SG subcomplex may be involved in the organization of CNS synapses. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Genes expressed in specific areas of the human fetal cerebral cortex display distinct patterns of evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelle Lambert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The developmental mechanisms through which the cerebral cortex increased in size and complexity during primate evolution are essentially unknown. To uncover genetic networks active in the developing cerebral cortex, we combined three-dimensional reconstruction of human fetal brains at midgestation and whole genome expression profiling. This novel approach enabled transcriptional characterization of neurons from accurately defined cortical regions containing presumptive Broca and Wernicke language areas, as well as surrounding associative areas. We identified hundreds of genes displaying differential expression between the two regions, but no significant difference in gene expression between left and right hemispheres. Validation by qRTPCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the robustness of our approach and revealed novel patterns of area- and layer-specific expression throughout the developing cortex. Genes differentially expressed between cortical areas were significantly associated with fast-evolving non-coding sequences harboring human-specific substitutions that could lead to divergence in their repertoires of transcription factor binding sites. Strikingly, while some of these sequences were accelerated in the human lineage only, many others were accelerated in chimpanzee and/or mouse lineages, indicating that genes important for cortical development may be particularly prone to changes in transcriptional regulation across mammals. Genes differentially expressed between cortical regions were also enriched for transcriptional targets of FoxP2, a key gene for the acquisition of language abilities in humans. Our findings point to a subset of genes with a unique combination of cortical areal expression and evolutionary patterns, suggesting that they play important roles in the transcriptional network underlying human-specific neural traits.

  6. Cerebral blood flow reduction in Alzheimer's disease: impact of capillary occlusions on mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Maxime; Merlo, Adlan; Peyrounette, Myriam; Doyeux, Vincent; Smith, Amy; Cruz-Hernandez, Jean; Bracko, Oliver; Haft-Javaherian, Mohammad; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Lorthois, Sylvie

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease may be the most common form of dementia, yet a satisfactory diagnosis procedure has still to be found. Recent studies suggest that a significant decrease of cerebral blood flow, probably caused by white blood cells stalling small vessels, may be among the earliest biological markers. To assess this hypothesis we derive a blood flow model, validate it against in vitro controlled experiments and in vivo measurements made on mice. We then investigate the influence of capillary occlusions on regional perfusion (sum of all arteriole flowrates feeding the network) of large mice and humans anatomical networks. Consistent with experiments, we observe no threshold effect, so that even a small percentage of occlusions (2-4%) leads to significant blood flow decrease (5-12%). We show that both species share the same linear dependance, suggesting possible translation from mice to human. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA61510, CALMIP HPC (Grant 2017-1541).

  7. Plasmodium berghei ANKA: erythropoietin activates neural stem cells in an experimental cerebral malaria model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Core, Andrew; Hempel, Casper; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) causes substantial mortality and neurological sequelae in survivors, and no neuroprotective regimens are currently available for this condition. Erythropoietin (EPO) reduces neuropathology and improves survival in murine CM. Using the Plasmodium berghei model of CM, we...

  8. Human Urinary Kallidinogenase Promotes Angiogenesis and Cerebral Perfusion in Experimental Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Han

    Full Text Available Angiogenesisis a key restorative mechanism in response to ischemia, and pro-angiogenic therapy could be beneficial in stroke. Accumulating experimental and clinical evidence suggest that human urinary kallidinogenase (HUK improves stroke outcome, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim of current study was to verify roles of HUK in post-ischemic angiogenesis and identify relevant mediators. In rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model, we confirmed that HUK treatment could improve stroke outcome, indicated by reduced infarct size and improved neurological function. Notably, the 18F-FDG micro-PET scan indicated that HUK enhanced cerebral perfusion in rats after MCAO treatment. In addition, HUK promotespost-ischemic angiogenesis, with increased vessel density as well as up-regulated VEGF andapelin/APJ expression in HUK-treated MCAO mice. In endothelial cell cultures, induction of VEGF and apelin/APJ expression, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by HUK was further confirmed. These changes were abrogated by U0126, a selective ERK1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, F13A, a competitive antagonist of APJ receptor, significantly suppressed HUK-induced VEGF expression. Furthermore, angiogenic functions of HUK were inhibited in the presence of selective bradykinin B1 or B2 receptor antagonist both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings indicate that HUK treatment promotes post-ischemic angiogenesis and cerebral perfusion via activation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors, which is potentially due to enhancement expression of VEGF and apelin/APJ in ERK1/2 dependent way.

  9. Dissolution of emboli in rats with experimental cerebral thromboembolism by recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (TD-2061)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Ogawa, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Tomikawa, M. (Research Institute, Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, (Japan))

    1990-08-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is frequently administered clinically as thrombolytic therapy. We injected recombinant t-PA into rats with cerebral {sup 125}I-labeled blood clot emboli to evaluate the dissolutive effect of recombinant human single-chain t-PA (rt-PA; TD-2061) on such emboli and to examine the possibility of improving neurological damage in patients with cerebral thrombosis. When rt-PA was given intravenously at a dose of 350,000 IU/kg 2 minutes before embolization, radioactivity in the affected cerebral hemisphere decreased to 20% of that in the vehicle control 2 hours after embolization. A significant decrease in radioactivity in the cerebral hemisphere was also found on the administration of 700,000 IU/kg of rt-PA 30 or 60 minutes after embolization, but not when rt-PA was administered 2 minutes after embolization. Marked inhibition of abnormal behavior such as hemiplegia was seen on treatment with rt-PA 2 minutes before embolization, but not at all when rt-PA treatment was given 30 or 60 minutes after embolization. The findings suggest that rt-PA can dissolve blood clot emboli in cerebral vessels and that prompt thrombolytic therapy is important to minimize neurological dysfunction in cases of cerebral thromboembolism.

  10. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Beecham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and related dementias are a major public health challenge and present a therapeutic imperative for which we need additional insight into molecular pathogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study and analysis of known genetic risk loci for AD dementia using neuropathologic data from 4,914 brain autopsies. Neuropathologic data were used to define clinico-pathologic AD dementia or controls, assess core neuropathologic features of AD (neuritic plaques, NPs; neurofibrillary tangles, NFTs, and evaluate commonly co-morbid neuropathologic changes: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, Lewy body disease (LBD, hippocampal sclerosis of the elderly (HS, and vascular brain injury (VBI. Genome-wide significance was observed for clinico-pathologic AD dementia, NPs, NFTs, CAA, and LBD with a number of variants in and around the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE. GalNAc transferase 7 (GALNT7, ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family G (WHITE, Member 1 (ABCG1, and an intergenic region on chromosome 9 were associated with NP score; and Potassium Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Channel, Subfamily M, Beta Member 2 (KCNMB2 was strongly associated with HS. Twelve of the 21 non-APOE genetic risk loci for clinically-defined AD dementia were confirmed in our clinico-pathologic sample: CR1, BIN1, CLU, MS4A6A, PICALM, ABCA7, CD33, PTK2B, SORL1, MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and CASS4 with 9 of these 12 loci showing larger odds ratio in the clinico-pathologic sample. Correlation of effect sizes for risk of AD dementia with effect size for NFTs or NPs showed positive correlation, while those for risk of VBI showed a moderate negative correlation. The other co-morbid neuropathologic features showed only nominal association with the known AD loci. Our results discovered new genetic associations with specific neuropathologic features and aligned known genetic risk for AD dementia with specific neuropathologic changes in the largest brain autopsy study of AD and related

  11. Region-specific maturation of cerebral cortex in human fetal brain: diffusion tensor imaging and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Saksena, Sona [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Husain, Nuzhat; Srivastava, Savita [CSM Medical University, Department of Pathology, Lucknow (India); Rathore, Ram K.S.; Sarma, Manoj K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Kanpur (India); Malik, Gyanendra K. [CSM Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Das, Vinita [CSM Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lucknow (India); Pradhan, Mandakini [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Genetics, Lucknow (India); Pandey, Chandra M. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Biostatistics, Lucknow (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemical analysis in different cortical regions in fetal brains at different gestational age (GA) were performed. DTI was performed on 50 freshly aborted fetal brains with GA ranging from 12 to 42 weeks to compare age-related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes in different cerebral cortical regions that include frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes at the level of thalami. GFAP immunostaining was performed and the percentage of GFAP-positive areas was quantified. The cortical FA values in the frontal lobe peaked at around 26 weeks of GA, occipital and temporal lobes at around 20 weeks, and parietal lobe at around 23 weeks. A significant, but modest, positive correlation (r=0.31, p=0.02) was observed between cortical FA values and percentage area of GFAP expression in cortical region around the time period during which the migrational events are at its peak, i.e., GA {<=} 28 weeks for frontal cortical region and GA{<=}22 weeks for rest of the lobes. The DTI-derived FA quantification with its GFAP immunohistologic correlation in cortical regions of the various lobes of the cerebral hemispheres supports region-specific migrational and maturational events in human fetal brain. (orig.)

  12. Fluid structural analysis of human cerebral aneurysm using their own wall mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Alvaro; Burdiles, Patricio; Ignat, Miguel; Mura, Jorge; Bravo, Eduardo; Rivera, Rodrigo; Sordo, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) simulations, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation, and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations were carried out in an anatomically realistic model of a saccular cerebral aneurysm with the objective of quantifying the effects of type of simulation on principal fluid and solid mechanics results. Eight CSD simulations, one CFD simulation, and four FSI simulations were made. The results allowed the study of the influence of the type of material elements in the solid, the aneurism's wall thickness, and the type of simulation on the modeling of a human cerebral aneurysm. The simulations use their own wall mechanical properties of the aneurysm. The more complex simulation was the FSI simulation completely coupled with hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin material, normal internal pressure, and normal variable thickness. The FSI simulation coupled in one direction using hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin material, normal internal pressure, and normal variable thickness is the one that presents the most similar results with respect to the more complex FSI simulation, requiring one-fourth of the calculation time.

  13. Fluid Structural Analysis of Human Cerebral Aneurysm Using Their Own Wall Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Valencia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD simulations, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation, and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI simulations were carried out in an anatomically realistic model of a saccular cerebral aneurysm with the objective of quantifying the effects of type of simulation on principal fluid and solid mechanics results. Eight CSD simulations, one CFD simulation, and four FSI simulations were made. The results allowed the study of the influence of the type of material elements in the solid, the aneurism’s wall thickness, and the type of simulation on the modeling of a human cerebral aneurysm. The simulations use their own wall mechanical properties of the aneurysm. The more complex simulation was the FSI simulation completely coupled with hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin material, normal internal pressure, and normal variable thickness. The FSI simulation coupled in one direction using hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin material, normal internal pressure, and normal variable thickness is the one that presents the most similar results with respect to the more complex FSI simulation, requiring one-fourth of the calculation time.

  14. Cerebral correlates of autonomic cardiovascular arousal: a functional neuroimaging investigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, H D; Corfield, D R; Chandler, M P; Mathias, C J; Dolan, R J

    2000-02-15

    1. States of peripheral autonomic arousal accompany emotional behaviour, physical exercise and cognitive effort, and their central representation may influence decision making and the regulation of social and emotional behaviours. However, the cerebral functional neuroanatomy representing and mediating peripheral autonomic responses in humans is poorly understood. 2. Six healthy volunteer subjects underwent H215O positron emission tomography (PET) scanning while performing isometric exercise and mental arithmetic stressor tasks, and during corresponding control tasks. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored during scanning. 3. Data were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). Conjunction analyses were used to determine significant changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during states of cardiovascular arousal common to both exercise and mental stressor tasks. 4. Exercise and mental stressor tasks, relative to their control tasks, were associated with significantly (P exercise and mental stress tasks, increased rCBF in cerebellar vermis, right anterior cingulate and right insula covaried with MAP; rCBF in pons, cerebellum and right insula covaried with HR. Cardiovascular arousal in both categorical and covariance analyses was associated with decreased rCBF in prefrontal and medial temporal regions. 5. Neural responses in discrete brain regions accompany peripheral cardiovascular arousal. We provide evidence for the involvement of areas previously implicated in cognitive and emotional behaviours in the representation of peripheral autonomic states, consistent with a functional organization that produces integrated cardiovascular response patterns in the service of volitional and emotional behaviours.

  15. Contribution of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition to the Pathogenesis of Human Cerebral and Orbital Cavernous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shigeki; Hojo, Masato; Tanigaki, Kenji; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of gene-targeted mouse mutants has demonstrated that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) is crucial to the onset and progression of cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs). It has also been shown that Notch and ephrin/Eph signaling are involved in EndMT. However, their roles in the pathogenesis of human intracranial CMs remain unclear. To elucidate the contribution of EndMT, the Notch pathway, and ephrin-B2/EphB4 signaling to the pathogenesis of human intracranial CMs. Eight human intracranial CMs (5 cerebral and 3 orbital CMs) were immunohistochemically investigated. CD31 (an endothelial marker) and EndMT markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin (a mesenchymal marker) and CD44 (a mesenchymal stem cell marker), were expressed in the endothelial layer of vascular sinusoids in all cases, suggesting that endothelial cells (ECs) have acquired mesenchymal and stem-cell-like characteristics and undergone EndMT in all cerebral and orbital CMs. EndMT was observed in about 70% and 35% of ECs in cerebral and orbital CMs, respectively. In all cases, Notch3 was expressed in the endothelial layer, indicating that ECs of vascular sinusoids have acquired mesenchymal features. In all cases, both ephrin-B2 and EphB4 were detected in the endothelial layer, suggesting that ECs of vascular sinusoids are immature or malformed cells and have both arterial and venous characteristics. EndMT plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of human cerebral and orbital CMs. Modulating EndMT is expected to be a new therapeutic strategy for cerebral and orbital CMs.

  16. Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-β pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Mead, Simon; Ellis, Matthew; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Nicoll, Andrew J; Kenny, Joanna; Launchbury, Francesca; Linehan, Jacqueline; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Walker, A Sarah; Rudge, Peter; Collinge, John; Brandner, Sebastian

    2015-09-10

    More than two hundred individuals developed Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) worldwide as a result of treatment, typically in childhood, with human cadaveric pituitary-derived growth hormone contaminated with prions. Although such treatment ceased in 1985, iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) continues to emerge because of the prolonged incubation periods seen in human prion infections. Unexpectedly, in an autopsy study of eight individuals with iCJD, aged 36-51 years, in four we found moderate to severe grey matter and vascular amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology. The Aβ deposition in the grey matter was typical of that seen in Alzheimer's disease and Aβ in the blood vessel walls was characteristic of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and did not co-localize with prion protein deposition. None of these patients had pathogenic mutations, APOE ε4 or other high-risk alleles associated with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Examination of a series of 116 patients with other prion diseases from a prospective observational cohort study showed minimal or no Aβ pathology in cases of similar age range, or a decade older, without APOE ε4 risk alleles. We also analysed pituitary glands from individuals with Aβ pathology and found marked Aβ deposition in multiple cases. Experimental seeding of Aβ pathology has been previously demonstrated in primates and transgenic mice by central nervous system or peripheral inoculation with Alzheimer's disease brain homogenate. The marked deposition of parenchymal and vascular Aβ in these relatively young patients with iCJD, in contrast with other prion disease patients and population controls, is consistent with iatrogenic transmission of Aβ pathology in addition to CJD and suggests that healthy exposed individuals may also be at risk of iatrogenic Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. These findings should also prompt investigation of whether other known iatrogenic routes of prion transmission may also be relevant to Aβ and other proteopathic

  17. Structural characterization of the human cerebral myelin sheath by small angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelici, M.; Felici, R.; Ferrero, C.; Tartari, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Finet, S.

    2008-10-01

    Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.

  18. Structural characterization of the human cerebral myelin sheath by small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Felici, M; Felici, R; Ferrero, C [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Tartari, A; Gambaccini, M [Physics Department, University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Finet, S [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, BP29, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-10-21

    Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.

  19. Molecular Neuropathology of TDP-43 Proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Neumann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of TDP-43 as the major component of the pathologic inclusions in most forms of sporadic and familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS resolved a long-standing enigma concerning the nature of the ubiquitinated disease protein under these conditions. Anti-TDP-43 immunohistochemistry and the recent development of novel tools, such as phosphorylation-specific TDP-43 antibodies, have increased our knowledge about the spectrum of pathological changes associated with FTLD-U and ALS and moreover, facilitated the neuropathological routine diagnosis of these conditions. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding on the molecular neuropathology and pathobiology of TDP-43 in FTLD and ALS.

  20. Frontal Cortex Neuropathology in Dementia Pugilistica

    OpenAIRE

    Saing, Tommy; Dick, Malcolm; Nelson, Peter T.; Kim, Ronald C; Cribbs, David H.; Head, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    AbstractDementia pugilistica (DP) is associated with chronic traumatic brain injury (CTBI), and leads to a “punch drunk” syndrome characterized by impairments in memory and executive function, behavioral changes, and motor signs. Microscopic features include the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), beta-amyloid (Aβ), and TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) pathology. Here we describe detailed clinical and neuropathological data about a 55-year-old retired boxer (ApoE3/4), who prese...

  1. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  2. Cerebral blood flow during submaximal and maximal dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, S N; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans was measured at rest and during dynamic exercise on a cycle ergometer corresponding to 56% (range 27-85) of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Exercise bouts were performed by 16 male and female subjects, lasted 15 min each, and were carried out in a semisupine position....... CBF (133Xe clearance) was expressed as the initial slope index (ISI) and as the first compartment flow (F1). CBF at rest [ISI, 58 (range 45-73); F1, 76 (range 55-98) ml.100 g-1.min-1] increased during exercise [ISI to 79 (57-94) and F1 to 118 (75-164) ml.100 g-1.min-1, P less than 0.01]. CBF did...

  3. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Hempel, Casper; Penkowa, Milena

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM) is an acute encephalopathy with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes and localized ischaemia. In children CM induces cognitive impairment in about 10% of the survivors. Erythropoietin (Epo) has - besides of its well known...... with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50-5000 U/kg/OD, i.p.) at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labelling), as a marker of apoptosis. Gene...... expression in brain tissue was measured by real time PCR. RESULTS: Treatment with rhEpo increased survival in mice with CM in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced apoptotic cell death of neurons as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain. This neuroprotective effect...

  4. The intent to exercise influences the cerebral O(2)/carbohydrate uptake ratio in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ide, Kojiro; Cai, Yan

    2002-01-01

    to 3.7 +/- 0.2 in the first minutes of the recovery (P exercise did not change the uptake ratio significantly. Yet, in a second experiment, when submaximal exercise required a maximal effort due to partial neuromuscular blockade, the ratio decreased and remained low (4.9 +/- 0.2......During and after maximal exercise there is a 15-30 % decrease in the metabolic uptake ratio (O(2)/[glucose + 1/2 lactate]) and a net lactate uptake by the human brain. This study evaluated if this cerebral metabolic uptake ratio is influenced by the intent to exercise, and whether a change could......) in the early recovery (n = 10; P 2) when the brain is activated by exhaustive exercise, and that such metabolic changes are influenced by the will to exercise. We speculate that the uptake ratio...

  5. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position......, but mainly through the vertebral plexus in the upright position. A Valsalva manoeuvre while standing completely re-opened the jugular veins. Results of ultrasound imaging of the right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area at the level of the laryngeal prominence in six healthy subjects, before...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  6. Trace elements during primordial plexiform network formation in human cerebral organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C. Sartore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic studies of micronutrients during brain formation are hindered by restrictions to animal models and adult post-mortem tissues. Recently, advances in stem cell biology have enabled recapitulation of the early stages of human telencephalon development in vitro. In the present work, we analyzed cerebral organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence in order to measure biologically valuable micronutrients incorporated and distributed into the exogenously developing brain. Our findings indicate that elemental inclusion in organoids is consistent with human brain tissue and involves P, S, K, Ca, Fe and Zn. Occurrence of different concentration gradients also suggests active regulation of elemental transmembrane transport. Finally, the analysis of pairs of elements shows interesting elemental interaction patterns that change from 30 to 45 days of development, suggesting short- or long-term associations, such as storage in similar compartments or relevance for time-dependent biological processes. These findings shed light on which trace elements are important during human brain development and will support studies aimed to unravel the consequences of disrupted metal homeostasis for neurodevelopmental diseases, including those manifested in adulthood.

  7. Crossbow suicide: mechanisms of injury and neuropathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, R W; Koszyca, B; James, R

    1999-12-01

    Crossbow injuries are rarely reported events in modern times. Two cases of death due to self-inflicted crossbow injuries to the head are reported in 2 men aged 18 and 27 years, respectively. Despite relatively low velocity and concussive force, the sharpness and propulsion force of crossbow bolts may be sufficient to enable penetration of the skull at short range. Due to the relatively low concussive force of the crossbow bolt, however, death may not be instantaneous but may occur from intraparenchymal cerebral damage sometime thereafter. Detailed neuropathologic evaluation of such cases may therefore demonstrate "red cell" hypoxic injury, as well as axonal injury, not limited to the region of the missile tract, but widely distributed, even to the point of extensive brain stem involvement. These changes may result from primary mechanical deformation at the time of injury, from secondary hypoxic damage, or from a combination of both factors. Immunohistochemical staining of brains for amyloid precursor protein to delineate more clearly the pattern of axonal damage may assist in determining the extent of injury in such cases.

  8. Stem/progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex of the human preterm: a resource for an endogenous regenerative neuronal medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vinci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of the central nervous system represents a very delicate period of embryogenesis. Premature interruption of neurogenesis in human preterm newborns can lead to motor deficits, including cerebral palsy, and significant cognitive, behavioral or sensory deficits in childhood. Preterm infants also have a higher risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In the last decade, great importance has been given to stem/progenitor cells and their possible role in the development and treatment of several neurological disorders. Several studies, mainly carried out on experimental models, evidenced that immunohistochemistry may allow the identification of different neural and glial precursors inside the developing cerebral cortex. However, only a few studies have been performed on markers of human stem cells in the embryonic period.This review aims at illustrating the importance of stem/progenitor cells in cerebral cortex during pre- and post-natal life. Defining the immunohistochemical markers of stem/progenitor cells in the human cerebral cortex during development may be important to develop an “endogenous” target therapy in the perinatal period. Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  9. Specific metabolomics adaptations define a differential regional vulnerability in the adult human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Cabré

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain neurons offer diverse responses to stresses and detrimental factors during development and aging, and as a result of both neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. This multiplicity of responses can be ascribed to the great diversity among neuronal populations. Here we have determined the metabolomic profile of three healthy adult human brain regions—entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex—using mass spectrometry-based technologies. Our results show the existence of a lessened energy demand, mitochondrial stress, and lower one-carbon metabolism (particularly restricted to the methionine cycle specifically in frontal cortex. These findings, along with the better antioxidant capacity and lower mTOR signaling also seen in frontal cortex, suggest that this brain region is especially resistant to stress compared to the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, which are more vulnerable regions. Globally, our results show the presence of specific metabolomics adaptations in three mature, healthy human brain regions, confirming the existence of cross-regional differences in cell vulnerability in the human cerebral cortex.

  10. Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in the Human Brain Stem, Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available The human brain is one of the most mysterious tissues in the body. Our knowledge of the human brain is limited due to the complexity of its structure and the microscopic nature of connections between brain regions and other tissues in the body. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of three brain regions-the brain stem, cerebellum and cerebral cortex-to identify genes that are differentially expressed among these different brain regions in humans and to obtain a list of robust, region-specific, differentially expressed genes by comparing the expression signatures from different individuals. Feature selection methods, specifically minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were employed to analyze the gene expression profiles. Sequential minimal optimization, a machine-learning algorithm, was employed to examine the utility of selected genes. We also performed a literature search, and we discuss the experimental evidence for the important physiological functions of several highly ranked genes, including NR2E1, DAO, and LRRC7, and we give our analyses on a gene (TFAP2B that have not been investigated or experimentally validated. As a whole, the results of our study will improve our ability to predict and understand genes related to brain regionalization and function.

  11. Upregulation of transmembrane endothelial junction proteins in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Schmidt, Dörthe; Schoenauer, Roman; Brokopp, Chad; Agarkova, Irina; Bozinov, Oliver; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2010-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are among the most prevalent cerebrovascular malformations, and endothelial cells seem to play a major role in the disease. However, the underlying mechanisms, including endothelial intercellular communication, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this article, the authors focus on the endothelial junction proteins CD31, VE-cadherin, and occludin as important factors for functional cell-cell contacts known as vascular adhesion molecules and adherence and tight junctions. Thirteen human CCM specimens and 6 control tissue specimens were cryopreserved and examined for the presence of VE-cadherin, occludin, and CD31 by immunofluorescence staining. Protein quantification was performed by triplicate measurements using western blot analysis. Immunofluorescent analyses of the CCM sections revealed a discontinuous pattern of dilated microvessels and capillaries as well as increased expression of occludin, VE-cadherin, and CD31 in the intima and in the enclosed parenchymal tissue compared with controls. Protein quantification confirmed these findings by showing upregulation of the levels of these proteins up to 2-6 times. A protocol enabling the molecular and morphological examination of the intercellular contact proteins in human CCM was validated. The abnormal and discontinuous pattern in these endothelial cell-contact proteins compared with control tissue explains the loose intercellular junctions that are considered to be one of the causes of CCM-associated bleeding or transendothelial oozing of erythrocytes. Despite the small number of specimens, this study demonstrates for the first time a quantitative analysis of endothelial junction proteins in human CCM.

  12. GBA mutations in Parkinson disease: earlier death but similar neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C H; Beach, T G; Shill, H A; Caviness, J N; Driver-Dunckley, E; Sabbagh, M N; Patel, A; Sue, L I; Serrano, G; Jacobson, S A; Davis, K; Belden, C M; Dugger, B N; Paciga, S A; Winslow, A R; Hirst, W D; Hentz, J G

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are known to be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Data on clinicopathological correlation are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinicopathological findings that might distinguish PD cases with and without mutations in the GBA gene. Data from the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders were used to identify autopsied PD cases that did or did not have a GBA gene mutation. Clinical and neuropathological data were compared. Twelve PD cases had a GBA mutation and 102 did not. The GBA mutation cases died younger (76 vs. 81 years of age) but there was no difference in disease duration or clinical examination findings. No neuropathological differences were found in total or regional semi-quantitative scores for Lewy-type synucleinopathy, senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, white matter rarefaction or cerebral amyloid angiopathy scores. In longitudinally assessed, autopsied PD cases, those with GBA mutations had a younger age at death but there was no evidence for clinical or neuropathological differences compared to cases without GBA mutations. Due to the small GBA group size, small differences cannot be excluded. © 2017 EAN.

  13. The cerebral metabolic ratio is not affected by oxygen availability during maximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volianitis, S.; Fabricius-Bjerre, A.; Overgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of O(2) to carbohydrates (glucose + (1/2) lactate) and the cerebral lactate uptake depends on its arterial concentration, but whether these variables are influenced by O(2) availability is not known. In six males, maximal ergometer rowing.......05) in the immediate recovery. During exercise, the cerebral metabolic ratio decreased from 5.67 +/- 0.52 at rest to 1.70 +/- 0.23 (P exercise with room air, and it reached 87.6 +/- 1.0% and 98.9 +/- 0.......2% during exercise with an inspired O(2) fraction of 0.17 and 0.30, respectively. Whilst the increase in a-v lactate difference was attenuated by manipulation of cerebral O(2) availability, the cerebral metabolic ratio was not affected significantly. During maximal rowing, the cerebral metabolic ratio...

  14. The Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory adaptive response to noradrenaline is attenuated during systemic inflammation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-07-01

    Vasopressor support is used widely for maintaining vital organ perfusion pressure in septic shock, with implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). This study investigated whether a noradrenaline-induced steady state increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) would enhance dCA following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion, a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis. The dCA in eight healthy males was examined prior to and during an intended noradrenaline-induced MAP increase of approximately 30 mmHg. This was performed at baseline and repeated after a 4-h intravenous LPS infusion. The assessments of dCA were based on transfer function analysis of spontaneous oscillations between MAP and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the low frequency range (0.07-0.20 Hz). Prior to LPS, noradrenaline administration was associated with a decrease in gain (1.18 (1.12-1.35) vs 0.93 (0.87-0.97) cm/mmHg per s; P noradrenaline administration changed neither gain (0.91 (0.85-1.01) vs 0.87 (0.81-0.97) cm/mmHg per s; P = 0.46) nor phase (1.10 (1.04-1.30) vs 1.37 (1.23-1.51) radians; P = 0.64). The improvement of dCA to a steady state increase in MAP is attenuated during an LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response. This may suggest that vasopressor treatment with noradrenaline offers no additional neuroprotective effect by enhancing dCA in patients with early sepsis. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Shahram; Stauffer, Jennifer E.; Schulte, Derek J.; Ravits, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a clinical syndrome named for its neuropathological hallmark: degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal anterior horn and motor cortex and loss of axons in the lateral columns of the spinal cord. The signature neuropathological molecular signature common to almost all sporadic ALS and most familial ALS is TDP-43 immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. The neuropathological and molecular neuropathological features of ALS variants primarly lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy are less certain, but also appear to share the primary features of ALS. A number of genetic causes including mutations in SOD1, FUS, and C9orf72 comprise a disease spectrum and all demonstrate distinctive molecular and neuropathological signatures. Neuropathology will continue to play to a key role in solving the puzzle of ALS pathogenesis. PMID:26515626

  16. Cerebral oxygenation decreases during exercise in humans with beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Beta-blockers reduce exercise capacity by attenuated increase in cardiac output, but it remains unknown whether performance also relates to attenuated cerebral oxygenation. METHODS: Acting as their own controls, eight healthy subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle test to exhaustion...... with or without administration of the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol. Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity were measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound and those in cerebral oxygenation were evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and the calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  17. Relationship between Cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans and cerebral microbleeds in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatani, F; Kuriyama, N; Watanabe, I; Nomura, R; Nakano, K; Matsui, D; Ozaki, E; Koyama, T; Nishigaki, M; Yamamoto, T; Mizuno, T; Tamura, A; Akazawa, K; Takada, A; Takeda, K; Yamada, K; Nakagawa, M; Ihara, M; Kanamura, N; Friedland, R P; Watanabe, Y

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage has been shown to occur in animals experimentally infected with Streptococcus mutans carrying the collagen-binding Cnm gene. However, the relationship between cerebral microbleeds and oral hygiene, with a focus on Cnm gene-positive S. mutans infection, remains unclear. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects participated. The presence or absence of Cnm-positive S. mutans and its collagen-binding activity were investigated using saliva samples, and relationship with cerebral microbleeds detected on MRI investigated, including clinical information and oral parameters. Fifty-one subjects were identified as Cnm-positive S. mutans carriers (36.7%), with cerebral microbleeds being detected in 43 (30.9%). A significantly larger number of subjects carried Cnm-positive S. mutans in the cerebral microbleeds (+) group. S. mutans with Cnm collagen-binding ability was detected in 39 (28.1%) of all subjects, and the adjusted odds ratio for cerebral microbleeds in the Cnm-positive group was 14.4. Regarding the presence of cerebral microbleeds, no significant differences were noted in the number of remaining teeth, dental caries, or in classic arteriosclerosis risk factors. The occurrence of cerebral microbleeds was higher in subjects carrying Cnm-positive S. mutans, indicating that the presence of Cnm-positive S. mutans increases cerebral microbleeds, and is an independent risk for the development of cerebrovascular disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Investigation of spatial correlation in MR images of human cerebral white matter using geostatistical methods

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    Keil, Fabian

    2014-03-20

    Investigating the structure of human cerebral white matter is gaining interest in the neurological as well as in the neuroscientific community. It has been demonstrated in many studies that white matter is a very dynamic structure, rather than a static construct which does not change for a lifetime. That means, structural changes within white matter can be observed even on short timescales, e.g. in the course of normal ageing, neurodegenerative diseases or even during learning processes. To investigate these changes, one method of choice is the texture analysis of images obtained from white matter. In this regard, MRI plays a distinguished role as it provides a completely non-invasive way of acquiring in vivo images of human white matter. This thesis adapted a statistical texture analysis method, known as variography, to quantify the spatial correlation of human cerebral white matter based on MR images. This method, originally introduced in geoscience, relies on the idea of spatial correlation in geological phenomena: in naturally grown structures near things are correlated stronger to each other than distant things. This work reveals that the geological principle of spatial correlation can be applied to MR images of human cerebral white matter and proves that variography is an adequate method to quantify alterations therein. Since the process of MRI data acquisition is completely different to the measuring process used to quantify geological phenomena, the variographic analysis had to be adapted carefully to MR methods in order to provide a correctly working methodology. Therefore, theoretical considerations were evaluated with numerical samples in a first, and validated with real measurements in a second step. It was shown that MR variography facilitates to reduce the information stored in the texture of a white matter image to a few highly significant parameters, thereby quantifying heterogeneity and spatial correlation distance with an accuracy better than 5

  19. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differe......During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio......-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P

  20. Aging is associated with increased collagen type IV accumulation in the basal lamina of human cerebral microvessels

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    Danek Adrian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvascular alterations contribute to the development of stroke and vascular dementia. The goal of this study was to evaluate age and hypertension related changes of the basal lamina in cerebral microvessels of individuals, who died from non-cerebral causes. Results We examined 27 human brains: 11 young and 16 old patients. Old patients were divided into two subgroups, those with hypertension (n = 8 and those without hypertension (n = 8. Basal lamina changes of the cerebral microvessels were determined in the putamen using antibodies against collagen type IV and by quantitative analysis of vessel number, total stained area of collagen, thickness of the vessel wall and lumen, and relative staining intensity using immunofluorescence. The total number of collagen positive vessels per microscopic field was reduced in old compared to young subjects (12.0+/-0.6 vs. 15.1+/-1.2, p = 0.02. The relative collagen content per vessel (1.01+/-0.06 vs. 0.76+/-0.05, p = 0.01 and the relative collagen intensity (233.1+/-4.5 vs. 167.8+/-10.6, p Conclusions The present data show age-related changes of the cerebral microvessels in sections of human putamen for the first time. Due to the accumulation of collagen, microvessels thicken and show a reduction in their lumen. Besides this, the number of vessels decreases. These findings might represent a precondition for the development of vascular cognitive impairment. However, hypertension was not proven to modulate these changes.

  1. Aging is associated with increased collagen type IV accumulation in the basal lamina of human cerebral microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskaia, Olga; Liebetrau, Martin; Herms, Jochen; Danek, Adrian; Hamann, Gerhard F

    2004-09-24

    Microvascular alterations contribute to the development of stroke and vascular dementia. The goal of this study was to evaluate age and hypertension related changes of the basal lamina in cerebral microvessels of individuals, who died from non-cerebral causes. We examined 27 human brains: 11 young and 16 old patients. Old patients were divided into two subgroups, those with hypertension (n = 8) and those without hypertension (n = 8). Basal lamina changes of the cerebral microvessels were determined in the putamen using antibodies against collagen type IV and by quantitative analysis of vessel number, total stained area of collagen, thickness of the vessel wall and lumen, and relative staining intensity using immunofluorescence. The total number of collagen positive vessels per microscopic field was reduced in old compared to young subjects (12.0+/-0.6 vs. 15.1+/-1.2, p = 0.02). The relative collagen content per vessel (1.01+/-0.06 vs. 0.76+/-0.05, p = 0.01) and the relative collagen intensity (233.1+/-4.5 vs. 167.8+/-10.6, p hypertensive and non-hypertensive patients. The present data show age-related changes of the cerebral microvessels in sections of human putamen for the first time. Due to the accumulation of collagen, microvessels thicken and show a reduction in their lumen. Besides this, the number of vessels decreases. These findings might represent a precondition for the development of vascular cognitive impairment. However, hypertension was not proven to modulate these changes.

  2. Cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex

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    Marcello eMelone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution, cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2, the main glutamate transporter, in normal human neocortex. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was in all layers and consisted of small neuropilar puncta and rare cells. In white matter EAAT2a+ cells were numerous. Electron microscopic studies showed that in gray matter ∼77% of immunoreactive elements were astrocytic processes, ∼14% axon terminals, ∼2.8% dendrites, whereas ∼5% were unidentifiable. In white matter, ∼81% were astrocytic processes, ∼17% were myelinated axons and ∼2.0% were unidentified. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was never in microglial cells and oligodendrocytes. Pre-embedding electron microscopy showed that ∼67% of EAAT2a expressed at (or in the vicinity of asymmetric synapses was in astrocytes, ∼17% in axon terminals, while ∼13% was both in astrocytes and in axons. Post-embeddeding electron microscopy studies showed that in astrocytic processes contacting asymmetric synapses and in axon terminals, gold particle density was ∼25.1 and ∼2.8 particles/µm2, respectively, and was concentrated in a membrane region extending for ∼300 nm from the active zone edge. Besides representing the first detailed description of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex, these findings may contribute to understanding its role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  3. Sleep deprivation increases cerebral serotonin 2A receptor binding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, David; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin and its cerebral receptors play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of 24-h total sleep deprivation on the apparent serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) binding capacity in the human brain to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation induces global molecular alterations in the cortical serotonergic receptor system. Volunteers were tested twice with the subtype-selective radiotracer [(18)F]altanserin and positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging of 5-HT(2A)Rs at baseline and after 24 h of sleep deprivation. [(18)F]Altanserin binding potentials were analyzed in 13 neocortical regions of interest. The efficacy of sleep deprivation was assessed by questionnaires, waking electroencephalography, and cognitive performance measurements. Sleep laboratory and neuroimaging center. Eighteen healthy volunteers. Sleep deprivation. A total of 24 hours of sleep deprivation led to a 9.6% increase of [(18)F]altanserin binding on neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptors. Significant region-specific increases were found in the medial inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and anterior cingulate, parietal, sensomotoric, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. This study demonstrates that a single night of total sleep deprivation causes significant increases of 5-HT(2A)R binding potentials in a variety of cortical regions although the increase declines as sleep deprivation continued. It provides in vivo evidence that total sleep deprivation induces adaptive processes in the serotonergic system of the human brain.

  4. Vascular Contributions in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Neuropathological Changes: First Autopsy Evidence from a South Asian Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Yasha, T C; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-10-18

    Evidence from various consortia on vascular contributions has been inconsistent in determining the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular pathologies associated in manifestation of AD-related neuropathological changes of an elderly population. Postmortem brain samples from 76 elderly subjects (≥50 years) were used to study genetic polymorphisms, intracranial atherosclerosis of the circle of Willis (IASCW), and microscopic infarcts in deep white matters. From this cohort, 50 brains (≥60 years) were subjected to neuropathological diagnosis using immunohistopathological techniques. Besides the association with age, the apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele was significantly and strongly associated with Thal amyloid-β phases ≥1 [odds ratio (OR) = 6.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-33.45] and inversely with Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) stages ≥III (0.02, 0.0-0.47). Illiterates showed a significant positive association for Braak NFT stages ≥IV (14.62, 1.21-176.73) and a significant negative association for microscopic infarcts (0.15, 0.03-0.71) in deep white matters. With respect to cerebrovascular pathologies, cerebral small vessel lesions (white matter hyperintensities and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) showed a higher degree of associations among them and with AD-related neuropathological changes (p pathology (IASCW), which showed a significant association only with Braak NFT stages ≥I (p = 0.050). These findings suggest that besides age, education, and genetic factors, other vascular risk factors were not associated with AD-related neuropathological changes and urge prompt actions be taken against cerebral small vessel diseases since evidence for effective prevention is still lacking.

  5. A neuropathological study of early onset Cockayne syndrome with chromosomal anomaly 47XXX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M; Hayakawa, K; Suzuki, F; Sugita, K; Satoh, J; Morimatsu, Y

    1992-01-01

    We present the clinical and neuropathological findings in a female patient with early onset Cockayne syndrome and a chromosomal anomaly (47XXX). The girl was the only child of healthy, unrelated parents. She was born with a birth weight of 1,930 gm. She had progeroid facial features with bilateral cataracts. A diagnosis of 47XXX was made on the basis of a chromosomal study. Physical shortness became increasingly prominent while her weight remained stationary. Psychomotor retardation was noted, and she could never sit alone. A brain CT scan showed cerebral atrophy and calcification of the basal ganglia. Cultured skin fibroblast exhibited significant sensitivity to the ultraviolet light. She died from a chest infection at the age of 7 years and 4 months. Microscopically, the renal glomeruli showed diffuse sclerotic changes with thick capillary basement membranes. A neuropathological examination revealed a very small brain (295 gm), extensive myelin deficiency, gliosis in the white matter, and calcifications in the basal ganglia, and cerebral and cerebellar cortices. The loss of both Purkinje and granular cells was noticed in the cerebellar cortex. This is the first report of a case with the Cockayne syndrome and 47XXX, and the 47XXX in this patient seems to be coincidental.

  6. Correlating interleukin-10 promoter gene polymorphisms with human cerebral infarction onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-hong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10 deficiency exacerbates inflammation and worsens the outcome of brain ischemia. In view of the critical role of the single nucleotide polymorphic sites -1082 (A/G and -819 (C/T in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene, we hypothesized that they are associated with cerebral infarction morbidity in the Chinese Han population. We genotyped these allelic gene polymorphisms by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction methods in 181 patients with cerebral infarction (cerebral infarction group and 115 healthy subjects (control group. We identified significant differences in genotype distribution and allele frequency of the IL-10-1082 A/G allele between cerebral infarction and control groups (χ2 = 6.643, P = 0.010. The IL-10-1082 A allele frequency was significantly higher in the cerebral infarction group (92.3% than in the control group (86.1% (P = 0.015. Moreover, cerebral infarction risk of the AA genotype was 2-fold higher than with the AG genotype (OR = 2.031, 95%CI: 1.134-3.637. In addition, AA genotype together with hypertension was the independent risk factor of cerebral infarction (OR = 2.073, 95%CI: 1.278-3.364. No statistical difference in genotype distribution or allele frequency of IL-10-819 C/T was found between cerebral infarction and control groups (P > 0.05. These findings suggest that the IL-10-1082 A/G gene polymorphism is involved in cerebral infarction, and increased A allele frequency is closely associated with occurrence of cerebral infarction.

  7. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  8. The influence of hyperoxia on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFVMCA) in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbitsch, Christian; Lorenz, Ingo H; Hörmann, Christoph; Hinteregger, Martin; Löckinger, Alexander; Moser, Patrizia L; Kremser, Christian; Schocke, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Benzer, Arnulf

    2002-09-01

    Conflicting results reported on the effects of hyperoxia on cerebral hemodynamics have been attributed mainly to methodical and species differences. In the present study contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion measurement was used to analyze the influence of hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 1.0) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in awake, normoventilating volunteers (n = 19). Furthermore, the experiment was repeated in 20 volunteers for transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFV(MCA)). When compared to normoxia (FiO2 = 0.21), hyperoxia heterogeneously influenced rCBV (4.95 +/- 0.02 to 12.87 +/- 0.08 mL/100g (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 4.50 +/- 0.02 to 13.09 +/- 0.09 mL/100g (FiO2 = 1.0). In contrast, hyperoxia diminished rCBF in all regions (68.08 +/- 0.38 to 199.58 +/- 1.58 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 58.63 +/- 0.32 to 175.16 +/- 1.51 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 1.0)) except in parietal and left frontal gray matter. CBFV(MCA) remained unchanged regardless of the inspired oxygen fraction (62 +/- 9 cm/s (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 64 +/- 8 cm/s (FiO2 = 1.0)). Finding CBFV(MCA) unchanged during hyperoxia is consistent with the present study's unchanged rCBF in parietal and left frontal gray matter. In these fronto-parietal regions predominantly fed by the middle cerebral artery, the vasoconstrictor effect of oxygen was probably counteracted by increased perfusion of foci of neuronal activity controlling general behavior and arousal.

  9. Human Cerebral Cortex Cajal-Retzius Neuron: Development, Structure and Function. A Golgi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eMarín-Padilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development, morphology and possible functional activity of the Cajal-Retzius cell of the developing human cerebral cortex have been explored herein. The C-RC, of extracortical origin, is the essential neuron of the neocortex first lamina. It receives inputs from subcortical afferent fibers that reach the first lamina early in development. Although the origin and function of these original afferent fibers remain unknown, they target the first lamina sole neuron: the C-RC. The neuron’ orchestrates the arrival, size and stratification of all pyramidal neurons (from ependymal origin of the neocortex gray matter. Its axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the entire first lamina establishing contacts with the dendritic terminals of all gray matter pyramidal cells regardless of size, location and/or eventual functional roles. While the neuron axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the first lamina, the neuron’ bodies undergoes progressive developmental dilution and locating any of them in the adult brain become quite difficult. The neuron bodies are probably retained in the older regions of the developing neocortex while their axonic collaterals will spread throughout its more recent ones that, eventually, will represent the great majority of the brain surface. This will explain their bodies progressive dilution in the developing neocortex and, later, in the adult brain. Although quite difficult to locate the body of any of them, they have been described in the adult brain.

  10. Human Development XI: The Structure of the Cerebral Cortex. Are There Really Modules in the Brain?

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    Tyge Dahl Hermansen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of human consciousness is thought to be closely connected to the structure of cerebral cortex. One of the most appreciated concepts in this regard is the Szanthagothei model of a modular building of neo-cortex. The modules are believed to organize brain activity pretty much like a computer. We looked at examples in the literature and argue that there is no significant evidence that supports Szanthagothei's model. We discuss the use of the limited genetic information, the corticocortical afferents termination and the columns in primary sensory cortex as arguments for the existence of the cortex-module. Further, we discuss the results of experiments with Luminization Microscopy (LM colouration of myalinized fibres, in which vertical bundles of afferent/efferent fibres that could support the cortex module are identified. We conclude that sensory maps seem not to be an expression for simple specific connectivity, but rather to be functional defined. We also conclude that evidence for the existence of the postulated module or column does not exist in the discussed material. This opens up for an important discussion of the brain as functionally directed by biological information (information-directed self-organisation, and for consciousness being closely linked to the structure of the universe at large. Consciousness is thus not a local phenomena limited to the brain, but a much more global phenomena connected to the wholeness of the world.

  11. Impact of hyperglycemia on neuropathological alterations during critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; den Hertog, Heleen M; Güiza, Fabian; Gunst, Jan; Derese, Inge; Wouters, Pieter J; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Polito, Andrea; Gray, Françoise; Chrétien, Fabrice; Charlier, Philippe; Annane, Djillali; Sharshar, Tarek; Van den Berghe, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    Although preventing excessive hyperglycemia during critical illness may provide clinical neuroprotection, it remains debated whether normoglycemia is without risk for the brain. To address this question, we compared the neuropathological alterations in microglia, astrocytes, and neurons, with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, moderately controlled hyperglycemia, and normoglycemia during human critical illness. We further investigated the time course in an animal model. We analyzed brain specimens from patients who died in the intensive care unit and from critically ill rabbits randomized to hyper- or normoglycemia. PATIENTS/OTHER PARTICIPANTS: We compared 10 critically ill patients randomized to normoglycemia (104 ±9 mg/dl) or moderate hyperglycemia (173 ±32 mg/dl), and five patients with uncontrolled hyperglycemia (254 ±83 mg/dl) with 16 controls (out of hospital sudden deaths). Critically ill rabbits were randomized to hyperglycemia (315 ±32 mg/dl) or normoglycemia (85 ±13 mg/dl) and studied after 3 and 7 d. Insulin was infused to control blood glucose. Patients with uncontrolled hyperglycemia showed 3.7-6-fold increased microglial activation, 54-95% reduced number and activation of astrocytes, more than 9-fold increased neuronal and glial apoptosis, and a 1.5-2-fold increase in damaged neurons in hippocampus and frontal cortex (all P ≤ 0.05). Most of these abnormalities were attenuated with moderate hyperglycemia and virtually absent with normoglycemia. Frontal cortex of hyperglycemic rabbits that had been critically ill for 3 d only revealed microglial activation, followed after 7 d by astrocyte and neuronal abnormalities similar to those observed in patients, all prevented by normoglycemia. Preventing hyperglycemia with insulin during critical illness reduced neuropathological abnormalities, with microglial activation being the earliest preventable event. Whether these pathological findings associate with neurological outcome remains unknown.

  12. Diurnal variation in baseline human regional cerebral blood flow demonstrated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, D.J.; Mintun, M.A.; Moore, R.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have previously described the diurnal variation in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response to bright light in human subjects as demonstrated by the positron emission tomography (PET) activation method. In this abstract, we report the differences in rCBF (an indicator of differences in regional neuronal activity) between the evening and midday dim light baseline scans which served as the control states in the above bright light activation study. Five right-handed, healthy volunteers underwent both an evening (8pm) and a midday (12N) O-15 water PET scanning session. Each scanning session was preceded by one hour of dim light adaptation (50 lux) and consisted of six rCBF scans at three different light intensities in an AABBCC sequence (A=50 lux, B=2500 lux, C=7000lux). Significant differences in rCBF between the evening and midday 50 lux states were identified using the statistical parametric mapping method developed by Friston et al (p<.001). The evening scans demonstrated areas of greater relative blood flow in the pineal gland, the lateral temporal cortex bilaterally, the right lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior aspect of the anterior cingulate, and the left thalamus. The midday scans showed areas of greater relative blood flow in the visual cortex, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. the inferior aspect of the anterior cingulate, the left parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Our results demonstrate an extensive diurnal variation in baseline human rCBF. This indicates that time of day may be an important variable in conducting and interpreting functional brain imaging studies. Furthermore, these results suggest possible neuroanatomical substrates through which the circadian system may regulate the various physiologic and behavioral processes that manifest circadian rhythms.

  13. Neuropathology in mice expressing mouse alpha-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Rieker

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (αSN in human is tightly linked both neuropathologically and genetically to Parkinson's disease (PD and related disorders. Disease-causing properties in vivo of the wildtype mouse ortholog (mαSN, which carries a threonine at position 53 like the A53T human mutant version that is genetically linked to PD, were never reported. To this end we generated mouse lines that express mαSN in central neurons at levels reaching up to six-fold compared to endogenous mαSN. Unlike transgenic mice expressing human wildtype or mutant forms of αSN, these mαSN transgenic mice showed pronounced ubiquitin immunopathology in spinal cord and brainstem. Isoelectric separation of mαSN species revealed multiple isoforms including two Ser129-phosphorylated species in the most severely affected brain regions. Neuronal Ser129-phosphorylated αSN occurred in granular and small fibrillar aggregates and pathological staining patterns in neurites occasionally revealed a striking ladder of small alternating segments staining either for Ser129-phosphorylated αSN or ubiquitin but not both. Axonal degeneration in long white matter tracts of the spinal cord, with breakdown of myelin sheaths and degeneration of neuromuscular junctions with loss of integrity of the presynaptic neurofilament network in mαSN transgenic mice, was similar to what we have reported for mice expressing human αSN wildtype or mutant forms. In hippocampal neurons, the mαSN protein accumulated and was phosphorylated but these neurons showed no ubiquitin immunopathology. In contrast to the early-onset motor abnormalities and muscle weakness observed in mice expressing human αSN, mαSN transgenic mice displayed only end-stage phenotypic alterations that manifested alongside with neuropathology. Altogether these findings show that increased levels of wildtype mαSN does not induce early-onset behavior changes, but drives end-stage pathophysiological changes in murine neurons that are

  14. Orthostatic tolerance, cerebral oxygenation, and blood velocity in humans with sympathetic failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M. P.; Colier, W. N.; Wieling, W.; Lenders, J. W.; Secher, N. H.; van Lieshout, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with orthostatic hypotension due to sympathetic failure become symptomatic when standing, although their capability to maintain cerebral blood flow is reported to be preserved. We tested the hypothesis that in patients with sympathetic failure, orthostatic symptoms

  15. Distinct cerebral pathways for object identity and number in human infants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izard, Véronique; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2008-01-01

    .... Behavioural evidence suggests that numerical competence may be present early on in infancy. Here, we present brain-imaging evidence for distinct cerebral coding of number and object identity in 3-mo-old infants...

  16. The influence of transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) on human cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.; Fidler, Vaclav; Staal, Michiel J.

    It has been shown that transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) reduces sympathetic tone. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has proven qualities to improve coronary, peripheral, and cerebral blood circulation. Therefore, we postulate that TENS and SCS affect the autonomic nervous system in

  17. Ventilatory response in metabolic acidosis and cerebral blood volume in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, M.T.P. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Sluijs, M.C. van der; Oeseburg, B.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between alterations in cerebral blood volume (CBV) and central chemosensitivity regulation was studied under neutral metabolic conditions and during metabolic acidosis. Fifteen healthy subjects (5610 years) were investigated. To induce metabolic acidosis, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl)

  18. [One hundred years of German neuropathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, J

    1997-05-01

    The history of the German Neuropathology since the beginning of the 20th Century with its roots in psychiatry, neurology, and pathology and with its interconnections in these specialties til today is demonstrated. The changes in methods and in main scientific topics are mentioned just as the shadows fallen after a flower time in the first three decenniums in the international reputation by the expulsion into the emigration and the political persecution of so many colleagues, furthermore by the involvement in the so-called euthanasia. The institutional development since 1945 lead to the foundation of an own scientific society, own congresses, and a regulated training as the basis to win again international acceptance. Risks will be seen in the overspecialization as well as in the uncritical adaptation of molecular genetic methods.

  19. Typical and atypical appearance of early-onset Alzheimer's disease: A clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Kobayashi, Ryota; Hayashi, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The International Working Group (IWG) has classified Alzheimer's disease (AD) as two different types, the typical form and the atypical form, but clinicopathological studies of atypical AD are limited. Because atypical AD cases usually present with early-onset dementia, we investigated 12 patients with early-onset AD, including two patients with typical AD and 10 patients with atypical AD. Of these patients, six had the posterior variant, three had the frontal variant and one had the logopenic variant mixed with semantic dementia. We reported MRI, single-photon emission CT and neuropathological findings in six representative cases. We also described a "left temporal variant" of AD presenting with transcortical cortical sensory aphasia, which has not been reported previously and is another subtype of the posterior variant of AD. We found a significant correlation between regional cerebral blood flow and counts of NFTs in the cerebral cortices. An atypical presentation with focal neuropsychological symptoms roughly correlated with the density of NFTs in the cerebral cortex and more directly related to spongiform changes in the superficial layers of these areas. In contrast, the distribution of amyloid depositions was diffuse and did not necessarily correlate with focal neuropsychological symptoms. Braak staging or ABC score is not necessarily appropriate to evaluate atypical AD, and instead, spongiform changes in addition to tau pathology in the association cortices better explain the diversity of atypical AD. Interestingly, another patient with a posterior variant of AD had a novel type of atypical plaque, which we referred to as "lucent plaque". They were recognizable with HE staining in the circumference and dystrophic neurites were abundant with Gallyas-Braak staining. These plaques demonstrated intense immunoreactivity to both tau AT-8 and amyloid β (Aβ), suggesting a peculiar coexistence pattern of amyloid and tau in these plaques. Clinicopathological studies

  20. Non-Linear Characterisation of Cerebral Pressure-Flow Dynamics in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqib Saleem

    Full Text Available Cerebral metabolism is critically dependent on the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF, so it would be expected that vascular mechanisms that play a critical role in CBF regulation would be tightly conserved across individuals. However, the relationships between blood pressure (BP and cerebral blood velocity fluctuations exhibit inter-individual variations consistent with heterogeneity in the integrity of CBF regulating systems. Here we sought to determine the nature and consistency of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA during the application of oscillatory lower body negative pressure (OLBNP. In 18 volunteers we recorded BP and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv and examined the relationships between BP and MCAv fluctuations during 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07Hz OLBNP. dCA was characterised using project pursuit regression (PPR and locally weighted scatterplot smoother (LOWESS plots. Additionally, we proposed a piecewise regression method to statistically determine the presence of a dCA curve, which was defined as the presence of a restricted autoregulatory plateau shouldered by pressure-passive regions. Results show that LOWESS has similar explanatory power to that of PPR. However, we observed heterogeneous patterns of dynamic BP-MCAv relations with few individuals demonstrating clear evidence of a dCA central plateau. Thus, although BP explains a significant proportion of variance, dCA does not manifest as any single characteristic BP-MCAv function.

  1. Impact of age on critical closing pressure of the cerebral circulation during dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Fadel, Paul J

    2011-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding cerebral vascular responses to dynamic exercise in older adults. We examined the influence of age on exercise-induced changes in the critical closing pressure (CCP) of the cerebral vasculature. Twelve young and twelve older subjects performed two bouts of steady-state cycling at low and moderate intensities (30 and 50% heart rate reserve). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCA V) and partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide ( ) were measured. The CCP was estimated by linear extrapolation of pairs of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and MCA V waveforms. Exercise-induced increases in MAP were greater in older subjects (P exercise were similar between groups (P = 0.59). The CCP was elevated from rest during low- and moderate-intensity exercise in both groups (moderate exercise: young, +13 ± 2 mmHg and older, +22 ± 2 mmHg; P exercise intensities (moderate exercise: young, +43 ± 9% rest versus older, +153 ± 45% rest; P = 0.04). In contrast, cerebral vascular conductance index (MCA V(mean)/MAP; CVCi) was only decreased during moderate exercise in older subjects (P age-group differences were observed in at rest or during two intensities of exercise (P = 0.40). These data demonstrate that older subjects exhibit larger exercise-induced increases in CCP and decreases in CVCi. Thus, ageing is associated with greater increases in cerebral vascular tone during low- and moderate-intensity dynamic exercise.

  2. Association of Seafood Consumption, Brain Mercury Level, and APOE ε4 Status With Brain Neuropathology in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Martha Clare; Brockman, John; Schneider, Julie A; Wang, Yamin; Bennett, David A; Tangney, Christy C; van de Rest, Ondine

    2016-02-02

    -linolenic acid (18:3 n-3) were correlated with lower odds of cerebral macroinfarctions (odds ratio for tertiles 3 vs 1, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.27 to 0.94]). Fish oil supplementation had no statistically significant correlation with any neuropathologic marker. Higher brain concentrations of mercury were not significantly correlated with increased levels of brain neuropathology. In cross-sectional analyses, moderate seafood consumption was correlated with lesser Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Although seafood consumption was also correlated with higher brain levels of mercury, these levels were not correlated with brain neuropathology.

  3. [Does Alzheimer's disease exist in all primates? Alzheimer pathology in non-human primates and its pathophysiological implications (II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, A; Álvarez, M I; López-Rodríguez, A B; Toledano-Díaz, A; Fernández-Verdecia, C I

    2014-01-01

    In the ageing process there are some species of non-human primates which can show some of the defining characteristics of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) of man, both in neuropathological changes and cognitive-behavioural symptoms. The study of these species is of prime importance to understand AD and develop therapies to combat this neurodegenerative disease. In this second part of the study, these AD features are discussed in the most important non-experimental AD models (Mouse Lemur -Microcebus murinus, Caribbean vervet -Chlorocebus aethiops, and the Rhesus and stump-tailed macaque -Macaca mulatta and M. arctoides) and experimental models (lesional, neurotoxic, pharmacological, immunological, etc.) non-human primates. In all these models cerebral amyloid neuropathology can occur in senility, although with different levels of incidence (100% in vervets;<30% in macaques). The differences between normal and pathological (Alzheimer's) senility in these species are difficult to establish due to the lack of cognitive-behavioural studies in the many groups analysed, as well as the controversy in the results of these studies when they were carried out. However, in some macaques, a correlation between a high degree of functional brain impairment and a large number of neuropathological changes ("possible AD") has been found. In some non-human primates, such as the macaque, the existence of a possible continuum between "normal" ageing process, "normal" ageing with no deep neuropathological and cognitive-behavioural changes, and "pathological ageing" (or "Alzheimer type ageing"), may be considered. In other cases, such as the Caribbean vervet, neuropathological changes are constant and quite marked, but its impact on cognition and behaviour does not seem to be very important. This does assume the possible existence in the human senile physiological regression of a stable phase without dementia even if neuropathological changes appeared. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de

  4. Cerebral blood flow response to flavanol-rich cocoa in healthy elderly humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh A Sorond

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Farzaneh A Sorond1,2, Lewis A Lipsitz2,4, Norman K Hollenberg3,5, Naomi DL Fisher31Department of Neurology, Stroke Division; 2Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA; 3Department of Medicine, Endocrine-Hypertension Division; 4Department of Medicine, Gerontology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MABackground and Purpose: Cerebral ischemia is a common, morbid condition accompanied by cognitive decline. Recent reports on the vascular health benefits of flavanol-containing foods signify a promising approach to the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Our study was designed to investigate the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa (FRC consumption on cerebral blood flow in older healthy volunteers.Methods: We used transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasound to measure mean blood flow velocity (MFV in the middle cerebral artery (MCA in thirty-four healthy elderly volunteers (72 ± 6 years in response to the regular intake of FRC or flavanol-poor cocoa (FPC.Results: In response to two weeks of FRC intake, MFV increased by 8% ± 4% at one week (p = 0.01 and 10% ± 4% (p = 0.04 at two weeks. In response to one week of cocoa, significantly more subjects in the FRC as compared with the FPC group had an increase in their MFV (p < 0.05.Conclusions: In summary, we show that dietary intake of FRC is associated with a significant increase in cerebral blood flow velocity in the MCA as measured by TCD. Our data suggest a promising role for regular cocoa flavanol’s consumption in the treatment of cerebrovascular ischemic syndromes, including dementias and stroke.Keywords: cerebral blood flow, flavanol, cocoa, transcranial Doppler ultrasound

  5. Cerebral circulation during mild +Gz hypergravity by short-arm human centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Yojiro; Aoki, Ken; Yanagida, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    We examined changes in cerebral circulation in 15 healthy men during exposure to mild +Gz hypergravity (1.5 Gz, head-to-foot) using a short-arm centrifuge. Continuous arterial pressure waveform (tonometry), cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasonography), and partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETco(2)) were measured in the sitting position (1 Gz) and during 21 min of exposure to mild hypergravity (1.5 Gz). Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was assessed by spectral and transfer function analysis between beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP) and mean CBF velocity (MCBFV). Steady-state MAP did not change, but MCBFV was significantly reduced with 1.5 Gz (-7%). ETco(2) was also reduced (-12%). Variability of MAP increased significantly with 1.5 Gz in low (53%)- and high-frequency ranges (88%), but variability of MCBFV did not change in these frequency ranges, resulting in significant decreases in transfer function gain between MAP and MCBFV (gain in low-frequency range, -17%; gain in high-frequency range, -13%). In contrast, all of these indexes in the very low-frequency range were unchanged. Transfer from arterial pressure oscillations to CBF fluctuations was thus suppressed in low- and high-frequency ranges. These results suggest that steady-state global CBF was reduced, but dynamic cerebral autoregulation in low- and high-frequency ranges was improved with stabilization of CBF fluctuations despite increases in arterial pressure oscillations during mild +Gz hypergravity. We speculate that this improvement in dynamic cerebral autoregulation within these frequency ranges may have been due to compensatory effects against the reduction in steady-state global CBF.

  6. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial–venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12–23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. PMID:24835170

  7. An in vitro patient-tailored model of human cerebral artery for simulating endovascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito; Fukuda, Toshio; Negoro, Makoto; Irie, Keiko; Takahashi, Ikuo

    2005-01-01

    An in vitro patient-tailored reproduction model of cerebral artery, a hardware platform for simulating endovascular intervention for making diagnoses and surgical trainings is presented. 3-D configuration of vessel lumen is reproduced as vessel model with 13 microm modeling resolution, using CT and MRI information. Physical characteristics of cerebral artery, such as elastic modulus and friction coefficient, are also reproduced. We also propose a novel method to visualize stress condition on vessel wall using photoelastic effect. Consequently, it should be helpful for clinical applications, academic researches and other various purposes.

  8. [Neuropathology of superficial hemosiderosis and neuroferritinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathology of superficial hemosiderosis. Gross finding shows diffuse brownish discoloration at the surface of the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Severe atrophy and necrosis is present in the cerebellum. Extensive deposits of hemosiderin that are well recognized with Berlin blue and ferritin immunohistochemistry are present at the surface and in the superficial parenchyma of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord. Although the pathomechanism of this disease remains unresolved, continuous or recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage may be important for developing diffuse hemosiderin deposition. Neuroferritinopathy. Intranuclear and intracytoplasmic bodies are seen in glia and subsets of neurons in the central nervous system as well as in extraneural tissue. They are stained by Perls' method for ferric iron. The bodies are immunopositive against antibodies raised against mutated and wild type of ferritin light polypeptide as well as ferritin heavy polypeptide. It is suggested that loss of normal function and gain of toxic function may be crucial for neurodegeneration of neuroferritinopathy. Both diseases could be helpful to understand and clarify the pathomechanism of neurodegeneration associated with iron metabolism.

  9. Neuropathologic substrates of Parkinson disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; White, Matthew T; Toledo, Jon B; Xie, Sharon X; Robinson, John L; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Leverenz, James B; Montine, Thomas J; Duda, John E; Hurtig, Howard I; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-10-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the neuropathological substrates of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in Parkinson disease (PD). One hundred forty patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD and either normal cognition or onset of dementia 2 or more years after motor symptoms (PDD) were studied. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies were excluded. Autopsy records of genetic data and semiquantitative scores for the burden of neurofibrillary tangles, senile plaques, Lewy bodies (LBs), and Lewy neurites (LNs) and other pathologies were used to develop a multivariate logistic regression model to determine the independent association of these variables with dementia. Correlates of comorbid Alzheimer disease (AD) were also examined. Niney-two PD patients developed dementia, and 48 remained cognitively normal. Severity of cortical LB (CLB)/LN pathology was positively associated with dementia (p dementia in PD. Additionally, APOE4 genotype may independently influence the risk of dementia in PD. AD pathology was abundant in a subset of patients, and may modify the clinical phenotype. Thus, therapies that target α-synuclein, tau, or amyloid β could potentially improve cognitive performance in PD. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  10. Aquaporins in Brain Edema and Neuropathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotelis S. Filippidis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aquaporin (AQP family of water channels are a group of small, membrane-spanning proteins that are vital for the rapid transport of water across the plasma membrane. These proteins are widely expressed, from tissues such as the renal epithelium and erythrocytes to the various cells of the central nervous system. This review will elucidate the basic structure and distribution of aquaporins and discuss the role of aquaporins in various neuropathologies. AQP1 and AQP4, the two primary aquaporin molecules of the central nervous system, regulate brain water and CSF movement and contribute to cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, where they control the size of the intracellular and extracellular fluid volumes, respectively. AQP4 expression is vital to the cellular migration and angiogenesis at the heart of tumor growth; AQP4 is central to dysfunctions in glutamate metabolism, synaptogenesis, and memory consolidation; and AQP1 and AQP4 adaptations have been seen in obstructive and non-obstructive hydrocephalus and may be therapeutic targets.

  11. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  12. Cerebral blood flow response to flavanol-rich cocoa in healthy elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorond, Farzaneh A; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Hollenberg, Norman K; Fisher, Naomi D Ll

    2008-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a common, morbid condition accompanied by cognitive decline. Recent reports on the vascular health benefits of flavanol-containing foods signify a promising approach to the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Our study was designed to investigate the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa (FRC) consumption on cerebral blood flow in older healthy volunteers. We used transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound to measure mean blood flow velocity (MFV) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in thirty-four healthy elderly volunteers (72 +/- 6 years) in response to the regular intake of FRC or flavanol-poor cocoa (FPC). In response to two weeks of FRC intake, MFV increased by 8% +/- 4% at one week (p = 0.01) and 10% +/- 4% (p = 0.04) at two weeks. In response to one week of cocoa, significantly more subjects in the FRC as compared with the FPC group had an increase in their MFV (p flavanol's consumption in the treatment of cerebrovascular ischemic syndromes, including dementias and stroke.

  13. Physiology of cerebral venous blood flow: from experimental data in animals to normal function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, B

    2004-11-01

    In contrast to the cerebroarterial system, the cerebrovenous system is not well examined and only partly understood. The cerebrovenous system represents a complex three-dimensional structure that is often asymmetric and considerably represent more variable pattern than the arterial anatomy. Particular emphasis is devoted to the venous return to extracranial drainage routes. As the state-of-the-art-imaging methods are playing a greater role in visualizing the intracranial venous system at present, its clinically pertinent anatomy and physiology has gain increasing interest, even so only few data are available. For this reason, experimental research on specific biophysical (fluid dynamic, rheologic factors) and hemodynamic (venous pressure, cerebral venous blood flow) parameters of the cerebral venous system is more on the focus; especially as these parameters are different to the cerebral arterial system. Particular emphasis is devoted to the venous return to extracranial drainage routes. From the present point of view, it seems that the cerebrovenous system may be one of the most important factors that guarantee normal brain function. In the light of this increasing interest in the cerebral venous system, the authors have summarized the current knowledge of the physiology of the cerebrovenous system and discuss it is in the light of its clinical relevance.

  14. Estimation of cerebral vascular tone during exercise; evaluation by critical closing pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Brothers, R Matthew; Jeschke, Monica

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to calculate critical closing pressure (CCP) of the cerebral vasculature at rest and during exercise to estimate cerebral vascular tone. Five men and two women were seated upright for 15 min and then performed 15 min of right-legged knee extension exercise at 40, ......, P = 0.564) or adrenaline concentrations (right, P = 0.138; left, P = 0.108). We consider that an exercise-induced increase in cerebral vascular tone serves to protect the blood-brain barrier from the exercise-induced hypertension....... and the left MCA. In both arteries, the CCP increased (right MCA, +6.6 +/- 8.5 mmHg, P = 0.023; left MCA, +7.3 +/- 9.1 mmHg, P = 0.016) during 75% WL(max) without changes in resistance-area product, while femoral vascular resistance of the non-exercising leg decreased (from 0.32 +/- 0.07 to 0.18 +/- 0.05 mm......Hg min ml(1); P right and left MCA (P = 0.31). These findings suggest an increase in cerebral vascular tone in both the right and the left MCA from rest to exercise despite a decrease in vascular resistance of the systemic vasculature...

  15. Cerebral hemodynamics measured with simultaneous PET and near-infrared spectroscopy in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Law, Ian; Pott, Frank

    2002-01-01

    and CBV as measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, the results were compared using a physiological model of cerebral oxygenation. In five healthy volunteers changes in CBF were induced in a randomized order by hyperventilation or inhalation of 6% CO(2). Arterial content of O(2) and CO...

  16. Middle cerebral artery diameter changes during rhythmic handgrip exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbree, J; Bronzwaer, Agt; van Buchem, M A; Daemen, Mjap; van Lieshout, J J; van Osch, Mjp

    2017-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography is a frequently employed technique for quantifying cerebral blood flow by assuming a constant arterial diameter. Given that exercise increases arterial pressure by sympathetic activation, we hypothesized that exercise might induce a change in the diameter of large cerebral arteries. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) cross-sectional area was assessed in response to handgrip exercise by direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) observations. Twenty healthy subjects (11 female) performed three 5 min bouts of rhythmic handgrip exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction, alternated with 5 min of rest. High-resolution 7 T MRI scans were acquired perpendicular to the MCA. Two blinded observers manually determined the MCA cross-sectional area. Sufficient image quality was obtained in 101 MCA-scans of 19 subjects (age-range 20-59 years). Mixed effects modelling showed that the MCA cross-sectional area decreased by 2.1 ± 0.8% (p = 0.01) during handgrip, while the heart rate increased by 11 ± 2% (p exercise. This further strengthens the current concept of sympathetic control of large cerebral arteries, showing in vivo vasoconstriction during exercise-induced sympathetic activation. Moreover, care must be taken when interpreting TCD exercise studies as diameter constancy cannot be assumed.

  17. Recurrent Subarachnoid Bleeding and Superficial Siderosis in a Patient with Histopathologically Proven Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profice, P.; Pilato, F.; Della Marca, Giacomo; Colosimo, C.; Gaudino, S.; Arena, V.; Pavone, A.; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with a history of hypertension presented with recurrent subarachnoid bleeding. Brain MRI showed superficial siderosis, and diagnostic cerebral angiograms did not show any intracranial vascular malformation or arterial aneurism. Post mortem neuropathological examination of the brain was consistent with a diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Clinicians should be aware that cerebral amyloid angiopathy should be considered in patients with unexplained recurrent subarachnoid bleeding, even in cases without familial clustering or transthyretin variant. PMID:21720529

  18. Overexpression of mutant ataxin-3 in mouse cerebellum induces ataxia and cerebellar neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Conceição, Mariana; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is a fatal, dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs culminating in severe neuronal degeneration. Currently, there is no therapy able to modify disease progression. In the present study, we aimed at investigating one of the most severely affected brain regions in the disorder--the cerebellum--and the behavioral defects associated with the neuropathology in this region. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding full-length human mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum of 3-week-old C57/BL6 mice. We show that circumscribed expression of human mutant ataxin-3 in the cerebellum mediates within a short time frame--6 weeks, the development of a behavioral phenotype including reduced motor coordination, wide-based ataxic gait, and hyperactivity. Furthermore, the expression of mutant ataxin-3 resulted in the accumulation of intranuclear inclusions, neuropathological abnormalities, and neuronal death. These data show that lentiviral-based expression of mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum induces localized neuropathology, which is sufficient to generate a behavioral ataxic phenotype. Moreover, this approach provides a physiologically relevant, cost-effective and time-effective animal model to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of MJD and for the evaluation of experimental therapeutics of MJD.

  19. Neuropathology of the recessive A673V APP mutation: Alzheimer disease with distinctive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Giorgio; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Botta, Mario; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Uggetti, Andrea; Catania, Marcella; Moro, Maria Luisa; Redaelli, Veronica; Spagnoli, Alberto; Rossi, Roberta Simona; Salmona, Mario; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2010-12-01

    Mutations of three different genes, encoding β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, the APP mutation A673V has been identified that stands out from all the genetic defects previously reported in these three genes, since it causes the disease only in the homozygous state (Di Fede et al. in Science 323:1473-1477, 2009). We here provide the detailed neuropathological picture of the proband of this family, who was homozygous for the APP A673V mutation and recently came to death. The brain has been studied by histological and immunohistochemical techniques, at the optical and ultrastructural levels. Cerebral Aβ accumulation and tau pathology were severe and extensive. Peculiar features were the configuration of the Aβ deposits that were of large size, mostly perivascular and exhibited a close correspondence between the pattern elicited by amyloid stainings and the labeling obtained with immunoreagents specific for Aβ40 or Aβ42. Moreover, Aβ deposition spared the neostriatum while deeply affecting the cerebellum, and therefore was not in compliance with the hierarchical topographical sequence of involvement documented in sporadic AD. Therefore, the neuropathological picture of familial AD caused by the APP recessive mutation A673V presents distinctive characteristics compared to sporadic AD or familial AD inherited as a dominant trait. Main peculiar features are the morphology, structural properties and composition of the Aβ deposits as well as their topographic distribution in the brain.

  20. Effects of W-CDMA 1950 MHz EMF emitted by mobile phones on regional cerebral blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yoko; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hikage, Takashi; Terao, Yasuo; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2009-10-01

    Use of the third generation mobile phone system is increasing worldwide. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the third generation system on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in humans. We compared effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) cellular system versus sham control exposure on rCBF in humans. Nine healthy male volunteers participated in this study. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were obtained before, during, and after unilateral 30 min EMF exposure. The subtraction analysis revealed no significant rCBF changes caused by the EMF conditions compared with the sham exposure, suggesting that EMF emitted by a third generation mobile phone does not affect rCBF in humans.

  1. Selective accumulation of aluminum in cerebral arteries in Alzheimer’s disease (AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhao, Yuhai; Hill, James M.; Culicchia, Frank; Kruck, Theodore P. A.; Percy, Maire E.; Pogue, Aileen I.; Walton, J.R.; Lukiw, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Once biologically available aluminum bypasses gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers, this environmentally-abundant neurotoxin has an exceedingly high affinity for the large pyramidal neurons of the human brain hippocampus. This same anatomical region of the brain is also targeted by the earliest evidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology. The mechanism for the selective targeting and transport of aluminum into the hippocampus of the human brain is not well understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of a pathological aluminum entry system into the brain, this study examined the aluminum content of 8 arteries that supply blood to the hippocampus, including the aorta and several cerebral arteries. In contrast to age-matched controls, in AD patients we found a gradient of increasing aluminum concentration from the aorta to the posterior cerebral artery that supplies blood to the hippocampus. Primary cultures of human brain endothelial cells were found to have an extremely high affinity for aluminum when compared to other types of brain cells. Together, these results suggest for the first time that endothelial cells that line the cerebral vasculature may have biochemical attributes conducive to binding and targeting aluminum to selective anatomical regions of the brain, such as the hippocampus, with potential downstream pro-inflammatory and pathogenic consequences. PMID:23764827

  2. Selective accumulation of aluminum in cerebral arteries in Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Zhao, Yuhai; Hill, James M; Culicchia, Frank; Kruck, Theodore P A; Percy, Maire E; Pogue, Aileen I; Walton, J R; Lukiw, Walter J

    2013-09-01

    Once biologically available aluminum bypasses gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers, this environmentally-abundant neurotoxin has an exceedingly high affinity for the large pyramidal neurons of the human brain hippocampus. This same anatomical region of the brain is also targeted by the earliest evidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The mechanism for the selective targeting and transport of aluminum into the hippocampus of the human brain is not well understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of a pathological aluminum entry system into the brain, this study examined the aluminum content of 8 arteries that supply blood to the hippocampus, including the aorta and several cerebral arteries. In contrast to age-matched controls, in AD patients we found a gradient of increasing aluminum concentration from the aorta to the posterior cerebral artery that supplies blood to the hippocampus. Primary cultures of human brain endothelial cells were found to have an extremely high affinity for aluminum when compared to other types of brain cells. Together, these results suggest for the first time that endothelial cells that line the cerebral vasculature may have biochemical attributes conducive to binding and targeting aluminum to selective anatomical regions of the brain, such as the hippocampus, with potential downstream pro-inflammatory and pathogenic consequences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hemodynamic and neuropathological analysis in rats with aluminum trichloride-induced Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ming; Fan, Chi-Chen; Chiue, Ming-Shiuan; Chou, Chi; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic normality is crucial to maintaining the integrity of cerebral vessels and, therefore, preserving the cognitive functions of Alzheimer's disease patients. This study investigates the implications of the hemodynamic changes and the neuropathological diversifications of AlCl3-induced AD. The experimental animals were 8- to 12-wk-old male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a (+)control group. Food intake, water intake, and weight changes were recorded daily for 22 wk. Synchronously, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the rats with AlCl3-induced AD were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hemorheological parameters were analyzed using a computerized auto-rotational rheometer. The brain tissue of the subjects was analyzed using immunohistological chemical (IHC) staining to determine the beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels. The results of hemodynamic analysis revealed that the whole blood viscosity (WBV), fibrinogen, plasma viscosity and RBC aggregation index (RAI) in (+)control were significantly higher than that of control group, while erythrocyte electrophoresis (EI) of whole blood in (+)control were significantly lower than that of control group. The results of acetylcholinesterase-RBC (AChE-RBC)in the (+)control group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The results also show that the reduction of rCBF in rats with AlCl3-induced AD was approximately 50% to 60% that of normal rats. IHC stain results show that significantly more Aβ plaques accumulated in the hippocampus and cortex of the (+)control than in the control group. The results accentuate the importance of hemorheology and reinforce the specific association between hemodynamic and neuropathological changes in rats with AlCl3-induced AD. Hemorheological parameters, such as WBV and fibrinogen, and AChE-RBC were ultimately proven to be useful biomarkers of the severity and progression of AD patients. In addition, the

  4. Diabetes, Alzheimer disease, and vascular dementia: a population-based neuropathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtiluoto, S; Polvikoski, T; Peltonen, M; Solomon, A; Tuomilehto, J; Winblad, B; Sulkava, R; Kivipelto, M

    2010-09-28

    To investigate the relation of diabetes to dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD), through analyses of incidence, mortality, and neuropathologic outcomes in a prospective population-based study of the oldest old. The Vantaa 85+ study included 553 residents living in the city of Vantaa, Finland, and aged ≥85 years on April 1, 1991. Survivors were reexamined in 1994, 1996, 1999, and 2001. Autopsies were performed in 291 persons who died during the follow-up (48% of total population). Diabetes was assessed according to self-report, medical record of physician-diagnosed diabetes, or use of antidiabetic medication. Macroscopic infarcts were identified from 1-cm coronal slices of cerebral hemispheres, 5-mm transverse brainstem slices, and sagittal cerebellum slices. Methenamine silver staining was used for β-amyloid, methenamine silver-Bodian staining for neurofibrillary tangles, and modified Bielschowsky method for neuritic plaques. Cox proportional hazards and multiple logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of diabetes with dementia and neuropathology, respectively. Diabetes at baseline doubled the incidence of dementia, AD, and VaD, and increased mortality. Individuals with diabetes were less likely to have β-amyloid (hazard ratio [HR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] was 0.48 [0.23-0.98]) and tangles (HR [95% CI] 0.72 [0.39-1.33]) but more likely to have cerebral infarcts (HR [95% CI] 1.88 [1.06-3.34]) after all adjustments. Elderly patients with diabetes develop more extensive vascular pathology, which alone or together with AD-type pathology (particularly in APOE ε4 carriers) results in increased dementia risk.

  5. MicroRNA Implications across Neurodevelopment and Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabata Martino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have rapidly emerged as biologically important mediators of posttranscriptional and epigenetic regulation in both plants and animals. miRNAs function through a variety of mechanisms including mRNA degradation and translational repression; additionally, miRNAs may guide gene expression by serving as transcription factors. miRNAs are highly expressed in human brain. Tissue and cell type-specific enrichments of certain miRNAs within the nervous system argue for a biological significance during neurodevelopmental stages. On the other hand, a large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathologic conditions such as cancer, heart diseases, and neurodegeneration. Thus, profiles of distinct or aberrant miRNA signatures have most recently surged as one of the most fascinating interests in current biology. Here, the most recent insights into the involvement of miRNAs in the biology of the nervous system and the occurrence of neuropathological disorders are reviewed and discussed.

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neuropathology of the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Hampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. Human regional cerebral blood flow during rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Holm, S; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    CBF increased by 4% (p less than 0.01) in the associative visual area, while it decreased by 9% (p less than 0.01) in the inferior frontal cortex. The CBF increase in the associative visual area suggests that activation of cerebral structures processing complex visual material is correlated to visual...... dream experiences. On the other hand, the reduced involvement of the inferior frontal cortex observed during REM sleep might explain the poor temporal organization and bizarreness often experienced in dreams....

  8. Cerebral blood flow response to flavanol-rich cocoa in healthy elderly humans

    OpenAIRE

    PhD, Farzaneh

    2008-01-01

    Farzaneh A Sorond1,2, Lewis A Lipsitz2,4, Norman K Hollenberg3,5, Naomi DL Fisher31Department of Neurology, Stroke Division; 2Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA; 3Department of Medicine, Endocrine-Hypertension Division; 4Department of Medicine, Gerontology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MABackground and Purpose: Cerebral ischemia is a common, morbid condition accompanied...

  9. Applicability of digital analysis and imaging technology in neuropathology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, William D; Gearing, Marla; Park, Yuna; Zhang, Lifan; Hanfelt, John; Glass, Jonathan D; Gutman, David A

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that affects more than 30 million people worldwide. While various dementia-related losses in cognitive functioning are its hallmark clinical symptoms, ultimate diagnosis is based on manual neuropathological assessments using various schemas, including Braak staging, CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) and Thal phase scoring. Since these scoring systems are based on subjective assessment, there is inevitably some degree of variation between readers, which could affect ultimate neuropathology diagnosis. Here, we report a pilot study investigating the applicability of computer-driven image analysis for characterizing neuropathological features, as well as its potential to supplement or even replace manually derived ratings commonly performed in medical settings. In this work, we quantitatively measured amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque in various brain regions from 34 patients using a robust digital quantification algorithm. We next verified these digitally derived measures to the manually derived pathology ratings using correlation and ordinal logistic regression methods, while also investigating the association with other AD-related neuropathology scoring schema commonly used at autopsy, such as Braak and CERAD. In addition to successfully verifying our digital measurements of Aβ plaques with respective categorical measurements, we found significant correlations with most AD-related scoring schemas. Our results demonstrate the potential for digital analysis to be adapted to more complex staining procedures commonly used in neuropathological diagnosis. As the efficiency of scanning and digital analysis of histology images increases, we believe that the basis of our semi-automatic approach may better standardize quantification of neuropathological changes and AD diagnosis, ultimately leading to a more comprehensive understanding of neurological disorders and more efficient patient

  10. Association of CD33 polymorphism rs3865444 with Alzheimer's disease pathology and CD33 expression in human cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Beach, Thomas G; Lue, Lih-Fen

    2015-02-01

    Recent findings identified the minor A allele present in the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3865444 in the CD33 gene as being associated with the reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). CD33 (Siglec-3) is an immune function protein with anti-inflammatory signaling, cell adhesion, and endocytosis functions with sialic acid-modified proteins or lipids as ligands. Its involvement in AD pathologic mechanisms is still unclear; so, the goal of this study was to investigate if the rs3865444 polymorphism affects the development of AD pathology and the expression of CD33 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein. For this study, we used DNA from 96 nondemented (ND) and 97 AD neuropathologically diagnosed cases to identify the different rs3865444 alleles and correlate with different measures of AD pathology. Using semiquantitative histologic measures of plaque and tangle pathology, we saw no significant differences between the different genotypes within these disease groups. However, increased expression of CD33 mRNA was associated with increasing AD pathology in temporal cortex brain samples. We also showed that cases with A/A alleles had reduced levels of CD33 protein in temporal cortex but increased levels of the microglia protein IBA-1. Using immunohistochemistry on temporal cortex sections, CD33 was selectively localized to microglia, with greater expression in activated microglia. The factors causing increased CD33 expression by microglia in brain are still unclear, although both genetic and disease factors are involved. Treatment of human microglia isolated from autopsy brains with amyloid-beta peptide and a range of other inflammatory activating agents resulted in reduced CD33 mRNA and protein levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ataque cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi Tan, Yuri; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1998-01-01

    ¿Qué es un ataque cerebral?/¿Qué tipos de ataque cerebral existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de un ataque cerebral?/Factores de riesgo para un ataque cerebral/Tratamiento médico del ataque cerebral/¿por qué es importante acudir temprano cuando se presentan las señales de alarma?/ Manejo preventivo del ataque cerebral isquémico/Tratamiento quirúrgico del ataque cerebral/Enfermedad vascular cerebral hemorrágica/¿Cómo está constituido el grupo de ataque cerebral de la fundación Clínica Valle d...

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging of the human cerebellar pathways and their interplay with cerebral macrostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Zafer; Hasan, Khader M.; Mwangi, Benson I.; Kamali, Arash; Ucisik-Keser, Fehime Eymen; Riascos, Roy F.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Francisco, Gerard E.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar white matter (WM) connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the Spinocerebellar (SC), vestibulocerebellar (VC), and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC) pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20–51 years) were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC), parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC), temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC) and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC). The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas) were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM), cerebral WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.6 ± 0.45 of the total intracranial volume (ICV). PMID:25904851

  14. Saccade abnormalities associated with focal cerebral lesions - How cortical and basal ganglia commands shape saccades in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yasuo; Fukuda, Hideki; Tokushuge, Shinnichi; Nomura, Yoshiko; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-08-01

    To study saccade abnormalities associated with focal cerebral lesions, including the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia (BG). We studied the latency and amplitude of reflexive and voluntary saccades in 37 patients with focal lesions of the frontal and parietal cortices and BG (caudate and putamen), and 51 age-matched controls, along with the ability to inhibit unwanted reflexive saccades. Latencies of reflexive saccades were prolonged in patients with parietal lesions involving the parietal eye field (PEF), whereas their amplitude was decreased with parietal or putaminal lesions. In contrast, latency of voluntary saccades was prolonged and their success rate reduced with frontal lesions including the frontal eye field (FEF) or its outflow tract as well as the dorsolateral/medial prefrontal cortex, and caudate lesions, whereas their amplitude was decreased with parietal lesions. Inhibitory control of reflexive saccades was impaired with frontal, caudate and, less prominently, parietal lesions. PEF is important in triggering reflexive saccades, also determining their amplitude. Whereas FEF and the caudate emit commands for initiating voluntary saccades, their amplitude is mainly determined by PEF. Commands not only from FEF and dorsolateral/medial prefrontal cortex but also from the caudate and PEF serve to inhibit unnecessary reflexive saccades. The findings suggested how cortical and BG commands shape reflexive and voluntary saccades in humans. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... 180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P change. These results indicate that a breath hold diverts blood toward the brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...

  16. Evolving concepts of chronic traumatic encephalopathy as a neuropathological entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, H; Neal, J W; Revesz, T

    2017-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a long-term neurodegenerative consequence of repetitive head impacts which can only be definitively diagnosed in post-mortem. Recently, the consensus neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of CTE was published requiring the presence of the accumulation of abnormal tau in neurons and astroglia distributed around small blood vessels at the depths of cortical sulci in an irregular pattern as the mandatory features. The clinical diagnosis and antemortem prediction of CTE pathology remain challenging if not impossible due to the common co-existing underlying neurodegenerative pathologies and the lack of specific clinical pointers and reliable biomarkers. This review summarizes the historical evolution of CTE as a neuropathological entity and highlights the latest advances and future directions of research studies on the topic of CTE. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of human cerebral infarction: Enhancement with Gd-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imakita, S.; Nishimura, T.; Naito, H.; Yamada, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Takamiya, M.; Yamada, Y.; Sakashita, Y.; Minamikawa, J.; Kikuchi, H.

    1987-09-01

    Five patients (1 female and 4 males) with cerebral infarction of 4 h to 27 months duration were studied 9 times with magnetic resonance (MR) using Gd-DTPA. Spinecho (SE) MR images (MRI) were obtained before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA, and correlative CT scans were performed on the same day. In 2 cases, 4 h and 27 months after the ictus, there was no enhancement with Gd-DTPA. There was faint enhancement in 2 cases with cerebral infarction of about 24 h duration and obvious enhancement in all cases in the subacute stage. Compared with enhanced CT, MR using Gd-DTPA demonstrated more obvious enhancement of infarcted areas. MR enhancement using Gd-DTPA showed a gradual increase and the accumulated Gd-DTPA in infarcted areas slowly diffused to the periphery. MR enhancement with Gd-DTPA is similar to that of enhanced CT, but may be more sensitive in the detection of blood brain barrier breakdown.

  18. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  19. Neuropathology does not Correlate with Regional Differences in the Extent of Expansion of CTG Repeats in the Brain with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kyoko; Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Futamura, Naonobu; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji; Fushiki, Shinji

    2010-12-29

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is known to be an adult-onset muscular dystrophy caused by the expansion of CTG repeats within the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophin myotonin protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The clinical features of DM1 include CNS symptoms, such as cognitive impairment and personality changes, the pathogenesis of which remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the distribution of neuropathological changes might be correlated with the extent of the length of the CTG repeats in the DMPK genes in DM1 patients. We studied the neuropathological changes in the brains of subjects with DM1 and investigated the extent of somatic instability in terms of CTG repeat expansion in the different brain regions of the same individuals by Southern blot analysis. The neuropathological changes included état criblé in the cerebral deep white matter and neurofibrillary tangles immunoreactive for phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, both of which were compatible with the subcortical dementia in DM1 patients. However, the length of the CTG repeats did not correlate with the regional differences in the extent of neuropathological changes. Our data suggested that pathomechanisms of dementia in DM1 might be more multifactorial rather than a toxic gain-of-function due to mutant RNA.

  20. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  1. Human-derived physiological heat shock protein 27 complex protects brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Teramoto

    Full Text Available Although challenging, neuroprotective therapies for ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy for countering ischemic injury and suppressing brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective molecules, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a strong cell death suppressor. To assess the neuroprotective effects of HSP27 in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we purified a "physiological" HSP27 (hHSP27 from normal human lymphocytes. hHSP27 differed from recombinant HSP27 in that it formed dimeric, tetrameric, and multimeric complexes, was phosphorylated, and contained small amounts of αβ-crystallin and HSP20. Mice received intravenous injections of hHSP27 following focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume, neurological deficit scores, physiological parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Intravenous injections of hHSP27 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct size and improved neurological deficits. Injected hHSP27 was localized in neurons on the ischemic side of the brain. hHSP27 suppressed neuronal cell death resulting from cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. Recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27, which was artificially expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and dephosphorylated hHSP27 did not have brain protective effects, suggesting that the phosphorylation of hHSP27 may be important for neuroprotection after ischemic insults. The present study suggests that hHSP27 with posttranslational modifications provided neuroprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the protection was mediated through the inhibition of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Intravenously injected human HSP27 should be explored for the treatment of acute ischemic strokes.

  2. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  3. Immune complex formation and in situ B-cell clonal expansion in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Kinloch, Andrew; Henderson, Scott G; Shaaya, Mark; Chong, Anita S; Clark, Marcus R; Awad, Issam A

    2014-07-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) represent clusters of dilated vascular channels, predisposing to hemorrhagic stroke and seizures. They are associated with defective blood brain barrier, hemorrhages of different ages and a robust inflammatory cell infiltrate. We report for the first time evidence of co-localized IgG and complement membrane attack complexes in CCM lesions. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells are aggregated with CD20(+) B-cells. And IgG repertoire analyses demonstrate in situ B-cell clonal expansion and antigen-driven affinity maturation in CCMs. These results suggest an organ-intrinsic adaptive immune response in CCMs that should be further characterized as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebral hemodynamics measured with simultaneous PET and near-infrared spectroscopy in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Law, Ian; Pott, Frank

    2002-01-01

    and CBV as measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, the results were compared using a physiological model of cerebral oxygenation. In five healthy volunteers changes in CBF were induced in a randomized order by hyperventilation or inhalation of 6% CO(2). Arterial content of O(2) and CO......(2) was measured several times during each scanning. Changes in deoxyhemoglobin (deltaHb), oxyhemoglobin (deltaHbO(2)) and total hemoglobin (deltaHb(tot)) were continuously recorded with NIRS equipment. CBF and CBV was also determined in MRI-coregistered PET-slices in regions determined...... by the placement of the two optodes, as localized from the transmission scan. The PET-measurements showed an average CBV of 5.5+/-0.74 ml 100 g(-1) in normoventilation, with an increase of 29% during hypercapnia, whereas no significant changes were seen during hyperventilation. CBF was 51+/-10 in normoventilation...

  5. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA)); Gillin, J.C. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  6. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...... perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P

  7. Rate of change of cerebral blood flow velocity with hyperventilation during anesthesia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, K Y; Craen, R A; Murkin, J M; Lee, D; Eliasziw, M; Gelb, A W

    2000-02-01

    Although it has been suggested that the rate at which the cerebral circulation responds to changes in PaCO2 is different with differing anesthetics, there have been no attempts to measure this. Transcranial Doppler allows the continuous measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and any changes over time. Our aim was to compare the rate of change of CBFV when end-tidal CO2 (P(ET)CO2) was rapidly altered during halothane or isoflurane anesthesia. Twenty-eight unpremedicated healthy patients were randomly assigned to receive air/O2 and either 1-1.5 MAC halothane or isoflurane as the primary anesthetic. After 15 min of steady state, P(ET)CO2 was rapidly reduced from 45 mm Hg to 30 mm Hg. CBFV and P(ET)CO2 were recorded every 30 sec for the next 10 min. The rate of change of normalized CBFV (delta CBFV vs. delta time) was more rapid in the isoflurane group (P <0.0001) especially in the initial few minutes. In all patients anesthetized with isoflurane, and in all but two patients anesthetized with halothane, the reduction in P(ET)CO2 produced a corresponding decrease in CBFV However, there were no differences in the magnitude of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (delta CBFV vs. delta P(ET)CO2) between the two groups. The rate of change of CBFV was faster in the isoflurane than in the halothane group especially in the initial few minutes. Indeed, for two patients in the halothane group Vmca did not change despite a change in P(ET)CO2. This may be of clinical importance when cerebrovascular tone needs to be changed rapidly.

  8. Un caso de infeccion humana por cisticerco racemoso cerebral de localizacion parenquimatosa en Valdivia, Chile A case of human cerebral infection by parenchymal racemose cysticercus in Valdivia, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ortega

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso clínico de infección por cisticerco racemoso cerebral de localización parenquimatosa en un paciente de la ciudad de Valdivia (Chile cuyo diagnóstico definitivo se efectuó a través del estudio morfológico del parásito. Se discute brevemente la escasa frecuencia de la localización parenquimatosa del cisticerco racemoso, así como su diagnóstico diferencial con otros estados larvarios de cestodos que desarrollan en el sistema nervioso.A clinical case of cerebral infection by parenchymal racemose cysticercus, diagnosed by means of morphological characteristics in a patient of Valdivia city is described. The rare frequency of parenquimal location of racemose cysticercus as well as its differential diagnosis with other larval stages of cestodes that develop in the brain and its treatment are discussed.

  9. Selected Gray Matter Volumes and Gender but Not Basal Ganglia nor Cerebellum Gyri Discriminate Left Versus Right Cerebral Hemispheres: Multivariate Analyses in human Brains at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Suarez-May, Marcela A; Favila, Rafael; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Rios, Camilo

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the lateralization of the human brain is evident through a multidisciplinary number of scientific studies. Understanding volumetric brain asymmetries allows the distinction between normal development stages and behavior, as well as brain diseases. We aimed to evaluate volumetric asymmetries in order to select the best gyri able to classify right- versus left cerebral hemispheres. A cross-sectional study performed in 47 right-handed young-adults healthy volunteers. SPM-based software performed brain segmentation, automatic labeling and volumetric analyses for 54 regions involving the cerebral lobes, basal ganglia and cerebellum from each cerebral hemisphere. Multivariate discriminant analysis (DA) allowed the assembling of a predictive model. DA revealed one discriminant function that significantly differentiated left vs. right cerebral hemispheres: Wilks' λ = 0.008, χ(2) (9) = 238.837, P brain gyri are able to accurately classify left vs. right cerebral hemispheres by using a multivariate approach; the selected regions correspond to key brain areas involved in attention, internal thought, vision and language; our findings favored the concept that lateralization has been evolutionary favored by mental processes increasing cognitive efficiency and brain capacity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Conditional deletion of Ccm2 causes hemorrhage in the adult brain: a mouse model of human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kirk; Uchida, Yutaka; O'Donnell, Erin; Claudio, Estefania; Li, Wenling; Soneji, Kosha; Wang, Hongshan; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2011-08-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are irregularly shaped and enlarged capillaries in the brain that are prone to hemorrhage, resulting in headaches, seizures, strokes and even death in patients. The disease affects up to 0.5% of the population and the inherited form has been linked to mutations in one of three genetic loci, CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. To understand the pathophysiology underlying the vascular lesions in CCM, it is critical to develop a reproducible mouse genetic model of this disease. Here, we report that limited conditional ablation of Ccm2 in young adult mice induces observable neurological dysfunction and reproducibly results in brain hemorrhages whose appearance is highly reminiscent of the lesions observed in human CCM patients. We first demonstrate that conventional or endothelial-specific deletion of Ccm2 leads to fatal cardiovascular defects during embryogenesis, including insufficient vascular lumen formation as well as defective arteriogenesis and heart malformation. These findings confirm and extend prior studies. We then demonstrate that the inducible deletion of Ccm2 in adult mice recapitulates the CCM-like brain lesions in humans; the lesions display disrupted vascular lumens, enlarged capillary cavities, loss of proper neuro-vascular associations and an inflammatory reaction. The CCM lesions also exhibit damaged neuronal architecture, the likely cause of neurologic defects, such as ataxia and seizure. These mice represent the first CCM2 animal model for CCM and should provide the means to elucidate disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic strategies for human CCM.

  11. The response of cerebral cortex to haemorrhagic damage: experimental evidence from a penetrating injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Purushothuman

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of the brain to haemorrhagic damage is important in haemorrhagic stroke and increasingly in the understanding the cerebral degeneration and dementia that follow head trauma and head-impact sports. In addition, there is growing evidence that haemorrhage from small cerebral vessels is important in the pathogenesis of age-related dementia (Alzheimer's disease. In a penetration injury model of rat cerebral cortex, we have examined the neuropathology induced by a needlestick injury, with emphasis on features prominent in the ageing and dementing human brain, particularly plaque-like depositions and the expression of related proteins. Needlestick lesions were made in neo- and hippocampal cortex in Sprague Dawley rats aged 3-5 months. Brains were examined after 1-30 d survival, for haemorrhage, for the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ, amyloid precursor protein (APP, for gliosis and for neuronal death. Temporal cortex from humans diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease was examined with the same techniques. Needlestick injury induced long-lasting changes-haem deposition, cell death, plaque-like deposits and glial invasion-along the needle track. Around the track, the lesion induced more transient changes, particularly upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosporylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. Reactions were similar in hippocampus and neocortex, except that neuronal death was more widespread in the hippocampus. In summary, experimental haemorrhagic injury to rat cerebral cortex induced both permanent and transient changes. The more permanent changes reproduced features of human senile plaques, including the formation of extracellular deposits in which haem and Aβ-related proteins co-localised, neuronal loss and gliosis. The transient changes, observed in tissue around the direct lesion, included the upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosphorylated tau, not associated with cell death. The findings support the

  12. Fat intake modulates cerebral blood flow in homeostatic and gustatory brain areas in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Sabine; Linder, Katarzyna; Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Ketterer, Caroline; Cavusoglu, Mustafa; Krzeminski, Alina; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Preissl, Hubert; Hinrichs, Jörg; Veit, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    The hypothalamus is the central homeostatic control region of the brain and, therefore, highly influenced by nutrients such as glucose and fat. Immediate and prolonged homeostatic effects of glucose ingestion have been well characterized. However, studies that used stimulation with fat have mainly investigated immediate perceptional processes. Besides homeostatic processes, the gustatory cortex, including parts of the insular cortex, is crucial for the processing of food items. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high- compared with low-fat meals on the hypothalamus and the insular cortex. Eleven healthy men participated in a single-blinded, functional MRI study of high- and low-fat meals on 2 measurement days. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured before and 30 and 120 min after intake of high- and low-fat yogurts. Hunger was rated and blood samples were taken before each CBF measurement. High-fat yogurt induced a pronounced decrease in CBF in the hypothalamus, and the corresponding CBF change correlated positively with the insulin change. Furthermore, insular activity increased after 120 min in the low-fat condition only. The CBF change in both regions correlated positively in the high-fat condition. The decrease in hypothalamic activity and the interaction with the insular cortex elicited by fat may contribute to an efficient energy homeostasis. Therefore, fat might be a modulator of homeostatic and gustatory brain regions and their interaction. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01516021.

  13. Impact of Gas Delivery Systems on Imaging Studies of Human Cerebral Blood Flow

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    John R. Cain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare a semiopen breathing circuit with a non-rebreathing (Hudson mask for MRI experiments involving gas delivery. Methods and Materials. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured by quantitative phase contrast angiography of the internal carotid and basilar arteries in 18 volunteers (20–31 years. In 8 subjects, gases were delivered via a standard non-rebreathing (Hudson mask. In 10 subjects, gases were delivered using a modified “Mapleson A” semiopen anesthetic gas circuit and mouthpiece. All subjects were given 100% O2, medical air, and carbogen gas (95% O2 and 5% CO2 delivered at 15 L/min in a random order. Results. The Hudson mask group showed significant increases in CBF in response to increased FiCO2 compared to air (+9.8%. A small nonsignificant reduction in CBF (−2.4% was seen in response to increased inspired concentrations of oxygen (FiO2. The Mapleson A group showed significantly larger changes in CBF in response to both increased inspired concentrations of carbon dioxide (FiCO2 (+32.2%, P<0.05 and FiO2 (−14.6%, P<0.01. Conclusions. The use of an anaesthetic gas delivery circuit avoids entrainment of room air and rebreathing effects that may otherwise adversely affect the experimental results.

  14. Impact of Gas Delivery Systems on Imaging Studies of Human Cerebral Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, John R.; Parkes, Laura M.; Eadsforth, Peter; Beards, Susan C.; Jackson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare a semiopen breathing circuit with a non-rebreathing (Hudson mask) for MRI experiments involving gas delivery. Methods and Materials. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by quantitative phase contrast angiography of the internal carotid and basilar arteries in 18 volunteers (20–31 years). In 8 subjects, gases were delivered via a standard non-rebreathing (Hudson mask). In 10 subjects, gases were delivered using a modified “Mapleson A” semiopen anesthetic gas circuit and mouthpiece. All subjects were given 100% O2, medical air, and carbogen gas (95% O2 and 5% CO2) delivered at 15 L/min in a random order. Results. The Hudson mask group showed significant increases in CBF in response to increased FiCO2 compared to air (+9.8%). A small nonsignificant reduction in CBF (−2.4%) was seen in response to increased inspired concentrations of oxygen (FiO2). The Mapleson A group showed significantly larger changes in CBF in response to both increased inspired concentrations of carbon dioxide (FiCO2) (+32.2%, P < 0.05) and FiO2 (−14.6%, P < 0.01). Conclusions. The use of an anaesthetic gas delivery circuit avoids entrainment of room air and rebreathing effects that may otherwise adversely affect the experimental results. PMID:24392225

  15. Reproducibility of T2 * mapping in the human cerebral cortex in vivo at 7 tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Sindhuja T; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Sormani, Maria Pia; Fan, Audrey P; Louapre, Céline; Mainero, Caterina

    2015-08-01

    To assess the test-retest reproducibility of cortical mapping of T2 * relaxation rates at 7 Tesla (T) MRI. T2 * maps have been used for studying cortical myelo-architecture patterns in vivo and for characterizing conditions associated with changes in iron and/or myelin concentration. T2 * maps were calculated from 7T multi-echo T2 *-weighted images acquired during separate scanning sessions on 8 healthy subjects. The reproducibility of surface-based cortical T2 * mapping was assessed at different depths of the cortex; from pial surface (0% depth) towards gray/white matter boundary (100% depth), across cortical regions and hemispheres, using coefficients of variation (COVs = SD/mean) between each couple (scan-rescan) of average T2 * measurements. Average cortical T2 * was significantly different among 25%, 50%, and 75% depths (analysis of variance, P < 0.001). Coefficient of variations were very low within cortical regions, and whole cortex (average COV = 0.83-1.79%), indicating a high degree of reproducibility in T2 * measures. Surface-based mapping of T2 * relaxation rates as a function of cortical depth is reproducible and could prove useful for studying the laminar architecture of the cerebral cortex in vivo, and for investigating physiological and pathological states associated with changes in iron and/or myelin concentration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    ," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2......-2.5 min of muscle ischemia. MAP increased similarly during static [114 (102-133) mmHg] and heavy dynamic exercise [121 (104-136) mmHg] and increased during muscle ischemia after dynamic exercise. During heavy dynamic exercise, Vmean increased 24% (10-47%; P less than 0.01) over approximately 3 min despite...... constant arterial carbon dioxide tension. In contrast, static exercise with a higher rate of perceived exertion [18 (13-20) vs. 15 (12-18) units; P less than 0.01] was associated with no significant change in Vmean. Muscle ischemia after exercise was not associated with an elevation in Vmean, and it did...

  17. Impairment of tight junctions and glucose transport in endothelial cells of human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Hannah; Errede, Mariella; Ulrich, Nils H; Virgintino, Daniela; Frei, Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-06-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) often cause hemorrhages that can result in severe clinical manifestations, including hemiparesis and seizures. The underlying mechanisms of the aggressive behavior of CCMs are undetermined to date, but alterations of vascular matrix components may be involved. We compared the localization of the tight junction proteins (TJPs) in 12 CCM specimens and the expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), which is sensitive to alterations in TJP levels, in 5 CCM specimens with those in 5 control temporal lobectomy specimens without CCM by immunofluorescence microscopy. The TJPs occludin, claudin-5, and zonula occludens ZO-1 were downregulated at intercellular contact sites and partly redistributed within the surrounding tissue in the CCM samples; there was also a marked reduction of GLUT-1 immunoreactivity compared with that in control specimens. Corresponding analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on 8 CCM and 8 control specimens revealed significant downregulation of mRNA expression of occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1, and GLUT-1. The altered expression and localization of the TJPs at interendothelial contact sites accompanied by a reduction of GLUT-1 expression in dilated CCM microvessels likely affect vascular matrix stability and may contribute to hemorrhages of CCMs.

  18. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  19. A human in vivo study of the extent to which 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy phosphomonoesters index cerebral cell membrane phospholipid anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, B K; Treasaden, I H

    2009-01-01

    The phosphomonoester narrow resonance of human in vivo 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy studies is believed to index the anabolism of cell membrane phospholipids and has therefore been used to study phospholipid anabolism in the brain non-invasively. However, it is an indirect measure of phospholipid metabolism and although it does contain major contributions from phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine and L-phosphoserine, which are important precursors of membrane phospholipids, many other metabolites, including sugar phosphates, can contribute to this region of the spectrum, and separation of these different peaks is not achieved with the present in vivo methodology. Recently, it has become possible to analyze signal directly from the cell membrane motion-restricted phospholipids by analysis of a broad resonance signal. We therefore hypothesized that there should be a positive correlation between the phosphomonoester narrow resonance and the broad resonance signal if the former does indeed index cell membrane phospholipid anabolism. Cerebral 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out in 54 human subjects, including normal volunteers and patients with schizophrenia in order to widen the range of phosphomonoester and broad resonance values. Spectra were obtained from 70x70x70mm(3) voxels using an image-selected in vivo spectroscopy pulse sequence. There was a highly significant positive correlation between the phosphomonoester resonances and the broad resonance signals (r=0.404, Panabolism in brain studies.

  20. PPARγ agonists improve survival and neurocognitive outcomes in experimental cerebral malaria and induce neuroprotective pathways in human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Serghides

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is associated with a high mortality rate, and long-term neurocognitive impairment in approximately one third of survivors. Adjunctive therapies that modify the pathophysiological processes involved in CM may improve outcome over anti-malarial therapy alone. PPARγ agonists have been reported to have immunomodulatory effects in a variety of disease models. Here we report that adjunctive therapy with PPARγ agonists improved survival and long-term neurocognitive outcomes in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA experimental model of CM. Compared to anti-malarial therapy alone, PPARγ adjunctive therapy administered to mice at the onset of CM signs, was associated with reduced endothelial activation, and enhanced expression of the anti-oxidant enzymes SOD-1 and catalase and the neurotrophic factors brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in the brains of infected mice. Two months following infection, mice that were treated with anti-malarials alone demonstrated cognitive dysfunction, while mice that received PPARγ adjunctive therapy were completely protected from neurocognitive impairment and from PbA-infection induced brain atrophy. In humans with P. falciparum malaria, PPARγ therapy was associated with reduced endothelial activation and with induction of neuroprotective pathways, such as BDNF. These findings provide insight into mechanisms conferring improved survival and preventing neurocognitive injury in CM, and support the evaluation of PPARγ agonists in human CM.

  1. Systemic immune challenges trigger and drive Alzheimer-like neuropathology in mice

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    Krstic Dimitrije

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent form of age-related dementia, and its effect on society increases exponentially as the population ages. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation, mediated by the brain’s innate immune system, contributes to AD neuropathology and exacerbates the course of the disease. However, there is no experimental evidence for a causal link between systemic inflammation or neuroinflammation and the onset of the disease. Methods The viral mimic, polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyI:C was used to stimulate the immune system of experimental animals. Wild-type (WT and transgenic mice were exposed to this cytokine inducer prenatally (gestation day (GD17 and/or in adulthood. Behavioral, immunological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical analyses of AD-associated neuropathologic changes were performed during aging. Results We found that a systemic immune challenge during late gestation predisposes WT mice to develop AD-like neuropathology during the course of aging. They display chronic elevation of inflammatory cytokines, an increase in the levels of hippocampal amyloid precursor protein (APP and its proteolytic fragments, altered Tau phosphorylation, and mis-sorting to somatodendritic compartments, and significant impairments in working memory in old age. If this prenatal infection is followed by a second immune challenge in adulthood, the phenotype is strongly exacerbated, and mimics AD-like neuropathologic changes. These include deposition of APP and its proteolytic fragments, along with Tau aggregation, microglia activation and reactive gliosis. Whereas Aβ peptides were not significantly enriched in extracellular deposits of double immune-challenged WT mice at 15 months, they dramatically increased in age-matched immune-challenged transgenic AD mice, precisely around the inflammation-induced accumulations of APP and its proteolytic fragments, in striking similarity to

  2. Transcriptional Alterations Related to Neuropathology and Clinical Manifestation of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Aderbal R. T.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Farfel, Jose M.; Diniz, Breno S.; Lima, Leandro A.; Silva, Paulo J. S.; Ferretti, Renata E. L.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Carraro, Dirce M.; Brentani, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the human population, characterized by a spectrum of neuropathological abnormalities that results in memory impairment and loss of other cognitive processes as well as the presence of non-cognitive symptoms. Transcriptomic analyses provide an important approach to elucidating the pathogenesis of complex diseases like AD, helping to figure out both pre-clinical markers to identify susceptible patients and the early pathogenic mechanisms to serve as therapeutic targets. This study provides the gene expression profile of postmortem brain tissue from subjects with clinic-pathological AD (Braak IV, V, or V and CERAD B or C; and CDR ≥1), preclinical AD (Braak IV, V, or VI and CERAD B or C; and CDR = 0), and healthy older individuals (Braak ≤ II and CERAD 0 or A; and CDR = 0) in order to establish genes related to both AD neuropathology and clinical emergence of dementia. Based on differential gene expression, hierarchical clustering and network analysis, genes involved in energy metabolism, oxidative stress, DNA damage/repair, senescence, and transcriptional regulation were implicated with the neuropathology of AD; a transcriptional profile related to clinical manifestation of AD could not be detected with reliability using differential gene expression analysis, although genes involved in synaptic plasticity, and cell cycle seems to have a role revealed by gene classifier. In conclusion, the present data suggest gene expression profile changes secondary to the development of AD-related pathology and some genes that appear to be related to the clinical manifestation of dementia in subjects with significant AD pathology, making necessary further investigations to better understand these transcriptional findings on the pathogenesis and clinical emergence of AD. PMID:23144955

  3. Correlation of Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes With Cognitive Status: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bouras, Constantin; Braak, Heiko; Cairns, Nigel J.; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Crain, Barbara J.; Davies, Peter; Del Tredici, Kelly; Duyckaerts, Charles; Frosch, Matthew P.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hof, Patrick R.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Kövari, Enikö; Kukull, Walter A.; Leverenz, James B.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Mann, David M.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Thal, Dietmar R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woltjer, Randall L.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Clinicopathologic correlation studies are critically important for the field of Alzheimer disease (AD) research. Studies on human subjects with autopsy confirmation entail numerous potential biases that affect both their general applicability and the validity of the correlations. Many sources of data variability can weaken the apparent correlation between cognitive status and AD neuropathologic changes. Indeed, most persons in advanced old age have significant non-AD brain lesions that may alter cognition independently of AD. Worldwide research efforts have evaluated thousands of human subjects to assess the causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly, and these studies have been interpreted in different ways. We review the literature focusing on the correlation of AD neuropathologic changes (i.e. β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) with cognitive impairment. We discuss the various patterns of brain changes that have been observed in elderly individuals to provide a perspective for understanding AD clinicopathologic correlation and conclude that evidence from many independent research centers strongly supports the existence of a specific disease, as defined by the presence of Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Although Aβ plaques may play a key role in AD pathogenesis, the severity of cognitive impairment correlates best with the burden of neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:22487856

  4. Hemodynamic and neuropathological analysis in rats with aluminum trichloride-induced Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ming Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hemodynamic normality is crucial to maintaining the integrity of cerebral vessels and, therefore, preserving the cognitive functions of Alzheimer's disease patients. This study investigates the implications of the hemodynamic changes and the neuropathological diversifications of AlCl3-induced AD. METHODS: The experimental animals were 8- to 12-wk-old male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a (+control group. Food intake, water intake, and weight changes were recorded daily for 22 wk. Synchronously, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF of the rats with AlCl3-induced AD were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The hemorheological parameters were analyzed using a computerized auto-rotational rheometer. The brain tissue of the subjects was analyzed using immunohistological chemical (IHC staining to determine the beta-amyloid (Aβ levels. RESULTS: The results of hemodynamic analysis revealed that the whole blood viscosity (WBV, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity and RBC aggregation index (RAI in (+control were significantly higher than that of control group, while erythrocyte electrophoresis (EI of whole blood in (+control were significantly lower than that of control group. The results of acetylcholinesterase-RBC (AChE-RBCin the (+control group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The results also show that the reduction of rCBF in rats with AlCl3-induced AD was approximately 50% to 60% that of normal rats. IHC stain results show that significantly more Aβ plaques accumulated in the hippocampus and cortex of the (+control than in the control group. CONCLUSION: The results accentuate the importance of hemorheology and reinforce the specific association between hemodynamic and neuropathological changes in rats with AlCl3-induced AD. Hemorheological parameters, such as WBV and fibrinogen, and AChE-RBC were ultimately proven to be useful biomarkers of the

  5. Effect of short-term exercise-heat acclimation on ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to passive heating at rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hyperthermia induces hyperventilation and cerebral hypoperfusion in resting humans. We tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise-heat acclimation would alleviate those effects. Twenty healthy male subjects were divided into two groups that performed exercise training in the heat (TR-HEAT, n = 10) or cold (TR-COLD, n = 10). Before and after the training, the subjects in both groups participated in passive-heat tests at rest. Training was performed at 37°C (TR-HEAT) or 10°C (TR-COLD) and entailed four 20-min bouts of cycling at 50% peak oxygen uptake separated by 10-min recoveries daily for 6 consecutive days. After TR-HEAT, esophageal temperature was lowered when measured before and during passive heating, as was the esophageal temperature threshold for cutaneous active vasodilation, whereas plasma volume was increased (all P COLD (all P > 0.05). TR-HEAT had no significant effect on passive heating-induced increases in minute ventilation, even when evaluated as the esophageal temperature threshold for increases in minute ventilation and the slope relating minute ventilation to esophageal temperature (all P > 0.05). By contrast, TR-HEAT attenuated the passive heating-induced reduction in the cerebral vascular conductance index (middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity/mean arterial pressure) (all P COLD did not attenuate the increase in minute ventilation or the decrease in the cerebral vascular conductance index observed during passive heating (all P > 0.05). These data suggest that in resting heated humans, short-term heat acclimation achieved through moderate-intensity exercise training (i.e., 50% peak oxygen uptake) in the heat does not influence hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation, but it does potentially attenuate cerebral hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis in the chronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udaka, F.; Okuda, B.; Tsuji, T.; Kameyama, M.; Okada, M.

    1988-02-01

    The CT findings in 5 patients with cerebral paragonimiasis in the chronic state are presented. The findings were: 1) multiple, densely calcified areas with a variety of round or nodular shapes in the brain, 2) a large low density area surrounding or connecting with the calcified areas, and 3) cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation. The relation between the CT findings and the previously reported plain skull X-ray findings or neuropathological findings are discussed.

  7. The first NINDS/NIBIB consensus meeting to define neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Cairns, Nigel J; Dickson, Dennis W; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Keene, C Dirk; Litvan, Irene; Perl, Daniel P; Stein, Thor D; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Stewart, William; Tripodis, Yorghos; Crary, John F; Bieniek, Kevin F; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Alvarez, Victor E; Gordon, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegeneration characterized by the abnormal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein within the brain. Like many other neurodegenerative conditions, at present, CTE can only be definitively diagnosed by post-mortem examination of brain tissue. As the first part of a series of consensus panels funded by the NINDS/NIBIB to define the neuropathological criteria for CTE, preliminary neuropathological criteria were used by 7 neuropathologists to blindly evaluate 25 cases of various tauopathies, including CTE, Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, argyrophilic grain disease, corticobasal degeneration, primary age-related tauopathy, and parkinsonism dementia complex of Guam. The results demonstrated that there was good agreement among the neuropathologists who reviewed the cases (Cohen's kappa, 0.67) and even better agreement between reviewers and the diagnosis of CTE (Cohen's kappa, 0.78). Based on these results, the panel defined the pathognomonic lesion of CTE as an accumulation of abnormal hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) in neurons and astroglia distributed around small blood vessels at the depths of cortical sulci and in an irregular pattern. The group also defined supportive but non-specific p-tau-immunoreactive features of CTE as: pretangles and NFTs affecting superficial layers (layers II-III) of cerebral cortex; pretangles, NFTs or extracellular tangles in CA2 and pretangles and proximal dendritic swellings in CA4 of the hippocampus; neuronal and astrocytic aggregates in subcortical nuclei; thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glial limitans of the subpial and periventricular regions; and large grain-like and dot-like structures. Supportive non-p-tau pathologies include TDP-43 immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dot-like structures in the hippocampus, anteromedial temporal cortex and amygdala. The panel also recommended a minimum blocking and staining scheme for pathological evaluation

  8. A chronic longitudinal characterization of neurobehavioral and neuropathological cognitive impairment in a mouse model of Gulf War agent exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchra eZakirova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gulf War Illness (GWI is a chronic multisymptom illness with a central nervous system component that includes memory impairment as well as neurological and musculoskeletal deficits. Previous studies have shown that in the First Persian Gulf War conflict (1990-1991 exposure to Gulf War (GW agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB and permethrin (PER, were key contributors to the etiology of GWI.For this study, we used our previously established mouse model of GW agent exposure (10 days PB+PER and undertook an extensive lifelong neurobehavioral characterization of the mice from 11 days to 22.5 months post exposure in order to address the persistence and chronicity of effects suffered by the current GWI patient population, 24 years post-exposure. Mice were evaluated using a battery of neurobehavioral testing paradigms, including Open Field Test, Elevated Plus Maze, Three Chamber Testing, Radial Arm Water Maze and Barnes Maze Test. We also carried out neuropathological analyses at 22.5 months post exposure to GW agents after the final behavioral testing. Our results demonstrate that PB+PER exposed mice exhibit neurobehavioral deficits beginning at the 13 months post exposure time point and continuing trends through the 22.5 month post exposure time point. Furthermore, neuropathological changes, including an increase in GFAP staining in the cerebral cortices of exposed mice, were noted 22.5 months post exposure. Thus, the persistent neuroinflammation evident in our model presents a platform with which to identify novel biological pathways, correlating with emergent outcomes that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. Furthermore, in this work we confirmed our previous findings that GW agent exposure causes neuropathological changes, and have presented novel data which demonstrate increased disinhibition, and lack of social preference in PB+PER exposed mice at 13 months after exposure. We also extended upon our previous work to cover the lifespan

  9. Zika Virus: An Emergent Neuropathological Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Martyn K.; Wollebo, Hassen S.; Beckham, J. David; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus in the Americas has followed a pattern that is familiar from earlier epidemics of other viruses, where a new disease is introduced into a human population and then spreads rapidly with important public health consequences. In the case of Zika virus, an accumulating body of recent evidence implicates the virus in the etiology of serious pathologies of the human nervous system, that is, the occurrence of microcephaly in neonates and Guillain–Barré syndrome in adults. Zika virus is an arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) and a member of the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. Zika virions are enveloped and icosahedral, and contain a nonsegmented, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome, which encodes 3 structural and 7 nonstructural proteins that are expressed as a single polyprotein that undergoes cleavage. Zika genomic RNA replicates in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Zika virus was first detected in 1947 in the blood of a febrile monkey in Uganda’s Zika Forest and in crushed suspensions of the Aedes mosquito, which is one of the vectors for Zika virus. The virus remained obscure, with a few human cases confined to Africa and Asia. There are two lineages of the Zika virus, African and Asian, with the Asian strain causing outbreaks in Micronesia in 2007 and French Polynesia in 2013–2014. From here, the virus spread to Brazil with the first report of autochthonous Zika transmission in the Americas in March 2015. The rapid advance of the virus in the Americas and its likely association with microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome make Zika an urgent public health concern. PMID:27464346

  10. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  11. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: the neuropathological legacy of traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E.; Smith, Douglas H.; Stewart, W

    2016-01-01

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy st...

  13. Prospective neuropathological validation of Hachinski's Ischaemic Score in dementias.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Fischer; Jellinger, K; Gatterer, G; Danielczyk, W

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of Hachinski's Ischaemic Score (IS) in the diagnosis of the vascular aetiology of dementia was studied in a series of 32 demented patients, dementia of the Alzheimer type (16), multi-infarct dementia (7), mixed dementia (6), Pick's disease (3), with neuropathological diagnosis as the point of reference. The IS distinguished between primary degenerative dementia and multi-infarct or mixed dementia. As single features of the IS "a positive history of stroke" and ...

  14. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon...

  15. Auditory evoked fields elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal changes in human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko eOkamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30 – 50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously.

  16. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Öz, Gülin

    2015-02-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the (13)C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness.

  17. Joint Spectral Decomposition for the Parcellation of the Human Cerebral Cortex Using Resting-State fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Salim; Parisot, Sarah; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Identification of functional connections within the human brain has gained a lot of attention due to its potential to reveal neural mechanisms. In a whole-brain connectivity analysis, a critical stage is the computation of a set of network nodes that can effectively represent cortical regions. To address this problem, we present a robust cerebral cortex parcellation method based on spectral graph theory and resting-state fMRI correlations that generates reliable parcellations at the single-subject level and across multiple subjects. Our method models the cortical surface in each hemisphere as a mesh graph represented in the spectral domain with its eigenvectors. We connect cortices of different subjects with each other based on the similarity of their connectivity profiles and construct a multi-layer graph, which effectively captures the fundamental properties of the whole group as well as preserves individual subject characteristics. Spectral decomposition of this joint graph is used to cluster each cortical vertex into a subregion in order to obtain whole-brain parcellations. Using rs-fMRI data collected from 40 healthy subjects, we show that our proposed algorithm computes highly reproducible parcellations across different groups of subjects and at varying levels of detail with an average Dice score of 0.78, achieving up to 9% better reproducibility compared to existing approaches. We also report that our group-wise parcellations are functionally more consistent, thus, can be reliably used to represent the population in network analyses.

  18. Neuropathology and Animal Models of Autism: Genetic and Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi S. Gadad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a heterogeneous behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder. It is defined by the presence of marked social deficits, specific language abnormalities, and stereotyped repetitive patterns of behavior. Because of the variability in the behavioral phenotype of the disorder among patients, the term autism spectrum disorder has been established. In the first part of this review, we provide an overview of neuropathological findings from studies of autism postmortem brains and identify the cerebellum as one of the key brain regions that can play a role in the autism phenotype. We review research findings that indicate possible links between the environment and autism including the role of mercury and immune-related factors. Because both genes and environment can alter the structure of the developing brain in different ways, it is not surprising that there is heterogeneity in the behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders. Finally, we describe animal models of autism that occur following insertion of different autism-related genes and exposure to environmental factors, highlighting those models which exhibit both autism-like behavior and neuropathology.

  19. Blood-Brain Barrier Imaging in Human Neuropathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler, Ronel; Shelef, Ilan; Friedman, Alon

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is essential for normal function of the brain, and its role in many brain pathologies has been the focus of numerous studies during the last decades. Dysfunction of the BBB is not only being shown in numerous brain diseases, but animal studies have indicated that it plays a direct key role in the genesis of neurovascular dysfunction and associated neurodegeneration. As such evidence accumulates, the need for robust and clinically applicable methods for minimally invasive assessment of BBB integrity is becoming urgent. This review provides an introduction to BBB imaging methods in the clinical scenario. First, imaging modalities are reviewed, with a focus on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). We then proceed to review image analysis methods, including quantitative and semi-quantitative methods. The advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed, and future directions and questions are highlighted. PMID:25453223

  20. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  1. Autism counts. Stereological studies on human postmortem brains and a mouse model for autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, I.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong genetic component and several known environmental risk factors. Classical neuropathology studies have reported consistent findings in the limbic system, cerebellum and cerebral cortex of patients with autism. However, the neurobiological

  2. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before, during, or soon after birth such as cerebral palsy Stroke Very low blood pressure Brain cells are very sensitive to a lack of ... of the eye to light Exams and Tests Cerebral hypoxia can usually be diagnosed based on the person's medical history and a physical exam. Tests are done to ...

  3. Stimulus rate dependence of regional cerebral blood flow in human striate cortex, demonstrated by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, P.T.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the repetition rate of a simple sensory stimulus and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the human brain. Positron emission tomography (PET), using intravenously administered H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O as the diffusible blood-flow tracer, was employed for all CBF measurements. The use of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O with PET allowed eight CBF measurements to be made in rapid sequence under multiple stimulation conditions without removing the subject from the tomograph. Nine normal volunteers each underwent a series of eight H2(/sup 15/)O PET measurements of CBF. Initial and final scans were made during visual deprivation. The six intervening scans were made during visual activation with patterned-flash stimuli given in random order at 1.0-, 3.9-, 7.8-, 15.5-, 33.1-, and 61-Hz repetition rates. The region of greatest rCBF increase was determined. Within this region the rCBF was determined for every test condition and then expressed as the percentage change from the value of the initial unstimulated scan (rCBF% delta). In every subject, striate cortex rCBF% delta varied systematically with stimulus rate. Between 0 and 7.8 Hz, rCBF% delta was a linear function of stimulus repetition rate. The rCBF response peaked at 7.8 Hz and then declined. The rCBF% delta during visual stimulation was significantly greater than that during visual deprivation for every stimulus rate except 1.0 Hz. The anatomical localization of the region of peak rCBF response was determined for every subject to be the mesial occipital lobes along the calcarine fissure, primary visual cortex. Stimulus rate is a significant determinant of rCBF response in the visual cortex. Investigators of brain responses to selective activation procedures should be aware of the potential effects of stimulus rate on rCBF and other measurements of cerebral metabolism.

  4. Cerebral blood flow and end-tidal PCO2 during prolonged acetazolamide treatment in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Kastrup, J; Rizzi, Dominick Albert

    1990-01-01

    decreasing alveolar PCO2 to 70% of the control value at the end of the treatment period. In healthy humans the hyperventilation will not increase brain oxygenation significantly at sea level. But at high altitudes the enhanced ventilatory drive will improve oxygenation of the brain, and this may account...

  5. Neuropathological features in a female fetus with OPHN1 deletion and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocas, Delphine; Alix, Eudeline; Michel, Jessica; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Labalme, Audrey; Guilbert, Hélène; Till, Marianne; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; de Haas, Pascale; Massardier, Jérôme; Portes, Vincent des; Edery, Patrick; Touraine, Renaud; Guibaud, Laurent; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-05-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old pregnant woman. The third-trimester ultrasound scan during pregnancy revealed fetal bilateral ventricular dilatation, macrosomia and a transverse diameter of the cerebellum at the 30th centile. A brain MRI scan at 31 weeks of gestation led to a diagnosis of hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis without hemisphere abnormalities and a non compressive expansion of the cisterna magna. The fetal karyotype was 46,XX. The pregnancy was terminated and array-CGH analysis of the fetus identified a 238 kb de novo deletion on chromosome Xp12, encompassing part of OPHN1 gene. Further studies revealed a completely skewed pattern of X inactivation. OPHN1 is involved in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with cerebellar hypoplasia and encodes a Rho-GTPase-activating protein called oligophrenin-1, which is produced throughout the developing mouse brain and in the hippocampus and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in adult mice. Neuropathological examination of the female fetus revealed cerebellar hypoplasia and the heterotopia of Purkinje cells at multiple sites in the white matter of the cerebellum. This condition mostly affects male fetuses in humans. We report here the first case of a de novo partial deletion of OPHN1, with radiological and neuropathological examination, in a female fetus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive Impairment, Neuroimaging, and Alzheimer Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Eric D.; Boger, Heather A.; Ledreux, Aurélie; Kelley, Christy M.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Falangola, Maria F.; Guilfoyle, David N.; Nixon, Ralph A.; Patterson, David; Duval, Nathan; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common non-lethal genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in 700 births in the United States of America. DS is characterized by complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy, which leads to variable intellectual disabilities, progressive memory loss, and accelerated neurodegeneration with age. During the last three decades, people with DS have experienced a doubling of life expectancy due to progress in treatment of medical comorbidities, which has allowed this population to reach the age when they develop early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Individuals with DS develop cognitive and pathological hallmarks of AD in their fourth or fifth decade, and are currently lacking successful prevention or treatment options for dementia. The profound memory deficits associated with DS-related AD (DS-AD) have been associated with degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms of neurodegeneration are largely unexplored. The most successful animal model for DS is the Ts65Dn mouse, but several new models have also been developed. In the current review, we discuss recent findings and potential treatment options for the management of memory loss and AD neuropathology in DS mouse models. We also review age-related neuropathology, and recent findings from neuroimaging studies. The validation of appropriate DS mouse models that mimic neurodegeneration and memory loss in humans with DS can be valuable in the study of novel preventative and treatment interventions, and may be helpful in pinpointing gene-gene interactions as well as specific gene segments involved in neurodegeneration. PMID:26391050

  7. Effects of aging on the cerebral distribution of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime in healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozley, P.D. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Sadek, A.M. [The University of Cairo (Egypt); Alavi, A. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Gur, R.C. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Muenz, L.R. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Bunow, B.J. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Kim, H> J. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Stecker, M.H. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Jolles, P. [The Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (United States); Newberg, A. [The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Some brain functions decline at a linear rate throughout adulthood. Others remain relatively stable until very late in the life cycle. This study characterized the effects of aging on the regional cerebral distribution of hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) in healthy human volunteers. The sample consisted of 26 men and 18 women with a mean age of 41.6{+-}14.9 years (range: 19-73). Their past medical histories, physical examinations, and laboratory screening tests were normal. Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scans of the brain were performed with a standardized acquisition and processing protocol on a triple-headed camera equipped with fan beam collimators. A 3-D restorative filter and a correction for uniform attenuation were applied before the images were reinterpolated in planes parallel to the line connecting the frontal and occipital poles. Mean counts per pixel were measured in multiple regions of interest (ROIs) within each hemisphere by custom fitting a set of templates to the images. The mean activity in each ROI was compared with the mean activity per pixel in the whole brain. Regression analyses were used to relate the activity ratios to age with both linear and nonlinear models. The relative concentration of radioactivity decreased significantly with age in most, but not all, gray matter structures. It increased in the white matter regions. The nonlinear model of aging fit the data significantly better than a straight line did. Most of the changes with age occurred during young adulthood. No further changes were detectable after the onset of middle age. The median breakpoint age at which the rate of change became negligible was 36.6 years. Aging significantly affects the relative uptake of HMPAO in healthy humans. It decreases in many gray matter regions and increases in most white matter regions. However, the changes do not appear to be linear. Most seem to occur during young adulthood before people reach their late thirties. (orig

  8. Effects of aging on the cerebral distribution of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, P D; Sadek, A M; Alavi, A; Gur, R C; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B J; Kim, H J; Stecker, M H; Jolles, P; Newberg, A

    1997-07-01

    Some brain functions decline at a linear rate throughout adulthood. Others remain relatively stable until very late in the life cycle. This study characterized the effects of aging on the regional cerebral distribution of hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) in healthy human volunteers. The sample consisted of 26 men and 18 women with a mean age of 41.6+/-14.9 years (range: 19-73). Their past medical histories, physical examinations, and laboratory screening tests were normal. Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scans of the brain were performed with a standardized acquisition and processing protocol on a triple-headed camera equipped with fan beam collimators. A 3-D restorative filter and a correction for uniform attenuation were applied before the images were reinterpolated in planes parallel to the line connecting the frontal and occipital poles. Mean counts per pixel were measured in multiple regions of interest (ROIs) within each hemisphere by custom fitting a set of templates to the images. The mean activity in each ROI was compared with the mean activity per pixel in the whole brain. Regression analyses were used to relate the activity ratios to age with both linear and nonlinear models. The relative concentration of radioactivity decreased significantly with age in most, but not all, gray matter structures. It increased in the white matter regions. The nonlinear model of aging fit the data significantly better than a straight line did. Most of the changes with age occurred during young adulthood. No further changes were detectable after the onset of middle age. The median breakpoint age at which the rate of change became negligible was 36.6 years. Aging significantly affects the relative uptake of HMPAO in healthy humans. It decreases in many gray matter regions and increases in most white matter regions. However, the changes do not appear to be linear. Most seem to occur during young adulthood before people reach their late thirties. The

  9. Stereological estimation of total cell numbers in the human cerebral and cerebellar cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walløe, Solveig; Pakkenberg, Bente; Fabricius, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the relationship between brain structure and cognitive function is still limited. Human brains and individual cortical areas vary considerably in size and shape. Studies of brain cell numbers have historically been based on biased methods, which did not always result in correct...... brain cell populations, and disease-related changes associated with a loss of function. In that this article concerns normal brain rather than brain disorders, it focuses on normal brain development in humans and age related changes in terms of cell numbers. For comparative purposes a few examples...... estimates and were often very time-consuming. Within the last 20-30 years, it has become possible to rely on more advanced and unbiased methods. These methods have provided us with information about fetal brain development, differences in cell numbers between men and women, the effect of age on selected...

  10. Rapid Induction of Cerebral Organoids From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Chemically Defined Hydrogel and Defined Cell Culture Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Beth A; Brekke, John H; Vegoe, Amanda L; Ulrich, Connor B; Haider, Kerri T; Subramaniam, Sandhya; Venhuizen, Scott L; Eide, Cindy R; Orchard, Paul J; Chen, Weili; Wang, Qi; Pelaez, Francisco; Scott, Carolyn M; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Keirstead, Susan A; Dutton, James R; Tolar, Jakub; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue organoids are a promising technology that may accelerate development of the societal and NIH mandate for precision medicine. Here we describe a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids (cOrgs) from human pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. By using no additional neural induction components, cOrgs appeared on the hydrogel surface within 10-14 days, and under static culture conditions, they attained sizes up to 3 mm in greatest dimension by day 28. Histologically, the organoids showed neural rosette and neural tube-like structures and evidence of early corticogenesis. Immunostaining and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated protein and gene expression representative of forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain development. Physiologic studies showed responses to glutamate and depolarization in many cells, consistent with neural behavior. The method of cerebral organoid generation described here facilitates access to this technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. Tissue organoids are a promising technology with many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical screens and development of in vitro disease models, particularly for human polygenic conditions where animal models are insufficient. This work describes a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. This method, by virtue of its simplicity and use of defined materials, greatly facilitates access to cerebral organoid technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Macrophage imbalance (M1 vs. M2 and upregulation of mast cells in wall of ruptured human cerebral aneurysms: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan David

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background M1 and M2 cells are two major subsets of human macrophages that exert opposite effects on the inflammatory response. This study aims to investigate the role of macrophage M1/M2 imbalance and mast cells in the progression of human cerebral aneurysms to rupture. Methods Ten patients with cerebral aneurysms (five ruptured and five unruptured underwent microsurgical clipping. During the procedure, a segment of the aneurysm dome was resected and immunostained with monoclonal antibodies for M1 cells (anti-HLA DR, M2 cells (anti-CD 163, and mast cells (anti-tryptase clone AA. A segment of the superficial temporal artery (STA was also removed and immunostained with monoclonal antibodies for M1, M2, and mast cells. Results All ten aneurysm tissues stained positive for M1, M2, and mast cells. M1 and M2 cells were present in equal proportions in unruptured aneurysms. This contrasted with a marked predominance of M1 over M2 cells in ruptured aneurysms (p = 0.045. Mast cells were also prominently upregulated in ruptured aneurysms (p = 0.001. Few M1 and M2 cells were present in STA samples. Conclusions M1/M2 macrophages and mast cells are found in human cerebral aneurysms; however, M1 and mast cell expression seems to markedly increase in ruptured aneurysms. These findings suggest that macrophage M1/M2 imbalance and upregulation of mast cells may have a role in the progression of cerebral aneurysms to rupture.

  12. Neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex of humans and other haplorrhine primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Conley, Tiffini; Sudduth, Jessica; Erwin, Joseph M.; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the distribution of neurons immunoreactive for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the posterior part of the superior temporal cortex (Brodmann's area 22 or area Tpt) of humans and nonhuman haplorrhine primates. NPY has been implicated in learning and memory and the density of NPY-expressing cortical neurons and axons is reduced in depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Due to the role that NPY plays in both cognition and neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that the density of cortical and interstitial neurons expressing NPY was increased in humans relative to other primate species. The study sample included great apes (chimpanzee and gorilla), Old World monkeys (pigtailed macaque, moor macaque, and baboon) and New World monkeys (squirrel monkey and capuchin). Stereologic methods were used to estimate the density of NPY-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons in layers I-VI of area Tpt and the subjacent white matter. Adjacent Nissl-stained sections were used to calculate local densities of all neurons. The ratio of NPY-ir neurons to total neurons within area Tpt and the total density of NPY-ir neurons within the white matter were compared among species. Overall, NPY-ir neurons represented only an average of 0.006% of the total neuron population. While there were significant differences among species, phylogenetic trends in NPY-ir neuron distributions were not observed and humans did not differ from other primates. However, variation among species warrants further investigation into the distribution of this neuromodulator system. PMID:23042407

  13. Atypical neuropathological sCJD-MM phenotype with abundant white matter Kuru-type plaques sparing the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ellen; Soler Insa, Josep Ma; Parchi, Piero; Saverioni, Daniela; Yagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Ribalta, Teresa; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    We describe an atypical neuropatholgical phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 64-year-old man presenting with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia, comprising behavioral disturbances, memory complaints, disorientation and language alterations. MRI showed diffuse atrophy and hyperintensities in parietal, occipital, temporal and frontal cortices and left caudate nucleus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. No typical EEG alterations were observed. Repeated 14-3-3 assay was positive after a first negative test. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes with small cortical foci of large confluent vacuoles and relatively well-preserved cerebellar cortex. The most striking feature was the presence of abundant Kuru-type plaques in both cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. Sparse Kuru-type plaques were also seen in cerebellum, although only in white matter. Immunohistochemistry showed, in addition to unicentric plaques, diffuse synaptic and patchy perivacuolar, as well as plaque-like and periaxonal pathological prion protein deposits (PrP(res) ). Western blot studies demonstrated the co-occurrence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2 in frontal cortex and a relatively weak type 2 signal in cerebellum. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 and excluded mutations. This case shows a previously undescribed combination of histopathological features which preclude its classification according to the current phenotypic and molecular sCJD classification. The observation demonstrates that Kuru-type amyloid plaques mainly involving the cerebral white matter may also occur in sCJD cases with short clinical course and the co-existence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2. This case further highlights the complexity of the correlations between histopathological phenotype and PrP(res) isotype in prion diseases. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Olfactory Cerebral Evoked Potentials for Pleasant and Unpleasant Smells in Humans

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    Tomohiko Igasaki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between sensory estimation and evoked potential when pleasant or unpleasant smell delivered to human nose was investigated. Ten healthy men participated. First, the subject was presented gamma-undecalactone (pleasant smell or isovaleric acid (unpleasant smell, and instructed to estimate the odor magnitude and pleasantness/unpleasantness (sensory test session. Then, evoked potentials of the subject were measured from 19 scalp electrodes when pleasant or unpleasant smell were delivered 100 times to the subject, respectively (EEG measurement session. In the sensory test session, both the evaluation of odor magnitude and pleasantness/unpleasantness were significantly changed according to the concentration of smells. On the Pz scalp electrode, the positive potentials at the latency of 610 ms and 450 ms were observed in the pleasant and unpleasant stimulation, respectively. Statistically, it was found that the variance of the positive potential latency in unpleasant stimulation was significantly smaller than that in pleasant stimulation. It was also found that the positive potential latency in unpleasant stimulation was significantly earlier than that in pleasant stimulation. The small variance of latency and the earlier latency for unpleasant smell could be considered to reflect human behavior, such as quick reaction for avoiding dangerous odor to save one's life.

  15. Murine versus human apolipoprotein E4: differential facilitation of and co-localization in cerebral amyloid angiopathy and amyloid plaques in APP transgenic mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J.; Jiang, Hong; Lefton, Katheryn B; Robinson, Grace O.; Vassar, Robert; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Holtzman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Amyloid ? (A?) accumulates in the extracellular space as diffuse and neuritic plaques in Alzheimer?s disease (AD). A? also deposits on the walls of arterioles as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in most cases of AD and sometimes independently of AD. Apolipoprotein E (apoE) ?4 is associated with increases in both A? plaques and CAA in humans. Studies in mouse models that develop A? deposition have shown that murine apoE and human apoE4 have different abilities to facilitate plaqu...

  16. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H; van Lieshout, J J

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2 the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established.

  17. Clinical and pathological study on 10 cases of cerebral lobe hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qi LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical data and pathological features of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA diagnosed pathologically, thereby to improve the knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. Methods The clinical data of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA, collected in the General Hospital of Shenyang Command from 1983 up to now, were retrospectively analyzed, and the clinical and neuropathological features of these cases were summarized. Results Of the 10 patients, 2 suffered from single lobar hemorrhage and 8 multiple lobar hemorrhage, all of them were confirmed pathologically to have ruptured into the subarachnoid space. Pathological examination revealed microaneurysm in 2 cases, "double barrel" change in 4 cases, multiple arteriolar clusters in 5 cases, obliterative onion-liked intima change in 4 cases, and fibrinoid necrosis of vessel wall in 7 cases. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles were found in 8 cases, and senile plaque was observed in 5 cases. Conclusions Cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA is mainly located in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, readily breaking into the subarachnoid space, and it is often multiple and recurrent. The CAA associated microvasculopathy was found frequently in the autopsy sample of CAA related cerebral lobar hemorrhage, and it may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.04

  18. An autopsy case of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome manifesting as cerebral hemiatrophy in an elderly man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Tamaki; Yoshida, Mari; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Sato, Shinya; Nokura, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    We report an autopsy case of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome in a 79-year-old man. HHE syndrome usually occurs in children younger than 4 years of age. Although most HHE syndrome patients live into adult life, only a few cases of the syndrome have been reported in the elderly. In our case, cerebral hemiatrophy, left mesial temporal sclerosis and crossed cerebellar atrophy were observed. Because this is the oldest case ever reported, we further investigated age-related neuropathological changes and found an interhemispheric difference in amyloid-β-related neuropathologic changes. There were almost no senile plaques or amyloid-laden vessels in the left hemisphere. As far as we know, this is the first report of age-related neuropathology in a brain manifesting HHE syndrome. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Cerebral aneurysms associated with human immunodeficiency virus in adults: literature review and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Campostrini Pagiola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has been decreasing patient morbidity and mortality by opportunistic infections and, thus, survival has increased. This new reality has been changing the spectrum of diseases affecting such patients. Objective: to discuss the association between HIV and the emergence of aneurysmal brain injuries. Method: it was performed a literature review using medical database. The following descriptors were searched: "Intracranial Aneurysms and HIV", "Intracranial Aneurysms and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome," "aneurysm and brain and HIV". Results: after performed a literature review, it was observed that the relationship between HIV infection and the formation of aneurysms appears to be real, however, it still lacks data to confirm the pathophysiology of this condition and its best treatment. Conclusion: there are new signs and symptoms that should be studied and researched relating HIV with other changes not previously known.

  20. Cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate consumption in humans driven by adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas S; Brassard, Patrice; Jørgensen, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    (1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist metroprolol. These observations suggest involvement of a beta(2)-adrenergic mechanism in non-oxidative metabolism for the brain. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of adrenaline (0.08 microg kg(-1) min(-1) i.v. for 15 min) and noradrenaline (0.5, 0.1 and 0.15 microg...... kg(-1) min(-1) i.v. for 20 min) on the arterial to internal jugular venous concentration differences (a-v diff) of O(2), glucose and lactate in healthy humans. Adrenaline (n = 10) increased the arterial concentrations of O(2), glucose and lactate (P ... from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 0.8 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/- s.d.; P adrenaline...

  1. XeCl excimer laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy for human cerebral tumor diagnosis: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrillier, Sigrid; Hor, Frederic; Desgeorges, Michel; Ettori, Dominique; Sitbon, Jean R.

    1993-09-01

    Three-hundred-eight nm laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of the normal human brain, astrocytoma grade IV and glioblastoma grade IV specimens, have been recorded in vitro two hours after surgical resection. Typical fluorescence spectra for normal (N) and malignant (M) tissue show 4 maxima at about 352, 362, 383, and 460 nm. These spectra are analyzed in detail. Subtle differences in normalized spectra of N and M tissues appear to be large enough for diagnosis. Several criteria such as maxima and minima absolute intensity and intensity ratios at typical wavelengths are computed and used to classify the tissue. This preliminary study shows that fluorescence spectroscopy with 308 nm UV excitation could be a valid technique for discriminating tumor types. However, it should be noted that these measurements are made in vitro. Living tissues may have different spectral characteristics, therefore future in vivo investigations must be performed.

  2. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  3. Third harmonic generation imaging of intact human cerebral organoids to assess key components of early neurogenesis in Rett Syndrome (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Murat; Feldman, Danielle; Wang, Tianyu; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Chou, Stephanie; Swaney, Justin; Chung, Kwanghun; Xu, Chris; So, Peter T. C.; Sur, Mriganka

    2017-02-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive, X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. It is mostly caused by a sporadic mutation in the gene encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2).The clinical features of RTT are most commonly reported to emerge between the ages of 6-18 months and implicating RTT as a disorder of postnatal development. However, a variety of recent evidence from our lab and others demonstrates that RTT phenotypes are present at the earliest stages of brain development including neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. We have used RTT patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to generate 3D human cerebral organoids that can serve as a model for human neurogenesis in vitro. We aim to expand on our existing findings in order to determine aberrancies at individual stages of neurogenesis by performing structural and immunocytochemical staining in isogenic control and MeCP2-deficient organoids. In addition, we aim to use Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy as a label-free, nondestructive 3D tissue visualization method in order to gain a complete understanding of the structural complexity that underlies human neurogenesis. As a proof of concept, we have performed THG imaging in healthy intact human cerebral organoids cleared with SWITCH. We acquired an intrinsic THG signal with the following laser configurations: 400 kHz repetition rate, 65 fs pulse width laser at 1350 nm wavelength. In these THG images, nuclei are clearly delineated and cross sections demonstrate the depth penetration capacity (< 1mm) that extends throughout the organoid. Imaging control and MeCP2-deficient human cerebral organoids in 2D sections reveals structural and protein expression-based alterations that we expect will be clearly elucidated via both THG and three-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Therapy for Cerebral Palsy by Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Combined With Basic Rehabilitation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Zhang MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause leading to childhood disability. Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs transplantation is a promising alternative considering the safety and efficacy in current reports. This report represents a case of hUCB-MSCs transplantation combined with basic rehabilitation treatment beginning as early as age 6 months with follow-up as long as 5 years. Methods. A 6-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CP at age 6 months. The patient accepted 4 infusions of intravenous hUCB-MSCs in each course and received 4 courses of transplantation totally. A series of assessments were performed before the first transplantation, including laboratory tests, CDCC Infant Mental Development Scale, and Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88. Then annual assessments using the GMFM-88, Ashworth spasm assessment, and comprehensive function assessment scale were made in addition to the annual laboratory tests. In addition, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging were conducted before transplantation and in the follow-up phase. Rehabilitation and safety follow-up have been ongoing for 5 years up to date. Results. There was no complaint about adverse effects during hospitalization or postoperative follow-up. Motor function recovered to normal level according to the evaluation of scales. Language function improved significantly. Linguistic rehabilitation therapy was enhanced for further improvement. Conclusions. The clinical application of hUC-MSCs combined with basic rehabilitation treatment was effective and safe for improving motor and comprehensive function in a patient with CP.

  5. The contribution of CXCL12-expressing radial glia cells to neuro-vascular patterning during human cerebral cortex development

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    Mariella eErrede

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on human developing brain by laser confocal and transmission electron microscopy to make a detailed analysis of important features of blood-brain barrier microvessels and possible control mechanisms of vessel growth and differentiation during cerebral cortex vascularization. The blood-brain barrier status of cortex microvessels was examined at a defined stage of cortex development, at the end of neuroblast waves of migration and before cortex lamination, with blood-brain barrier-endothelial cell markers, namely tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5 and influx and efflux transporters (Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein, the latter supporting evidence for functional effectiveness of the fetal blood-brain barrier. According to the well-known roles of astroglia cells on microvessel growth and differentiation, the early composition of astroglia/endothelial cell relationships was analysed by detecting the appropriate astroglia, endothelial, and pericyte markers. GFAP, chemokine CXCL12, and connexin 43 (Cx43 were utilized as markers of radial glia cells, CD105 (endoglin as a marker of angiogenically activated endothelial cells, and proteoglycan NG2 as a marker of immature pericytes. Immunolabeling for CXCL12 showed the highest level of the ligand in radial glial fibres in contact with the growing cortex microvessels. These specialized contacts, recognizable on both perforating radial vessels and growing collaterals, appeared as CXCL12-reactive en passant, symmetrical and asymmetrical vessel-specific RG fibre swellings. At the highest confocal resolution, these RG varicosities showed a CXCL12-reactive dot-like content whose microvesicular nature was confirmed by ultrastructural observations. A further analysis of radial glial varicosities reveals colocalization of CXCL12 with connexin Cx43, which is possibly implicated in vessel-specific chemokine signalling.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Meta-analysis of Neuropathologic Features of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Beecham, Gary W.; Hamilton, Kara; Adam C Naj; Martin, Eden R; Huentelman, Matt; Myers, Amanda J.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Hardy, John; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Younkin, Steven G.; Bennett, David A.; Philip L De Jager; Larson, Eric B.; Crane, Paul K.; Kamboh, M Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias are a major public health challenge and present a therapeutic imperative for which we need additional insight into molecular pathogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study and analysis of known genetic risk loci for AD dementia using neuropathologic data from 4,914 brain autopsies. Neuropathologic data were used to define clinico-pathologic AD dementia or controls, assess core neuropathologic features of AD (neuritic plaques, NPs; neu...

  7. Patient-tailored multimodal neuroimaging, visualization and quantification of human intra-cerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Sheng-Yang M.; Irimia, Andrei; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2016-03-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the heterogeneity of lesion sizes and types necessitates a variety of imaging modalities to acquire a comprehensive perspective on injury extent. Although it is advantageous to combine imaging modalities and to leverage their complementary benefits, there are difficulties in integrating information across imaging types. Thus, it is important that efforts be dedicated to the creation and sustained refinement of resources for multimodal data integration. Here, we propose a novel approach to the integration of neuroimaging data acquired from human patients with TBI/ICH using various modalities; we also demonstrate the integrated use of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data for TBI analysis based on both visual observations and quantitative metrics. 3D models of healthy-appearing tissues and TBIrelated pathology are generated, both of which are derived from multimodal imaging data. MRI volumes acquired using FLAIR, SWI, and T2 GRE are used to segment pathology. Healthy tissues are segmented using user-supervised tools, and results are visualized using a novel graphical approach called a `connectogram', where brain connectivity information is depicted within a circle of radially aligned elements. Inter-region connectivity and its strength are represented by links of variable opacities drawn between regions, where opacity reflects the percentage longitudinal change in brain connectivity density. Our method for integrating, analyzing and visualizing structural brain changes due to TBI and ICH can promote knowledge extraction and enhance the understanding of mechanisms underlying recovery.

  8. Cerebral glial tumors and human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. More than a coincidental association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulignier, A; Mikol, J; Pialoux, G; Eliaszewicz, M; Thurel, C; Thiebaut, J B

    1994-07-15

    The authors describe the clinical and morphologic patterns in four patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed intracranial glial tumors. This retrospective study reports 70 patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy for an intracerebral space-occupying lesion. Of these patients, four had glial tumors: one astroblastoma, two astrocytomas, and one glioblastoma. Glial tumors probably arise from a complex interplay of factors; possibilities include the activation of a dominant oncogene or viral inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene by a viral promoter (like the tat protein), impairment of immune defenses (which facilitates the growth of astrocytomas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia), production of cellular growth factors, cytokines, possible infection of glial cells by HIV, and the potentiation of a coinfectious agent. These cases illustrate that glial tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain masses in HIV-1 infection, especially because specific treatment for these tumors is available. Moreover, the occurrence of glial tumors in AIDS patients is not only an important event from a clinical point of view, but may also have implications for the pathogenesis of tumors in AIDS.

  9. Cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... chap 598. Nass R, Sidhu R, Ross G. Autism and other developmental disabilities. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  10. Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Cephalic Disorders Information Page NINDS Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Information Page NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page ... Information Page Adrenoleukodystrophy Information Page Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Information Page Agnosia Information Page Aicardi-Goutieres ...

  11. Neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic-crush asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraj, Safa; Laxton, Ross; Swift, Ben; Kolar, Alexander J; Chapman, Rob C; Fegan-Earl, Ashley W; Cary, Nat R B

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic (crush) asphyxia is a rare condition caused by severe compression of the chest and trunk leading to often extreme so-called asphyxial signs, including cyanosis in head and neck regions, multiple petechiae, and subconjunctival haemorrhage as well as neurological manifestations. To investigate the neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic asphyxia caused by different accidents such as industrial accidents and road traffic collision. Post mortem records of 20 cases of traumatic asphyxia (TA) resulting from different causes of which four brains are available for comprehensive neuropathological examination. The expected brain weights for given body height and associated 95% confidence range were calculated according to the following formula: baseline brain weight (BBW) + body height x rate (g/cm). The 95% confidence range was calculated by adding and subtracting the standard error (SE) x 1.96 (7-8). There was a trend for higher brain weight in the TA cohort but it was not significant (1494 g vs 1404 g, p = 0.1). The upper limits of the brain weight of 95% confidence was 1680 g vs 1660 g, p = 0.9. The neuropathological examination of four available brains from the TA cohort showed severe congestion of blood vessels, perivascular haemorrhages and occasional βAPP deposits consistent with early axonal disruption. Brain examination is informative as part of investigation of TA. Developing ischaemic changes and an increase in brain weight are the most likely indicators of a prolonged period of patient's survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Arendash

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF

  13. Lipopolysaccharide infusion enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation without affecting cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Plovsing, Ronni R; Evans, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation in a h...... in a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during the early stages of sepsis....

  14. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  15. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dirk Keene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2 structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG, and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3 cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines

  16. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, C Dirk; Darvas, Martin; Kraemer, Brian; Liggitt, Denny; Sigurdson, Christina; Ladiges, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2) structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3) cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines and standards

  17. Severe neonatal epileptic encephalopathy and KCNQ2 mutation: neuropathological substrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eDalen Meurs-Van Der Schoor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Neonatal convulsions are clinical manifestations in a heterogeneous group of disorders with different etiology and outcome. They are attributed to several genetic causes. Methods:We describe a patient with intractable neonatal seizures who died from respiratory compromise during a status epilepticus. Results:This case report provides EEG, MRI, genetic analysis and neuropathological data. Genetic analysis revealed a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ2 gene, which encodes a subunit of a voltage-gated potassium channel. KCNQ2 gene mutation is associated with intractable neonatal seizures. EEG, MRI data as well as mutation analysis have been described in other KCNQ2 cases. Postmortem neuropathologic investigation revealed mild malformation of cortical development with increased heterotopic neurons in the deep white matter compared to an age-matched control subject. The new finding of this study is the combination of a KCNQ2 mutation and the cortical abnormalities. Conclusions:KCNQ2 mutations should be considered in neonates with refractory epilepsy of unknown cause. The mild cortical malformation is an important new finding, though it remains unknown whether these cortical abnormalities are due to the KCNQ2 mutation or are secondary to the refractory seizures.

  18. Neuropathologic assessment of dementia markers in identical and fraternal twins

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    Iacono, Diego; Volkman, Inga; Nennesmo, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Johansson, Boo; Karlsson, David; Winblad, Bengt; Gatz, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Twin studies are an incomparable source of investigation to shed light on genetic and non-genetic components of neurodegenerative diseases, as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Detailed clinicopathologic correlations using twin longitudinal data and postmortem examinations are mostly missing. We describe clinical and pathologic findings of 7 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. Our findings show good agreement between clinical and pathologic diagnoses in the majority of the twin pairs, with greater neuropathologic concordance in MZ than DZ twins. Greater neuropathologic concordance was found for β-amyloid than tau pathology within the pairs. ApoE4 was associated with higher β-amyloid and earlier dementia onset, and importantly, higher frequency of other co-occurring brain pathologies, regardless of the zygosity. Dementia onset, dementia duration, difference between twins in age at dementia onset and at death, did not correlate with AD pathology. These clinicopathologic correlations of older identical and fraternal twins support the relevance of genetic factors in AD, but not their sufficiency to determine the pathology, and consequently the disease, even in monozygotic twins. It is the interaction among genetic and non-genetic risks which plays a major role in influencing, or probably determining, the degeneration of those brain circuits associated with pathology and cognitive deficits in AD. PMID:24450926

  19. Neuropathologic Studies of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA)

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    O’Brien, Richard J.; Resnick, Susan M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Crain, Barbara J.; Pletnikova, Olga; Rudow, Gay; Iacono, Diego; Riudavets, Miguel A.; Driscoll, Ira; Price, Donald L.; Martin, Lee J.; Troncoso, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) was established in 1958 and is one the oldest prospective studies of aging in the USA and the world. The BLSA is supported by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and its mission is to learn what happens to people as they get old and how to sort out changes due to aging and from those due to disease or other causes. In 1986, an autopsy program combined with comprehensive neurologic and cognitive evaluations was established in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC). Since then, 211 subjects have undergone autopsy. Here we review the key clinical neuropathological correlations from this autopsy series. The focus is on the morphological and biochemical changes that occur in normal aging, and the early neuropathological changes of neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We highlight the combined clinical, pathologic, morphometric, and biochemical evidence of asymptomatic AD, a state characterized by normal clinical evaluations in subjects with abundant AD pathology. We conclude that in some individuals, successful cognitive aging results from compensatory mechanisms that occur at the neuronal level (i.e., neuronal hypertrophy and synaptic plasticity) whereas a failure of compensation may culminate in disease. PMID:19661626

  20. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E.; Smith, Douglas H.; Stewart, William

    2017-01-01

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of non-boxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  1. Mental stress and cognitive performance do not increase overall level of cerebral O2 uptake in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1992-01-01

    stress induced a slight but highly significant (P less than 0.002) 6% reduction in global CMRO2. This finding is in contrast to results from earlier investigations and contradicts the generally accepted notion of an association between mental arousal and a diffuse upregulation of cerebral synaptic...

  2. The neuropathological foundations for the restorative neurology of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakulas, Byron A; Kaelan, Cahyono

    2015-02-01

    An appreciation of the neuropathology of human spinal cord injury (SCI) is a basic requirement for all concerned with the medical treatment of patients with SCI as well as for the many neuroscientists devoted to finding a "cure". An understanding of the neuropathology of SCI is a necessary guide to those concerned at all levels of treatment, whether they are doctors or other health professionals. The underlying changes in the spinal cord are especially relevant to the restorative neurology (RN) of SCI. The new discipline of RN seeks to enhance the function of residual spinal cord elements which have survived the injury and so improve the patient's rehabilitative status. This is in contrast to the conventional approach in rehabilitation which works around the clinical neurological deficiencies. Following the injury a series of changes take place in the spinal cord and surrounding tissues which continue to evolve throughout the life of the patient. In flexion and extension injuries resulting from motor vehicle trauma, diving and sporting accidents the spinal cord is compressed and disrupted but usually with some continuity remaining in the white matter columns. The brunt of the injury is usually centrally placed where there is bleeding into the disrupted grey matter involving one two segments, usually cervical. The loss of central grey matter is nowhere near as important as is the tearing apart of the white matter tracts in determining the patient's clinical state. The central grey matter supplies one two overlapping segmental myotomes and sensory fields. In contrast loss of continuity in the long white matter tracts is catastrophic because all functions below the level of injury are affected, autonomic or voluntary either by paralysis or anaesthesia, usually both. It is important to determine the exact nature of the injury in every patient as a preliminary to treatment by RN. This assessment is both clinical and neurophysiological with special attention given to any

  3. Repulsive Guidance Molecule a (RGMa) Induces Neuropathological and Behavioral Changes That Closely Resemble Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecka, Joanna A; Moloney, Elizabeth B; Eggers, Ruben; Hobo, Barbara; Scheffer, Sanny; Ras-Verloop, Nienke; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Swaab, Dick F; Smit, August B; van Kesteren, Ronald E; Bossers, Koen; Verhaagen, Joost

    2017-09-27

    Repulsive guidance molecule member a (RGMa) is a membrane-associated or released guidance molecule that is involved in axon guidance, cell patterning, and cell survival. In our previous work, we showed that RGMa is significantly upregulated in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we demonstrate the expression of RGMa in midbrain human dopaminergic (DA) neurons. To investigate whether RGMa might model aspects of the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease in mouse, we targeted RGMa to adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons using adeno-associated viral vectors. Overexpression of RGMa resulted in a progressive movement disorder, including motor coordination and imbalance, which is typical for a loss of DA release in the striatum. In line with this, RGMa induced selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and affected the integrity of the nigrostriatal system. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons was accompanied by a strong microglia and astrocyte activation. The behavioral, molecular, and anatomical changes induced by RGMa in mice are remarkably similar to the clinical and neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. Our data indicate that dysregulation of RGMa plays an important role in the pathology of Parkinson's disease, and antibody-mediated functional interference with RGMa may be a disease modifying treatment option.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe motor dysfunction due to progressive degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. To date, there is no regenerative treatment available. We previously showed that repulsive guidance molecule member a (RGMa) is upregulated in the substantia nigra of PD patients. Adeno-associated virus-mediated targeting of RGMa to mouse DA neurons showed that overexpression of this repulsive axon guidance and cell patterning cue models the behavioral and

  4. Cerebral Anatomy of the Spider Monkey Ateles Geoffroyi Studied Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. First Report: a Comparative Study with the Human Brain Homo Sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Chico-Ponce de León

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present qualitative studywas to analyze the morphological aspects of theinner cerebral anatomy of two species of primates,using magnetic resonance images (MRI:spider monkey (A. geoffroyi and human (H.sapiens, on the basis of a comparative study ofthe cerebral structures of the two species, focusingupon the brain of the spider monkey and,primarily, its limbic system. In spite of beingan endemic Western hemisphere species, a factwhich is by its own right interesting for researchdue to this animal’s social organization and motorfunctions, the spider monkey (A. geoffroyihas hardly been studied in regard to its neuroanatomy.MRI was carried out, in one spidermonkey, employing a General Electric Signa1.5 T scanner. This investigation was carried inaccordance to international regulations for theprotection of animals in captivity, taking intoaccount all protective means utilized in experimentalhandling, and not leaving behind any residualeffects, either physiological or behavioral.From a qualitative point of view, the brains ofthe spider monkey and the human were found to have similar structures. In reference to shape,the most similar structures were found in thelimbic system; proportionally, however, cervical curvature, amygdala, hippocampus, anteriorcommissure and the colliculi, were larger in thespider monkey than in the human.

  5. [Neuropathology of sudden infant death syndrome: Review of the literature and proposal of a protocol for neuropathological examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Clémence; Meyronet, David; Maues de Paula, Andre; Jouvet, Anne; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique

    2018-02-08

    According to the French High Authority for Health, sudden unexpected death in infants (SUDI) is defined as "a sudden death that occurs in an infant, whereas nothing in its known history could have predicted it". This is an exclusion diagnosis. There are great interregional disparities despite the professional recommendations established in February 2007. For the examination of the brain, instructions are not adapted to current and research practice. The role of the pathologist, like anyone involved in SUDI, is to eliminate an abuse head trauma and to determine the cause of death. Major neuropathological lesions by definition do not exist. Lesions of hypoxia/ischemia are the most frequent but not specific. The accessibility of anti-APP immunoblotting has highlighted the role of anoxia in the development of axonal diffuse damages. Many studies are looking for a neurological substratum of the SUDI (neuropathological and/or neurobiochinic). This article aims to define a detailed sampling protocol based on foreign consensus and current data of science in order to assist pathologists and to promote a homogeneous data bank in France. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Dogs with Cognitive Dysfunction as a Spontaneous Model for Early Alzheimer's Disease: A Translational Study of Neuropathological and Inflammatory Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Trine; Helboe, Lone; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Waldemar, Gunhild; Berendt, Mette; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2016-03-15

    Aged companion dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) spontaneously develop varying degrees of progressive cognitive decline and particular neuropathological features correspondent to the changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. The aim of the present study was to characterize certain aspects of neuropathology and inflammatory markers related to aging and CCD in dogs in comparison with human AD. Fifteen brains from aged dogs with normal cognitive function, mild cognitive impairment, or CCD were investigated and compared with two control brains from young dogs and brain sections from human AD subjects. The neuropathological investigations included evaluation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposition (N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamyl-modified Aβ included), tau pathology, and inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex. Cortical Aβ deposition was found to be only of the diffuse subtype as no dense-core or neuritic plaques were found. The Aβ deposition followed a progressive pattern in four maturation stages. Accumulation of the Aβ peptide was also observed in the vessel walls. Both immunohistochemically and biochemically measured levels of Aβ pathology in prefrontal cortex showed a consistent positive correlation to age but not to cognitive deficit severity. No evidence of neurofibrillary tau pathology was found. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokines was generally low and showed no significant association to cognitive status. The findings of the present study support the senescent dog with spontaneous cognitive dysfunction as a valuable non-transgenic model for further investigations of the molecular events involved in the neurodegenerative processes associated with aging and early stage AD, especially the Aβ-related pathology.

  7. The Importance of Brain Banks for Molecular Neuropathological Research: The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Harding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available New developments in molecular neuropathology have evoked increased demands for postmortem human brain tissue. The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (TRC at The University of Sydney has grown from a small tissue collection into one of the leading international brain banking facilities, which operates with best practice and quality control protocols. The focus of this tissue collection is on schizophrenia and allied disorders, alcohol use disorders and controls. This review highlights changes in TRC operational procedures dictated by modern neuroscience, and provides examples of applications of modern molecular techniques to study the neuropathogenesis of many different brain disorders.

  8. Identification of genes associated with dissociation of cognitive performance and neuropathological burden: Multistep analysis of genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptional data.

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    Charles C White

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular underpinnings of the dissociation of cognitive performance and neuropathological burden are poorly understood, and there are currently no known genetic or epigenetic determinants of the dissociation."Residual cognition" was quantified by regressing out the effects of cerebral pathologies and demographic characteristics on global cognitive performance proximate to death. To identify genes influencing residual cognition, we leveraged neuropathological, genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptional data available for deceased participants of the Religious Orders Study (n = 492 and the Rush Memory and Aging Project (n = 487. Given that our sample size was underpowered to detect genome-wide significance, we applied a multistep approach to identify genes influencing residual cognition, based on our prior observation that independent genetic and epigenetic risk factors can converge on the same locus. In the first step (n = 979, we performed a genome-wide association study with a predefined suggestive p < 10-5, and nine independent loci met this threshold in eight distinct chromosomal regions. Three of the six genes within 100 kb of the lead SNP are expressed in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC: UNC5C, ENC1, and TMEM106B. In the second step, in the subset of participants with DLPFC DNA methylation data (n = 648, we found that residual cognition was related to differential DNA methylation of UNC5C and ENC1 (false discovery rate < 0.05. In the third step, in the subset of participants with DLPFC RNA sequencing data (n = 469, brain transcription levels of UNC5C and ENC1 were evaluated for their association with residual cognition: RNA levels of both UNC5C (estimated effect = -0.40, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.10, p = 0.0089 and ENC1 (estimated effect = 0.0064, 95% CI 0.0033 to 0.0096, p = 5.7 × 10-5 were associated with residual cognition. In secondary analyses, we explored the mechanism of these associations and found that ENC1 may be related to

  9. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral bioimpedance for detection of cerebral edema in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwood, Barbara E; Dunster, Kimble R; Colditz, Paul B; Ward, Leigh C

    2002-07-26

    The association of sustained cerebral edema with poor neurological outcome following hypoxia-ischaemia in the neonate suggests that measurement of cerebral edema may allow early prediction of outcome in these infants. Direct measurements of cerebral impedance have been widely used in animal studies to monitor cerebral edema, but such invasive measurements are not possible in the human neonate. This study investigated the ability of noninvasive cerebral impedance measurements to detect cerebral edema following hypoxia-ischaemia. One-day-old piglets were anaesthetized, intubated and ventilated. Hypoxia was induced by reducing the inspired oxygen concentration to 4-6% O(2). Noninvasive cerebral bioimpedance was measured using gel electrodes attached to the scalp. Cerebral bioimpedance was also measured directly by insertion of two silver-silver chloride electrodes subdurally. Noninvasive and invasive measurements were made before, during and after hypoxia. Whole body impedance was measured to assess overall fluid movements. Intracranial pressure was measured continuously via a catheter inserted subdurally, as an index of cerebral edema. There was good agreement between noninvasive and invasive measurements of cerebral impedance although externally obtained responses were attenuated. Noninvasive measurements were also well correlated with intracranial pressure. Whole body impedance changes did not account for increases in noninvasively measured cerebral impedance. Results suggest that noninvasive cerebral impedance measurements do reflect intracranial events, and are able to detect cerebral edema following hypoxia-ischaemia in the neonate. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. [Clinical and neuropathological characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, János; Simon, Viktória; Bereczki, Erika; Majer, Réka; Varkoly, Gréta; Murnyák, Balázs; Kálmán, János; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2017-04-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia. The accurate diagnosis is often possible only by neuropathological examination. The morphologic hallmarks are the presence of α-synuclein-rich Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, identical to those seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Neurotransmitter deficits, synaptic and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) dysfunction play major role in the pathomechanism. Characteristic symptoms are cognitive fluctuation, parkinsonism and visual hallucinations. Due to the often atypical clinical presentation novel imaging techniques and biomarkers could help the early diagnosis. Although curative treatment is not available, therapies can improve quality of life. Clinicopathological studies are important in exploring pathomechanisms, ensuring accurate diagnosis and identifying therapeutic targets. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(17): 643-652.

  11. Involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Groot, D.M.; Bierman, E.P.; Van Huygevoort, A.H.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.

    1993-05-13

    Our current working hypothesis with regard to soman-induced neuropathology is that accumulated ACh, resulting from soman-inhibited ACHE potentiates glutamate-induced neuronal degeneration, most likely by lowering the threshold for glutamate excitation at the NMDA-receptor sites. The activation of the NMDA-ionic channels may lead to massive Ca2+ fluxes into the postsynaptic cell, causing cell degeneration. In this concept the NMDA receptor plays a crucial role. In the present study, the involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced convulsions is tested by injecting NMDA receptor antagonists MK801, AP5 and TCP, whether or not in combination with atropine and/or diazepam, either directly into the hippocampal CA1 area or in the lateral ventricle very near to CA1. This area is predominantly affected by soman and contains high concentrations of NMDA receptors. Also the effect of injection with a non-NMDA receptor antagonist is tested.

  12. Unexpected Perinatal Loss versus Sids-a Common Neuropathologic Entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturri, Luigi; Mauri, Maria; Elena Ferrero, Maria; Lavezzi, Anna Maria

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the involvement of alterations of the central autonomic nervous system, particularly of the brainstem and cerebellum, in a wide set of victims of sudden and unexplained perinatal and infant death. Material and Methods: The study population consisted of 63 stillbirths, 28 neonatal deaths and 140 suspected SIDS. The victims were subjected to in-depth anatomopathological examination following appropriate guidelines. The protocol included, in particular, the histological evaluation on serial sections of the cardiorespiratory autonomic nervous system. Results: A diagnosis of “unexplained death” was established for 217 of the 231 victims (59 stillbirths, 28 newborns and 130 SIDS). In a very high percentage of these deaths (84%) we observed one or more anomalies of the nuclei and/or structures of the brainstem and cerebellum related to vital functions. Conclusion: Unexpected perinatal loss should not be regarded as a separate entity from SIDS, given the common neuropathological substrates. PMID:19018308

  13. Neurofisiologia e plasticidade no córtex cerebral pela estimulação magnética transcraniana repetitiva Plasticity of the human cerebral cortex as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Joaquim Brasil Neto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Um velho dogma da biologia afirma que só existiria capacidade de reorganização cortical (neuroplasticidade em animais muito jovens; no adulto, tal capacidade seria pequena ou mesmo inexistente. Aqui, revisamos estudos realizados em animais e em humanos que demonstram uma capacidade de reorganização cortical nos sistemas sensoriais e motores em indivíduos adultos. Destacamos os estudos realizados com a técnica de estimulação magnética transcraniana. O córtex cerebral asulto é capaz de reorganização após lesões do sistema nervoso periférico ou central ou no contexto do aprendizado.An old biological dogma states that a potencial for cortical reorganization (neuroplasticity exists nly in young animals, being lost in adlt life. Here we review studies carried out both in animals and humans, whixh demonstrate cortical reorganization in sensory and motor systems in adult subjects. We particulary emphasiza human studies carried out with the aid of transcranial magnetic stimulation. The adult cortex is capable of reorganization after peripheral or central nervous system lesions and as a result of learning.

  14. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Neuropathological findings after cardiac surgery-retrospective study over 6 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmrich, P; Hahn, J; Ogunlade, V; Geiger, K; Schober, R; Mohr, F W

    2003-11-01

    Neuropathological studies may contribute to the discovery of central nervous system complications after heart surgery and thus help to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological or cognitive disturbances. We examined the brains of 262 such patients operated for coronary bypass, valve replacement, or heart transplantation. Circulatory disturbances (macro- and microhemorrhages, infarcts, subarachnoid hemorrhages, and hypoxemic brain damage) were present in 128 cases (49%), as the cause of death in 33 cases (12.6%). The infarcts were caused by local arteriosclerosis of brain arteries, arterial emboli originating from the operative sites or myocardial infarctions, or by fat emboli, foreign body emboli or megakaryocytic capillary emboli in rare cases. Inflammatory disturbances were present in 17 cases and consisted of fungal or bacterial septicopyemic changes (12) or of glial nodules (5) as the substrate of a viral or autoimmunencephalitis (Bickerstaff). An incidental finding was Alzheimer's disease in 37 cases (14% of the material) of elderly patients, often associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy but not as cause of death or cause of macroscopic brain hemorrhage. Since we have conducted an autopsy study, there is a limitation to transfer the documented changes to the total group of post-cardiac surgery patients with neurologic and cognitive deficits. Contrary to some previous reports, histologically overt microembolic phenomena do not seem to play a major role in our material. On the other hand, careful scrutiny revealed non-fatal white matter microhemorrhages of varying frequency in the different groups, especially after valve operations. These as well as the occasional glial nodules, after resorption and microscarring, could well be the cause of slight neurologic and cognitive impairments.

  16. Hypoglossal neuropathology and respiratory activity in Pompe mice

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    Kun-Ze eLee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa-/- mice and the periodic acid Schiff (PAS method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 µm plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa-/- and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa-/- compared to B6/129 mice (P < 0.01. Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44 %baseline; P < 0.01 but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa-/- mice (130 ± 23 %baseline; P > 0.05. We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease.

  17. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neuropathological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question about essential tremor (ET) is whether its associated pathological changes and disease mechanisms are linkable to a specific brain region. To that end, recent tissue-based studies have made significant strides in elucidating changes in the ET brain. Emerging from these studies is increasing neuropathological evidence linking ET to the cerebellum. These studies have systematically identified a broad range of structural, degenerative changes in the ET cerebellum, spanning across all Purkinje cell compartments. These include the dendritic compartment (where there is an increase in number of Purkinje cell dendritic swellings, a pruning of the dendritic arbor, and a reduction in spine density), the cell body (where, aside from reductions in Purkinje cell linear density in some studies, there is an increase in the number of heterotopic Purkinje cell soma), and the axonal compartment (where a plethora of changes in axonal morphology have been observed, including an increase in the number of thickened axonal profiles, torpedoes, axonal recurrent collaterals, axonal branching, and terminal axonal sprouting). Additional changes, possibly due to secondary remodeling, have been observed in neighboring neuronal populations. These include a hypertrophy of basket cell axonal processes and changes in the distribution of climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. These changes all distinguish ET from normal control brains. Initial studies further indicate that the profile (i.e., constellation) of these changes may separate ET from other diseases of the cerebellum, thereby serving as a disease signature. With the discovery of these changes, a new model of ET has arisen, which posits that it may be a neurodegenerative disorder centered in the cerebellar cortex. These newly emerging neuropathological studies pave the way for anatomically focused, hypothesis-driven, molecular mechanistic studies of disease pathogenesis.

  18. Neuropathological diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia with implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is recognised as a neurocognitive disorder, which is explained by numerous vascular causes in the general absence of other pathologies. The heterogeneity of cerebrovascular disease makes it challenging to elucidate the neuropathological substrates and mechanisms of VaD as well as vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Consensus and accurate diagnosis of VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychometric and neuroimaging measures with subsequent pathological confirmation. Pathological diagnosis of suspected clinical VaD requires adequate postmortem brain sampling and rigorous assessment methods to identify important substrates. Factors that define the subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases appear the most common substrates of vascular brain injury or infarction. Small vessel disease characterised by arteriolosclerosis and lacunar infarcts also causes cortical and subcortical microinfarcts, which appear to be the most robust substrates of cognitive impairment. Diffuse WM changes with loss of myelin and axonal abnormalities are common to almost all subtypes of VaD. Medial temporal lobe and hippocampal atrophy accompanied by variable hippocampal sclerosis are also features of VaD as they are of Alzheimer's disease. Recent observations suggest that there is a vascular basis for neuronal atrophy in both the temporal and frontal lobes in VaD that is entirely independent of any Alzheimer pathology. Further knowledge on specific neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes in key regions resulting in executive dysfunction and other cognitive deficits, which define VCI and VaD, needs to be gathered. Hereditary arteriopathies such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy or CADASIL have provided insights into the mechanisms of

  19. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM) includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion, and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and associations with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF...... increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. EPO treatment normalized VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and EPO levels remained unchanged...

  20. Tacrolimus prevents murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are immunosuppressants frequently used in human organ transplantation. Tacrolimus is also reported to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. Here, we report that tacrolimus prevented the death from cerebral malaria of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57BL/6J mice, but not their death from malaria due to the high parasitaemia and severe anaemia. The mycophenolate mofetil-treated mice showed higher mortality from cerebral malaria and succumbed to malaria earlier than tacrolimus-treated littermates. Tacrolimus attenuated the infiltration of mononuclear cells including pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain. It appears to prevent murine cerebral malaria through the inhibition of cerebral infiltration of CD8+ T cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade prevents reduction of the cerebral metabolic ratio during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Rasmussen, P.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of oxygen to carbohydrates [O(2)/(glucose + (1/2)lactate)], but whether this ratio is influenced by adrenergic stimulation is not known. In eight males, incremental cycle ergometry increased arterial lactate to 15.3 +/- 4.2 mm (mean +/- s...... of a non-selective beta-adrenergic (beta(1) + beta(2)) receptor antagonist (propranolol) reduced heart rate (69 +/- 8 to 58 +/- 6 beats min(-1)) and exercise capacity (239 +/- 42 to 209 +/- 31 W; P exercise with propranolol, the increase in a......-v lactate difference (to 0.5 +/- 0.5 mm; P exercise with administration of the beta(1...

  2. Therapeutic effect of BDNF-overexpressing human neural stem cells (HB1.F3.BDNF) in a rodent model of middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Da-Jeong; Lee, Nayeon; Choi, Chunggab; Jeon, Iksoo; Oh, Seung-Hun; Shin, Dong Ah; Hwang, Tae-Sun; Lee, Hong J; Kim, Seung U; Moon, Hyeyoung; Hong, Kwan Soo; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Song, Jihwan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke mainly caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) represents the major type of stroke; however, there are still very limited therapeutic options for the stroke-damaged patients. In this study, we evaluated the neurogenic and therapeutic potentials of human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (HB1.F3.BDNF) following transplantation into a rodent model of MCAo. F3.BDNF human NSCs (F3.BDNF) were transplanted into the contralateral side of striatum at 7 days after MCAo, and the transplanted animals were monitored up to 8 weeks using animal MRI and various behavioral tests before they were sacrificed for immunohistochemical analysis. Interestingly, animal MRI results indicate that the majority of contralaterally transplanted neural stem cells were migrated to the peri-infarct area, showing a pathotropism. Transplanted animals exhibited significant behavioral improvements in stepping, rotarod, and modified neurological severity score (mNSS) tests. We also found that the transplanted human cells were colocalized with nestin, DCX, MAP2, DARPP-32, TH, GAD65/67-positive cells, of which results can be correlated with neural regeneration and behavioral recovery in the transplanted animals. More importantly, we were able to detect high levels of human BDNF protein expression, presumably derived from the transplanted F3.BDNF. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that human neural stem cells (F3.BDNF) are effective in treating stroke animal models.

  3. Neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells extend long–distance axonal projections through growth along host white matter tracts after intra-cerebral transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eDenham

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the capacity for directed differentiation into a wide variety of neuronal subtypes that may be useful for brain repair. While a substantial body of research has lead to a detailed understanding of the ability of neurons in fetal tissue grafts to structurally and functionally integrate after intra-cerebral transplantation, we are only just beginning to understand the in vivo properties of neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Here we have utilised the human embryonic stem (ES cell line Envy, which constitutively expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP, in order to study the in vivo properties of neurons derived from human ES cells. Rapid and efficient neural induction, followed by differentiation as neurospheres resulted in a GFP+ neural precursor population with traits of neuroepithelial and dorsal forebrain identity. Ten weeks after transplantation into neonatal rats, GFP+ fibre patterns revealed extensive axonal growth in the host brain, particularly along host white matter tracts, although innervation of adjacent nuclei was limited. The grafts were composed of a mix of neural cell types including differentiated neurons and glia, but also dividing neural progenitors and migrating neuroblasts, indicating an incomplete state of maturation at 10 weeks. This was reflected in patch-clamp recordings showing stereotypical properties appropriate for mature functional neurons, including the ability to generate action potentials, as well profiles consistent for more immature neurons. These findings illustrate the intrinsic capacity for neurons derived from human ES cells to integrate at a structural and functional level following transplantation.

  4. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  5. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  6. A robust Kalman algorithm to facilitate human-computer interaction for people with cerebral palsy, using a new interface based on inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Rafael; Rocon, Eduardo; Gallego, Juan A; Ceres, Ramón; Pons, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to create an advanced human-computer interface called ENLAZA for people with cerebral palsy (CP). Although there are computer-access solutions for disabled people in general, there are few evidences from motor disabled community (e.g., CP) using these alternative interfaces. The proposed interface is based on inertial sensors in order to characterize involuntary motion in terms of time, frequency and range of motion. This characterization is used to design a filtering technique that reduces the effect of involuntary motion on person-computer interaction. This paper presents a robust Kalman filter (RKF) design to facilitate fine motor control based on the previous characterization. The filter increases mouse pointer directivity and the target acquisition time is reduced by a factor of ten. The interface is validated with CP users who were unable to control the computer using other interfaces. The interface ENLAZA and the RKF enabled them to use the computer.

  7. The Neuropathology of Developmental Dysphasia: Behavioral, Morphological, and Physiological Evidence for a Pervasive Temporal Processing Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallal, Paula; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews research toward defining the neuropathological mechanisms responsible for developmental dysphasia. Hypothesizes that higher level auditory processing dysfunction may result from more basic temporal processing deficits which interfere with resolution of brief duration stimuli. Suggests two alternative hypotheses regarding the…

  8. Neuropathological correlates of late-life depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopelas, Christos; Stewart, Robert; Savva, George M; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul; Thomas, Alan; Matthews, Fiona E

    2011-02-01

    Depression is common in old age and is associated with risk of dementia, but its neuropathological correlates in the community are unknown. To investigate for the first time in a population-representative sample of people with no dementia the association between depression observed during life and neurofibrillary tangles, diffuse and neuritic plaques, Lewy bodies, brain atrophy and cerebrovascular disease found in the brain at post-mortem. Out of 456 donations to a population-based study, 153 brains were selected where donors had no dementia measured in life. Alzheimer and vascular pathology measures, Lewy bodies and neuronal loss were compared between those with (n = 36) and without (n = 117) depression ascertained using a fully structured diagnostic interview during life. Brain areas examined included frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortical areas as well as the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus and brain-stem monoaminergic nuclei. Depression was significantly associated with the presence of subcortical Lewy bodies. No association was found between depression and cerebrovascular or Alzheimer pathology in cortical or subcortical areas, although depression was associated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus as well as in some of the subcortical structures investigated (nucleus basalis, substantia nigra, raphe nucleus). Late-life depression was associated with subcortical and hippocampal neuronal loss but not with cerebrovascular or Alzheimer pathology.

  9. Shaken infant syndrome: developmental neuropathology, progressive cortical dysplasia, and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel; Parisi, Joseph E; Armstrong, Dawna L; Sargent, Steve K; Kaplan, James A

    2002-04-01

    This study describes the developmental neuropathology of two infants who survived 7 and 9 years, respectively, an episode of violent shaking (shaken infant syndrome) early in their lives. The shaking injuries include cortical and subcortical contusions, hemorrhages, hypoxic/ischemic and axonal damage, and severe edema. The types, distribution, and resolution of these shaking injuries are detailed by sequential radiographic studies and by pathologic examination at postmortem. Despite their severity and extent, these injuries resolved in a relatively short period of time. By 6 months, the original injuries are repaired and the resultant encephaloclastic encephalopathies (e.g., multicystic encephalomalacia, porencephaly, generalized white matter attenuation, diffuse cortical atrophy, microgyria, ulegyria, and hydrocephalus ex vacuo) are well established. No appreciable pathologic differences are detected when radiographic findings at 6 months of age are compared to postmortem observations. On the other hand, undamaged and/or partially damaged cortical regions survive the original insult and undergo post-injury reorganization that transforms the residual cortex structural and presumably functional organization. Prominent features of this post-injury reorganization include progressive cortical dysplasia with cytoarchitectural disorganization, laminar obliteration, morphologic and functional (synaptic reorganization) transformation of some neurons, preservation of layer 1 intrinsic fibers and Cajal-Retzius cells, and the presence of large (hypertrophic) intrinsic neurons with intense neurofilament immunoreactivity. We propose that this progressive dysplastic process modifies the residual cortex structural and functional organization, influences the child's neurological and psychological maturation, and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ensuing neurological and/or psychological sequelae.

  10. Review: Hippocampal sclerosis in epilepsy: a neuropathology review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is a common pathology encountered in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) as well as other epilepsy syndromes and in both surgical and post-mortem practice. The 2013 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification segregates HS into typical (type 1) and atypical (type 2 and 3) groups, based on the histological patterns of subfield neuronal loss and gliosis. In addition, granule cell reorganization and alterations of interneuronal populations, neuropeptide fibre networks and mossy fibre sprouting are distinctive features of HS associated with epilepsies; they can be useful diagnostic aids to discriminate from other causes of HS, as well as highlighting potential mechanisms of hippocampal epileptogenesis. The cause of HS remains elusive and may be multifactorial; the contribution of febrile seizures, genetic susceptibility, inflammatory and neurodevelopmental factors are discussed. Post-mortem based research in HS, as an addition to studies on surgical samples, has the added advantage of enabling the study of the wider network changes associated with HS, the long-term effects of epilepsy on the pathology and associated comorbidities. It is likely that HS is heterogeneous in aspects of its cause, epileptogenetic mechanisms, network alterations and response to medical and surgical treatments. Future neuropathological studies will contribute to better recognition and understanding of these clinical and patho-aetiological subtypes of HS. PMID:24762203

  11. Neuropathological and transcriptomic characteristics of the aged brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeremy A; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela; Gibbons, Laura E; Postupna, Nadia; Renz, Anne; Beller, Allison E; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Rose, Shannon E; Smith, Kimberly A; Szafer, Aaron; Barber, Chris; Bertagnolli, Darren; Bickley, Kristopher; Brouner, Krissy; Caldejon, Shiella; Chapin, Mike; Chua, Mindy L; Coleman, Natalie M; Cudaback, Eiron; Cuhaciyan, Christine; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Desta, Tsega; Dolbeare, Tim A; Dotson, Nadezhda I; Fisher, Michael; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Gee, Garrett; Gilbert, Terri L; Goldy, Jeff; Griffin, Fiona; Habel, Caroline; Haradon, Zeb; Hejazinia, Nika; Hellstern, Leanne L; Horvath, Steve; Howard, Kim; Howard, Robert; Johal, Justin; Jorstad, Nikolas L; Josephsen, Samuel R; Kuan, Chihchau L; Lai, Florence; Lee, Eric; Lee, Felix; Lemon, Tracy; Li, Xianwu; Marshall, Desiree A; Melchor, Jose; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Nyhus, Julie; Pendergraft, Julie; Potekhina, Lydia; Rha, Elizabeth Y; Rice, Samantha; Rosen, David; Sapru, Abharika; Schantz, Aimee; Shen, Elaine; Sherfield, Emily; Shi, Shu; Sodt, Andy J; Thatra, Nivretta; Tieu, Michael; Wilson, Angela M; Montine, Thomas J; Larson, Eric B; Bernard, Amy; Crane, Paul K; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    As more people live longer, age-related neurodegenerative diseases are an increasingly important societal health issue. Treatments targeting specific pathologies such as amyloid beta in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have not led to effective treatments, and there is increasing evidence of a disconnect between traditional pathology and cognitive abilities with advancing age, indicative of individual variation in resilience to pathology. Here, we generated a comprehensive neuropathological, molecular, and transcriptomic characterization of hippocampus and two regions cortex in 107 aged donors (median = 90) from the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study as a freely-available resource (http://aging.brain-map.org/). We confirm established associations between AD pathology and dementia, albeit with increased, presumably aging-related variability, and identify sets of co-expressed genes correlated with pathological tau and inflammation markers. Finally, we demonstrate a relationship between dementia and RNA quality, and find common gene signatures, highlighting the importance of properly controlling for RNA quality when studying dementia. PMID:29120328

  12. Gulf War agent exposure causes impairment of long-term memory formation and neuropathological changes in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchra Zakirova

    Full Text Available Gulf War Illness (GWI is a chronic multisymptom illness with a central nervous system component such as memory deficits, neurological, and musculoskeletal problems. There are ample data that demonstrate that exposure to Gulf War (GW agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB and pesticides such as permethrin (PER, were key contributors to the etiology of GWI post deployment to the Persian GW. In the current study, we examined the consequences of acute (10 days exposure to PB and PER in C57BL6 mice. Learning and memory tests were performed at 18 days and at 5 months post-exposure. We investigated the relationship between the cognitive phenotype and neuropathological changes at short and long-term time points post-exposure. No cognitive deficits were observed at the short-term time point, and only minor neuropathological changes were detected. However, cognitive deficits emerged at the later time point and were associated with increased astrogliosis and reduction of synaptophysin staining in the hippocampi and cerebral cortices of exposed mice, 5 months post exposure. In summary, our findings in this mouse model of GW agent exposure are consistent with some GWI symptom manifestations, including delayed onset of symptoms and CNS disturbances observed in GWI veterans.

  13. MRI 3D lateral cerebral ventricles in living humans: morphological and morphometrical age-, gender-related preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Fabio; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia; Milardi, Demetrio; Di Mauro, Debora; Ielitro, Giuseppe; Valenti, Barbara; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milazzo, Carmelo; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-03-01

    Morphological and volumetric variabilities of lateral ventricles are considered indirect indicators of age-and gender-related reductions of white and gray matter. However, no studies have classified lateral ventricles with different morphologies or showed its asymmetric shapes in healthy subjects. We performed an analysis on living subjects, using 3D volume rendering techniques. Eighty-five healthy Caucasian volunteers (49 women and 36 men aged 19-69 years) were scanned by a Philips Achieva 3T R2.6. Three-dimensional reconstruction allowed us to identify three main morphological shapes in living subjects and to show asymmetries between horns. We also assessed the surface deformation of the cerebral ventricles to identify region-specific shape differences in aging healthy adults. Statistical analysis showed significant gender- and age-related volume differences. An increase in lateral ventricle volume appears to be a constant, linear function of age throughout adult life.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow in humans at high altitude: gradual ascent and 2 wk at 5,050 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, C K; Smith, K J; Day, T A; Ray, L A; Lewis, N C S; Bakker, A; Macleod, D B; Ainslie, P N

    2014-04-01

    The interindividual variation in ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude is likely reflected in variability in the cerebrovascular responses to high altitude, particularly between brain regions displaying disparate hypoxic sensitivity. We assessed regional differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with Duplex ultrasound of the left internal carotid and vertebral arteries. End-tidal Pco2, oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during a trekking ascent to, and during the first 2 wk at, 5,050 m. Transcranial color-coded Duplex ultrasound (TCCD) was employed to measure flow and diameter of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Measures were collected at 344 m (TCCD-baseline), 1,338 m (CBF-baseline), 3,440 m, and 4,371 m. Following arrival to 5,050 m, regional CBF was measured every 12 h during the first 3 days, once at 5-9 days, and once at 12-16 days. Total CBF was calculated as twice the sum of internal carotid and vertebral flow and increased steadily with ascent, reaching a maximum of 842 ± 110 ml/min (+53 ± 7.6% vs. 1,338 m; mean ± SE) at ∼ 60 h after arrival at 5,050 m. These changes returned to +15 ± 12% after 12-16 days at 5,050 m and were related to changes in SpO2 (R(2) = 0.36; P < 0.0001). TCCD-measured MCA flow paralleled the temporal changes in total CBF. Dilation of the MCA was sustained on days 2 (+12.6 ± 4.6%) and 8 (+12.9 ± 2.9%) after arrival at 5,050 m. We observed no significant differences in regional CBF at any time point. In conclusion, the variability in CBF during ascent and acclimatization is related to ventilatory acclimatization, as reflected in changes in SpO2.

  15. Neuropathological aspects of Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2008-01-01

    Proteinopathies are a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by intra- and extracellular accumulation of abnormal filament proteins. To describe the neuropathology of specific forms of tauopathies and synucleinopathies, the overlap of morphologic features and molecular interactions. The study uses currently available morphologic criteria of different proteinopathies. Alzheimer disease (AD) is featured by deposition of beta-amyloid peptides, phosphorylated tau protein (3- and 4-repeat tau) and frequent alpha-synuclein (aSyn) deposits. Lewy body diseases (LBD), such as sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), show aSyn-positive deposits in neurons, neurites, glia, and presynaptic terminals, while frontotemporal dementias present tau-positive and tau-negative, ubiquitin- and TDP-43-positive neuronal and glial inclusions. The latter have also been observed in AD, PD, PD dementia and motor neuron disorders. Molecular interactions between major proteins, which may occur within the same brain in various distribution patterns, cause variable phenotypes and mixed pathologies, e.g. AD with aSyn pathology in the brainstem and amygdala, PD and DLB with AD lesions, and frontotemporal dementia with a mixture of various deposits, while others are featured by one principal pathology without other lesions (e.g. tangle-predominant type of dementia, pure PD, brainstem-predominant LBD). Animal models and in vitro studies showing co-occurrence and mutual promotion of fibrillation of these proteins indicate their synergistic interactions in the pathogenesis of these disorders which, at least in part, are genetically influenced. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Neuropathological mechanisms of seizures in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eugene Frye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews biological abnormalities shared by autism spectrum disorder (ASD and epilepsy. Two neuropathological findings are shared by ASD and epilepsy: abnormalities in minicolumn architecture and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. The peripheral neuropil, which is the region that contains the inhibition circuits of the minicolumns, has been found to be decreased in the post-mortem ASD brain. ASD and epilepsy are associated with inhibitory GABA neurotransmission abnormalities including reduced GABAA and GABAB subunit expression. These abnormalities can elevate the excitation-to-inhibition balance, resulting in hyperexcitablity of the cortex and, in turn, increases the risk of seizures. Medical abnormalities associated with both epilepsy and ASD are discussed. These include specific genetic syndromes, specific metabolic disorders including disorders of energy metabolism and GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, heavy metal exposures and immune dysfunction. Many of these medical abnormalities can result in an elevation of the excitatory-inhibitory balance. Fragile X is linked to dysfunction of the mGluR5 receptor and Fragile X, Angelman and Rett syndromes are linked to a reduction in GABAA receptor expression. Defects in energy metabolism can reduce GABA interneuron function. Both pyridoxine dependent seizures and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency cause GABA deficiencies while urea cycle defects and phenylketonuria cause abnormalities in glutamate neurotransmission. Mineral deficiencies can cause glutamate and GABA neurotransmission abnormalities and heavy metals can cause mitochondrial dysfunction which disrupts GABA metabolism. Thus, both ASD and epilepsy are associated with similar abnormalities that may alter the excitatory-to-inhibitory balance of the cortex. These parallels may explain the high prevalence of epilepsy in ASD and the elevated prevalence of ASD features in individuals with

  17. Neuropathological diagnoses and clinical correlates in older adults in Brazil: A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia K Suemoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinicopathological studies are important in determining the brain lesions underlying dementia. Although almost 60% of individuals with dementia live in developing countries, few clinicopathological studies focus on these individuals. We investigated the frequency of neurodegenerative and vascular-related neuropathological lesions in 1,092 Brazilian admixed older adults, their correlation with cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms, and the accuracy of dementia subtype diagnosis.In this cross-sectional study, we describe clinical and neuropathological variables related to cognitive impairment in 1,092 participants (mean age = 74 y, 49% male, 69% white, and mean education = 4 y. Cognitive function was investigated using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR and the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE; neuropsychiatric symptoms were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. Associations between neuropathological lesions and cognitive impairment were investigated using ordinal logistic regression. We developed a neuropathological comorbidity (NPC score and compared it to CDR, IQCODE, and NPI scores. We also described and compared the frequency of neuropathological diagnosis to clinical diagnosis of dementia subtype. Forty-four percent of the sample met criteria for neuropathological diagnosis. Among these participants, 50% had neuropathological diagnoses of Alzheimer disease (AD, and 35% of vascular dementia (VaD. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, hippocampal sclerosis, lacunar infarcts, hyaline atherosclerosis, siderocalcinosis, and Lewy body disease were independently associated with cognitive impairment. Higher NPC scores were associated with worse scores in the CDR sum of boxes (β = 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.46, IQCODE (β = 0.14, 95% CI 0.13-0.16, and NPI (β = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.33-2.16. Compared to neuropathological diagnoses, clinical diagnosis had high sensitivity to AD and high specificity to dementia with

  18. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine L; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological changes depends on the stability of n in response to different stimuli. The effect of visual stimulus contrast on this coupling ratio was tested in 9 healthy human subjects, measuring CBF and BOLD responses to a flickering checkerboard at four visual contrast levels. The theory of the BOLD effect makes a robust prediction-independent of details of the model-that if the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling ratio n remains constant, then the response ratio between the lowest and highest contrast levels should be higher for the BOLD response than the CBF response because of the ceiling effect on the BOLD response. Instead, this response ratio was significantly lower for the BOLD response (BOLD response: 0.23 ± 0.13, mean ± SD; CBF response: 0.42 ± 0.18; p=0.0054). This data is consistent with a reduced dynamic range (strongest/weakest response ratio) of the CMRO(2) response (~1.7-fold) compared to that of the CBF response (~2.4-fold) as luminance contrast increases, corresponding to an increase of n from 1.7 at the lowest contrast level to 2.3 at the highest contrast level. The implication of these results for fMRI studies is that the magnitude of the BOLD response does not accurately reflect the magnitude of underlying physiological processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Active necrotizing cerebral vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Deepa; Reddy, S Rajashekhar; Sundaram, Challa; Prayaga, Aruna K; Rajasekhar, Liza; Narsimulu, Gumdal

    2007-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic disease with varied clinical manifestations. Focal cortical brain infarcts and CNS infections are the most common neuropathological features reported in most studies. This report describes a 32-year-old woman who had repeated episodes of strokes over 5 years. In view of polyarthritis, oral ulcers, presence of high titres of serum antinuclear antibodies, high titres of double-stranded DNA and strokes, she was treated as SLE. Despite prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and pulse cyclophosphamide, she succumbed to a brainstem stroke. Complete body autopsy showed multiple cerebral cortical and brainstem infarcts with fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall. Renal infarction with healed vasculitis and systemic vasculitis involving small vessels was seen. Extensive thrombosis was remarkable by its absence. Active necrotizing vasculitis of cerebral and renal vessels is a rare complication of SLE, which contributed to a fatal outcome in this patient.

  20. Nerve cell nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities in the human oedematous cerebral cortex. An electron microscopic study using cortical biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Arismendi, G J

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral cortical biopsies of 17 patients with clinical diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus, complicated brain trauma, cerebellar syndrome and vascular anomaly were examined with the transmission electron microscope to study the nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities induced by moderate and severe brain oedema, and the associated anoxic-ischemic conditions of brain tissue. In infant patients with congenital hydrocephalus and Arnold-Chiari malformation two different structural patterns of immature chromatin organization were found: the clear type characterized by a clear granular and fibrillar structure of euchromatin, scarce heterochromatin masses and few perichromatin granules, and a dense granular and fibrillar euchromatin with abundant and scattered heterochromatin masses, and increased number of perichromatin granules. The lobulated nuclei exhibited an irregularly dilated and fragmented perinuclear cistern, and areas of apparently intact nuclear pore complexes alternating with regions of nuclear pore complex disassembly. In moderate traumatic brain injuries some nucleoli exhibit apparent intact nucleolar substructures, and in severe brain oedema some nucleoli appeared shrunken and irregularly outlined with one or two fibrillar centers, and others were disintegrated. The nuclear and nucleolar morphological alterations are discussed in relation with oxidative stress, peroxidative damage, hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity, calcium overload, glutamate excitotoxicity, and caspase activation.

  1. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle.......3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast...... venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However...

  2. Cerebral schistosomiasis | Ravi | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although schistosomiasis (bilharzia) is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans, schistosomal infection of the nervous system is rare. This report is of an unusual case of primary cerebral schistosomiasis and describes its magnetic resonance imaging appearance.

  3. Alcohol abuse and docosahexaenoic acid: Effects on cerebral circulation and neurosurvival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are major and yet surprisingly unacknowledged worldwide causes of brain damage, cognitive impairment, and dementia. Chronic abuse of alcohol is likely to elicit significant changes in essential polyenoic fatty acids and the membrane phospholipids (PLs that covalently contain them in brain membranes. Among the fatty acids of the omega-3 polyenoic class, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, which is relatively concentrated in mammalian brain, has proven particularly important for proper brain development as well as neurosurvival and protection. DHA losses in brains of chronic alcohol-treated animals may contribute to alcohol′s neuroinflammatory and neuropathological sequelae; indeed, DHA supplementation has beneficial effects, including the possibility that its documented augmenting effects on cerebral circulation could be important. The neurochemical mechanisms by which DHA exerts its effects encompass several signaling routes involving both the membrane PLs in which DHA is esterified as well as unique neuroactive metabolites of the free fatty acid itself. In view of indications that brain DHA deficits are a deleterious outcome of human alcoholism, increasing brain DHA via supplementation during detoxification of alcoholics could potentially fortify against dependence-related neuroinjury.

  4. Atlas-based and DTI-guided quantification of human brain cerebral blood flow: feasibility, quality assurance, spatial heterogeneity and age effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Khader M; Ali, Hiba; Shad, Mujeeb U

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and noninvasive quantification of regional cerebral blood perfusion (CBF) of the human brain tissue would advance the study of the complex interplay between human brain structure and function, in both health and disease. Despite the plethora of works on CBF in gray matter, a detailed quantitative white matter perfusion atlas has not been presented on healthy adults using the International Consortium for Brain Mapping atlases. In this study, we present a host of assurance measures such as temporal stability, spatial heterogeneity and age effects of regional and global CBF in selected deep, cortical gray matter and white matter tracts identified and quantified using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We utilized whole brain high-resolution DTI combined with arterial spin labeling to quantify regional CBF on 15 healthy adults aged 23.2-57.1years. We present total brain and regional CBF, corresponding volume, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy spatial heterogeneity, and dependence on age as additional quality assurance measures to compare with published trends using both MRI and nuclear medicine methods. Total CBF showed a steady decrease with age in gray matter (r=-0.58; P=.03), whereas total CBF of white matter did not significantly change with age (r=0.11; P=.7). This quantitative report offers a preliminary baseline of CBF, volume and DTI measurements for the design of future multicenter and clinical studies utilizing noninvasive perfusion and DT-MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Title: Investigating the effects of a penetrating vessel occlusion with a multi-scale microvasculature model of the human cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bouri, Wahbi K; Payne, Stephen J

    2018-01-19

    The effect of the microvasculature on observed clinical parameters, such as cerebral blood flow, is poorly understood. This is partly due to the gap between the vessels that can be individually imaged in humans and the microvasculature, meaning that mathematical models are required to understand the role of the microvasculature. As a result, a multi-scale model based on morphological data was developed here that is able to model large regions of the human microvasculature. From this model, a clear layering of flow (and 1-dimensional depth profiles) was observed within a voxel, with the flow in the microvasculature being driven predominantly by the geometry of the penetrating vessels. It also appears that the pressure and flow are decoupled, both in healthy vasculatures and in those where occlusions have occurred, again due to the topology of the penetrating vessels shunting flow between them. Occlusion of a penetrating arteriole resulted in a very high degree of overlap of blood pressure drop with experimentally observed cell death. However, drops in blood flow were far more widespread, providing additional support for the theory that pericyte controlled regulation on the capillary scale likely plays a large part in the perfusion of tissue post-occlusion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

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    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  7. Argyrophilic Grain Disease: Demographics, Clinical, and Neuropathological Features From a Large Autopsy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Roberta Diehl; Suemoto, Claudia Kimie; Molina, Mariana; Nascimento, Camila Fernandes; Leite, Renata Elaine Paraizo; de Lucena Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah; Farfel, José Marcelo; Heinsen, Helmut; Nitrini, Ricardo; Ueda, Kenji; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Yaffe, Kristine; Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz

    2016-07-01

    Argyrophilic grain disease (AGD) is a frequent late-onset, 4-repeat tauopathy reported in Caucasians with high educational attainment. Little is known about AGD in non-Caucasians or in those with low educational attainment. We describe AGD demographics, clinical, and neuropathological features in a multiethnic cohort of 983 subjects ≥50 years of age from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical data were collected through semistructured interviews with an informant and included in the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly, the Clinical Dementia Rating, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Neuropathologic assessment relied on internationally accepted criteria. AGD was frequent (15.2%) and was the only neuropathological diagnosis in 8.9% of all cases (mean, 78.9 ± 9.4 years); it rarely occurred as an isolated neuropathological finding. AGD was associated with older age, lower socioeconomic status (SES), and appetite disorders. This is the first study of demographic, clinical, and neuropathological aspects of AGD in different ethnicities and subjects from all socioeconomic strata. The results suggest that prospective studies of AGD patients include levels of hormones related to appetite control as possible antemortem markers. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms behind higher susceptibility to AGD of low SES subjects may disclose novel environmental risk factors for AGD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain structural and functional connectivity and the progression of neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Matthews, Paul M; Filippini, Nicola; Douaud, Gwenaëlle

    2013-01-01

    In our contribution to this special issue focusing on advances in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research since the centennial, we will briefly review some of our own studies applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of function and connectivity for characterization of genetic contributions to the neuropathology of AD and as candidate biomarkers. We review how functional MRI during both memory encoding and at rest is able to define APOE4 genotype-dependent physiological changes decades before potential development of AD and demonstrate changes distinct from those with healthy aging. More generally, imaging provides a powerful quantitative measure of phenotype for understanding associations arising from whole genome studies in AD. Structural connectivity measures derived from diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) methods offer additional markers of neuropathology arising from the secondary changes in axonal caliber and myelination that accompany decreased neuronal activity and neurodegeneration. We illustrate applications of DTI for more finely mapping neurodegenerative changes with AD in the thalamus in vivo and for defining neuropathological changes in the white matter itself. The latter efforts have highlighted how sensitivity to the neuropathology can be enhanced by using more specific DTI measures and interpreting them relative to knowledge of local white matter anatomy in the healthy brain. Together, our studies and related work are helping to establish the exciting potential of a new range of MRI methods as neuropathological measures and as biomarkers of disease progression.

  9. Dilemas éticos da vida humana: a trajetória hospitalar de crianças portadoras de paralisia cerebral grave The ethical dilemmas of human life: the hospital history of children with serious cerebral palsy

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    Debora Diniz

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available O artigo é um estudo antropológico que aborda os pressupostos éticos do tratamento médico ministrado em crianças portadoras de paralisia cerebral grave. A pesquisa foi realizada a partir de um trabalho etnográfico de oito meses, com pacientes em tratamento no Centro de Paralisia Cerebral do Hospital Sarah, Salvador. A observação da terapêutica ministrada a estas crianças, que apresentam pouquíssimas mudanças do quadro clínico, levou ao questionamento já bastante sugerido em discussões relativas à deontologia médica: Qual o objetivo do tratamento médico empregado nestas crianças? Na verdade, os resultados desta pesquisa indicaram a existência de explicações sócio-humanistas que estariam além da explicação médico-científica oficial, a qual resumiria a terapêutica a um fisicalismo corporal.This study deals with the ethical premises of medical treatment for children with serious cerebral palsy. Eight months of ethnographic research were carried out with patients at the Cerebral Palsy Center in the Sarah Hospital in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Observation of treatment for these children, who displayed limited clinical change, led to the following question, as suggested by discussions from medical deontology: What is the purpose of medical treatment for children with serious cerebral palsy? The results of our research point to social and humanist explanations going beyond the official medical scientific explanation, which limits treatment to corporal mechanicism.

  10. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel transgenic rat model for spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 recapitulates neuropathological changes and supplies in vivo imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelp, Alexandra; Koeppen, Arnulf H; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Calaminus, Carsten; Bauer, Claudia; Portal, Esteban; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Pichler, Bernd; Bauer, Peter; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-05-22

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17) is an autosomal-dominant, late-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). To further investigate this devastating disease, we sought to create a first transgenic rat model for SCA17 that carries a full human cDNA fragment of the TBP gene with 64 CAA/CAG repeats (TBPQ64). In line with previous observations in mouse models for SCA17, TBPQ64 rats show a severe neurological phenotype including ataxia, impairment of postural reflexes, and hyperactivity in early stages followed by reduced activity, loss of body weight, and early death. Neuropathologically, the severe phenotype of SCA17 rats was associated with neuronal loss, particularly in the cerebellum. Degeneration of Purkinje, basket, and stellate cells, changes in the morphology of the dendrites, nuclear TBP-positive immunoreactivity, and axonal torpedos were readily found by light and electron microscopy. While some of these changes are well recapitulated in existing mouse models for SCA17, we provide evidence that some crucial characteristics of SCA17 are better mirrored in TBPQ64 rats. Thus, this SCA17 model represents a valuable tool to pursue experimentation and therapeutic approaches that may be difficult or impossible to perform with SCA17 transgenic mice. We show for the first time positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of a SCA animal model that replicate recent PET studies in human SCA17 patients. Our results also confirm that DTI are potentially useful correlates of neuropathological changes in TBPQ64 rats and raise hope that DTI imaging could provide a biomarker for SCA17 patients.

  13. Neurologic symptoms and neuropathologic antibodies in poultry workers exposed to Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Lance B; Roess, Amira; Graham, Jay P; Baqar, Shahida; Vailes, Rocio; Sheikh, Kazim A; Silbergeld, Ellen

    2007-07-01

    To examine associations between occupational exposure to live poultry with Campylobacter exposure, Campylobacter-associated neurologic symptoms, and neuropathologic antibodies. Questionnaires, serum samples, and stool specimens were collected from 20 poultry workers and 40 community referents. Campylobacter exposure was evaluated by stool culture and serum antibodies; neurologic symptoms were assessed by questionnaire; and neuropathologic antibodies were measured by serum anti-glycolipid antibody concentrations. Poultry workers had significantly higher anti-Campylobacter immunoglobulin G titers compared with that of referents (P Campylobacter-associated neurologic symptoms; and male poultry workers had a higher point risk estimate for detectable neuropathologic anti-glycolipid immunoglobulin G titers (P = 0.07) compared with male referents. These data suggest that poultry workers are at elevated risk of Campylobacter exposure and may be at elevated risk for Campylobacter-associated neurologic sequelae.

  14. Frontotemporal dementia with severe thalamic involvement : a clinical and neuropathological study

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    Radanovic Márcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the third-leading cause of cortical dementia after Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia, and is characterized by a dementia where behavioral disturbances are prominent and appear early in the course of the disease. We report the case of a 58 year-old man affected by dementia with behavioral disturbances, in addition to rigid-hypokinetic and a lower motor neuron syndrome that were present at later stages of the illness. Neuroimaging studies showed frontotemporal atrophy. Neuropathological studies revealed intense thalamic neuronal loss and astrocytic gliosis, as well as moderate frontotemporal neuronal loss, astrocytosis and spongiform degeneration. Thalamic degeneration has previously been described among the wide group of neuropathological features of FTD. The aim of the present study is to show the clinical and neuropathological aspects of thalamic degeneration in FTD, along with its role in behavioral disturbances, a common finding in this condition.

  15. Effects of wavelength, beam type and size on cerebral low-level laser therapy by a Monte Carlo study on visible Chinese human

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    Ting Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy (LLLT has been clinically utilized for many indications in medicine requiring protection from cell/tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, pain reduction, swelling and inflammation. Presently, the use of LLLT to treat stroke, traumatic brain injury and cognitive dysfunction are attracting growing interest. Near-infrared light is capable of penetrating into the cerebral cortex, allowing noninvasive treatments to be carried out with few treatment-related adverse events. Optimization of LLLT treatment effect is a crucial issue of this field; however, only a few experimental tests on mice for wavelength selection have been reported. We addressed this issue by low-cost, straightforward and quantitative comparisons on light dosage distribution within visible Chinese human head by Monte Carlo modeling of near-infrared light propagation. Optimized selection in wavelength, beam type and size were given based on comparisons among frequently used setups (i.e., wavelengths: 660, 810 and 980 nm; beam type: Gaussian and flat beam; beam diameter: 2, 4 and 6 cm. This study provided an efficient way for guiding the optimization of LLLT setup and selection on wavelength, beam type and size for clinical brain LLLT.

  16. Motor hemiplegia and the cerebral organization of movement in man: II. The myth of the human extrapyramidal system

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    R. Oliveira-Souza

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a brief review of the concept of extrapyramidal system, clinical and anatomic evidence is presented against its relative prominence in man. It is proposed that the greatest part of those structures traditionally labeled as extrapyramidal effects its respective functional activities by way of the pyramidal tracts themselves. Such structures, centered around the basal nuclei, the cerebellum and possibly, the limbic areas of the prosencephalon are, according to the present suggestion, indeed, pre pyramidal. This model is based upon the clinical analysis of patients and agrees with more than one century of anatomic verifications in human brains, favoring the notion of the singularity of the human brain.

  17. Cerebral malaria: insight into pathogenesis, complications and molecular biomarkers

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    Yusuf FH

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Farah Hafiz Yusuf,1 Muhammad Yusuf Hafiz,1 Maria Shoaib,1 Syed Ahsanuddin Ahmed2 1Department of Medicine, Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, Sindh Medical College, Jinnah Sindh Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan Abstract: Cerebral malaria is a medical emergency. All patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria with neurologic manifestations of any degree should be urgently treated as cases of cerebral malaria. Pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is due to damaged vascular endothelium by parasite sequestration, inflammatory cytokine production and vascular leakage, which result in brain hypoxia, as indicated by increased lactate and alanine concentrations. The levels of the biomarkers’ histidine-rich protein II, angiopoietin-Tie-2 system and plasma osteoprotegrin serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers. Brain imaging may show neuropathology around the caudate and putamen. Mortality is high and patients who survive sustain brain injury which manifests as long-term neurocognitive impairments. Keywords: cerebral malaria, neurologic manifestations, mortality, biomarkers, brain imaging

  18. Development of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in the nonhuman primate and a safety study of i.v. infusion of human mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Masanori Sasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most experimental stroke research is carried out in rodents, but given differences between rodents and human, nonhuman primate (NHP models may provide a valuable tool to study therapeutic interventions. The authors developed a surgical method for transient occlusion of the M1 branch of middle cerebral artery (MCA in the African green monkey to evaluate safety aspects of intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs derived from human bone marrow. METHODS: The left Sylvian fissure was exposed by a small fronto-temporal craniotomy. The M1 branch of the MCA was exposed by microsurgical dissection and clipped for 2 to 4 hours. Neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were carried out at regular post-operative course. hMSCs were infused 1 hour after reperfusion (clip release in the 3-hour occlusion model. RESULTS: During M1 occlusion, two patterns of changes were observed in the lateral hemisphere surface. One pattern (Pattern 1 was darkening of venous blood, small vessel collapse, and blood pooling with no venous return in cortical veins. Animals with these three features had severe and lasting hemiplegia and MRI demonstrated extensive MCA territory infarction. Animals in the second pattern (Pattern 2 displayed darkening of venous blood, small vessel collapse, and reduced but incompletely occluded venous flow and the functional deficit was much less severe and MRI indicated smaller infarction areas in brain. The severe group (Pattern 1 likely had less extensive collateral circulation than the less severe group (Pattern 2 where venous pooling of blood was not observed. The hMSC infused animals showed a trend for greater functional improvement that was not statistically significant in the acute phase and no additive negative effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate inter-animal variability of collateral circulation after complete M1 occlusion and that hMSC infusion is safe in the developed NHP stroke model.

  19. Neuropathology and Neurochemistry of Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

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    Isidro Ferrer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is no longer considered a complex motor disorder characterized by Parkinsonism but rather a systemic disease with variegated non-motor deficits and neurological symptoms, including impaired olfaction, autonomic failure, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric symptoms. Many of these alterations appear before or in parallel with motor deficits and then worsen with disease progression. Although there is a close relation between motor symptoms and the presence of Lewy bodies (LBs and neurites filled with abnormal -synuclein, other neurological alterations are independent of the amount of -synuclein inclusions in neurons and neurites, thereby indicating that different mechanisms probably converge in the degenerative process. Involvement of the cerebral cortex that may lead to altered behaviour and cognition are related to several convergent factors such as (a abnormal -synuclein and other proteins at the synapses, rather than LBs and neurites, (b impaired dopaminergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and serotoninergic cortical innervation, and (c altered neuronal function resulting from reduced energy production and increased energy demands. These alterations appear at early stages of the disease and may precede by years the appearance of cell loss and cortical atrophy.

  20. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: clinical, neuropathological, ultrastructural and biochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, W F; Verity, M A; Fluharty, A L; Nguyen, H T; Philippart, M

    1990-07-01

    We describe the clinical, pathological, ultrastructural and biochemical features in the case of a 15-year-old boy with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Clinical abnormalities included hypotonia, retarded psychomotor development, hepatosplenomegaly, pigmentary degeneration of the retina, myoclonic seizures, aortic insufficiency and quadriplegia. Urinalysis revealed increased heparan sulfate. At necropsy, aortic and mitral valves revealed nodular thickening and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive, metachromatic granules in renal proximal tubules. The brain weighed 400 g and demonstrated cerebral and cerebellar atrophy with a retrocerebellar meningeal cyst. Cortical neurons contained periodic acid-Schiff-positive and cresyl violet-reactive granules. White matter demonstrated brown metachromasia and intense fibrillary gliosis. Conjunctival fibroblasts contained amorphous vacuoles with dense osmiophilic nucleoid cores. Pleomorphic extracellular, intraneural and intraglial inclusions were noted in the brain. Activities of arylsulfatase A, B and C were diminished markedly in autopsied tissue from brain, liver, and kidney (0, 0 and less than 10% of control activities, respectively). Partial deficiencies of iduronate sulfatase and heparan sulfatase were noted in different tissues. Variable decreased enzyme activities were expressed in leukocytes: arylsulfatase A, less than 33%; B, 40%; and C, 90%; heparan sulfatase, 2%; and iduronate sulfatase was not detectable. Near normal activities were found in cultured fibroblasts.

  1. Timing of mTOR activation affects tuberous sclerosis complex neuropathology in mouse models

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    Laura Magri

    2013-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a dominantly inherited disease with high penetrance and morbidity, and is caused by mutations in either of two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Most affected individuals display severe neurological manifestations – such as intractable epilepsy, mental retardation and autism – that are intimately associated with peculiar CNS lesions known as cortical tubers (CTs. The existence of a significant genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals bearing mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 is highly controversial. Similar to observations in humans, mouse modeling has suggested that a more severe phenotype is associated with mutation in Tsc2 rather than in Tsc1. However, in these mutant mice, deletion of either gene was achieved in differentiated astrocytes. Here, we report that loss of Tsc1 expression in undifferentiated radial glia cells (RGCs early during development yields the same phenotype detected upon deletion of Tsc2 in the same cells. Indeed, the same aberrations in cortical cytoarchitecture, hippocampal disturbances and spontaneous epilepsy that have been detected in RGC-targeted Tsc2 mutants were observed in RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutant mice. Remarkably, thorough characterization of RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutants also highlighted subventricular zone (SVZ disturbances as well as STAT3-dependent and -independent developmental-stage-specific defects in the differentiation potential of ex-vivo-derived embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs. As such, deletion of either Tsc1 or Tsc2 induces mostly overlapping phenotypic neuropathological features when performed early during neurogenesis, thus suggesting that the timing of mTOR activation is a key event in proper neural development.

  2. Fluoxetine Ameliorates Behavioral and Neuropathological Deficits in a Transgenic Model Mouse of α-synucleinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubhi, Kiren; Inglis, Chandra; Mante, Michael; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; May, Verena; Winkler, Juergen; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    The term α-synucleinopathies refers to a group of age-related neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) that display an abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). In contrast to the neuronal α-syn accumulation observed in PD and DLB, MSA is characterized by a widespread oligodendrocytic α-syn accumulation. Transgenic mice expressing human α-syn under the oligodendrocyte-specific myelin basic protein promoter (MBP1-hαsyn tg mice) model many of the behavioral and neuropathological alterations observed in MSA. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to be protective in toxin-induced models of PD, however its effects in an in vivo transgenic model of α-synucleinopathy remain unclear. In this context, this study examined the effect of fluoxetine in the MBP1-hαsyn tg mice, a model of MSA. Fluoxetine adminstration ameliorated motor deficits in the MBP1-hαsyn tg mice, with a concomitant decrease in neurodegenerative pathology in the basal ganglia, neocortex and hippocampus. Fluoxetine adminstration also increased levels of the neurotrophic factors, GDNF (glial-derived neurotrophic factor) and BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in the MBP1-hαsyn tg mice compared to vehicle-treated tg mice. This fluoxetine-induced increase in GDNF and BDNF protein levels was accompanied by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. The effects of fluoxetine adminstration on myelin and serotonin markers were also examined. Collectively these results indicate that fluoxetine may represent a novel therapeutic intervention for MSA and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22281106

  3. Neuropathologic correlates of hippocampal atrophy in the elderly: a clinical, pathologic, postmortem MRI study.

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    Robert J Dawe

    Full Text Available The volume of the hippocampus measured with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is increasingly used as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the neuropathologic basis of structural MRI changes in the hippocampus in the elderly has not been directly assessed. Postmortem MRI of the aging human brain, combined with histopathology, could be an important tool to address this issue. Therefore, this study combined postmortem MRI and histopathology in 100 elderly subjects from the Rush Memory and Aging Project and the Religious Orders Study. First, to validate the information contained in postmortem MRI data, we tested the hypothesis that postmortem hippocampal volume is smaller in subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease compared to subjects with mild or no cognitive impairment, as observed in antemortem imaging studies. Subsequently, the relations of postmortem hippocampal volume to AD pathology, Lewy bodies, amyloid angiopathy, gross infarcts, microscopic infarcts, and hippocampal sclerosis were examined. It was demonstrated that hippocampal volume was smaller in persons with a clinical diagnosis of AD compared to those with no cognitive impairment (P = 2.6 × 10(-7 or mild cognitive impairment (P = 9.6 × 10(-7. Additionally, hippocampal volume was related to multiple cognitive abilities assessed proximate to death, with its strongest association with episodic memory. Among all pathologies investigated, the most significant factors related to lower hippocampal volume were shown to be AD pathology (P = 0.0018 and hippocampal sclerosis (P = 4.2 × 10(-7. Shape analysis allowed for visualization of the hippocampal regions most associated with volume loss for each of these two pathologies. Overall, this investigation confirmed the relation of hippocampal volume measured postmortem to clinical diagnosis of AD and measures of cognition, and concluded that both AD pathology and hippocampal sclerosis affect hippocampal

  4. Short term changes in the proteome of human cerebral organoids induced by 5-MeO-DMT

    OpenAIRE

    Dakic, Vanja; Minardi Nascimento, Juliana; Costa Sartore, Rafaela; Maciel, Renata de Moraes; de Araujo, Draulio B.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2017-01-01

    Dimethyltryptamines are entheogenic serotonin-like molecules present in traditional Amerindian medicine recently associated with cognitive gains, antidepressant effects, and changes in brain areas related to attention. Legal restrictions and the lack of adequate experimental models have limited the understanding of how such substances impact human brain metabolism. Here we used shotgun mass spectrometry to explore proteomic differences induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) o...

  5. Asymmetric activation of the anterior cerebral cortex in recipients of IRECA: Preliminary evidence for the energetic effects of an intention-based biofield treatment modality on human neurophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, C.; Vernon, D.; Hald, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic studies of mindfulness link the health benefits of meditation to activation of the left-anterior cerebral cortex. The similarity and functional importance of intention and attentional stance in meditative and biofield therapeutic practices suggest that modulation of recipient

  6. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dieting OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  7. New cerebral protection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Werner, Christian

    2005-10-01

    This article presents an overview of the most recent and important strategies to reduce secondary brain damage. There is currently no magic bullet available to protect the brain after neuronal injury. This is related to the complex pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, which makes it unlikely that a single pharmacological intervention results in sustained neuroprotection. Analyses of clinical studies reveal that acute physiologic derangements (e.g. fever, hypertension and hypotension, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, hyperglycemia) are the most important predictors of unfavorable outcome after brain injury and have to be treated. The effectiveness of anesthetic agents to extend the ischemic tolerance of neurons has been demonstrated in experimental settings, but such benefits have not been demonstrated in humans. The effectiveness of osmodiuretics to decrease elevated intracranial pressure, a factor with relevance to outcome, has been demonstrated. Infusion of magnesium in patients with subarachnoidal hemorrhage can reduce the occurrence of delayed ischemia caused by cerebrovascular spasm. The prophylactic administration of glucocorticoids should be avoided. While the positive effects of chronic administration of statins to reduce the incidence of stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical studies, the protective effect of acute administration of statins after a cerebral insult has do be defined. Control of physiological variables, avoidance of hyperthermia, intensive control of plasma glucose concentrations, use of anesthetic agents and osmodiuretics to control intracranial hypertension and the possible prophylactic administration of magnesium in patients at risk of vasospasm and of statins in patients with cerebrovascular risk factors are currently the most important strategies to reduce neuronal injury.

  8. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  9. Recovery of slow potentials in AC-coupled electrocorticography: application to spreading depolarizations in rat and human cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Watanabe, Tomas; Dreier, Jens P

    2009-01-01

    Cortical spreading depolarizations (spreading depressions and peri-infarct depolarizations) are a pathology intrinsic to acute brain injury, generating large negative extracellular slow potential changes (SPCs) that, lasting on the order of minutes, are studied with DC-coupled recordings in animals....... The spreading SPCs of depolarization waves are observed in human cortex with AC-coupled electrocorticography (ECoG), although SPC morphology is distorted by the high-pass filter stage of the amplifiers. Here, we present a signal processing method to reverse these distortions and recover approximate full...

  10. Overview of neuropathological theories of schizophrenia: From degeneration to progressive developmental disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, L.; Bakker, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Based on a review of literature three main hypotheses on the neuropathology of schizophrenia are identified: (1) neurodegeneration, (2) a disorder that is limited to the early development of the brain, and (3) a progressive developmental disorder. Research findings and clinical observations present

  11. Brief Report: Life History and Neuropathology of a Gifted Man with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, Karen, M.; Escobar, Alfonso; Rapin, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent interest in the pathogenesis of the autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), neuropathological descriptions of brains of individuals with well documented clinical information and without potentially confounding symptomatology are exceptionally rare. Asperger syndrome differs from classic autism by lack of…

  12. Multisite assessment of NIA-AA guidelines for the neuropathologic evaluation of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montine, Thomas J; Monsell, Sarah E; Beach, Thomas G; Bigio, Eileen H; Bu, Yunqi; Cairns, Nigel J; Frosch, Matthew; Henriksen, Jonathan; Kofler, Julia; Kukull, Walter A; Lee, Edward B; Nelson, Peter T; Schantz, Aimee M; Schneider, Julie A; Sonnen, Joshua A; Trojanowski, John Q; Vinters, Harry V; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Hyman, Bradley T

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathologic assessment is the current "gold standard" for evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is no consensus on the methods used. Fifteen unstained slides (8 brain regions) from each of the 14 cases were prepared and distributed to 10 different National Institute on Aging AD Centers for application of usual staining and evaluation following recently revised guidelines for AD neuropathologic change. Current practice used in the AD Centers Program achieved robustly excellent agreement for the severity score for AD neuropathologic change (average weighted κ = .88, 95% confidence interval: 0.77-0.95) and good-to-excellent agreement for the three supporting scores. Some improvement was observed with consensus evaluation but not with central staining of slides. Evaluation of glass slides and digitally prepared whole-slide images was comparable. AD neuropathologic evaluation as performed across AD Centers yields data that have high agreement with potential modifications for modest improvements. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The neuropathological signature of bulbar-onset ALS: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellikeri, S; Karthikeyan, V; Martino, R; Black, S E; Zinman, L; Keith, J; Yunusova, Y

    2017-04-01

    ALS is a multisystem disorder affecting motor and cognitive functions. Bulbar-onset ALS (bALS) may be preferentially associated with cognitive and language impairments, compared with spinal-onset ALS (sALS), stemming from a potentially unique neuropathology. The objective of this systematic review was to compare neuropathology findings reported for bALS and sALS subtypes in studies of cadaveric brains. Using Cochrane guidelines, we reviewed articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO databases using standardized search terms for ALS and neuropathology, from inception until July 16th 2016. 17 studies were accepted for analysis. The analysis revealed that both subtypes presented with involvement in motor and frontotemporal cortices, deep cortical structures, and cerebellum and were characterized by neuronal loss, spongiosis, myelin pallor, and ubiquitin+ and TDP43+ inclusion bodies. Changes in Broca and Wernicke areas - regions associated with speech and language processing - were noted exclusively in bALS. Further, some bALS cases presented with atypical pathology such as neurofibrillary tangles and basophilic inclusions, which were not found in sALS cases. Given the limited number of studies, all with methodological biases, further work is required to better understand neuropathology of ALS subtypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Valle, Brian William; Hempel, Casper; Staalsoe, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria from Plasmodium falciparum infection is major cause of death in the tropics. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex and the contribution of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the brain is incompletely understood. Insulinotropic glucagon-like peptide-1...... (GLP-1) mimetics have potent neuroprotective effects in animal models of neuropathology associated with ROS/RNS dysfunction. This study investigates the effect of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide against the clinical outcome of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) and Plasmodium falciparum growth....... Furthermore the role of oxidative stress on ECM pathogenesis is evaluated. METHODS: ECM was induced in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57Bl/6j mice. Infected Balb/c (non-cerebral malaria) and uninfected C57Bl/6j mice were included as controls. Mice were treated twice-daily with vehicle or liraglutide (200...

  15. Cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis. A report of two cases, with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy in one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verity, M A; Wolfson, W L

    1976-10-15

    Neuropathologic findings in 2 cases of cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis with sequelae are presented. A 30-year old male with macular rash and pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis responded to Prednisone terapy but developed acute intracranial hypertension with coma. A necrotizing hemorrhagic lesion was evident in the left putamen surrounded by diffuse and perivascular atypical lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. An 18-year old girl developed pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis, diplopia, slurred speech and right hemiparesis. Brain scan, angiography and EEG suggested a left fronto-parietal mass assumed to represent lymphomatoid granulomatosis. She responded well to cerebral irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate and cytoxan but relapsed with seizures and increasing respiratory insufficiency. At autopsy, stigmata of cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis were absent but a parenchymatous degeneration consistent with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy following antileukemic therapy in children, was found.

  16. Pathogenesis of cerebral malaria: new diagnostic tools, biomarkers, and therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Praveen K.; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Prativa K.; Mishra, Saroj K.; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel Crocodile

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a severe neuropathological complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It results in high mortality and post-recovery neuro-cognitive disorders in children, even after appropriate treatment with effective anti-parasitic drugs. While the complete landscape of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria still remains to be elucidated, numerous innovative approaches have been developed in recent years in order to improve the early detection of this neurological syndrome and, subsequently, the clinical care of affected patients. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of cerebral malaria pathogenesis, compile the array of new biomarkers and tools available for diagnosis and research, and describe the emerging therapeutic approaches to tackle this pathology effectively. PMID:26579500

  17. Cystatin C modulates cerebral beta-amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Stephan A; Herzig, Martin C; Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Kilger, Ellen; Selenica, Maj-Linda; Winkler, David T; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Levy, Efrat; Grubb, Anders; Jucker, Mathias

    2007-12-01

    The CST3 Thr25 allele of CST3, which encodes cystatin C, leads to reduced cystatin C secretion and conveys susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that overexpression of human cystatin C in brains of APP-transgenic mice reduces cerebral amyloid-beta deposition and that cystatin C binds amyloid-beta and inhibits its fibril formation. Our results suggest that cystatin C concentrations modulate cerebral amyloidosis risk and provide an opportunity for genetic risk assessment and therapeutic interventions.

  18. Expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in rat hippocampus after cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering, Robert; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin, ischemia, hippocampus, rat, in situ hybridisation, immunocytochemistry, neuropathology......Somatostatin, ischemia, hippocampus, rat, in situ hybridisation, immunocytochemistry, neuropathology...

  19. Cerebral microangiopathies; Zerebrale Mikroangiopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-03-15

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  20. Atypical CLN2 with later onset and prolonged course: a neuropathologic study showing different sensitivity of neuronal subpopulations to TPP1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleder, Milan; Dvoráková, Lenka; Stolnaja, Larisa; Vlásková, Hana; Hůlková, Helena; Druga, Rastislav; Poupetová, Helena; Kostálová, Eva; Mikulástík, Josef

    2008-07-01

    This is the first neuropathology report of a male patient (born 1960-died 1975) with an extremely rare, atypical variant of CLN2 that has been diagnosed only in five families so far. The clinical history started during his preschool years with relatively mild motor and psychological difficulties, but with normal intellect and vision. Since age six there were progressive cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptomatology, amaurosis, and mental deterioration. Epileptic seizures were absent. The child died aged 15 years in extreme cachexy. Neuropathology revealed neurolysosomal storage of autofluorescent, curvilinear and subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase (SCMAS) rich material. The neuronal storage led to laminar neuronal depopulation in the cerebral cortex and to a practically total eradication of the cerebellar cortical neurons. The other areas of the central nervous system including hippocampus, which are usually heavily affected in classical forms of CLN2, displayed either a lesser degree or absence of neuronal storage, or storage without significant neuronal loss. Transformation of the stored material to the spheroid like perikaryal inclusions was rudimentary. The follow-up, after 30 years, showed heterozygous values of TPP1 (tripeptidylpeptidase 1) activity in the white blood cells of both parents and the sister. DNA analysis of CLN2 gene identified a paternal frequent null mutation c.622C > T (p.Arg208 X) in the 6th exon and a maternal novel mutation c.1439 T > G in exon 12 (p.Val480Gly). TPP1 immunohistochemistry using a specific antibody gave negative results in the brain and other organs. Our report supports the notion that the spectrum of CLN2 phenotypes may be surprisingly broad. The study revealed variable sensitivities in neuronal subpopulations to the metabolic defect which may be responsible for the variant's serious course.

  1. Relation of neuropathology with cognitive decline among older persons without dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eBoyle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although it is now widely accepted that dementia has a long preclinical phase during which neuropathology accumulates and cognition declines, little is known about the relation of neuropathology with the longitudinal rate of change in cognition among older persons without dementia. We quantified the burden of the neuropathologies of the three most common causes of dementia (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease (AD, cerebrovascular disease (CVD, and Lewy body disease (LBD and examined their relation with cognitive decline in a large cohort of persons without dementia proximate to death. Methods: 467 deceased participants without dementia from two longitudinal clinical-pathologic studies, Rush Memory and Aging Project and Religious Orders Study, completed a mean of 7 annual evaluations including 17 cognitive tests. Neuropathologic examinations provided quantitative measures of AD (i.e., amyloid load, tangle density, CVD (i.e., macroscopic infarcts, microinfarcts, and neocortical Lewy bodies. Random coefficient models were used to examine the relation of the neuropathologies with rates of global cognitive decline as well as decline in 4 specific cognitive systems. Results: At autopsy, 82% of persons without dementia had amyloid, 100% had tangles, 29% had macroscopic infarcts, 25% had microinfarcts, and 6% had neocortical Lewy bodies. Global cognition declined a mean of 0.034 unit per year (SE=0.003, p<0.001. In separate analyses, amyloid, tangles (p-values<0.001 and neocortical Lewy bodies (p=0.015 were associated with an increased rate of global cognitive decline; macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts were not. Further, when analyzed simultaneously, amyloid, tangles, and neocortical Lewy bodies remained associated with global cognitive decline (p- values<0.024. Finally, measures of AD were associated with decline in 3 of 4 systems, including episodic memory (i.e., tangles, semantic memory (i.e., amyloid and tangles, and working memory (i

  2. Encephalometry on the medial face of the human brain hemisphere: a necropsy study Encefalometria na face medial do hemisfério cerebral humano: estudo em necropsias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula J. Ribeiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the dimensions of the human brain, specifically in the frontal cortex, helping the analysis of neuroimaging. A form was made to register and describe encephalic measurements and 81 cerebral hemispheres (CH were analyzed. Male individuals showed larger CH length; wider superior frontal gyrus in the right CH; bigger encephalic weight and corpus callosum (CC width. The proportion of measurement from the frontal pole to the most anterior part of the CC genu, related to the CH length gets smaller with aging, whereas the average distance from the most posterior part of the splenum of the CC to the occipital pole was bigger in both male CHs and there was a tendency of decrease in this difference with aging.Este estudo visa avaliar as dimensões do cérebro humano, particularmente do córtex frontal, podendo colaborar para as análises de neuroimagem. Foi elaborado um formulário para registro e descrição das medidas encefálicas. A amostra foi constituída por 81 hemisférios cerebrais (HC adultos. Os homens apresentaram maior comprimento do HC; giro frontal superior mais largo no HC direito; maior peso encefálico e largura do corpo caloso (CC. A proporção da medida do pólo frontal à parte mais anterior do joelho do CC, em relação ao comprimento do HC diminui com o avanço da idade. Já a da média da distância da parte mais posterior do esplênio do CC ao pólo occipital foi maior em ambos HC dos homens e houve tendência à diminuição desta proporção com o avanço da idade.

  3. Clearance of beta-amyloid is facilitated by apolipoprotein E and circulating high-density lipoproteins in bioengineered human vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Emily B; Yuen, Brian; Gilmour, Megan; Kang, Kevin; Bahrabadi, Arvin; Stukas, Sophie; Zhao, Wenchen; Kulic, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid plaques, consisting of deposited beta-amyloid (Aβ), are a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Cerebral vessels play a major role in AD, as Aβ is cleared from the brain by pathways involving the cerebrovasculature, most AD patients have cerebrovascular amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cardiovascular risk factors increase dementia risk. Here we present a notable advance in vascular tissue engineering by generating the first functional 3-dimensioinal model of CAA in bioengineered human vessels. We show that lipoproteins including brain (apoE) and circulating (high-density lipoprotein, HDL) synergize to facilitate Aβ transport across bioengineered human cerebral vessels. These lipoproteins facilitate Aβ42 transport more efficiently than Aβ40, consistent with Aβ40 being the primary species that accumulates in CAA. Moreover, apoE4 is less effective than apoE2 in promoting Aβ transport, also consistent with the well-established role of apoE4 in Aβ deposition in AD. PMID:28994390

  4. Differential gene expression in multiple neurological, inflammatory and connective tissue pathways in a spontaneous model of human small vessel stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Emma L; McBride, Martin W; Beattie, Wendy; McClure, John D; Graham, Delyth; Dominiczak, Anna F; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Smith, Colin; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) causes a fifth of all strokes plus diffuse brain damage leading to cognitive decline, physical disabilities and dementia. The aetiology and pathogenesis of SVD are unknown, but largely attributed to hypertension or microatheroma. We used the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat (SHRSP), the closest spontaneous experimental model of human SVD, and age-matched control rats kept under identical, non-salt-loaded conditions, to perform a blinded analysis of mRNA microarray, qRT-PCR and pathway analysis in two brain regions (frontal and mid-coronal) commonly affected by SVD in the SHRSP at age five, 16 and 21 weeks. We found gene expression abnormalities, with fold changes ranging from 2.5 to 59 for the 10 most differentially expressed genes, related to endothelial tight junctions (reduced), nitric oxide bioavailability (reduced), myelination (impaired), glial and microglial activity (increased), matrix proteins (impaired), vascular reactivity (impaired) and albumin (reduced), consistent with protein expression defects in the same rats. All were present at age 5 weeks thus predating blood pressure elevation. 'Neurological' and 'inflammatory' pathways were more affected than 'vascular' functional pathways. This set of defects, although individually modest, when acting in combination could explain the SHRSP's susceptibility to microvascular and brain injury, compared with control rats. Similar combined, individually modest, but multiple neurovascular unit defects, could explain susceptibility to spontaneous human SVD. © 2014 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  5. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the gray matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Gabi, Mariana; Mota, Bruno; Grinberg, Lea T.; Farfel, José M.; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata E. L.; Leite, Renata E. P.; Filho, Wilson J.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex) the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are distributed across their gray matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non-occipital areas. PMID

  6. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: Neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the grey matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro F. M. Ribeiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital that differ in how neurons distributed across their grey matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non

  7. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  8. Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and coenzyme-Q10 ameliorate post treatment reactive encephalopathy associated with cerebral human African trypanosomiasis in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Khalid; Wachira, Francis N; Nyariki, James N; Isaac, Alfred O

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a tropical disease caused by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, the East African variant T. b. rhodesiense and the West African variant T. b. gambiense. Melarsoprol, an organic arsenical, is the only drug used to treat late stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. Unfortunately, this drug induces an extremely severe post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE) in up to 10% of treated patients, half of whom die from this complication. A highly reproducible mouse model was adapted to assess the use of Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and/or coenzyme-Q10 in blocking the occurrence of PTRE. Female Swiss white mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with approximately 10(4) trypanosome isolate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537 and treated sub-curatively 21days post infection with 5mg/kg diminazene aceturate (DA) daily for 3days to induce severe late CNS infection that closely mirrors PTRE in human subjects. Thereafter mice were monitored for relapse of parasitemia after which they were treated with melarsoprol at a dosage of 3.6mg/kg body weight for 4days and sacrificed 24h post the last dosage to obtain brain samples. Brain sections from mice with PTRE that did not receive any antioxidant treatment showed a more marked presence of inflammatory cells, microglial activation and disruption of the brain parenchyma when compared to PTRE mice supplemented with either coenzyme-Q10, purple tea anthocyanins or a combination of the two. The mice group that was treated with coenzyme-Q10 or purple tea anthocyanins had higher levels of GSH and aconitase-1 in the brain compared to untreated groups, implying a boost in brain antioxidant capacity. Overall, coenzyme-Q10 treatment produced more beneficial effects compared to anthocyanin treatment. These findings demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with coenzyme-Q10 and/or purple tea anthocyanins can be used in an experimental mouse model to ameliorate PTRE associated with cerebral HAT. Copyright

  9. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome.

  10. Continual Low-Dose Infusion of Sulfamidase Is Superior to Intermittent High-Dose Delivery in Ameliorating Neuropathology in the MPS IIIA Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Luck, Amanda J; Rozaklis, Tina; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder characterised by progressive loss of learned skills, sleep disturbance and behavioural problems. Reduced activity of lysosomal sulfamidase results in accumulation of heparan sulfate and secondary storage of glycolipids in the brain. Intra-cisternal sulfamidase infusions reduce disease-related neuropathology; however, repeated injections may subject patients to the risk of infection and tissue damage so alternative approaches are required. We undertook a proof-of-principle study comparing the ability of slow/continual or repeat/bolus infusion to ameliorate neuropathology in MPS IIIA mouse brain. Six-week-old MPS IIIA mice were implanted with subcutaneously located mini-osmotic pumps filled with recombinant human sulfamidase (rhSGSH) or vehicle, connected to lateral ventricle-directed cannulae. Pumps were replaced at 8 weeks of age. Additional MPS IIIA mice received intra-cisternal bolus infusions of the same amount of rhSGSH (or vehicle), at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Unaffected mice received vehicle via each strategy. All mice were euthanised at 10 weeks of age and the brain was harvested to assess the effect of treatment on neuropathology. Mice receiving pump-delivered rhSGSH exhibited highly significant reductions in lysosomal storage markers (lysosomal integral membrane protein-2, GM3 ganglioside and filipin-positive lipids) and neuroinflammation (isolectin B4-positive microglia, glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astroglia). MPS IIIA mice receiving rhSGSH via bolus infusion displayed reductions in these markers, but the effectiveness of the strategy was inferior to that seen with slow/pump-based delivery. Continual low-dose infusion may therefore be a more effective strategy for enzyme delivery in MPS IIIA.

  11. Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Devos, David; Moreau, Caroline; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in 15% of the cases. A neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD-TDP is suspected. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study compares the topographic distribution of iron (Fe) deposition and the incidence of small cerebrovascular lesions in ALS and in FTLD brains. Seventy-eight post-mortem brains underwent 7.0-tesla MRI. The patients consisted of 12 with ALS, 38 with FTLD, and 28 controls. Three ALS brains had minor FTLD features. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere were submitted to T2 and T2* MRI sequences. The amount of Fe deposition in the deep brain structures and the number of small cerebrovascular lesions was determined in ALS and the subtypes of FTLD compared to control brains, with neuropathological correlates. A significant increase of Fe deposition was observed in the claustrum, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus, and subthalamic nucleus of the FTLD-FUS and FTLD-TDP groups, while in the ALS one, the Fe increase was only observed in the caudate and the subthalamic nuclei. White matter changes were only significantly more severe in the FTLD compared to those in ALS and in controls brains. Cortical micro-bleeds were increased in the frontal and temporal lobes of FTLD as well as of ALS brains compared to controls. Cortical micro-infarcts were, on the other hand, more frequent in the control compared to the ALS and FTLD groups. The present study supports the assumption of a neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD and illustrates the favourable vascular risk profile in these diseases.

  12. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2...

  13. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion: a key mechanism leading to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. Closing the translational gap between rodent models and human vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Jessica; Kitamura, Akihiro; Hase, Yoshiki; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Raj N; Horsburgh, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that vascular risk factors contribute to neurodegeneration, cognitive impairment and dementia. While there is considerable overlap between features of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), it appears that cerebral hypoperfusion is the common underlying pathophysiological mechanism which is a major contributor to cognitive decline and degenerative processes leading to dementia. Sustained cerebral hypoperfusion is suggested to be the cause of white matter attenuation, a key feature common to both AD and dementia associated with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). White matter changes increase the risk for stroke, dementia and disability. A major gap has been the lack of mechanistic insights into the evolution and progress of VCID. However, this gap is closing with the recent refinement of rodent models which replicate chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In this review, we discuss the relevance and advantages of these models in elucidating the pathogenesis of VCID and explore the interplay between hypoperfusion and the deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) protein, as it relates to AD. We use examples of our recent investigations to illustrate the utility of the model in preclinical testing of candidate drugs and lifestyle factors. We propose that the use of such models is necessary for tackling the urgently needed translational gap from preclinical models to clinical treatments. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Functional analyses of human and zebrafish 18-amino acid in-frame deletion pave the way for domain mapping of the cerebral cavernous malformation 3 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, K.; Stahl, S.; Hogan, B.M.; Reinders, J.; Schleider, E.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Felbor, U.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) may cause recurrent headaches, seizures, and hemorrhagic stroke and have been associated with loss-of-function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2, and CCM3/programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). The CCM3/PDCD10 amino acid sequence does not reveal significant homologies

  15. Functional Analyses of Human and Zebrafish 18-Amino Acid In-Frame Deletion Pave the Way for Domain Mapping of the Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, Katrin; Stahl, Sonja; Hogan, Benjamin M.; Reinders, Joerg; Schleider, Elisa; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) may cause recurrent headaches, seizures, and hemorrhagic stroke and have been associated with loss-of-function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2, and CCM3/programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). The CCM3/PDCD10 amino acid sequence does not reveal significant homologies

  16. Genomic Analysis in the Practice of Surgical Neuropathology: The Emory Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Stewart G; Saxe, Debra F; Rossi, Michael R; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Brat, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation of central nervous system tumors increasingly relies on molecular genetic methods to aid in classification, offer prognostic information, and predict response to therapy. Available assays make it possible to assess genetic losses, amplifications, translocations, mutations, or the expression levels of specific gene transcripts or proteins. Current molecular diagnostics frequently use a panel-based approach and whole genome analysis, and generally rely either on DNA sequencing or on hybridization-based methodologies, such as those used in cytogenomic microarrays. In some cases, immunohistochemistry can be used as a surrogate for genetic analysis when the mutation of interest consistently results in overexpression or underexpression of a known protein product. In surgical neuropathology practice, the diagnostic workup of diffuse gliomas, medulloblastomas, low-grade circumscribed gliomas, as well as other diseases, now routinely incorporates the results of genomic studies. Here we summarize our institution's current approach to diagnostic surgical neuropathology, using these contemporary molecular diagnostic applications.

  17. The spectrum of neuropathologic findings in deaths associated with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisard, K S; McFeeley, P J

    1988-07-01

    The pathologic and neuropathologic findings in 90 autopsied cases of death associated with a seizure disorder or complication thereof were reviewed. Most (69%) of the deceased individuals were between 21 and 40 years of age; two thirds were male. In 58% of patients, no cause of death other than seizure disorder was found. The ultimate cause of death in those patients was assumed to be a cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory arrest. Drowning accounted for 19% of deaths, and 17% of patients died of other contributory causes such as suicide, exposure, or atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease. Aspiration was found in the remaining 6%. Tongue lacerations or bite marks were observed in only one third of cases. The brain was normal in approximately two thirds of cases, with no focus for the origination of seizure found on neuropathologic examination. In the remainder of cases, a variety of lesions was found, with cavitary lesions, contusions, and dural lesions being the most common ones.

  18. Tau deposition drives neuropathological, inflammatory and behavioral abnormalities independently of neuronal loss in a novel mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Casey; Kang, Silvia S.; Carlomagno, Yari; Lin, Wen-Lang; Yue, Mei; Kurti, Aishe; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Jansen-West, Karen; Perkerson, Emilie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Phillips, Virginia; Bu, Guojun; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Fryer, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant tau protein accumulation drives neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in several neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, efforts to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and assess the efficacy of therapeutic targets are limited by constraints of existing models of tauopathy. In order to generate a more versatile mouse model of tauopathy, somatic brain transgenesis was utilized to deliver adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) encoding human mutant P301L-tau compared with GFP control. At 6 months of age, we observed widespread human tau expression with concomitant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and abnormally folded proteinase K resistant tau. However, no overt neuronal loss was observed, though significant abnormalities were noted in the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD95. Neurofibrillary pathology was also detected with Gallyas silver stain and Thioflavin-S, and electron microscopy revealed the deposition of closely packed filaments. In addition to classic markers of tauopathy, significant neuroinflammation and extensive gliosis were detected in AAV1-TauP301L mice. This model also recapitulates the behavioral phenotype characteristic of mouse models of tauopathy, including abnormalities in exploration, anxiety, and learning and memory. These findings indicate that biochemical and neuropathological hallmarks of tauopathies are accurately conserved and are independent of cell death in this novel AAV-based model of tauopathy, which offers exceptional versatility and speed in comparison with existing transgenic models. Therefore, we anticipate this approach will facilitate the identification and validation of genetic modifiers of disease, as well as accelerate preclinical assessment of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26276810

  19. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years) who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII) compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS. PMID:21303513

  20. Neuropathology in mouse models of mucopolysaccharidosis type I, IIIA and IIIB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona L Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharide diseases (MPS are caused by deficiency of glycosaminoglycan (GAG degrading enzymes, leading to GAG accumulation. Neurodegenerative MPS diseases exhibit cognitive decline, behavioural problems and shortened lifespan. We have characterised neuropathological changes in mouse models of MPSI, IIIA and IIIB to provide a better understanding of these events.Wild-type (WT, MPSI, IIIA and IIIB mouse brains were analysed at 4 and 9 months of age. Quantitative immunohistochemistry showed significantly increased lysosomal compartment, GM2 ganglioside storage, neuroinflammation, decreased and mislocalised synaptic vesicle associated membrane protein, (VAMP2, and decreased post-synaptic protein, Homer-1, in layers II/III-VI of the primary motor, somatosensory and parietal cortex. Total heparan sulphate (HS, was significantly elevated, and abnormally N-, 6-O and 2-O sulphated compared to WT, potentially altering HS-dependent cellular functions. Neuroinflammation was confirmed by significantly increased MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-1α, using cytometric bead arrays. An overall genotype effect was seen in all parameters tested except for synaptophysin staining, neuronal cell number and cortical thickness which were not significantly different from WT. MPSIIIA and IIIB showed significantly more pronounced pathology than MPSI in lysosomal storage, astrocytosis, microgliosis and the percentage of 2-O sulphation of HS. We also observed significant time progression of all genotypes from 4-9 months in lysosomal storage, astrocytosis, microgliosis and synaptic disorganisation but not GM2 gangliosidosis. Individual genotype*time differences were disparate, with significant progression from 4 to 9 months only seen for MPSIIIB with lysosomal storage, MPSI with astrocytocis and MPSIIIA with microgliosis as well as neuronal loss. Transmission electron microscopy of MPS brains revealed dystrophic axons, axonal storage, and extensive lipid and lysosomal storage

  1. [Neuropathology and pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease: Focus on α-synuclein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Alice; Lionnet, Arthur; Corbillé, Anne-Gaëlle; Derkinderen, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    The past 20 years has witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of Parkinson's disease. It is now well established that α-synuclein, a presynaptic neuronal protein, is not only a marker but also an actor of the disease. In this review, we discuss the advances that have been obtained in neuropathology using α-synuclein immunohistochemistry and the role of this protein in the spread of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Sustained Low-Level Elevations of Carbon Dioxide on Cerebral Blood Flow and Autoregulation of the Intracerebral Arteries in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwka, U.; Krasney, J. A.; Simon, S. G.; Schmidt, P.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) was measured by insonating the middle cerebral arteries of 4 subjects using a 2 Mhz transcranial Doppler. Ambient CO2 was elevated to 0.7% for 23 days in the first study and to 1.2% for 23 days in the same subjects in the second study. By non-parametric testing CBFv was elevated significantly by +35% above pre-exposure levels during the first 1-3 days at both exposure levels after which CBFv progressively readjusted to pre-exposure levels. Despite similar CBFv responses, headache was only reported during the initial phase of exposure to 1.2% CO2. Vascular reactivity to CO2 assessed by rebreathing showed a similar pattern with the CBFv increases early in the exposures being greater than those elicited later. An increase in metabolic rate of the visual cortex was evoked by having the subjects open and close their eyes during a visual stimulus. Evoked CBFv responses measured in the posterior cerebral artery were also elevated in the first 1-3 days of both studies returning to pre-exposure levels as hypercapnia continued. Cerebral vascular autoregulation assessed by raising head pressure during 10 deg head-down tilt both during the low-level exposures and during rebreathing was unaltered. There were no changes in the retinal microcirculation during serial fundoscopy studies. The time-dependent changes in CO2 vascular reactivity might be due either to retention of bicarbonate in brain extracellular fluid or to progressive increases in ventilation, or both. Cerebral vascular autoregulation appears preserved during chronic exposure to these levels of ambient CO2.

  3. Transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induces early and chronic axonal changes in rats: its importance for the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinan Zhang

    Full Text Available The dementia of Alzheimer's type and brain ischemia are known to increase at comparable rates with age. Recent advances suggest that cerebral ischemia may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, however, the neuropathological relationship between these two disorders is largely unclear. It has been demonstrated that axonopathy, mainly manifesting as impairment of axonal transport and swelling of the axon and varicosity, is a prominent feature in AD and may play an important role in the neuropathological mechanisms in AD. In this study, we investigated the early and chronic changes of the axons of neurons in the different brain areas (cortex, hippocampus and striatum using in vivo tracing technique and grading analysis method in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (middle cerebral artery occlusion, MCAO. In addition, the relationship between the changes of axons and the expression of β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42 and hyperphosphorylated Tau, which have been considered as the key neuropathological processes of AD, was analyzed by combining tracing technique with immunohistochemistry or western blotting. Subsequently, we found that transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion produced obvious swelling of the axons and varicosities, from 6 hours after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion even up to 4 weeks. We could not observe Aβ plaques or overexpression of Aβ42 in the ischemic brain areas, however, the site-specific hyperphosphorylated Tau could be detected in the ischemic cortex. These results suggest that transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induce early and chronic axonal changes, which may be an important mechanism affecting the clinical outcome and possibly contributing to the development of AD after stroke.

  4. Polyubiquitinylation Profile in Down Syndrome Brain Before and After the Development of Alzheimer Neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramutola, Antonella; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Andrea; Giorgi, Alessandra; di Francesco, Laura; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Coccia, Raffaella; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2017-03-01

    Among the putative mechanisms proposed to be common factors in Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, deficits in protein quality control (PQC) have emerged as a unifying mechanism of neurodegeneration. Considering that disturbance of protein degradation systems is present in DS and that oxidized/misfolded proteins require polyubiquitinylation for degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system, this study investigated if dysregulation of protein polyubiquitinylation is associated with AD neurodegeneration in DS. Postmortem brains from DS cases before and after development of AD neuropathology and age-matched controls were analyzed. By selectively isolating polyubiquitinated proteins, we were able to identify specific proteins with an altered pattern of polyubiquitinylation as a function of age. Interestingly, we found that oxidation is coupled with polyubiquitinylation for most proteins mainly involved in PQC and energy metabolism. This is the first study showing alteration of the polyubiquitinylation profile as a function of aging in DS brain compared with healthy controls. Understanding the onset of the altered ubiquitome profile in DS brain may contribute to identification of key molecular regulators of age-associated cognitive decline. Disturbance of the polyubiquitinylation machinery may be a key feature of aging and neurodegeneration. In DS, age-associated deficits of the proteolytic system may further exacerbate the accumulation of oxidized/misfolded/polyubiquitinated proteins, which is not efficiently degraded and may become harmful to neurons and contribute to AD neuropathology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 280-298.

  5. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  6. Comparsion between Intravenous Delivered Human Fetal Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Treatment of Rat Cerebral Infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Bin; Ma, Bu-Qing; Guan, Yun-Qian; Zhou, Yi-Dan

    2016-10-10

    Objective To compare the effecacy of human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) with human mononuclear cell (hMNC) in treating rat cerebral infarct.Methods The SD rat models of cerebral infarct were established by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO). Rats were divided into four groups: sham,ischemia vehicle,MSC,and MNC transplantation groups. For the transplantation group,1×10(6) hMSCs or hMNCs were intravascularly transplanted into the tail vein 1 hour after the ischemia onset. The ischemia vehicle group received dMCAO surgery and intravascular saline injection 1,3,5,and 7 days after the ischemia onset,and then behavioral tests were performed. At 48 h after the ischemia onset,the abundance of Iba- 1,the symbol of activated microglia,was evaluated in the peri-ischemia striatum area; meanwhile,the neurotrophic factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in ipsilateral peri-ischemia striatum area were also measured. Results The relative infarct volume in ischemia vehicle group,hMSC group,and hMNC transplantation group were (37.85±4.40)%,(33.41±3.82)%,and (30.23±3.63)%,respectively. The infarct volumes of MSC group (t=2.100,P=0.034) and MNC group (t=2.109,P=0.0009) were significantly smaller than that of ischemia vehicle group,and that of MNC group was significantly smaller than that of MSC group (t=1.743,P=0.043). One day after transplantation,the score of ischemia vehicle group in limb placing test was (4.32±0.71)%,which was significantly lower than that in sham group (9.73±0.36)% (t=2.178,P=8.61×10(-11)). The scores of MSC and MNC group,which were (5.09±0.62)% (t=2.1009,P=0.024) and (5.90±0.68)% (t=2.1008,P=0.0001),respectively,were significantly higher than that of ischemia vehicle group; also,the score of MNC group was significantly higher than that of MSC group(t=2.1009,P=0.0165). The contralateral forelimb scores of MSC and MNC groups in beam walking test were (5.56±0.86)% (t=2

  7. Bacteraemia in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enwere, G.; van Hensbroek, M. B.; Adegbola, R.; Palmer, A.; Onyiora, E.; Weber, M.; Greenwood, B.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a treatment trial of cerebral malaria, blood cultures were done in 276 Gambian children, aged between 1 and 9 years, with cerebral malaria. Fourteen (5%) of these were positive. The organisms isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (6), coliforms (4), Pseudomonas spp. (2), Salmonella spp. (1)

  8. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  9. Spectrum of short- and long-term brain pathology and long-term behavioral deficits in male repeated hypoxic rats closely resembling human extreme prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oorschot, Dorothy E; Voss, Logan; Covey, Matthew V; Goddard, Liping; Huang, William; Birchall, Penny; Bilkey, David K; Kohe, Sarah E

    2013-07-17

    Brain injury in the premature infant is associated with a high risk of neurodevelopmental disability. Previous small-animal models of brain injury attributable to extreme prematurity typically fail to generate a spectrum of pathology and behavior that closely resembles that observed in humans, although they provide initial answers to numerous cellular, molecular, and therapeutic questions. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of rats to repeated hypoxia from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P3 models the characteristic white matter neuropathological injury, gray matter volume loss, and memory deficits seen in children born extremely prematurely. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to repeated hypoxia or repeated normoxia from P1 to P3. The absolute number of pre-oligodendrocytes and mature oligodendrocytes, the surface area and g-ratio of myelin, the absolute volume of cerebral white and gray matter, and the absolute number of cerebral neurons were quantified stereologically. Spatial memory was investigated on a radial arm maze. Rats exposed to repeated hypoxia had a significant loss of (1) pre-oligodendrocytes at P4, (2) cerebral white matter volume and myelin at P14, (3) cerebral cortical and striatal gray matter volume without neuronal loss at P14, and (4) cerebral myelin and memory deficits in adulthood. Decreased myelin was correlated with increased attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-like hyperactivity. This new small-animal model of extreme prematurity generates a spectrum of short- and long-term pathology and behavior that closely resembles that observed in humans. This new rat model provides a clinically relevant tool to investigate numerous cellular, molecular, and therapeutic questions on brain injury attributable to extreme prematurity.

  10. Influence of skin blood flow and source-detector distance on near-infrared spectroscopy-determined cerebral oxygenation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirasawa, Ai; Yanagisawa, Shintaro; Tanaka, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    in a semi-recumbent position, while extracranial blood flow was restricted by application of four different pressures (+20 to +80 mmHg) to the left temporal artery. The O2 Hb was measured at the forehead via a multidistance probe (source-detector distance; 15, 22·5 and 30 mm), and SkBF was determined......Most near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) apparatus fails to isolate cerebral oxygenation from an extracranial contribution although they use different source-detector distances. Nevertheless, the effect of different source-detector distances and change in extracranial blood flow on the NIRS signal...... (Psource to detector distance. These findings suggest that the NIRS-determined cerebral oxyhaemoglobin is affected by change in extracranial blood flow independent of the source-detector distance from 15...

  11. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A. In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes. This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  12. Tissue-specific conditional CCM2 knockout mice establish the essential role of endothelial CCM2 in angiogenesis: implications for human cerebral cavernous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulday, Gwénola; Blécon, Anne; Petit, Nathalie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Garcia, Luis A.; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Giovannini, Marco; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations of the brain that lead to cerebral hemorrhages. In 20% of CCM patients, this results from an autosomal dominant condition caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the three CCM genes. High expression levels of the CCM genes in the neuroepithelium indicate that CCM lesions might be caused by a loss of function of these genes in neural cells rather than in vascular cells. However, their in vivo function, particularly during cerebral angiogenesis, is totally unknown. We developed mice with constitutive and tissue-specific CCM2 deletions to investigate CCM2 function in vivo. Constitutive deletion of CCM2 leads to early embryonic death. Deletion of CCM2 from neuroglial precursor cells does not lead to cerebrovascular defects, whereas CCM2 is required in endothelial cells for proper vascular development. Deletion of CCM2 from endothelial cells severely affects angiogenesis, leading to morphogenic defects in the major arterial and venous blood vessels and in the heart, and results in embryonic lethality at mid-gestation. These findings establish the essential role of endothelial CCM2 for proper vascular development and strongly suggest that the endothelial cell is the primary target in the cascade of events leading from CCM2 mutations to CCM cerebrovascular lesions. PMID:19259391

  13. [Cerebral paragonimiasis and Bo Sung Sim's hemispherectomy in Korea in 1950s-1960s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Miyagawa, Takuya; Hong, Jeonghwa; Kim, Ockjoo

    2011-06-30

    This paper deals with cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral hemispherectomy conducted as a treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis by Bo Sung Sim in Korea in 1950s-1960s. He demonstrated that cerebral hemispherectomy could be used for unilateral diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis. Sim learned cerebral hemispherectomy from Dr. L. A. French. at the University of Minnesota from 1955 to 1957 in America. The authors argues that Bo Sung Sim's introduction of cerebral hemispherectomy to Korea was not a simple application of an advanced medical technology, but a complicated and active process in that Sim used the technique to intervene intractable complications from cerebral paragonimiasis such as generalized convulsions, spastic hemiplegia and mental deterioration. Bo Sung Sim, one of the neurosurgeons of the first generation in Korea, was trained in neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology and animal experiments as well as in neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota. After returning to Korea, Sim faced parasitic diseases, one of the most serious public health problems at that time, which were far different from what he learned in America. As a neurosurgeon, Sim tackled with parasitic diseases of the central nervous system with various diagnostics and therapeutics. In 1950s, more than one million populations suffered from pulmonary paragonimiasis acquired by eating raw crabs or by feeding juice of crushed crayfish for the treatment of measles in Korea. About 26.6 percent of people with paragonimiasis had cerebral paragonimiasis. Before bithionol therapy was introduced in 1962, neurosurgery was the only available treatment to control increased intracranial pressures, intractable epilepsy, paralysis and mental deterioration. Between 1958 to 1962, Bo Sung Sim operated on 24 patients of cerebral paragonimiasis. In two of them, he performed cerebral hemispherectomy to control intractable convulsions when he found diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral atrophy at the

  14. Two key genes closely implicated with the neuropathological characteristics in Down syndrome: DYRK1A and RCAN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joongkyu; Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2009-01-31

    The most common genetic disorder Down syndrome (DS) displays various developmental defects including mental retardation, learning and memory deficit, the early onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD), congenital heart disease, and craniofacial abnormalities. Those characteristics result from the extra-genes located in the specific region called nDown syndrome critical region (DSCR)' in human chromosome 21. In this review, we summarized the recent findings of the DYRK1A and RCAN1 genes, which are located on DSCR and thought to be closely associated with the typical features of DS patients, and their implication to the pathogenesis of neural defects in DS. DYRK1A phosphorylates several transcriptional factors, such as CREB and NFAT, endocytic complex proteins, and AD-linked gene products. Meanwhile, RCAN1 is an endogenous inhibitor of calcineurin A, and its unbalanced activity is thought to cause major neuronal and/or non-neuronal malfunction in DS and AD. Interestingly, they both contribute to the learning and memory deficit, altered synaptic plasticity, impaired cell cycle regulation, and AD-like neuropathology in DS. By understanding their biochemical, functional and physiological roles, we hope to get important molecular basis of DS pathology, which would consequently lead to the basis to develop the possible therapeutic tools for the neural defects in DS. [BMB reports 2009; 42(1): 6-15].

  15. Selenomethionine Ameliorates Neuropathology in the Olfactory Bulb of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Hao Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory dysfunction is an early and common symptom in Alzheimer′s disease (AD and is reported to be related to several pathologic changes, including the deposition of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as synaptic impairment. Selenomethionine (Se-Met, the major form of selenium in animals and humans, may be a promising therapeutic option for AD as it decreases the deposition of Aβ and tau hyperphosphorylation in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3× Tg-AD. In this study, 4-month-old AD mice were treated with 6 µg/mL Se-Met in drinking water for 12 weeks and the effect of Se-Met on neuropathological deficits in olfactory bulb (OB of 3× Tg-AD mice was investigated. The administration of Se-Met effectively decreased the production and deposition of Aβ by inhibiting β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1-regulated amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and reduced the level of total tau and phosphorylated tau, which depended on depressing the activity and expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5. Meanwhile, Se-Met reduced glial activation, relieved neuroinflammation and attenuated neuronal cell death in the OB of AD mice. So Se-Met could improve pathologic changes of AD in the OB, which further demonstrated the potential therapeutic effect of Se-Met in AD.

  16. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  17. Trends in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, E

    2001-05-01

    The terms trend and cerebral palsy are defined emphazing the non-diagnostic nature of the cerebral palsy label. Criteria necessary for valid estimation of trends include constant methods of estimating population based numerators and denominators over a number of years, which render them hard to obtain, particularly in developing countries. Trends in cerebral palsy are an important source of aetiological hypotheses for congenital cerebral palsy, provide corroborative evidence for existing hypotheses and may direct strategies to prevent post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy. In developed countries the overall frequency of congenital cerebral palsy has changed little during the last decades. However this masks a dramatic increase in the frequency in the infants born most preterm, a decline in those born moderately preterm and little change in those born at term, but the severity of impairments of those born very preterm is decreasing while for those born at term severity in increasing. These changes may be the result of the increasing ability of perinatal care to rescue very vulnerable infants. There is less agreement in trends of post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy which are more sensitive to social well being.

  18. Acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G J; Lessell, S

    1977-01-01

    Color blindness developed in five patients apparently because of lesions in the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. Three of them also had symptoms of prosopagnosia. The lesions were neoplastic in two and vascular in three of the patients. It would appear that bilateral, inferior, occipital lobe lesions may be responsible both for acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia and prosopagnosia. Evidence from experimental investigations in primates suggests that the areas of the cerebral hemispheres analogous to those involved in these patients, may be specialized for the processing of colored stimuli.

  19. Reversible cerebral periventricular white matter changes with corpus callosum involvement in acute toluene-poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Substance poisoning, such as toluene intoxication, has seldom been reported in the relevant literature. The documented cerebral neuroimaging has mostly described reversible symmetrical white matter changes in both the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. This paper presents 2 patients with toluene poisoning, whose brain magnetic resonance imaging studies showed a similar picture that included extra involvement over the corpus callosum; however, such corpus callosum involvement has never been mentioned and is quite rare in the literature. We discussed the underlying neuropathological pathways in this article. Hopefully, these cases will provide first-line clinicians with some valuable information with regard to toluene intoxication and clinical neuroimaging presentations. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Kristin H; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Krabbe, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) linked to the spastic gait gene 4 (SPG4) is controversial, as the "pure" form traditionally has been considered confined to the long axons of the spinal cord. However, recent immunolabeling experiments have demonstrated extensive Spastin expression in the cortex...... and striatum. This could indicate a more widespread neuropathology from mutations in the SPG4 gene than previously assumed. The aim of this study was therefore to ascertain the extent of cerebral involvement in SPG4 linked HSP by neuropsychological examination and measurement of the regional cerebral blood...... flow (rCBF) as an indirect marker of regional neuronal activity. Eighteen SPG4 patients and 18 matched control subjects were studied. Resting state rCBF was measured using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and the (15)O-labelled water bolus technique and relative group differences were explored using...

  1. Neuropathological role of PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis in Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perluigi, Marzia; Pupo, Gilda; Tramutola, Antonella; Cini, Chiara; Coccia, Raffaella; Barone, Eugenio; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability characterized by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (Chr21). Individuals with DS have sufficient neuropathology for a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) after the age of 40years. The aim of our study is to gain new insights in the molecular mechanisms impaired in DS subjects that eventually lead to the development of dementia. We evaluate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis in the frontal cortex from DS cases (under the age of 40years) and DS with AD neuropathology compared with age-matched controls (Young and Old). The PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis may control several key pathways involved in AD that, if aberrantly regulated, affect amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition and tau phosphorylation. Our results show a hyperactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis in individuals with DS, with and without AD pathology, in comparison with respective controls. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR deregulation results in decreased autophagy, inhibition of IRS1 and GSK3β activity. Moreover, our data suggest that aberrant activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis acts in parallel to RCAN1 in phosphorylating tau, in DS and DS/AD. In conclusion, this study provides insights into the neuropathological mechanisms that may be engaged during the development of AD in DS. We suggest that deregulation of this signaling cascade is already evident in young DS cases and persist in the presence of AD pathology. The impairment of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis in DS population might represent a key-contributing factor to the neurodegenerative process that culminates in Alzheimer-like dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  3. Direct microinjection of soman or VX into the amygdala produces repetitive limbic convulsions and neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, J H; McLeod, C G; Nipwoda, M T

    1987-12-01

    Rats were injected in the amygdala and other forebrain sites with nmolar amounts of the highly toxic organophosphate 'nerve agent' compounds soman or VX (O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)-methylphosphonothioate) in an attempt to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for the permanent brain pathology that has been observed following systemic intoxication with these agents. Injections were performed using a stereotaxically guided microsyringe in animals maintained under halothane/oxygen anesthesia or using chronically implanted cannulae in conscious animals. Bilateral microsyringe injections of up to 11.0 nmol soman into the amygdala failed to evoke abnormal behavior or brain pathology. When rats were pretreated with lithium chloride, or when carbachol was coadministered, soman injections evoked repetitive clonic convulsions and neuropathology. Unilateral injections of 3.4 nmol of VX into the amygdala elicited convulsions and brain damage in 67% of the animals tested. Atropine pretreatment (15.0 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the development of convulsions and brain damage. Neuropathology was observed only in animals that developed repetitive convulsions; the piriform and entorhinal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus and thalamus were the brain structures most consistently damaged. With unilateral injections, the damage was more severe on the side ipsilateral to the injection. The behavioral topography of the convulsions and the neuroanatomical distribution and nature of the subsequent pathology closely resemble that observed with systemic administration of these compounds. The results indicate that the nerve agents are not directly neurotoxic, that peripherally induced hypoxia or anoxia are unlikely mechanisms of the neuropathology, and that the brain damage produced by these compounds is primarily seizure-mediated.

  4. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  5. Cerebral Manifestations of Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Brussé (Ingrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis intends to describe and explain the course of clinical neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameters in patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. We aimed to improve knowledge on cerebral pathophysiological mechanisms of preeclampsia related to signs and

  6. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Cerebral Cavernous Malformation ...

  7. Dysphagia in cerebral palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annamaria Salghetti; Andrea Martinuzzi

    2012-01-01

      Feeding problems are often present in children with neuromotor impairment: dysphagia is usually seen in the most severe form of cerebral palsy and it's defined as the difficulty with any of the four phases of swallowing...

  8. Cerebral and cerebellar grey matter atrophy in Friedreich ataxia: the IMAGE-FRDA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Louisa P; Harding, Ian H; Corben, Louise A; Stagnitti, Monique R; Storey, Elsdon; Egan, Gary F; Delatycki, Martin B; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2016-11-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is traditionally associated with neuropathology in the cerebellar dentate nucleus and spinal cord. Growing evidence also suggests involvement of the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, although reports of structural abnormalities remain mixed. This study assessed the structural integrity of cortical grey matter in FRDA, focussing on regions in which pathology may underlie the motor deficits characteristic of this disorder. T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired from 31 individuals with FRDA and 37 healthy controls. Cortical thickness (FreeSurfer) and cortical volume (SPM-VBM) were measured in cerebral motor regions-of-interest (primary motor, dorsal and ventral premotor, and supplementary motor areas) alongside unconstrained exploratory analyses of the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Correlations were assessed between cortical thickness/volume measures and each of disease severity, length of the causative genetic triplet-repeat expansion, and finger-tapping behavioural measures. Individuals with FRDA had significantly reduced cortical thickness, relative to controls, in the premotor and supplementary motor areas. Reduced cortical thickness and/or volume were also observed in the cuneus and precuneus, posterior aspects of the medial and lateral prefrontal cortices, insula, temporal poles, and cerebellar lobules V, VI, and VII. Measures of clinical severity, genetic abnormality, and motor dysfunction correlated with volume loss in the lateral cerebellar hemispheres. These results suggest that atrophy preferentially affects premotor relative to primary areas of the cortical motor system, and also extends to a range of non-motor brain regions. Furthermore, cortical thickness and cortical volume findings were largely divergent, suggesting that each is sensitive to different aspects of neuropathology in FRDA. Overall, this study supports a disease model involving neural aberrations within the cerebral and

  9. Cerebral Palsy in Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lucila Merino Marcos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty-five years, a number of important films have been made in which the protagonist or supporting actor has had, or simulated having, cerebral palsy.  On occasion, these characters have been played by people with disabilities.  In the course of this field’s history, films have portrayed many diverse aspects of cerebral palsy such as healthcare and social and familial obligations.

  10. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author).

  11. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  12. Organization of sensory discrimination and response selection in choice and nonchoice conditions: a study using cerebral evoked potentials in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, D S; Aminoff, M J; Shefrin, S L

    1990-10-01

    1. It has been suggested that the long-latency "event-related" cerebral evoked potentials (ERPs) reflect certain aspects of the neural processing underlying sensory discrimination in a two-choice reaction time task. The present paper examines the hypothesis that the coupling of these ERPs to sensory discrimination is variable and that the discrimination process is completed at different points during the course of cerebral processing, depending on the actual requirements of the task. 2. We recorded the cerebral evoked potentials and electromyogram (EMG) of the responding muscle in five different reaction time tasks, each requiring sensory discrimination and response selection of varying complexity. In the Choice condition two stimuli were presented, and two separate responses were required. In the two Go-No Go conditions two stimuli were presented, but a response was required to only one or the other of the stimuli. In the two Simple conditions only one stimulus was presented, and one response was required. 3. Under both Choice and Go-No Go conditions, the frequency histogram of the onset latency of the compound muscle action potential for the response to the frequent tone showed a bimodal distribution without overlap, suggesting that there were two distinct types of responder: fast and slow. The comparable histograms for the onset latency of the response to the rare tone also showed a bimodal distribution, but the mean onset latency was prolonged relative to the response to the frequent tone, and the mean separation was less so that the two distributions overlapped each other. 4. Despite the marked difference in response latencies between the fast and slow responders, there was no appreciable difference in cerebral evoked responses between the two groups. Moreover, in response to the frequent tone, all slow responders and, likewise, all fast responders had similar onset latencies of the averaged EMG activity regardless of condition. Nonetheless, fast or slow

  13. Influence of acute jugular vein compression on the cerebral blood flow velocity, pial artery pulsation and width of subarachnoid space in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej F Frydrychowski

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1 pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ; (2 cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV; (3 peripheral blood pressure; and (4 possible relations between mentioned parameters. METHODS: Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19-30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS, CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO(2 was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT and swayed to the back (initial position. RESULTS: In the first group (n = 10 during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP decreased (-17.6% and -17.9%, respectively and CBFV increased (+35.0%, while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%. In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22 cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively, while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (-15.5% and -9.0%, respectively. End-tidal CO(2 remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = -0.74. CONCLUSIONS: Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small vessel cerebral

  14. Influence of Acute Jugular Vein Compression on the Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, Pial Artery Pulsation and Width of Subarachnoid Space in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Winklewski, Pawel J.; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. METHODS: Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19-30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV i...

  15. Influence of acute jugular vein compression on the cerebral blood flow velocity, pial artery pulsation and width of subarachnoid space in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Winklewski, Pawel J; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19-30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO(2) was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT) and swayed to the back (initial) position. In the first group (n = 10) during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP) decreased (-17.6% and -17.9%, respectively) and CBFV increased (+35.0%), while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%). In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22) cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively), while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (-15.5% and -9.0%, respectively). End-tidal CO(2) remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = -0.74). Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small vessel cerebral disease.

  16. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis , permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  17. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  18. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with enhanced Alzheimer-like neuropathology in 3×Tg-AD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Yan

    Full Text Available The comorbidity between epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD is a topic of growing interest. Senile plaques and tauopathy are found in epileptic human temporal lobe structures, and individuals with AD have an increased incidence of spontaneous seizures. However, why and how epilepsy is associated with enhanced AD-like pathology remains unknown. We have recently shown β-secretase-1 (BACE1 elevation associated with aberrant limbic axonal sprouting in epileptic CD1 mice. Here we sought to explore whether BACE1 upregulation affected the development of Alzheimer-type neuropathology in mice expressing mutant human APP, presenilin and tau proteins, the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD. 3×Tg-AD mice were treated with pilocarpine or saline (i.p. at 6-8 months of age. Immunoreactivity (IR for BACE1, β-amyloid (Aβ and phosphorylated tau (p-tau was subsequently examined at 9, 11 or 14 months of age. Recurrent convulsive seizures, as well as mossy fiber sprouting and neuronal death in the hippocampus and limbic cortex, were observed in all epileptic mice. Neuritic plaques composed of BACE1-labeled swollen/sprouting axons and extracellular AβIR were seen in the hippocampal formation, amygdala and piriform cortices of 9 month-old epileptic, but not control, 3×Tg-AD mice. Densities of plaque-associated BACE1 and AβIR were elevated in epileptic versus control mice at 11 and 14 months of age. p-Tau IR was increased in dentate granule cells and mossy fibers in epileptic mice relative to controls at all time points examined. Thus, pilocarpine-induced chronic epilepsy was associated with accelerated and enhanced neuritic plaque formation and altered intraneuronal p-tau expression in temporal lobe structures in 3×Tg-AD mice, with these pathologies occurring in regions showing neuronal death and axonal dystrophy.

  19. Tau deposition drives neuropathological, inflammatory and behavioral abnormalities independently of neuronal loss in a novel mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Casey; Kang, Silvia S; Carlomagno, Yari; Lin, Wen-Lang; Yue, Mei; Kurti, Aishe; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Jansen-West, Karen; Perkerson, Emilie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Phillips, Virginia; Bu, Guojun; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Fryer, John D

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant tau protein accumulation drives neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in several neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, efforts to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and assess the efficacy of therapeutic targets are limited by constraints of existing models of tauopathy. In order to generate a more versatile mouse model of tauopathy, somatic brain transgenesis was utilized to deliver adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) encoding human mutant P301L-tau compared with GFP control. At 6 months of age, we observed widespread human tau expression with concomitant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and abnormally folded proteinase K resistant tau. However, no overt neuronal loss was observed, though significant abnormalities were noted in the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD95. Neurofibrillary pathology was also detected with Gallyas silver stain and Thioflavin-S, and electron microscopy revealed the deposition of closely packed filaments. In addition to classic markers of tauopathy, significant neuroinflammation and extensive gliosis were detected in AAV1-Tau(P301L) mice. This model also recapitulates the behavioral phenotype characteristic of mouse models of tauopathy, including abnormalities in exploration, anxiety, and learning and memory. These findings indicate that biochemical and neuropathological hallmarks of tauopathies are accurately conserved and are independent of cell death in this novel AAV-based model of tauopathy, which offers exceptional versatility and speed in comparison with existing transgenic models. Therefore, we anticipate this approach will facilitate the identification and validation of genetic modifiers of disease, as well as accelerate preclinical assessment of potential therapeutic targets. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Advances in the management of cerebral malaria in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Saroj K; Wiese, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cerebral malaria continues to be a substantial cause of death and disability worldwide. Although many studies deal with cerebral malaria in children, only very few pertain to adults. Presence of multiorgan failure makes the prognosis poor. Various mechanisms in the pathogenesis...... of cerebral malaria and the role of adjuvant therapy will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Artemisinin-based therapies have improved antiparasitic treatment, but in-hospital mortality still remains high, as do neurological sequelae. Several recent studies have given new insights in the pathophysiology...... of cerebral malaria particularly the role of immune mechanisms in disease progression. Recent findings have identified several potential candidates for adjuvant neuroprotective treatment. Recombinant human erythropoietin has shown beneficial effect in experimental cerebral malaria and will soon enter...

  1. Administration of thimerosal-containing vaccines to infant rhesus macaques does not result in autism-like behavior or neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Li, Wenhao; Yazdani, Umar; Grady, Stephen; Johnson, Trevor; Hammond, Jacob; Gunn, Howard; Curtis, Britni; English, Chris; Yutuc, Vernon; Ferrier, Clayton; Sackett, Gene P; Marti, C Nathan; Young, Keith; Hewitson, Laura; German, Dwight C

    2015-10-06

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Some anecdotal reports suggest that ASD is related to exposure to ethyl mercury, in the form of the vaccine preservative, thimerosal, and/or receiving the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine. Using infant rhesus macaques receiving thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) following the recommended pediatric vaccine schedules from the 1990s and 2008, we examined behavior, and neuropathology in three brain regions found to exhibit neuropathology in postmortem ASD brains. No neuronal cellular or protein changes in the cerebellum, hippocampus, or amygdala were observed in animals following the 1990s or 2008 vaccine schedules. Analysis of social behavior in juvenile animals indicated that there were no significant differences in negative behaviors between animals in the control and experimental groups. These data indicate that administration of TCVs and/or the MMR vaccine to rhesus macaques does not result in neuropathological abnormalities, or aberrant behaviors, like those observed in ASD.

  2. The dysexecutive syndrome associated with ischaemic vascular disease and related subcortical neuropathology: a Boston process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Melissa; Price, Cate C; Giovannetti, Tania; Swenson, Rod; Libon, David J

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia has helped to re-define the impact of various subcortical neuropathologies on aging; however, state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques and autopsy studies suggest that not all structural brain alterations associated with vascular dementia are exclusive to this neurodegenerative process alone. Thus, a detailed analysis of the cognitive phenotype associated with ischaemic vascular disease is key to our understanding of subcortical neuropathology and its associated behaviors. Over the past twenty years, we have operationally defined this cognitive phenotype using the Boston Process Approach to neuropsychological assessment. This has led to both an empirical, as well as a theoretical understanding of three core constructs related to the dysexecutive syndrome associated with ischaemic vascular disease affecting periventricular and deep white matter as well as subcortical structures connecting these regions with the prefrontal cortex. Thus, difficulties with mental set, cognitive control and mental manipulation negatively impact executive functioning. This review will outline the subtle markers underlying this prefrontal dysfunction, i.e., the dysexecutive phenotype, associated with ischaemic vascular disease and relate it to fundamental impairments of gating subserved by basal ganglia-thalamic pathways within and across various dementia syndromes.

  3. The Dysexecutive Syndrome Associated with Ischaemic Vascular Disease and Related Subcortical Neuropathology: A Boston Process Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lamar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia has helped to re-define the impact of various subcortical neuropathologies on aging; however, state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques and autopsy studies suggest that not all structural brain alterations associated with vascular dementia are exclusive to this neurodegenerative process alone. Thus, a detailed analysis of the cognitive phenotype associated with ischaemic vascular disease is key to our understanding of subcortical neuropathology and its associated behaviors. Over the past twenty years, we have operationally defined this cognitive phenotype using the Boston Process Approach to neuropsychological assessment. This has led to both an empirical, as well as a theoretical understanding of three core constructs related to the dysexecutive syndrome associated with ischaemic vascular disease affecting periventricular and deep white matter as well as subcortical structures connecting these regions with the prefrontal cortex. Thus, difficulties with mental set, cognitive control and mental manipulation negatively impact executive functioning. This review will outline the subtle markers underlying this prefrontal dysfunction, i.e., the dysexecutive phenotype, associated with ischaemic vascular disease and relate it to fundamental impairments of gating subserved by basal ganglia-thalamic pathways within and across various dementia syndromes.

  4. Neuropathology of chronic vitamine E deficiency in fatal familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K; Yokoyama, T; Okaniwa, M; Kamoshita, S

    1982-01-01

    A progressive neuromuscular syndrome developed in a girl suffering from fatal familial intrahepatic cholestasis (Byler disease). The neuromuscular syndrome included muscular wasting of the legs, pes cavus, areflexia, decreased vibratory sensation, cerebellar symptoms, ophthalmoplegia, and visual disturbance with retinitis pigmentosa. The serum vitamin E level was extremely low. Postmortem neuropathologic study revealed the following lesions: (1) Systemic axonopathy involving the peripheral nerves and proximal axons of the dorsal root ganglia and posterior roots as well as the distal axons of the central nervous system (CNS) (2) Neuronal loss in the sensory and oculomotor nuclei of the brain stem, basal ganglia, Clarke's column, posterior horn, and dorsal root ganglia. (3) Neuronal lipofuscinosis. Axonopathy was severer in the more distal axonal segments, although the cuneate fasciculus was more affected than the gracile fasciculus. The severity of neuronal lipofuscinosis was not correlated with that of neuronal disintegration. The electron-dense bodies in the dystrophic swollen axons resembled lipofuscin granules. These neuropathologic lesions were considered to be the sequelae to chronic vitamin E deficiency.

  5. Reducing GBA2 Activity Ameliorates Neuropathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R A Marques

    Full Text Available The enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA hydrolyses glucosylceramide (GlcCer in lysosomes. Markedly reduced GBA activity is associated with severe manifestations of Gaucher disease including neurological involvement. Mutations in the GBA gene have recently also been identified as major genetic risk factor for Parkinsonism. Disturbed metabolism of GlcCer may therefore play a role in neuropathology. Besides lysosomal GBA, cells also contain a non-lysosomal glucosylceramidase (GBA2. Given that the two β-glucosidases share substrates, we speculated that over-activity of GBA2 during severe GBA impairment might influence neuropathology. This hypothesis was studied in Niemann-Pick type C (Npc1-/- mice showing secondary deficiency in GBA in various tissues. Here we report that GBA2 activity is indeed increased in the brain of Npc1-/- mice. We found that GBA2 is particularly abundant in Purkinje cells (PCs, one of the most affected neuronal populations in NPC disease. Inhibiting GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice with a brain-permeable low nanomolar inhibitor significantly improved motor coordination and extended lifespan in the absence of correction in cholesterol and ganglioside abnormalities. This trend was recapitulated, although not to full extent, by introducing a genetic loss of GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice. Our findings point to GBA2 activity as therapeutic target in NPC.

  6. Convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain: therapeutic potential and neuropathological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Neil U; Gill, Steven S; Love, Seth

    2014-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) describes a direct method of drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the infusion catheter in order to exploit bulk flow through the interstitial spaces of the brain, CED offers a number of advantages over conventional drug delivery methods-bypass of the blood-brain barrier, targeted distribution through large brain volumes and minimization of systemic side effects. Despite showing early promise, CED is yet to fulfill its potential as a mainstream strategy for the treatment of neurological disease. Substantial research effort has been dedicated to optimize the technology for CED and identify the parameters, which govern successful drug distribution. It seems likely that successful clinical translation of CED will depend on suitable catheter technology being used in combination with drugs with optimal physicochemical characteristics, and on neuropathological analysis in appropriate preclinical models. In this review, we consider the factors most likely to influence the success or failure of CED, and review its application to the treatment of high-grade glioma, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). © 2013 International Society of Neuropathology.

  7. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral...

  8. An autopsied case of MV2K + C-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with widespread cerebral cortical involvement and Kuru plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Aiba, Ikuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-06-01

    MV2-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), which was previously called "Kuru-plaque variant", was gradually revealed to have a wide spectrum and has been classified into three pathological subtypes: MV2K, MV2C and MV2K + C. We herein describe the detailed clinical findings and neuropathologic observations from an autopsied MV2K + C-type Japanese sCJD case with widespread cerebral cortical pathology and Kuru plaques. In the early stages of the disease, the patient exhibited gait disturbance with ataxia and dysarthria as well as gradual appearance of cognitive dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) on MRI revealed extensive cerebral cortical hyperintensity. Pathologic investigation revealed extensive spongiform change in the cerebral cortex, particularly in the deeper layers. Vacuole size varied, and some were confluent. Prion protein (PrP) immunostaining revealed extensive PrP deposition in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. In the cerebral cortex, synaptic-type, Kuru plaque-like, and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions were mainly observed, along with some perivacuolar-type PrP depositions. Kuru plaques and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions also were observed in the cerebellar cortex. PrP gene analysis revealed no mutations, and polymorphic codon 129 exhibited Met/Val heterozygosity. Western blot analysis revealed a mixture of intermediate-type PrPSc and type 2 PrPSc . Based on previous reports regarding MV2-type sCJD and the clinicopathologic findings of the present case, we speculated that it may be possible to clinically distinguish each MV2 subtype. Clinical presentation of the MV2K + C subtype includes predominant cerebral cortical involvement signs with ataxia and DWI hyperintensity of the cerebral cortex on MRI. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  9. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding....

  10. Analysis of music-brain interaction with simultaneous measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and electroencephalogram beta rhythm in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Sadato, N; Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Fuwamoto, Y; Yonekura, Y

    1999-11-19

    To elucidate the neural substrates of the receptive aspect of music, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with positron emission tomography (PET) and simultaneously recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) in eight normal volunteers. Compared with the rest condition, listening to music caused a significant increase in EEG beta power spectrum (13-30 Hz) averaged over the posterior two third of the scalp. The averaged beta power spectrum was positively correlated with rCBF in the premotor cortex and adjacent prefrontal cortices bilaterally, the anterior portion of the precuneus and the anterior cingulate cortex in both the rest and the music conditions. Listening to music newly recruited the posterior portion of the precuneus bilaterally. This may reflect the interaction of the music with the cognitive processes, such as music-evoked memory recall or visual imagery.

  11. Patient with rapidly evolving neurological disease with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body dementia, chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tiple, Dorina; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Ladogana, Anna; Colaizzo, Elisa; Capellari, Sabina; Rossi, Marcello; Parchi, Piero; Masullo, Carlo; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of rapidly evolving neurological disease in a patient with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma. The coexistence of severe multiple pathologies in a single patient strengthens the need to perform accurate clinical differential diagnoses in rapidly progressive dementias. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  13. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radouil Tzekov

    Full Text Available Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL, tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A, microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B, collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3 and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1, APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the

  14. Cerebral palsy-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha D

    2004-07-01

    Cerebral Palsy encompasses a heterogeneous group of non-progressive motor disorders caused by injury to the developing brain. Management is best done in a multidisciplinary set up under one roof. Comprehensive assessment of the child to evaluate functional ability and associated problems is followed by an individualized plan of management with long term goals and short term objectives. Participation of the family is pivotal to ensure proper habilitation of the child. A home-based management plan is advocated. Considerable experience, sensitivity and understanding are needed both for breaking the news and counselling the parents of a child with cerebral palsy.

  15. Is cerebral hemorrhage approaching?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yoneyama, Takumi; Hamasuna, Ryouichi; Fujime, Kenichi; Goya, Tomokazu [Junwakai Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In Junwakai Memorial Hospital, from May, 2000 to April, 2001, 1042 patients underwent MRI examination to detect intracerebral microbleed (MB). This series included 481 hypertensive cases and 109 intra-cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage patients. MB was identified by MRI GRASS image that detects hemosiderin with high sensitivity. The occurrence of MB is high in men and increased with the age. The hypertensive patients showed increased frequency of MB in proportion to the duration of hypertension. Almost all of the symptomatic cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage cases showed multiple MBs except for massive hemorrhagic lesions. Therefore, MB can be an antecedant feature of the inpending symptomatic intracerebral and cerebellar hemorrhages. (author)

  16. Resistance to Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes and Apparent Cognitive Resilience in the Nun and Honolulu-Asia Aging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Caitlin S; Keene, C Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret E; Hemmy, Laura S; Lim, Kelvin O; White, Lon R; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    Two population-based studies key to advancing knowledge of brain aging are the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HAAS) and the Nun Study. Harmonization of their neuropathologic data allows cross comparison, with findings common to both studies likely generalizable, while distinct observations may point to aging brain changes that are dependent on sex, ethnicity, environment, or lifestyle factors. Here, we expanded the neuropathologic evaluation of these 2 studies using revised NIA-Alzheimer's Association guidelines and compared directly the neuropathologic features of resistance and apparent cognitive resilience. There were significant differences in prevalence of Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change, small vessel vascular brain injury, and Lewy body disease between these 2 studies, suggesting that sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle factors may significantly influence resistance to developing brain injury with age. In contrast, hippocampal sclerosis prevalence was very similar, but skewed to poorer cognitive performance, suggesting that hippocampal sclerosis could act sequentially with other diseases to impair cognitive function. Strikingly, despite these observed differences, the proportion of individuals resistant to all 4 diseases of brain or displaying apparent cognitive resilience was virtually identical between HAAS and Nun Study participants. Future in vivo validation of these results awaits comprehensive biomarkers of these 4 brain diseases. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of neuropathological markers in the interpretation of neuropsychiatric disorders: Focus on fetal and perinatal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Rais, Monica; Ravarino, Alberto; Van Eyken, Peter; Fanos, Vassilios; Faa, Gavino

    2016-11-03

    The study of neuropathological markers in patients affected by mental/psychiatric disorders is relevant for the comprehension of the pathogenesis and the correlation with the clinical symptomatology. The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) recognizes intraneuronal and extracellular neurofibrillary formation responsible for neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemical studies discovered many interesting results for a better interpretation of the AD pathogenesis, while the "metal hypothesis" supports that metal ions might differentially influence the formation of amyloid aggregates. The most relevant pathological findings reported in schizophrenia originate from computer assisted tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), suggesting the brain abnormalities involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The theory of fetal programming illustrates the epigenetic factors that may act during the intrauterine life on brain development, with relevant consequences on the susceptibility to develop AD or schizophrenia later in life. The neuropathological interpretation of AD and schizophrenia shows that the presence of severe neuropathological changes is not always associated with severe cognitive impairment. A better dialogue between psychiatrics and pathologists might help to halt insurgence and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Depression and Alzheimer's disease: is stress the initiating factor in a common neuropathological cascade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a high co-morbidity between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression has been known for a long time. More interesting though are recent studies indicating that depression and number of depressive episodes earlier in life is associated with increased risk of AD development....... This suggests the existence of common neuropathological mechanisms behind depression and AD. Here we propose that the brain changes associated with depressive episodes that compromise the brain's ability to cope with stress may constitute risk factors for development of AD. Furthermore, in individuals...... with a genetic linkage to depression, there may be an increased vulnerability towards the initiation of a detrimental neurodegenerative cascade. The following review will deal with the various observations reported within the different neurobiological systems known to be involved and affected in depression, like...

  19. Neuropathological studies of the spinal cord in early stage HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, A; Hirose, G; Ueda, Y; Nishimura, Y; Sakai, K

    1993-09-01

    Necropsy findings for a patient with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM) of 9 months clinical duration are reported. Loss of myelin sheaths and axons together with perivascular lymphocytic infiltration was seen in the lateral and posterior columns of the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar region where vacuolar changes caused by the splitting of myelin sheaths were prominent. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed CD8+ cytotoxic T cell infiltration predominated in the absence of HTLV-I core protein antigen bearing-cells in the brain and spinal cord. Myelin sheath damage and predominant CD8+ cytotoxic T cell infiltration are thought to be the main neuropathological findings in the spinal cord in early stage HAM.

  20. Farnesyltransferase haplodeficiency reduces neuropathology and rescues cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaowu; Cao, Dongfeng; Hottman, David A; Yuan, LiLian; Bergo, Martin O; Li, Ling

    2013-12-13

    Isoprenoids and prenylated proteins have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD), including amyloid-β precursor protein metabolism, Tau phosphorylation, synaptic plasticity, and neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the relative importance of the two protein prenyltransferases, farnesyltransferase (FT) and geranylgeranyltransferase-1 (GGT), in the pathogenesis of AD. In this study, we defined the impact of deleting one copy of FT or GGT on the development of amyloid-β (Aβ)-associated neuropathology and learning/memory impairments in APPPS1 double transgenic mice, a well established model of AD. Heterozygous deletion of FT reduced Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation and rescued spatial learning and memory function in APPPS1 mice. Heterozygous deletion of GGT reduced the levels of Aβ and neuroinflammation but had no impact on learning and memory. These results document that farnesylation and geranylgeranylation play differential roles in AD pathogenesis and suggest that specific inhibition of protein farnesylation could be a potential strategy for effectively treating AD.

  1. Frequency and topography of small cerebrovascular lesions in vascular and in mixed dementia: a post-mortem 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Pasquier, Florence; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mixed dementia (MixD) refers to a combination of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular encephalopathy. The existence of a "pure" type of vascular dementia (VaD) is controversial. There is a need to find magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics allowing the distinction between VaD and MixD. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI compares the frequency or severity and the topography of the small cerebrovascular lesions in brains of patients with VaD and with MixD. Material and methods: Based on neuropathological criteria, 14 brains were classified as VaD, 24 as MixD and 11 as controls. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere and a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere underwent T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI examination. The mean values and topographic distribution of white matter changes (WMCs), lacunar infarcts (LIs), cortical microbleeds (CoMBs) and cortical microinfarcts (CoMIs) were determined and compared between the different groups. Results: Compared to the controls, both VaD and MixD brains had significantly more severe WMCs and increased numbers of CoMBs and CoMIs. Lacunar infarcts predominated only in the VaD cases. On mutual comparison of VaD and MixD brains, CoMBs and CoMIs predominated in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum of VaD, while were mainly present in the occipital lobe of MixD. White matter changes predominated in the temporal lobe of MixD cases. Lacunar infarcts were significantly increased in the corona radiata and putamen of VaD patients. Conclusions: The present post-mortem MRI study shows clear differences in the distribution and the types of cerebrovascular lesions on high-field MRI, confirming that VaD and MixD are different diseases. .

  2. Frequency and topography of small cerebrovascular lesions in vascular and in mixed dementia: a post-mortem 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques De Reuck

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Mixed dementia (MixD refers to a combination of definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular encephalopathy. The existence of a “pure” type of vascular dementia (VaD is controversial. There is a need to find magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics allowing the distinction between VaD and MixD. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI compares the frequency or severity and the topography of the small cerebrovascular lesions in brains of patients with VaD and with MixD. Material and methods : Based on neuropathological criteria, 14 brains were classified as VaD, 24 as MixD and 11 as controls. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere and a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere underwent T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI examination. The mean values and topographic distribution of white matter changes (WMCs, lacunar infarcts (LIs, cortical microbleeds (CoMBs and cortical microinfarcts (CoMIs were determined and compared between the different groups. Results : Compared to the controls, both VaD and MixD brains had significantly more severe WMCs and increased numbers of CoMBs and CoMIs. Lacunar infarcts predominated only in the VaD cases. On mutual comparison of VaD and MixD brains, CoMBs and CoMIs predominated in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum of VaD, while were mainly present in the occipital lobe of MixD. White matter changes predominated in the temporal lobe of MixD cases. Lacunar infarcts were significantly increased in the corona radiata and putamen of VaD patients. Conclusions : The present post-mortem MRI study shows clear differences in the distribution and the types of cerebrovascular lesions on high-field MRI, confirming that VaD and MixD are different diseases.

  3. Dravet syndrome as epileptic encephalopathy: evidence from long-term course and neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Claudia B.; Liu, Joan Y.W.; Liagkouras, Ioannis; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Labrum, Robyn W.; Ellis, Rachael; Woodward, Cathy; Davis, Mary B.; Smith, Shelagh J.; Cross, J. Helen; Appleton, Richard E.; Yendle, Simone C.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Bellows, Susannah T.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Martinian, Lillian; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Thom, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epilepsy syndrome of infantile onset, frequently caused by SCN1A mutations or deletions. Its prevalence, long-term evolution in adults and neuropathology are not well known. We identified a series of 22 adult patients, including three adult post-mortem cases with Dravet syndrome. For all patients, we reviewed the clinical history, seizure types and frequency, antiepileptic drugs, cognitive, social and functional outcome and results of investigations. A systematic neuropathology study was performed, with post-mortem material from three adult cases with Dravet syndrome, in comparison with controls and a range of relevant paediatric tissue. Twenty-two adults with Dravet syndrome, 10 female, were included, median age 39 years (range 20–66). SCN1A structural variation was found in 60% of the adult Dravet patients tested, including one post-mortem case with DNA extracted from brain tissue. Novel mutations were described for 11 adult patients; one patient had three SCN1A mutations. Features of Dravet syndrome in adulthood include multiple seizure types despite polytherapy, and age-dependent evolution in seizure semiology and electroencephalographic pattern. Fever sensitivity persisted through adulthood in 11 cases. Neurological decline occurred in adulthood with cognitive and motor deterioration. Dysphagia may develop in or after the fourth decade of life, leading to significant morbidity, or death. The correct diagnosis at an older age made an impact at several levels. Treatment changes improved seizure control even after years of drug resistance in all three cases with sufficient follow-up after drug changes were instituted; better control led to significant improvement in cognitive performance and quality of life in adulthood in two cases. There was no histopathological hallmark feature of Dravet syndrome in this series. Strikingly, there was remarkable preservation of neurons and interneurons in the neocortex and hippocampi of Dravet adult post

  4. Effect of Common Neuropathologies on Progression of Late Life Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Leurgans, Sue; Schneider, Julie A.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Wilson, Robert S.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain pathologies of Alzheimer’s, cerebrovascular and Lewy body diseases are common in old age, but the relationship of these pathologies with progression from normal cognitive function to the various stages of cognitive impairment is unknown. In this study, we fit latent Markov models from longitudinal cognitive data to empirically derive three latent stages corresponding to no impairment, mild impairment, and moderate impairment; then, we examined the associations of common neuropathologies with the rates of transition among these stages. Cognitive and neuropathological data were available from 653 autopsied participants in two ongoing cohort studies of aging who were cognitively healthy at baseline (mean baseline age 79.1 years) and had longitudinal cognitive data. On average, participants in these analyses developed mild impairment 5 years after enrollment, progressed to moderate impairment after an additional 3.4 years, and stayed impaired for 2.8 years until death. AD and chronic macroscopic infarcts were associated with a higher risk of progression to mild impairment and subsequently to moderate impairment. By contrast, Lewy bodies were associated only with progression from mild to moderate impairment. The 5-year probability of progression to mild or moderate impairment was 20% for persons without any of these three pathologies, 38% for AD only, 51% for AD and macroscopic infarcts, and 56% for AD, infarcts and Lewy bodies. Thus, the presence of AD pathology alone nearly doubles the risk of developing cognitive impairment in late life, and the presence of multiple pathologies further increases this risk over multiple years prior to death. PMID:25976345

  5. Transcriptome assessment of the Pompe (Gaa-/-) mouse spinal cord indicates widespread neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S M F; Falk, D J; Byrne, B J; Fuller, D D

    2016-11-01

    Pompe disease, caused by deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), leads to widespread glycogen accumulation and profound neuromuscular impairments. There has been controversy, however, regarding the role of central nervous system pathology in Pompe motor dysfunction. We hypothesized that absence of GAA protein causes progressive activation of neuropathological signaling, including pathways associated with cell death. To test this hypothesis, genomic data (Affymetrix Mouse Gene Array 2.0ST) from the midcervical spinal cord in 6 and 16 mo old Pompe (Gaa(-/-)) mice were evaluated (Broad Institute Molecular Signature Database), along with spinal cord histology. The midcervical cord was selected because it contains phrenic motoneurons, and phrenic-diaphragm dysfunction is prominent in Pompe disease. Several clinically important themes for the neurologic etiology of Pompe disease emerged from this unbiased genomic assessment. First, pathways associated with cell death were strongly upregulated as Gaa(-/-) mice aged, and motoneuron apoptosis was histologically verified. Second, proinflammatory signaling was dramatically upregulated in the Gaa(-/-) spinal cord. Third, many signal transduction pathways in the Gaa(-/-) cervical cord were altered in a manner suggestive of impaired synaptic function. Notably, glutamatergic signaling pathways were downregulated, as were "synaptic plasticity pathways" including genes related to neuroplasticity. Fourth, many genes and pathways related to cellular metabolism are dysregulated. Collectively, the data unequivocally confirm that systemic absence of GAA induces a complex neuropathological cascade in the spinal cord. Most importantly, the results indicate that Pompe is a neurodegenerative condition, and this underscores the need for early therapeutic intervention capable of targeting the central nervous system. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. [Multiple cerebral tuberculomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, L; Villarreal, F

    The tuberculosis is a disease that continues being important cause of morbidity and mortality at worldwide level. Its presentation as tuberculomas cerebral manifold at level of the central nervous system is little frequent in immunocompetent patients and can be confused with other etiology. An indigenous young man, immunocompetent consulted for history of headache, nausea, vomits, convulsions, double vision and hemiparesia left side, which in the cerebral tomography of revenue was showing injuries compatible with cerebral abscesses; for which he received treatment with antibiotics without improvement for what there takes biopsy of the injuries that reported tuberculomas, specific treatment being initiated later and the primary area being investigated without the same one be detecting. After the first procedural step with evident clinical and radiographic improvement. The tuberculosis in anyone of their forms of presentation must be included within the diagnosis differential of the patients in our endemic countries for this disease. The clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral injuries is difficult and single usually it obtains to the diagnosis during a pathology study that shows tuberculomas with caseosa necrosis, epiteliodes cell and the acid alcohol bacilli resistant.

  7. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  8. CASE REPORT Cerebral schistosomiasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0b013e3182704d1e]. 5. Sanelli PC, Lev MH, Gonzalez RG, Schaefer PW. Unique linear and nodular MR enhancement pattern in schistosomiasis of the central nervous system: Report of three patients. AJR 2001;177(6):1471-1474. Cerebral schistosomiasis.

  9. The human prion diseases. A review with special emphasis on new variant CJD and comments on surveillance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, C

    2012-02-03

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases represent a new group of diseases with unique clinical and neuropathological features, the transmission of which is both genetic and infectious. The responsible agent is unconventional and appears to be largely composed of a glycoprotein, the prion protein PrP. This is normally present on different cells. In prion diseases, it becomes converted to the pathogenic form PrPres which is resistant to proteinase and accumulates within the brain and this process is accompanied by the development of spongiform change, gliosis and neuronal loss. The human prion diseases include Kuru a progressive cerebellar degeneration with late dementia affecting Fore tribes in New-Guinea, now almost extinct, regarded as being related to cannibalism. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is the more frequent human prion disease. Its incidence is approximately one case per million per year. Four variants are now recognized: sporadic, familial, iatrogenic and the new variant. The latter represents a distinct clinico-pathological entity. It is now widely accepted that it is due to the same agent responsible for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in cattle. Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease is a very rare inherited disorder due to a number of different mutations in the PRP gene, characterized by abundant deposits of plaque PrPres in the cerebral grey matter. Fatal familial insomnia is another inherited disorder due to a mutation at codon 178 of the PRP gene associated with methionine on codon 129 of the mutant allele. The main neuropathological change is neuronal loss in the thalamus with little or no spongiosis and usually no PrPres deposition. Following the emergence of new variant CJD in 1996, surveillance of all forms of prion diseases has been now been actively introduced in many European nations in order to determine the true incidence and geographic distribution of these rare disorders in humans.

  10. Lack of unique neuropathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with p.K54E angiogenin (ANG) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J; Highley, J R; Cox, L; Goodall, E F; Hewitt, C; Hartley, J A; Hollinger, H C; Fox, M; Ince, P G; McDermott, C J; Shaw, P J

    2013-08-01

    Five to 10% of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are familial, with the most common genetic causes being mutations in the C9ORF72, SOD1, TARDBP and FUS genes. Mutations in the angiogenin gene, ANG, have been identified in both familial and sporadic patients in several populations within Europe and North America. The aim of this study was to establish the incidence of ANG mutations in a large cohort of 517 patients from Northern England and establish the neuropathology associated with these cases. The single exon ANG gene was amplified, sequenced and analysed for mutations. Pathological examination of brain, spinal cord and skeletal muscle included conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. Mutation screening identified a single sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis case with a p.K54E mutation, which is absent from 278 neurologically normal control samples. The clinical presentation was of limb onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with rapid disease progression and no evidence of cognitive impairment. Neuropathological examination established the presence of characteristic ubiquitinated and TDP-43-positive neuronal and glial inclusions, but no abnormality in the distribution of angiogenin protein. There is only one previous report describing the neuropathology in a single case with a p.K17I ANG mutation which highlighted the presence of eosinophilic neuronal intranuclear inclusions in the hippocampus. The absence of this feature in the present case indicates that patients with ANG mutations do not always have pathological changes distinguishable from those of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2012 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2012 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    El término parálisis cerebral (PC) engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia me...

  12. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  13. The effects of chronic trans-resveratrol supplementation on aspects of cognitive function, mood, sleep, health and cerebral blood flow in healthy, young humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Emma L; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F; Reay, Jonathon L; Williamson, Gary; Dew, Tristan; Zhang, Wei; Kennedy, David O

    2015-11-14

    Single doses of resveratrol have previously been shown to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) with no clear effect on cognitive function or mood in healthy adults. Chronic resveratrol consumption may increase the poor bioavailability of resveratrol or otherwise potentiate its psychological effects. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-groups study, a total of sixty adults aged between 18 and 30 years received either placebo or resveratrol for 28 d. On the 1st and 28th day of treatment, the performance of cognitively demanding tasks (serial subtractions, rapid visual information processing and 3-Back) (n 41 complete data sets) was assessed, alongside blood pressure (n 26) and acute (near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS)) and chronic (transcranial Doppler) measures of CBF (n 46). Subjective mood, sleep quality and health questionnaires were completed at weekly intervals (n 53/54). The results showed that the cognitive effects of resveratrol on day 1 were restricted to more accurate but slower serial subtraction task performance. The only cognitive finding on day 28 was a beneficial effect of resveratrol on the accuracy of the 3-Back task before treatment consumption. Subjective ratings of 'fatigue' were significantly lower across the entire 28 d in the resveratrol condition. Resveratrol also resulted in modulation of CBF parameters on day 1, as assessed by NIRS, and significantly increased diastolic blood pressure on day 28. Levels of resveratrol metabolites were significantly higher both before and after the day's treatment on day 28, in comparison with day 1. These results confirm the acute CBF effects of resveratrol and the lack of interpretable cognitive effects.

  14. Rac1 activity changes are associated with neuronal pathology and spatial memory long-term recovery after global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanna, Gutiérrez-Vargas; Fredy, Castro-Alvarez John; David, Velásquez-Carvajal; Natalia, Montañez-Velásquez Maria; Angel, Céspedes-Rubio; Patricia, Cardona-Gómez Gloria

    2010-12-01

    Excitotoxicity is the main event during neurological disorders producing drastic morphological and functional changes. Rac-GTPase is involved in cytoskeletal remodeling and survival. However, the role of Rac1 after cerebral ischemia has not been completely understood yet. In this study, we evaluated the activity of Rac1 and its immunoreactivity associated to neuropathological hallmarks and behavioral task analyses after global cerebral ischemia in an acute and long-term post-ischemia period. Our findings showed that during the acute phase (24h) after global cerebral ischemia, a decrease of the active state of Rac1 was detected in the hippocampus, together with a down-regulation of survival signaling. In this same post-ischemia time, Rac1 immunoreactivity was redistributed to cytoplasm and to aberrant neurites, accompanied by dendritic and actin cytoskeletal retraction both in vivo and in vitro in neuronal primary cultures treated with glutamate. Neurons transfected with the constitutively active mutant of Rac1 were recovered from the glutamate-induced affection in vitro. However, in the in vivo model an inactive state of Rac1, and its cellular localization remained one month after ischemia, with still decreased survival signaling, significant tauopathy, and learning and memory alterations. These neuropathological hallmarks were reversed two months post-ischemia, related with a Rac1 activity state similar to control, as well as a "normalization" of the learning and memory tasks in the ischemic rats. In summary, our data suggests that changes in Rac1 activity are involved in the neurodegenerative processes after cerebral ischemia, and also in its long-term recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Rat model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Shen, Yan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Huanmin

    2015-01-01

    In the human brain, the dominant hemisphere is more complex than the non-dominant hemisphere. Hence, cerebral ischemia of the dominant hemisphere often leads to serious consequences. This study aims to establish a rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere. The quadruped feeding test was used to screen 70 male Sprague Dawley rats. From this test, 48 rats with right paw preference were selected and randomly assigned numbers. Half were assigned to the dominant hemisphere ischemia (DHI) group, and the other half were assigned to the non-dominant hemisphere ischemia (NDHI) group. The middle cerebral artery was occluded 2 h before reperfusion. Neurological functions were tested. TTC and HE staining were performed. The volume of cerebral infarction was calculated. Rats in the DHI group had significantly worse neurological scores than rats in the NDHI group (P dominant hemisphere than in the non-dominant hemisphere. The dominant hippocampus indicated severe neuronal loss and disorderly cellular arrangement. The volume of cerebral infarction was also greater in the DHI group compared to the NDHI group (P dominant hemisphere, MCA occlusion in the dominant hemisphere caused greater impairment in neurological functions. The proposed rodent model is reliable and has high levels of reproducibility. Therefore, his model can be reliably for investigating the mechanism of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere of human brains.

  17. Plasticidad cerebral y lenguaje

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Torres Sánchez, Ignacio; Berthier Torres, Marcelo Luís

    2012-01-01

    Hace pocos años se daba por sentado que la recuperación del lenguaje tras una lesión cerebral era imposible, al igual que adquirir la lengua materna más allá de los tres primeros años de vida. Sin embargo, las últimas indagaciones muestran que nuestra capacidad de aprender es mucho mayor.

  18. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  19. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    reflected a cerebral form of high altitude illness. In 1964, Fitch described a similar form of mountain sickness with neurolkgical manifestations in the...71% in thaL of Hackett et al; this sex distribution undoubtedly reflects the larger numbers of males presently involved in trekking and 44...HACE with loss of consciousness, absence of pupillary reactions, flaccidity of all extremities and the presence of bilateral Babinski responses. The

  20. Presence of D4 dopamine receptors in human prefrontal cortex: a postmortem study Presença de receptores dopaminérgicos D4 em córtex cerebral humano: um estudo post-mortem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Marazziti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to explore the presence and the distribution of D4 dopamine receptors in postmortem human prefrontal cortex, by means of the binding of [³H]YM-09151-2, an antagonist that has equal affinity for D2, D3 and D4 receptors. It was therefore necessary to devise a unique assay method in order to distinguish and detect the D4 component. METHOD: Frontal cortex samples were harvested postmortem, during autopsy sessions, from 5 subjects. In the first assay, tissue homogenates were incubated with increasing concentrations of [³H]YM-09151-2, whereas L-745870, which has a high affinity for D4 and a low affinity for D2/D3 receptors, was used as the displacer. In the second assay, raclopride, which has a high affinity for D2/D3 receptors and a low affinity for D4 receptors, was used to block D2/D3. The L-745870 (500 nM was added to both assays in order to determine the nonspecific binding. RESULTS: Our experiments revealed the presence of specific and saturable binding of [³H]YM-09151-2. The blockade of D2 and D3 receptors with raclopride ensured that the D4 receptors were labeled. The mean maximum binding capacity was 88 ± 25 fmol/mg protein, and the dissociation constant was 0.8 ± 0.4 nM. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, although not conclusive, suggest that the density of D4 receptors is low in the human prefrontal cortex.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi quantificar a presença e a distribuição de receptores dopaminérgicos do tipo 4 (D4 no córtex cerebral humano em amostras post-mortem através do bloqueio com ³H-YM-09151-2 - um antagonista com afinidade equivalente pelos receptores D2, D3 e D4 - e do desenvolvimento de um método para a detecção específica do componente D4. MÉTODO: Foram obtidas amostras de córtex cerebral de cinco cadáveres. Em um primeiro ensaio, os homogeneizados de tecido cerebral foram incubados em concentrações crescentes de ³H-YM-09151-2, enquanto que o L-745

  1. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Richard Bain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g. posture and degree of hyperthermia. The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g. hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges, an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e. 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided.

  2. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  3. Mannitol infusion immediately after reperfusion suppresses the development of focal cortical infarction after temporary cerebral ischemia in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Umeo; Hakamata, Yoji; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu

    2014-08-01

    -feet, thus preventing the microvascular compression and stasis and thereby microvasculogenic secondary focal cerebral ischemia. © 2014 The Authors. Neuropathology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  4. Cerebral Autoregulation in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Griffioen, Annemiek C.; Zeeman, Gerda; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preeclampsia is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. METHODS: In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (determined by transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (determined by noninvasive

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Cerebral cavernous malformation Cerebral cavernous malformation Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cerebral cavernous malformations are collections of small blood vessels ( capillaries ) ...

  6. Purpose in Life and Cerebral Infarcts in Community Dwelling Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Levine, Steven R.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Purpose in life, the sense that life has meaning and direction, is associated with reduced risks of adverse health outcomes. However, it remains unknown whether purpose in life protects against the risk of cerebral infarcts among community-dwelling older persons. We tested the hypothesis that greater purpose in life is associated with lower risk of cerebral infarcts. Methods Participants came from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Each participant completed a standard measure of purpose in life. Uniform neuropathologic examination identified macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts, blinded to clinical information. Association of purpose in life with cerebral infarcts was examined in ordinal logistic regression models using a semiquantitative outcome. Results 453 participants were included in the analyses. The mean score on the measure of purpose was 3.5 (Standard Deviation=0.47, range=2.1-5.0). Macroscopic infarcts were found in 154 (34.0 %) persons, and microinfarcts were found in 128 (28.3%) persons. Greater purpose in life was associated with a lower odds of having one or more macroscopic infarcts (Odds Ratio=0.535, 95% Confidence Interval=0.346-0.826, p=.005), but we did not find association with microinfarcts (Odds Ratio=0.780, 95% Confidence Interval=0.495-1.229, p=.283). These results persisted after adjusting for vascular risk factors of body mass index, history of smoking, diabetes, and blood pressure, as well as measures of negative affect, physical activity, and clinical stroke. The association with macroscopic infarcts was driven by lacunar infarcts, and was independent of cerebral atherosclerosis and arteriolosclerosis. Conclusions Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts. PMID:25791714

  7. Purpose in life and cerebral infarcts in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A; Wilson, Robert S; Levine, Steven R; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2015-04-01

    Purpose in life, the sense that life has meaning and direction, is associated with reduced risks of adverse health outcomes. However, it remains unknown whether purpose in life protects against the risk of cerebral infarcts among community-dwelling older people. We tested the hypothesis that greater purpose in life is associated with lower risk of cerebral infarcts. Participants came from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Each participant completed a standard measure of purpose in life. Uniform neuropathologic examination identified macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts, blinded to clinical information. Association of purpose in life with cerebral infarcts was examined in ordinal logistic regression models using a semiquantitative outcome. Four hundred fifty-three participants were included in the analyses. The mean score on the measure of purpose was 3.5 (SD, 0.5; range, 2.1-5.0). Macroscopic infarcts were found in 154 (34.0%) people, and microinfarcts were found in 128 (28.3%) people. Greater purpose in life was associated with a lower odds of having more macroscopic infarcts (odds ratio, 0.535; 95% confidence interval, 0.346-0.826; P=0.005), but we did not find association with microinfarcts (odds ratio, 0.780; 95% confidence interval, 0.495-1.229; P=0.283). These results persisted after adjusting for vascular risk factors of body mass index, history of smoking, diabetes mellitus, and blood pressure, as well as measures of negative affect, physical activity, and clinical stroke. The association with macroscopic infarcts was driven by lacunar infarcts, and was independent of cerebral atherosclerosis and arteriolosclerosis. Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María; García-Vallejo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition.

  9. "Boomerang Neuropathology" of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease is Shrouded in Harmful "BDDS": Breathing, Diet, Drinking, and Sleep During Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-07-01

    Brain damage begins years before substantial neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's dementia. Crucial fundamental activities of life are breathing, eating, drinking, and sleeping. When these pivotal functions are maligned over a prolonged period, they impart escalating dyshomeostasis. The latter may lead to disastrous consequences including cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current theme here is that multiple pathophysiological derangements are promoted over a prolonged period by the very fundamental activities of life-when "rendered unhealthy." They may converge on several regulating/modulating factors (e.g., mitochondrial energy production, oxidative stress, innate immunity, and vascular function) and promote insidious neuropathology that culminates in cognitive decline in the aged. This is of course associated with the accumulation of amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Epidemiological, biomarker, and neuroimaging studies have provided significant copious evidence on the presence of indolent prodromal AD neuropathology many years prior to symptomatic onset. Progressive oxidative damage to specific gene promoters may result in gene silencing. A mechanistic link may possibly exist between epigenomic state, DNA damage, and chronically unhealthy/dysfunctional body systems. This paper, therefore, addresses and delineates the deleterious pathophysiological impact triggered by dysfunctional breathing, harmful diet, excess of alcohol consumption, and sleep deprivation; indeed, their impact may alter epigenetic state. It is mandatory, therefore, to abrogate cognitive decline and attenuate AD pathology through adoption of a healthy lifestyle, in conjunction with combination therapy with known moderators of cognitive decline. This strategy may thwart multiple concurrent and synergistic pathologies, including epigenetic dysfunction. A multi-factorial therapeutic intervention is required to overcome wide ranging neuropathology and multi

  10. Association of Seafood Consumption, Brain Mercury Level, and APOE ��4 Status With Brain Neuropathology in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Martha Clare; Brockman, John; Schneider, J.; Wang, Yamin; Bennett, D.; Tangney, Christy; Rest, van, J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Seafood consumption is promoted for its many health benefits even though its contamination by mercury, a known neurotoxin, is a growing concern.Objective To determine whether seafood consumption is correlated with increased brain mercury levels and also whether seafood consumption or brain mercury levels are correlated with brain neuropathologies.Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional analyses of deceased participants in the Memory and Aging Project clinical neuropatholo...

  11. Age-dependent postoperative cognitive impairment and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with increased cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. However, its pathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Specifically, it is unknown why elderly patients are more likely to develop POCD and whether POCD is dependent on general anesthesia. We therefore set out to investigate the effects of peripheral surgery on the cognition and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in the mice. The surgery induced post-operative elevation in brain β-amyloid (Aβ) levels and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old wild-type and 9 month-old Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice, but not the 9 month-old wild-type mice. The Aβ accumulation likely resulted from elevation of beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme and phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. γ-Secretase inhibitor compound E ameliorated the surgery-induced brain Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgery was able to induce cognitive impairment independent of general anesthesia, and that the combination of peripheral surgery with aging- or Alzheimer gene mutation-associated Aβ accumulation was needed for the POCD to occur. These findings would likely promote more research to investigate the pathogenesis of POCD.

  12. Validity of the Katz Index to assess activities of daily living by informants in neuropathological studies

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    Renata Eloah de Lucena Ferretti-Rebustini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the evidences of construct validity of the Katz Index for the retrospective assessment of activities of daily living (ADL by informants, to assist neuropathological studies in the elderly. METHOD A cross-sectional study analyzed the functional ability of ADL measure by the Katz Index, of 650 cases randomly selected from the Brazilian Brain Bank of the Ageing Brain Study Group (BBBABSG database. Sample was divided in two subsamples for the analysis (N=325, each and then stratified according to cognitive decline assessed by the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR. Factor analyses with calculations of internal consistency and invariance were performed. RESULTS Factor analysis evidenced a unidimensional instrument with optimal internal consistency, in all subgroups. Goodness of fit indices were obtained after two treatments of covariance, indicating adequacy of the scale for assessing ADL by informants. The scale is invariant to cognitive decline meaning that it can be used for subjects with or without cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION Katz Index is valid for the retrospective assessment of basic ADL by informants, with optimal reliability.

  13. KCC3 axonopathy: neuropathological features in the central and peripheral nervous system.

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    Auer, Roland N; Laganière, Janet L; Robitaille, Yves O; Richardson, John; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Shekarabi, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC) is an autosomal recessive disease of the central and peripheral nervous system that presents as early-onset polyneuropathy. Patients are hypotonic and areflexic from birth, with abnormal facial features and atrophic muscles. Progressive peripheral neuropathy eventually confines them to a wheelchair in the second decade of life, and death occurs by the fourth decade. We here define the neuropathologic features of the disease in autopsy tissues from eight cases. Both developmental and neurodegenerative features were found. Hypoplasia or absence of the major telencephalic commissures and a hypoplasia of corticospinal tracts to half the normal size, were the major neurodevelopmental defects we observed. Despite being a neurodegenerative disease, preservation of brain weight and a conspicuous absence of neuronal or glial cell death were signal features of this disease. Small tumor-like overgrowths of axons, termed axonomas, were found in the central and peripheral nervous system, indicating attempted axonal regeneration. We conclude that the neurodegenerative deficits in HMSN/ACC are primarily caused by an axonopathy superimposed upon abnormal development, affecting peripheral but also central nervous system axons, all ultimately because of a genetic defect in the axonal cotransporter KCC3.

  14. Role of NMDA Receptor-Mediated Glutamatergic Signaling in Chronic and Acute Neuropathologies

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    Francisco J. Carvajal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs have two opposing roles in the brain. On the one hand, NMDARs control critical events in the formation and development of synaptic organization and synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, the overactivation of NMDARs can promote neuronal death in neuropathological conditions. Ca2+ influx acts as a primary modulator after NMDAR channel activation. An imbalance in Ca2+ homeostasis is associated with several neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These chronic conditions have a lengthy progression depending on internal and external factors. External factors such as acute episodes of brain damage are associated with an earlier onset of several of these chronic mental conditions. Here, we will review some of the current evidence of how traumatic brain injury can hasten the onset of several neurological conditions, focusing on the role of NMDAR distribution and the functional consequences in calcium homeostasis associated with synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death present in this group of chronic diseases.

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy-Like Abnormalities in a Routine Neuropathology Service.

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    Noy, Shawna; Krawitz, Sherry; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2016-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described mainly in professional athletes and military personnel and is characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of cortical sulci and around blood vessels. To assess CTE-like changes in a routine neuropathology service, we prospectively examined 111 brains (age 18-60 years). The presence of tau-immunoreactive deposits was staged using guidelines described by others and was correlated with the medical history. 72/111 cases were negative for CTE-like changes; 34/111 were CTE stage 40 years old. CTE-like changes were not identified at sites of contusion. Among a separate group studied retrospectively, we identified 4 cases that met full criteria for CTE. We conclude that CTE-like findings are not confined to professional athletes; the risk factors of head injury and substance abuse are similar in the routine population. However, the significance of very small hyperphosphorylated tau deposits remains to be determined. In addition, the absence of typical CTE-like deposits near contusion sites keeps open the question of pathogenesis. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Developmental neuropathology of brainstem respiratory centers in unexplained stillbirth: What's the meaning?

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    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ferrero, Stefano; Matturri, Luigi; Roncati, Luca; Pusiol, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Stillbirth is one of the most stressful life events affecting over 3 million pregnancies per year throughout the world. An accurate autopsy of the stillborn fetus, including the placenta and umbilical cord examination, should be performed promptly after delivery. A thorough maternal history also should be taken, including exposures to risk factors. In many cases a death cause, attributable to fetal, maternal, or placental pathology, is clearly identified. However, in 50% or more of cases the cause remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to highlight possible developmental alterations of the autonomic nervous system in unexplained stillbirths to provide an explanation of the pathogenetic mechanism of their death. We conducted a careful neuropathological study of the brainstem, where the main vital centers are located, in 85 unexplained stillbirths and 52 age-matched controls died of known cause. Information on the maternal lifestyle, including the smoking habit, was collected in all cases. Hypodevelopment of neuronal centers involved in breathing control, all connected together in a "respiratory network", precisely hypoplasia of the facial/parafacial complex, Kölliker-Fuse nucleus, pre-Bötzinger nucleus and intermediolateral nucleus, were frequently observed in unexplained deaths, significantly related to maternal cigarette smoking. We support the hypothesis of a strong action of maternal smoking during pregnancy on the development of brainstem respiratory nuclei and suggest an explanation of the high incidence of the respiratory network alterations in unexplained fetal death, when breathing not represents a vital function. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuropathological effect of carbamate molluscicides on the land snail, Eobania vermiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essawy, Amina E; Abdelmeguied, Nabila E; Radwan, Mohamed A; Hamed, Sherifa S; Hegazy, Amira E

    2009-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the neuropathological effect of the two carbamate pesticides: methomyl and methiocarb on the neurons of the buccal ganglia in the land snail Eobania vermiculata using topical application and baiting technique. Their in vivo effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity were also investigated. Sublethal dose and concentration (1/4 LD(50) and 1/4 LC(50)) of both pesticides were used, and the experiment lasted for 14 days. Histopathological and ultrastuctural alterations in the buccal ganglia were more obvious after the baiting technique treatment than after the topical application method, and methomyl was found to be more toxic than methiocarb. These alterations included shrinkage of the perikarya of neurons, increased cytoplasmic basophilia, and extreme indentation of the plasma membrane. In addition, the nuclei appeared karyolitic, eccentric, and highly shrunken with an irregular nuclear envelope. The most outstanding symptom observed after topical application of methiocarb was a highly vacuolated cytoplasm with a peripheral increase in electron density associated with dense accumulations of free ribosomes. On the other hand, an increased number of lysosomes and autophagosomes were observed after topical application of methomyl. Mitochondrial damage, increased number of lipid droplets, and myelin figures were frequently observed in ganglia treated with either methomyl or methiocarb. Moreover, it was noticed that both compounds induced reductions in AChE activity. However, methomyl exhibited more potency in reducing AChE activity than methiocarb.

  18. Quantification of neuropathological findings by image data for the diagnosis of dementia in forensic autopsy cases.

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    Takayama, Mio; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Matsusue, Aya; Waters, Brian; Hara, Kenji; Ikematsu, Natsuki; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify neuropathological findings using image analysis software for the diagnosis of dementia in deceased who underwent forensic autopsy. Of the autopsies performed within 48 hours of death and excluding those of patients with head injury, thermal injury, heat stroke, or intracranial lesions, 8 were of autopsy cases clinically diagnosed with dementia and thus included in the dementia group (D). The non-dementia group (non-D) consisted of 6 deceased without dementia. To compare the D and non-D groups, 6 regions and 7 types of pathological findings were observed semi-quantitatively using 4 conventional stainings. Quantitative analysis of collected image data was performed using image analysis software. Semiquantitative analysis of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles was performed with Bielschowsky-Hirano's silver staining image data. An easy, simple, and effective quantification method of the pathological findings was achieved. However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups, and diagnosis of dementia by the quantification of pathological findings was not successful. Diagnosis of dementia using image data may be possible in future studies with an increased number of autopsies, and by utilizing staining techniques with higher specificity and sensitivity, such as immunohistochemical staining.

  19. Spinocerebellar ataxia 3 and Machado-Joseph disease: clinical, molecular, and neuropathological features.

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    Dürr, A; Stevanin, G; Cancel, G; Duyckaerts, C; Abbas, N; Didierjean, O; Chneiweiss, H; Benomar, A; Lyon-Caen, O; Julien, J; Serdaru, M; Penet, C; Agid, Y; Brice, A

    1996-04-01

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) carry an expanded CAG repeat in the MJD1 gene. One hundred twenty families of different geographic origin with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) type I were tested. Thirty-four families (126 patients) carried an expanded CAG repeat. The expanded and the normal allele did not overlap and the repeat was unstable during transmission, with variation in the size of the CAG length ranging from -8 to +5 and a mean expansion of 0.86 repeats without differences according to the parental sex. There was a combined effect of the number of CAG repeats of the expanded and normal allele on the age at onset, which accounted for 70% of its variability. The length of the CAG repeat influenced the frequency of clinical signs associated with cerebellar ataxia, such as abnormal tendon reflexes or decreased vibration sense, whereas the interindividual variation of supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, sphincter and swallowing difficulties, and amyotrophy was mostly determined by different disease durations. We compared the clinical profile of 91 SCA3/MJD patients with 51 SCA1 and 32 SCA2 patients. There were striking differences between the SCA3/MJD and SCA2 but not with SCA1 groups of patients. Despite their clinical similarities, distinct neuropathological features were observed in 2 SCA3/MJD and 2 SCA1 patients.

  20. Effect of synthetic cannabinoid HU210 on memory deficits and neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

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    Chen, B; Bromley-Brits, K; He, G; Cai, F; Zhang, X; Song, W

    2010-05-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to increase neurogenesis in adult brain, as well as protect neurons from excitotoxicity, calcium influx, inflammation, and ischemia. Recent studies have shown that synthetic cannabinoids can alleviate water maze impairments in rats treated with intracranial amyloid beta protein (Abeta); however it is unknown whether this effect is due to the cannabinoids' anti-inflammatory properties or whether it affects Abeta processing. Here we investigate whether cannabinoids have any effect on Alzheimer's disease in vivo. We found that HU210, a potent synthetic cannabinoid, did not improve water maze performance or a contextual fear conditioning task in an APP23/PS45 double transgenic mouse model of AD. HU210 had no effect on APP processing and Abeta generation, as well as neuritic plaque formation in the brains of AD transgenic mice. Our study showed that synthetic cannabinoid HU210 had no beneficial effects on AD neuropathology and behavioral deficits of AD model mice, which advises caution of such drug's application in AD therapies.

  1. AAV-BDNF mediated attenuation of quinolinic acid-induced neuropathology and motor function impairment.

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    Kells, A P; Henry, R A; Connor, B

    2008-07-01

    Maintenance and plasticity of striatal neurons is dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is depleted in the Huntington's disease striatum due to reduced expression and disrupted corticostriatal transportation. In this study we demonstrate that overexpression of BDNF in the striatum attenuates motor impairment and reduces the extent of striatal damage following quinolinic acid lesioning. Transfer of the BDNF gene to striatal neurons using serotype 1/2 adeno-associated viral vectors enhanced BDNF protein levels in the striatum, but induced weight loss and seizure activity following long-term high-level expression. Lower concentration BDNF expression supported striatal neurons against excitotoxic insult, as demonstrated by enhanced krox-24 immunopositive neuron survival, reduction of striatal atrophy and maintenance of the patch/matrix organization. Additionally, BDNF expression attenuated motor impairment in the forelimb use cylinder test, sensorimotor neglect in the corridor food selection task and reversed apomorphine-induced rotational behaviour. Direct correlations were shown for the first time between BDNF-mediated attenuation of behavioural impairment and the integrity of the globus pallidus, seemingly independent from the severity of striatal lesioning. These results demonstrate that BDNF holds considerable therapeutic potential for alleviating both neuropathological and motor function deficits in the Huntington's disease brain, and the critical role of pallidal neurons in facilitating motor performance.

  2. Early-onset familial lewy body dementia with extensive tauopathy: a clinical, genetic, and neuropathological study.

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    Clarimón, Jordi; Molina-Porcel, Laura; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Blesa, Rafael; Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina; González-Neira, Anna; Estorch, Montserrat; Ma Grau, Josep; Barraquer, Lluís; Roig, Carles; Ferrer, Isidre; Lleó, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Spanish family in which 3 of 4 siblings had dementia with Lewy bodies, 2 of them starting at age 26 years and the other at 29 years. The father has recently been diagnosed with Lewy body disease, with onset at 77 years. Neuropathological examination of the brain of the index patient disclosed unusual features characterized by diffuse Lewy body disease and generalized neurofibrillary tangle pathology but with no amyloid deposits in any region. Moreover, Lewy body pathology colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles in most affected neurons. Mutation screening that included all coding exons of presenilin 1 (PSEN1), presenilin 2 (PSEN2), alpha-synuclein (SNCA), beta-synuclein (SNCB), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), glucocerebrosidase (GBA), and exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes did not identify any mutation. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism was performed in 4 family members and ruled out any pathogenic duplication or deletion in the entire genome. In summary, we report a unique family with pathologically confirmed early-onset dementia with Lewy bodies with widespread tau and alpha-synuclein deposition. The absence of mutations in genes known to cause Lewy body disease suggests that a novel locus or loci are implicated in this neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Neuropathological Hallmarks of Brain Malformations in Extreme Phenotypes Related to DYNC1H1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquerriere, Annie; Maillard, Camille; Cavallin, Mara; Chapon, Françoise; Marguet, Florent; Molin, Arnaud; Sigaudy, Sabine; Blouet, Marie; Benoist, Guillaume; Fernandez, Carla; Poirier, Karine; Chelly, Jamel; Thomas, Sophie; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia

    2017-03-01

    Dyneins play a critical role in a wide variety of cellular functions such as the movement of organelles and numerous aspects of mitosis, making it central player in neocortical neurogenesis and migration. Recently, cytoplasmic dynein-1, heavy chain-1 (DYNC1H1) mutations have been found to cause a wide spectrum of brain cortical malformations. We report on the detailed neuropathological features of brain lesions from 2 fetuses aged 36 and 22 weeks of gestation (WG), respectively, carrying de novo DYNC1H1 mutations, p.Arg2720Lys and p.Val3951Ala and presenting the most severe phenotype reported to date. Analysis using the Dictyostelium discoideum dynein motor crystal structure showed that the mutations are both predicted to have deleterious consequences on the function of the motor domain. Both fetuses showed a similar macroscopic and histological brain malformative complex associating bilateral fronto-parietal polymicrogyria (PMG), dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and of the cortico-spinal tracts, along with brainstem and cerebellar abnormalities. Both exhibited extremely severe disrupted cortical lamination. Immunohistochemical studies provided the evidence for defects in cell proliferation and postmitotic neuroblast ability to exit from the subventricular zone resulting in a failure of radial migration toward the cortical plate, thus providing new insights for the understanding of the pathophysiology in these cortical malformations. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropathology in respiratory-related motoneurons in young Pompe (Gaa(-/-)) mice.

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    Turner, Sara M F; Hoyt, Aaron K; ElMallah, Mai K; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Fuller, David D

    2016-06-15

    Respiratory and/or lingual dysfunction are among the first motor symptoms in Pompe disease, a disorder resulting from absence or dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Here, we histologically evaluated the medulla, cervical and thoracic spinal cords in 6 weeks old asymptomatic Pompe (Gaa(-/-)) mice to determine if neuropathology in respiratory motor regions has an early onset. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining indicated glycogen accumulation was exclusively occurring in Gaa(-/-) hypoglossal, mid-cervical and upper thoracic motoneurons. Markers of DNA damage (Tunel) and ongoing apoptosis (Cleaved Caspase 3) did not co-localize with PAS staining, but were prominent in a medullary region which included the nucleus tractus solitarius, and also in the thoracic spinal dorsal horn. We conclude that respiratory-related motoneurons are particularly susceptible to GAA deficiency and that neuronal glycogen accumulation and neurodegeneration may occur independently in early stage disease. The data support early therapeutic intervention in Pompe disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A Single Neonatal Exposure to BMAA in a Rat Model Produces Neuropathology Consistent with Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Laura Louise Scott

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although cyanobacterial β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, Parkinson’s Disease (PD and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, no BMAA animal model has reproduced all the neuropathology typically associated with these neurodegenerative diseases. We present here a neonatal BMAA model that causes β-amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary tangles of hyper-phosphorylated tau, TDP-43 inclusions, Lewy bodies, microbleeds and microgliosis as well as severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus, striatum, substantia nigra pars compacta, and ventral horn of the spinal cord in rats following a single BMAA exposure. We also report here that BMAA exposure on particularly PND3, but also PND4 and 5, the critical period of neurogenesis in the rodent brain, is substantially more toxic than exposure to BMAA on G14, PND6, 7 and 10 which suggests that BMAA could potentially interfere with neonatal neurogenesis in rats. The observed selective toxicity of BMAA during neurogenesis and, in particular, the observed pattern of neuronal loss observed in BMAA-exposed rats suggest that BMAA elicits its effect by altering dopamine and/or serotonin signaling in rats.

  6. Genetic variation in the Cytb gene of human cerebral Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from clinically and radiologically heterogeneous patients with neurocysticercosis

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    Hector Palafox-Fonseca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NC is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous parasitic disease caused by the establishment of larval Taenia solium in the human central nervous system. Host and/or parasite variations may be related to this observed heterogeneity. Genetic differences between pig and human-derived T. solium cysticerci have been reported previously. In this study, 28 cysticerci were surgically removed from 12 human NC patients, the mitochondrial gene that encodes cytochrome b was amplified from the cysticerci and genetic variations that may be related to NC heterogeneity were characterised. Nine different haplotypes (Ht, which were clustered in four haplogroups (Hg, were identified. Hg 3 and 4 exhibited a tendency to associate with age and gender, respectively. However, no significant associations were found between NC heterogeneity and the different T. solium cysticerci Ht or Hg. Parasite variants obtained from patients with similar NC clinical or radiological features were genetically closer than those found in groups of patients with a different NC profile when using the Mantel test. Overall, this study establishes the presence of genetic differences in the Cytb gene of T. solium isolated from human cysticerci and suggests that parasite variation could contribute to NC heterogeneity.

  7. Transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells improves motor coordination and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease mice.

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    Mendonça, Liliana S; Nóbrega, Clévio; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kaspar, Brian K; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is a neurodegenerative disease without effective treatment. Patients with Machado-Joseph disease exhibit significant motor impairments such as gait ataxia, associated with multiple neuropathological changes including mutant ATXN3 inclusions, marked neuronal loss and atrophy of the cerebellum. Thus, an effective treatment of symptomatic patients with Machado-Joseph disease may require cell replacement, which we investigated in this study. For this purpose, we injected cerebellar neural stem cells into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice and assessed the effect on the neuropathology, neuroinflammation mediators and neurotrophic factor levels and motor coordination. We found that upon transplantation into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease mice, cerebellar neural stem cells differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, cerebellar neural stem cell transplantation mediated a significant and robust alleviation of the motor behaviour impairments, which correlated with preservation from Machado-Joseph disease-associated neuropathology, namely reduction of Purkinje cell loss, reduction of cellular layer shrinkage and mutant ATXN3 aggregates. Additionally, a significant reduction of neuroinflammation and an increase of neurotrophic factors levels was observed, indicating that transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells also triggers important neuroprotective effects. Thus, cerebellar neural stem cells have the potential to be used as a cell replacement and neuroprotective approach for Machado-Joseph disease therapy. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The importance of the detail forensic-neuropathological examination in the determination of the diffuse brain injuries.

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    Davceva, N; Janevska, V; Ilievski, B; Jovanovic, R

    2012-01-01

    According to the contemporary classification, traumatic brain damage is divided on focal and diffuse brain injuries, and primary and secondary brain damage. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the necessity of the forensic-neuropathological examination in the determination of the diffuse brain injuries. In those injuries frequently neither the most sophisticated clinical-investigation techniques like CT and MRI, nor the routine post-mortem forensic pathological examination, give any results with discovering an intracranial mass lesion, despite the fact that patients had manifested a serious brain failure. In a series of 80 cases with closed head injuries where forensic-neuropathological examination has been undertaken (examination of a fixed brain tissue and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against β-amyloid precursor protein), the occurrence of the diffuse brain injuries in the absence of any other massive intracranial lesion has been established in 14 (17,7%) of the cases. Hence, forensic-neuropathological examination has been the only way to establish the diagnosis of the brain injury that caused a serious brain failure and in most of them occurred as a concrete cause of death. This method has already been affirmed in the forensic medicine science and has been implemented in a Recommendation No 99 of the Council of Europe where medico-legal autopsy rules are given, thus, establishing it as an unavoidable part of the daily forensic medicine practice. diffuse axonal injury - diffuse vascular injury - closed head injuries - traumatic brain damage - diffuse brain damage.

  9. The 2,6-disubstituted naphthalene derivative FDDNP labeling reliably predicts Congo red birefringence of protein deposits in brain sections of selected human neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Lojze M; Vovko, Tomaz D; Popovic, Mara; Petric, Andrej; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Vidmar, Gaj; Bresjanac, Mara

    2006-04-01

    Deposition of conformationally altered proteins prominently characterizes pathogenesis and pathomorphology of a number of neurodegenerative disorders. 2-(1-{6-[(2-[F-18]fluor