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Sample records for human cells assayed

  1. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

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    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  2. The glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.; Jensen, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    In this report we briefly review our past experience and some new developments with the GPA assay. Particular emphasis will be placed on two areas that affect the utility of the GPA assay for human population monitoring. The first is our efforts to simplify the GPA assay to make it more generally available for large population studies. The second is to begin to understand some of the characteristics of human hemopoiesis which affect the accumulation and expression of mutant phenotype cells. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  4. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells

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    Drosten Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. Results 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2 replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2. CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. Conclusion CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  5. The application of single cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay to human monitoring studies

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    Valverde Mahara

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the search of new human genotoxic biomarkers, the single cell gel electrophoresis assay has been proposed as a sensible alternative. Material and methods. This technique detects principally single strand breaks as well as alkali-labile and repair-retarded sites. Results. Herein we present our experience using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay in human population studies, both occupationally and environmentally exposed. Conclusions. We discuss the assay feasibility as a genotoxic biomarker.

  6. Toxcast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for Developmental Toxicity (SOT)

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    We correlated the ToxCast library in a metabolic biomarker-based in vitro assay (Stemina devTOXqP) utilizing human embryonic stem (hES) cells (H9 line). This assay identifies the concentration of a chemical that disrupts cellular metabolism in a manner indicative of teratogenic...

  7. Interspecific in vitro assay for the chimera-forming ability of human pluripotent stem cells.

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    Masaki, Hideki; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Umino, Ayumi; Sato, Hideyuki; Hamanaka, Sanae; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-09-15

    Functional assay limitations are an emerging issue in characterizing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). With rodent PSCs, chimera formation using pre-implantation embryos is the gold-standard assay of pluripotency (competence of progeny to differentiate into all three germ layers). In human PSCs (hPSCs), however, this can only be monitored via teratoma formation or in vitro differentiation, as ethical concerns preclude generation of human-human or human-animal chimeras. To circumvent this issue, we developed a functional assay utilizing interspecific blastocyst injection and in vitro culture (interspecies in vitro chimera assay) that enables the development and observation of embryos up to headfold stage. The assay uses mouse pre-implantation embryos and rat, monkey and human PSCs to create interspecies chimeras cultured in vitro to the early egg-cylinder stage. Intra- and interspecific chimera assays with rodent PSC lines were performed to confirm the consistency of results in vitro and in vivo. The behavior of chimeras developed in vitro appeared to recapitulate that of chimeras developed in vivo; that is, PSC-derived cells survived and were integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. This indicates that the interspecific in vitro chimera assay is useful in evaluating the chimera-forming ability of rodent PSCs. However, when human induced PSCs (both conventional and naïve-like types) were injected into mouse embryos and cultured, some human cells survived but were segregated; unlike epiblast-stage rodent PSCs, they never integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. These data suggest that the mouse-human interspecies in vitro chimera assay does not accurately reflect the early developmental potential/process of hPSCs. The use of evolutionarily more closely related species as host embryos might be necessary to evaluate the developmental potency of hPSCs. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Clonogenic assay: adherent cells.

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    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-03-13

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 1956. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811). Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  9. Tissue-specific methylation of human insulin gene and PCR assay for monitoring beta cell death.

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    Mohamed I Husseiny

    Full Text Available The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy.

  10. Quantum Dot Nanotoxicity Investigations Using Human Lung Cells and TOXOR Electrochemical Enzyme Assay Methodology.

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    O'Hara, Tony; Seddon, Brian; O'Connor, Andrew; McClean, Siobhán; Singh, Baljit; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Fuku, Xolile; Dempsey, Eithne

    2017-01-27

    Recent studies have suggested that certain nanomaterials can interfere with optically based cytotoxicity assays resulting in underestimations of nanomaterial toxicity. As a result there has been growing interest in the use of whole cell electrochemical biosensors for nanotoxicity applications. Herein we report application of an electrochemical cytotoxicity assay developed in house (TOXOR) in the evaluation of toxic effects of mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (MSA capped CdTe QDs), toward mammalian cells. MSA capped CdTe QDs were synthesized, characterized, and their cytotoxicity toward A549 human lung epithelial cells investigated. The internalization of QDs within cells was scrutinized via confocal microscopy. The cytotoxicity assay is based on the measurement of changes in cellular enzyme acid phosphatase upon 24 h exposure to QDs. Acid phosphatase catalyzes dephosphorylation of 2-naphthyl phosphate to 2-naphthol (determined by chronocoulometry) and is indicative of metabolic activity in cells. The 24 h IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% reduction in acid phosphatase activity) value for MSA capped CdTe QDs was found to be 118 ± 49 μg/mL using the TOXOR assay and was in agreement with the MTT assay (157 ± 31 μg/mL). Potential uses of this electrochemical assay include the screening of nanomaterials, environmental toxins, in addition to applications in the pharmaceutical, food, and health sectors.

  11. Chemosensitivity testing of primary human renal cell carcinoma by a tetrazolium based microculture assay (MTT).

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    Mickisch, G; Fajta, S; Keilhauer, G; Schlick, E; Tschada, R; Alken, P

    1990-01-01

    MTT staining procedures have been used in chemosensitivity testing of established cell lines of human and other sources as well as of human leukaemias, but only limited information on its application in primary solid human tumors is presently available. We have evaluated MTT staining in primary human Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs), studied various factors interfering with the optimal use, and finally applied it in subsequent chemosensitivity testing. The method depends on the conversion of a water-soluble tetrazolium salt (MTT) to a purple colored formazan precipitate, a reaction effected by enzymes active only in living cells. Single cell suspensions of RCCs were obtained either by enzymatic dispersion or by mechanical dissagregation, filtered through gauze, and purified by Ficoll density centrifugation. Tests were carried out in 96-well microculture plates. 10(4) viable tumor cells per well at 4 h incubation time with 20 micrograms MTT/100 microliters total medium volume yielded best results. Formazan crystals were dissolved with DMSO, and the plates were immediately measured on a microculture plate reader at 540 nm. Under these criteria, linearity of the system could be demonstrated. For chemosensitivity testing, cells were continuously exposed to a number of drugs prior to the MTT staining procedure. Reproducibility of results was assessed and confirmed by culturing RCCs in flasks additionally, resubmitting them after 1, 2, and 4 weeks to the MTT assay. We conclude that the semiautomated MTT assay offers a valid, rapid, reliable and simple method to determine the degree of chemoresistance in primary human RCCs.

  12. Feasibility of drug screening with panels of human tumor cell lines using a microculture tetrazolium assay.

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    Alley, M C; Scudiero, D A; Monks, A; Hursey, M L; Czerwinski, M J; Fine, D L; Abbott, B J; Mayo, J G; Shoemaker, R H; Boyd, M R

    1988-02-01

    For the past 30 years strategies for the preclinical discovery and development of potential anticancer agents have been based largely upon the testing of agents in mice bearing transplantable leukemias and solid tumors derived from a limited number of murine as well as human sources. The feasibility of implementing an alternate approach, namely combined in vitro/in vivo screening for selective cytotoxicity among panels of human tumor cell lines derived from a broad spectrum of human solid tumors is under investigation. A group of 30 cell lines acquired from a variety of sources and representing 8 lung cancer pathologies as well as 76 cell lines representing 10 other categories of human cancer (carcinomas of colon, breast, kidney, prostate, ovary, head and neck; glioma; leukemia; melanoma; and sarcoma) have exhibited acceptable growth characteristics and suitable colorimetric profiles in a single, standard culture medium. Measurements of in vitro growth in microculture wells by cell-mediated reduction of tetrazolium showed excellent correlation (0.89 less than r2 less than 0.98) with measurements of cellular protein in adherent cell line cultures as well as viable cell count in suspension cell line cultures (0.94 less than r2 less than 0.99). Since the microculture tetrazolium assay provides sensitive and reproducible indices of growth as well as drug sensitivity in individual cell lines over the course of multiple passages and several months' cultivation, it appears suitable for initial-stage in vitro drug screening.

  13. Cell-free assay measuring repair DNA synthesis in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarrocchi, G.; Linn, S.

    1978-01-01

    Osmotic disruption of confluent cultured human fibroblasts that have been irradiated or exposed to chemical carcinogens allows the specific measurement of repair DNA synthesis using dTTP as a precursor. Fibroblasts similarly prepared from various xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines show the deficiencies of uv-induced DNA synthesis predicted from in vivo studies, while giving normal responses to methylmethanesulfonate. A pyrimidine-dimer-specific enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, stimulated the rate of uv-induced repair synthesis with normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines. This system should prove useful for identifying agents that induce DNA repair, and cells that respond abnormally to such induction. It should also be applicable to an in vitro complementation assay with repair-defective cells and proteins obtained from repair-proficient cells. Finally, by using actively growing fibroblasts and thymidine in the system, DNA replication can be measured and studied in vitro

  14. CYTOKINESIS-BLOCK MICRONUCLEUS ASSAY IN HUMAN GLIOMA CELLS EXPOSED TO RADIATION

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    Jerzy Slowinski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biological tests are efficient in reflecting the biological influences of several types of generally harmful exposures. The micronucleus assay is widely used in genotoxicity studies or studies on genomic damage in general. We present methodological aspects of cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay performed in human gliomas irradiated in vitro. Eight human glioblastoma cell lines obtained from DSMZ (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Germany were gamma-irradiated (60Co over a dose range of 0-10 Gy. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was performed to quantitate cytogenetic damage. The cells were fixed directly on dishes, stained with fluorochrome DAPI and evaluated under fluorescent and phase contrast microscope. The micronucleus frequency was expressed as a micronuclei (MN per binucleated cell (BNC ratio, calculated after scoring at least 100 BNC per dish. The frequency of spontaneous MN ranged from 0.17 to 0.613 (mean: 0.29 ± 0.14. After irradiation increase of MN frequency in the range of 0.312 - 2.241 (mean: 0.98 ± 0.68 was found at 10 Gy. Gliomas are extremely heterogenous in regard to cytogenetic effects of irradiation, as shown in this study by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. This test is easily performed on irradiated glioma cell lines and can assist in determining their radiosensitivity. However, in order to obtain reliable and reproducible results, precise criteria for MN scoring must be strictly followed. Simultaneous use of fluorescent and phase contrast equipment improves imaging of morphological details and can further optimize MN scoring.

  15. A buccal cell model comet assay: Development and evaluation for human biomonitoring and nutritional studies

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    Szeto, Y.T. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); School of Health Sciences, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao (China); Benzie, I.F.F. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: iris.benzie@inet.polyu.edu.hk; Collins, A.R. [Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Choi, S.W. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, C.Y. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yow, C.M.N. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Tse, M.M.Y. [School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-10-15

    The comet assay is a widely used biomonitoring tool for DNA damage. The most commonly used cells in human studies are lymphocytes. There is an urgent need to find an alternative target human cell that can be collected from normal subjects with minimal invasion. There are some reports of buccal cells, collected easily from the inside of the mouth, being used in studies of DNA damage and repair, and these were of interest. However, our preliminary studies following the published protocol showed that buccal cells sustained massive damage and disintegrated at the high pH [O. Ostling, K.J. Johanson. Microelectrophoretic study of radiation-induced DNA damages in individual mammalian cells. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 123 (1984) 291-298] used, but that at lower pH were extremely resistant to lysis, an essential step in the comet assay. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop a protocol than enabled buccal cell lysis and DNA damage testing in the comet assay, and to use the model to evaluate the potential use of the buccal cell model in human biomonitoring and nutritional study. Specifically, we aimed to investigate intra- and inter-individual differences in buccal cell DNA damage (as strand breaks), the effect of in vitro exposure to both a standard oxidant challenge and antioxidant treatment, as well as in situ exposure to an antioxidant-rich beverage and supplementation-related effects using a carotenoid-rich food. Successful lysis was achieved using 0.25% trypsin for 30 min followed by proteinase K (1 mg/ml) treatment for 60 min. When this procedure was performed on cells pre-embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, followed by electrophoresis (in 0.01 M NaOH, 1 mM EDTA, pH 9.1, 18 min at 12 V), a satisfactory comet image was obtained, though inter-individual variation was quite wide. Pre-lysis exposure of cells to a standard oxidant challenge (induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) increased DNA strand breaks in a dose related manner, and incubation of cells in

  16. A buccal cell model comet assay: Development and evaluation for human biomonitoring and nutritional studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeto, Y.T.; Benzie, I.F.F.; Collins, A.R.; Choi, S.W.; Cheng, C.Y.; Yow, C.M.N.; Tse, M.M.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The comet assay is a widely used biomonitoring tool for DNA damage. The most commonly used cells in human studies are lymphocytes. There is an urgent need to find an alternative target human cell that can be collected from normal subjects with minimal invasion. There are some reports of buccal cells, collected easily from the inside of the mouth, being used in studies of DNA damage and repair, and these were of interest. However, our preliminary studies following the published protocol showed that buccal cells sustained massive damage and disintegrated at the high pH [O. Ostling, K.J. Johanson. Microelectrophoretic study of radiation-induced DNA damages in individual mammalian cells. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 123 (1984) 291-298] used, but that at lower pH were extremely resistant to lysis, an essential step in the comet assay. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop a protocol than enabled buccal cell lysis and DNA damage testing in the comet assay, and to use the model to evaluate the potential use of the buccal cell model in human biomonitoring and nutritional study. Specifically, we aimed to investigate intra- and inter-individual differences in buccal cell DNA damage (as strand breaks), the effect of in vitro exposure to both a standard oxidant challenge and antioxidant treatment, as well as in situ exposure to an antioxidant-rich beverage and supplementation-related effects using a carotenoid-rich food. Successful lysis was achieved using 0.25% trypsin for 30 min followed by proteinase K (1 mg/ml) treatment for 60 min. When this procedure was performed on cells pre-embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, followed by electrophoresis (in 0.01 M NaOH, 1 mM EDTA, pH 9.1, 18 min at 12 V), a satisfactory comet image was obtained, though inter-individual variation was quite wide. Pre-lysis exposure of cells to a standard oxidant challenge (induced by H 2 O 2 ) increased DNA strand breaks in a dose related manner, and incubation of cells in Trolox

  17. Comparison of multiple assays for detecting human antibodies directed against antigens on normal and malignant tissue culture cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, S.A.; Schwarz, S.; Anding, H.; Hyatt, C.; Williams, G.M.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md.

    1977-01-01

    Four separate assays of human antibody reactivity to four separate normal and malignant human tissue culture cells lines from two patients have been evaluated using a single highly-reactive allogeneic serum. The visual end-point cytolysis assay and the chromium-51 release assay were equally sensitive in measuring complement mediated antibody cytotoxicity and both were far more sensitive than a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The assay of antibody reactivity by hemadsorption technique was about 10 times more sensitive than any of the cytotoxicity assays. This latter assay measures only IgG antibody however. These assays showed that cell lines from different patients may differ greatly in 'reactivity' to an allogeneic serum and emphasized the importance of utilizing tumor and normal cells from the same patient when using tissue culture cells to search for tumor specific reactivity. These observations emphasize the importance of utilizing multiple assays against paired normal and malignant cells from the same patient to be certain of the specificity and magnitude of the measured antibody

  18. Sensitive cell-based assay for determination of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor tropism.

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    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, Ana C; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard M; Rhea, Ariel M; Rose, Justine D; Wylie, Doug; Henry, Kenneth; Wright, Alison; King, Kevin; Archer, John; Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vicente; Robertson, David L; Olivo, Paul D; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2013-05-01

    CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that require a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed, characterized, verified, and prevalidated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis (URA3) gene replacing the HIV-1 env coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2% to 5.75%, 3.5%, or 10% false-positive rate [FPR]), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens, with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay, with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at a 0.3% detection threshold (67%), whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454

  19. ToxCast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for ...

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    Standard practice for assessing disruptions in embryogenesis involves testing pregnant animals of two species, typically rats and rabbits, exposed during major organogenesis and evaluated just prior to term. Under this design the major manifestations of developmental toxicity are observed as one or more apical endpoints including intrauterine death, fetal growth retardation, structural malformations and variations. Alternative approaches to traditional developmental toxicity testing have been proposed in the form of in vitro data (e.g., embryonic stem cells, zebrafish embryos, HTS assays) and in silico models (e.g., computational toxicology). To increase the diversity of assays used to assess developmental toxicity in EPA’s ToxCast program, we tested the chemicals in Stemina’s metabolomics-based platform that utilizes the commecrially available H9 human embryonic stem cell line. The devTOXqP dataset for ToxCast of high-quality based on replicate samples and model performance (82% balanced accuracy, 0.71 sensitivity and 1.00 specificity). To date, 136 ToxCast chemicals (12.8% of 1065 tested) were positive in this platform; 48 triggered the biomarker signal without any change in hESC viability and 88 triggered activity concurrent with effects on cell viability. Work is in progress to complete the STM dataset entry into the TCPL, compare data with results from zFish and mESC platforms, profile bioactivity (ToxCastDB), endpoints (ToxRefDB), chemotypes (DSSTox)

  20. Micro-arrayed human embryonic stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes for in vitro functional assay.

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    Elena Serena

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the body and any major insult can result in a significant loss of heart cells. The development of an in vitro-based cardiac tissue could be of paramount importance for many aspects of the cardiology research. In this context, we developed an in vitro assay based on human cardiomyocytes (hCMs and ad hoc micro-technologies, suitable for several applications: from pharmacological analysis to physio-phatological studies on transplantable hCMs. We focused on the development of an assay able to analyze not only hCMs viability, but also their functionality. METHODS: hCMs were cultured onto a poly-acrylamide hydrogel with tunable tissue-like mechanical properties and organized through micropatterning in a 20×20 array. Arrayed hCMs were characterized by immunofluorescence, GAP-FRAP analyses and live and dead assay. Their functionality was evaluated monitoring the excitation-contraction coupling. RESULTS: Micropatterned hCMs maintained the expression of the major cardiac markers (cTnT, cTnI, Cx43, Nkx2.5, α-actinin and functional properties. The spontaneous contraction frequency was (0.83±0.2 Hz, while exogenous electrical stimulation lead to an increase up to 2 Hz. As proof of concept that our device can be used for screening the effects of pathological conditions, hCMs were exposed to increasing levels of H(2O(2. Remarkably, hCMs viability was not compromised with exposure to 0.1 mM H(2O(2, but hCMs contractility was dramatically suppressed. As proof of concept, we also developed a microfluidic platform to selectively treat areas of the cell array, in the perspective of performing multi-parametric assay. CONCLUSIONS: Such system could be a useful tool for testing the effects of multiple conditions on an in vitro cell model representative of human heart physiology, thus potentially helping the processes of therapy and drug development.

  1. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

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    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: van.biologa@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S., E-mail: aurcruz@ial.sp.gov.br [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  2. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  3. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Validation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Bolis, Sara; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter focuses on the validation of the following analytical methods for the control of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for cell therapy clinical trials: Microbiological control for cellular product Endotoxin assay Mycoplasma assay Cell count and viability Immunophenotype Clonogenic potential (CFU-F assay) In our lab, these methods are in use for product release, process control or control of the biological starting materials. They are described in detail in the accompanying Chapter 19.For each method, validation goals and strategy are presented, and a detailed experimental scheme is proposed.

  4. Nyctanthes arbortristis mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity assay against THP-1 human leukemia cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Priti; Kumari, Niraj; Jha, Anal K.; Singh, K. P.; Prasad, K.

    2018-05-01

    Green synthesis, characterizations and applications of nanoparticles have become an important branch of nanotechnology now a day. In this paper, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the aqueous extract of Nyctanthes arbortristis as a reducing and stabilizing agent, has been discussed. Present synthetic method is very handy, cost-effective and reproducible. Formation of AgNPs was characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. The phytochemicals responsible for nano-transformation were principally flavonoids, phenols and glycosides present in the leaves. Further, the dose dependent cytotoxicity assay of biosynthesized AgNPs against THP-1 human leukemia cell lines showed the encouraging results.

  5. Intra-laboratory validation of a human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay for testing angiogenesis modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jertta-Riina Sarkanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed standardized human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay was intra-laboratory validated to verify that the method is reliable and relevant for routine testing of modulators of angiogenesis e.g. pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. This assay is based on the earlier published method but it was improved and shown to be more sensitive and rapid than the previous assay. The performance of the assay was assessed by using 6 reference chemicals, which are widely used pharmaceuticals that inhibit angiogenesis: acetyl salicylic acid, erlotinib, 2-methoxyestradiol, levamisole, thalidomide, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. In the intra-laboratory validation, the sensitivity of the assay (upper and lower limits of detection and linearity of response in tubule formation, batch to batch variation in tubule formation between different Master cell bank batches, and precision as well as the reliability of the assay (reproducibility and repeatability were tested. The pre-set acceptance criteria for the intra-laboratory validation study were met. The relevance of the assay in man was investigated by comparing the effects of reference chemicals and their concentrations to the published human data. The comparison showed a good concordance, which indicates that this human cell based angiogenesis model predicts well the effects in man and has the potential to be used to supplement and/or replace of animal tests.

  6. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env- and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) -assays. Rituximab® (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used...

  7. Development of an in vitro potency assay for human skeletal muscle derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Marco; Asim, Faheem; Garczarczyk-Asim, Dorota; Janke, Katrin; Deutsch, Martin; Margreiter, Eva; Troppmair, Jakob; Marksteiner, Rainer

    2018-01-01

    Potency is a quantitative measure of the desired biological function of an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) and is a prerequisite for market approval application (MAA). To assess the potency of human skeletal muscle-derived cells (SMDCs), which are currently investigated in clinical trials for the regeneration of skeletal muscle defects, we evaluated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is expressed in skeletal muscle and nervous tissue of all mammals. CD56+ SMDCs were separated from CD56- SMDCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and both differentiated in skeletal muscle differentiation medium. AChE activity of in vitro differentiated SMDCs was correlated with CD56 expression, fusion index, cell number, cell doubling numbers, differentiation markers and compared to the clinical efficacy in patients treated with SMDCs against fecal incontinence. CD56- SMDCs did not form multinucleated myotubes and remained low in AChE activity during differentiation. CD56+ SMDCs generated myotubes and increased in AChE activity during differentiation. AChE activity was found to accurately reflect the number of CD56+ SMDCs in culture, their fusion competence, and cell doubling number. In patients with fecal incontinence responding to SMDCs treatment, the improvement of clinical symptoms was positively linked with the AChE activity of the SMDCs injected. AChE activity was found to truly reflect the in vitro differentiation status of SMDCs and to be superior to the mere use of surface markers as it reflects not only the number of myogenic SMDCs in culture but also their fusion competence and population doubling number, thus combining cell quality and quantification of the expected mode of action (MoA) of SMDCs. Moreover, the successful in vitro validation of the assay proves its suitability for routine use. Most convincingly, our results demonstrate a link between clinical efficacy and the AChE activity of the SMDCs preparations used for the treatment of fecal

  8. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  9. 20180312 - Profiling the ToxCast library with a pluripotent human (H9) embryonic stem cell assay (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Stemina devTOX quickPredict platform (STM) is a human pluripotent H9 stem cell-based assay that predicts developmental toxicants. Using the STM model, we screened 1065 ToxCast chemicals and entered the data into the ToxCast data analysis pipeline. Model performance was 83.3% ...

  10. Radiosensitivity evaluation of human tumor cell lines by detecting 4977 bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA and comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Liping; Liu Qiang; Wang Qin; Li Jin; Yue Jingyin; Mu Chuanjie; Fan Feiyue

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using the assay of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and comet assay. Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction(SF), the ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and DNA damage were detected by MTY assay, nested PCR technique and comet assay, respectively. Results: The results of MTT assay showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher significantly than that of MCF-7 (P 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The difference of radiosensitivity among these three tumor cell lines was significant after 8 Gy γ-ray irradiation. Conclusions: Combination of many biological parameter is helpful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more accurately. (authors)

  11. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Methods for ATMP Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Bolis, Sara; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for the development of cell-based therapies for various diseases and are currently being evaluated in a number of clinical trials (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014). MSC for therapeutic applications are classified as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) (Regulation (EC) No 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004) and must be prepared according to good manufacturing practices ( http://ec.europa.eu/health/documents/eudralex/vol-4 ). They may be derived from different starting materials (mainly bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, or cord blood) and applied as fresh or cryopreserved products, in the autologous as well as an allogeneic context (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014; Sensebé and Bourin, Transplantation 87(9 Suppl):S49-S53, 2009). In any case, they require an approved and well-defined panel of assays in order to be released for clinical use.This chapter describes analytical methods implemented and performed in our cell factory as part of the release strategy for an ATMP consisting of frozen autologous BM-derived MSC. Such methods are designed to assess the safety (sterility, endotoxin, and mycoplasma assays) and identity/potency (cell count and viability, immunophenotype and clonogenic assay) of the final product. Some assays are also applied to the biological starting material (sterility) or carried out as in-process controls (sterility, cell count and viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic assay).The validation strategy for each analytical method is described in the accompanying Chapter 20 .

  12. Cytotoxicity Test Based on Human Cells Labeled with Fluorescent Proteins: Fluorimetry, Photography, and Scanning for High-Throughput Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, Marina A; Skvortsov, Dmitry A; Rubtsova, Maria P; Komarova, Ekaterina S; Dontsova, Olga A

    2018-06-01

    High- and medium-throughput assays are now routine methods for drug screening and toxicology investigations on mammalian cells. However, a simple and cost-effective analysis of cytotoxicity that can be carried out with commonly used laboratory equipment is still required. The developed cytotoxicity assays are based on human cell lines stably expressing eGFP, tdTomato, mCherry, or Katushka2S fluorescent proteins. Red fluorescent proteins exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio, due to less interference by medium autofluorescence, in comparison to green fluorescent protein. Measurements have been performed on a fluorescence scanner, a plate fluorimeter, and a camera photodocumentation system. For a 96-well plate assay, the sensitivity per well and the measurement duration were 250 cells and 15 min for the scanner, 500 cells and 2 min for the plate fluorimeter, and 1000 cells and less than 1 min for the camera detection. These sensitivities are similar to commonly used MTT (tetrazolium dye) assays. The used scanner and the camera had not been previously applied for cytotoxicity evaluation. An image processing scheme for the high-resolution scanner is proposed that significantly diminishes the number of control wells, even for a library containing fluorescent substances. The suggested cytotoxicity assay has been verified by measurements of the cytotoxicity of several well-known cytotoxic drugs and further applied to test a set of novel bacteriotoxic compounds in a medium-throughput format. The fluorescent signal of living cells is detected without disturbing them and adding any reagents, thus allowing to investigate time-dependent cytotoxicity effects on the same sample of cells. A fast, simple and cost-effective assay is suggested for cytotoxicity evaluation based on mammalian cells expressing fluorescent proteins and commonly used laboratory equipment.

  13. Ultraviolet and chemical induced DNA repair in human cells assayed by bromodeoxyuridine photolysis or cytosine arabinoside arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Dunn, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay of DNA damage in human cells permits an estimate of both the number of repaired regions in the DNA and the size of the average repaired region - the patch size. The antineoplastic agent arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara-C) can also be employed to assay the magnitude of repair since this agent appears to block rejoining of single-strand incisions made in the DNA during the initial step of repair. Thus, the number of incisions can be accumulated. The ara-C effect is dependent on the presence of hydroxyurea. Both assays can be employed for the study of physical or chemical DNA damages. Results comparing these assays are presented

  14. A Comparison of the Human Buccal Cell Assay and the Pollen Abortion Assay in Assessing Genotoxicity in an Urban-Rural Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan da Silveira Fleck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004 and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001 following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas.

  15. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  16. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate) can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Zapotoczny and Sekelsky.

  17. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zapotoczny

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells.

  18. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  19. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves' patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves' disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs

  20. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  1. Analysis of close associations of uropod-associated proteins in human T-cells using the proximity ligation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that the raft-associated proteins flotillin-1 and -2 are rapidly recruited to the uropods of chemoattractant-stimulated human neutrophils and T-cells and are involved in cell polarization. Other proteins such as the adhesion receptor PSGL-1, the actin-membrane linker proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM and the signaling enzyme phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ90 (PIPKIγ90 also accumulate in the T-cell uropod. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA we now have investigated putative close associations of these proteins in human freshly isolated T-cells before and after chemokine addition. The PLA allows in situ subcellular localization of close proximity of endogenous proteins at single-molecule resolution in fixed cells. It allows detection also of weaker and transient complexes that would not be revealed with co-immunoprecipitation approaches. We previously provided evidence for heterodimer formation of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in T-cells before and after chemokine addition using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We now confirm these findings using PLA for the endogenous flotillins in fixed human T-cells. Moreover, in agreement with the literature, our PLA findings confirm a close association of endogenous PSGL-1 and ERM proteins both in resting and chemokine-activated human T-cells. In addition, we provide novel evidence using the PLA for close associations of endogenous activated ERM proteins with PIPKIγ90 and of endogenous flotillins with PSGL-1 in human T-cells, before and after chemokine addition. Our findings suggest that preformed clusters of these proteins coalesce in the uropod upon cell stimulation.

  2. Human neuronal cell based assay: A new in vitro model for toxicity evaluation of ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccini, Teresa; Caloni, Francesca; De Simone, Uliana

    2017-06-01

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are emerging marine neurotoxins representing the main cause of ciguatera fish poisoning, an intoxication syndrome which configures a health emergency and constitutes an evolving issue constantly changing due to new vectors and derivatives of CTXs, as well as their presence in new non-endemic areas. The study applied the neuroblastoma cell model of human origin (SH-SY5Y) to evaluate species-specific mechanistic information on CTX toxicity. Metabolic functionality, cell morphology, cytosolic Ca 2+ i responses, neuronal cell growth and proliferation were assessed after short- (4-24h) and long-term exposure (10days) to P-CTX-3C. In SH-SY5Y, P-CTX-3C displayed a powerful cytotoxicity requiring the presence of both Veratridine and Ouabain. SH-SY5Y were very sensitive to Ouabain: 10 and 0.25nM appeared the optimal concentrations, for short- and long-term toxicity studies, respectively, to be used in co-incubation with Veratridine (25μM), simulating the physiological and pathological endogenous Ouabain levels in humans. P-CTX-3C cytotoxic effect, on human neurons co-incubated with OV (Ouabain+Veratridine) mix, was expressed starting from 100pM after short- and 25pM after long-term exposure. Notably, P-CTX-3C alone at 25nM induced cytotoxicity after 24h and prolonged exposure. This human brain-derived cell line appears a suitable cell-based-model to evaluate cytotoxicity of CTX present in marine food contaminated at low toxic levels and to characterize the toxicological profile of other/new congeners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The MTT assays of bovine retinal pericytes and human microvascular endothelial cells on DLC and Si-DLC-coated TCPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpalugo, T I T; McKenna, E; Magee, A C; McLaughlin, J; Brown, N M D

    2004-11-01

    MTT (Tetrazolium)-assay suggests that diamond-like carbon (DLC) and silicon-doped DLC (Si-DLC) films obtained under appropriate deposition parameters are not toxic to bovine retinal pericytes, and human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC). The observed frequency distributions of the optical density (OD) values indicative of cell viability are near Gaussian-normal distribution. One-way ANOVA indicates that at 0.05 levels the population means are not significantly different for the coated and control samples. The observed OD values depend on the cell line (cell growth/metabolic rate), possibly cell cycle stage, the deposition parameters-bias voltage, ion energy, pressure, argon precleaning, and the dopant. For colored thin films like DLC with room temperature photoconductivity and photoelectric effects, it is important to account for the OD contribution from the coating itself. MTT assay, not surprisingly, seems not to be highly sensitive to interfacial cellular interaction resulting from the change in the film's nanostructure, because the tetrazolium metabolism is mainly intracellular and not interfacial. The thin films were synthesized by 13.56 MHz RF-PECVD using argon and acetylene as source gases, with tetramethylsilane (TMS) vapor introduced for silicon doping. This study could be relevant to biomedical application of the films in the eye, peri-vascular, vascular compartments, and for cell-tissue engineering. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references

  5. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  6. Single Cell Analysis of Human RAD18-Dependent DNA Post-Replication Repair by Alkaline Bromodeoxyuridine Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mórocz, Mónika; Gali, Himabindu; Raskó, István; Downes, C. Stephen; Haracska, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Damage to DNA can block replication progression resulting in gaps in the newly synthesized DNA. Cells utilize a number of post-replication repair (PRR) mechanisms such as the RAD18 controlled translesion synthesis or template switching to overcome the discontinuities formed opposite the DNA lesions and to complete DNA replication. Gaining more insights into the role of PRR genes promotes better understanding of DNA damage tolerance and of how their malfunction can lead to increased genome instability and cancer. However, a simple and efficient method to characterise gene specific PRR deficiencies at a single cell level has not been developed. Here we describe the so named BrdU comet PRR assay to test the contribution of human RAD18 to PRR at a single cell level, by which we kinetically characterized the consequences of the deletion of human RAD18 on the replication of UV-damaged DNA. Moreover, we demonstrate the capability of our method to evaluate PRR at a single cell level in unsynchronized cell population. PMID:23936422

  7. A novel dendritic cell-based direct ex vivo assay for detection and enumeration of circulating antigen-specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrio, Roberto; Zhang, Ge; Drake, Donald R; Schanen, Brian C

    2018-05-07

    Although a variety of assays have been used to examine T cell responses in vitro, standardized ex vivo detection of antigen-specific CD4 + T cells from human circulatory PBMCs remains constrained by low-dimensional characterization outputs and the need for polyclonal, mitogen-induced expansion methods to generate detectable response signals. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel methodology utilizing antigen-pulsed autologous human dendritic target cells in a rapid and sensitive assay to accurately enumerate antigen-specific CD4 + T cell precursor frequency by multiparametric flow cytometry. With this approach, we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly quantitate poly-functional T cell responses following both primary and recall antigenic stimulation. Furthermore, this approach enables more comprehensive phenotypic profiling of circulating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells, providing valuable insights into the pre-existing polarization of antigen-specific T cells in humans. Combined, this approach permits sensitive and detailed ex vivo detection of antigen-specific CD4 + T cells delivering an important tool for advancing vaccine, immune-oncology and other therapeutic studies.

  8. Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, A. C.; Winner, D.; Gibson, R. M.; Rhea, A. M.; Rose, J. D.; Wylie, D.; Henry, K.; Wright, A.; King, K.; Archer, J.; Poveda, E.; Soriano, V.; Robertson, D. L.; Olivo, P. D.; Arts, E. J.; Quinones-Mateu, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2013), s. 1517-1527 ISSN 0095-1137 Grant - others:NIH(US) P30 AI036219 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV tropism * phenotypic assay * genotypic prediction * disease progression * CCR5 antagonists * naive patients Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.232, year: 2013

  9. Regulatory perspective on in vitro potency assays for human mesenchymal stromal cells used in immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, Charlotte; van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Hoefnagel, Marcel C

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells derived from various tissues that can differentiate into several cell types. MSCs are able to modulate the response of immune cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. Because of these multimodal properties, the potential use of MSCs for

  10. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Groene, E.M. de; Meeteren-Kreikamp, A.P. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2

  11. Cell motility assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Angela; Jones, Gareth E

    2008-10-01

    This report summarises practical aspects to measuring cell motility in culture. The methods described here were discussed at a 1-day European Tissue Culture Society (ETCS-UK) workshop organised by John Masters and Gareth E Jones that was held at University College London on 19th April 2007.

  12. Subclass of individual IgA-secreting human lymphocytes. Investigation of in vivo pneumococcal polysaccharide-induced and in vitro mitogen-induced blood B cells by monolayer plaque-forming cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T; Sigsgaard, T

    1988-01-01

    The subclass of individual human IgA B cells was investigated by means of monolayer plaque-forming cell assays permitting analysis of all IgA-secreting cells as well as of cells secreting IgA anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide antibody. Center cells were examined by indirect immunofluorescence...

  13. Analysis of human blood plasma cell-free DNA fragment size distribution using EvaGreen chemistry based droplet digital PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, M Rohan; Jiang, Chao; Krzyzanowski, Gary D; Ryan, Wayne L

    2018-04-12

    Plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) fragment size distribution provides important information required for diagnostic assay development. We have developed and optimized droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays that quantify short and long DNA fragments. These assays were used to analyze plasma cfDNA fragment size distribution in human blood. Assays were designed to amplify 76,135, 490 and 905 base pair fragments of human β-actin gene. These assays were used for fragment size analysis of plasma cell-free, exosome and apoptotic body DNA obtained from normal and pregnant donors. The relative percentages for 76, 135, 490 and 905 bp fragments from non-pregnant plasma and exosome DNA were 100%, 39%, 18%, 5.6% and 100%, 40%, 18%,3.3%, respectively. The relative percentages for pregnant plasma and exosome DNA were 100%, 34%, 14%, 23%, and 100%, 30%, 12%, 18%, respectively. The relative percentages for non-pregnant plasma pellet (obtained after 2nd centrifugation step) were 100%, 100%, 87% and 83%, respectively. Non-pregnant Plasma cell-free and exosome DNA share a unique fragment distribution pattern which is different from pregnant donor plasma and exosome DNA fragment distribution indicating the effect of physiological status on cfDNA fragment size distribution. Fragment distribution pattern for plasma pellet that includes apoptotic bodies and nuclear DNA was greatly different from plasma cell-free and exosome DNA. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Products of cells from gliomas: VIII. Multiple-well immunoperoxidase assay of immunoreactivity of primary hybridoma supernatants with human glioma and brain tissue and cultured glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, P E; Wahl, R L; Shakui, P; Jackson, G A; Letica, L H; Liebert, M; Taren, J A; Beierwaltes, W H; Hoff, J T

    1990-06-01

    To test the feasibility of primary screening of hybridoma supernatants against human glioma tissue, over 5000 combinations of hybridoma supernatants with glioma tissue, cultured glioma cells, and normal central neural tissue were screened with a new multiple-well (M-well) screening system. This is an immunoperoxidase assay system with visual endpoints for screening 20-30 hybridoma supernatants per single microscope slide. There were extensive differences between specificities to tissue and to cultured glioma cells when both were screened with M-wells and when cultured cells were screened with standard semi-automated fluorescence. Primary M-well screening with glioma tissue detected seven hybridoma supernatants that specifically identified parenchymal cells of glioma tissue and that were not detected with cultured cells. Immunoreactivities of individual supernatants for vascular components (nine supernatants), necrosis (five supernatants), and nuclei (three supernatants) were detected. Other supernatants bound multiple sites on glioma tissue and/or subpopulations of neurons and glia of normal tissue. The results show that primary screening with glioma tissue detects a number of different specificities of hybridoma supernatants to gliomas not detected by conventional screening with cultured cells. These are potentially applicable to diagnosis and therapy.

  15. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and characterization of a pre-treatment procedure to eliminate human monoclonal antibody therapeutic drug and matrix interference in cell-based functional neutralizing antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weifeng; Jiang, Hao; Titsch, Craig; Haulenbeek, Jonathan R; Pillutla, Renuka C; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; DeSilva, Binodh S; Arnold, Mark E; Zeng, Jianing; Dodge, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Biological therapeutics can induce an undesirable immune response resulting in the formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADA), including neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Functional (usually cell-based) NAb assays are preferred to determine NAb presence in patient serum, but are often subject to interferences from numerous serum factors, such as growth factors and disease-related cytokines. Many functional cell-based NAb assays are essentially drug concentration assays that imply the presence of NAbs by the detection of small changes in functional drug concentration. Any drug contained in the test sample will increase the total amount of drug in the assay, thus reducing the sensitivity of NAb detection. Biotin-drug Extraction with Acid Dissociation (BEAD) has been successfully applied to extract ADA, thereby removing drug and other interfering factors from human serum samples. However, to date there has been no report to estimate the residual drug level after BEAD treatment when the drug itself is a human monoclonal antibody; mainly due to the limitation of traditional ligand-binding assays. Here we describe a universal BEAD optimization procedure for human monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs by using a LC-MS/MS method to simultaneously measure drug (a mutant human IgG4), NAb positive control (a mouse IgG), and endogenous human IgGs as an indicator of nonspecific carry-over in the BEAD eluate. This is the first report demonstrating that residual human mAb drug level in clinical sample can be measured after BEAD pre-treatment, which is critical for further BEAD procedure optimization and downstream immunogenicity testing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphological analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells co-cultured with ovarian cancer cells in 3D: An oncogenic angiogenesis assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wan

    Full Text Available Antiangiogenic therapy for cancer is a strategy targeted at tumour vasculature, often in combination with conventional cytotoxicity treatments. Animal testing is still the most common method used for evaluating the efficacy of new drugs but tissue-engineered in vitro models are becoming more acceptable for replacing and reducing the use of animals in anti-cancer drug screening. In this study, a 3D co-culture model of human endothelial cells and ovarian cancer cells was developed. This model has the potential to mimic the interactions between endothelial cells and ovarian cancer cells. The feasibility of applying this model in drug testing was explored here. The complex morphology of the co-culture system, which features development of both endothelial tubule-like structures and tumour structures, was analysed quantitatively by an image analysis method. The co-culture morphology integrity was maintained for 10 days and the potential of the model for anti-cancer drug testing was evaluated using Paclitaxel and Cisplatin, two common anti-tumour drugs with different mechanisms of action. Both traditional cell viability assays and quantitative morphological analyses were applied in the drug testing. Cisplatin proved a good example showing the advantages of morphological analysis of the co-culture model when compared with mono-culture of endothelial cells, which did not reveal an inhibitory effect of Cisplatin on the tubule-like endothelial structures. Thus, the tubule areas of the co-culture reflected the anti-angiogenesis potential of Cisplatin. In summary, in vitro cancer models can be developed using a tissue engineering approach to more closely mimic the characteristics of tumours in vivo. Combined with the image analysis technique, this developed 3D co-culture angiogenesis model will provide more reproducible and reliably quantified results and reveal further information of the drug's effects on both tumour cell growth and tumour angiogenesis.

  18. In vitro evaluation of new anticancer drugs, exemplified by vinorelbine, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay on human tumor cell lines and patient biopsy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridborg, H; Nygren, P; Dhar, S; Csoka, K; Kristensen, J; Larsson, R

    1996-09-01

    The feasibility of combined studies on a cell-line panel and primary cultures of patient tumor cells in the preclinical evaluation of new anticancer drugs was evaluated in a study of the activity and cross-resistance pattern in vitro of the new semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid vinorelbine (Vrb). The activity of Vrb was investigated in ten cell lines representing different resistance mechanisms and in a total of 256 fresh human tumor samples, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Resistance to Vrb in the cell lines was associated with expression of the multidrug resistance-mediating P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and by a recently described tubulin-associated mechanism, while the cell lines with topoisomerase II- and glutathion-associated resistance did not show decreased sensitivity to the drug. Cross-resistance to vincristine (Vcr) and other tubulin-active agents was high in cell lines as well as in patient cells. As with most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, Vrb was more active in hematological than in solid tumor samples. Among the solid tumors investigated, the highest in vitro response rates were observed in ovarian cancer (27%), sarcoma (25%), non-small cell lung cancer (21%) and bladder cancer (20%), while no response was observed in renal or colorectal cancer. Compared to Vcr, Vrb appeared to be slightly more active in solid tumors and slightly less active in hematological tumors. The results show that although Vrb displays a high degree of cross-resistance to Vcr and other tubulin-active drugs, some difference in the activity spectrum could be detected and that the drug is sensitive to multiple mechanisms of resistance. The results also suggest that leukemias, ovarian cancer, sarcoma and bladder cancer are possible further targets for Vrb. The combination of studies on a cell-line panel and patient tumor cells from a broad spectrum of diagnoses to evaluate a new drug seems feasible and may give

  19. A simple and rapid Hepatitis A Virus (HAV titration assay based on antibiotic resistance of infected cells: evaluation of the HAV neutralization potency of human immune globulin preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Gerardo G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the causative agent of acute hepatitis in humans, is an atypical Picornaviridae that grows poorly in cell culture. HAV titrations are laborious and time-consuming because the virus in general does not cause cytopathic effect and is detected by immunochemical or molecular probes. Simple HAV titration assays could be developed using currently available viral construct containing selectable markers. Results We developed an antibiotic resistance titration assay (ARTA based on the infection of human hepatoma cells with a wild type HAV construct containing a blasticidin (Bsd resistance gene. Human hepatoma cells infected with the HAV-Bsd construct survived selection with 2 μg/ml of blasticidin whereas uninfected cells died within a few days. At 8 days postinfection, the color of the pH indicator phenol red in cell culture media correlated with the presence of HAV-Bsd-infected blasticidin-resistant cells: an orange-to-yellow color indicated the presence of growing cells whereas a pink-to-purple color indicated that the cells were dead. HAV-Bsd titers were determined by an endpoint dilution assay based on the color of the cell culture medium scoring orange-to-yellow wells as positive and pink-to-purple wells as negative for HAV. As a proof-of-concept, we used the ARTA to evaluate the HAV neutralization potency of two commercially available human immune globulin (IG preparations and a WHO International Standard for anti-HAV. The three IG preparations contained comparable levels of anti-HAV antibodies that neutralized approximately 1.5 log of HAV-Bsd. Similar neutralization results were obtained in the absence of blasticidin by an endpoint dilution ELISA at 2 weeks postinfection. Conclusion The ARTA is a simple and rapid method to determine HAV titers without using HAV-specific probes. We determined the HAV neutralization potency of human IG preparations in 8 days by ARTA compared to the 14 days required by the

  20. A fluorescence assay for measuring acetylcholinesterase activity in rat blood and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Michael F; Liu, Yitong

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme responsible for metabolism of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and inhibition of AChE can have therapeutic applications (e.g., drugs for Alzheimer's disease) or neurotoxic consequences (e.g., pesticides). A common absorbance-based AChE activity assay that uses 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) can have limited sensitivity and be prone to interference. Therefore, an alternative assay was developed, in which AChE activity was determined by measuring fluorescence of resorufin produced from coupled enzyme reactions involving acetylcholine and Amplex Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine). The Amplex Red assay was used for two separate applications. First, AChE activity was measured in rat whole blood, which is a biomarker for exposure to AChE inhibitor pesticides. Activity was quantified from a 10(5)-fold dilution of whole blood, and there was a linear correlation between Amplex Red and DTNB assays. For the second application, Amplex Red assay was used to measure AChE inhibition potency in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), which is important for assessing pharmacological and toxicological potential of AChE inhibitors including drugs, phytochemicals, and pesticides. Five known reversible inhibitors were evaluated (IC50, 7-225 nM), along with irreversible inhibitors chlorpyrifos-oxon (ki=1.01 nM(-1)h(-1)) and paraoxon (ki=0.16 nM(-1)h(-1)). Lastly, in addition to inhibition, AChE reactivation was measured in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM). The Amplex Red assay is a sensitive, specific, and reliable fluorescence method for measuring AChE activity in both rat whole blood and cultured SH-SY5Y cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Evaluation of a multiple-cycle, recombinant virus, growth competition assay that uses flow cytometry to measure replication efficiency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Carrie; Wang, Jiong; Jin, Xia; Planelles, Vicente; An, Dong Sung; Tallo, Amanda; Huang, Yangxin; Wu, Hulin; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication efficiency or fitness, as measured in cell culture, has been postulated to correlate with clinical outcome of HIV infection, although this is still controversial. One limitation is the lack of high-throughput assays that can measure replication efficiency over multiple rounds of replication. We have developed a multiple-cycle growth competition assay to measure HIV-1 replication efficiency that uses flow cytometry to determine the relative proportions of test and reference viruses, each of which expresses a different reporter gene in place of nef. The reporter genes are expressed on the surface of infected cells and are detected by commercially available fluorescence-labeled antibodies. This method is less labor-intensive than those that require isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. The two reporter gene products are detected with similar specificity and sensitivity, and the proportion of infected cells in culture correlates with the amount of viral p24 antigen produced in the culture supernatant. HIV replication efficiencies of six different drug-resistant site-directed mutants were reproducibly quantified and were similar to those obtained with a growth competition assay in which the relative proportion of each variant was measured by sequence analysis, indicating that recombination between the pol and reporter genes was negligible. This assay also reproducibly quantified the relative fitness conferred by protease and reverse transcriptase sequences containing multiple drug resistance mutations, amplified from patient plasma. This flow cytometry-based growth competition assay offers advantages over current assays for HIV replication efficiency and should prove useful for the evaluation of patient samples in clinical trials.

  2. The application of single cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay to human monitoring studies Aplicacion de la electroforesis unicelular o ensayo cometa en estudios de monitoreo humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahara Valverde

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the search of new human genotoxic biomarkers, the single cell gel electrophoresis assay has been proposed as a sensible alternative. Material and methods. This technique detects principally single strand breaks as well as alkali-labile and repair-retarded sites. Results. Herein we present our experience using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay in human population studies, both occupationally and environmentally exposed. Conclusions. We discuss the assay feasibility as a genotoxic biomarker.Objetivo. En la búsqueda de nuevos marcadores genotóxicos aplicables a estudios de poblaciones humanas expuestos a xenobióticos, la utilización del ensayo de electroforesis en una sola célula se ha propuesto como un método sensible y una buena alternativa. Material y métodos. Esta técnica detecta rompimientos en el ADN de cadena sencilla, así como sitios álcali lábiles y sitios retardados de reparación. Resultados. En este trabajo, presentamos nuestra experiencia utilizando este ensayo en poblaciones humanas expuestas ocupacionalmente o ambientalmente a diferentes xenobióticos. Conclusiones. Se discute la posible utilidad de este ensayo como un biomarcador de efecto genotóxico.

  3. Potential predictive assay using RAR-β for radiosensitization by 13-cis-retinoic acid and interferonα2a in human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Nevaldine, Barbara H.; Unguraneau, Carmen; Chung, Chung T.; King, Gerald A.; Stein, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Cell culture studies have shown increased cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation by combined use of 13-cis-retinoic acid (CRA) and interferon-α2a (IFN). Clinically, a direct antitumor activity has been observed by combined use of CRA and IFN in patients with cancer of the cervix and skin. Since IFN is known to enhance radiation response in selected human carcinoma cell lines, we carried out a series of experiments in an effort to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy by CRA and IFN in combination. Materials and Methods: Human cervical carcinoma ME-180 and HeLa cell lines were exposed to 10 μM CRA and 1000 unit/ml IFN in combination for 48 hours prior to radiation. Endpoint of radiosensitization study was colony-forming ability of single cells. Retinoic acid receptors (RAR and RXR) were detected by RNAse protection assay. Apoptosis was quantitated by using immunohistochemical staining method (Apop Tag). The cells were also transfected with bcl-2 or RAR-β gene to explore the mechanism of radiation-induced cell killing. Results: A substantial radiosensitization was observed by the combined use of CRA and IFN in human cervical carcinoma ME-180 cells in culture. The radiation enhancement ratio was 2.0 at 1% cell survival level. The principal mode of radiation-induced cell killing was apoptosis since more than 90% of the ME-180 cells showed evidence of apoptosis by combined treatment of CRA, IFN, and radiation. Both apoptosis and radiosensitization were blocked by transfecting bcl-2 gene into ME-180 cells. In contrast to these results with ME-180 cells, no radiosensitization was observed in HeLa cells by CRA and IFN under the same experimental conditions. Both cell lines express various RXR and RAR mRNAs. However, the RAR-β was undetectable in HeLa cells but present at high levels in ME-180 cells, as determined by RNAse protection assay. Because of this differential expression of RAR-β mRNA, we hypothesized that RAR-β may mediate the

  4. Mammalian cell transformation: Mechanisms of carcinogenesis and assays for carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, J.C.; Tennant, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: Molecular Changes in Cell Transformation; Differentiation, Growth Control, and Cell Transformation; Mutagenesis and Cell Transformation; Tumor Promotion and Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Transformation of Human Fibroblasts; Mechanisms of Transformation of Epithelial Cells; Mechanisms of C 3 H 10T12 Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Cell Transformation; and Use of Cell Transformation Assays for Carcinogen Testing

  5. Inter-experiment variation and dependence on culture conditions in assaying the chemosensitivity of human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, H; Christensen, I B; Vindeløv, L L

    1987-01-01

    by a logarithmic function. Even after correction for lack of proportionality the two assay systems provided significantly different dose-response curves. The stability of the chemosensitivity was tested after 25-30 weeks continuous in vitro culture or prolonged storage in liquid nitrogen. One cell line underwent...... significant changes after continuous in vitro culture whereas the cell lines tested after prolonged storage in liquid nitrogen showed only minor changes. It is concluded that instead of considering the concentration necessary to achieve a certain degree of cell kill (e.g. ID50) in one experiment on one cell...

  6. Optimization of interferon gamma ELISPOT assay to detect human cytomegalovirus specific T-cell responses in solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Davide; Saldan, Alda; Forner, Gabriella; Tinto, Daniel; Bianchin, Alice; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Assessing the CMV specific CMI in transplant subjects represents a promising strategy to determine the risk of infection on individual basis. In this study 61 adult CMV IgG seropositive solid organ transplant recipients were examined in order to improve the efficacy of CMI detection. For this purpose, pair-wise comparisons were conducted comparing positive control stimuli PWM and PMA/iono and CMV stimuli, pp65 peptide pool and whole CMV particle. Rosette pre-depletion of blood was also investigated for detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses using the IFN-g ELISPOT assay. In the time-points 30-180 days after transplantation, PMA/iono produced statistically significant higher responses compared to PWM, probably because PMA/iono activation pathway is independent from the effect of immunosuppressive drugs. The data showed that 11% of transplant patients displayed very low or undetectable responses to pp65 peptide pool antigen while having sustained high responses to whole CMV particle. In addition, in all the subjects analyzed, CMI responses to CMV particle produced a statistically significant higher number of spots compared to pp65 peptide pool antigen. Rosette pre-depletion of whole blood proved to be effective in detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses similarly to flow cytometry. Taken together, the following recommendations are suggested to optimize the CMV-ELISPOT for transplantation settings: (1) use PMA/iono as positive control; (2) whole virus particle should be used to avoid peptide-related false negative responses; (3) a rosette pre-depletion step may be useful to detect CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct Human Papillomavirus E6 Whole-Cell Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Objective Measurement of E6 Oncoproteins in Cytology Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi-Shan; Smith-McCune, Karen; Darragh, Teresa M.; Lai, Yvonne; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Chang, Ting-Chang; Guo, Hsiao-Yun; Kesler, Tiea; Carter, Alicia; Castle, Philip E.; Cheng, Shuling

    2012-01-01

    A novel, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a non-type-specific anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 antibody was tested on 182 residual cytological specimens. For samples with a designation of more severe than cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3+), 83% tested positive for E6; in a subset with paired testing for E6 ELISA and HPV DNA, 72% tested E6 positive and 92% tested high-risk (HR)-HPV DNA positive (P = 0.2). Among the women with a less than CIN3 diag...

  8. Evaluation of genotoxicity after application of Listerine(R) on human lymphocytes by micronucleus and single cell gel electrophoresis assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkez, Hasan; Togar, Basak; Arabaci, Taner

    2012-04-01

    Listerine (LN) is one of the most commonly used mouth rinses worldwide although very limited information is available concerning its genotoxicity. In another view, the biological safety profile of oral care products is frequently assumed on the basis of simplistic test models. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the in vitro genotoxic potential of LN using micronucleus and single cell gel electrophoresis tests as genetic endpoints. Different concentrations of LN (0-100% of ml/culture, v/v) were applied to whole human blood cultures (n = 5). The result of the present study showed that there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) between the control group and the groups treated with LN alone in both analysed endpoints. In conclusion, our result first demonstrated the absence of genotoxicity of LN on human lymphocytes.

  9. Evaluation of radio-induced DNA damage and their repair in human lymphocytes by comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Patricia A. do; Suzuki, Miriam F.; Okazaki, Kayo

    1997-01-01

    The comet assay, also called single cell gel electrophoresis technique, permits to evaluate quantitatively DNA breakage induced by chemical and physical agents at the level of the single cell. The present paper refers to the construction of dose-response curves to DNA damage and repair studies in human peripheral lymphocytes, utilizing the comet assay for the radiosensitivity analysis. So, the blood samples were obtained from healthy donors (40-50 year old), irradiated in a 60 Co source (GAMMACEL 220) with doses of 0.17, 0.25, 0.57, 1.10, 2.12 and 4.22 Gy (0.59 Gy/min.) and processed 1 and 24 hours after the exposition. Results obtained showed a increase in the total lenght of comet (DNA migration) as a function of radiation dose in samples processed 1 and 24 hours after the treatment. The DNA lesion in irradiated lymphocytes with 4.22 Gy (means value of 101.4 μm) were 3.4 times higher than in the untreated lymphocytes (mean value of 30 μm) instead of 24 hours after the irradiation were 1.5 times higher (mean value of 46.3 μm). This reduction on DNA repair occurred in these cells. It was also possible visualized the presence of subpopulations of the cells with different sensitivity and repair capacity to ionizing radiation in these donors. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  10. Bioluminescence-based cytotoxicity assay for simultaneous evaluation of cell viability and membrane damage in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a bioluminescence-based non-destructive cytotoxicity assay in which cell viability and membrane damage are simultaneously evaluated using Emerald luciferase (ELuc) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted copepod luciferase (GLuc-KDEL), respectively, by using multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome (MI-MAC) vector. We have demonstrated that the time-dependent concentration response curves of ELuc luminescence intensity and WST-1 assay, and GLuc-KDEL luminescence intensity and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the culture medium accompanied by cytotoxicity show good agreement in toxicant-treated ELuc- and GLuc-KDEL-expressing HepG2 stable cell lines. We have clarified that the increase of GLuc-KDEL luminescence intensity in the culture medium reflects the type of cell death, including necrosis and late apoptosis, but not early apoptosis. We have also uncovered a strong correlation between GLuc-KDEL luminescence intensity in the culture medium and the extracellular release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a representative damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule. The bioluminescence measurement assay using ELuc and GLuc-KDEL developed in this study can simultaneously monitor cell viability and membrane damage, respectively, and the increase of GLuc-KDEL luminescence intensity in the culture medium accompanied by the increase of cytotoxicity is an index of necrosis and late apoptosis associated with the extracellular release of DAMP molecules. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH 2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [ 125 I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [ 125 I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10 9 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  12. Additive mixture effects of estrogenic chemicals in human cell-based assays can be influenced by inclusion of chemicals with differing effect profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mark Evans

    Full Text Available A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX and cell proliferation (ESCREEN endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1 a 'balanced' design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC(10 and 2 a 'non-balanced' design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential

  13. Additive mixture effects of estrogenic chemicals in human cell-based assays can be influenced by inclusion of chemicals with differing effect profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard Mark; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA) concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX) and cell proliferation (ESCREEN) endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1) a 'balanced' design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC(10)) and 2) a 'non-balanced' design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity) to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate) the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential modulators

  14. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal, long-term expansion, and leukemic transformation of genetically modified human hematopoietic and patient-derived leukemic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Carretta, Marco; Capala, Marta; Schepers, Hein; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemic stem cell (LSC), assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID or NSG xenotransplantation model is currently still the favored assay of choice in most cases, this system has some

  15. Genotoxicity assessment of antidiabetic formulation (ADPHF6 in human lymphocytes by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay - an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanand Shanmugasundaram

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS molecules during aerobic metabolism are often regulated by unique endogenous antioxidant system. During hyperglycaemic condition, accumulation of excess fatty acids & glucose in adipose tissue (Wright Jr E., 2006 results in increased levels of ROS. When ROS molecules overwhelms the cells antioxidant defence system, it ends up in cellular oxidative stress; which in turn is reported to cause oxidative DNA damage & intervene damage to macromolecules & cellular membranes (Ahmad et al., 2013. Our novel anti-hyperglycaemic polyherbal formulation (ADPHF6 had already illustrated significant inhibitory activity against α-amylase & α-glucosidase enzymes and also scavenging free radicals (in vitro models. The present study demonstrates the protective effect of formulation against H2O2 induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE assay. Experimental procedures were approved by Institutional Human Ethics Committee of Frontier Lifeline Hospital, Chennai, India (FLL/IEC/02/2014. Peripheral human lymphocytes were isolated (Duthie et.al, 2002 and subjected for Cell viability by Trypan blue exclusion method. The alkaline SCGE assay was carried out to determine the level of DNA damage in ADPHF6 treated cells with minor modifications from Singh et al., 1988. Frosted microscopic slides were pre-coated with 1% NMA followed by 1% LMA and incubated for 15 min at 15-20o C. 100 μL of freshly prepared cell suspension (2 x 104 cells was mixed with 0.5% LMA & casted on microscopic slide. The cells were immersed in lysing solution for 2 hours at 4O C and washed in TBE buffer for 5 min at RT. All the slides were treated with fresh alkaline solution for 20 minutes for expression of alkali-labile damage. Electrophoresis was performed at 24 V for 20 min at RT. Slides were washed in neutralizing buffer for 5 min at RT. All the groups were stained with Acridine Orange (20µg/ml & Propidium Iodide (20µg

  16. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Practical, sensitive, effective, human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. When available, such assays should allow us to fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. We will be able to validate the role of somatic mutations in carcinogenesis, to identify environmental factors that affect human germ cells, to integrate the effects of complex mixtures and the environment in the human subject, and to identify people who are hypersusceptible to genetic injury. Human cellular mutational assays, particularly when combined with cytogenetic and heritable mutational tests, promise to play pivotal roles in estimating the risk from low-dose radiation and chemical exposures. These combined methods avoid extrapolations of dose and from species to species, and may be sensitive enough and credible enough to permit politically, socially and scientifically acceptable risk management. 16 references

  17. Strong interferon-gamma mediated cellular immunity to scrub typhus demonstrated using a novel whole cell antigen ELISpot assay in rhesus macaques and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manutsanun Sumonwiriya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a febrile infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi, which causes significant morbidity and mortality across the Asia-Pacific region. The control of this vector-borne disease is challenging due to humans being dead-end hosts, vertical maintenance of the pathogen in the vector itself, and a potentially large rodent reservoir of unclear significance, coupled with a lack of accurate diagnostic tests. Development of an effective vaccine is highly desirable. This however requires better characterization of the natural immune response of this neglected but important disease. Here we implement a novel IFN-γ ELISpot assay as a tool for studying O. tsutsugamushi induced cellular immune responses in an experimental scrub typhus rhesus macaque model and human populations. Whole cell antigen for O. tsutsugamushi (OT-WCA was prepared by heat inactivation of Karp-strain bacteria. Rhesus macaques were infected intradermally with O. tsutsugamushi. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from infected (n = 10 and uninfected animals (n = 5 were stimulated with OT-WCA, and IFN-γ secreting cells quantitated by ELISpot assay at five time points over 28 days. PBMC were then assayed from people in a scrub typhus-endemic region of Thailand (n = 105 and responses compared to those from a partially exposed population in a non-endemic region (n = 14, and to a naïve population in UK (n = 12. Mean results at Day 0 prior to O. tsutsugamushi infection were 12 (95% CI 0-25 and 15 (2-27 spot-forming cells (SFC/106 PBMC for infected and control macaques respectively. Strong O. tsutsugamushi-specific IFN-γ responses were seen post infection, with ELISpot responses 20-fold higher than baseline at Day 7 (mean 235, 95% CI 200-270 SFC/106 PBMC, 105-fold higher at Day 14 (mean 1261, 95% CI 1,097-1,425 SFC/106 PBMC, 125-fold higher at Day 21 (mean 1,498, 95% CI 1,496-1,500 SFC/106 PBMC and 118-fold higher at

  18. Strong interferon-gamma mediated cellular immunity to scrub typhus demonstrated using a novel whole cell antigen ELISpot assay in rhesus macaques and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumonwiriya, Manutsanun; Paris, Daniel H; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Anantatat, Tippawan; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Chumseng, Suchintana; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Jintaworn, Suthatip; Blacksell, Stuart D; Chowdhury, Fazle R; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Burke, Robin L; Lombardini, Eric D; Richards, Allen L; Mason, Carl J; Jones, James W; Day, Nicholas P J; Dunachie, Susanna J

    2017-09-01

    Scrub typhus is a febrile infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi, which causes significant morbidity and mortality across the Asia-Pacific region. The control of this vector-borne disease is challenging due to humans being dead-end hosts, vertical maintenance of the pathogen in the vector itself, and a potentially large rodent reservoir of unclear significance, coupled with a lack of accurate diagnostic tests. Development of an effective vaccine is highly desirable. This however requires better characterization of the natural immune response of this neglected but important disease. Here we implement a novel IFN-γ ELISpot assay as a tool for studying O. tsutsugamushi induced cellular immune responses in an experimental scrub typhus rhesus macaque model and human populations. Whole cell antigen for O. tsutsugamushi (OT-WCA) was prepared by heat inactivation of Karp-strain bacteria. Rhesus macaques were infected intradermally with O. tsutsugamushi. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected (n = 10) and uninfected animals (n = 5) were stimulated with OT-WCA, and IFN-γ secreting cells quantitated by ELISpot assay at five time points over 28 days. PBMC were then assayed from people in a scrub typhus-endemic region of Thailand (n = 105) and responses compared to those from a partially exposed population in a non-endemic region (n = 14), and to a naïve population in UK (n = 12). Mean results at Day 0 prior to O. tsutsugamushi infection were 12 (95% CI 0-25) and 15 (2-27) spot-forming cells (SFC)/106 PBMC for infected and control macaques respectively. Strong O. tsutsugamushi-specific IFN-γ responses were seen post infection, with ELISpot responses 20-fold higher than baseline at Day 7 (mean 235, 95% CI 200-270 SFC/106 PBMC), 105-fold higher at Day 14 (mean 1261, 95% CI 1,097-1,425 SFC/106 PBMC), 125-fold higher at Day 21 (mean 1,498, 95% CI 1,496-1,500 SFC/106 PBMC) and 118-fold higher at Day 28

  19. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  20. Assay of hybrid ribonuclease using a membrane filter-immobilized synthetic hybrid: application to the human leukemic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaphilis, A.D.; Kamper, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    A method for assaying hybrid ribonuclease has been devised which utilizes as substrate the synthetic hybrid [ 3 H]polyriboadenylic acid [poly(rA)]:polydeoxythymidylic acid [poly(dT)] immobilized on the solid matrix of nitrocellulose filters. The hybridization on filter of [ 3 H]poly(rA) to poly(dT) has been explored in terms of efficacy of the process and the response of the product to RNase H. A pulse of uv irradiation of poly(dT) while in dry state on the filter increased its firm binding to the filter in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in a concomitant increase of the yield of hybrid formation. The filter-immobilized hybrid was 95% resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. When stored in toluene in the cold the hybrid maintained its stability for over 6 months, as judged by its resistance to RNase A. The method offers a number of advantages over assays that use solution hybrids as substrates and was readily applicable in the screening of leukemic patients, in the leukocytes of which it has demonstrated increased RNase H levels

  1. Fused pyrazine mono-N-oxides as bioreductive drugs. II cytotoxicity in human cells and oncogenicity in a rodent transformation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmuir, Virginia K.; Laderoute, Keith R.; Mendonca, Holly L.; Sutherland, Robert M.; Hei, Tom K.; Liu, S.-X.; Hall, Eric J.; Naylor, Matthew A.; Adams, Gerald E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what structural moieties of the fused pyrazine mono-N-oxides are determining factors in their in vitro cytotoxicity and oncogenicity. Methods and Materials: A new series of experimental bioreductive drugs, fused pyrazine mono-N-oxides, was evaluated in vitro for aerobic and hypoxic cytotoxicity in the HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line by using clonogenic assays. The relative oncogenicities of these compounds were also determined in aerobic cultures of C3H 10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts by using a standard transformation assay. Results: Removal of the 4-methyl piperazine side chain from the parent compound, RB 90740, reduced the potency of the hypoxic cytotoxin. Reduction of the N-oxide function increased the aerobic cytotoxicity and eliminated most of the hypoxic/aerobic cytotoxic differential. The reduced N-oxide also had significant oncogenicity, consistent with a mechanism of genotoxicity following bioreduction of RB 90740. Conclusion: This new series of bioreductive compounds may be effective in cancer therapy, particularly the lead compound RB 90740. The oncogenic potential of these compounds is similar to that for other cancer therapies. Further studies should include evaluation of these compounds in vivo and the development of analogs with reduced oncogenic potential and retention of the hypoxic/aerobic cytotoxicity differential

  2. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell...

  4. A comparative evaluation of in vitro skin sensitisation tests: the human cell-line activation test (h-CLAT) versus the local lymph node assay (LLNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Takao; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Sono, Sakiko; Kosaka, Nanae; Ishikawa, Makie; Nukada, Yuko; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    We previously developed the human cell-line activation test (h-CLAT) in vitro skin sensitisation test, based on our reported finding that a 24-hour exposure of THP-1 cells (a human monocytic leukaemia cell line) to sensitisers is sufficient to induce the augmented expression of CD86 and CD54. The aim of this study is to confirm the predictive value of h-CLAT for skin sensitisation activity by employing a larger number of test chemicals. One hundred chemicals were selected, according to their categorisation in the local lymph node assay (LLNA), as being: extreme, strong, moderate and weak sensitisers, and non-sensitisers. The correlation of the h-CLAT results with the LLNA results was 84%. There were some false negatives (e.g. benzoyl peroxide, hexyl cinnamic aldehyde) and some false positives (e.g. 1-bromobutane, diethylphthalate). Eight out of the 9 false negatives (89%) were water-insoluble chemicals. The h-CLAT could positively predict not only extreme and strong sensitisers, but also moderate and weak sensitisers, though the detection rates of weak sensitisers and non-sensitisers were comparatively low. Some sensitisers enhanced both CD86 and CD54 levels, and some enhanced the level of only one of them. The use of the combination of CD86 and CD54 induction as a positive indicator, improved the accuracy of the test. In conclusion, the h-CLAT is expected to be a useful cell-based in vitro method for predicting skin sensitisation potential. 2010 FRAME.

  5. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  6. A novel assay system for macrophage-activating factor activity using a human U937 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages play important roles in antitumor immunity, and immunotherapy with the group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has been reported to be effective in patients with various types of cancers. However, in macrophage research, it is important to properly evaluate macrophage activity. U937 macrophages were induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbolacetate (TPA). The phagocytic activity of macrophages was evaluated as the internalized beads ratio. The MAF activity was assessed at 30 min after MAF addition as the activation ratio. We established a novel assay for phagocytic activities using differentiated U937 macrophages. The novel protocol was simple and rapid and was sensitive for GcMAF. This protocol should be useful not only for basic studies, such as those on molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, but also for clinical studies, such as assessment of GcMAF activity prior to clinical use. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Progress on the development of human in vitro dendritic cell based assays for assessment of the sensitizing potential of a compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao dos Santos, G.; Reinders, J.; Ouwehand, K.; Rustemeyer, T.; Scheper, R.J.; Gibbs, S.

    2009-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is the result of an adaptive immune response of the skin to direct exposure to an allergen. Since many chemicals are also allergens, European regulations require strict screening of all ingredients in consumer products. Until recently, identifying a potential allergen has completely relied on animal testing (e.g.: Local Lymph Node Assay). In addition to the ethical problems, both the 7th Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive and REACH have stimulated the development of alternative tests for the assessment of potential sensitizers. This review is aimed at summarising the progress on cell based assays, in particular dendritic cell based assays, being developed as animal alternatives. Primary cells (CD34 + derived dendritic cells, monocyte derived dendritic cells) as well as dendritic cell-like cell lines (THP-1, U-937, MUTZ-3, KG-1, HL-60, and K562) are extensively described along with biomarkers such as cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines and kinases. From this review, it can be concluded that no single cell based assay nor single marker is yet able to distinguish all sensitizers from non-sensitizers in a test panel of chemicals, nor is it possible to rank the sensitizing potential of the test chemicals. This suggests that sensitivity and specificity may be increased by a tiered assay approach. Only a limited number of genomic and proteomic studies have been completed until now. Such studies have the potential to identify novel biomarkers for inclusion in future assay development. Although progress is promising, this review suggests that it may be difficult to meet the up and coming European regulatory deadlines.

  8. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal and long-term expansion of genetically modified primary human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Schepers, Hein

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID xenotransplantation model is still the favored model of choice in most cases, this system has some limitations as well, such

  9. Problems and challenges in the development and validation of human cell-based assays to determine nanoparticle-induced immunomodulatory effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi François

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing use of nanomaterials, the need for methods and assays to examine their immunosafety is becoming urgent, in particular for nanomaterials that are deliberately administered to human subjects (as in the case of nanomedicines. To obtain reliable results, standardised in vitro immunotoxicological tests should be used to determine the effects of engineered nanoparticles on human immune responses. However, before assays can be standardised, it is important that suitable methods are established and validated. Results In a collaborative work between European laboratories, existing immunological and toxicological in vitro assays were tested and compared for their suitability to test effects of nanoparticles on immune responses. The prototypical nanoparticles used were metal (oxide particles, either custom-generated by wet synthesis or commercially available as powders. Several problems and challenges were encountered during assay validation, ranging from particle agglomeration in biological media and optical interference with assay systems, to chemical immunotoxicity of solvents and contamination with endotoxin. Conclusion The problems that were encountered in the immunological assay systems used in this study, such as chemical or endotoxin contamination and optical interference caused by the dense material, significantly affected the data obtained. These problems have to be solved to enable the development of reliable assays for the assessment of nano-immunosafety.

  10. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the comet assay, single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose and they are inexpensive.

  11. Human semen assays for workplace monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    Decades of human semen studies have yielded compelling evidence that sperm can be used to access reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. With these studies as background, the small number of detailed semen studies of men exposed to physical and chemical agents point with optimism to the application of human semen assays as efficient, effective means to monitor for reproductive hazards in the workplace. Sperm are the most accessible of human gonadal tissue and provide a means of monitoring exposure induced changes in the human testes, changes which may result in infertility and increased frequencies of genetically abnormal gametes. The focus on semen has precipitated the development of new sperm bioassays which use older conventional andrological methods (i.e., sperm counts, motility, and morphology) as well as recently developed high speed flow and scanning methods for automated cytological analyses. The status of these sperm assays for workplace surveillance is reviewed, procedures are suggested with examples of use, and their effectiveness is evaluated. The available mouse models of induced semen changes are briefly described and the importance of these models for evaluating the genetic implications of findings in human semen is discussed

  12. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Rapid method for detecting base damage in DNA of mammalian cells: assay of U. V. -induced pyrimidine dimers in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, P E [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit; Jansson, G; Ahnstroem, G

    1978-11-01

    Simple and rapid techniques are described for the detection of pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Human cells derived from embryonic lung tissue were UV-irradiated and subjected to either an osmotic shock procedure or detergent lysis, then treated with UV-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus and the DNA partially denatured by treatment with weak alkali. Brief sonication reduced the molecular weight of the DNA, and the single- and double-stranded DNA could then be separated by hydroxylapatite chromatography. Approximately 40% of the expected number of pyrimidine dimers were detected by the enzyme treatment technique. The mean value of numbers of strand breaks per 10/sup 9/ dalton per J/m/sup 2/ was approximately 50% of the expected value. The method has advantages of speed and reproducibility and a large reduction in the quantities of materials used, particularly at the scintillation-counting stage.

  14. Evaluation of radio-induced DNA damage and their repair in human lymphocytes by comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis; Avaliacao do dano radioinduzido no DNA e reparo em linfocitos humanos pelo metodo do cometa (single cell gel electrophoresis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Patricia A. do; Suzuki, Miriam F.; Okazaki, Kayo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    The comet assay, also called single cell gel electrophoresis technique, permits to evaluate quantitatively DNA breakage induced by chemical and physical agents at the level of the single cell. The present paper refers to the construction of dose-response curves to DNA damage and repair studies in human peripheral lymphocytes, utilizing the comet assay for the radiosensitivity analysis. So, the blood samples were obtained from healthy donors (40-50 year old), irradiated in a {sup 60} Co source (GAMMACEL 220) with doses of 0.17, 0.25, 0.57, 1.10, 2.12 and 4.22 Gy (0.59 Gy/min.) and processed 1 and 24 hours after the exposition. Results obtained showed a increase in the total lenght of comet (DNA migration) as a function of radiation dose in samples processed 1 and 24 hours after the treatment. The DNA lesion in irradiated lymphocytes with 4.22 Gy (means value of 101.4 {mu}m) were 3.4 times higher than in the untreated lymphocytes (mean value of 30 {mu}m) instead of 24 hours after the irradiation were 1.5 times higher (mean value of 46.3 {mu}m). This reduction on DNA repair occurred in these cells. It was also possible visualized the presence of subpopulations of the cells with different sensitivity and repair capacity to ionizing radiation in these donors. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Effects of currently used pesticides in the AhR-CALUX assay: comparison between the human TV101L and the rat H4IIE cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, M.; Laier, Peter; Vinggaard, Anne

    2003-01-01

    TV101L hepatoma cell lines. In comparison the results indicated that the rat H4IIE cell line is more sensitive than the human TV101L for detection of TCDD inducing AhR-CALUX activity. The pesticides iprodione, chlorpyrifos and prochloraz showed dose-dependent AhR agonistic effects in both cell lines...

  16. Cytotoxicity and mitogenicity assays with real-time and label-free monitoring of human granulosa cells with an impedance-based signal processing technology intergrating micro-electronics and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem, Ozgur; Bildik, Gamze; Senbabaoglu, Filiz; Lack, Nathan A; Akin, Nazli; Yakar, Feridun; Urman, Defne; Guzel, Yilmaz; Balaban, Basak; Iwase, Akira; Urman, Bulent

    2016-04-01

    A recently developed technology (xCelligence) integrating micro-electronics and cell biology allows real-time, uninterrupted and quantitative analysis of cell proliferation, viability and cytotoxicity by measuring the electrical impedance of the cell population in the wells without using any labeling agent. In this study we investigated if this system is a suitable model to analyze the effects of mitogenic (FSH) and cytotoxic (chemotherapy) agents with different toxicity profiles on human granulosa cells in comparison to conventional methods of assessing cell viability, DNA damage, apoptosis and steroidogenesis. The system generated the real-time growth curves of the cells, and determined their doubling times, mean cell indices and generated dose-response curves after exposure to cytotoxic and mitogenic stimuli. It accurately predicted the gonadotoxicity of the drugs and distinguished less toxic agents (5-FU and paclitaxel) from more toxic ones (cisplatin and cyclophosphamide). This platform can be a useful tool for specific end-point assays in reproductive toxicology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing the performance of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection and subtyping of high-risk suptypes of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OPSCC) without DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatensky, Mitchell G; Livingstone, Devon M; Mintchev, Paul; Barnes, Heather K; Nakoneshny, Steven C; Demetrick, Douglas J; Dort, Joseph C; van Marle, Guido

    2018-02-08

    Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing in incidence despite a decline in traditional risk factors. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), specifically subtypes 16, 18, 31 and 35, has been implicated as the high-risk etiologic agent. HPV positive cancers have a significantly better prognosis than HPV negative cancers of comparable stage, and may benefit from different treatment regimens. Currently, HPV related carcinogenesis is established indirectly through Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for p16, a tumour suppressor gene, or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that directly tests for HPV DNA in biopsied tissue. Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is more accurate than IHC, more rapid than PCR and is significantly less costly. In previous work we showed that a subtype specific HPV LAMP assay performed similar to PCR on purified DNA. In this study we examined the performance of this LAMP assay without DNA purification. We used LAMP assays using established primers for HPV 16 and 18, and new primers for HPV 31 and 35. LAMP reaction conditions were tested on serial dilutions of plasmid HPV DNA to confirm minimum viral copy number detection thresholds. LAMP was then performed directly on different human cell line samples without DNA purification. Our LAMP assays could detect 10 5 , 10 3 , 10 4 , and 10 5 copies of plasmid DNA for HPV 16, 18, 31, and 35, respectively. All primer sets were subtype specific, with no cross-amplification. Our LAMP assays also reliably amplified subtype specific HPV DNA from samples without requiring DNA isolation and purification. The high risk OPSCC HPV subtype specific LAMP primer sets demonstrated, excellent clinically relevant, minimum copy number detection thresholds with an easy readout system. Amplification directly from samples without purification illustrated the robust nature of the assay, and the primers used. This lends further support HPV type specific LAMP assays, and these specific primer sets and assays

  18. A novel microculture kinetic assay (MiCK assay) for malignant cell growth and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, V D

    1994-01-01

    The THERMOmax microplate reader was adapted for monitoring the growth kinetics of human leukaemic OCI/AML-2 and mouse tumour J-774.1 cell lines in continuous culture. Fluid evaporation from wells, CO2 escape and contamination were prevented by hermetic sealing of the microcultures in wells of a 96-well microplate, thus enabling the cells to grow exponentially for 72 h under the conditions of the incubated microplate reader. For both OCI/AML-2 cells, which grow in suspension, and adherent J-774.1 cells, a linear correlation was demonstrated between the number of unstained cells seeded in a given microplate well and the optical density (OD) of that well. Therefore, the OD/time curve of the culture could be deemed to be its growth curve. By the use of the linear fit equation, the actual number of the cells in the wells was computable at any time point of the assay. In the chemosensitivity test, an inhibitory effect of ARA-C on the growth of the cells could be estimated by viewing of the growth curves plotted on the screen. The maximum kinetic rates (Vmax) of the curves in the control and the ARA-C-treated wells were compared, yielding a growth inhibition index (GII). Comparison of results of the kinetic chemosensitivity assay with those of a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay revealed that the novel assay is suitable for precise quantitation of the cell chemosensitivity, is more informative and has the added technical advantage of performance without recourse to radioactive or chemically hazardous substances.

  19. Stimulated human fibroblast cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.P.; Gale, K.L.; Einspenner, M.; Greenstock, C.L.; Gentner, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for cloning cultured mammalian cells have supported the most universally-accepted method for measuring the induction of lethality by geno-toxicants such as ionizing radiation: the 'survival of colony-forming ability (CFA)' assay. Since most cultured human cell lines exhibit plating efficiency (i.e. the percentage of cells that are capable of reproductively surviving and dividing to form visible colonies) well below 100%, such assays are in essence 'survival of plating efficiency' assays, since they are referred to the plating (or cloning) efficiency of control (i.e. unirradiated) cells. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  20. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lipoxygenase and Cyclo-Oxygenase Inhibitors in Inflammation-Induced Human Fetal Glia Cells and the Aβ Degradation Capacity of Human Fetal Astrocytes in an Ex vivo Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Pihlaja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a common phenomenon present in the background of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The arachidonic acid pathway overproduces proinflammatory eicosanoids during these states and glial cells in the brain gradually lose their vital functions of protecting and supporting neurons. In this study, the role of different key enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway mediating inflammatory responses was examined in vitro and ex vivo using human fetal glial cells. Astrocytes and microglia were exposed to proinflammatory agents i.e., cytokines interleukin 1-β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. ELISA assays were used to examine the effects of inhibitors of key enzymes in the eicosanoid pathway. Inhibitors for 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX and cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2 in both cell types and 5-, 12-, and 15-LOX-inhibitor in astrocytes reduced significantly IL-6 secretion, compared to exposed glial cells without inhibitors. The cytokine antibody array showed that especially treatments with 5, -12, and -15 LOX inhibitor in astrocytes, 5-LOX inhibitor in microglia and COX-2 inhibitor in both glial cell types significantly reduced the expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, human fetal astrocytes and microglia were cultured on top of AD-affected and control human brain sections for 30 h. According to the immunochemical evaluation of the level of total Aβ, astrocytes were very efficient at degrading Aβ from AD-affected brain sections ex vivo; simultaneously added enzyme inhibitors did not increase their Aβ degradation capabilities. Microglia were not able to reduce the level of total Aβ during the 30 h incubation time.

  1. Use of the fluorescent micronucleus assay to detect the genotoxic effects of radiation and arsenic exposure in exfoliated human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L.E.; Warner, M.L.; Smith, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    The exfoliated cell micronucleus (MN) assay using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromeric probe is a rapid method for determining the mechanism of MN formation in epithelial tissues exposed to carcinogenic agents. Here, we describe the use of this assay to detect the presence or absence of centromeric DNA in MN induced in vivo by radiation therapy and chronic arsenic (As) ingestion. We examined the buccal cells of an individual receiving 6,500 rads of photon radiation to the head and neck. Exfoliated cells were collected before, during, and after treatment. After radiation exposure a 16.6-fold increase in buccal cell MN frequency was seen. All induced MN were centromere negative (MN-) resulting from chromosome breakage. This finding is consistent with the clastogenic action of radiation and confirmed the reliability of the method. Three weeks post-therapy, MN frequencies returned to baseline. The assay was used on 18 people chronically exposed to high levels of inorganic arsenic (In-As) in drinking water (average level, 1,312 μg As/L) and 18 matched controls (average level, 16 μg As/L). The combined increase in MN frequency was 1.8-fold (P = 0.001, Fisher's exact test). Frequencies of micronuclei containing acentric fragments (MN-) and those containing whole chromosomes (MN+) both increased, suggesting that arsenic may have both clastogenic and weak aneuploidogenic properties in vivo. After stratification on sex, the effect was stronger in male than in female bladder cells. In males the MN-frequency increased 2.06-fold (P =0.07) while the frequency of MN+ increased 1.86-fold (P = 0.08). In addition, the frequencies of MN and MN+ were positively associated with urinary arsenic and its metabolites. The association was stronger for micronuclei containing acentric fragments. By using FISH with centromeric probes, the mechanism of chemically induced genotoxicity can not be determined in epithelial tissues. 35 refs., 4 tabs

  2. Isotope release cytotoxicity assay applicable to human tumors: the use of 111-indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, P; Wiltrout, R; Maciorowski, Z; Rose, N R

    1977-01-01

    We have demonstrated that human tumors can be labelled efficiently with the 111indium-oxine chelate. Subsequently, this isotope can be released by cytotoxic lymphoid cells. Both natural and induced cytotoxicity can be demonstrated utilizing this isotope release method. Because of the slow spontaneous release of 111indium and its efficient labelling of human tumor cells, this isotope release assay can be utilized in long-term cytotoxic assays in the study of human tumor immunology.

  3. Mixture Genotoxicity of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, Acrylamide, and Maleic Hydrazide on Human Caco-2 Cells Assessed with Comet Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Cedergreen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of genotoxic properties of chemicals is mainly conducted only for single chemicals, without taking mixture genotoxic effects into consideration. The current study assessed mixture effects of the three known genotoxic chemicals, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), acrylamide (AA......), and maleic hydrazide (MH), in an experiment with a fixed ratio design setup. The genotoxic effects were assessed with the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) for both single chemicals and the ternary mixture. The concentration ranges used were 0-1.4, 0-20, and 0-37.7 mM for 2,4-D, AA, and MH......, respectively. Mixture toxicity was tested with a fixed ratio design at a 10:23:77% ratio for 2.4-D:AA:MH. Results indicated that the three chemicals yielded a synergistic mixture effect. It is not clear which mechanisms are responsible for this interaction. A few possible interactions are discussed...

  4. Detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in p53 mutation hotspots and expression of mutant p53 in human cell lines using an enzyme-linked electrochemical assay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Šimková, Eva; Vychodilová, Zdenka; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 15 (2009), s. 1723-1729 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1195; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : enzyme-linked electrochemical assay * SNP typing * p53 mutation Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2009

  5. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of selenium compounds in the in vitro micronucleus assay with human whole blood lymphocytes and tk6 lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Cemeli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is known to possess both genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties. In the present study, we have evaluated the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of three selenium compounds (sodium selenate, sodium selenite and selenous acid by measuring in vitro micronucleus induction. Assays were conducted in whole blood lymphocytes and in the TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line, with and without co-treatment with potassium dichromate, a known genotoxic compound. In general, the compounds were more active in TK6 cells than they were in blood lymphocytes. Only 1 μM selenous acid increased the frequency of binucleated cells containing micronuclei (BNMN in blood lymphocytes, while all three selenium compounds increased BNMN in TK6 cells. In addition, combinations of selenous acid and potassium dichromate resulted in lower frequencies of BNMN than potassium dichromate alone in blood lymphocytes, while combinations of sodium selenate and potassium dichromate produced lower frequencies of BNMN than potassium dichromate alone in TK6 cells. The concentrations of selenium compounds that were used, in combination with the medium components and the biological physiology of the whole blood lymphocytes and TK6 cells, could have affected the redox potential of the compounds, switching the chemicals from a pro-oxidant to antioxidant status and vice-versa. The lower activities of the compounds in blood lymphocytes may be due to the protective effects of blood components. The results indicate that the genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of selenium compounds are highly dependent upon the conditions under which they are evaluated.

  6. A new sensitive and quantitative HTLV-I-mediated cell fusion assay in T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pare, Marie-Eve; Gauthier, Sonia; Landry, Sebastien; Sun Jiangfeng; Legault, Eric; Leclerc, Denis; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Marriott, Susan J.; Tremblay, Michel J.; Barbeau, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    Similar to several other viruses, human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells (also known as syncytium) when amplified in tissue culture. These syncytia result from the fusion of infected cells with uninfected cells. Due to the intrinsic difficulty of infecting cells with cell-free HTLV-I virions, syncytium formation has become an important tool in the study of HTLV-I infection and transmission. Since most HTLV-I-based cell fusion assays rely on the use of non-T cells, the aim of this study was to optimize a new HTLV-I-induced cell fusion assay in which HTLV-I-infected T cell lines are co-cultured with T cells that have been transfected with an HTLV-I long terminal repeat (LTR) luciferase reporter construct. We demonstrate that co-culture of various HTLV-I-infected T cells with different transfected T cell lines resulted in induction of luciferase activity. Cell-to-cell contact and expression of the viral gp46 envelope protein was crucial for this induction while other cell surface proteins (including HSC70) did not have a significant effect. This quantitative assay was shown to be very sensitive. In this assay, the cell fusion-mediated activation of NF-κB and the HTLV-I LTR occurred through previously described Tax-dependent signaling pathways. This assay also showed that cell fusion could activate Tax-inducible cellular promoters. These results thus demonstrate that this new quantitative HTLV-I-dependent cell fusion assay is versatile, highly sensitive, and can provide an important tool to investigate cellular promoter activation and intrinsic signaling cascades that modulate cellular gene expression

  7. Development of a dual luciferase activity and fluorescamine protein assay adapted to a 384 micro-well plate format: Reducing variability in human luciferase transactivation cell lines aimed at endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jennifer; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2018-01-01

    There is a need to adapt cell bioassays to 384-well and 1536-well formats instead of the traditional 96-well format as high-throughput screening (HTS) demands increase. However, the sensitivity and performance of the bioassay must be re-verified in these higher micro-well plates, and verification of cell health must also be HT (high-throughput). We have adapted two commonly used human breast luciferase transactivation cell bioassays, the recently re-named estrogen agonist/antagonist screening VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassay (previously designated BG1Luc4E2) and the androgen/glucocorticoid screening MDA-kb2 cell bioassay, to 384-well formats for HTS of endocrine-active substances (EASs). This cost-saving adaptation includes a fast, accurate, and easy measurement of protein amount in each well via the fluorescamine assay with which to normalize luciferase activity of cell lysates without requiring any transfer of the cell lysates. Here we demonstrate that by accounting for protein amount in the cell lysates, antagonistic agents can easily be distinguished from cytotoxic agents in the MDA-kb2 and VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassays. Additionally, we demonstrate via the fluorescamine assay improved interpretation of luciferase activity in wells along the edge of the plate (the so-called “edge effect”), thereby increasing usable wells to the entire plate, not just interior wells.

  8. A radiobiological comparison of human tumor soft-agar clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C M; Sutherland, R M

    1986-06-15

    Radiation survival curves have been generated for 3 human tumor cell lines as a means of comparing and evaluating the validity of human tumor soft-agar clonogenic assays. The assays investigated were the Hamburger-Salmon, Courtenay-Mills, Courtenay-Mills plus additions, soft agar (no additions), and soft agar plus additions. The additions were formulated to supplement the media used in soft agar assays of primary ovarian and cervical carcinoma specimens. Supplementing the media with additions led to a 2- to 3-fold increase in PE of CaSki cells but had no effect on the PEs of ME180 and OWI cells. Radiation survival curves were similar in all assays for CaSki and OWI but differed for ME180 cells. For ME180 cells, the Courtenay-Mills and soft agar assays plus additions produced the most radioresistant curves (Do = 2.2 Gy); the cells were more responsive when assayed by the Hamburger-Salmon method (Do = 1.5 Gy), and the soft agar and Courtenay-Mills assays gave the most radiosensitive curves (Do = 1.2 Gy). These results demonstrate that the PE of human tumor cell lines may be increased with no effect on radiation survival; radiation survival may be altered without changes in PE and neither may be altered by applying modifications and supplements to existing clonogenic assays.

  9. An indicator cell assay for blood-based diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Danziger

    Full Text Available We have established proof of principle for the Indicator Cell Assay Platform™ (iCAP™, a broadly applicable tool for blood-based diagnostics that uses specifically-selected, standardized cells as biosensors, relying on their innate ability to integrate and respond to diverse signals present in patients' blood. To develop an assay, indicator cells are exposed in vitro to serum from case or control subjects and their global differential response patterns are used to train reliable, disease classifiers based on a small number of features. In a feasibility study, the iCAP detected pre-symptomatic disease in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS with 94% accuracy (p-Value = 3.81E-6 and correctly identified samples from a murine Huntington's disease model as non-carriers of ALS. Beyond the mouse model, in a preliminary human disease study, the iCAP detected early stage Alzheimer's disease with 72% cross-validated accuracy (p-Value = 3.10E-3. For both assays, iCAP features were enriched for disease-related genes, supporting the assay's relevance for disease research.

  10. An in vitro drug sensitivity test using a higher 3H-TdR incorporation and a modified human tumor stem cell assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Enzhong

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro drug sensitivity test was developed to evaluate the lethal effects of drugs on human pulmonary carcinoma cells (HPCC). This method was a variant and combination of Human Tumor Stem (HTSCA) and a short-term test using 3 H-TdR incorporation. It consisted of a cell containing liquid top layer and a soft agar bottom layer in 24-well microplates. The medium was RPMI 1640 supplemented with 20% malignant pleural effusion, which could enhance 3 H-TdR incorporation into malignant cells. When 50%, 40%, 30% and 30% of cell survival rate defined as sensitivity-threshold for VCR, MMC, DDP and ADM respectively, in the vitro effectiveness were close to those of clinical single-drug treatment in HPCC by Wright et al. This method was also compared with HTSCA in ten human lung cancer cell lines and four pulmonary carcinoma tissues. The agreement rates were 83% and 100% respectively. Thus we presume this system is more useful for oncological clinics than the others

  11. Tools for the identification of bioactives impacting the metabolic syndrome: Screening of a botanical extract library using subcutaneous and visceral human adipose-derived stem cell based assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehrer, Benjamin M.; Duffin, David J.; Lea-Currie, Y. Renee; Ribnicky, David; Raskin, Ilya; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Cefalu, William T.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Plant extracts continue to represent an untapped source of renewable therapeutic compounds for the treatment and prevention of illnesses including chronic metabolic disorders. With the increase in worldwide obesity and its related morbidities, the need for identifying safe and effective treatments is also rising. As such, use of primary human adipose-derived stem cells represents a physiologically relevant cell system to screen for bioactive agents in the prevention and treatment of obesity and its related complications. By using these cells in a primary screen, the risk and cost of identifying artifacts due to interspecies variation and immortalized cell lines is eliminated. We demonstrate that these cells can be formatted into 384-well high throughput screens to rapidly identify botanical extracts that affect lipogenesis and lipolysis. Additionally, counterscreening with human primary stem cells from distinct adipose depots can be routinely performed to identify tissue specific responses. In our study, over 500 botanical extracts were screened and 16 (2.7%) were found to affect lipogenesis and 4 (0.7%) affected lipolysis. PMID:21543201

  12. Diagnostic sensitivity of two radio receptor assays (TRAK Assay and TRAK Dyno human) for the detection of TSH receptor antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunkovic, N.; Paunkovic, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radio receptor assays for the detection of TSH receptor antibodies in serum are typically based on binding the competition of TSH-R antibodies and 125I -labelled-TSH for membrane preparation of thyrocytes (TBII tests). The sensitivity of the available tests utilizing porcine cell membranes was found to be around 80%. A new test (TRAK Dyno human, BRAHMS) utilizes human recombinant TSH receptor and human standard material that is supposed to improve the performance of the test. We have compared the results of these two assays. The sensitivity of the TRAK Assay tested in 356 patients with untreated Grave's disease was found to be 85%, and 97.5% for TRAK Dyno human in 111 newly diagnosed patients. Both tests were performed from the same serum specimen for 60 of the investigated patients. The TRAK Assay was positive in 50 patients (83.2%) and TRAK Dyno human in 59 patients (98.3%). The specificity of the new radio receptor assay was also improved. (author)

  13. A fully human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 MAb in an in vitro assay enhances antigen-specific T-cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Grenga, Italia; Donahue, Renee N; Lepone, Lauren M; Richards, Jacob; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that interfere with checkpoint molecules are being investigated for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer, with the aim of enhancing the function of an impaired immune system. Avelumab (MSB0010718C) is a fully human IgG1 MAb targeting programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), which differs from other checkpoint-blocking antibodies in its ability to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These studies were conducted to define whether avelumab cou...

  14. Mathematical modelling of the automated FADU assay for the quantification of DNA strand breaks and their repair in human peripheral mononuclear blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junk, Michael; Salzwedel, Judy; Sindlinger, Thilo; Bürkle, Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cells continuously undergo DNA damage from exogenous agents like irradiation or genotoxic chemicals or from endogenous radicals produced by normal cellular metabolic activities. DNA strand breaks are one of the most common genotoxic lesions and they can also arise as intermediates of DNA repair activity. Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to genomic instability, which can massively compromise the health status of organisms. Therefore it is important to measure and quantify DNA damage and its repair. We have previously published an automated method for measuring DNA strand breaks based on fluorimetric detection of alkaline DNA unwinding [1], and here we present a mathematical model of the FADU assay, which enables to an analytic expression for the relation between measured fluorescence and the number of strand breaks. Assessment of the formation and also the repair of DNA strand breaks is a crucial functional parameter to investigate genotoxicity in living cells. A reliable and convenient method to quantify DNA strand breakage is therefore of significant importance for a wide variety of scientific fields, e.g. toxicology, pharmacology, epidemiology and medical sciences

  15. Human HepaRG Cells can be Cultured in Hanging-drop Plates for Cytochrome P450 Induction and Function Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Norie; Usui, Takashi; Slawny, Nicky; Chesné, Christophe; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent guidance/guidelines for industry recommend that cytochrome P450 induction can be assessed using human hepatocyte enzyme activity and/or mRNA levels to evaluate potential drug- drug interactions. To evaluate time-dependent cytochrome P450 induction precisely, induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 mRNA was confirmed (>2-fold) by the treatment with omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampicin, respectively, for 24 or 48 h on day 3 from the start of culture. After 24 h, the fold induction of CYP1A2 with 3.6 and 1.8x10(4) HepaRG cells per well was lower than that for 7.2x10(4) cells. CYP1A2 induction levels at 24 h were higher than those after 48 h. In contrast, higher CYP2B6 inductions were confirmed after 48 h exposure than after 24 h, independent of the number of cells per well. To help reduce the use of human cryopreserved hepatocytes, typical P450-dependent enzyme activities were investigated in human HepaRG cells cultured in commercial hanging-drop plates. Newly designed 96-well hanging-drop plates were capable of maintaining human CYP3A-dependent midazolam hydroxylation activities for up to 4 days using only 10% of the recommended initial 7.2x10(4) cells per well. Favorable HepaRG function using hanging-drop plates was confirmed by detecting 1'- hydroxymidazolam O-glucuronide on day 3, suggesting an improvement over traditional control plates in which this metabolite can be detected for 24-well plates. These results suggest that the catalytic function and/or induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 can be readily assessed with reduced numbers of starting HepaRG cells cultured in three-dimensional cultures in drops prepared with hanging-drop plates.

  16. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Zhang, Leshuai W.; Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu; Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming

    2016-01-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag + ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4 h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was > 98 × the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5 nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75 nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag + ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs. - Highlights: • We established the stable HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter cells. • Silver nanoparticles induced dose-dependent increases in luciferase activity. • HSPA1A promoter activity is a sensitive and responsive indicator of oxidative stress. • HepG2-luciferase

  17. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Lili, E-mail: llxin@suda.edu.cn [School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jianshu [Suzhou Center for Disease Prevention and Control, 72 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Leshuai W. [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection & School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123 (China); Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu [School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu (China); Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming [Suzhou Industrial Park Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 58 Suqian Road, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag{sup +} ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4 h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was > 98 × the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5 nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75 nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag{sup +} ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs. - Highlights: • We established the stable HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter cells. • Silver nanoparticles induced dose-dependent increases in luciferase activity. • HSPA1A promoter activity is a sensitive and responsive indicator of oxidative stress. • HepG2

  18. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.R. Vivek, E-mail: prvkumar06@gmail.com [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Seshadri, M. [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jaikrishan, G. [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Das, Birajalaxmi [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in radio adaptive response studied. • PBMCs of subjects from NLNRA and HLNRA were challenged with gamma radiation. • DNA damage and repair in PBMCs was compared using the alkaline comet assay. • Significant reduction in DNA damage in subjects of high dose group from HLNRA noted. • Probable induction of an in vivo radio adaptive response in subjects from HLNRA. - Abstract: This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year{sup −1}), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N = 43, range 1.07 mSv year{sup −1} to 5.55 mSv year{sup −1}) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year{sup −1} to17.41 mSv year{sup −1}), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from

  19. Evaluation of tetrazolium-based semiautomatic colorimetric assay for measurement of human antitumor cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, D.S.; Park, J.G.; Hata, K.; Day, R.; Herberman, R.B.; Whiteside, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based colorimetric assay was developed and compared with 51Cr release from different adherent tumor cell targets (human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck established in our laboratory, melanoma, and colorectal carcinoma) using 5-7-day human lymphokine-activated killer cells and monocyte-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes as effectors. With adherent tumor cell targets, MTT colorimetry was more sensitive than the 51Cr release assay in measuring the antitumor activity of effectors: median, 4385 (range, 988-8144) versus median, 1061 (range, 582-7294) lytic units (the number of effector cells required to lyse 20% of 5 x 10(3) targets)/10(7) effectors (P less than 0.01). Background effects (without effector cells) were comparable in 4-h assays (9% versus 10%) between MTT colorimetry and 51Cr release. In 24-h assays, MTT colorimetry showed higher antitumor activity (70-100% versus 40-60% lysis at 1:1 effector:target cell ratio) but lower background effects (6% versus 38%) than 51Cr release assay. Thus, MTT colorimetry was more sensitive, did not use radiolabeled targets, required fewer effector cells, and was easier, less expensive, and better adaptable to serial monitoring of effector cell function in cancer patients. This colorimetric assay is especially well suited to adherent tumor cell targets. The use of adherent tumor cell monolayers, as opposed to trypsinized single cell suspensions, provides an opportunity to measure interactions of effector cells with enzymatically unaltered solid tumor targets. Because of the greater sensitivity of the colorimetric assay, the transformation of MTT data into lytic units, as commonly used for 51Cr release assays, required an adjustment to avoid the extrapolation based on the exponential fit equation

  20. Development of an artificial neural network model for risk assessment of skin sensitization using human cell line activation test, direct peptide reactivity assay, KeratinoSens™ and in silico structure alert parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Morihiko; Ashikaga, Takao; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2018-04-01

    It is important to predict the potential of cosmetic ingredients to cause skin sensitization, and in accordance with the European Union cosmetic directive for the replacement of animal tests, several in vitro tests based on the adverse outcome pathway have been developed for hazard identification, such as the direct peptide reactivity assay, KeratinoSens™ and the human cell line activation test. Here, we describe the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) prediction model for skin sensitization risk assessment based on the integrated testing strategy concept, using direct peptide reactivity assay, KeratinoSens™, human cell line activation test and an in silico or structure alert parameter. We first investigated the relationship between published murine local lymph node assay EC3 values, which represent skin sensitization potency, and in vitro test results using a panel of about 134 chemicals for which all the required data were available. Predictions based on ANN analysis using combinations of parameters from all three in vitro tests showed a good correlation with local lymph node assay EC3 values. However, when the ANN model was applied to a testing set of 28 chemicals that had not been included in the training set, predicted EC3s were overestimated for some chemicals. Incorporation of an additional in silico or structure alert descriptor (obtained with TIMES-M or Toxtree software) in the ANN model improved the results. Our findings suggest that the ANN model based on the integrated testing strategy concept could be useful for evaluating the skin sensitization potential. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Human neuron-astrocyte 3D co-culture-based assay for evaluation of neuroprotective compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasso, Ana Paula; Silva, Ana Carina; Filipe, Augusto; Pedroso, Pedro; Ferreira, Ana Lúcia; Alves, Paula Marques; Brito, Catarina

    Central nervous system drug development has registered high attrition rates, mainly due to the lack of efficacy of drug candidates, highlighting the low reliability of the models used in early-stage drug development and the need for new in vitro human cell-based models and assays to accurately identify and validate drug candidates. 3D human cell models can include different tissue cell types and represent the spatiotemporal context of the original tissue (co-cultures), allowing the establishment of biologically-relevant cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Nevertheless, exploitation of these 3D models for neuroprotection assessment has been limited due to the lack of data to validate such 3D co-culture approaches. In this work we combined a 3D human neuron-astrocyte co-culture with a cell viability endpoint for the implementation of a novel in vitro neuroprotection assay, over an oxidative insult. Neuroprotection assay robustness and specificity, and the applicability of Presto Blue, MTT and CytoTox-Glo viability assays to the 3D co-culture were evaluated. Presto Blue was the adequate endpoint as it is non-destructive and is a simpler and reliable assay. Semi-automation of the cell viability endpoint was performed, indicating that the assay setup is amenable to be transferred to automated screening platforms. Finally, the neuroprotection assay setup was applied to a series of 36 test compounds and several candidates with higher neuroprotective effect than the positive control, Idebenone, were identified. The robustness and simplicity of the implemented neuroprotection assay with the cell viability endpoint enables the use of more complex and reliable 3D in vitro cell models to identify and validate drug candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reliability of plant root comet assay in comparison with human leukocyte comet assay for assessment environmental genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Gabriela Barreto Dos; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Moraes, Isabella de Campos; César, Pedro Henrique Souza; Marcussi, Silvana; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-08-01

    Comet assay is an efficient test to detect genotoxic compounds based on observation of DNA damage. The aim of this work was to compare the results obtained from the comet assay in two different type of cells extracted from the root tips from Lactuca sativa L. and human blood. For this, Spent Pot Liner (SPL), and its components (aluminum and fluoride) were applied as toxic agents. SPL is a solid waste generated in industry from the aluminum mining and processing with known toxicity. Three concentrations of all tested solutions were applied and the damages observed were compared to negative and positive controls. It was observed an increase in the frequency of DNA damage for human leukocytes and plant cells, in all treatments. On human leukocytes, SPL induced the highest percentage of damage, with an average of 87.68%. For root tips cells of L. sativa the highest percentage of damage was detected for aluminum (93.89%). Considering the arbitrary units (AU), the average of nuclei with high levels of DNA fragmentation was significant for both cells type evaluated. The tested cells demonstrated equal effectiveness for detection of the genotoxicity induced by the SPL and its chemical components, aluminum and fluoride. Further, using a unique method, the comet assay, we proved that cells from root tips of Lactuca sativa represent a reliable model to detect DNA damage induced by genotoxic pollutants is in agreement of those observed in human leukocytes as model. So far, plant cells may be suggested as important system to assess the toxicological risk of environmental agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Whole blood microculture assay of human lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, J L; Han, T

    1976-11-01

    A whole blood microculture assay is described for measuring lymphocyte reactivity to mitogenic and antigenic stimulants. This assay employs heparinized whole blood, serum-free culture medium, microtiter plates, and a Multiple Automated Sample Harvester (MASH). When this assay is compared to other leukocyte assays, its major advantages include (1) the utilization of fewer lymphocytes per microculture, thuus reducing the amount of blood required per test while increasing the number of test agents and replicate cultures which can be employed in any given experiment; (2) the conservation of mitogens, antigens, drugs, enzymes, hormones, lymphokines, and other test agents, some of which are either expensive of difficult to prepare in large quantities; (3) the elimination of lymphocyte isolation and purification procedures which may disrupt the relative proportion of T cells, B cells and antigen-processing cells; and (4) the application of an automated harvester which simplifies and expedites procedures required for processing cells for liquid scintillation counting.

  4. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  5. Immunoradiometric assay for ferritin in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyland, M.J.; Ganguli, P.C.; Blower, D.; Delamore, I.W.

    1975-01-01

    A sensitiv specific and precise immunoradiometric assay for ferritin has been developed. Ferritin was measured in the serum of 160 hospital controls, 101 females (118 plus/minus 9 μg/l) and 59 males (189 plus/minus 16 μg/l). This difference was statistically significant. In 28 patients with untreated iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin concentration (6.1plus/minus 0.7 μg/l) was significantly lower than in the controls, but it was within the normal range in 14 cases of polycythaemia vera treated by repeated phlebotomy. In 4 patients with primary haemachromatosis (2884 plus/minus 56 μg/l), 25 with secondary iron overload states (5702 plus/minus 1235 μg/l) and 8 with haemolytic anaemia (1612 plus/minus 605 μg/l), serum ferritin levels were markedly elevated. In 14 cases of transfusional siderosis there was a highly significant correlation between serum ferritin concentration and units of blood transfused. A circadian rhythmin serum ferritin concentration was observed in 7 healthy subjects. (author)

  6. The influence of interleukin-2, feeder cells, and timing of irradiation on the radiosensitivity of human T lymphocytes assessed by the colony-forming assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.; Guichard, M.; Pioch, Y.; Dubois, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of human lymphocytes was investigated by the method of colony formation in the absence of interleukin-2 (IL2) and feeder cells, both of which enhance growth of T-cell colonies. The shape of the survival curve and the radiosensitivity was shown to depend upon the ability of lymphocytes to produce IL2: the survival curve for lymphocytes that were the most competent producers of IL2 is the closest to linearity; the lymphocytes that were poor producers show biphasic survival curves. The radiosensitivity of the lymphocytes from the first group is less than that of the latter, when the comparison is based on the first part of the biphasic survival curve. This is more easily seen when cultures are irradiated 24 h after stimulation by phytohemagglutinin (the time of the peak IL2 production) than when cultures are irradiated 2 h before stimulation. This study demonstrates that growth conditions influence the response of lymphocytes to irradiation and that optimal growth conditions result in a linear survival curve

  7. The single-cell gel electrophoresis assay to determine apoptosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When the frequency of appearance of apoptotic cells following was observed over a period of time, there was a significant increase in appearance of apoptosis when using single cell gel electrophoresis assay. The present report demonstrates that the characteristic pattern of apoptotic comets detected by the comet assay ...

  8. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays

    OpenAIRE

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2007-01-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we ...

  9. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshal, Karni S.; Ferri-Lagneau, Karine F.; Haider, Jamil; Pardhanani, Pooja; Leung, TinChung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299) and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13). Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP) vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to measure cancer cell

  10. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Pardhanani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299 and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13. Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to

  11. Adhesion kinetics of human primary monocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages: Dynamic cell adhesion measurements with a label-free optical biosensor and their comparison with end-point assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Lukácsi, Szilvia; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages (MFs) are closely related immune cells that differ in their main functions. These specific functions are, to a considerable degree, determined by the differences in the adhesion behavior of the cells. To study the inherently and essentially dynamic aspects of the adhesion of monocytes, DCs, and MFs, dynamic cell adhesion assays were performed with a high-throughput label-free optical biosensor [Epic BenchTop (BT)] on surfaces coated with either fibrinogen (Fgn) or the biomimetic copolymer PLL-g-PEG-RGD. Cell adhesion profiles typically reached their maximum at ∼60 min after cell seeding, which was followed by a monotonic signal decrease, indicating gradually weakening cell adhesion. According to the biosensor response, cell types could be ordered by increasing adherence as monocytes, MFs, and DCs. Notably, all three cell types induced a larger biosensor signal on Fgn than on PLL-g-PEG-RGD. To interpret this result, the molecular layers were characterized by further exploiting the potentials of the biosensor: by measuring the adsorption signal induced during the surface coating procedure, the authors could estimate the surface density of adsorbed molecules and, thus, the number of binding sites potentially presented for the adhesion receptors. Surfaces coated with PLL-g-PEG-RGD presented less RGD sites, but was less efficient in promoting cell spreading than those coated with Fgn; hence, other binding sites in Fgn played a more decisive role in determining cell adherence. To support the cell adhesion data obtained with the biosensor, cell adherence on Fgn-coated surfaces 30-60 min after cell seeding was measured with three complementary techniques, i.e., with (1) a fluorescence-based classical adherence assay, (2) a shear flow chamber applying hydrodynamic shear stress to wash cells away, and (3) an automated micropipette using vacuum-generated fluid flow to lift cells up. These techniques confirmed the results

  12. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Chinen, Isabel; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  13. Single-cell nanotoxicity assays of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2012-01-01

    Properly evaluating the nanotoxicity of nanoparticles involves much more than bulk-cell assays of cell death by necrosis. Cells exposed to nanoparticles may undergo repairable oxidative stress and DNA damage or be induced into apoptosis. Exposure to nanoparticles may cause the cells to alter their proliferation or differentiation or their cell-cell signaling with neighboring cells in a tissue. Nanoparticles are usually more toxic to some cell subpopulations than others, and toxicity often varies with cell cycle. All of these facts dictate that any nanotoxicity assay must be at the single-cell level and must try whenever feasible and reasonable to include many of these other factors. Focusing on one type of quantitative measure of nanotoxicity, we describe flow and scanning image cytometry approaches to measuring nanotoxicity at the single-cell level by using a commonly used assay for distinguishing between necrotic and apoptotic causes of cell death by one type of nanoparticle. Flow cytometry is fast and quantitative, provided that the cells can be prepared into a single-cell suspension for analysis. But when cells cannot be put into suspension without altering nanotoxicity results, or if morphology, attachment, and stain location are important, a scanning image cytometry approach must be used. Both methods are described with application to a particular type of nanoparticle, a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION), as an example of how these assays may be applied to the more general problem of determining the effects of nanomaterial exposure to living cells.

  14. Phosphatase Inhibitors Function as Novel, Broad Spectrum Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonists in Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neuron-Based Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kiris

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop novel treatments to counter Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT poisoning. Currently, the majority of BoNT drug development efforts focus on directly inhibiting the proteolytic components of BoNT, i.e. light chains (LC. Although this is a rational approach, previous research has shown that LCs are extremely difficult drug targets and that inhibiting multi-serotype BoNTs with a single LC inhibitor may not be feasible. An alternative approach would target neuronal pathways involved in intoxication/recovery, rather than the LC itself. Phosphorylation-related mechanisms have been implicated in the intoxication pathway(s of BoNTs. However, the effects of phosphatase inhibitors upon BoNT activity in the physiological target of BoNTs, i.e. motor neurons, have not been investigated. In this study, a small library of phosphatase inhibitors was screened for BoNT antagonism in the context of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ES-MNs. Four inhibitors were found to function as BoNT/A antagonists. Subsequently, we confirmed that these inhibitors protect against BoNT/A in a dose-dependent manner in human ES-MNs. Additionally, these compounds provide protection when administered in post-intoxication scenario. Importantly, the inhibitors were also effective against BoNT serotypes B and E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing phosphatase inhibitors as broad-spectrum BoNT antagonists.

  15. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, crAssphage, was discovered by metagenomic data mining and reported to be abundant in and closely associated with human fecal waste. To confirm bioinformatic predictions, 384 primer sets were designed along the length of the crAssphage genome. Based upon initial screening, two novel crAssphage qPCR assays (CPQ_056 and CPQ_064) were designed and evaluated in reference fecal samples and water matrices. The assays exhibited high specificities (98.6%) when tested against a large animal fecal reference library and were highly abundant in raw sewage and sewage impacted water samples. In addition, CPQ_056 and CPQ_064 assay performance was compared to HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 methods in paired experiments. Findings confirm viral crAssphage qPCR assays perform at a similar level to well established bacterial human-associated fecal source identification technologies. These new viral based assays could become important water quality management and research tools. To inform the public.

  16. Development and Fit-for-Purpose Validation of a Soluble Human Programmed Death-1 Protein Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan G; Yuan, Xiling; Newitt, John A; Peterson, Jon E; Gleason, Carol R; Haulenbeek, Jonathan; Santockyte, Rasa; Lafont, Virginie; Marsilio, Frank; Neely, Robert J; DeSilva, Binodh; Piccoli, Steven P

    2015-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) protein is a co-inhibitory receptor which negatively regulates immune cell activation and permits tumors to evade normal immune defense. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have been shown to restore immune cell activation and effector function-an exciting breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. Recent reports have documented a soluble form of PD-1 (sPD-1) in the circulation of normal and disease state individuals. A clinical assay to quantify sPD-1 would contribute to the understanding of sPD-1-function and facilitate the development of anti-PD-1 drugs. Here, we report the development and validation of a sPD-1 protein assay. The assay validation followed the framework for full validation of a biotherapeutic pharmacokinetic assay. A purified recombinant human PD-1 protein was characterized extensively and was identified as the assay reference material which mimics the endogenous analyte in structure and function. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 100 pg/mL, with a dynamic range spanning three logs to 10,000 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision were ≤15%, and the assay bias (percent deviation) was ≤10%. Potential matrix effects were investigated in sera from both normal healthy volunteers and selected cancer patients. Bulk-prepared frozen standards and pre-coated Streptavidin plates were used in the assay to ensure consistency in assay performance over time. This assay appears to specifically measure total sPD-1 protein since the human anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, and the endogenous ligands of PD-1 protein, PDL-1 and PDL-2, do not interfere with the assay.

  17. Moving beyond the comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmia assay: Use of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to assess contractile effects associated with drug-induced structural cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Papoian, Thomas

    2018-02-27

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity is a potentially severe side effect that can adversely affect myocardial contractility through structural or electrophysiological changes in cardiomyocytes. Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are a promising human cardiac in vitro model system to assess both proarrhythmic and non-proarrhythmic cardiotoxicity of new drug candidates. The scalable differentiation of hiPSCs into cardiomyocytes provides a renewable cell source that overcomes species differences present in current animal models of drug toxicity testing. The Comprehensive in vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) initiative represents a paradigm shift for proarrhythmic risk assessment, and hiPSC-CMs are an integral component of that paradigm. The recent advancements in hiPSC-CMs will not only impact safety decisions for possible drug-induced proarrhythmia, but should also facilitate risk assessment for non-proarrhythmic cardiotoxicity, where current non-clinical approaches are limited in detecting this risk before initiation of clinical trials. Importantly, emerging evidence strongly suggests that the use of hiPSC-CMs with cardiac physiological relevant measurements in vitro improves the detection of structural cardiotoxicity. Here we review high-throughput drug screening using the hiPSC-CM model as an experimentally feasible approach to assess potential contractile and structural cardiotoxicity in early phase drug development. We also suggest that the assessment of structural cardiotoxicity can be added to electrophysiological tests in the same platform to complement the Comprehensive in vitro Proarrhythmia Assay for regulatory use. Ideally, application of these novel tools in early drug development will allow for more reliable risk assessment and lead to more informed regulatory decisions in making safe and effective drugs available to the public. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Development of Androgen- and Estrogen-Responsive bio-assays, members of a panel of human cell line-based highly selective steroid-responsive bioassays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, E.; Jansen, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have established highly sensitive and specific androgen and estrogen reporter cell lines which we have named AR (androgen receptor) and ERα (estrogen receptor alpha) CALUX® (Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression), respectively. Both bioassays are member of a panel of CALUX reporter cell

  19. Human epidermal growth factor: molecular forms and application of radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Y.; Orth, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a 53 amino acid polypeptide, was first isolated by Cohen. EGF's growth-promoting activity is not limited to epidermal cells, but is expressed on a wide variety of tissues derived from a number of different species. Human EGF (hEGF) was isolated and subsequently purified from human urine. Unexpectedly, a close structural relationship was recognized between mEGF and human β-urogastrone. The authors recently developed both an homologous hEGF radioimmunoassay (RIA) and a radioreceptor assay (RRA) using a human placental membrane fraction. Using these assays, the molecular size of hEGF in human body fluids and tissues was evaluated, and partial characterization of a high molecular weight form of hEGF isolated from human urine was carried out. The concentrations of immunoreactive hEGF were also determined in human tissues and plasma after extraction either with cationic exchange chromatography or with immunoaffinity chromatography. (Auth.)

  20. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Ugur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes.

  1. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)” has published classification criteria...... scoring of randomly selected cells....

  2. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  3. Development and optimization of a direct plaque assay for human and avian metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yongwei; Li, Junan; Li, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae and family Paramyxoviridae includes only two viruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), which cause respiratory disease in humans and birds, respectively. These two viruses grow poorly in cell culture and other quantitation methods, such as indirect immuno-staining and immuno-fluorescent assays, are expensive, time consuming, and do not allow for plaque purification of the virus. In order to enhance research efforts for studying these two viruses, a direct plaque assay for both hMPV and aMPV has been developed. By optimizing the chemical components of the agarose overlay, it was found that both hMPV with a trypsin-independent F cleavage site and aMPV formed clear and countable plaques in a number of mammalian cell lines (such as Vero-E6 and LLC-MK2 cells) after 5 days of incubation. The plaque forming assay has similar sensitivity and reliability as the currently used immunological methods for viral quantitation. The plaque assay is also a more simple, rapid, and economical method compared to immunological assays, and in addition allows for plaque purification of the viruses. The direct plaque assay will be a valuable method for the quantitation and evaluation of the biological properties of some metapneumoviruses. PMID:22684013

  4. Functional characterisation of human glycine receptors in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.

    2005-01-01

    The human glycine receptor subtypes alpha1beta and alpha2 have been expressed stably in HEK293 cells, and the functional characteristics of the receptors have been characterised in the FLIPR Membrane Potential Assay. The pharmacological properties obtained for nine standard ligands at the two rec...

  5. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer

  6. Multiplex High-Throughput Targeted Proteomic Assay To Identify Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Anna; Wessely, Frank; Mazzacuva, Francesca; McCormick, James; Camuzeaux, Stephane; Heywood, Wendy E; Little, Daniel; Vowles, Jane; Tuefferd, Marianne; Mosaku, Olukunbi; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Webber, Caleb; Cader, M Zameel; Peeters, Pieter; Gissen, Paul; Cowley, Sally A; Mills, Kevin

    2017-02-21

    Induced pluripotent stem cells have great potential as a human model system in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug screening. However, their use in medical research is hampered by laborious reprogramming procedures that yield low numbers of induced pluripotent stem cells. For further applications in research, only the best, competent clones should be used. The standard assays for pluripotency are based on genomic approaches, which take up to 1 week to perform and incur significant cost. Therefore, there is a need for a rapid and cost-effective assay able to distinguish between pluripotent and nonpluripotent cells. Here, we describe a novel multiplexed, high-throughput, and sensitive peptide-based multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay, allowing for the identification and absolute quantitation of multiple core transcription factors and pluripotency markers. This assay provides simpler and high-throughput classification into either pluripotent or nonpluripotent cells in 7 min analysis while being more cost-effective than conventional genomic tests.

  7. Drug-permeability and transporter assays in Caco-2 and MDCK cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Donna A

    2011-12-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell lines provide in vitro tools to assess a drug's permeability and transporter interactions during discovery and development. The cells, when cultured on semiporous filters, form confluent monolayers that model the intestinal epithelial barrier for permeability, transporter and drug-interaction assays. The applications of these assays in pharmaceutical research include qualitative prediction and ranking of absorption, determining mechanism(s) of permeability, formulation effects on drug permeability, and the potential for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. This review focuses on recent examples of Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells assays for drug permeability including transfected and knock-down cells, miniaturization and automation, and assay combinations to better understand and predict intestinal drug absorption.

  8. Development of norepinephrine transporter reuptake inhibition assays using SK-N-BE(2C cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Decker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes efforts to develop and validate novel norepinephrine transporter reuptake inhibition assays using human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE(2C cells in 24-well format. Before conducting the assays, the SK-N-BE(2C cells were first evaluated for their ability to uptake [3H]norepinephrine and were shown to have a saturable uptake with a KM value of 416 nM. Using this determined KM value, reuptake inhibition assays were then conducted with a variety of ligands including antidepressants, as well as piperazine and phenyltropane derivatives. The results obtained with the SK-N-BE(2C cells indicate that this model system can detect a range of ligand potencies, which compare well with other established transporter assays. Our data suggest that SK-N-BE(2C cells have potential utility to serve as another model system to detect norepinephrine reuptake inhibition activity.

  9. Measurement of the capability of DNA synthesis of human fetal liver cells by the assay of 3H-TdR incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Ma Xiangrui; Wang Hongyun; Cao Xia

    1987-01-01

    The fetal liver is one of the major sites of hematopoiesis during gestation. Under erythropoietin (EPO) stimulation, in erythroid precusor cells of fetal liver, proliferation and differentiation occurred and function of metabolism was enhanced. The technique of 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to measure the function of fetal liver cellular DNA synthesis. As EPO concentration at the range of approximately 20 ∼ 100 mU/ml, the counts of 3 H-TdR incorporation into fetal liver cells increased. As the concentration of EPO increased, however, its incorporation counts are lower than that in bone marrow of either the fetal or the adult. It suggested that precusors of erythrocyte of fetal liver has differentiated to later phases with the progressive accumulation of mature cells, therefore, both proliferation and function of metabolism are more or less decreased respectively. Under EPO stimulation, however, precusor of erythroid of fetal liver can greatly increase potential effects on DNA synthesis

  10. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  11. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  12. Assessment of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a human cell-based reporter gene assay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondráček, Jan; Pěnčíková, K.; Neca, J.; Ciganek, M.; Grycová, A.; Dvořák, Z.; Machala, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN2017 (2017), s. 307-316 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07711S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : rat primary hepatocytes * liver epithelial-cells * cancer-risk assessment Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  13. Testing human sperm chemotaxis: how to detect biased motion in population assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Armon

    Full Text Available Biased motion of motile cells in a concentration gradient of a chemoattractant is frequently studied on the population level. This approach has been particularly employed in human sperm chemotactic assays, where the fraction of responsive cells is low and detection of biased motion depends on subtle differences. In these assays, statistical measures such as population odds ratios of swimming directions can be employed to infer chemotactic performance. Here, we report on an improved method to assess statistical significance of experimentally determined odds ratios and discuss the strong impact of data correlations that arise from the directional persistence of sperm swimming.

  14. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  15. An improved haemolytic plaque assay for the detection of cells secreting antibody to bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines for human use have stimulated interest in the use of assays detecting antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) with specificity for bacterial antigens. Here we present improved haemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays detecting Ab......SC with specificity for tetanus and diphtheria toxoid as well as for Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides. These assays were found to be less time consuming, more economical and yielded 1.9-3.4-fold higher plaque numbers than traditional Jerne-type PFC assays. In the case of anti......-polysaccharide antibodies aggregation of secreted monomeric antibody (IgG) is critical for plaque formation and increases the avidity of binding to target cells....

  16. Quantitative relationship between the local lymph node assay and human skin sensitization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Akkan, Z

    2004-06-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is a new test method which allows for the quantitative assessment of sensitizing potency in the mouse. Here, we investigate the quantitative correlation between results from the LLNA and two human sensitization tests--specifically, human repeat insult patch tests (HRIPTs) and human maximization tests (HMTs). Data for 57 substances were evaluated, of which 46 showed skin sensitizing properties in human tests, whereas 11 yielded negative results in humans. For better comparability data from mouse and human tests were transformed to applied doses per skin area, which ranged over four orders of magnitude for the substances considered. Regression analysis for the 46 human sensitizing substances revealed a significant positive correlation between the LLNA and human tests. The correlation was better between LLNA and HRIPT data (n=23; r=0.77) than between LLNA and HMT data (n=38; r=0.65). The observed scattering of data points is related to various uncertainties, in part associated with insufficiencies of data from older HMT studies. Predominantly negative results in the LLNA for another 11 substances which showed no skin sensitizing activity in human maximization tests further corroborate the correspondence between LLNA and human tests. Based on this analysis, the LLNA can be considered a reliable basis for relative potency assessments for skin sensitizers. Proposals are made for the regulatory exploitation of the LLNA: four potency groups can be established, and assignment of substances to these groups according to the outcome of the LLNA can be used to characterize skin sensitizing potency in substance-specific assessments. Moreover, based on these potency groups, a more adequate consideration of sensitizing substances in preparations becomes possible. It is proposed to replace the current single concentration limit for skin sensitizers in preparations, which leads to an all or nothing classification of a preparation as sensitizing to

  17. Two-tiered keratinocyte assay: IL-18 production by NCTC2544 cells to determine the skin sensitizing capacity and an epidermal equivalent assay to determine sensitizer potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunis, Marc; Corsini, Emanuela; Smits, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    the use of animals. The aim of the EU FP6 Integrated Project Sens-it-iv was to develop and optimize an integrated testing strategy consisting of in vitro, human cell based assays which will closely mimic sensitization mechanisms in vivo. These assays should be an alternative approach to the LLNA. The NCTC...... method to the LLNA. Both assays are based on the use of human keratinocytes, which have been shown, over the last two decades, to play a key role in all phases of skin sensitization. First, 4 known chemicals were tested during a transferability study in which 6 laboratories participated. Three...

  18. A polyethylene glycol radioimmunoprecipitation assay for human immunoglobulin G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, S.J.; Taylor, R.P.; Andrews, B.S.

    1979-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) radioimmunoprecipitation assay for human IgG is described that is sufficiently sensitive to detect 0.5 ng of IgG. This model antibody-antigen system was also used to study the stoichiometries of PEG-precipitation complexes. The results suggest that the presence of PEG may affect the stoichiometry of the complexes which precipitate from solution. (Auth.)

  19. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  20. Comparison of RAW264.7, human whole blood and PBMC assays to screen for immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisia, Ingrid; Pae, Han Bee; Lam, Vivian; Cederberg, Rachel; Hofs, Elyse; Krystal, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    The RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line is used extensively to carry out in vitro screens for immunomodulators. Compounds that are effective at reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines or nitric oxide (NO) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells are often considered candidate anti-inflammatory agents for humans. There is, however, very little data on the reliability of this screen to identify bona fide human immunomodulators. We compared the efficacy of 37 purported immunomodulators to modulate LPS or E. coli-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cell, whole human blood and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assays. Interestingly, there was no significant correlation (R=0.315) between the responses obtained with RAW264.7 cells and the whole blood assay (WBA), suggesting that compounds demonstrating efficacy in RAW264.7 cells may be ineffective in humans, and, more importantly, compounds that are effective in humans may be missed with a RAW264.7 screen. Interestingly, there was also no significant correlation between the WBA and human PBMCs when the latter were cultured with 10% FCS, but a moderate correlation was seen when the PBMCs were cultured with 25% autologous plasma. The presence of plasma thus contributes to the overall inflammatory response observed in the WBA. We then asked if RAW264.7 cells, given that they are mouse macrophage-like cells, respond in a manner similar to primary murine derived macrophages. Intriguingly, there was no significant correlation (R=0.012) with the 37 putative immunomodulators, pointing to distinct inflammatory response mechanisms in the two model systems. We conclude that the use of a WBA to confirm potential immunomodulators obtained from high throughput screening with RAW264.7 cells is advisable and that future screens be carried out using a WBA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  2. In vitro assays for predicting tumor cell response to radiation by apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Oe.; Hanks, G.E.; Biade, S.; Chapman, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We had previously shown that the rate of spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis was significantly greater in well-differentiated compared to anaplastic Dunning prostate carcinomas. The goal of this study was to define the most useful assay for quantifying radiation-induced apoptotic cell death and to determine if measured rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cell populations can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: The time course and extent of radiation-induced apoptosis after single doses of Cesium-137 gamma-rays were measured by five different assays. These included gross DNA degradation, nucleosome ladder formation, labeling of 3'-OH ends in DNA with an immunofluorescence probe, immunofluorescence vital stains (LIVE/DEAD[reg] EUKOLIGHT TM ) and trypan blue. The majority of these studies were performed with DU-145 human prostate cells. Data was analyzed to determine the component of cell inactivation resulting from apoptosis with the modified linear quadratic equation, -1n (SF) = (α a + α p ) D + β p D 2 , were α a represents cell inactivation by radiation-induced apoptosis, α p and β p represent cell death by proliferative mechanisms and D represents radiation dose. Results: These studies indicated that DU-145 cell death after radiation occurs over two distinct time periods. The first phase of death begins shortly after irradiation and plateaus within 16-24 hr. This process of cell death has properties consistent with apoptosis as determined by 3'-OH DNA end-labeling and nucleosome ladder assays. The second phase of cell death (determined by viability staining) begins approximately 48 hr after irradiation and continues until the remainder of inactivated cells express their death. This longer phase of cell inactivation probably represents proliferative cell death and other non-apoptotic mechanisms. The five different assays were performed on DU-145 cells 24 hr after irradiation with 10 Gy. Significant nucleosome ladders

  3. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  4. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  5. A novel immunological assay for hepcidin quantification in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Koliaraki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepcidin is a 25-aminoacid cysteine-rich iron regulating peptide. Increased hepcidin concentrations lead to iron sequestration in macrophages, contributing to the pathogenesis of anaemia of chronic disease whereas decreased hepcidin is observed in iron deficiency and primary iron overload diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis. Hepcidin quantification in human blood or urine may provide further insights for the pathogenesis of disorders of iron homeostasis and might prove a valuable tool for clinicians for the differential diagnosis of anaemia. This study describes a specific and non-operator demanding immunoassay for hepcidin quantification in human sera. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An ELISA assay was developed for measuring hepcidin serum concentration using a recombinant hepcidin25-His peptide and a polyclonal antibody against this peptide, which was able to identify native hepcidin. The ELISA assay had a detection range of 10-1500 microg/L and a detection limit of 5.4 microg/L. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variance ranged from 8-15% and 5-16%, respectively. Mean linearity and recovery were 101% and 107%, respectively. Mean hepcidin levels were significantly lower in 7 patients with juvenile hemochromatosis (12.8 microg/L and 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia (15.7 microg/L and higher in 7 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (116.7 microg/L compared to 32 age-matched healthy controls (42.7 microg/L. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a new simple ELISA assay for measuring hepcidin in human serum with sufficient accuracy and reproducibility.

  6. A cell-based fluorescent glucose transporter assay for SGLT2 inhibitor discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 is responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney, and currently, SGLT2 inhibitors are considered as promising hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. By constructing CHO cell lines that stably express the human SGLT2 transmembrane protein, along with a fluorescent glucose transporter assay that uses 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG as a glucose analog, we have developed a nonradioactive, cell-based assay for the discovery and characterization of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  7. Optimization of a colorimetric assay for glycosylated human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohney, J.P.; Feldhoff, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay has been used for several years to quantitate the amount of glucose which has been non-enzymatically linked to hemoglobin and other proteins. The ketoamine-protein adduct is converted to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by mild hydrolysis with oxalic acid. Reaction of HMF with TBA yields a colored product which has an absorbance maximum at 443 nm. Several modifications of the original procedure has been published, but none permit the unambiguous quantitation of glycosylated human serum albumin (glc-HSA). Problems relate to reagent preparation and stability, the time and temperature of hydrolysis, the choice of standards, and background color corrections. The authors have found that maximum color yield occurs after hydrolysis in an autoclave for 2 h. This increases the sensitivity 3-fold and cuts the assay time in half relative to hydrolysis for 4.5 h at 100 0 C. A NaBH 4 reduction of a parallel protein sample must be performed to correct for variable background color associated with different sample sources and amounts. HMF can be used as a standard, however, corrections must be made for HMF degradation. Fructose is a better standard, but HMF formation from fructose is faster than formation from glc-HSA. This may result in an underestimate of percent glycosylation. The best standard appears to be glc-HSA prepared with [ 3 H]glucose. It appears that with proper controls and standards the TBA assay can be used to determine actual rather than relative percent glycosylation

  8. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  9. Development of a recombinant DNA assay system for the detection of genetic change in astronauts' cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchley, S.V.; Chen, D.J.C.; Strniste, G.F.; Walters, R.A.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    We are developing a new recombinant DNA system for the detection and measurement of genetic change in humans caused by exposure to low level ionizing radiation. A unique feature of the method is the use of cloned repetitive DNA probes to assay human DNA for structural changes during or after irradiation. Repetitive sequences exist in different families. Collectively they constitute over 25% of the DNA in a human cell. Repeat families have between 10 and 500,000 members. We have constructed repetitive DNA sequence libraries using recombinant DNA techniques. From these libraries we have isolated and characterized individual repeats comprising 75 to 90% of the mass of human repetitive DNA. Repeats used in our assay system exist in tandem arrays in the genome. Perturbation of these sequences in a cell, followed by detection with a repeat probe, produces a new, multimeric ''ladder'' pattern on an autoradiogram. The repeat probe used in our initial study is complementary to 1% of human DNA. Therefore, the sensitivity of this method is several orders of magnitude better than existing assays. Preliminary evidence from human skin cells exposed to acute, low-dose x-ray treatments indicates that DNA is affected at a dose as low as 5R. The radiation doses used in this system are well within the range of doses received by astronauts during spaceflight missions. Due to its small material requirements, this technique could easily be adapted for use in space. 16 refs., 1 fig

  10. Stem cell-like differentiation potentials of endometrial side population cells as revealed by a newly developed in vivo endometrial stem cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP, but not endometrial main population cells (EMP, exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay.ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom, a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells.We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo endometrial tissue reconstitution. Using this assay, we demonstrated that ESP

  11. Phenolsulphotransferase in human tissue: radiochemical enzymatic assay and biochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.J.; Weinshilboum, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Phenolsulphotransferase (EC 2.8.2.1) (PST) is an important catecholamine and drug metabolizing enzyme. Optimal conditions have been determined for the accurate measurement of PST activity in the human platelet, human renal cortex, and human jejunum with a radiochemical microassay. 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 35 S-3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate ( 35 S-PAPS) were the substrates for the reaction. The apparent Michaelis-Menten (Ksub(m)) values for MHPG with platelet, renal cortex, and jejunum were 1.09, 0.46 and 1.16 mmol/l, respectively. Apparent Ksub(m) values for PAPS in the same tissues were 0.14, 0.13 and 0.21 μmol/l. The pH optimum of the reacton in all three tissues was approximately 6.2-6.8 with three different buffer systems. The coefficients of variation for the assay of platelet, renal cortex, and jejunal activities were 6.2%, 3.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Mean platelet PST activity in blood samples from 75 randomly selected adult subjects was 5.0 +- 1.72 mmol of MHPG sulfate formed per hour per mg of platelet protein (8.3 X 10 -5 +- 2.9 X 10 -5 μmol min -1 mg -1 , mean +- S.D.). There was a 5-fold intersubject variation in platelet PST activity within two standard deviations of the mean value. Experiments in which partially purified human erythrocyte PST was added to platelet, kidney and gut homogenates under these assay conditions provided evidence that endogenous PST inhibitors did not affect the observed enzyme activity. (Auth.)

  12. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalization assays: cell viability and radioligand integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Sosabowski, Jane K; Nagra, Saeed Ahamad; Ishfaq, Malik M; Mather, Stephen J; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalization assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalized peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalized peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalisation assays: Cell viability and radioligand integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza Naqvi, Syed Ali; Sosabowski, Jane K.; Ahamad Nagra, Saeed; Ishfaq, Malik M.; Mather, Stephen J.; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalisation assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalised peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalised peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times.

  14. Optimization of a colorimetric assay for glycosylated human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohney, J.P.; Feldhoff, R.C.

    1986-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay has been used for several years to quantitate the amount of glucose which has been non-enzymatically linked to hemoglobin and other proteins. The ketoamine-protein adduct is converted to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by mild hydrolysis with oxalic acid. Reaction of HMF with TBA yields a colored product which has an absorbance maximum at 443 nm. Several modifications of the original procedure has been published, but none permit the unambiguous quantitation of glycosylated human serum albumin (glc-HSA). Problems relate to reagent preparation and stability, the time and temperature of hydrolysis, the choice of standards, and background color corrections. The authors have found that maximum color yield occurs after hydrolysis in an autoclave for 2 h. This increases the sensitivity 3-fold and cuts the assay time in half relative to hydrolysis for 4.5 h at 100/sup 0/C. A NaBH/sub 4/ reduction of a parallel protein sample must be performed to correct for variable background color associated with different sample sources and amounts. HMF can be used as a standard, however, corrections must be made for HMF degradation. Fructose is a better standard, but HMF formation from fructose is faster than formation from glc-HSA. This may result in an underestimate of percent glycosylation. The best standard appears to be glc-HSA prepared with (/sup 3/H)glucose. It appears that with proper controls and standards the TBA assay can be used to determine actual rather than relative percent glycosylation.

  15. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  16. Expression of assayable residual stem cell damage in erythroid differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.E.; Miller, M.E.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    In rodents, residual damage is inducible in hematopoietic stem cells by exposure to ionizing radiation or alkylating agents. This damage can b e assayed in mice by transferring bone marrow into lethally irradiated syngeneic recipients and subsequently measuring the incremental increase of-( 125 I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation in spleens. In this study, bone marrow from mice treated 3 weeks previously with Methylnitrosourea (50 mg/kg) or 450 rad was injected into recipients in order to determine possible residual effects of treatment of erythroid cell differentiation following stem cell seeding. Such effects were detected by a reduced amount of 59 Fe incorporation into spleens, thus indicatin g transfer of residual stem cell damage to differentiating cells. (orig.)

  17. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2007-06-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we compared the colony staining efficiencies of the widely used methylene blue, and Ethidium bromide (ETeB) stains. Results show that the ETeB protocol works well on plastic and is extremely effective for staining colonies on collagen when compared to methylene blue. The key features and advantages of ETeB technique are; (a) reduction in background for colonies grown on collagen and possibly other substrates, (b) the whole procedure takes less than a minute, (c) no post-stain washing step is required which eliminates colony losses for cell lines that are loosely adherent, (d) colony visualization and counting can be done immediately following the staining procedure using a standard UV illuminator and software, and (e) the method works across a wide variety of cell lines. The simplicity and robustness of this procedure should warrant its usage in both small and large-scale clonogenic experiments.

  18. An assay for the assessment of lipocortin 1 levels in human lung lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S F; Goulding, N J; Godolphin, J L; Tetley, T D; Roberts, C M; Guz, A; Flower, R J

    1990-07-20

    The physiological function of the lipocortins, proteins which are thought to be glucocorticoid-regulated, is unclear. An improved assay for lipocortins might help to elucidate their role. A rapid and specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for lipocortin 1 with a working range of 1-2000 ng/ml and an interrun coefficient of variation of less than 10% is described and used in this pilot study to quantify human lipocortin 1 for the first time in acellular bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and in media conditioned by BAL cells, from control patients and those with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Using this assay a statistically significant relationship, not previously observed in man, has been demonstrated between concentrations of lipocortin 1/ml of BALF and serum cortisol levels (n = 10, rs = 0.6939, P less than 0.05). Although lipocortin 1 levels in acellular BALF were the same in control and sarcoid patients, significantly more lipocortin 1 was released from sarcoid BAL cells in culture (median 21.6, range 8.1-45.4 ng lipocortin/10(6) cells/h in culture) than from control cells (2.5, 1.5-7.6 ng lipocortin/10(6) cells/h in culture). The possible clinical significance of these data is discussed, but remains to be established.

  19. Sensing radiosensitivity of human epidermal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachidi, Walid; Harfourche, Ghida; Lemaitre, Gilles; Amiot, Franck; Vaigot, Pierre; Martin, Michele T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitivity of stem cells is a matter of debate. For mouse somatic stem cells, both radiosensitive and radioresistant stem cells have been described. By contrast, the response of human stem cells to radiation has been poorly studied. As epidermis is a radiosensitive tissue, we evaluated in the present work the radiosensitivity of cell populations enriched for epithelial stem cells of human epidermis. Methods and materials: The total keratinocyte population was enzymatically isolated from normal human skin. We used flow cytometry and antibodies against cell surface markers to isolate basal cell populations from human foreskin. Cell survival was measured after a dose of 2 Gy with the XTT assay at 72 h after exposure and with a clonogenic assay at 2 weeks. Transcriptome analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays was performed to assess the genomic cell responses to radiation. Results: Cell sorting based on two membrane proteins, α6 integrin and the transferrin receptor CD71, allowed isolation of keratinocyte populations enriched for the two types of cells found in the basal layer of epidermis: stem cells and progenitors. Both the XTT assay and the clonogenic assay showed that the stem cells were radioresistant whereas the progenitors were radiosensitive. We made the hypothesis that upstream DNA damage signalling might be different in the stem cells and used microarray technology to test this hypothesis. The stem cells exhibited a much more reduced gene response to a dose of 2 Gy than the progenitors, as we found that 6% of the spotted genes were regulated in the stem cells and 20% in the progenitors. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, we found that radiation exposure induced very specific pathways in the stem cells. The most striking responses were the repression of a network of genes involved in apoptosis and the induction of a network of cytokines and growth factors. Conclusion: These results show for the first time that keratinocyte

  20. Single Cell Assay for Analyzing Single Cell Exosome and Endocrine Secretion and Cancer Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Jui

    To understand the inhomogeneity of cells in biological systems, there is a growing demand for the capability to characterize the properties of individual single cells. Since single cell studies require continuous monitoring of the cell behaviors instead of a snapshot test at a single time point, an effective single-cell assay that can support time lapsed studies in a high throughput manner is desired. Most currently available single-cell technologies cannot provide proper environments to sustain cell growth and cannot provide, for appropriate cell types, proliferation of single cells and convenient, non-invasive tests of single cell behaviors from molecular markers. In this dissertation, I present a highly versatile single-cell assay that can accommodate different cellular types, enable easy and efficient single cell loading and culturing, and be suitable for the study of effects of in-vitro environmental factors in combination with drug screening. The salient features of the assay are the non-invasive collection and surveying of single cell secretions at different time points and massively parallel translocation of single cells by user defined criteria, producing very high compatibility to the downstream process such as single cell qPCR and sequencing. Above all, the acquired information is quantitative -- for example, one of the studies is measured by the number of exosomes each single cell secretes for a given time period. Therefore, our single-cell assay provides a convenient, low-cost, and enabling tool for quantitative, time lapsed studies of single cell properties.

  1. A Modified NK Cell Degranulation Assay Applicable for Routine Evaluation of NK Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Shabrish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play important role in innate immunity against tumors and viral infections. Studies show that lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, CD107a is a marker for degranulation of NK and cytotoxic T cells and its expression is a sensitive marker for the cytotoxic activity determination. The conventional methods of determination of CD107a on NK cells involve use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC or pure NK cells and K562 cells as stimulants. Thus, it requires large volume of blood sample which is usually difficult to obtain in pediatric patients and patients with cytopenia and also requires specialized laboratory for maintaining cell line. We have designed a flow cytometric assay to determine CD107a on NK cells using whole blood, eliminating the need for isolation of PBMC or isolate NK cells. This assay uses phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA and calcium ionophore (Ca2+-ionophore instead of K562 cells for stimulation and thus does not require specialized cell culture laboratory. CD107a expression on NK cells using modified NK cell degranulation assay compared to the conventional assay was significantly elevated (p<0.0001. It was also validated by testing patients diagnosed with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL with defect in exocytosis. This assay is rapid, cost effective, and reproducible and requires significantly less volume of blood which is important for clinical evaluation of NK cells.

  2. Ultra-Sensitive HIV-1 Latency Viral Outgrowth Assays Using Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kimberly; Akkina, Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    In the current quest for a complete cure for HIV/AIDS, highly sensitive HIV-1 latency detection methods are critical to verify full viral eradication. Until now, the in vitro quantitative viral outgrowth assays (qVOA) have been the gold standard for assessing latent HIV-1 viral burden. However, these assays have been inadequate in detecting the presence of ultralow levels of latent virus in a number of patients who were initially thought to have been cured, but eventually showed viral rebound. In this context, new approaches utilizing in vivo mouse-based VOAs are promising. In the murine VOA (mVOA), large numbers of CD4 + T cells or PBMC from aviremic subjects are xenografted into immunodeficient NSG mice, whereas in the humanized mouse-based VOA (hmVOA) patient CD4 + T cell samples are injected into BLT or hu-hematopoetic stem cells (hu-HSC) humanized mice. While latent virus could be recovered in both of these systems, the hmVOA provides higher sensitivity than the mVOA using a fewer number of input cells. In contrast to the mVOA, the hmVOA provides a broader spectrum of highly susceptible HIV-1 target cells and enables newly engrafted cells to home into preformed human lymphoid organs where they can infect cells in situ after viral activation. Hu-mice also allow for both xenograft- and allograft-driven cell expansions with less severe GvH providing a longer time frame for potential viral outgrowth from cells with a delayed latent viral activation. Based on these advantages, the hmVOA has great potential in playing an important role in HIV-1 latency and cure research.

  3. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput scr...... not be suited for sophisticated studies of GlyR pharmacology and kinetics. However, the assay offers several advantages in studies of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, the assay could be highly useful in the search for structurally novel ligands acting at GlyRs.......In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput...... ion did not appear to potentiate GlyR function at lower concentrations. Analogously, whereas pregnenolone sulphate inhibited alpha1 GlyR function, the potentiation of alpha1 GlyR by pregnenolone in electrophysiological studies could not be reproduced in the assay. In conclusion, the FMP assay may...

  4. Spectrophotometric assay of creatinine in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Krishnegowda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new spectrophotometric method for the analysis of creatinine concentration in human serum samples is developed. The method explores the oxidation of p-methylamino phenol sulfate (Metol in the presence of copper sulfate and creatinine which yields an intense violet colored species with maximum absorbance at 530 nm. The calibration graph of creatinine by fixed time assay ranged from 4.4 to 620 μM. Recovery of creatinine in human serum samples varied from 101% to 106%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.145 μM and 0.487 μM respectively. Sandell’s sensitivity was 0.112 μg cm−2 and molar absorptivity was 0.101 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Within day precision was 2.5–4.8% and day-to-day precision range was 3.2–7.8%. The robustness and ruggedness of the method expressed in RSD values ranged from 0.78% to 2.12% and 1.32% to 3.46% respectively, suggesting that the developed method was rugged. This method provides good sensitivity and is comparable to standard Jaffe’s method with comparatively less interference from foreign substances.

  5. Aloe vera is non-toxic to cells: A microculture tetrazolium technique colorimetric assay study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Gopakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aloe vera (Av, a succulent of Liliaceae family is now a widely used medicinal plant. Its′ application covers a wide spectrum of human diseases, including oral mucosa, gastric mucosa and skin. Aloe vera preparations in the form of gel, mouth washes and cream are applied topically for many oral diseases. The applications include oral lichen planus, candidiasis, oral submucous fibrosis, geographic tongue, etc. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the cytotoxicity of Av on human fibroblasts. Materials and Methods: Aloe vera preparation (70% was applied on the fibroblast cell lineage and the cell viability was evaluated by microculture tetrazolium technique (MTT colorimetric assay. Results: The cell viability at different concentrations was measured. The cells have maintained their viability at different concentrations used in the study. Conclusion: Our study shows the cell viability at different sample concentrations of Av. This could open up wide clinical applications of Av for reactive, inflammatory and potentially malignant oral and other mucocutaneous diseases.

  6. Verification of the harmonization of human epididymis protein 4 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simona; Borille, Simona; Carnevale, Assunta; Frusciante, Erika; Bassani, Niccolò; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    Serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has gained relevance as an ovarian cancer (OC) biomarker and new automated methods have replaced the first released manual EIA by tracing results to it. We verified agreement and bias of automated methods vs. EIA as well as possible effects on patients' management. One hundred and fifteen serum samples were measured by Abbott Architect i2000, Fujirebio Lumipulse G1200, Roche Modular E170, and Fujirebio EIA. Passing-Bablok regression was used to compare automated assays to EIA and agreement between methods was estimated by Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). The bias vs. EIA was estimated and compared to specifications derived from HE4 biological variation. Median (25th-75th percentiles) HE4 concentrations (pmol/L) were 84.5 (60.1-148.8) for EIA, 82.7 (50.3-153.9) for Abbott, 89.1 (55.2-154.9) for Roche, and 112.2 (67.8-194.2) for Fujirebio. Estimated regressions and agreements (95% confidence interval) were: Abbott=1.01(0.98-1.03) EIA-4.8(-7.5/-2.6), CCC=0.99(0.99-1.00); Roche=0.91(0.89-0.93) EIA+5.7(4.2/8.0), CCC=0.98(0.98-0.99); Fujirebio=1.20(1.17-1.24) EIA+ 2.4(-0.6/4.9), CCC=0.97(0.96-0.98). The average bias vs. EIA resulted within the desirable goal for Abbott [-3.3% (-6.1/-0.5)] and Roche [-0.2% (-3.0/2.5)]. However, while for Abbott the bias was constant and acceptable along the measurement concentration range, Roche bias increased up to -28% for HE4 values >250 pmol/L. Lumipulse showed a markedly positive bias [25.3% (21.8/28.8)]. Abbott and Roche assays exhibited a good comparability in the range of HE4 values around the previously recommended 140 pmol/L cut-off. For patient monitoring, however, the assay used for determining serial HE4 must not be changed as results from different systems in lower and higher concentration ranges can markedly differ.

  7. In Vitro Bioluminescence Assay to Characterize Circadian Rhythm in Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingzhu; Kang, Hwan-Goo; Park, Youngil; Estrella, Brian; Zarbl, Helmut

    2017-09-28

    The circadian rhythm is a fundamental physiological process present in all organisms that regulates biological processes ranging from gene expression to sleep behavior. In vertebrates, circadian rhythm is controlled by a molecular oscillator that functions in both the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; central pacemaker) and individual cells comprising most peripheral tissues. More importantly, disruption of circadian rhythm by exposure to light-at-night, environmental stressors and/or toxicants is associated with increased risk of chronic diseases and aging. The ability to identify agents that can disrupt central and/or peripheral biological clocks, and agents that can prevent or mitigate the effects of circadian disruption, has significant implications for prevention of chronic diseases. Although rodent models can be used to identify exposures and agents that induce or prevent/mitigate circadian disruption, these experiments require large numbers of animals. In vivo studies also require significant resources and infrastructure, and require researchers to work all night. Thus, there is an urgent need for a cell-type appropriate in vitro system to screen for environmental circadian disruptors and enhancers in cell types from different organs and disease states. We constructed a vector that drives transcription of the destabilized luciferase in eukaryotic cells under the control of the human PERIOD 2 gene promoter. This circadian reporter construct was stably transfected into human mammary epithelial cells, and circadian responsive reporter cells were selected to develop the in vitro bioluminescence assay. Here, we present a detailed protocol to establish and validate the assay. We further provide details for proof of concept experiments demonstrating the ability of our in vitro assay to recapitulate the in vivo effects of various chemicals on the cellular biological clock. The results indicate that the assay can be adapted to a variety of cell types to screen for both

  8. MODERATE CYTOTOXICITY OF PROANTHOCYANIDINS TO HUMAN TUMOR-CELL LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOLODZIEJ, H; HABERLAND, C; WOERDENBAG, HJ; KONINGS, AWT

    In the present study the cytotoxicity of 16 proanthocyanidins was evaluated in GLC(4), a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, and in COLO 320, a human colorectal cancer cell line, using the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. With IC50 values ranging from 18 to >200 mu m following continuous

  9. Simultaneous assay for plasmin and DNase using radiolabeled human fibroblasts on microcarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, G.S.; Dimitrijevich, S.D.; Gracy, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    A critical step in tissue and wound repair is the removal of eschar--accumulation of denatured cellular and extracellular macromolecules. Enzymatic debridement using a combination of plasmin (fibrinolysin) and DNase has been successfully utilized on a variety of types of wounds. Monitoring the activity of these enzymes by measuring the rate of fibrinolysis, or by viscometric changes due to DNA hydrolysis, is exceedingly cumbersome, time consuming, and, at best, only semiquantitative. Although spectrophotometric assays using synthetic substrates offer several advantages, they do not allow extrapolation of the data to the more complex natural substrates encountered in vivo. We have, therefore, developed an in vitro radioisotopic assay for the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the hydrolytic activity of both plasmin and DNase. Double labeled ([3H]thymidine, [14C]leucine) human dermal fibroblasts grown on microcarrier beads are utilized as sources of nucleic acid and protein substrates. The assay meets all the criteria of analytical validity, is sensitive and rapid, and is amenable to adaptation for analysis of other hydrolytic enzymes. The method offers a direct evaluation of the enzymatic debridement of wounds using actual human cellular substrates. Moreover, the microcarriers provide a greatly increased surface area for cell attachment and growth, are amenable to rapid separation from the cells by simple mechanical methods, and are ideally suited to analytical manipulations

  10. Direct measurement of the precursors of adrenocorticotropin in human plasma by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, S.R.; Stewart, M.F.; Ratcliffe, J.G.; White, A.

    1988-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the direct measurement of the precursors of ACTH in unextracted human plasma has been developed and evaluated clinically in normal subjects and patients with disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The IRMA is based on an iodinated monoclonal antibody to ACTH and a monoclonal antibody to gamma MSH coupled to Sephacryl S300. The assay detects only peptides containing both epitopes, i.e. POMC (31K) and pro-ACTH (22K). The reference standard was partially purified POMC from culture medium of human corticotroph adenoma cells. The detection limit (greater than +2.5SD of the 0 standard) was 2.0 pmol/L and the within-assay coefficient of variation was less than 10% between 29 and 2600 pmol/L. Plasma concentrations of ACTH precursor peptides in 11 normal subjects sampled at 0930 h ranged from 5-34 pmol/L. The concentrations in the patient groups studied were: 260-2300 pmol/L in 5 patients with the ectopic ACTH syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer, less than 2.0-104 pmol/L in 10 patients with pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease, 23 pmol/L in a patient with Nelson's syndrome, and 3.0-230 pmol/L in 5 patients with Addison's disease. We conclude that this IRMA offers a simple and reliable method for measuring ACTH precursors in unextracted plasma. The proportionately greater elevation of ACTH precursors compared to ACTH in patients with the ectopic ACTH syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer but not in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome, suggests that this assay may be clinically useful

  11. The loss-of-allele assay for ES cell screening and mouse genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendewey, David; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Esau, Lakeisha; Om, Jinsop; Xue, Yingzi; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Valenzuela, David M

    2010-01-01

    (qPCR) as our method of allele quantification, but any method that can reliably distinguish the difference between one and two copies of the target gene can be used to develop an LOA assay. We have designed qPCR LOA assays for deletions, insertions, point mutations, domain swaps, conditional, and humanized alleles and have used the insert assays to quantify the copy number of random insertion BAC transgenics. Because of its quantitative precision, specificity, and compatibility with high throughput robotic operations, the LOA assay eliminates bottlenecks in ES cell screening and mouse genotyping and facilitates maximal speed and throughput for knockout mouse production. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism profiles in clinical samples by the Trofile and MT-2 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B

    2009-11-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  13. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-01

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems

  14. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  15. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity study of 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane and 1,1,3-trichloropropene, using the micronucleus test and the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay) in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, M; Kirsch-Volders, M

    1996-12-20

    The main objective of this study was to compare the cytotoxic genotoxic and mutagenic activity of a number of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are widely used as chemical intermediates, solvents, degreasing agents etc. in industry, and to establish the structure-toxicity relationship of the chemicals by using the most adequate determinants in estimating their toxicity. The mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of some of the candidate chemicals, namely 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane and 1,1,3-trichloropropene were evaluated in an in vitro micronucleus assay. The cytokinesis-block methodology was applied on human lymphocytes in the presence or absence of an external metabolic activation system (S9-mix). In the micronucleus assay, all test substances, except 1,2,3-trichloropropane with and without S9-mix and 1,1,2-trichloroethane without S9-mix in the repeated experiment, exhibited a low but statistically significant mutagenic activity, compared to the concurrent control. However, none of the five chemicals was able to induce a clear and reproducible linear dose-dependent increase in micronucleus frequencies in this assay. Generally, mutagenic activity of the chemicals was found in the absence of severe cytotoxicity and/or cell cycle delay. The DNA breakage capacity and the cytotoxicity of these chemicals were also assessed in the alkaline single cell gel (SCG) electrophoresis test (comet assay) with and without S9-mix in isolated human lymphocytes. All chemical compounds induced DNA breakage, in the presence or absence of the metabolic activation system, at the doses tested. The data showed that the DNA reactivity of the chemicals increased with increasing degree of halogenation. The results of the present work suggested that the comet assay might be a more suitable and sensitive screening method than the micronucleus test for this particular class of compound. However, both assays do detect different

  17. Functional cell mediated lympholysis I. Description of the assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeken, N.E.; Thompson, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The anamnestic response by human bi-directional (BD) mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) to restimulation by cells of the original stimulating type is generally strikingly reduced as compared to that of standard one-way cultures. This difference was shown not to be related to a change in kinetics nor was it due to exhaustion of the media or soluble factors since fresh media did not ameliorate the effect nor were supernatants from BD cultures found to be suppressive. The relative inhibition was also not reversed by removal of the allogeneic cells by phenotype specific antiserum. Cytotoxic tests with donor and responder specific antisera revealed that the cells bearing that phenotype were dramatically reduced in BD as compared to one-way cultures. Thus, the diminished secondary response appears to be due to cytotoxic elimination of the responder cells. This allogeneic cytotoxicity is dependent on non-T, phagocytic, adherent cells. The phenomenon is called Functional Cell Mediated Lympholysis (F-CML). (author)

  18. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novielli Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells, images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P

  19. A novel high-throughput assay for islet respiration reveals uncoupling of rodent and human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob D Wikstrom

    Full Text Available The pancreatic beta cell is unique in its response to nutrient by increased fuel oxidation. Recent studies have demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR may be a valuable predictor of islet quality and long term nutrient responsiveness. To date, high-throughput and user-friendly assays for islet respiration are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop such an assay and to examine bioenergetic efficiency of rodent and human islets.The XF24 respirometer platform was adapted to islets by the development of a 24-well plate specifically designed to confine islets. The islet plate generated data with low inter-well variability and enabled stable measurement of oxygen consumption for hours. The F1F0 ATP synthase blocker oligomycin was used to assess uncoupling while rotenone together with myxothiazol/antimycin was used to measure the level of non-mitochondrial respiration. The use of oligomycin in islets was validated by reversing its effect in the presence of the uncoupler FCCP. Respiratory leak averaged to 59% and 49% of basal OCR in islets from C57Bl6/J and FVB/N mice, respectively. In comparison, respiratory leak of INS-1 cells and C2C12 myotubes was measured to 38% and 23% respectively. Islets from a cohort of human donors showed a respiratory leak of 38%, significantly lower than mouse islets.The assay for islet respiration presented here provides a novel tool that can be used to study islet mitochondrial function in a relatively high-throughput manner. The data obtained in this study shows that rodent islets are less bioenergetically efficient than human islets as well as INS1 cells.

  20. Discriminating the hemolytic risk of blood type A plasmas using the complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Hair, Pamela S; Krishna, Neel K; Sass, Megan A; Enos, Clinton W; Whitley, Pamela H; Maes, Lanne Y; Goldberg, Corinne L

    2017-03-01

    The agglutination-based cross-matching method is sensitive for antibody binding to red blood cells but is only partially predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis, which is important in many acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Here, we describe complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assays that directly evaluate complement-mediated hemolysis between individual serum-plasma and red blood cell combinations. The CHUHE assay is used to evaluate correlations between agglutination titers and complement-mediated hemolysis as well as the hemolytic potential of plasma from type A blood donors. Plasma or serum from each type A blood donor was incubated with AB or B red blood cells in the CHUHE assay and measured for free hemoglobin release. CHUHE assays for serum or plasma demonstrate a wide, dynamic range and high sensitivity for complement-mediated hemolysis for individual serum/plasma and red blood cell combinations. CHUHE results suggest that agglutination assays alone are only moderately predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis. CHUHE results also suggest that plasma from particular type A blood donors produce minimal complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas plasma from other type A blood donors produce moderate to high-level complement-mediated hemolysis, depending on the red blood cell donor. The current results indicate that the CHUHE assay can be used to assess complement-mediated hemolysis for plasma or serum from a type A blood donor, providing additional risk discrimination over agglutination titers alone. © 2016 AABB.

  1. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  2. Cryopreservation of human blood for alkaline and Fpg-modified comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2016-01-01

    The Comet assay is a reproducible and sensitive assay for the detection of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells and tissues. Incorporation of lesion specific, oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes (for example, Fpg, OGG1 and EndoIII) in the standard alkaline Comet assay procedure allows for the detection and measurement of oxidative DNA damage. The Comet assay using white blood cells (WBC) has proven useful in monitoring DNA damage from environmental agents in humans. However, it is often impractical to performance Comet assay immediately after blood sampling. Thus, storage of blood sample is required. In this study, we developed and tested a simple storage method for very small amount of whole blood for standard and Fpg-modified modified Comet assay. Whole blood was stored in RPMI 1640 media containing 10% FBS, 10% DMSO and 1 mM deferoxamine at a sample to media ratio of 1:50. Samples were stored at -20 °C and -80 °C for 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. Isolated lymphocytes from the same subjects were also stored under the same conditions for comparison. Direct DNA strand breakage and oxidative DNA damage in WBC and lymphocytes were analyzed using standard and Fpg-modified alkaline Comet assay and compared with freshly analyzed samples. No significant changes in either direct DNA strand breakage or oxidative DNA damage was seen in WBC and lymphocytes stored at -20 °C for 1 and 7 days compared to fresh samples. However, significant increases in both direct and oxidative DNA damage were seen in samples stored at -20 °C for 14 and 28 days. No changes in direct and oxidative DNA damage were observed in WBC and lymphocytes stored at -80 °C for up to 28 days. These results identified the proper storage conditions for storing whole blood or isolated lymphocytes to evaluate direct and oxidative DNA damage using standard and Fpg-modified alkaline Comet assay.

  3. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A simple fluorescence based assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus particle release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuser Anke-Mareil

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly and release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV particles from infected cells represent attractive, but not yet exploited targets for antiretroviral therapy. The availability of simple methods to measure the efficiency of these replication steps in tissue culture would facilitate the identification of host factors essential for these processes as well as the screening for lead compounds acting as specific inhibitors of particle formation. We describe here the development of a rapid cell based assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 particle assembly and/or release. Results Using a fluorescently labelled HIV-derivative, which carries an eYFP domain within the main viral structural protein Gag in the complete viral protein context, the release of virus like particles could be monitored by directly measuring the fluorescence intensity of the tissue culture supernatant. Intracellular Gag was quantitated in parallel by direct fluorescence analysis of cell lysates, allowing us to normalize for Gag expression efficiency. The assay was validated by comparison with p24 capsid ELISA measurements, a standard method for quantifying HIV-1 particles. Optimization of conditions allowed the robust detection of particle amounts corresponding to 50 ng p24/ml in medium by fluorescence spectroscopy. Further adaptation to a multi-well format rendered the assay suitable for medium or high throughput screening of siRNA libraries to identify host cell factors involved in late stages of HIV replication, as well as for random screening approaches to search for potential inhibitors of HIV-1 assembly or release. Conclusions The fast and simple fluorescence based quantification of HIV particle release yielded reproducible results which were comparable to the well established ELISA measurements, while in addition allowing the parallel determination of intracellular Gag expression. The protocols described here

  5. Marrow stem cell release in the autorepopulation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, M A; Patt, H M [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Lab. of Radiobiology

    1978-01-01

    The early migration of stem cells from shielded marrow to an irradiated spleen has been re-evaluated, and the findings have been compared with the results of earlier studies. The composite data reveal a constant rate during the first 24 h after irradiation, with a slope of 1.6 cells per h and an intercept of 2.4. The positive intercept is interpreted to signify an immediate brief perturbation of CFU/sub s/ release. The low concentration of CFU/sub s/ in the bloodstream, despite their continuous migration from the shielded marrow, is indicative of a rapid, and probably greatly increased, blood turnover. Despite the constancy of stem cell seeding, it is not yet possible to determine whether the rate of stem cell release is different in shielded marrow than in normal marrow. The resolution of this question requires more precise information about spleen seeding efficiency in the autorepopulation assay and about the normal turnover rate of stem cells in the bloodstream.

  6. Two-site sandwich immunoradiometric assay of human lymphotoxin with monoclonal antibodies and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meager, A; Parti, S; Leung, H; Woolley, J; Peil, E; Sidhu, S; Roberts, T

    1987-11-23

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs L49-15, L81-11 and L238-14) were raised against recombinant human lymphotoxin (rLT) derived from E. coli containing the cDNA sequence specifying LT. These MoAbs were ideal reagents for immunoassay of LT and a very sensitive, highly specific immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) was developed. This assay was rapid to perform and was capable of detecting as little as 10 pg/ml of LT. Application of the LT IRMA in combination with previously developed human gamma-interferon (IFN-..gamma..) and human tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific IRMA permitted independent estimations of these three substances to be carried out in parallel. By these means, it was found that RPMI 1788 lymphoblastoid cell line produced both LT and TNF, but not IFN-..gamma... Extensive analyses on cytokine (monokine and lymphokine) preparations derived from a variety of activated lymphocytes are also reported. Co-production of LT, TNF, and IFN-..gamma.. was a common finding, even occurring in alloantigen-specific T helper cell clones. 45 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs.

  7. Determination of antipsychotic drug in human serum by radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinchang; Jiang Yimin

    1989-01-01

    Serum antipsychotic drug in 50 psychosis cases were measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and the values were compared in parallel with that by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results showed that the RRA values were lower than the RIA values, but both assays gave significant correlation between the serum drug level and antipsychotic dose

  8. EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity assays for determination of neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Brown, J Edward; Torabazar, Nahid R; Smith, Leonard A

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant ricin toxin A-chain 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc), developed at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases as a vaccine candidate, is under investigation in a phase 1 clinical study. To effectively evaluate the immunogenicity of this ricin vaccine and to eliminate the use of radioactive material, an EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay using a CellTiter 96 AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay Reagent has been developed, optimized, and applied in the vaccine efficacy studies. The TNA assay measures the protective neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies in animal sera by determining the cell viability after ricin exposure in the assay system and comparing it to a purified mouse polyclonal antiricin IgG standard curve. The standard curve of the anti-ricin TNA assay closely fits a four-parameter logistic regression model. The unknown test sample concentration was expressed as microg/mL, but not the 50% effective concentration (EC50), which was determined by most TNA assays. The neutralizing endpoint titers, not the 50% effective dilution (ED50), of human specimens were measured with the TNA assay in support of the clinical study of the RVEc vaccine. The optimal amount of ricin toxin, EL4 cells, and concentration of standards used in the assay system was established to minimize false-negative and false-positive results of serum specimens from the nonclinical and clinical studies of RVEc. The testing conditions were adjusted to optimize assay performance. The colorimetric TNA assay replaced a radioactive TNA assay previously used in the ricin vaccine studies.

  9. Using reporter gene assays to identify cis regulatory differences between humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Adrien; Shrit, Ralla A; Blekhman, Ran; Gilad, Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Most phenotypic differences between human and chimpanzee are likely to result from differences in gene regulation, rather than changes to protein-coding regions. To date, however, only a handful of human-chimpanzee nucleotide differences leading to changes in gene regulation have been identified. To hone in on differences in regulatory elements between human and chimpanzee, we focused on 10 genes that were previously found to be differentially expressed between the two species. We then designed reporter gene assays for the putative human and chimpanzee promoters of the 10 genes. Of seven promoters that we found to be active in human liver cell lines, human and chimpanzee promoters had significantly different activity in four cases, three of which recapitulated the gene expression difference seen in the microarray experiment. For these three genes, we were therefore able to demonstrate that a change in cis influences expression differences between humans and chimpanzees. Moreover, using site-directed mutagenesis on one construct, the promoter for the DDA3 gene, we were able to identify three nucleotides that together lead to a cis regulatory difference between the species. High-throughput application of this approach can provide a map of regulatory element differences between humans and our close evolutionary relatives.

  10. Assessment of radiation induced cytogenetic damage in human keratinocytes by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev Ganesh; Narayana, Y.; Puthali, Abhay; Bhat, N.N.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the effect of gamma radiation on normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells has been analyzed using alkaline comet assay and a comparative study over the sensitivity of different comet parameters such as tail length (TL), olive tail moment (OTM) and percentage tail DNA (TDNA) has also been made. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified essential medium (DMEM) (10% FCS) at 37 °C in a humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO 2 . Cultured cells were harvested with 0.025 % trypsin EDTA. The sample (2 X 10 cells/ml) was exposed to gamma radiation of different dose using a 60 Co gamma source at dose rate of 2 Gy min -1 and the dosimetry has been carried out using Fricke and FBX dosimeters. After irradiation, to quantify the DNA damage the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) was carried out under alkaline conditions, by the methods outlined by Singh et al. The quantification of the DNA strand breaks in each cells were performed using CASP software. The DNA damage quantification can be accomplished by measuring those comet parameters which exhibit a linear dependence on the amount of DNA damage. In the present study, comet parameters such as OTM, TL and TDNA were recorded and the variation of these parameters and their correlation coefficients for different doses of gamma radiation is plotted. The OTM value is normalized with control value and control for TL and TDNA is adjusted to zero to avoid initial variations in different experiments

  11. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring cell death in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, L; Aaronson, S A; Abrams, J; Alnemri, E S; Andrews, D W; Baehrecke, E H; Bazan, N G; Blagosklonny, M V; Blomgren, K; Borner, C; Bredesen, D E; Brenner, C; Castedo, M; Cidlowski, J A; Ciechanover, A; Cohen, G M; De Laurenzi, V; De Maria, R; Deshmukh, M; Dynlacht, B D; El-Deiry, W S; Flavell, R A; Fulda, S; Garrido, C; Golstein, P; Gougeon, M-L; Green, D R; Gronemeyer, H; Hajnóczky, G; Hardwick, J M; Hengartner, M O; Ichijo, H; Jäättelä, M; Kepp, O; Kimchi, A; Klionsky, D J; Knight, R A; Kornbluth, S; Kumar, S; Levine, B; Lipton, S A; Lugli, E; Madeo, F; Malomi, W; Marine, J-C W; Martin, S J; Medema, J P; Mehlen, P; Melino, G; Moll, U M; Morselli, E; Nagata, S; Nicholson, D W; Nicotera, P; Nuñez, G; Oren, M; Penninger, J; Pervaiz, S; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Prehn, J H M; Puthalakath, H; Rabinovich, G A; Rizzuto, R; Rodrigues, C M P; Rubinsztein, D C; Rudel, T; Scorrano, L; Simon, H-U; Steller, H; Tschopp, J; Tsujimoto, Y; Vandenabeele, P; Vitale, I; Vousden, K H; Youle, R J; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Kroemer, G

    2009-08-01

    Cell death is essential for a plethora of physiological processes, and its deregulation characterizes numerous human diseases. Thus, the in-depth investigation of cell death and its mechanisms constitutes a formidable challenge for fundamental and applied biomedical research, and has tremendous implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to standardize the experimental procedures that identify dying and dead cells in cell cultures and/or in tissues, from model organisms and/or humans, in healthy and/or pathological scenarios. Thus far, dozens of methods have been proposed to quantify cell death-related parameters. However, no guidelines exist regarding their use and interpretation, and nobody has thoroughly annotated the experimental settings for which each of these techniques is most appropriate. Here, we provide a nonexhaustive comparison of methods to detect cell death with apoptotic or nonapoptotic morphologies, their advantages and pitfalls. These guidelines are intended for investigators who study cell death, as well as for reviewers who need to constructively critique scientific reports that deal with cellular demise. Given the difficulties in determining the exact number of cells that have passed the point-of-no-return of the signaling cascades leading to cell death, we emphasize the importance of performing multiple, methodologically unrelated assays to quantify dying and dead cells.

  12. ASTRO Research Fellow Presentation - A comparison of the comet assay and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Eady, John J.; Peacock, John H.; Steel, G. Gordon

    1996-01-01

    -response relationship from 0 to 100 Gy. In contrast, PFGE was able to detect initial damage after 2 Gy and exhibited a linear dose-response relationship only up to 30-40 Gy. Residual damage was reliably detected after 40 Gy with the comet assay and after 20 Gy with PFGE. Both techniques exhibited a linear dose-response relationship for residual damage. Not only was the comet assay less sensitive in detecting initial and residual damage than PFGE, but the comet assay was also less accurate in detecting small differences in radiosensitivity in the panel of fibroblasts tested. A complete analysis of six cell lines with the comet assay and PFGE is underway and the results will be presented. Conclusions: The comet assay appears to be less sensitive than PFGE for use as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity in non-transformed human fibroblasts

  13. Pertussis serology: assessment of IgG anti-PT ELISA for replacement of the CHO cell assay*

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALBY, TINE; SØRENSEN, CHARLOTTE; PETERSEN, JESPER WESTPHAL; KROGFELT, KAREN ANGELIKI

    2010-01-01

    Dalby T, Sørensen C, Petersen JW, Krogfelt KA. Pertussis serology: assessment of IgG anti-PT ELISA for replacement of the CHO cell assay. APMIS 2010; 118: 968–72. Two types of serological assays are commonly used for the assessment of pertussis vaccine-induced antibodies; the Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO cell) assay and the immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti pertussis toxin (PT) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgG anti-PT ELISA). Recently, both the techniques have been modified to improve performance with sera with interfering activity (CHO cell assay) or with heat-treated sera (IgG anti-PT ELISA). These two improved techniques were compared by the analysis of 100 individual serum samples from a previous clinical trial and 213 sera from a longitudinal serum collection from 20 Danish adults recently vaccinated with the Danish acellular pertussis vaccine. The comparison showed a significant linear correlation between the results of the two assays with a p-value of ELISA can be used as a replacement for the often troublesome and time-consuming CHO cell assay for the measurement of vaccine-induced human antibodies to PT. PMID:21091778

  14. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  15. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A; Bradford, William D; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S; Li, Rong

    2015-03-30

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein-based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Zhu et al.

  16. A cell-based high-throughput screening assay for radiation susceptibility using automated cell counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodzic, Jasmina; Dingjan, Ilse; Maas, Mariëlle JP; Meulen-Muileman, Ida H van der; Menezes, Renee X de; Heukelom, Stan; Verheij, Marcel; Gerritsen, Winald R; Geldof, Albert A; Triest, Baukelien van; Beusechem, Victor W van

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the mainstays in the treatment for cancer, but its success can be limited due to inherent or acquired resistance. Mechanisms underlying radioresistance in various cancers are poorly understood and available radiosensitizers have shown only modest clinical benefit. There is thus a need to identify new targets and drugs for more effective sensitization of cancer cells to irradiation. Compound and RNA interference high-throughput screening technologies allow comprehensive enterprises to identify new agents and targets for radiosensitization. However, the gold standard assay to investigate radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, the colony formation assay (CFA), is unsuitable for high-throughput screening. We developed a new high-throughput screening method for determining radiation susceptibility. Fast and uniform irradiation of batches up to 30 microplates was achieved using a Perspex container and a clinically employed linear accelerator. The readout was done by automated counting of fluorescently stained nuclei using the Acumen eX3 laser scanning cytometer. Assay performance was compared to that of the CFA and the CellTiter-Blue homogeneous uniform-well cell viability assay. The assay was validated in a whole-genome siRNA library screening setting using PC-3 prostate cancer cells. On 4 different cancer cell lines, the automated cell counting assay produced radiation dose response curves that followed a linear-quadratic equation and that exhibited a better correlation to the results of the CFA than did the cell viability assay. Moreover, the cell counting assay could be used to detect radiosensitization by silencing DNA-PKcs or by adding caffeine. In a high-throughput screening setting, using 4 Gy irradiated and control PC-3 cells, the effects of DNA-PKcs siRNA and non-targeting control siRNA could be clearly discriminated. We developed a simple assay for radiation susceptibility that can be used for high-throughput screening. This will aid

  17. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation into Functional Epicardial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Guadix

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are widely used to study cardiovascular cell differentiation and function. Here, we induced differentiation of hPSCs (both embryonic and induced to proepicardial/epicardial progenitor cells that cover the heart during development. Addition of retinoic acid (RA and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 promoted expression of the mesodermal marker PDGFRα, upregulated characteristic (proepicardial progenitor cell genes, and downregulated transcription of myocardial genes. We confirmed the (proepicardial-like properties of these cells using in vitro co-culture assays and in ovo grafting of hPSC-epicardial cells into chick embryos. Our data show that RA + BMP4-treated hPSCs differentiate into (proepicardial-like cells displaying functional properties (adhesion and spreading over the myocardium of their in vivo counterpart. The results extend evidence that hPSCs are an excellent model to study (proepicardial differentiation into cardiovascular cells in human development and evaluate their potential for cardiac regeneration. : The authors have shown that hPSCs can be instructed in vitro to differentiate into a specific cardiac embryonic progenitor cell population called the proepicardium. Proepicardial cells are required for normal formation of the heart during development and might contribute to the development of cell-based therapies for heart repair. Keywords: human pluripotent stem cells, proepicardium, progenitor cells, cardiovascular, differentiation

  18. Biochemical studies of immune RNA using a cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.D.; Sellin, H.G.; Novelli, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    Immune RNA (iRNA), a subcellular macromolecular species usually prepared by phenol extraction of lymphoid tissue, can confer some manifestation(s) of cellular immunity on naive lymphocytes. Experiments were done to develop an assay system to detect activation of lymphocytes by iRNA to become cytotoxic toward tumor cells, and to study certain properties of iRNA using this system. Guinea pigs were immunized with human mammary carcinoma cells and the iRNA, prepared from spleens of animals shown by prior assay to have blood lymphocytes highly cytotoxic against the tumor cells, was assayed by ability of iRNA-activated lymphocytes to lyse /sup 51/Cr-labelled tumor cells. The ability of iRNA to activate lymphocytes to tumor cytotoxicity could only be differentiated from a cytotoxic activation by RNA preparations from unimmunized animals at very low doses of RNA. The most active iRNA preparations were from cytoplasmic subcellular fractions, extracted by a cold phenol procedure, while iRNA isolated by hot phenol methods was no more active than control RNA prepared by the same techniques. Attempts to demonstrate poly(A) sequences in iRNA were inconclusive.

  19. induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular basis of arsenite (As +3 )-induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... Methods: After performing cytotoxic assays on a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, expression analysis was done by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and ...

  20. Cell-based lipid flippase assay employing fluorescent lipid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, s...... flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example.......P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases......, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid...

  1. Optimization and validation of a neutralizing antibody assay for HIV-1 in A3R5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Daniell, Xiaoju; Todd, Christopher A; Bilska, Miroslawa; Martelli, Amanda; LaBranche, Celia; Perez, Lautaro G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Rountree, Wes; Denny, Thomas N; Montefiori, David C

    2014-07-01

    A3R5 is a human CD4(+) lymphoblastoid cell line that was engineered to express CCR5 and is useful for the detection of weak neutralizing antibody responses against tier 2 strains of HIV-1. Here we describe the optimization and validation of the HIV-1 neutralizing antibody assay that utilizes A3R5 cells, performed in compliance with Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines. The assay utilizes Renilla luciferase-expressing replication competent infectious molecular clones (IMC) encoding heterologous env genes from different HIV-1 clades. Key assay validation parameters tested included specificity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection and quantitation, specificity, linearity and range, and robustness. Plasma samples demonstrated higher non-specific activity than serum samples in the A3R5 assay. This assay can tolerate a wide range of virus input but is more sensitive to cell concentration. The higher sensitivity of the A3R5 assay in neutralization responses to tier 2 strains of HIV-1 makes it complementary to, but not a substitute for the TZM-bl assay. The validated A3R5 assay is employed as an endpoint immunogenicity test for vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies against tier 2 strains of HIV-1, and to identify correlates of protection in HIV-1 vaccine trials conducted globally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxicity of diuron in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Marjo; Loikkanen, Jarkko; Naarala, Jonne; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2015-10-01

    Diuron is a substituted phenylurea used as a herbicide to control broadleaf and grass weeds and as a biocidal antifouling agent. Diuron is carcinogenic in rat urinary bladder and toxic to the reproductive system of oysters, sea urchins and lizards. The few studies carried out in human cells do not include the genotoxicity of diuron. We have investigated the toxicity of diuron in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was statistically significantly increased in both cell lines but only at the highest 200 μM concentration. Diuron clearly reduced the viability of BeWo, but not MCF-7 cells. The relative cell number was decreased in both cell lines indicative of inhibition of cell proliferation. In the Comet assay, diuron increased DNA fragmentation in MCF-7 but not in BeWo cells. The expressions of p53 protein, a marker for cell stress, and p21 protein, a transcriptional target of p53, were increased, but only in MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that diuron is cytotoxic and potentially genotoxic in a tissue-specific manner and that ROS play a role in its toxicity. Thus, exposure to diuron may exert harmful effects on fetal development and damage human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a human somatic mutation detection method--GPA assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jianping; Dong Yan; Liu Bin; Lin Ruxian; Sun Zhixian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the damage to human body caused by environmental radiation, and supervise the somatic mutations. Methods: Three monoclonal antibodies specific to M-type(3G4), N-type(6A8), and MN-type (3C5) of glycophorin A, respectively, were prepared. Fluorescence or biotin conjugated antibodies were bound specifically to formalin and/or dimethyl suber-imidate fixed erythrocytes. M, MN and N type cells were divided by cytometry to demonstrate the erythrocyte mutation characteristics (MN→MO, MM, NO, NN) and give out the variant frequency. Results: 1Wa, 1Wb and 2Wa methods of GPA assay were developed. Erythrocytes of MN type individuals could be separated to normal and single locus variant groups by 1W methods and they could be sorted as normal (MN), single gene deletion mutants (MO, NO), homozygous mutants (MM, NN) cell groups by 2Wa method. Conclusion: The assay is applicable to evaluating the frequency of variant erythrocytes from human somatic mutation

  4. Measurement of human tissue-type plasminogen activator by a two-site immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijken, D.C.; Juhan-Vague, I.; De Cock, F.; Collen, D.

    1983-01-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for human extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator was developed by using rabbit antibodies raised against plasminogen activator purified from human melanoma cell culture fluid. Samples of 100 μl containing 1 to 100 ng/ml plasminogen activator were incubated in the wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates coated with antibody. The amount of bound extrinsic plasminogen activator was quantitated by the subsequent binding of 125 I-labeled affinospecific antibody. The mean level of plasma samples taken at rest was 6.6 +/- 2.9 ng/ml (n = 54). This level increased approximately threefold by exhaustive physical exercise, venous occlusion, or infusion of DDAVP. Extrinsic plasminogen activator in plasma is composed of a fibrin-adsorbable and active component (1.9 +/- 1.1 ng/ml, n = 54, in resting conditions) and an inactive component that does not bind to a fibrin clot (probably extrinsic plasminogen activator-proteinase inhibitor complexes). The fibrin-adsorbable fraction increased approximately fivefold to eightfold after physical exercise, venous occlusion, or DDAVP injections. Potential applications of the immunoradiometric assay are illustrated by the measurement of extrinsic plasminogen activator in different tissue extracts, body fluids, and cell culture fluids and in oocyte translation products after injection with mRNA for plasminogen activator

  5. Stem cell assays: Something old, something new, something borrowed : Something old, something new, something borrowed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, R.; Kamminga, Leonie; de Haan, G.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous assays exist that measure the function of stem cells. In this article, we review in detail the history and future of existing stem cell assays. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are historically the most well studied, but new developments in stem cell research, including the claim of stem

  6. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W.; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by β-galactosidase α-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion

  7. Self-Checking Cell-Based Assays for GPCR Desensitization and Resensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gregory W; Fuhrman, Margaret H; Adler, Sally A; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Waggoner, Alan S; Jarvik, Jonathan W

    2014-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play stimulatory or modulatory roles in numerous physiological states and processes, including growth and development, vision, taste and olfaction, behavior and learning, emotion and mood, inflammation, and autonomic functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion. GPCRs constitute the largest protein superfamily in the human and are the largest target class for prescription drugs, yet most are poorly characterized, and of the more than 350 nonolfactory human GPCRs, over 100 are orphans for which no endogenous ligand has yet been convincingly identified. We here describe new live-cell assays that use recombinant GPCRs to quantify two general features of GPCR cell biology-receptor desensitization and resensitization. The assays employ a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) reporter that reversibly complexes with either of two soluble organic molecules (fluorogens) whose fluorescence is strongly enhanced when complexed with the FAP. Both assays require no wash or cleanup steps and are readily performed in microwell plates, making them adaptable to high-throughput drug discovery applications. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. The potential value of the neutral comet assay and the expression of genes associated with DNA damage in assessing the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Bhilwade, Hari N; Pandey, Badri N; Sandur, Santosh K; Chaubey, Ramesh C

    2012-10-09

    The assessment of tumor radiosensitivity would be particularly useful in optimizing the radiation dose during radiotherapy. Therefore, the degree of correlation between radiation-induced DNA damage, as measured by the alkaline and the neutral comet assays, and the clonogenic survival of different human tumor cells was studied. Further, tumor radiosensitivity was compared with the expression of genes associated with the cellular response to radiation damage. Five different human tumor cell lines were chosen and the radiosensitivity of these cells was established by clonogenic assay. Alkaline and neutral comet assays were performed in γ-irradiated cells (2-8Gy; either acute or fractionated). Quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the expression of DNA damage response genes in control and irradiated cells. The relative radiosensitivity of the cell lines assessed by the extent of DNA damage (neutral comet assay) immediately after irradiation (4Gy or 6Gy) was in agreement with radiosensitivity pattern obtained by the clonogenic assay. The survival fraction of irradiated cells showed a better correlation with the magnitude of DNA damage measured by the neutral comet assay (r=-0.9; Pcomet assay (r=-0.73; Pcomet assay was better than alkaline comet assay for assessment of radiosensitivities of tumor cells after acute or fractionated doses of irradiation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytotoxic Effect of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells by MTT Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Mohseni Kouchesfehani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the wide range of applications, there is a serious lack of information on the impact of the nanoparticles on human health and the environment. The present study was done to determine the range of dangerous concentrations of iron oxide nanoparticle and their effects on mouse embryonic stem cells. Methods: Iron oxide nanoparticles with less than 20 nanometers diameter were encapsulated by a PEG-phospholipid. The suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles was prepared using the culture media and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Results: MTT assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticle s. Royan B1 cells were treated with medium containing different concentrations (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60µg/ml of the iron oxide nanoparticle. Cell viability was determined at 12 and 24 hours after treatment which showed significant decreases when concentration and time period increased. Conclusion: The main mechanism of nanoparticles action is still unknown, but in vivo and in vitro studies in different environments suggest that they are capable of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, they may have an effect on the concentration of intracellular calcium, activation of transcription factors, and changes in cytokine. The results of this study show that the higher concentration and duration of treatment of cells with iron oxide nanoparticles increase the rate of cell death.

  10. Comparison of cell-based assays for the identification and evaluation of competitive CXCR4 inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Van Hout

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is activated by its unique chemokine ligand CXCL12 and regulates many physiological and developmental processes such as hematopoietic cell trafficking. CXCR4 is also one of the main co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV entry. Dysfunction of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis contributes to several human pathologies, including cancer and inflammatory diseases. Consequently, inhibition of CXCR4 activation is recognized as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this regard, numerous agents modifying CXCR4 activity have been evaluated in in vitro experimental studies and pre-clinical models. Here, we evaluated a CXCL12 competition binding assay for its potential as a valuable initial screen for functional and competitive CXCR4 inhibitors. In total, 11 structurally diverse compounds were included in a side-by-side comparison of in vitro CXCR4 cell-based assays, such as CXCL12 competition binding, CXCL12-induced calcium signaling, CXCR4 internalization, CXCL12-guided cell migration and CXCR4-specific HIV-1 replication experiments. Our data indicated that agents that inhibit CXCL12 binding, i.e. the anti-CXCR4 peptide analogs T22, T140 and TC14012 and the small molecule antagonists AMD3100, AMD3465, AMD11070 and IT1t showed inhibitory activity with consistent relative potencies in all further applied CXCR4-related assays. Accordingly, agents exerting no or very weak receptor binding (i.e., CTCE-9908, WZ811, Me6TREN and gambogic acid showed no or very poor anti-CXCR4 inhibitory activity. Thus, CXCL12 competition binding studies were proven to be highly valuable as an initial screening assay and indicative for the pharmacological and functional profile of competitive CXCR4 antagonists, which will help the design of new potent CXCR4 inhibitors.

  11. A quantitative assay for lysosomal acidification rates in human osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vicki Kaiser; Nosjean, Olivier; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2011-01-01

    The osteoclast initiates resorption by creating a resorption lacuna. The ruffled border surrounding the lacunae arises from exocytosis of lysosomes. To dissolve the inorganic phase of the bone, the vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase, located in the ruffled border, pumps protons into the resorption...... assay with respect to lysosomal acidification and assess whether it is a reliable test of a compound's ability to inhibit acidification. Investigated were the expression levels of the lysosomal acidification machinery, the activation of the assay by adenosine triphosphate, H(+) and Cl(-) dependency...

  12. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  13. Development of a quantitative bead capture assay for soluble IL-7 receptor alpha in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IL-7 is an essential cytokine in T-cell development and homeostasis. It binds to the IL-7R receptor, a complex of the IL-7Ralpha (CD127 and common gamma (CD132 chains. There is significant interest in evaluating the expression of CD127 on human T-cells as it often decreased in medical conditions leading to lymphopenia. Previous reports showed the usefulness of CD127 as a prognostic marker in viral infections such as HIV, CMV, EBV and HCV. A soluble CD127 (sCD127 is released in plasma and may contribute to disease pathogenesis through its control on IL-7 activities. Measuring sCD127 is important to define its role and may complement existing markers used in lymphopenic disease management. We describe a new quantitative assay for the measurement of sCD127 in plasma and report sCD127 concentrations in healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a quantitative bead-based sCD127 capture assay. Polyclonal CD127-specific antibodies were chosen for capture and a biotinylated monoclonal anti-CD127 antibody was selected for detection. The assay can detect native sCD127 and recombinant sCD127 which served as the calibrator. The analytical performance of the assay was characterized and the concentration and stability of plasma sCD127 in healthy adults was determined. The assay's range was 3.2-1000 ng/mL. The concentration of plasma sCD127 was 164+/-104 ng/mL with over a log variation between subjects. Individual sCD127 concentrations remained stable when measured serially during a period of up to one year. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report on the quantification of plasma sCD127 in a population of healthy adults. Soluble CD127 plasma concentrations remained stable over time in a given individual and sCD127 immunoreactivity was resistant to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. This quantitative sCD127 assay is a valuable tool for defining the potential role of sCD127 in lymphopenic diseases.

  14. One-year enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay follow-up of human interleukin for Da cells/leukemia inhibitory factor in blood and urine of 22 kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, D; Taupin, J L; Combe, C; Potaux, L; Gualde, N; Moreau, J F

    1994-12-15

    The cytokine human interleukin for Da cells/leukemia inhibitory factor (HILDA/LIF) exerts multiple biological effects in vitro. In mice, high circulating levels of HILDA/LIF induce a wide range of pathophysiological events, some of them closely involved with immunological and inflammatory responses. Using a sandwich ELISA recognizing the natural human HILDA/LIF molecule with a threshold of 50 pg/ml in urine and 150 pg/ml in plasma, we monitored the urine and plasma HILDA/LIF levels of 22 patients in their first year after a kidney transplant. HILDA/LIF urine excretion is increased during acute rejection, and infections also trigger heavy HILDA/LIF plasma concentrations or urine excretion. In addition, this study raises the question of HILDA/LIF involvement in post-kidney-transplant phenomena such as hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, or the reversal of anemia.

  15. Blood cells kinetics by stable tracers assayed by XRF-analysis and by radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesareo, R.; Del Principe, D.; Tallarida, B.

    1980-01-01

    Stable rubidium, as an analogue of potassium, has been employed to label human and rabbit red cells and platelets. The concentration of rubidium bound to the cells, which are deposited on filter paper disks, is assayed by a simple version of the X-ray fluorescence equipment, characterized by a 1 mCi Cd-109 radioisotopic source, a xenon-filled proportional detector and a single-channel-analyzer. Survival curves of platelets and of red-cells labelled with stable Rb were determined by measuring the Rb concentration in the labelled cells, withdrawn at different times. The fluorescent counts are linearly proportional to the mass of rubidium per unit area of the filter. The sensitivity of the XRF technique is about 0.05 μg/cm 2 in a measuring time of 500 s. The mean quantity of Rb incorporated by the platelets is of about 5-10 μg for human platelets labelled ''in vitro'', of about 30-50 μg for rabbit platelets labelled in vivo and of about 0.5 mg for rabbit red cell labelled in vivo. The following half-time values were deduced: Tsub(1/2) = 35-45 h for human platelets labelled in ''in vitro''. Tsub(1/2) = 22 +- 3 h for rabbit platelets labelled ''in vivo''. Tsub(1/2) = 310 +- 15 h for rabbit red cells labelled ''in vivo''. The next step of our studies is to label ''in vivo'' human red cells and human platelets. (author)

  16. A study on the toxicity of three radiosensitizers on retinoblastoma cells by MTT assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Xianjin; Jin Yizun; Ding Li; Ni Zhou; Wang Wenji

    1994-01-01

    The toxicity of three radiosensitizers BSO, CM and RSU-1069 on retinoblastoma cells was determined and the efficiency of in vitro MTT assay on drug-screening for retinoblastoma was also evaluated. The results showed that the MTT assay is very useful. The toxicity of radiosensitizers on retinoblastoma cells is dependent on cell line characteristics, drug concentration and time of exposure to it

  17. A point mutation of human p53, which was not detected as a mutation by a yeast functional assay, led to apoptosis but not p21Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1 expression in response to ionizing radiation in a human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okaichi, Kumio; Wang Lihong; Sasaki, Ji-ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Okumura, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The 123A point mutation of p53 showed increased radiosensitivity, whereas other mutations (143A, 175H, and 273H) were not affected. To determine the reason for increased radiosensitivity of the 123A mutation, the response of the transformant of 123A mutation to ionizing radiation (IR) was examined and compared to those of transformants with the wild type p53 or other point mutations (143A, 175H, and 273H). Methods and Materials: Stable transformants with a mutant or wild type p53 made by introducing cDNA into the human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2, which lacks an endogenous p53 were used. The transcriptional activity of mutant p53 was examined using a yeast functional assay. The transformants were examined for the accumulation of p53, the induction of p21 Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1 (hereafter referred to as p21), and the other response of p53-responsive genes (MDM2, Bax, and Bcl-2) by Western blotting. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of DNA fragmentation. Results: The 123A point mutation of p53 was detected as a wild type in the yeast functional assay. The 123A mutant accumulated p53 in response to IR. The 123A mutant did not induce p21, but normally responded to MDM2, Bax, and Bcl-2. The 123A mutant entered apoptosis earlier than the wild type p53 transformant, and induced Fas at earlier in response to IR. Conclusion: The 123A mutant led to apoptosis, but not p21 expression in response to IR. The occurrence of apoptosis, but not induction of p21, corresponded to the radiosensitivity in the transformant. The early occurrence of apoptosis in 123A transformants may depend on the early induction of Fas

  18. Sensitivity of PCR assays for murine gammaretroviruses and mouse contamination in human blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Gammaretroviruses related to murine leukemia virus (MLV have variously been reported to be present or absent in blood from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME patients and healthy controls. Using subjects from New York State, we have investigated by PCR methods whether MLV-related sequences can be identified in nucleic acids isolated from whole blood or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or following PBMC culture. We have also passaged the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP following incubation with plasma from patients and controls and assayed nucleic acids for viral sequences. We have used 15 sets of primers that can effectively amplify conserved regions of murine endogenous and exogenous retrovirus sequences. We demonstrate that our PCR assays for MLV-related gag sequences and for mouse DNA contamination are extremely sensitive. While we have identified MLV-like gag sequences following PCR on human DNA preparations, we are unable to conclude that these sequences originated in the blood samples.

  19. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16 ink4a , one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16 ink4a contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16 ink4a expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16 ink4a expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose γ-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16 ink4a expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16 ink4a transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16 ink4a plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas

  20. Rapid assay for cell age response to radiation by electronic volume flow cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, J.P.; Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique is described for measuring cell survival as a function of cell cycle position using flow cytometric cell sorting on the basis of electronic volume signals. Sorting of cells into different cell age compartments is demonstrated for three different cell lines commonly used in radiobiological research. Using flow cytometric DNA content analysis and [ 3 H]thymidine autoradiography of the sorted cell populations, it is demonstrated that resolution of the age compartment separation is as good as or better than that reported for other cell synchronizing techniques. Variation in cell survival as a function of position in the cell cycle after a single dose of radiation as measured by volume cell sorting is similar to that determined by other cell synchrony techniques. Advantages of this method include: (1) no treatment of the cells is required, thus, this method is noncytotoxic; (2) no cell cycle progression is needed to obtain different cell age compartments; (3) the cell population can be held in complete growth medium at any desired temperature during sorting; (4) a complete radiation age - response assay can be plated in 2 h. Applications of this method are discussed, along with some technical limitations. (author)

  1. Mixture models for single-cell assays with applications to vaccine studies

    OpenAIRE

    Finak, Greg; McDavid, Andrew; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Dominguez, Maria; De Rosa, Steve; Roederer, Mario; Gottardo, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Blood and tissue are composed of many functionally distinct cell subsets. In immunological studies, these can be measured accurately only using single-cell assays. The characterization of these small cell subsets is crucial to decipher system-level biological changes. For this reason, an increasing number of studies rely on assays that provide single-cell measurements of multiple genes and proteins from bulk cell samples. A common problem in the analysis of such data is to identify biomarkers...

  2. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  3. Sensitivity of neuroprogenitor cells to chemical-induced apoptosis using a multiplexed assay suitable for high-throughput screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druwe, Ingrid; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Wallace, Kathleen; Shafer, Timothy J.; Mundy, William R.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput methods are useful for rapidly screening large numbers of chemicals for biological activity, including the perturbation of pathways that may lead to adverse cellular effects. In vitro assays for the key events of neurodevelopment, including apoptosis, may be used in a battery of tests for detecting chemicals that could result in developmental neurotoxicity. Apoptosis contributes to nervous system development by regulating the size of the neuroprogenitor cell pool, and the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis during neuroprogenitor cell proliferation helps to determine the size and shape of the nervous system. Therefore, chemicals that affect apoptosis during neuronal development can have deleterious effects on the developing brain. The present study examined the utility of a high-throughput assay to detect chemical-induced apoptosis in mouse or human neuroprogenitor cells, as well as differentiated human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Apoptosis was assessed using an assay that measures enzymatic activity of caspase-3/7 in a rapid and cost efficient manner. The results show that all three commercially available models generated a robust source of proliferating neuroprogenitor cells, and that the assay was sensitive and reproducible when used in a multi-well plate format. There were differences in the response of rodent and human neuroprogenitor cells to a set of chemicals previously shown to induce apoptosis in vitro. Neuroprogenitor cells were more sensitive to chemical-induced apoptosis than differentiated neurons, suggesting that neuroprogenitor cells are one of the cell models that should be considered for use in a developmental neurotoxicity screening battery

  4. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  5. In vitro Cell Viability by CellProfiler® Software as Equivalent to MTT Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Luciana S; Macedo, Nayana D; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Fronza, Marcio; Junior, Valdemar L; Borges, Warley S; Cole, Eduardo R; Andrade, Tadeu U; Endringer, Denise C; Lenz, Dominik

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated in vitro cell viability by the colorimetric MTT stands for 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay compared to image analysis by CellProfiler ® software. Hepatoma (Hepa-1c1c7) and fibroblast (L929) cells were exposed to isolated substances, camptothecin, lycorine, tazettine, albomaculine, 3-epimacronine, trispheridine, galanthine and Padina gymnospora , Sargassum sp. methanolic extract, and Habranthus itaobinus Ravenna ethyl acetate in different concentrations. After MTT assay, cells were stained with Panotic dye kit. Cell images were obtained with an inverted microscope equipped with a digital camera. The images were analyzed by CellProfiler ® . No cytotoxicity at the highest concentration analyzed for 3-epimacronine, albomaculine, galanthine, trispheridine, P. gymnospora extract and Sargassum sp. extract where detected. Tazettine offered cytotoxicity only against the Hepa1c1c7 cell line. Lycorine, camptothecin, and H. itaobinus extract exhibited cytotoxic effects in both cell lines. The viability methods tested were correlated demonstrated by Bland-Atman test with normal distribution with mean difference between the two methods close to zero, bias value 3.0263. The error was within the limits of the confidence intervals and these values had a narrow difference. The correlation between the two methods was demonstrated by the linear regression plotted as R 2 . CellProfiler ® image analysis presented similar results to the MTT assay in the identification of viable cells, and image analysis may assist part of biological analysis procedures. The presented methodology is inexpensive and reproducible. In vitro cell viability assessment with MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay may be replaced by image analysis by CellProfiler ® . The viability methods

  6. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone

  7. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay evolves into a 'cytome' assay of chromosomal instability, mitotic dysfunction and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was originally developed as an ideal system for measuring micronuclei (MNi) however it can also be used to measure nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), nuclear buds (NBUDs), cell death (necrosis or apoptosis) and nuclear division rate. Current evidence suggests that (a) NPBs originate from dicentric chromosomes in which the centromeres have been pulled to the opposite poles of the cell at anaphase and are therefore indicative of DNA mis-repair, chromosome rearrangement or telomere end-fusions, (b) NPBs may break to form MNi, (c) the nuclear budding process is the mechanism by which cells remove amplified and/or excess DNA and is therefore a marker of gene amplification and/or altered gene dosage, (d) cell cycle checkpoint defects result in micronucleus formation and (e) hypomethylation of DNA, induced nutritionally or by inhibition of DNA methyl transferase can lead to micronucleus formation either via chromosome loss or chromosome breakage. The strong correlation between micronucleus formation, nuclear budding and NPBs (r = 0.75-0.77, P < 0.001) induced by either folic acid deficiency or exposure to ionising radiation is supportive of the hypothesis that folic acid deficiency and/or ionising radiation cause genomic instability and gene amplification by the initiation of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. In its comprehensive mode, the CBMN assay measures all cells including necrotic and apoptotic cells as well as number of nuclei per cell to provide a measure of cytotoxicity and mitotic activity. The CBMN assay has in fact evolved into a 'cytome' method for measuring comprehensively chromosomal instability phenotype and altered cellular viability caused by genetic defects and/or nutrional deficiencies and/or exogenous genotoxins thus opening up an exciting future for the use of this methodology in the emerging fields of nutrigenomics and toxicogenomics and their combinations

  8. The Ussing Chamber Assay to Study Drug Metabolism and Transport in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Beatrice; Mangelsen, Eva; Wingolf, Caroline; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Tannergren, Christer; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus

    2017-06-22

    The Ussing chamber is an old but still powerful technique originally designed to study the vectorial transport of ions through frog skin. This technique is also used to investigate the transport of chemical agents through the intestinal barrier as well as drug metabolism in enterocytes, both of which are key determinants for the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. More contemporary model systems, such as Caco-2 cell monolayers or stably transfected cells, are more limited in their use compared to the Ussing chamber because of differences in expression rates of transporter proteins and/or metabolizing enzymes. While there are limitations to the Ussing chamber assay, the use of human intestinal tissue remains the best laboratory test for characterizing the transport and metabolism of compounds following oral administration. Detailed in this unit is a step-by-step protocol for preparing human intestinal tissue, for designing Ussing chamber experiments, and for analyzing and interpreting the findings. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Radio response of human lymphocytes pretreated with boron and gadoliniums assessed by the, comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. K.; Park, T. W.; Cebulska-Wasiewska, A.; Nili, M.

    2009-01-01

    Boron and gadolinium are among the nuclides that hold a unique property of being a neutron capture therapy agent. Neutron beams have often a considerable portion of gamma rays with fast neutrons. Gamma rays, as beam contaminants, can cause considerable damage to normal tissues even if such tissues do contain high boron concentrations. Materials and Methods: The modification of radio response in human lymphocytes pretreated with boron or gadolinium compound was studied by assessing the DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis, the comet assay. The lymphocytes from the human peripheral blood were irradiated with 0, 1, 2 and 4 Gy of gamma rays from a 60 Co isotopic source with or without pretreatment of boron or gadolinium compound for 10 minutes at 4 d egree C . Post-irradiation procedures included slide preparation, cell-lysing, unwinding and electrophoresis, neutralization, staining, and analytic steps, gel electrophoresis. Results: The results indicate that pretreatment with boron compound (50 n M or 250 n M of 10 B) is effective in reducing the radiosensitivity of the lymphocyte DNA. Conversely, pretreatment with gadolinium compound (50 n M) led to a dose-dependent increase in the radiosensitivity, most prominently with a dose of 4 Gy (P<0.001). Furthermore, when the lymphocytes were pretreated with a Combined mixture (1:1) of boron (250 n M) and gadolinium (50 n M) compounds, the reduced radiosensitivity was also observed.

  10. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as 51 Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer

  11. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  12. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lötzerich Mark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2 detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens

  13. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating the wound healing ability of bioactive milk proteins using an optimized cell based assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Steffen; Andreasen, Trine; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    Milk contains many different proteins of which the larger constituents like the caseins and major whey constituents are well characterized. We have for some time been studying the structure and function of proteins associated with the milk fat globule membrane like lactadherin, MUC1/15, xanthine...... oxidoreductase along with minor whey constituents like osteopontin, EPV20 etc. The enterocyte migration rate is a key parameter in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and intestinal repair when recovering from infection or intestinal diseases like Crohns and ulcerative colitis. We developed a novel in vitro wound...... healing assay to determine the bioactive effects of various milk proteins using human small intestine cells grown on extracellular matrix. Silicone inserts are placed in a 96-well plate and enterocytes seeded around it, creating a monolayer with a cell free area. In current ongoing experiments, various...

  15. Haemagglutination assay of some human and animal arcobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arcobacter are emerging food borne enteropathogens which can cause severe diarrhea and occasional systemic infection such as bacteraemia and peritonitis in humans. To understand the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen, putative adhesive factors in the organism were studied by examining their ability to ...

  16. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  17. Production of iPS-Derived Human Retinal Organoids for Use in Transgene Expression Assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, Peter M; Buck, Thilo M; Ohonin, Charlotte; Mikkers, Harald M M; Wijnholds, J.

    2018-01-01

    In vitro retinal organoid modeling from human pluripotent stem cells is becoming more common place in many ophthalmic laboratories worldwide. These organoids mimic human retinogenesis through formation of organized layered retinal structures that display markers for typical retinal cell types.

  18. The influence of the number of cells scored on the sensitivity in the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Soussaline, Françoise; Sallette, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    The impact on the sensitivity of the in vitro comet assay by increasing the number of cells scored has only been addressed in a few studies. The present study investigated whether the sensitivity of the assay could be improved by scoring more than 100 cells. Two cell lines and three different che...... of the assay. A two-way ANOVA analysis of variance showed that the contribution from the two variables “the number of cells scored” and “concentration” on the total variation in the coefficients of variance dataset was statistically significant (p...

  19. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  20. Determination of Interference During In Vitro Pyrogen Detection: Development and Characterization of a Cell-Based Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Linda; Rossetti, Francesca; Dominici, Sabrina; Buondelmonte, Costantina; Rocchi, Marco B L; Rizzardi, Gian P; Vallanti, Giuliana; Magnani, Mauro

    Contamination of pharmaceutical products and medical devices with pyrogens such as endotoxins is the most common cause of systemic inflammation and, in worst cases, of septic shock. Thus, quantification of pyrogens is crucial. The limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays are the reference tests for in vitro endotoxin detection, in association with the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test (RPT), according to European Pharmacopoeia (EP 2.6.14), and U.S. Pharmacopoeia (USP ). However, several substances interfere with LAL assay, while RPT is not accurate, not quantitative, and raises ethical limits. Biological assays, as monocyte activation tests, have been developed and included in European Pharmacopoeia (EP 7.0; 04/2010:20630) guidelines as an alternative to RPT and proved relevant to the febrile reaction in vivo. Because this reaction is carried out by endogenous mediators under the transcriptional control of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), we sought to determine whether a NF-kappaB reporter-gene assay, based on MonoMac-6 (MM6) cells, could reconcile the basic mechanism of innate immune response with the relevance of monocytoid cell lines to the organism reaction to endotoxins. This article describes both optimization and characterization of the reporter cells-based assay, which overall proved the linearity, accuracy, and precision of the test, and demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay to 0.24 EU/mL endotoxin, close to the pyrogenic threshold in humans. Moreover, the assay was experimentally compared to the LAL test in the evaluation of selected interfering samples. The good performance of the MM6 reporter test demonstrates the suitability of this assay to evaluate interfering or false-positive samples.

  1. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chang-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC still is a big burden for China. In recent years, the third-generation platinum compounds have been proposed as potential active agents for HCC. However, more experimental and clinical data are warranted to support the proposal. In the present study, the effect of lobaplatin was assessed in five HCC cell lines and the underlying molecular mechanisms in terms of cell cycle kinetics were explored. Methods Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin to human HCC cell lines was examined using MTT cell proliferation assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle-regulated genes was examined at both the mRNA (RT-PCR and protein (Western blot levels. The phosphorylation status of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and retinoblastoma (Rb protein was also examined using Western blot analysis. Results Lobaplatin inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. For the most sensitive SMMC-7721 cells, lobaplatin arrested cell cycle progression in G1 and G2/M phases time-dependently which might be associated with the down-regulation of cyclin B, CDK1, CDC25C, phosphorylated CDK1 (pCDK1, pCDK4, Rb, E2F, and pRb, and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27. Conclusion Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin in human HCC cells might be due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression which would contribute to the potential use of lobaplatin for the management of HCC.

  2. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  3. Application of human erythrocytes to a radioimmune assay of immune complexes in serum. [Lupus erythematosus, type B hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, F; Miyakawa, Y; Mayumi, M [Tokyo Metropolitan Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    1979-07-01

    An immune adherence receptor exists on the surface of primate erythrocytes, and has been characterized as a receptor for the activated third component of complement (C3b). Human red blood cells (RCBs, blood group O) were applied to a sensitive determination of complement-fixing, soluble immune complexes in serum. The method involved the binding of immune complexes with RBCs in the presence of complement and the detection of cell-bound IgG molecules by radiolabelled anti-human IgG antibodies. Since the binding of RBCs with monomeric IgG was minimal, cell bound IgG molecules were taken as representing immune complexes. When aggregated human gammaglobulin (AHG) was used as a model of immune complexes, as little as 5 ..mu..g dissolved in 1 ml of normal human serum were detected. The binding of RBCs with AHG was inhibited in EDTA solution where the classical complement pathway could not be activated. The RBC radioimmune assay was successfully applied to the determination of soluble immune complexes in pathological serum samples obtained from the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with fulminant Type B hepatitis. False-positive results by autoantibodies against RBCs could be excluded by a Coombs test and by comparing the binding in the presence of complement with that in EDTA solution. The ubiquitous availability of RBCs coupled with a high sensitivity would allow the RBC radioimmune assay to be used as a further method of determining immune complexes in the serum.

  4. Wharton's Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Comparing Human and Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Barbara; Teti, Gabriella; Mazzotti, Eleonora; Ingrà, Laura; Salvatore, Viviana; Buzzi, Marina; Cerqueni, Giorgia; Dicarlo, Manuela; Lanci, Aliai; Castagnetti, Carolina; Iacono, Eleonora

    2018-08-01

    Wharton's jelly (WJ) is an important source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) both in human and other animals. The aim of this study was to compare human and equine WJMSCs. Human and equine WJMSCs were isolated and cultured using the same protocols and culture media. Cells were characterized by analysing morphology, growth rate, migration and adhesion capability, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and ultrastructure. Results showed that human and equine WJMSCs have similar ultrastructural details connected with intense synthetic and metabolic activity, but differ in growth, migration, adhesion capability and differentiation potential. In fact, at the scratch assay and transwell migration assay, the migration ability of human WJMSCs was higher (P cells, while the volume of spheroids obtained after 48 h of culture in hanging drop was larger than the volume of equine ones (P cell adhesion ability. This can also revealed in the lower doubling time of equine cells (3.5 ± 2.4 days) as compared to human (6.5 ± 4.3 days) (P cell doubling after 44 days of culture observed for the equine (20.3 ± 1.7) as compared to human cells (8.7 ± 2.4) (P cells showed an higher chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability (P staminal phenotype in human and equine WJMSCs, they showed different properties reflecting the different sources of MSCs.

  5. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells

  6. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  7. New Applications of the Human Whole Blood Pyrogen Assay (PyroCheck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennrich; Wendel; Hartung

    1999-01-01

    The absence of pyrogens in injectable drugs is an indispensable safety control because contaminants causing fever pose a life-threatening risk to the patient resulting in the worst case in death by shock. When fever- inducing agents, i.e.pyrogens, come into contact with the immunocompetent cells in blood, these cells release mediators which transmit the fever signal to the thermoregulatory centre of the brain. The Phamocopoeia lists currently two test systems for pyrogenicity: 1. The in vivo rabbit pyrogen test which measures the fever reaction following injection of the sample to the animals. 2. The in vitro Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL) which measures the coagulation in a lysate prepared from the blood of the horseshoe crab specifically initiated by endotoxins, i.e. cell wall components from Gram-negative bacteria. The new test presented here (PyroCheck) exploits the reaction of monocytes/macrophages for the detection of pyrogens: human whole blood taken from healthy volunteers is incubated in the presence of the test sample in any form, be it a solution, a powder or even solid material. Pyrogenic contaminations initiate the release of the "endogenous pyrogen" Interleukin-1beta determined by ELISA after a fixed incubation time. The technology presently listed in the Pharmacopoeia is limited to parenteralia (rabbit test: biologicals and pharmaceuticals, LAL: predominantly pharmaceuticals). In the EU Medical Devices Directive from 1995 the rabbit pyrogen test for medical products is in some cases requested. (in some cases LAL of an eluate from the device). However, pyrogen-testing needs to cover also innovative high-tech products such as medical devices (implants, medical plastic materials, dialysis machines), cellular therapies and species-specific agents (e.g. recombinant proteins). Here we report that the human blood test PyroCheck is suitable for testing filters in air quality control as well as for assessing medical devices and biocompatibility

  8. A simple assay for the detection of antibodies to endocrine islet cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreas, G.; Madsen, O.D.; Vissing, H.; Lernmark, Aa.

    1986-01-01

    A simple and sensitive immunoradiometric assay for the detection of islet cell surface antibodies (CIRMA) has been developed. Live, transformed islet cells derived from a liver metastasis of a transplantable islet cell tumor were grown in removable microtiter wells and incubated with antibody. Cell-bound antibodies were quantitated using 125 I-labelled second antibodies. The assay was used to detect islet cell antibodies present in sera from non-diabetic and diabetic BB rats and proved to be particularly effective for screening hybridoma supernatants in order to identify monoclonal antibodies recognizing islet cell surface antigens. (Auth.)

  9. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Reverté

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs.

  10. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  11. A PDMS Device Coupled with Culture Dish for In Vitro Cell Migration Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoqing; Geng, Zhaoxin; Fan, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shicai; Pei, WeiHua; Chen, Hongda

    2018-04-30

    Cell migration and invasion are important factors during tumor progression and metastasis. Wound-healing assay and the Boyden chamber assay are efficient tools to investigate tumor development because both of them could be applied to measure cell migration rate. Therefore, a simple and integrated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device was developed for cell migration assay, which could perform quantitative evaluation of cell migration behaviors, especially for the wound-healing assay. The integrated device was composed of three units, which included cell culture dish, PDMS chamber, and wound generation mold. The PDMS chamber was integrated with cell culture chamber and could perform six experiments under different conditions of stimuli simultaneously. To verify the function of this device, it was utilized to explore the tumor cell migration behaviors under different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) at different time points. This device has the unique capability to create the "wound" area in parallel during cell migration assay and provides a simple and efficient platform for investigating cell migration assay in biomedical application.

  12. Interlaboratory Optimization and Evaluation of a Serological Assay for Diagnosis of Human Baylisascariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rascoe, Lisa N.; Santamaria, Cynthia; Handali, Sukwan; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Kazacos, Kevin R.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Ndao, Momar

    2013-01-01

    A Western blot assay using a recombinant protein, recombinant Baylisascaris procyonis RAG1 protein (rBpRAG1), was developed for the diagnosis of human baylisascariasis concurrently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, and the National Reference Centre for Parasitology (NRCP) in Montreal, Canada. Assay performance was assessed by testing 275 specimens at the CDC and 405 specimens at the NRCP. Twenty specimens from 16 cases of baylisascariasis were evalua...

  13. Quantitative assay for the measurement of immune responses directed against the human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M; Sutcliffe, R G [Glasgow Univ. (UK)

    1982-02-12

    A quantitative in vitro immune assay based on the classical chromium release assay has been developed to detect immune responses directed against alien antigens expressed by the developing foetus and present on the maternal-facing surface of the human placenta. A plasma membrane fraction from the surface of the placenta was prepared and the vesicles thus formed were radiolabelled with /sup 51/Cr. The /sup 51/Cr-labelled vesicles, by various criteria, were found to be suitable for use as targets in a release assay. Further, by means of experimentally immunised animals, the target membranes were shown to be capable of detecting both cellular and humoral anti-placental activity.

  14. Evaluating human cancer cell metastasis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Yong; Xie, Xiayang; Walker, Steven; White, David T; Mumm, Jeff S; Cowell, John K

    2013-01-01

    In vivo metastasis assays have traditionally been performed in mice, but the process is inefficient and costly. However, since zebrafish do not develop an adaptive immune system until 14 days post-fertilization, human cancer cells can survive and metastasize when transplanted into zebrafish larvae. Despite isolated reports, there has been no systematic evaluation of the robustness of this system to date. Individual cell lines were stained with CM-Dil and injected into the perivitelline space of 2-day old zebrafish larvae. After 2-4 days fish were imaged using confocal microscopy and the number of metastatic cells was determined using Fiji software. To determine whether zebrafish can faithfully report metastatic potential in human cancer cells, we injected a series of cells with different metastatic potential into the perivitelline space of 2 day old embryos. Using cells from breast, prostate, colon and pancreas we demonstrated that the degree of cell metastasis in fish is proportional to their invasion potential in vitro. Highly metastatic cells such as MDA231, DU145, SW620 and ASPC-1 are seen in the vasculature and throughout the body of the fish after only 24–48 hours. Importantly, cells that are not invasive in vitro such as T47D, LNCaP and HT29 do not metastasize in fish. Inactivation of JAK1/2 in fibrosarcoma cells leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo, and in zebrafish these cells show limited spread throughout the zebrafish body compared with the highly metastatic parental cells. Further, knockdown of WASF3 in DU145 cells which leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo also results in suppression of metastasis in zebrafish. In a cancer progression model involving normal MCF10A breast epithelial cells, the degree of invasion/metastasis in vitro and in mice is mirrored in zebrafish. Using a modified version of Fiji software, it is possible to quantify individual metastatic cells in the transparent larvae to correlate with

  15. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu Chang; Li Chenzhong, E-mail: licz@fiu.edu [Nanobioengineering/Bioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  16. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Chang; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-08-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  17. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu Chang; Li Chenzhong

    2010-01-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  18. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  19. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  20. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  1. A novel multiparametric flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay simultaneously immunophenotypes effector cells: Comparisons to a 4 h 51Cr-release assay

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, GG; Donnenberg, VS; Donnenberg, AD; Gooding, W; Whiteside, TL

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell- or T cell-mediated cytotoxicity traditionally is measured in 4-16h 51Cr-release assays (CRA). A new four-color flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay (FCC) was developed to simultaneously measure NK cell cytotoxicity and NK cell phenotype (CD3−CD16+CD56+). Target cells, K562 or Daudi, were labeled with Cell Tracker Orange (CTO) prior to the addition of effector cells. Following co-incubation, 7 amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) was added to measure death of target cells. ...

  2. Development of a new in vivo kit for detection of prostate specific antigen in human serum using immunoradiometric assay method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, M. H.; Behradkia, P.; Shafii, M.; Movla, M.; Forutan, H.; Najafi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate is a leading site for the cancer incidence, accounted for 31.0% of new cancer cases in men. Prostate-specific antigen is widely used in the detection and monitoring of the prostate cancer. Currently, immunoassay is used to detect Prostate-specific antigen in human serum. This technique is based on the interaction between antibody and antigen. The varied immunoassay formats and equipment to run the assays allow the users to measure the analytes rapidly, with the flexibility to run a small or a large number of samples. Among different immunoassay methods, immunoradiometric assay is a more sensitive and valuable detection approach. This study has been made in 4 parts: (1) purification of Prostate-specific antigen from seminal fluid; (2) preparation of hybridoma cells which secrete monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Prostate-specific antigen , (3) selection of pair monoclonal antibody among those antibodies, and finally (4) design of an immunoradiometric assay kit and it's quality control . The results of this study were: (1) obtaining a huge amount of Prostate-specific antigen as semi-purified and purified, that is a valuable material for preparation of standard kits; (2) preparation of 8 kinds of monoclonal antibodies; (3) finding 4 pairs of monoclonal antibodies which react with different epitopes on Prostate-specific antigen molecule; and (4) preparation of immunoradiometric assay kit for measuring Prostate-specific antigen concentration in human serum

  3. Human embryonic stem cells have enhanced repair of multiple forms of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Swistowska, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan

    2008-01-01

    cells compared with various differentiated murine cells. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) we found that human embryonic stem cells (BG01, I6) have more efficient repair of different types of DNA damage (generated from H2O2, UV-C, ionizing radiation, or psoralen) than human primary...

  4. Monoclonal antibodies against human angiotensinogen, their characterization and use in an angiotensinogen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, I; Lykkegaard, S; Olsen, A A; Selmer, J; Ballegaard, M

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human angiotensinogen. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using a high affinity monoclonal antibody as catching antibody and a polyclonal rabbit anti human angiotensinogen antibody as detecting antibody in a "sandwich" ELISA. Linear range of the ELISA was 15-450 pmol/l of human angiotensinogen. Intra- and inter- assay variation coefficients were in the range of 2% to 8%. A correlation coefficient, r = 0.97, (n = 20), with values obtained by radioimmunoassay. This correlation coefficient, obtained by using both normal and pregnant sera, confirmed that the ELISA fulfill the requirements for clinical useful assay. Characterization of the antibodies were performed with respect to affinity constant and epitopes.

  5. Evaluation of estrogenic potential of flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and MCF7/BUS cell proliferation assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia A Resende

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, there is a search for compounds with estrogenic activity that can replace estrogen in hormone replacement therapy during menopause, without the undesirable effects of estrogen, such as the elevation of breast cancer occurrence. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to assess the estrogenic activity of flavonoids with different hydroxylation patterns: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone via two different in vitro assays, the recombinant yeast assay (RYA and the MCF-7 proliferation assay (E-screen, since the most potent phytoestrogens are members of the flavonoid family. In these assays, kaempferol was the only compound that showed ERα-dependent transcriptional activation activity by RYA, showing 6.74±1.7 nM EEQ, besides acting as a full agonist for the stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells. The other compounds did not show detectable levels of interaction with ER under the conditions used in the RYA. However, in the E-screen assay, compounds such as galangin, luteolin and fisetin also stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells, acting as partial agonists. In the evaluation of antiestrogenicity, the compounds quercetin, chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone significantly inhibited the cell proliferation induced by 17-β-estradiol in the E-screen assay, indicating that these compounds may act as estrogen receptor antagonists. Overall, it became clear in the assay results that the estrogenic activity of flavonoids was affected by small structural differences such as the number of hydroxyl groups, especially those on the B ring of the flavonoid.

  6. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.E.; Graham, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125 I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  7. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation.

  8. Diagnostic assays for active infection with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Mary T; Hall, Caroline Breese; Schnabel, Kenneth; Lofthus, Geraldine; Marino, Andrea; Shelley, Lynne; Yoo, Christina; Carnahan, Jennifer; Anderson, Linda; Wang, Hongyue

    2010-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) causes ubiquitous infection in early childhood with lifelong latency or persistence. Reactivation of HHV-6 has been associated with multiple diseases including encephalitis. Chromosomal integration of HHV-6 also occurs. Previous studies have suggested that the detection of HHV-6 DNA in plasma is an accurate marker of active viral replication. We sought to determine whether PCR assays on plasma could correctly differentiate between primary HHV-6 infection, chromosomal integration of HHV-6 and latent HHV-6 infection. We performed qualitative PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR), and reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays on samples of peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells, as well as plasma, from groups of subjects with well defined HHV-6 infection, including subjects with chromosomally integrated HHV-6. The detection of HHV-6 DNA in plasma was 92% sensitive compared to viral isolation for the identification of primary infection with HHV-6. All plasma samples from infants with chromosomally integrated HHV-6 had HHV-6 DNA detectable in plasma while only 5.6% were positive by RT-PCR. The specificity of plasma PCR for active replication of HHV-6 was 84% compared to viral culture while the specificity of RT-PCR was 98%. Our results demonstrate that qualitative or quantitative PCR of plasma is insufficient to distinguish between active viral replication and chromosomal integration with HHV-6. We found a higher specificity of RT-PCR performed on PBMC samples compared to PCR or RQ-PCR performed on plasma when evaluating samples for active HHV-6 replication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiosensitivity of CD4 and CD8 positive human T lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1989-12-01

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay provides a new opportunity to examine possible variations in human radiosensitivity using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in place of the hitherto used skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4 + and CD8 + cells in PBL differs among individuals, it was suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4 + and CD8 + cells differed. In the present study, CD4 + lymphocytes (helper/inducer T cells) and CD8 + lymphocytes (suppressor/cytotoxic T cells) were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D 10 (the dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10 %) was quite similar for these two types of cells (3.13 ± 0.10 Gy [mean ±SD] for CD4 + , 3.34 ± 0.50 Gy for CD8 + and 3.07 ± 0.05 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of a whole PBL population for screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity. (author)

  10. Evaluation of performance of human immunodeficiency virus antigen/antibody combination assays in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kai; Kao, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Pi-Han; Huang, Hui-Lin; Ho, Shu-Yuan; Wong, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Bo-Chang; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Lee, Chia-Yeh; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Chun-Nan; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yang, Jyh-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) combination assay, which can simultaneously detect the presence of anti-HIV antibody and HIV antigen, has been shown to shorten the window period in HIV diagnosis compared with the third-generation HIV antibody immunoassay. This study was aimed to determine the performance of HIV combination assays in Taiwan, where the HIV-1 seroprevalence is 0.007% and HIV-2 infection has never been reported. Performance of three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays (Dia.Pro, Wantai, and Bio-Rad) and one third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay (AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO) was assessed. A total of 152 specimens, including 86 confirmed HIV-seropositive and 66 HIV-seronegative samples, were used in the study. The sensitivity of four assays varied from 98.8% to 100%, and specificity varied from 98.5% to 100%. Performance of the 75 equivocal samples, the HIV status of which was confirmed later, in terms of negative prediction varied from 81.8% to 87.5%. The Bio-Rad and Dia.Pro assays exhibited higher sensitivity for the detection of p24 antigen among the three fourth-generation HIV combination assays. The three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays exhibited better sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction than the third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. [Assays of HbA1c and Amadori products in human biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillery, P

    2014-09-01

    Different Amadori products, formed during the early steps of the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, may be assayed in current practice in human biology. The most important marker is HbA1c, resulting from the binding of glucose to the N-terminal extremity of HbA beta chains. HbA1c may be evaluated by various techniques (ion exchange or affinity high performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, immunoassay, enzymatic technique) and is considered the best marker of diabetic patient survey. Due to its irreversible and cumulative formation, it provides a retrospective information on the glycemic balance over the four to eight weeks preceding blood collection. It benefits from an international standardization, based on a reference method using liquid chromatography coupled to capillary electrophoresis or mass spectrometry, maintained by an international network of reference laboratories. When HbA1c assay cannot be used (anemia, hemolysis, hemoglobinopathy) or when a shorter period of glycemic equilibrium must be evaluated (child and adolescent, pregnancy, therapeutic changes), other Amadori products may be assayed, like plasma fructosamine (all plasma glycated proteins) or glycated albumin. Nevertheless, these assays are less used in practice, because their semiological value has been less evidenced. Besides, fructosamine assay lacks specificity, and glycated albumin assay has been described recently. An expanding use of HbA1c assay is expected, especially for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and the evaluation of other risks, especially cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of intermediate electron acceptors to enhance MTT bioreduction in a microculture tetrazolium assay for human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C J; Holt, S J; Downes, S; Marshall, N J

    1996-01-01

    We contrast the effects of three intermediate electron acceptors (IEAs) on the highly quantitative ESTA bioassay for human growth hormone. This is a microculture tetrazolium assay based upon the in vitro reduction of the tetrazolium salt MTT, by Nb2 cells which have been activated with hGH. Each of the IEAs influenced MTT-formazan production in a distinctive manner. The two quinonoids, namely menadione and co-enzyme Q0 markedly increased the MTT-formazan produced by hormone activated Nb2 cells and thereby amplified the response of our bioassay for human growth hormone (hGH). The exceptionally low bioassay baseline which is characteristic of the unstimulated Nb2 cells when only MTT is added was retained in the presence of CoQ0, but was greatly increased by menadione. Phenazine methosulphate, which is the most widely used redox intermediary in microculture tetrazolium assays, also increased the baseline, but had only a minimal additional effect on MTT reduction by activated Nb2 cells. We conclude that CoQ0 is the preferred IEA for this ESTA bioassay for hGH.

  13. Studies on bystander effects of 14MeV neutrons in human blood lymphocytes using CBMN assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Arul Anantha Kumar, A.; Sonwani, Swetha; Alaguraja, E.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation induced Bystander Effects (RIBE) in cells generally describes the phenomenon that non-irradiated cells respond as if they have themselves been irradiated upon receiving signals from directly irradiated cells, either through partnering or medium transfer. While it has been well established that bystander effects could be induced by gamma radiation and alpha-particle radiation it is still a question whether neutrons induce bystander effects or not. In view of this, experiments were carried out to quantify cytogenetic damage in human blood lymphocytes induced by neutron directly and indirectly i.e. RIBE through medium transfer method. Cytokinesis Blocked MicroNucleus (CBMN) assay was used to study DNA damage events wherein micronuclei (MN) were scored in binucleated cells. Results of MN frequency in neutron direct and indirect irradiated blood lymphocytes (bystander samples) are compared

  14. Development of a radioreceptor assay for human chorion gonadotropin: Application in normal and pathological pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.

    1978-01-01

    Rats testes were homogenised, and the binding capacity of several dilutions of these were tested with iodine 125 -labelled human choriongonadotropin. Investigations about binding over a period of 36 hrs. with 3 different temperatures, inhibition tests and cross reaction analyses for determining the specificity were carried out. 2 assay systems could be developed. The highly sensitive assay was applied at early pregnancy, at suspected disturbed or ectopic gravidity and allowed to measure the hCG-serum concentration above the physiological basal secretion of hLH. The less sensitive assay was used for measuring hCG in later stages of pregnancy, chorionepitheliomas and other hCG producing tumours. With the highly sensitive and specific assay, hCG was determinable 8 to 10 days post conceptionem. (orig.) [de

  15. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD+ or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD+/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD+-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD+ and NADH contents and the NAD+/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD+, total NAD contents, and NAD+/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ. PMID:25730862

  16. IL-2 absorption affects IFN-gamma and IL-5, but not IL-4 producing memory T cells in double color cytokine ELISPOT assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Stefan; Zhang, Wenji; Shive, Carey; Kovalovski, Damian; Ott, Patrick A; Herzog, Bernhard A; Boehm, Bernhard O; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Karulin, Alexey Y; Lehmann, Paul V

    2005-09-01

    Cytokine assays are gaining increasing importance for human immune monitoring because they reliably detect antigen-specific T cells in primary PBMC, even at low clonal sizes. Double color ELISPOT assays permit the simultaneous visualization of cells producing two different cytokines. Permitting the simultaneous assessment of type 1 and 2 immunity and due to the limited numbers of PBMC available from human study subjects, double color assays should be particularly attractive for clinical trials. Since the performance of double color assays has not yet been validated, we set out to compare them to single color measurements. Testing the recall antigen-induced cytokine response of PBMC, we found that double color assays regularly provided lower numbers of IFN-gamma and IL-5 spots than single color measurements when IL-2 detection was part of the double color assay. We showed that the inhibitory effect resulted from IL-2 absorption and could be overcome by either antibody free preactivation cultures or by inclusion of anti-CD28 antibody. In contrast, the simultaneous detection of IL-2 did not affect the numbers of IL-4 spots. Therefore, unlike IL-2/IL-4 and IFN-gamma/IL-5 assays, IL-2/IFN-gamma, and IL-2/IL-5 assays require compensation for the IL-2 capture to provide accurate numbers for the frequencies of cytokine producing memory T cells.

  17. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  18. Imaging flow cytometry assays for quantifying pigment grade titanium dioxide particle internalization and interactions with immune cells in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Rachel E; Vis, Bradley; Pele, Laetitia C; Faria, Nuno; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-10-01

    Pigment grade titanium dioxide is composed of sub-micron sized particles, including a nanofraction, and is widely utilized in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries. Oral exposure to pigment grade titanium dioxide results in at least some material entering the circulation in humans, although subsequent interactions with blood immune cells are unknown. Pigment grade titanium dioxide is employed for its strong light scattering properties, and this work exploited that attribute to determine whether single cell-particle associations could be determined in immune cells of human whole blood at "real life" concentrations. In vitro assays, initially using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, identified titanium dioxide associated with the surface of, and within, immune cells by darkfield reflectance in imaging flow cytometry. This was confirmed at the population level by side scatter measurements using conventional flow cytometry. Next, it was demonstrated that imaging flow cytometry could quantify titanium dioxide particle-bearing cells, within the immune cell populations of fresh whole blood, down to titanium dioxide levels of 10 parts per billion, which is in the range anticipated for human blood following titanium dioxide ingestion. Moreover, surface association and internal localization of titanium dioxide particles could be discriminated in the assays. Overall, results showed that in addition to the anticipated activity of blood monocytes internalizing titanium dioxide particles, neutrophil internalization and cell membrane adhesion also occurred, the latter for both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cell types. What happens in vivo and whether this contributes to activation of one or more of these different cells types in blood merits further attention. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Human prostatic cancer cells, PC3, elaborate mitogenic activity which selectively stimulates human bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkel, V.S.; Mohan, S.; Herring, S.J.; Baylink, D.J.; Linkhart, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Prostatic cancer typically produces osteoblastic metastases which are not attended by marrow fibrosis. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factor(s) which act selectively on human osteoblasts. Such a paracrine mechanism would explain the observed increase in osteoblasts, unaccompanied by an increase in marrow fibroblasts. To test this hypothesis we investigated the mitogenic activity released by the human prostatic tumor cell line, PC3. PC3 cells have been reported previously to produce mitogenic activity for cells that was relatively specific for rat osteoblasts compared to rat fibroblasts. However, the effects of this activity on human cells has not been examined previously. PC3-conditioned medium (CM) (5-50 micrograms CM protein/ml) stimulated human osteoblast proliferation by 200-950% yet did not stimulate human fibroblast proliferation ([3H]thymidine incorporation). PC3 CM also increased cell numbers in human osteoblast but not fibroblast cell cultures. To determine whether the osteoblast-specific mitogenic activity could be attributed to known bone growth factors, specific assays for these growth factors were performed. PC3 CM contained 10 pg insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I, less than 2 pg IGF II, 54 pg basic fibroblast growth factor, and 16 pg transforming growth factor beta/microgram CM protein. None of these growth factors alone or in combination could account for the observed osteoblast-specific PC3 cell-derived mitogenic activity. Furthermore, when 5 micrograms/ml PC3 CM was tested in combination with maximally effective concentrations of either basic fibroblast growth factor, IGF I, IGF II, or transforming growth factor beta, it produced an additive effect suggesting that PC3 CM stimulates osteoblast proliferation by a mechanism independent of these bone mitogens

  20. Cytotoxicity of four denture adhesives on human gingival fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Chung, Shin-Hye; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Ju, Sung-Won; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of four denture adhesives on human gingival fibroblast cells. Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts were cultured with one of four different denture adhesives, Polident, Protefix, Staydent or Denfix-A, which was placed in insert dishes (10% w/v concentration) for 48 h. The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometric apoptosis assay were used to evaluate cell viability and apoptosis rates. The fibroblasts were also examined under a scanning electron microscope. The MTT assay showed that all denture adhesives resulted in a significantly lower cell viability compared to the control cells propagated in normal culture medium (p 0.05). Staydent showed the highest apoptosis rate. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells of the Staydent group underwent cytoplasmic membrane shrinkage, with cell free areas containing residual fragments of the membrane of dead cells. The four denture adhesives evaluated in this study imparted cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblast cells. Staydent showed the highest toxicity.

  1. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. High-pressure liquid chromatographic assay of Bay n 7133 in human serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Fasching, C E; Hughes, C E; Hector, R F; Peterson, L R

    1984-01-01

    A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method that includes a Sep-Pak (Waters Associates, Inc., Milford , Mass.) preparation of human serum was employed for the quantitative assay of Bay n 7133. Drug levels of 0.1 to 20 micrograms/ml could be detected. No interference from amphotericin B was found in the chromatographic analysis of Bay n 7133.

  3. Concordant testing results between various Human Papillomavirus assays in primary cervical cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Thurah, Lena; Bonde, Jesper; Hoa Lam, Janni Uyen

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays are increasingly used for primary cervical screening and HPV vaccination effect monitoring. We undertook a systematic literature review to determine the concordance in positive test results (i.e., detection of HPV infections) between Hybrid Capture 2 ...

  4. Culture of human cell lines by a pathogen-inactivated human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Mariotti, A; Fioravanti, D; Procoli, A; Cicchetti, E; Scambia, G; Bonanno, G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-01

    Alternatives to the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) have been investigated to ensure xeno-free growth condition. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of human platelet lysate (PL) as a substitute of FBS for the in vitro culture of some human cell lines. PL was obtained by pools of pathogen inactivated human donor platelet (PLT) concentrates. Human leukemia cell lines (KG-1, K562, JURKAT, HL-60) and epithelial tumor cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7) were cultured with either FBS or PL. Changes in cell proliferation, viability, morphology, surface markers and cell cycle were evaluated for each cell line. Functional characteristics were analysed by drug sensitivity test and cytotoxicity assay. Our results demonstrated that PL can support growth and expansion of all cell lines, although the cells cultured in presence of PL experienced a less massive proliferation compared to those grown with FBS. We found a comparable percentage of viable specific marker-expressing cells in both conditions, confirming lineage fidelity in all cultures. Functionality assays showed that cells in both FBS- and PL-supported cultures maintained their normal responsiveness to adriamycin and NK cell-mediated lysis. Our findings indicate that PL is a feasible serum substitute for supporting growth and propagation of haematopoietic and epithelial cell lines with many advantages from a perspective of process standardization, ethicality and product safety.

  5. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayehunie, Seyoum; Snell, Maureen; Child, Matthew; Klausner, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N=26) or non-allergens (N=22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2-5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥ 1.5 fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity. PMID:19665512

  6. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayehunie, Seyoum; Snell, Maureen; Child, Matthew; Klausner, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N = 26) or non-allergens (N = 22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2 to 5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥1.5-fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity.

  7. Automatic cell cloning assay for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer and cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedr, Radek; Pernicová, Zuzana; Slabáková, Eva; Straková, Nicol; Bouchal, Jan; Grepl, Michal; Kozubík, Alois; Souček, Karel

    2013-05-01

    The clonogenic assay is a well-established in vitro method for testing the survival and proliferative capability of cells. It can be used to determine the cytotoxic effects of various treatments including chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation. However, this approach can also characterize cells with different phenotypes and biological properties, such as stem cells or cancer stem cells. In this study, we implemented a faster and more precise method for assessing the cloning efficiency of cancer stem-like cells that were characterized and separated using a high-speed cell sorter. Cell plating onto a microplate using an automatic cell deposition unit was performed in a single-cell or dilution rank mode by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting method. We tested the new automatic cell-cloning assay (ACCA) on selected cancer cell lines and compared it with the manual approach. The obtained results were also compared with the results of the limiting dilution assay for different cell lines. We applied the ACCA to analyze the cloning capacity of different subpopulations of prostate and colon cancer cells based on the expression of the characteristic markers of stem (CD44 and CD133) and cancer stem cells (TROP-2, CD49f, and CD44). Our results revealed that the novel ACCA is a straightforward approach for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer stem-like cells identified in both cell lines and patient samples. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  9. Hybrid Capture 2 and cobas human papillomavirus assays perform similarly on SurePath samples from women with abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornari, D; Rebolj, M; Bjerregaard, B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In two laboratories (Departments of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospitals of Herlev and Hvidovre), we compared cobas and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) assays using SurePath® samples from women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS......) at ≥30 years and women after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). METHODS: Samples from 566 women with ASCUS and 411 women after treatment were routinely tested with HC2 and, thereafter, with cobas. Histological outcomes were retrieved from the Danish Pathology Data Base. We calculated...... the overall agreement between the assays, and compared their sensitivity and specificity for ≥CIN2. RESULTS: In women with ASCUS, HC2 and cobas testing results were similar in the two laboratories. The overall agreement was 91% (95% CI, 88-93). After CIN treatment, the overall agreement was 87% (95% CI, 82...

  10. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  11. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential...... (FMP) assay. The K(m) and K(i) values obtained for 12 standard EAAT ligands at EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in the FMP assay correlated well with the K(i) values obtained in the [(3) H]-d-aspartate assay (r(2) values of 0.92, 0.92, and 0.95, respectively). Furthermore, the pharmacological characteristics...

  12. Detection of Hypoxia in Human Brain Tumor Xenografts Using a Modified Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wang

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We used the standard comet assay successfully to generate in vitro dose-response curves under oxic and hypoxic conditions. We then made mixtures of cells that had been irradiated with 3 and 9 Gy of X-rays to simulate two subpopulations in a tumor, but efforts to accurately detect and quantify the subpopulations using the standard comet assay were unsuccessful. Therefore, we investigated a modified comet assay to determine whether it could be used for measuring hypoxia in our model systems. U251 MG cells were grown as subcutaneous tumors in athymic mice; U251 MG and U87 MG cells were grown as intracerebral (i.c. tumors in athymic rats. Animals were injected with RSU 1069, irradiated, and euthanized. Tumors and normal brains were removed, and the cells were analyzed using a modified comet assay. Differences in comet tail moment distributions between tumor and contralateral normal brain, using tail moments at either the 25th or 50th percentile in each distribution, were taken as measures of the degree of tumor hypoxia. For U251 MG tumors, there was a positive relationship between tumor size and the degree of hypoxia, whereas preliminary data from U87 MG i.c. tumors showed less hypoxia and no apparent relationship between tumor size and hypoxia.

  13. Comparative antioxidant activity of cultivated and wild Vaccinium species investigated by EPR, human neutrophil burst and COMET assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, P C; Antonacci, R; Wang, Y Y; Lattuada, N; Dal Sasso, M; Marabini, L; Fibiani, M; Lo Scalzo, R

    2013-01-01

    The Vaccinium (V.) spp. berries are considered a source of antioxidants, mainly belonging to polyphenols, specifically flavonoids and anthocyanins. Wild genotypes generally contain more antioxidants than cultivated counterparts. So, seven different antioxidants assays on extracts from cultivated and wild Vaccinium berries were performed, to evaluate their difference in terms of bioactivity on oxidative protection and minimum dosage to have a significant action. Four cell-free antioxidant assays (ABTS radical scavenging and electronic paramagnetic resonance using Fremy's salt, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical), and three assays on human cells (two luminol amplified chemiluminescence, LACL, one on DNA damage, COMET) were used to measure the effects of cultivated blueberry (V. corymbosum) and wild bilberry (V. myrtillus) on the differently induced oxidative stress. Concentrations vs activity patterns were obtained by successive dilutions of extracts in order to identify both EC50 and minimum significant activity (MSA). All the assays (except for the hydroxyl radical scavenging) showed a good relationship mainly with anthocyanin and polyphenol content and the significant greater activity of wild Vaccinium extracts. In fact, LACL data gave an EC50 of 11.8 and an MSA of 5.2 g were calculated as fresh weight dosage in cultivated berries, compared with lower doses in wild berries, EC50 of 5.7 g and MSA of 3.4 g. Wild Vaccinium extracts averaged 3.04 and 2.40 fold more activity than cultivated extracts by EC50 and MSA, respectively. COMET assay confirmed the stronger action on DNA protection in wild samples.

  14. The comet assay as a tool for human biomonitoring studies: the ComNet project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew; Koppen, Gudrun; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Dusinska, Maria; Kruszewski, Marcin; Møller, Peter; Rojas, Emilio; Dhawan, Alok; Benzie, Iris; Coskun, Erdem; Moretti, Massimo; Speit, Günter; Bonassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents or to investigate genoprotective effects. Studies often involve small numbers of subjects, and design may be sub-optimal in other respects. In addition, comet assay protocols in use in different laboratories vary significantly. In spite of these difficulties, it is appropriate to carry out a pooled analysis of all available comet assay biomonitoring data, in order to establish baseline parameters of DNA damage, and to investigate associations between comet assay measurements and factors such as sex, age, smoking status, nutrition, lifestyle, etc. With this as its major objective, the ComNet project has recruited almost 100 research groups willing to share datasets. Here we provide a background to this project, discussing the history of the comet assay and practical issues that can critically affect its performance. We survey its diverse applications in biomonitoring studies, including environmental and occupational exposure to genotoxic agents, genoprotection by dietary and other factors, DNA damage associated with various diseases, and intrinsic factors that affect DNA damage levels in humans. We examine in depth the quality of data from a random selection of studies, from an epidemiological and statistical point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Defective repair of UV-damaged DNA in human tumor and SV40-transformed human cells but not in adenovirus-transformed human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The DNA repair capacities of five human tumor cell lines, one SV40-transformed human cell line and one adenovirus-transformed human cell line were compared with that of normal human fibroblasts using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Unirradiated and UV-irradiated suspensions of adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) were assayed for their ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the various cell types using immunofluorescent staining. The survival of Vag formation for UV-irradiated Ad 2 was significantly reduced in all the human tumor cell lines and the SV40-transformed human line compared to the normal human fibroblasts, but was apparently normal in the adenovirus-transformed human cells. D 0 values for the UV survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the tumor and virally transformed lines expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal fibroblast strains were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values ranged from 26 to 53% in the tumor cells. These results indicate a deficiency in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage associated with human tumorigenesis and the transformation of human cells by SV40 but not the transformation of human cells by adenovirus. (author)

  16. Design, development, and validation of a high-throughput drug-screening assay for targeting of human leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Pasqualini, Renata; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Lichtiger, Benjamin; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Koivunen, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Background We introduce an ex vivo methodology to perform drug library screening against human leukemia. Method Our strategy relies on human blood or bone marrow cultures under hypoxia; under these conditions, leukemia cells deplete oxygen faster than normal cells, causing a hemoglobin oxygenation shift. We demonstrate several advantages: (I) partial recapitulation of the leukemia microenvironment, (ii) use of native hemoglobin oxygenation as real-time sensor/reporter, (iii) cost-effectiveness, (iv) species-specificity, and (v) format that enables high-throughput screening. Results As a proof-of-concept, we screened a chemical library (size ∼20,000) against human leukemia cells. We identified 70 compounds (“hit” rate=0.35%; Z-factor=0.71) with activity; we examined 20 to find 18 true-positives (90%). Finally, we show that carbonohydraxonic diamide group-containing compounds are potent anti-leukemia agents that induce cell death in leukemia cells and patient-derived samples. Conclusions This unique functional assay can identify novel drug candidates as well as find future applications in personalized drug selection for leukemia patients. PMID:24496871

  17. Bioactivity assays and application of 125I labeled human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingping; Meng Zhiyun; Dou Guifang; Wu Yingliang; Wang Minwei

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the bioactivity and application of 125 I labeled human mouse chimeric monoclonal SM03, SM03 was labeled with 125 I using Indogen method. The labeled mixture was purified by Sephacryl S-300 HR separation chromospectry. The purity and concentration of separated fractions were determined by HPLC and Protein Assay Kit, respectively. Competitive binding method and ELISA method were used for bioactivity assays. 125 I-SM03 was applied to screen cell lines which express the most abundant CD22 antigen. The purity and recovery of 125 I-SM03 were >99% and >47%, respectively. The bioactivity of 125 I- SM03 and SM03 hasn't significant difference in statistics. Ramos cell line had the strongest special radioactivity when 125 I-SM03 bound with in Raji, Daudi and Ramos cell lines. Indogen method is a good way to label Human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03 and the label will not affect the activity of SM03. The 125 I-SM03 not only can be used for detect agent, but also may be put into market for NHL therapy. (authors)

  18. Patterning cell using Si-stencil for high-throughput assay

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    In this communication, we report a newly developed cell pattering methodology by a silicon-based stencil, which exhibited advantages such as easy handling, reusability, hydrophilic surface and mature fabrication technologies. Cell arrays obtained by this method were used to investigate cell growth under a temperature gradient, which demonstrated the possibility of studying cell behavior in a high-throughput assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  19. Somatic cell genotoxicity at the glycophorin A locus in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.H.; Grant, S.G.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an assay for detecting variant erythrocytes that occur as a result of in vivo allele loss at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus on chromosome 4 in humans. This gene codes for an erythroid- specific cell surface glycoprotein, and with our assay we are able to detect rare variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of one of the two GPA alleles. Two distinctly different variant cell types are detected with this assay. One variant cell type (called N OE) is hemizygous. Our assay also detects homozygous variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of the GPA(M) allele and express the GPA(N) allele at twice the heterozygous level. The results of this assay are an enumeration of the frequency of N OE and NN variant cell types for each individual analyzed. These variant cell frequencies provide a measure of the amount of somatic cell genotoxicity that has occurred at the GPA locus. Such genotoxicity could be the result of (1) reactions of toxic chemicals to which the individual has been exposed, or (2) high energy radiation effects on erythroid precursor cells, or (3) errors in DNA replication or repair in these cells of the bone marrow. Thus, the GPA-based variant cell frequency can serve as a biodosimeter that indicates the amount of genotoxic exposure each individual has received. Because two very different kinds of variant cells are enumerated, different kinds of genotoxicity should be distinguishable. Results of the GPA somatic genotoxicity assay may also provide valuable information for cancer-risk estimation on each individual. 16 refs

  20. Direct measurement of human plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linton, E.A.; McLean, C.; Nieuwenhuyzen Kruseman, A.C.; Tilders, F.J.; Van der Veen, E.A.; Lowry, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) which allows the direct estimation of human CRH (hCRH) in plasma is described. Using this IRMA, basal levels of CRH in normal subjects ranged from 2-28 pg/mL [mean, 15 +/- 7 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 58]. Values in men and women were similar. Plasma CRH values within this range were also found in patients with Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and Nelson's syndrome, with no correlation between plasma CRH and ACTH levels in these patients. Elevated plasma CRH levels were found in pregnant women near term [1462 +/- 752 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 55], and the dilution curve of this CRH-like immunoreactivity paralleled the IRMA standard curve. After its immunoadsorption from maternal plasma, this CRH-like material eluted on reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with a retention time identical to that of synthetic CRH and had equipotent bioactivity with the synthetic peptide in the perfused anterior pituitary cell bioassay. Circulating CRH was not detected in Wistar rats, even after adrenalectomy and subsequent ether stress. Synthetic hCRH was degraded by fresh human plasma relatively slowly; 65% of added CRH remained after 1 h of incubation at 37 C. Degradation was inhibited by heat treatment (54 C; 1 h), cold treatment (4 C; 4 h), or freezing and thawing. Loss of synthetic rat CRH occurred more rapidly when fresh rat plasma was used; only 20% of added CRH remained under the same conditions. The inability to measure CRH in peripheral rat plasma may be due to the presence of active CRH-degrading enzymes which fragment the CRH molecule into forms not recognized by the CRH IRMA

  1. Quantifying rates of cell migration and cell proliferation in co-culture barrier assays reveals how skin and melanoma cells interact during melanoma spreading and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Parvathi; Penington, Catherine J; McGovern, Jacqui A; McElwain, D L Sean; Simpson, Matthew J

    2017-06-21

    Malignant spreading involves the migration of cancer cells amongst other native cell types. For example, in vivo melanoma invasion involves individual melanoma cells migrating through native skin, which is composed of several distinct subpopulations of cells. Here, we aim to quantify how interactions between melanoma and fibroblast cells affect the collective spreading of a heterogeneous population of these cells in vitro. We perform a suite of circular barrier assays that includes: (i) monoculture assays with fibroblast cells; (ii) monoculture assays with SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells; and (iii) a series of co-culture assays initiated with three different ratios of SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells and fibroblast cells. Using immunostaining, detailed cell density histograms are constructed to illustrate how the two subpopulations of cells are spatially arranged within the spreading heterogeneous population. Calibrating the solution of a continuum partial differential equation to the experimental results from the monoculture assays allows us to estimate the cell diffusivity and the cell proliferation rate for the melanoma and the fibroblast cells, separately. Using the parameter estimates from the monoculture assays, we then make a prediction of the spatial spreading in the co-culture assays. Results show that the parameter estimates obtained from the monoculture assays lead to a reasonably accurate prediction of the spatial arrangement of the two subpopulations in the co-culture assays. Overall, the spatial pattern of spreading of the melanoma cells and the fibroblast cells is very similar in monoculture and co-culture conditions. Therefore, we find no clear evidence of any interactions other than cell-to-cell contact and crowding effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytogenetic status and oxidative DNA-damage induced by atorvastatin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Standard and Fpg-modified comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Orescanin, Visnja

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the genotoxic potential of atorvastatin on human lymphocytes in vitro standard comet assay was used in the evaluation of basal DNA damage and to investigate possible oxidative DNA damage produced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) Fpg-modified version of comet assay was also conducted. In addition to these techniques the new criteria for scoring micronucleus test were applied for more complete detection of baseline damage in binuclear lymphocytes exposed to atorvastatin 80 mg/day in different time periods by virtue of measuring the frequency of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. All parameters obtained with the standard comet assay and Fpg-modified comet assay were significantly higher in the treated than in control lymphocytes. The Fpg-modified comet assay showed a significantly greater tail length, tail intensity, and tail moment in all treated lymphocytes than did the standard comet assay, which suggests that oxidative stress is likely to be responsible for DNA damage. DNA damage detected by the standard comet assay indicates that some other mechanism is also involved. In addition to the comet assay, a total number of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds were significantly higher in the exposed than in controlled lymphocytes. Regression analyses showed a positive correlation between the results obtained by the comet (Fpg-modified and standard) and micronucleus assay. Overall, the study demonstrated that atorvastatin in its highest dose is capable of producing damage on the level of DNA molecule and cell

  3. Cytogenetic status and oxidative DNA-damage induced by atorvastatin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Standard and Fpg-modified comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajski, Goran [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Mutagenesis Unit, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Mutagenesis Unit, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Orescanin, Visnja [Ruder Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-08-15

    To investigate the genotoxic potential of atorvastatin on human lymphocytes in vitro standard comet assay was used in the evaluation of basal DNA damage and to investigate possible oxidative DNA damage produced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) Fpg-modified version of comet assay was also conducted. In addition to these techniques the new criteria for scoring micronucleus test were applied for more complete detection of baseline damage in binuclear lymphocytes exposed to atorvastatin 80 mg/day in different time periods by virtue of measuring the frequency of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. All parameters obtained with the standard comet assay and Fpg-modified comet assay were significantly higher in the treated than in control lymphocytes. The Fpg-modified comet assay showed a significantly greater tail length, tail intensity, and tail moment in all treated lymphocytes than did the standard comet assay, which suggests that oxidative stress is likely to be responsible for DNA damage. DNA damage detected by the standard comet assay indicates that some other mechanism is also involved. In addition to the comet assay, a total number of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds were significantly higher in the exposed than in controlled lymphocytes. Regression analyses showed a positive correlation between the results obtained by the comet (Fpg-modified and standard) and micronucleus assay. Overall, the study demonstrated that atorvastatin in its highest dose is capable of producing damage on the level of DNA molecule and cell.

  4. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  6. Use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dipstick assay for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, H. Rogier; Koelewijn, Rob; Hofwegen, Henk; Gilis, Henk; Wetsteyn, Jose C. F. M.; Wismans, Pieter J.; Sarfati, Claudine; Vervoort, Tony; van Gool, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A homemade enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Academic Medical Center ELISA [AMC-ELISA]) and a dipstick assay for the detection of anti-Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies in serum were developed and evaluated together with two commercially available ELISAs (IVD-ELISA [IVD Research, Inc.

  7. Development of a replication-competent lentivirus assay for dendritic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Farley

    Full Text Available It is a current regulatory requirement to demonstrate absence of detectable replication-competent lentivirus (RCL in lentiviral vector products prior to use in clinical trials. Immune Design previously described an HIV-1-based integration-deficient lentiviral vector for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02. VP02 is enveloped with E1001, a modified Sindbis virus glycoprotein which targets dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells in vivo. Vector enveloped with E1001 does not transduce T-cell lines used in standard HIV-1-based RCL assays, making current RCL testing formats unsuitable for testing VP02. We therefore developed a novel assay to test for RCL in clinical lots of VP02. This assay, which utilizes a murine leukemia positive control virus and a 293F cell line expressing the E1001 receptor DC-SIGN, meets a series of evaluation criteria defined in collaboration with US regulatory authorities and demonstrates the ability of the assay format to amplify and detect a hypothetical RCL derived from VP02 vector components. This assay was qualified and used to test six independent GMP production lots of VP02, in which no RCL was detected. We propose that the evaluation criteria used to rationally design this novel method should be considered when developing an RCL assay for any lentiviral vector.

  8. A novel synthetic peptide microarray assay detects Chlamydia species-specific antibodies in animal and human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Konrad; Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Schnee, Christiane; Müller, Elke; Peisker, Madlen; Schumacher, Thomas; Schubert, Evelyn; Ruettger, Anke; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Ehricht, Ralf

    2018-03-16

    Serological analysis of Chlamydia (C.) spp. infections is still mainly based on micro-immunofluorescence and ELISA. To overcome the limitations of conventional serology, we have designed a novel microarray carrying 52 synthetic peptides representing B-cell epitopes from immunodominant proteins of all 11 chlamydial species. The new assay has been validated using monospecific mouse hyperimmune sera. Subsequently, serum samples from cattle, sheep and humans with a known history of chlamydial infection were examined. For instance, the specific humoral response of sheep to treatment with a C. abortus vaccine has been visualized against a background of C. pecorum carriership. In samples from humans, dual infection with C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae could be demonstrated. The experiments revealed that the peptide microarray assay was capable of simultaneously identifying specific antibodies to each Chlamydia spp. The actual assay represents an open platform test that can be complemented through future advances in Chlamydia proteome research. The concept of the highly parallel multi-antigen microarray proven in this study has the potential to enhance our understanding of antibody responses by defining not only a single quantitative response, but also the pattern of this response. The added value of using peptide antigens will consist in unprecedented serodiagnostic specificity.

  9. STANDARDIZATION OF A FLUORESCENT-BASED QUANTITATIVE ADHESION ASSAY TO STUDY ATTACHMENT OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE TO EPITHELIAL CELLS In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Nancy; Evangelista, Julio; Gilman, Robert H.; Arana, Yanina; Palma, Sandra; Sterling, Charles R; Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzalez, Armando; Verastegui, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    To fully understand the preliminary stages of Taenia solium oncosphere attachment in the gut, adequate tools and assays are necessary to observe and quantify this event that leads to infection. A fluorescent-based quantitative adhesion assay, using biotinylated activated-oncospheres and monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) or human intestinal monolayer cells (INT-407, HCT-8 or HT-29), was developed to study initial events during the infection of target cells and to rapidly quantify the in vitro adhesion of T. solium oncospheres. Fluorescein streptavidin was used to identify biotinylated activated-oncospheres adhered to cells. This adherence was quantified using an automated fluorescence plate reader, and the results were expressed as fluorescence intensity values. A series of three assays were performed. The first was to identify the optimum number of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to be used in the adhesion assay. The goal of the second assay was to validate this novel method with the established oncosphere-binding system using the immunofluorescent-antibody assay (IFA) method to quantify oncosphere adhesion. A total of 10,000 biotinylated activated-oncospheres were utilized to assess the role of sera and laminin (LM) in oncosphere adherence to a CHO-K1 cell monolayer. The findings that sera and LM increase the adhesion of oncospheres to monolayer cells were similar to results that were previously obtained using the IFA method. The third assay compared the adherence of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to different types of human intestinal monolayer cells. In this case, the fluorescence intensity was greatest when using the INT-407 cell monolayer. We believe this new method of quantification offers the potential for rapid, large-scale screening to study and elucidate specific molecules and mechanisms involved in oncosphere-host cell attachment. PMID:22178422

  10. A Cancer Cell-Activatable Aptamer-Reporter System for One-Step Assay of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihua Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current antibody-mediated numeration assays of circulating tumor cells (CTCs require multiple steps and are time-consuming. To overcome these technical limitations, a cancer cell-activatable aptamer-reporter was formulated by conjugating a biomarker-specific aptamer sequence with paired fluorochrome-quencher molecules. In contrast to the antibody probes, the intact aptamer-reporter was optically silent in the absence of cells of interest. However, when used in an assay, the aptamer selectively targeted cancer cells through interaction with a specific surface biomarker, which triggered internalization of the aptamer-reporter and, subsequently, into cell lysosomes. Rapid lysosomal degradation of the aptamer-reporter resulted in separation of the paired fluorochrome-quencher molecules. The released fluorochrome emitted bright fluorescent signals exclusively within the targeted cancer cells, with no background noise in the assay. Thus, the assays could be completed in a single step within minutes. By using this one-step assay, CTCs in whole blood and marrow aspirate samples of patients with lymphoma tumors were selectively highlighted and rapidly detected with no off-target signals from background blood cells. The development of the cancer cell-activatable aptamer-reporter system allows for the possibility of a simple and robust point-of-care test for CTC detection, which is currently unavailable.

  11. Inhibition of neuronal cell–cell adhesion measured by the microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiertz, Remy; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing (IS) were used to monitor a change in in vitro neuron–neuron adhesion in response to blocking of cell adhesion molecules. By blocking neuron–neuron adhesion, migration and aggregation of neuronal cells can be inhibited. This leads to better control

  12. Development of a partition-controlled dosing system for cell assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, N.I.; Busser, F.J.M.; Oosterwijk, M.T.; Schirmer, K.; Escher, B.I.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic and volatile chemicals have proven to be difficult to dose in cell assays. Cosolvents are often needed to dissolve these chemicals in cell culture medium. Moreover, the free concentration of these chemicals in culture medium may diminish over time due to metabolism, evaporation, and

  13. Assay for identification of heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphism (Ala67Thr in human poliovirus receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Nandi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A new SNP assay for detection of heterozygous Ala67Thr genotype was developed and validated by testing 150 DNA samples. Heterozygous CD155 was detected in 27.33 per cent (41/150 of DNA samples tested by both SNP detection assay and sequencing. Interpretation & conclusions: The SNP detection assay was successfully developed for identification of Ala67Thr polymorphism in human PVR/CD155 gene. The SNP assay will be useful for large scale screening of DNA samples.

  14. Does the recommended lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay for human biomonitoring actually detect DNA damage induced by occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic chemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter

    2013-07-01

    This commentary challenges the paradigm that the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay) with cultured human lymphocytes, as it is performed currently, is a sensitive and useful tool for detecting genotoxic effects in populations exposed occupationally or environmentally to genotoxic chemicals. Based on the principle of the assay and the available data, increased micronucleus (MN) frequencies in binucleated cells (BNC) are mainly due to MN produced in vitro during the cultivation period (i.e. MN produced in vivo do not substantially contribute to the MN frequency measured in BNC). The sensitivity of the assay for the detection of induced MN in BNC after an in vivo exposure to a genotoxic chemical is limited because cytochalasin B (Cyt-B) is added relatively late during the culture period and, therefore, the BNC that are scored do not always represent cells that have completed one cell cycle only. Furthermore, this delay means that damaged cells can be eliminated by apoptosis and/or that DNA damage induced in vivo can be repaired prior to the production of a MN in the presence of Cyt-B. A comparison with the in vitro CBMN assay used for genotoxicity testing leads to the conclusion that it is highly unlikely that DNA damage induced in vivo is the cause for increased MN frequencies in BNC after occupational or environmental exposure to genotoxic chemicals. This commentary casts doubt on the usefulness of the CBMN assay as an indicator of genotoxicity in human biomonitoring and questions the relevance of many published data for hazard identification and risk assessment. Thus, it seems worthwhile to reconsider the use of the CBMN assay as presently conducted for the detection of genotoxic exposure in human biomonitoring.

  15. Differential Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia by Four Commercial Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in 2.5 years after the baseline testing were determined from the national pathology register. HPV-positive women undergoing primary screening having concordant samples were more likely to harbor high-risk infections and less likely to harbor only low-risk infections than women......Laboratories can nowadays choose from >100 Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays for cervical screening. Our previous analysis based on the data from the Danish Horizon study, however, showed that four widely used assays, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART and APTIMA, frequently do not detect...... the same HPV infections. Here, we determined the characteristics of the concordant (all four assays returning a positive HPV test result) and discordant samples (all other HPV-positive samples) in primary cervical screening at 30-65 years (n=2859) and in a concurrent referral population from the same...

  16. A novel multiparametric flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay simultaneously immunophenotypes effector cells: comparisons to a 4 h 51Cr-release assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G G; Donnenberg, V S; Donnenberg, A D; Gooding, W; Whiteside, T L

    2007-08-31

    Natural killer (NK) cell-or T cell-mediated cytotoxicity traditionally is measured in 4-16 h (51)Cr-release assays (CRA). A new four-color flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay (FCC) was developed to simultaneously measure NK cell cytotoxicity and NK cell phenotype (CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+)). Target cells, K562 or Daudi, were labeled with Cell Tracker Orange (CTO) prior to the addition of effector cells. Following co-incubation, 7 amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) was added to measure death of target cells. The phenotype of effectors, viability of targets, the formation of tumor-effector cell conjugates and absolute numbers of all cells were measured based on light scatter (FSC/SSC), double discrimination of the fluorescence peak integral and height, and fluorescence intensity. Kinetic studies (0.5 and 1 to 4 h) at different effector to target (E:T) cell ratios (50, 25, 12, and 6) confirmed that the 3 h incubation was optimal. The FCC assay is more sensitive than the CRA, has a coefficient of variation (CV) 8-13% and reliably measures NK cell-or lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell-mediated killing of target cells in normal controls and subjects with cancer. The FCC assay can be used to study a range of phenotypic attributes, in addition to lytic activity of various subsets of effector cells, without radioactive tracers and thus, it is relatively inexpensive. The FCC assay has a potential for providing information about molecular interactions underlying target cell lysis and thus becoming a major tool for studies of disease pathogenesis as well as development of novel immune therapies.

  17. A molecular assay for sensitive detection of pathogen-specific T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria O Kasprowicz

    Full Text Available Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR for two reporters--monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10. We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001. Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings.

  18. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety.

  19. Human papillomavirus detection and typing using a nested-PCR-RFLP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coser, Janaina; Boeira, Thaís da Rocha; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Ikuta, Nilo; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    It is clinically important to detect and type human papillomavirus (HPV) in a sensitive and specific manner. Development of a nested-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (nested-PCR-RFLP) assay to detect and type HPV based on the analysis of L1 gene. Analysis of published DNA sequence of mucosal HPV types to select sequences of new primers. Design of an original nested-PCR assay using the new primers pair selected and classical MY09/11 primers. HPV detection and typing in cervical samples using the nested-PCR-RFLP assay. The nested-PCR-RFLP assay detected and typed HPV in cervical samples. Of the total of 128 clinical samples submitted to simple PCR and nested-PCR for detection of HPV, 37 (28.9%) were positive for the virus by both methods and 25 samples were positive only by nested-PCR (67.5% increase in detection rate compared with single PCR). All HPV positive samples were effectively typed by RFLP assay. The method of nested-PCR proved to be an effective diagnostic tool for HPV detection and typing.

  20. Application of the comet assay in studies of programmed cell death (PCD in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Charzyńska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plants is an intensively investigated process. One of the main characteristics of PCD in both animal and plant organisms is the non-random, internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA, usually analysed using total DNA gel electrophoresis or TUNEL method. In this paper we present application of the "comet assay" (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis for detection of nDNA degradation in studies of PCD during plant life cycle. We analyzed three types of tissue: anther tapetum, endosperm and mesophyll which were prepared in different ways to obtain a suspension of viable cells (without cell walls. The comet assay gives a possibility of examination of the nDNA degradation in individual cell. This method is significant for studies of the plant tissue differentiation and senescence especially in the cases when it is not possible to isolate large number of cells at the same developmental stage.

  1. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  2. A Cardiac Cell Outgrowth Assay for Evaluating Drug Compounds Using a Cardiac Spheroid-on-a-Chip Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Christoffersson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D models with cells arranged in clusters or spheroids have emerged as valuable tools to improve physiological relevance in drug screening. One of the challenges with cells cultured in 3D, especially for high-throughput applications, is to quickly and non-invasively assess the cellular state in vitro. In this article, we show that the number of cells growing out from human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiac spheroids can be quantified to serve as an indicator of a drug’s effect on spheroids captured in a microfluidic device. Combining this spheroid-on-a-chip with confocal high content imaging reveals easily accessible, quantitative outgrowth data. We found that effects on outgrowing cell numbers correlate to the concentrations of relevant pharmacological compounds and could thus serve as a practical readout to monitor drug effects. Here, we demonstrate the potential of this semi-high-throughput “cardiac cell outgrowth assay” with six compounds at three concentrations applied to spheroids for 48 h. The image-based readout complements end-point assays or may be used as a non-invasive assay for quality control during long-term culture.

  3. The discussion of method for survey the radiosensitivity of human glioma cell line SHG-44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Xu Changshao; Zhou Juying; Xu Xiaoting; Luo Jialin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if thiazolyl blue colorimetric assay (MTT) and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) can replace clone forming assay for survey the radiosensitivity of SHG-44. Methods; Three assays was applied to examine the growth inhibition of human glioma cell line SHG-44 in eight dose groups of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy, and statistical research was applied to analyze the correlation between survival fraction and various doses. Results: Dose was associated with survival fraction in these three assays at some range of irradiation doseage (dose≤3 Gy). If out of the range, the relation is poor. CCK-8 has no rather superiority than MTT. Conclusion: By now clone forming assay is still the 'gold standard'. In some cases, MTT and other assays can give us some reference, but these assays still can not replace clone forming assay. (authors)

  4. Assay for Epstein--Barr virus based on stimulation of DNA systhesis in mixed leukocytes from human umbilical cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.; Miller, G.

    1975-01-01

    Relationships between the rate of DNA synthesis in cultured human umbilical cord leukocytes and the multiplicity of added Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were studied. At low multiplicities of approximately 0.1 transforming units/cell (approximately 10 physical particles/cell), inoculated cultures demonstrated increased rates of DNA synthesis, by comparison to uninoculated cultures, 3 days after inoculation. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was evident at progressively longer intervals after inoculations of 10-fold dilutions of virus. The rate of DNA synthesis, determined by short [ 3 H]thymidine pulses, reflected as small as twofold changes in multiplicity and thus can serve as a quantitative assay for the virus. Changes in the rate of DNA synthesis were evident before increases in cell number or alteration in morphology. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in umbilical cord leukocytes was inhibited by treatment of EBV with antibody and also in graded fashion, by progressive doses of uv irradiation to the virus. Induction of DNA synthesis by EBV was serum dependent. Estimates of the number of cells transformed were obtained by extrapolation from a standard curve relating known numbers of transformed cells to [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation and also by cloning cells after exposure to virus. At the low multiplicities of infection used in these experiments approximately 0.04 to 0.002 of the total cellular population was transformed. The high efficiency of cell transformation by EBV by comparison to other DNA tumor viruses is emphasized

  5. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been one of the most productive classes of drug targets for several decades, and new technologies for GPCR-based discovery promise to keep this field active for years to come. While molecular screens for GPCR receptor agonist- and antagonist-based drugs...... will continue to be valuable discovery tools, the most exciting developments in the field involve cell-based assays for GPCR function. Some cell-based discovery strategies, such as the use of beta-arrestin as a surrogate marker for GPCR function, have already been reduced to practice, and have been used...... as valuable discovery tools for several years. The application of high content cell-based screening to GPCR discovery has opened up additional possibilities, such as direct tracking of GPCRs, G proteins and other signaling pathway components using intracellular translocation assays. These assays provide...

  6. Cell transformation assays for prediction of carcinogenic potential: state of the science and future research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creton, Stuart; Aardema, Marilyn J.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Harvey, James S.; Martin, Francis L.; Newbold, Robert F.; O’Donovan, Michael R.; Pant, Kamala; Poth, Albrecht; Sakai, Ayako; Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Scott, Andrew D.; Schechtman, Leonard M.; Shen, Rhine R.; Tanaka, Noriho; Yasaei, Hemad

    2012-01-01

    Cell transformation assays (CTAs) have long been proposed as in vitro methods for the identification of potential chemical carcinogens. Despite showing good correlation with rodent bioassay data, concerns over the subjective nature of using morphological criteria for identifying transformed cells and a lack of understanding of the mechanistic basis of the assays has limited their acceptance for regulatory purposes. However, recent drivers to find alternative carcinogenicity assessment methodologies, such as the Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive, have fuelled renewed interest in CTAs. Research is currently ongoing to improve the objectivity of the assays, reveal the underlying molecular changes leading to transformation and explore the use of novel cell types. The UK NC3Rs held an international workshop in November 2010 to review the current state of the art in this field and provide directions for future research. This paper outlines the key points highlighted at this meeting. PMID:21852270

  7. Morphological Effects and Antioxidant Capacity of Solanum crispum (Natre) In Vitro Assayed on Human Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Ramírez, Patricia; Avello, Marcia; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Barriga, Andrés; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela

    2016-06-01

    In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of the antioxidant properties of Solanum crispum, aqueous extracts of its leaves were assayed on human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane. Phenolics and alkaloids were detected by HPLC-MS. Scanning electron and defocusing microscopy showed that S. crispum changed erythrocytes from the normal shape to echinocytes. These results imply that molecules present in the aqueous extracts were located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) were chosen as representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that S. crispum preferentially interacted with DMPC bilayers. Experiments regarding its antioxidant properties showed that S. crispum neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPE bilayers; defocusing microscopy and hemolysis assays demonstrated the protective effect of S. crispum against the oxidant effects of HClO on human erythrocytes.

  8. Establishment and clinical application of immunoradiometric assay for human growth hormone in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jinfeng; Wu Congyuan; Niu Zhanpo; Zhang Kui; Song Ailing; Deng Jieying; Shi Mifan

    1992-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for human growth hormone (hGH) in serum is developed based on two high specific monoclonal antibodies against hGh. It can specifically detect the levels of serum bioactive hGh and had no cross-reaction with human prolactin (hPRL) and hGh oligmeric forms. The sensitivity was 0.2 ng/ml and the recovery for different concentrations of hGh was 92.0% ∼ 103.2%. The coefficients of variation for intra and inter-assay were<9.1% and <14.2%, respectively. Integral analysis of the results of RIA and IRMA with the patients' clinical manifestations revealed that hGh IRMA is better than hGh RIA in reflecting the clinical states of different acromegalic patients

  9. Computer-assisted image analysis assay of human neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P; Kharazmi, A

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a computer-based image analysis system to measure in-filter migration of human neutrophils in the Boyden chamber. This method is compared with the conventional manual counting techniques. Neutrophils from healthy individuals and from patients with reduced chemotactic activity were....... Another advantage of the assay is that it can be used to show the migration pattern of different populations of neutrophils from both healthy individuals and patients....

  10. A microprocessor-controlled assay for the estimation of human placental lactogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, T.; Roulston, J.E.; Bagshawe, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for human placental lactogen (HPL) is described using the KEMTEK 3000, which is a modular radioimmunoassay apparatus controlled by a microprocessor. Operation of the KEMTEK 3000 is largely automatic and it requires minimal intervention from the operator. It is capable of 300 reactions per hour so that a large number of estimations can readily be performed. HPL was assayed by a double antibody method on serum samples from pregnant women and patients with trophoblastic tumours. (Auth.)

  11. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchelle Edith

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa.

  12. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine

    2015-01-01

    shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9μM and 3.1μ....... In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were......M for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine...

  13. Enzyme-immuno assay for total estrogens and human placental lactogen. Comparison with radio-immuno-assay in normal pregnancy-monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichvarg, D.; Tallet, F.; Lajeunie, E.; Bonnaire, Y.; Danglas, P.

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations of estrogens (E) and human placental lactogen (HLP) are estimated in sera by radio immuno-assay (RIA) and enzyme-immuno-assay (EIA). Statistical data indicate mean intra-assay variation coefficients of 7% and 12% for E and HLP tests, respectively. The correlation coefficient (RIA/EIA) are found higher than 0,9% for both hormonal assays. The dilution curves obtained by RIA and EIA are similar. However, Student'test gives a significant difference for E determination. In fact, total E and E 3 only are measured by EIA and RIA, respectively. In most cases biological interferences are negligible except for HLP in presence of higher protein or haemoglobin levels. RIA and EIA are performed to study serum HLP and E levels throughout normal pregnancies. Results allow to use EIA for HLP and E evaluations in pregnancy-monitoring [fr

  14. Development of a novel cell-based assay system EPISSAY for screening epigenetic drugs and liposome formulated decitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sue Ping; Callen, David F; Kumar, Raman; Akkamsetty, Yamini; Wang, Wen; Ho, Kristen; Neilsen, Paul M; Walther, Diego J; Suetani, Rachel J; Prestidge, Clive

    2013-01-01

    Despite the potential of improving the delivery of epigenetic drugs, the subsequent assessment of changes in their epigenetic activity is largely dependent on the availability of a suitable and rapid screening bioassay. Here, we describe a cell-based assay system for screening gene reactivation. A cell-based assay system (EPISSAY) was designed based on a silenced triple-mutated bacterial nitroreductase TMnfsB fused with Red-Fluorescent Protein (RFP) expressed in the non-malignant human breast cell line MCF10A. EPISSAY was validated using the target gene TXNIP, which has previously been shown to respond to epigenetic drugs. The potency of a epigenetic drug model, decitabine, formulated with PEGylated liposomes was also validated using this assay system. Following treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors such as decitabine and vorinostat, increases in RFP expression were observed, indicating expression of RFP-TMnfsB. The EPISSAY system was then used to test the potency of decitabine, before and after PEGylated liposomal encapsulation. We observed a 50% higher potency of decitabine when encapsulated in PEGylated liposomes, which is likely to be due to its protection from rapid degradation. The EPISSAY bioassay system provides a novel and rapid system to compare the efficiencies of existing and newly formulated drugs that reactivate gene expression

  15. Automated image-based assay for evaluation of HIV neutralization and cell-to-cell fusion inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Özkaya Şahin, Gülsen; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Carpenter, Anne E; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2014-08-30

    Standardized techniques to detect HIV-neutralizing antibody responses are of great importance in the search for an HIV vaccine. Here, we present a high-throughput, high-content automated plaque reduction (APR) assay based on automated microscopy and image analysis that allows evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay. Neutralization of virus particles is measured as a reduction in the number of fluorescent plaques, and inhibition of cell-cell fusion as a reduction in plaque area. We found neutralization strength to be a significant factor in the ability of virus to form syncytia. Further, we introduce the inhibitory concentration of plaque area reduction (ICpar) as an additional measure of antiviral activity, i.e. fusion inhibition. We present an automated image based high-throughput, high-content HIV plaque reduction assay. This allows, for the first time, simultaneous evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay, by quantifying the reduction in number of plaques and mean plaque area, respectively. Inhibition of cell-to-cell fusion requires higher quantities of inhibitory reagent than inhibition of virus neutralization.

  16. Comparison of antibody responses to human papillomavirus vaccination as measured by three assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Ann Robbins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different assays, including the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA, secreted alkaline phosphatase neutralization assay (SEAP-NA, and virus-like particle-based ELISA, are commonly used to measure antibody responses after human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination. Direct assay comparisons aid interpretation of immunogenicity data evaluated by different assays. Methods: We compared cLIA to SEAP-NA and ELISA among 51 HPV16/18-vaccinated women enrolled in the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. We tested replicate serum samples collected at months 0, 1, and 12 by HPV16/18 cLIA, SEAP-NA, and ELISA. For a subset (N=10, we further tested month 24 and 36 samples. We calculated seroprevalence estimates and Spearman rank correlation coefficients comparing cLIA to SEAP-NA and ELISA.Results: After one vaccine dose, seroprevalence by SEAP-NA and ELISA was 100% (both HPV16 and HPV18, and by cLIA was 96% (95% CI 87%-100% for HPV16 and 71% (95% CI 56%-83% for HPV18. Seroprevalence was 100% by all assays after 3 doses. Correlation between assays was high after one vaccine dose (cLIA/SEAP-NA ρ=0.91 (HPV16 and ρ=0.86 (HPV18; cLIA/ELISA ρ=0.84 (HPV16 and ρ=0.74 (HPV18; all p<0.001 and remained high through month 36. Ratios of mean antibody levels to seropositivity cutoffs at month 36 were lower for cLIA than for SEAP-NA or ELISA, particularly for HPV18 (HPV18 ratio for cLIA 1.9, SEAP-NA 3.5, ELISA 3.4.Conclusion: Though correlation between cLIA and SEAP-NA/ELISA is high and stable after vaccination, the assays differ in scale and sensitivity, with notable differences after 1 vaccine dose and for HPV18. Our results demonstrate that comparisons of antibody responses to HPV vaccination measured by different assays are approximate, and must consider biological and technical differences between assays.

  17. Single-cell microgel electrophoresis: an in vitro assay of radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeley, J.O.T.; Moore, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The results obtained by a microgel electrophoresis are comparable to conventional gel electrophoresis and elution techniques (Singh et al, 1989), DNA precipitation, alkali unwinding and cell clonogenicity assays (Olive et al, 1990). Since single cells are assessed, microgel electrophoresis is particularly appropriate for end-points such as the intercell variation in response. The simplicity, low cost and rapidity of microgel electrophoresis compared with other assays makes it particularly attractive for assessing the effects on DNA of radiation and other genotoxic agents on the general population. (Author)

  18. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengues, Muriel; Gu, Jian; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  19. A CpG-methylation-based assay to predict survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jin-Huan; Haddad, Ahmed; Wu, Kai-Jie; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhao, Liang-Yun; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Jian-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Dan; Liao, Bing; Li, Cai-Xia; Li, Pei-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Qing-Zuo; Gao, Zhen-Li; He, Da-Lin; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Li, Quan-Zhen; Margulis, Vitaly; Luo, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) display divergent clinical behaviours. Molecular markers might improve risk stratification of ccRCC. Here we use, based on genome-wide CpG methylation profiling, a LASSO model to develop a five-CpG-based assay for ccRCC prognosis that can be used with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. The five-CpG-based classifier was validated in three independent sets from China, United States and the Cancer Genome Atlas data set. The classifier predicts the overall survival of ccRCC patients (hazard ratio=2.96−4.82; P=3.9 × 10−6−2.2 × 10−9), independent of standard clinical prognostic factors. The five-CpG-based classifier successfully categorizes patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, with significant differences of clinical outcome in respective clinical stages and individual ‘stage, size, grade and necrosis' scores. Moreover, methylation at the five CpGs correlates with expression of five genes: PITX1, FOXE3, TWF2, EHBP1L1 and RIN1. Our five-CpG-based classifier is a practical and reliable prognostic tool for ccRCC that can add prognostic value to the staging system. PMID:26515236

  20. A novel parameter, cell-cycle progression index, for radiation dose absorbed estimation in the premature chromosome condensation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Nakano, Manabu; Nakata, Akifumi; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Abe, Yu; Tsushima, Eiki; Ossetrova, Natalia I.; Blakely, William F.

    2014-01-01

    The calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is a simple and useful method for assessing the cell-cycle distribution in cells, since calyculin A induces chromosome condensation in various phases of the cell cycle. In this study, a novel parameter, the cell-cycle progression index (CPI), in the PCC assay was validated as a novel bio-marker for bio-dosimetry. Peripheral blood was drawn from healthy donors after informed consent was obtained. CPI was investigated using a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) ex vivo irradiation ( 60 Co-gamma rays: ∼0.6 Gy min -1 , or X ray: 1.0 Gy min -1 ; 0-10 Gy) model. The calyculin A-induced PCC assay was performed for chromosome preparation. PCC cells were divided into the following five categories according to cell-cycle stage: non-PCC, G1-PCC, S-PCC, G2/M-PCC and M/A-PCC cells. CPI was calculated as the ratio of G2/M-PCC cells to G1-PCC cells. The PCC-stage distribution varied markedly with irradiation doses. The G1-PCC cell fraction was significantly reduced, and the G2/M-PCC cell fraction increased, in 10-Gy-irradiated PBL after 48 h of culture. CPI levels were fitted to an exponential dose-response curve with gamma-ray irradiation [y = 0.6729 + 0.3934 exp(0.5685D), r = 1.0000, p < 0.0001] and X-ray irradiation [y = -0.3743 + 0.9744 exp(0.3321D), r = 0.9999, p < 0.0001]. There were no significant individual (p = 0.853) or gender effects (p = 0.951) on the CPI in the human peripheral blood ex vivo irradiation model. Furthermore, CPI measurements are rapid (< 15 min per case). These results suggest that the CPI is a useful screening tool for the assessment of radiation doses received ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in radiation exposure early after a radiation event, especially after a mass-casualty radiological incident. (authors)

  1. A radioreceptor-assay of a methionine-enkephalin-like substance in human CSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furui, Tomoo; Kageyama, Naoki; Haga, Tatsuya; Ichiyama, Arata; Fukushima, Masanori.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a radioreceptor-assay system of the met-enkephalin-like substance in human CSF. A particulate fraction was prepared from rat brain essentially according to the method of Pasternak and used as a receptor. In order to obtain the most sensitive radioreceptor-assay, displacement curves by met-enkephalin were compared with each other using three kinds of radiolabeled ligand: 3 H-met-enkephalin, 3 H-naloxone and 3 H-dihydromorphine. When 3 H-dihydromorphine was used as the radiolabeled ligand, the concentration of met-enkephalin required to inhibit 50% of specific binding (IC 50 ) was the lowest. The addition of 1 mM EDTA and 2 mM Mg was found to decrease further the IC 50 and enhance the binding. Thus the radioreceptor-assay of the metenkephalin-like substance in CSF was carried out using 3 H-dihydromorphine as the radiolabeled ligand in the presence of 1 mM EDTA and 2 mM Mg. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from about 1 to 100 pmoles of met-enkephalin. The isolation of met-enkephalin from CSF was performed by a Sephadex G 10 gel filtration followed by a SP-Sephadex (H + ) column chromatography. Sodium and non-specific inhibitor (s) of the specific binding of 3 H-dihydromorphine were removed from CSF by the chromatography. The overall recovery of met-enkephalin was about 60%. Human CSF was obtained from 8 patients hospitalized for neurosurgical study and therapy. All assays were duplicated. The met-enkephalin-like substance levels were 3.3 +- 2.1 (mean +- S.D., n=8) pmoles/ml and ranged from 0.7 to 6.7 pmoles of the met-enkephalin equivalents. (J.P.N.)

  2. Indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus western blot results in Iranian patients with discordant screening assay results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravanshad, M.; Sabahi, F.; Mahboudi, F.; Sabahi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Western blot (WB) assay is the most widely accepted confirmatory assay for the detection and confirmation of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and 2 (HIV-2). However, indeterminate WB reactivity to HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteins may occur in individuals who do not appear to be infected with HIV. In this study, we describe the results of indeterminate WB reactivity in Iranian patients with discordant screening assays. The samples were obtained from Iranian Blood Transfusion Center, Tehran, Iran and evaluated in the Biotechnology Process Development Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran between 2003 and 2004. A total of 4707 were tested for the presence of HIV-1 antibodies. Six hundred and four (12.8%) patients tested for HIV were positive for HIV-1 antibody. Nine (1.49%) have discordant results among screening assays and indeterminate WB results as interpreted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. Most (66.7%) of these indeterminate WB results were due to p24 reactivity. However, 2(22.2%) display reactivity to both gp41 and gp120 proteins [Positive by World Health Organization (WHO) criteria]. Of 9 WB assays initially indeterminate by the CDC criteria and with follow-up samples 8(88.8%) became negative when retested subsequently while one (11.1%) remained indeterminate for more than a year and were thus considered negative. In addition all the indeterminate samples were negative when assessed by polymerase chain reaction assay. In general, there were was an 88.8% concordance between the CDC and WHO criteria for an indeterminate WB result. The CDC II criteria for an indeterminate WB result. The CDC II criteria best met the specified objectives for diagnosis in our setting. (author)

  3. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  4. Stable radioresistance in ataxia-telangiectasia cells containing DNA from normal human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, L.N.; Painter, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    SV40-transformed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells were transfected with a cosmid containing a normal human DNA library and selectable marker, the neo gene, which endows successfully transformed mammalian cells with resistance to the antibiotic G418. Cells from this line were irradiated with 50 Gy of X-rays and fused with non-transfected AT cells. Among the G418-resistant colonies recovered was one stably resistant to radiation. Resistance to ionizing radiation of both primary transfectant line and its fusion derivative was intermediate between that of AT cells and normal cells, as assayed by colony-forming ability and measurement of radiation-induced G 2 chromatic aberrations; both cell lines retained AT-like radioresistant DNA synthesis. Results suggest that, because radioresistance in transfected cells was not as great as in normal human cells, two hallmarks of AT, radiosensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis, may still be the result of a single defective AT gene. (author)

  5. A simple, versatile and sensitive cell-based assay for prions from various species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira E Arellano-Anaya

    Full Text Available Detection and quantification of prion infectivity is a crucial step for various fundamental and applied aspects of prion research. Identification of cell lines highly sensitive to prion infection led to the development of cell-based titration procedures aiming at replacing animal bioassays, usually performed in mice or hamsters. However, most of these cell lines are only permissive to mouse-adapted prions strains and do not allow titration of prions from other species. In this study, we show that epithelial RK13, a cell line permissive to mouse and bank vole prion strains and to natural prion agents from sheep and cervids, enables a robust and sensitive detection of mouse and ovine-derived prions. Importantly, the cell culture work is strongly reduced as the RK13 cell assay procedure designed here does not require subcultivation of the inoculated cultures. We also show that prions effectively bind to culture plastic vessel and are quantitatively detected by the cell assay. The possibility to easily quantify a wider range of prions, including rodent experimental strains but also natural agents from sheep and cervids, should prompt the spread of cell assays for routine prion titration and lead to valuable information in fundamental and applied studies.

  6. A simple method to measure cell viability in proliferation and cytotoxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Carneiro Borra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resazurin dye has been broadly used as indicator of cell viability in several types of assays for evaluation of the biocompatibility of medical and dental materials. Mitochondrial enzymes, as carriers of diaphorase activities, are probably responsible for the transference of electrons from NADPH + H+ to resazurin, which is reduced to resorufin. The level of reduction can be quantified by spectrophotometers since resazurin exhibits an absorption peak at 600 ηm and resorufin at 570 ηm wavelengths. However, the requirement of a spectrophotometer and specific filters for the quantification could be a barrier to many laboratories. Digital cameras containing red, green and blue filters, which allow the capture of red (600 to 700 ηm and green (500 to 600 ηm light wavelengths in ranges bordering on resazurin and resorufin absorption bands, could be used as an alternative method for the assessment of resazurin and resorufin concentrations. Thus, our aim was to develop a simple, cheap and precise method based on a digital CCD camera to measure the reduction of resazurin. We compared the capability of the CCD-based method to distinguish different concentrations of L929 and normal Human buccal fibroblast cell lines with that of a conventional microplate reader. The correlation was analyzed through the Pearson coefficient. The results showed a strong association between the measurements of the method developed here and those made with the microplate reader (r² = 0.996; p < 0.01 and with the cellular concentrations (r² = 0.965; p < 0.01. We concluded that the developed Colorimetric Quantification System based on CCD Images allowed rapid assessment of the cultured cell concentrations with simple equipment at a reduced cost.

  7. Generation of hiPSTZ16 (ISMMSi003-A cell line from normal human foreskin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dejosez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human foreskin fibroblasts from a commercial source were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells to establish a clonal stem cell line, hiPSTZ16 (ISMMSi003-A. These cells show a normal karyotype and full differentiation potential in teratoma assays. The described cells provide a useful resource in combination with other iPS cell lines generated from normal human foreskin fibroblasts to study source- and reprogramming method-independent effects in downstream applications.

  8. Polyalkoxybenzenes from plants. 5. Parsley seed extract in synthesis of azapodophyllotoxins featuring strong tubulin destabilizing activity in the sea urchin embryo and cell culture assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Marina N; Kiselyov, Alex S; Tsyganov, Dmitry V; Konyushkin, Leonid D; Firgang, Sergei I; Semenov, Roman V; Malyshev, Oleg R; Raihstat, Mikhail M; Fuchs, Fabian; Stielow, Anne; Lantow, Margareta; Philchenkov, Alex A; Zavelevich, Michael P; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Semenov, Victor V

    2011-10-27

    A series of 4-azapodophyllotoxin derivatives with modified rings B and E have been synthesized using allylpolyalkoxybenzenes from parsley seed oil. The targeted molecules were evaluated in vivo in a phenotypic sea urchin embryo assay for antimitotic and tubulin destabilizing activity. The most active compounds identified by the in vivo sea urchin embryo assay featured myristicin-derived ring E. These molecules were determined to be more potent than podophyllotoxin. Cytotoxic effects of selected molecules were further confirmed and evaluated by conventional assays with A549 and Jurkat human leukemic T-cell lines including cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, cellular microtubule disruption, and induction of apoptosis. The ring B modification yielded 6-OMe substituted molecule as the most active compound. Finally, in Jurkat cells, compound induced caspase-dependent apoptosis mediated by the apical caspases-2 and -9 and not caspase-8, implying the involvement of the intrinsic caspase-9-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  9. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazely, F.; Ledinko, N.; Smith, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The biological activity of retinoids was assayed in an in vitro quantitative assay of human tumor cell invasion using human amnion basement membrane (BM). The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the BM and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 14 C-proline labeled collagenous and noncollagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested, the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.009 μg/mL, and of TC-106 cells at 0.07 μg/mL. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels over 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more potent than retinol palmitate. The model system will be useful for investigating antiinvasive activity of other retinoids as well as other compounds

  10. Cell-based cytotoxicity assays for engineered nanomaterials safety screening: exposure of adipose derived stromal cells to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Hadjiargyrou, M; Rafailovich, Miriam; Mironava, Tatsiana

    2017-07-11

    Increasing production of nanomaterials requires fast and proper assessment of its potential toxicity. Therefore, there is a need to develop new assays that can be performed in vitro, be cost effective, and allow faster screening of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Herein, we report that titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) can induce damage to adipose derived stromal cells (ADSCs) at concentrations which are rated as safe by standard assays such as measuring proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Specifically, we demonstrated that low concentrations of TiO 2 NPs, at which cellular LDH, ROS, or proliferation profiles were not affected, induced changes in the ADSCs secretory function and differentiation capability. These two functions are essential for ADSCs in wound healing, energy expenditure, and metabolism with serious health implications in vivo. We demonstrated that cytotoxicity assays based on specialized cell functions exhibit greater sensitivity and reveal damage induced by ENMs that was not otherwise detected by traditional ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays. For proper toxicological assessment of ENMs standard ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays should be combined with assays that investigate cellular functions relevant to the specific cell type.

  11. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  12. Dopamine receptor repertoire of human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Lars

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of dopamine (DA were described in human ovary and recently evidence for DA receptors in granulosa and luteal cells has been provided, as well. However, neither the full repertoire of ovarian receptors for DA, nor their specific role, is established. Human granulosa cells (GCs derived from women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF are an adequate model for endocrine cells of the follicle and the corpus luteum and were therefore employed in an attempt to decipher their DA receptor repertoire and functionality. Methods Cells were obtained from patients undergoing IVF and examined using cDNA-array, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. In addition, calcium measurements (with FLUO-4 were employed. Expression of two DA receptors was also examined by in-situ hybridization in rat ovary. Effects of DA on cell viability and cell volume were studied by using an ATP assay and an electronic cell counter system. Results We found members of the two DA receptor families (D1- and D2 -like associated with different signaling pathways in human GCs, namely D1 (as expected and D5 (both are Gs coupled and linked to cAMP increase and D2, D4 (Gi/Gq coupled and linked to IP3/DAG. D3 was not found. The presence of the trophic hormone hCG (10 IU/ml in the culture medium for several days did not alter mRNA (semiquantitative RT-PCR or protein levels (immunocytochemistry/Western blotting of D1,2,4,5 DA receptors. Expression of prototype receptors for the two families, D1 and D2, was furthermore shown in rat granulosa and luteal cells by in situ hybridization. Among the DA receptors found in human GCs, D2 expression was marked both at mRNA and protein levels and it was therefore further studied. Results of additional RT-PCR and Western blots showed two splice variants (D2L, D2S. Irrespective of these variants, D2 proved to be functional, as DA raised intracellular calcium levels. This calcium mobilizing effect of DA was observed

  13. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, D. H.; Whitehead, R. H.; Foster, H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting f...

  14. MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells exhibit augmented responses to human insulin on a collagen IV surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Listov-Saabye, Nicolai; Jensen, Marianne Blirup; Kiehr, Benedicte

    2009-01-01

    Human mammary cell lines are extensively used for preclinical safety assessment of insulin analogs. However, it is essentially unknown how mitogenic responses can be optimized in mammary cell-based systems. We developed an insulin mitogenicity assay in MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells......, under low serum (0.1% FCS) and phenol red-free conditions, with 3H thymidine incorporation as endpoint. Based on EC50 values determined from 10-fold dilution series, beta-estradiol was the most potent mitogen, followed by human IGF-1, human AspB10 insulin and native human insulin. AspB10 insulin...... was significantly more mitogenic than native insulin, validating the ability of the assay to identify hypermitogenic human insulin analogs. With MCF-7 cells on a collagen IV surface, the ranking of mitogens was maintained, but fold mitogenic responses and dynamic range and steepness of dose-response curves were...

  15. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [ 3 H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [ 3 H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  16. Curcumin and Viscum album Extract Decrease Proliferation and Cell Viability of Soft-Tissue Sarcoma Cells: An In Vitro Analysis of Eight Cell Lines Using Real-Time Monitoring and Colorimetric Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harati, K; Behr, B; Daigeler, A; Hirsch, T; Jacobsen, F; Renner, M; Harati, A; Wallner, C; Lehnhardt, M; Becerikli, M

    2017-01-01

    The cytostatic effects of the polyphenol curcumin and Viscum album extract (VAE) were assessed in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Eight human STS cell lines were used: fibrosarcoma (HT1080), liposarcoma (SW872, T778, MLS-402), synovial sarcoma (SW982, SYO1, 1273), and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (U2197). Primary human fibroblasts served as control cells. Cell proliferation, viability, and cell index (CI) were analyzed by BrdU assay, MTT assay, and real-time cell analysis (RTCA). As indicated by BrdU and MTT, curcumin significantly decreased the cell proliferation of five cell lines (HT1080, SW872, SYO1, 1273, and U2197) and the viability of two cell lines (SW872 and SW982). VAE led to significant decreases of proliferation in eight cell lines (HT1080, SW872, T778, MLS-402, SW982, SYO1, 1293, and U2197) and reduced viability in seven STS lines (HT1080, SW872, T778, MLS-402, SW982, SYO1, and 1273). As indicated by RTCA for 160 h, curcumin decreased the CI of all synovial sarcoma cell lines as well as T778 and HT1080. VAE diminished the CI in most of the synovial sarcoma (SW982, SYO1) and liposarcoma (SW872, T778) cell lines as well as HT1080. Primary fibroblasts were not affected adversely by the two compounds in RTCA. Curcumin and VAE can inhibit the proliferation and viability of STS cells.

  17. Mkit: A Cell Migration Assay Based on Microfluidic Device and Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Zhu, Ling; Li, Zhigang; Sang, Yaoshuo; Hipolito, Jolly; Zhang, Michael; Santos, Susy; Hillier, Craig; de Faria, Ricardo Lobato; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic device and smartphone, so-called MS2 technology, has enabled many applications over recent years, and continues to stimulate growing interest in both research communities and industries. In particular, it has been envisioned that MS2 technology can be developed for various cell functional assays to enable basic research and clinical applications. Toward this direction, in this paper, we describe the development of a MS2-based cell functional assay for testing cell migration (the Mkit). The system is constructed as an integrated test kit, which includes microfluidic chips, a smartphone-based imaging platform, the phone apps for image capturing and data analysis, and a set of reagent and accessories for performing the cell migration assay. We demonstrated that the Mkit can effectively measure purified neutrophil and cancer cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, neutrophil chemotaxis can be tested from a drop of whole blood using the Mkit with red blood cell (RBC) lysis. The effects of chemoattractant dose and gradient profile on neutrophil chemotaxis were also tested using the Mkit. In addition to research applications, we demonstrated the effective use of the Mkit for on-site test at the hospital and for testing clinical samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient. Thus, this developed Mkit provides an easy and integrated experimental platform for cell migration related research and potential medical diagnostic applications. PMID:28772229

  18. Mkit: A cell migration assay based on microfluidic device and smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Zhu, Ling; Li, Zhigang; Sang, Yaoshuo; Hipolito, Jolly; Zhang, Michael; Santos, Susy; Hillier, Craig; de Faria, Ricardo Lobato; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2018-01-15

    Mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic device and smartphone, so-called MS 2 technology, has enabled many applications over recent years, and continues to stimulate growing interest in both research communities and industries. In particular, it has been envisioned that MS 2 technology can be developed for various cell functional assays to enable basic research and clinical applications. Toward this direction, in this paper, we describe the development of a MS 2 -based cell functional assay for testing cell migration (the M kit ). The system is constructed as an integrated test kit, which includes microfluidic chips, a smartphone-based imaging platform, the phone apps for image capturing and data analysis, and a set of reagent and accessories for performing the cell migration assay. We demonstrated that the M kit can effectively measure purified neutrophil and cancer cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, neutrophil chemotaxis can be tested from a drop of whole blood using the M kit with red blood cell (RBC) lysis. The effects of chemoattractant dose and gradient profile on neutrophil chemotaxis were also tested using the M kit . In addition to research applications, we demonstrated the effective use of the M kit for on-site test at the hospital and for testing clinical samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient. Thus, this developed M kit provides an easy and integrated experimental platform for cell migration related research and potential medical diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hybrid clone cells derived from human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells exhibit properties of cancer stem/initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauck, Daria; Keil, Silvia; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2017-08-02

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression since it was determined that normal cell × tumor cell fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit novel properties, such as enhanced metastatogenic capacity or increased drug resistance, and even as a mechanism that could give rise to cancer stem/initiating cells (CS/ICs). CS/ICs have been proposed as cancer cells that exhibit stem cell properties, including the ability to (re)initiate tumor growth. Five M13HS hybrid clone cells, which originated from spontaneous cell fusion events between M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells and HS578T-Hyg human breast cancer cells, and their parental cells were analyzed for expression of stemness and EMT-related marker proteins by Western blot analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The frequency of ALDH1-positive cells was determined by flow cytometry using AldeRed fluorescent dye. Concurrently, the cells' colony forming capabilities as well as the cells' abilities to form mammospheres were investigated. The migratory activity of the cells was analyzed using a 3D collagen matrix migration assay. M13HS hybrid clone cells co-expressed SOX9, SLUG, CK8 and CK14, which were differently expressed in parental cells. A variation in the ALDH1-positive putative stem cell population was observed among the five hybrids ranging from 1.44% (M13HS-7) to 13.68% (M13HS-2). In comparison to the parental cells, all five hybrid clone cells possessed increased but also unique colony formation and mammosphere formation capabilities. M13HS-4 hybrid clone cells exhibited the highest colony formation capacity and second highest mammosphere formation capacity of all hybrids, whereby the mean diameter of the mammospheres was comparable to the parental cells. In contrast, the largest mammospheres originated from the M13HS-2 hybrid clone cells, whereas these cells' mammosphere formation capacity was comparable to the parental breast cancer cells. All M13HS

  20. Radiosensitizing effect of epothilone B on human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, T.; Kriesen, S.; Hildebrandt, G.; Manda, K. [Univ. of Rostock (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Weiss, D.G. [Univ. of Rostock (Germany). Inst. of Biological Sciences, Cell Biology, and Biosystems Technology

    2012-02-15

    A combined modality treatment employing radiation and chemotherapy plays a central role in the management of solid tumors. In our study, we examined the cytotoxic and radiosensitive effect of the microtubule stabilizer epothilone B on two human epithelial tumor cell lines in vitro and its influence on the microtubule assembly. Cancer cells were treated with epothilone B in proliferation assays and in combination with radiation in colony-forming assays. For the analysis of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and the influence of the drug on its repair a {gamma}H2AX foci assay was used. To determine the effect of epothilone B on the microtubule assembly in cells and on purified tubulin, immunofluorescence staining and tubulin polymerization assay, respectively, were conducted. Epothilone B induced a concentration- and application-dependent antiproliferative effect on the cells, with IC{sub 50} values in the low nanomolar range. Colony forming assays showed a synergistic radiosensitive effect on both cell lines which was dependent on incubation time and applied concentration of epothilone B. The {gamma}H2AX assays demonstrated that ionizing radiation combined with the drug resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the number of double-strand breaks and suggested a reduction in DNA repair capacity. Epothilone B produced enhanced microtubule bundling and abnormal spindle formation as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy and caused microtubule formation from purified tubulin. The results of this study showed that epothilone B displays cytotoxic antitumor activity at low nanomolar concentrations and also enhances the radiation response in the tumor cells tested; this may be induced by a reduced DNA repair capacity triggered by epothilone B. It was also demonstrated that epothilone B in fact targets microtubules in a more effective manner than paclitaxel. (orig.)

  1. Large-scale prospective T cell function assays in shipped, unfrozen blood samples: experiences from the multicenter TRIGR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, David; Cheung, Roy K; Becker, Dorothy J; Girgis, Rose; Palmer, Jerry P; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Dosch, Hans-Michael

    2014-02-01

    Broad consensus assigns T lymphocytes fundamental roles in inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. However, clinical investigations have lacked fully characterized and validated procedures, equivalent to those of widely practiced biochemical tests with established clinical roles, for measuring core T cell functions. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) type 1 diabetes prevention trial used consecutive measurements of T cell proliferative responses in prospectively collected fresh heparinized blood samples shipped by courier within North America. In this article, we report on the quality control implications of this simple and pragmatic shipping practice and the interpretation of positive- and negative-control analytes in our assay. We used polyclonal and postvaccination responses in 4,919 samples to analyze the development of T cell immunocompetence. We have found that the vast majority of the samples were viable up to 3 days from the blood draw, yet meaningful responses were found in a proportion of those with longer travel times. Furthermore, the shipping time of uncooled samples significantly decreased both the viabilities of the samples and the unstimulated cell counts in the viable samples. Also, subject age was significantly associated with the number of unstimulated cells and T cell proliferation to positive activators. Finally, we observed a pattern of statistically significant increases in T cell responses to tetanus toxin around the timing of infant vaccinations. This assay platform and shipping protocol satisfy the criteria for robust and reproducible long-term measurements of human T cell function, comparable to those of established blood biochemical tests. We present a stable technology for prospective disease-relevant T cell analysis in immunological diseases, vaccination medicine, and measurement of herd immunity.

  2. Rapid and Quantitative Assay of Amyloid-Seeding Activity in Human Brains Affected with Prion Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanae Takatsuki

    Full Text Available The infectious agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are composed of amyloidogenic prion protein, PrPSc. Real-time quaking-induced conversion can amplify very small amounts of PrPSc seeds in tissues/body fluids of patients or animals. Using this in vitro PrP-amyloid amplification assay, we quantitated the seeding activity of affected human brains. End-point assay using serially diluted brain homogenates of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients demonstrated that 50% seeding dose (SD50 is reached approximately 10(10/g brain (values varies 10(8.79-10.63/g. A genetic case (GSS-P102L yielded a similar level of seeding activity in an autopsy brain sample. The range of PrPSc concentrations in the samples, determined by dot-blot assay, was 0.6-5.4 μg/g brain; therefore, we estimated that 1 SD50 unit was equivalent to 0.06-0.27 fg of PrPSc. The SD50 values of the affected brains dropped more than three orders of magnitude after autoclaving at 121°C. This new method for quantitation of human prion activity provides a new way to reduce the risk of iatrogenic prion transmission.

  3. Radioisotopic assays of CoASH and carnitine and their acetylated forms in human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederblad, G.; Carlin, J.I.; Constantin-Teodosiu, D.; Harper, P.; Hultman, E.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotopic assays for the determination of acetyl-CoA, CoASH, and acetylcarnitine have been modified for application to the amount of human muscle tissue that can be obtained by needle biopsy. In the last step common to all three methods, acetyl-CoA is condensed with [14C]oxaloacetate by citrate synthase to give [14C]-citrate. For determination of CoASH, CoASH is reacted with acetylphosphate in a reaction catalyzed by phosphotransacetylase to yield acetyl-CoA. In the assay for acetylcarnitine, acetylcarnitine is reacted with CoASH in a reaction catalyzed by carnitine acetyltransferase to form acetyl-CoA. Inclusion of new simple steps in the acetylcarnitine assay and conditions affecting the reliability of all three methods are also described. Acetylcarnitine and free carnitine levels in human rectus abdominis muscle were 3.0 +/- 1.5 (SD) and 13.5 +/- 4.0 mumol/g dry wt, respectively. Values for acetyl-CoA and CoASH were about 500-fold lower, 6.7 +/- 1.8 and 21 +/- 8.9 nmol/g dry wt, respectively. A strong correlation between acetylcarnitine (y) and short-chain acylcarnitine (x), determined as the difference between total and free carnitine, was found in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle obtained during intense muscular effort, y = 1.0x + 0.5; r = 0.976

  4. A comparative study of Mono Mac 6 cells, isolated mononuclear cells and Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay in pyrogen testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Lise; Jensen, S; Hansen, E W

    1999-01-01

    ) and Staphylococcus aureus was comparable to that of MNC. Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans induced IL-6 in isolated MNC, but not in MM6. The detection limit for Salmonella typhimurium in the MM6 assay was comparable to that of the LAL assay. As expected, S. aureus and C. albicans did not show any LAL activity......Pyrogen induced secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells was measured. The ability of the MM6 cell culture to detect pyrogens was compared to the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test and isolated mononuclear cells (MNC). The detection limit of MM6 for lipopolysaccharide (LPS....... A. niger and Influenza virus showed some activity in the LAL test, but could not be detected by MM6 cells. In conclusion, the MM6 assay is a good supplement to the current pyrogen assays for detection of LPS, S. aureus and S. typhimurium, but the MM6 assay could not detect A. niger, C. albicans...

  5. An automated high throughput screening-compatible assay to identify regulators of stem cell neural differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Laura; Magnani, Dario; De Falco, Sandro; Filosa, Stefania; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Patriarca, Eduardo J; De Cesare, Dario

    2012-03-01

    The use of Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) holds considerable promise both for drug discovery programs and the treatment of degenerative disorders in regenerative medicine approaches. Nevertheless, the successful use of ESCs is still limited by the lack of efficient control of ESC self-renewal and differentiation capabilities. In this context, the possibility to modulate ESC biological properties and to obtain homogenous populations of correctly specified cells will help developing physiologically relevant screens, designed for the identification of stem cell modulators. Here, we developed a high throughput screening-suitable ESC neural differentiation assay by exploiting the Cell(maker) robotic platform and demonstrated that neural progenies can be generated from ESCs in complete automation, with high standards of accuracy and reliability. Moreover, we performed a pilot screening providing proof of concept that this assay allows the identification of regulators of ESC neural differentiation in full automation.

  6. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  7. Isolation and functional interrogation of adult human prostate epithelial stem cells at single cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Hu, Dan-Ping; Xie, Lishi; Li, Ye; Majumdar, Shyama; Nonn, Larisa; Hu, Hong; Shioda, Toshi; Prins, Gail S

    2017-08-01

    Using primary cultures of normal human prostate epithelial cells, we developed a novel prostasphere-based, label-retention assay that permits identification and isolation of stem cells at a single cell level. Their bona fide stem cell nature was corroborated using in vitro and in vivo regenerative assays and documentation of symmetric/asymmetric division. Robust WNT10B and KRT13 levels without E-cadherin or KRT14 staining distinguished individual stem cells from daughter progenitors in spheroids. Following FACS to isolate label-retaining stem cells from label-free progenitors, RNA-seq identified unique gene signatures for the separate populations which may serve as useful biomarkers. Knockdown of KRT13 or PRAC1 reduced sphere formation and symmetric self-renewal highlighting their role in stem cell maintenance. Pathways analysis identified ribosome biogenesis and membrane estrogen-receptor signaling enriched in stem cells with NF-ĸB signaling enriched in progenitors; activities that were biologically confirmed. Further, bioassays identified heightened autophagy flux and reduced metabolism in stem cells relative to progenitors. These approaches similarly identified stem-like cells from prostate cancer specimens and prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines suggesting wide applicability. Together, the present studies isolate and identify unique characteristics of normal human prostate stem cells and uncover processes that maintain stem cell homeostasis in the prostate gland. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation and functional interrogation of adult human prostate epithelial stem cells at single cell resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using primary cultures of normal human prostate epithelial cells, we developed a novel prostasphere-based, label-retention assay that permits identification and isolation of stem cells at a single cell level. Their bona fide stem cell nature was corroborated using in vitro and in vivo regenerative assays and documentation of symmetric/asymmetric division. Robust WNT10B and KRT13 levels without E-cadherin or KRT14 staining distinguished individual stem cells from daughter progenitors in spheroids. Following FACS to isolate label-retaining stem cells from label-free progenitors, RNA-seq identified unique gene signatures for the separate populations which may serve as useful biomarkers. Knockdown of KRT13 or PRAC1 reduced sphere formation and symmetric self-renewal highlighting their role in stem cell maintenance. Pathways analysis identified ribosome biogenesis and membrane estrogen-receptor signaling enriched in stem cells with NF-ĸB signaling enriched in progenitors; activities that were biologically confirmed. Further, bioassays identified heightened autophagy flux and reduced metabolism in stem cells relative to progenitors. These approaches similarly identified stem-like cells from prostate cancer specimens and prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines suggesting wide applicability. Together, the present studies isolate and identify unique characteristics of normal human prostate stem cells and uncover processes that maintain stem cell homeostasis in the prostate gland.

  9. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity for melanome tumor cells: detection by a (3H)proline release assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saal, J.G.; Rieber, E.P.; Riethmueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    An in vitro lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity assay using [ 3 H]proline-labelled target cells is described. The assay, modified from an original procedure of Bean et al., assesses the release of [ 3 H]proline by filtering the total culture fluid containing both trypsinised tumor cells and effector cells. Filtration is performed with a semiautomatic harvesting device using low suction pressure and large-diameter glass filters. Pretreatment of filters with whole serum diminishes adsorption of cell-free radioactive material considerably and thus increases the sensitivity of the assay. Nearly 100% of the radioactivity could be recovered with this harvesting device. The technique allowed the detection of cytolytic activities of lymphocytes after 6 h of incubation. Lymphocytes from patients with primary malignant melanoma showed a significantly higher cytolytic reactivity (p > 0.001) than normal donors' lymphocytes against three different melanoma cell lines. In a series of parallel experiments on 36 patients and 18 normal donors, this modification of the [ 3 ]proline test was compared with three different assays: the conventional microcytotoxicity test of Takasugi and Klein, the original [ 3 H]proline microcytotoxicity test of Bean et al., and the viability count of tumor cells. (Auth.)

  10. Dendritic cell migration assay: a potential prediction model for identification of contact allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Susan; Spiekstra, Sander; Corsini, Emanuela; McLeod, Julie; Reinders, Judith

    2013-04-01

    This manuscript describes methodology and a prediction model for the MUTZ-LC migration assay. The assay represents the physiological change in Langerhans cell (LC) behavior after exposure to a sensitizing chemical, resulting in LC migration from the epidermis to the dermis. MUTZ-LC are derived from the commercially available MUTZ-3 cell line. Upon exposure to a sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate preferentially towards CXCL12 whereas upon exposure to a non-sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate towards CCL5. A CXCL12/CCL5 ratio >1.10 in 2/3 independent experiments is indicative of a sensitizer, whereas a CXCL12/CCL5 ratio ≤1.10 is indicative of a non-sensitizer. At non cytotoxic chemical concentrations 9 sensitizers (2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, paraphenylendiamine, cinnamaldehyde, isoeugenol, nickel-sulfate, tetramethylthiuram disulfide, eugenol, cinnamic-alcohol, ammonium-hexachloroplatinate) were distinguished from 4 non sensitizers (sodium lauryl sulfate, salicylic acid, phenol, octanoic acid). Critical points in assay performance are (i) MUTZ-3 passage number after thawing (p6-p40); (ii) cell viability (>80%); (iii) standard curve to optimize correlation of fluorescence with cell number; and (iv) optimization of the concentration of rhCXCL12 and rhCCL5 in transwell. The protocol has been tested in three European laboratories and results suggest that it may provide working conditions for performing the DC migration assay which is aimed at distinguishing sensitizers from non sensitizers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Herpes simplex virus produces larger plaques when assayed on ultraviolet irradiated CV1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coohill, T.P.; Babich, M.A.; Taylor, W.D.; Snipes, W.

    1980-01-01

    Plaque development for either untreated or UV treated irradiated Herpes simplex virus Type 1 was faster when assayed on UV irradiated CV1 cells. This Large Plaque Effect only occurred if a minimum delay of 12h between cell irradiation and viral inoculation was allowed. Shorter delays gave plaques that were smaller than controls (unirradiated virus-unirradiated cells). The effect was maximal for a 48-h delay and remained unchanged for delays as long as 84h. The effect was greatest for cell exposures of 10Jm -2 . (author)

  12. An in vitro clonogenic assay to assess radiation damage in rat CNS glial progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Verhagen, I.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1990-01-01

    Normal glial progenitor cells can be isolated from the rat central nervous system (CNS) and cultured in vitro on a monolayer of type-1 astrocytes. These monolayers are able to support and stimulate explanted glial progenitor cells to proliferate. Employing these in vitro interactions of specific glial cell types, an in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay has been developed. This method offers the possibility to study the intrinsic radiosensitivity, repair and regeneration of glial progenitor cells after in vitro or in vivo irradiation. (author)

  13. Prion strain discrimination based on rapid in vivo amplification and analysis by the cell panel assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yervand Eduard Karapetyan

    Full Text Available Prion strain identification has been hitherto achieved using time-consuming incubation time determinations in one or more mouse lines and elaborate neuropathological assessment. In the present work, we make a detailed study of the properties of PrP-overproducing Tga20 mice. We show that in these mice the four prion strains examined are rapidly and faithfully amplified and can subsequently be discriminated by a cell-based procedure, the Cell Panel Assay.

  14. The inhibition of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 activity by crude and purified human pregnancy plug mucus and mucins in an inhibition assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeman Leann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The female reproductive tract is amongst the main routes for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV transmission. Cervical mucus however is known to protect the female reproductive tract from bacterial invasion and fluid loss and regulates and facilitates sperm transport to the upper reproductive tract. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize pregnancy plug mucins and determine their anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Methods Pregnancy plug mucins were purified by caesium chloride density-gradient ultra-centrifugation and characterized by Western blotting analysis. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the crude pregnancy plug mucus and purified pregnancy plug mucins was determined by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells. Results The pregnancy plug mucus had MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified pregnancy plug mucins inhibit HIV-1 activity by approximately 97.5%, the crude pregnancy plug mucus failed to inhibit HIV-1 activity. Conclusion Although it is not clear why the crude sample did not inhibit HIV-1 activity, it may be that the amount of mucins in the crude pregnancy plug mucus (which contains water, mucins, lipids, nucleic acids, lactoferrin, lysozyme, immunoglobulins and ions, is insufficient to cause viral inhibition or aggregation.

  15. Development of Two Antibody Detection Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Serodiagnosis of Human Chronic Fascioliasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabán-Hernández, Kimberly; Gaudier, José F.; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Coprological examination based on egg detection in stool samples is currently used as the gold standard for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. However, this method is not effective during the acute phase of the disease and has poor sensitivity during the chronic phase. Serodiagnosis has become an excellent alternative to coprological examination in efforts to combat the effects of fascioliasis on human and animal health. Two novel recombinant Fasciola hepatica proteins, i.e., a ferritin (FhFtn-1) and a tegument-associated protein (FhTP16.5), were used as antigens to develop in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The assays were optimized and validated using 152 serum samples from humans with a known infection status, including healthy subjects, patients with chronic fascioliasis, and patients with other parasitic diseases. The FhFtn-1 ELISA was shown to be 96.6% sensitive and 95.7% specific; the respective parameters for the FhTP16.5 ELISA were 91.4% and 92.4%. The performances of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs were compared with that of an available commercial test (the DRG test) using a subset of serum samples. Our in-house tests were slightly more sensitive than the DRG test in detecting antibodies against F. hepatica, but the differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the potential of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs as diagnostic tools for human fascioliasis, as might be implemented in conjunction with standard assays for large-scale screenings in areas where the disease is endemic and for the detection of occasional cases in clinical laboratories. PMID:24353000

  16. Development of two antibody detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for serodiagnosis of human chronic fascioliasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabán-Hernández, Kimberly; Gaudier, José F; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb; Espino, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Coprological examination based on egg detection in stool samples is currently used as the gold standard for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. However, this method is not effective during the acute phase of the disease and has poor sensitivity during the chronic phase. Serodiagnosis has become an excellent alternative to coprological examination in efforts to combat the effects of fascioliasis on human and animal health. Two novel recombinant Fasciola hepatica proteins, i.e., a ferritin (FhFtn-1) and a tegument-associated protein (FhTP16.5), were used as antigens to develop in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The assays were optimized and validated using 152 serum samples from humans with a known infection status, including healthy subjects, patients with chronic fascioliasis, and patients with other parasitic diseases. The FhFtn-1 ELISA was shown to be 96.6% sensitive and 95.7% specific; the respective parameters for the FhTP16.5 ELISA were 91.4% and 92.4%. The performances of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs were compared with that of an available commercial test (the DRG test) using a subset of serum samples. Our in-house tests were slightly more sensitive than the DRG test in detecting antibodies against F. hepatica, but the differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the potential of the FhFtn-1 and FhTP16.5 ELISAs as diagnostic tools for human fascioliasis, as might be implemented in conjunction with standard assays for large-scale screenings in areas where the disease is endemic and for the detection of occasional cases in clinical laboratories.

  17. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  18. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  19. Human Papillomavirus Assays and Cytology in Primary Cervical Screening of Women Aged 30 Years and Above

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In women aged ≥30 years, Human Papillomavirus testing will replace cytology for primary cervical screening. We compared Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART, and APTIMA HPV assays with cytology on 2869 SurePath samples from women undergoing routine screening at 30-65 years in Copenhagen, Denmark....... Women with cytological abnormalities were managed according to routine recommendations, with 92% completeness. Those with cytology-normal/HPV-positive samples (on any of the four assays) were invited for repeated cytology and HPV testing in 1.5 year, and 58% had additional testing. HPV testing detected...... more ≥CIN3 than cytology (HC2: 35, cobas, CLART: 37, APTIMA: 34, cytology: 31), although statistically the differences were not significant. Cobas and CLART detected significantly more ≥CIN2 than cytology (cobas, CLART: 49, cytology: 39). The proportion of women with false-positive test results...

  20. Induction of apoptosis by eugenol in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidhya, N.; Niranjali Devaraj, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, potential anticancer effect of eugenol on inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells was investigated. Induction of cell death by eugenol was evaluated following MTT assay and monitoring lactate dehydrogenase released into the culture medium for cell viability and cytotoxicity, giemsa staining for morphological alterations, fluorescence microscopy analysis of cells using ethidium bromide and acridine orange and quantitation of DNA fragments for induction of apoptosis. Effect of eugenol on intracellular redox status of the human breast cancer cells was assessed by determining the level of glutathione and lipid peroxidation products (TBARS). Eugenol treatment inhibited the growth and proliferation of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells through induction of cell death, which was dose and time dependent. Microscopic examination of eugenol treated cells showed cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and apoptotic body formation. Further, eugenol treatment also depleted the level of intracellular glutathione and increased the level of lipid peroxidation. The dose dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and DNA fragments suggested that apoptosis was involved in eugenol induced cell death and apoptosis might have played a role in the chemopreventive action of eugenol. (author)

  1. A dual reporter cell assay for identifying serotype and drug susceptibility of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Wen; Sun, Jun-Ren; Wu, Szu-Sian; Lin, Wan-Hsuan; Kung, Szu-Hao

    2011-08-15

    A dual reporter cell assay (DRCA) that allows real-time detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was developed. This was achieved by stable transfection of cells with an expression cassette that contains the dual reporter genes, secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), under the control of an HSV early gene promoter. Baby hamster kidney (BHK) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines were used as parental cell lines because the former is permissive for both HSV serotypes, HSV-1 and HSV-2, whereas the latter is susceptible to infection only by HSV-2. The DRCA permitted differential detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 by observation of EGFP-positive cells, as substantiated by screening a total of 35 samples. The BHK-based cell line is sensitive to a viral titer as low as a single plaque-forming unit with a robust assay window as measured by a chemiluminescent assay. Evaluations of the DRCA with representative acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSV strains demonstrated that their drug susceptibilities were accurately determined by a 48-h format. In summary, this novel DRCA is a useful means for serotyping of HSV in real time as well as a rapid screening method for determining anti-HSV susceptibilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An HPLC-UV method for the measurement of permeability of marker drugs in the Caco-2 cell assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Kratz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Caco-2 cell line has been used as a model to predict the in vitro permeability of the human intestinal barrier. The predictive potential of the assay relies on an appropriate in-house validation of the method. The objective of the present study was to develop a single HPLC-UV method for the identification and quantitation of marker drugs and to determine the suitability of the Caco-2 cell permeability assay. A simple chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of both passively (propranolol, carbamazepine, acyclovir, and hydrochlorothiazide and actively transported drugs (vinblastine and verapamil. Separation was achieved on a C18 column with step-gradient elution (acetonitrile and aqueous solution of ammonium acetate, pH 3.0 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and UV detection at 275 nm during the total run time of 35 min. The method was validated and found to be specific, linear, precise, and accurate. This chromatographic system can be readily used on a routine basis and its utilization can be extended to other permeability models. The results obtained in the Caco-2 bi-directional transport experiments confirmed the validity of the assay, given that high and low permeability profiles were identified, and P-glycoprotein functionality was established.

  3. A modified fluorimetric host cell reactivation assay to determine the repair capacity of primary keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebhard Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Host Cell Reactivation Assay (HCRA is widely used to identify circumstances and substances affecting the repair capacity of cells, however, it is restricted by the transfection procedure used and the sensitivity of the detection method. Primary skin cells are particularly difficult to transfect, and therefore sensitive methods are needed to detect any variations due to the cell-type or inter-individual differences or changes induced by diverse substances. A sensitive and repeatable method to detect the repair capacity of skin cells would be useful in two different aspects: On the one hand, to identify substances influencing the repair capacity in a positive manner (these substances could be promising ingredients for cosmetic products and on the other hand, to exclude the negative effects of substances on the repair capacity (this could serve as one step further towards replacing or at least reducing animal testing. Results In this paper, we present a rapid and sensitive assay to determine the repair capacity of primary keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts based on two wave-length Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP and DsRed reporter technology in order to test different substances and their potential to influence the DNA repair capacity. For the detection of plasmid restoration, we used FACS technology, which, in comparison to luminometer technology, is highly sensitive and allows single cell based analysis. The usefulness of this assay and studying the repair capacity is demonstrated by the evidence that DNA repair is repressed by Cyclosporin A in fibroblasts. Conclusions The methodology described in this paper determines the DNA repair capacity in different types of human skin cells. The described transfection protocol is suitable for the transfection of melanocytes, keratinocytes and fibroblasts, reaching efficacies suitable for the detection of the restored plasmids by FACS technology. Therefore the repair capacity

  4. A Functional Assay for Putative Mouse and Human Definitive Endoderm using Chick Whole-Embryo Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Martina; Semb, Tor Henrik; Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    . Thus, the purpose of this study is to describe a method whereby the in vivo functionality of DE derived from ESCs can be assessed. Methods: By directed differentiation, putative DE was derived from human and mouse ESCs. This putative DE was subsequently transplanted into the endoderm of chick embryos...... to determine any occurrence of integration. Putative DE was analyzed by gene and protein expression prior to transplantation and 48 h post transplantation. Results: Putative DE, derived from mouse and human ESCs, was successfully integrated within the chick endoderm. Endoderm-specific genes were expressed...... result show that putative DE integrates with the chick endoderm and participate in the development of the chicken gut, indicating the generation of functional DE from ESCs. This functional assay can be used to assess the generation of functional DE derived from both human and mouse ESCs and provides...

  5. Comparison of cell-based and non-cell-based assay platforms for the detection of clinically relevant anti-drug neutralizing antibodies for immunogenicity assessment of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jenny; Wala, Iwona; Han, Hong; Nagatani, Janice; Barger, Troy; Civoli, Francesca; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Zhuang, Yao; Gupta, Shalini

    2015-04-01

    Anti-drug neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) formed due to unwanted immunogenicity of a therapeutic protein point towards a mature immune response. NAb detection is important in interpreting the therapeutic's efficacy and safety in vivo. In vitro cell-based NAb assays provide a physiological system for NAb detection, however are complex assays. Non-cell-based competitive ligand binding (CLB) approaches are also employed for NAb detection. Instead of cells, CLB assays use soluble receptor and conjugated reagents and are easier to perform, however have reduced physiological relevance. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of CLB assays to established cell-based assays to determine the former's ability to detect clinically relevant NAbs towards therapeutics that (i) acted as an agonist or (ii) acted as antagonists by binding to a target receptor. We performed a head-to-head comparison of the performance of cell-based and CLB NAb assays for erythropoietin (EPO) and two anti-receptor monoclonal antibodies (AMG-X and AMG 317). Clinically relevant NAb-positive samples identified previously by a cell-based assay were assessed in the corresponding CLB format(s). A panel of 12 engineered fully human anti-EPO monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested in both EPO NAb assay formats. Our results showed that the CLB format was (i) capable of detecting human anti-EPO MAbs of differing neutralizing capabilities and affinities and (ii) provided similar results as the cell-based assay for detecting NAbs in patient samples. The cell-based and CLB assays also behaved comparably in detecting NAbs in clinical samples for AMG-X. In the case of anti-AMG 317 NAbs, the CLB format failed to detect NAbs in more than 50% of the tested samples. We conclude that assay sensitivity, drug tolerance and the selected assay matrix played an important role in the inability of AMG 317 CLB assays to detect clinically relevant NAbs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fundamental and clinical evaluation of ''SCC RIABEAD'' kit for immunoradiometric assay of squamous cell carcinoma related antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Mitsuru; Endo, Keigo; Nakajima, Kotoko

    1987-01-01

    A commercial ''SCC RIABEAD'' kit for immunoradiometric assay of squamous cell carcinoma related antigen (SCC antigen) was fundamentally and clinically evaluated. Laboratory performance was satisfactory for intra-assay and inter-assay reproducibility, recovery, and dilution, with rapid and simple measurement techniques. Seropositivity for SCC antigen was significantly higher for squamous cell carcinoma of the liver and uterine cervix than the other histology types. In the case of cervical squamous cell carcinoma, it increased with progressing disease. Post-treatment serum levels of SCC antigen returned to negative. SCC antigen is considered to be a useful tumor marker for these diseases. There was a good correlation between the measurement values obtained from the present and conventional (SCC RIAKIT) assays. The present assay remarkably decreased false-positive cases of pulmonary benign diseases. The results showed a ''SCC RIABEAD'' to be a favorable kit for immunoradiometric assay of SSC antigen, as compared with conventional assay kit. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Tartrazine and sunset yellow are xenoestrogens in a new screening assay to identify modulators of human oestrogen receptor transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axon, Andrew; May, Felicity E.B.; Gaughan, Luke E.; Williams, Faith M.; Blain, Peter G.; Wright, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause that occurs most frequently in post-menopausal women. Since the female sex hormone oestrogen can be cholestatic, we hypothesised that PBC may be triggered in part by chronic exposure to xenoestrogens (which may be more active on a background of low endogenous oestrogen levels seen in post-menopausal women). A reporter gene construct employing a synthetic oestrogen response element predicted to specifically interact with oestrogen receptors (ER) was constructed. Co-transfection of this reporter into an ER null cell line with a variety of nuclear receptor expression constructs indicated that the reporter gene was trans-activated by ERα and ERβ, but not by the androgen, thyroid, progesterone, glucocorticoid or vitamin D receptors. Chemicals linked to PBC were then screened for xenoestrogen activity in the human ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Using this assay, the coal-derived food and cosmetic colourings – sunset yellow and tartrazine – were identified as novel human ERα activators, activating the human ER with an EC 50% concentration of 220 and 160 nM, respectively.

  8. Tartrazine and sunset yellow are xenoestrogens in a new screening assay to identify modulators of human oestrogen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, Andrew; May, Felicity E B; Gaughan, Luke E; Williams, Faith M; Blain, Peter G; Wright, Matthew C

    2012-08-16

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause that occurs most frequently in post-menopausal women. Since the female sex hormone oestrogen can be cholestatic, we hypothesised that PBC may be triggered in part by chronic exposure to xenoestrogens (which may be more active on a background of low endogenous oestrogen levels seen in post-menopausal women). A reporter gene construct employing a synthetic oestrogen response element predicted to specifically interact with oestrogen receptors (ER) was constructed. Co-transfection of this reporter into an ER null cell line with a variety of nuclear receptor expression constructs indicated that the reporter gene was trans-activated by ERα and ERβ, but not by the androgen, thyroid, progesterone, glucocorticoid or vitamin D receptors. Chemicals linked to PBC were then screened for xenoestrogen activity in the human ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Using this assay, the coal-derived food and cosmetic colourings--sunset yellow and tartrazine--were identified as novel human ERα activators, activating the human ER with an EC(50%) concentration of 220 and 160 nM, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  10. Cell-patterned glass spray for direct drug assay using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Shiqi; Chen, Qiushui; Jiang, Hao; Liang, Shuping; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the establishment of a glass spray mass spectrometry (GS-MS) platform for direct cell-based drug assay was described. Cell co-culture, drug-induced cell apoptosis, proliferation analysis and intracellular drug absorption measurement were performed simultaneously on this specifically designed platform. Two groups of co-cultured cells (NIH-3T3/HepG2 and HepG2/MCF-7) were cultivated and they showed high viability within 3 days. The biocompatibility of the platform facilitated the subsequent bioassays, in which, cyclophosphamide (CPA) and genistein were used as the model drugs. The distinctions of cell apoptosis and proliferation between the mono-cultured and co-cultured cells were clearly observed and well explained by in situ GS-MS measurements. A satisfactory linearity of the calibration curve between the relative MS intensity and CPA concentrations was obtained using stable isotope labeling method (y = 0.16545 + 0.0985x, R"2 = 0.9937). The variations in the quantity of absorbed drug were detected and the results were consistent with the concentration-dependence of cell apoptosis. All the results demonstrated that direct cell-based drug assay could be performed on the stable isotope labeling assisted GS-MS platform in a facile and quantitative manner. - Highlights: • A versatile glass spray mass spectrometry (GS-MS) platform for direct cell-based drug assay was developed in this paper. • It has characteristics of the atmospheric pressure ionization method. • It is multifunctional for cell co-culture, bioassays, qualitative and quantitative intracellular drug absorption measurement. • GS-MS has the potential to increase the use of mass spectrometry in biological analysis.

  11. Quantitative serology assays for determination of antibody responses to Ebola virus glycoprotein and matrix protein in nonhuman primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Grolla, Allen; Audet, Jonathan; He, Shihua; Kobinger, Gary; Unfer, Robert C; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad; Holtsberg, Frederick W

    2016-02-01

    The West Africa Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has reached unprecedented magnitude and caused worldwide concerns for the spread of this deadly virus. Recent findings in nonhuman primates (NHPs) demonstrate that antibodies can be protective against EVD. However, the role of antibody response in vaccine-mediated protection is not fully understood. To address these questions quantitative serology assays are needed for measurement of the antibody response to key Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. Serology enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA's), using a reference detection antibody, were developed in order to standardize the quantitation of antibody levels in vaccinated NHPs or in humans exposed to EBOV or immunized with an EBOV vaccine. Critical reagents were generated to support the development of the serology ELISAs. Recombinant EBOV matrix protein (VP40) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Two variants of the glycoprotein (GP), the ectodomain lacking the transmembrane domain (GPΔTM), and an engineered GP lacking the mucin-like domain (GPΔmuc) were expressed and purified from mammalian cell systems. Using these proteins, three ELISA methods were developed and optimized for reproducibility and robustness, including stability testing of critical reagents. The assay was used to determine the antibody response against VP40, GPΔTM, and GPΔmuc in a NHP vaccine study using EBOV virus-like particles (VLP) vaccine expressing GP, VP40 and the nucleoprotein. Additionally, these ELISAs were used to successfully detect antibody responses to VP40, GPΔTM and GPΔmuc in human sera from EBOV infected individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Formaldehyde on Human Middle Ear Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hye Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA is a familiar indoor air pollutant found in everything from cosmetics to clothing, but its impact on the middle ear is unknown. This study investigated whether FA causes cytotoxicity, inflammation, or induction of apoptosis in human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs. Cell viability was investigated using the trypan blue assay and a cell counting kit (CCK-8 in HMEECs treated with FA for 4 or 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and mucin (MUC5AC was analyzed using RT-PCR. Activation of the apoptosis pathway was determined by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, cytochrome oxidase, caspase-9/Mch6/Apaf 3, and Caspase-Glo® 3/7 activities. The CCK-8 assay and trypan blue assay results showed a reduction in cell viability in FA-treated HMEECs. FA also increased the cellular expression of TNF-α and MUC5AC and reduced the activities of MMP and cytochrome oxidase. Caspase-9 activity increased in cells stimulated for 4 h, as well as caspase-3/7 activity in cells stimulated for 24 h. The decreased cell viability, the induction of inflammation and mucin gene expression, and the activation of the apoptosis pathway together indicate a link between environmental FA exposure and the development of otitis media.

  13. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucklidge, G.J.; Milne, G.

    1990-01-01

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue

  14. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of chemical preservatives on human fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonsales Spindola

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Preservatives are widely used substances that are commonly added to various cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to prevent or inhibit microbial growth. In this study, we compared the in vitro cytotoxicity of different types of currently used preservatives, including methylparaben, imidazolidinyl urea (IMU, and sodium benzoate, using the human newborn fibroblast cell line CCD1072Sk. Of the tested preservatives, only IMU induced a reduction in cell viability, as shown using the MTT assay and propidium iodide staining (IMU>methylparaben>sodium benzoate. IMU was shown to promote homeostatic alterations potentially related to the initiation of programed cell death, such as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation, in the treated cells. Methylparaben and sodium benzoate were shown to have a very low cytotoxic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that IMU induces programed cell death in human fibroblasts by a canonical intrinsic pathway via mitochondrial perturbation and subsequent release of proapoptotic factors.

  16. Immunochromatographic Brucella-specific immunoglobulin M and G lateral flow assays for rapid serodiagnosis of human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Henk L.; Abdoel, Theresia H.; Solera, Javier; Clavijo, Encarnacion; Diaz, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    To fulfill the need for a simple and rapid diagnostic test for human brucellosis, we used the immunochromatographic lateral flow assay format to develop two assays, one for the detection of Brucella-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies and one for the detection of Brucella-specific IgG

  17. Collaborative study for the validation of alternative in vitro potency assays for human tetanus immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S; Janssen, S W J; de Vries, B; Terao, E; Daas, A; Buchheit, K-H

    2010-07-01

    An international collaborative study to validate 2 alternative in vitro methods for the potency testing of human tetanus immunoglobulin products was organised by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM). The study, run in the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) under the aegis of the European Commission and the Council of Europe, involved 21 official medicines control and industry laboratories from 15 countries. Both methods, an enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) and a toxoid inhibition assay (TIA), showed good reproducibility, repeatability and precision. EIA and TIA discriminated between low, medium and high potency samples. Potency estimates correlated well and both values were in close agreement with those obtained by in vivo methods. Moreover, these alternative methods allowed to resolve discrepant results between laboratories that were due to product potency loss and reporting errors. The study demonstrated that EIA and TIA are suitable quality control methods for tetanus immunoglobulin, which can be standardised in a control laboratory using a quality assurance system. Consequently, the Group of Experts on Human Blood and Blood Products of the European Pharmacopoeia revised the monograph on human tetanus immunoglobulins to include both the methods as compendial alternatives to the in vivo mouse challenge assay. 2010 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using ATP-driven bioluminescence assay to monitor microbial safety in a contemporary human cadaver laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion; Maier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize a cost-effective method for assessing the levels of bacterial, yeast, and mold activity during a human dissection laboratory course. Nowadays, compliance with safety regulations is policed by institutions at higher standards than ever before. Fear of acquiring an unknown infection is one of the top concerns of professional healthcare students, and it provokes anti-laboratory anxiety. Human cadavers are not routinely tested for bacteria and viruses prior to embalming. Human anatomy dissecting rooms that house embalmed cadavers are normally cleaned after the dissected cadavers have been removed. There is no evidence that investigators have ever assessed bacterial and fungal activities using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven bioluminescence assays. A literature search was conducted on texts, journals, and websites regarding bacterial, yeast, and mold activities in an active cadaver laboratory. Midway into a clinical anatomy course, ATP bioluminescence assays were used to swab various sites within the dissection room, including entrance and exiting door handles, water taps, cadaver tables, counter tops, imaging material, X-ray box switches, and the cadaver surfaces. The results demonstrated very low activities on cadaver tables, washing up areas, and exiting door handles. There was low activity on counter tops and X-ray boxes. There was medium activity on the entrance door handles. These findings suggest an inexpensive and accurate method for monitoring safety compliance and microbial activity. Students can feel confident and safe in the environment in which they work. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity assay for antioxidants in human serum and for hydroxyl radical scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Güçlü, Kubilay; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Bektaşoğlu, Burcu; Bener, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Tests measuring the combined antioxidant effect of the nonenzymatic defenses in biological fluids may be useful in providing an index of the organism's capability to counteract reactive species known as pro-oxidants, resist oxidative damage, and combat oxidative stress-related diseases. The selected chromogenic redox reagent for the assay of human serum should be easily accessible, stable, selective, and respond to all types of biologically important antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, reduced glutathione (GSH), uric acid, and bilirubin, regardless of chemical type or hydrophilicity. Our recently developed cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) spectrophotometric method for a number of polyphenols and flavonoids using the copper(II)-neocuproine reagent in ammonium acetate buffer is now applied to a complete series of plasma antioxidants for the assay of total antioxidant capacity of serum, and the resulting absorbance at 450 nm is recorded either directly (e.g., for ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and glutathione) or after incubation at 50 degrees C for 20 min (e.g., for uric acid, bilirubin, and albumin), quantitation being made by means of a calibration curve. The lipophilic antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, are assayed in dichloromethane. Lipophilic antioxidants of serum are extracted with n-hexane from an ethanolic solution of serum subjected to centrifugation. Hydrophilic antioxidants of serum are assayed in the centrifugate after perchloric acid precipitation of proteins. The CUPRAC molar absorptivities, linear ranges, and TEAC (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) coefficients of the serum antioxidants are established, and the results are evaluated in comparison with the findings of the ABTS/TEAC reference method. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) are 0.7 and 1.5%, respectively, for serum. The CUPRAC assay proved to be efficient for glutathione and thiol-type antioxidants

  20. Automation of cell-based drug absorption assays in 96-well format using permeable support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Brad; Banks, Peter; Sherman, Hilary; Rothenberg, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based drug absorption assays, such as Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1, are an essential component of lead compound ADME/Tox testing. The permeability and transport data they provide can determine whether a compound continues in the drug discovery process. Current methods typically incorporate 24-well microplates and are performed manually. Yet the need to generate absorption data earlier in the drug discovery process, on an increasing number of compounds, is driving the use of higher density plates. A simple, more efficient process that incorporates 96-well permeable supports and proper instrumentation in an automated process provides more reproducible data compared to manual methods. Here we demonstrate the ability to perform drug permeability and transport assays using Caco-2 or MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The assay procedure was automated in a 96-well format, including cell seeding, media and buffer exchanges, compound dispense, and sample removal using simple robotic instrumentation. Cell monolayer integrity was confirmed via transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow measurements. Proper cell function was validated by analyzing apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical movement of rhodamine 123, a known P-glycoprotein substrate. Apparent permeability and efflux data demonstrate how the automated procedure provides a less variable method than manual processing, and delivers a more accurate assessment of a compound's absorption characteristics.

  1. Detection of Human Epididymis Protein 4 (HE4) in Human Serum Samples Using a Specific Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijun; Lv, Zhiqiang; Shao, Jing; Xu, Ying; Luo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wenji; Luo, Shuhong; Fang, Jianmin; Wang, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Huang, Ruopan

    2016-09-01

    The human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) may have high specificity in the detection of malignant diseases, making the development of an immunoassay for HE4 essential. In our study, a fusion gene was constructed encoded with the HE4 protein. This protein was then produced in the bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) and used to immunize mice in order to eventually generate hybridomas specific to HE4. The hybridoma supernatants were then screened, and four positive anti-HE4 cell lines were selected. These cell lines produce monoclonal antibodies against HE4 epitopes, as demonstrated in the Western blot as well as by direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using the developed antibodies, we successfully identified several good antibody pairs from the hybridomas, which allowed for the development of a sandwich ELISA to measure HE4 levels. By using the HE4 ELISA, we measured HE4 levels of 60 clinical human serum samples. Compared with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved kit (Roche), our results showed a strong positive correlation to those of the FDA-approved kit. In summary, highly sensitive antibody pairs were screened against HE4, and a sandwich ELISA was developed as an accurate analytical tool for the detection of HE4 in human serum, which could be especially valuable for diagnosing ovarian carcinomas. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Development of a surrogate angiogenic potency assay for clinical-grade stem cell production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Nicholas; Cutrone, Rochelle; Raber, Amy; Perry, Robert; Van't Hof, Wouter; Deans, Robert; Ting, Anthony E; Woda, Juliana

    2012-09-01

    Clinical results from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients treated with MultiStem®, a large-scale expanded adherent multipotent progenitor cell population (MAPC), have demonstrated a strong safety and benefit profile for these cells. The mechanism of benefit with MAPC treatment is a result, in part, of its ability to induce neovascularization through trophic support. Production of clinical-grade stem cell products requires the development of lot-release criteria based on potency assays that directly reflect the fundamental mechanistic pathway underlying the therapeutic response to verify manufacturing process consistency and product potency. Using an in vitro endothelial tube formation assay, a potency assay has been developed that reflects MAPC pro-angiogenic activity. Serum-free conditioned media collected from MAPC culture induced endothelial tube formation. A proteomic survey of angiogenic factors produced by the cells in vitro revealed candidate factors linked to angiogenic potency. Three cytokines, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5), interleukin 8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), were required for this angiogenic activity. Depletion of any of these factors from the media prevented tube formation, while adding back increasing amounts of these cytokines into the depleted serum-free conditioned media established the lower limits of each of the cytokines required to induce angiogenesis. A necessary threshold of angiogenic factor expression was established using an in vitro angiogenesis assay. By correlating the levels of the cytokines required to induce tube formation in vitro with levels of the factors found in the spent media from manufacturing production runs, detection of these factors was identified as a surrogate potency assay with defined pass/fail criteria.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to human factor VII: a one step immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag.

    OpenAIRE

    Takase, T; Tuddenham, E G; Chand, S; Goodall, A H

    1988-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (RFF-VII/1, RFF-VII/2, and RFF-VII/3) which bind specifically to different epitopes on human factor VII antigen were raised. Two of the antibodies, RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2, bound strongly to factor VII antigen (VII:Ag), but only RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/3 were potent inhibitors of factor VII coagulation activity (VII:C). RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2 were used in a one step, double monoclonal immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag. This was highly reproducible and detecte...

  4. Ginsenoside Rg3 induces DNA damage in human osteosarcoma cells and reduces MNNG-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in normal human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue-Hui; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, Bo; Jiang, Sheng-Dan; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Panax ginseng is a Chinese medicinal herb. Ginsenosides are the main bioactive components of P. ginseng, and ginsenoside Rg3 is the primary ginsenoside. Ginsenosides can potently kill various types of cancer cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of ginsenoside Rg3 in human osteosarcoma cells and the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg3 with respect to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in a normal human cell line (human fibroblasts). Four human osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63, OS732, U-2OS and HOS cells) and a normal human cell line (human fibroblasts) were employed to investigate the cytotoxicity of ginsenosides Rg3 by MTT assay. Alkaline comet assay and γH2AX focus staining were used to detect the DNA damage in MG-63 and U-2OS cells. The extent of cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and a DNA ladder assay. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ginsenoside Rg3 was dose-dependent in the human osteosarcoma cell lines, and MG-63 and U-2OS cells were the most sensitive to ginsenoside Rg3. As expected, compared to the negative control, ginsenoside Rg3 significantly increased DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner. In agreement with the comet assay data, the percentage of γH2AX-positive MG-63 and U-2OS cells indicated that ginsenoside Rg3 induced DNA double-strand breaks in a concentration-dependent manner. The results also suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 reduces the extent of MNNG-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human fibroblasts.

  5. A critical assessment of the use of microculture tetrazolium assays to measure cell growth and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N J; Goodwin, C J; Holt, S J

    1995-06-01

    Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are being widely applied to probe the relationships between cell survival, growth, and differentiation and also to investigate associations between compromised cell metabolism, oxidative stress, and programmed cell death as occurs in apoptosis. MTAs rely upon the cellular reduction of tetrazolium salts to their intensely coloured formazans. The resulting colorimetric assays form the basis of exceptionally precise systems which are technically amenable and capable of a high throughput of samples. As a consequence, MTAs are being used to monitor responses to both extracellular activators and toxic agents in disciplines as diverse as radiobiology and endocrinology. We review the chemistry and histochemical applications of tetrazolium salts and subsequently discuss the criteria for their use in MTAs. These assays are one of the latest examples of the application of the tetrazolium/formazan system to cell biology. We outline current views on the mechanisms of the bioreduction of tetrazolium salts. These probably combine to reflect the integrated pyridine nucleotide dependent redox state of the cell. We try to illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms helps to avoid some of the pitfalls of the MTA systems. There is now for example, extensive evidence that changes in cell culture environments, such as glucose supply or pH of the medium, influence the reduction of tetrazolium salts and thereby introduce artefacts into MTAs. Finally, we provide examples of situations in which MTAs can be used to complement other more established experimental systems. They then act as unique probes with which to investigate changes in the redox state of the cell. These changes are associated with regulation of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation and conversely, the different pathways leading to cell death.

  6. Using a medium-throughput comet assay to evaluate the global DNA methylation status of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewies, Angélique; Van Dyk, Etresia; Wentzel, Johannes F.; Pretorius, Pieter J.

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a simple and cost effective technique, commonly used to analyze and quantify DNA damage in individual cells. The versatility of the comet assay allows introduction of various modifications to the basic technique. The difference in the methylation sensitivity of the isoschizomeric restriction enzymes HpaII and MspI are used to demonstrate the ability of the comet assay to measure the global DNA methylation level of individual cells when using cell cultures. In the experiments described here, a medium-throughput comet assay and methylation sensitive comet assay are combined to produce a methylation sensitive medium-throughput comet assay to measure changes in the global DNA methylation pattern in individual cells under various growth conditions. PMID:25071840

  7. Knockdown of MAGEA6 Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Signaling to Inhibit Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xueting; Xie, Jing; Huang, Hang; Deng, Zhexian

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A6 (MAGEA6) is a cancer-specific ubiquitin ligase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The current study tested MAGEA6 expression and potential function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MAGEA6 and AMPK expression in human RCC tissues and RCC cells were tested by Western blotting assay and qRT-PCR assay. shRNA method was applied to knockdown MAGEA6 in human RCC cells. Cell survival and proliferation were tested by MTT assay and BrdU ELISA assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was tested by the TUNEL assay and single strand DNA ELISA assay. The 786-O xenograft in nude mouse model was established to test RCC cell growth in vivo. MAGEA6 is specifically expressed in RCC tissues as well as in the established (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. MAGEA6 expression is correlated with AMPKα1 downregulation in RCC tissues and cells. It is not detected in normal renal tissues nor in the HK-2 renal epithelial cells. MAGEA6 knockdown by targeted-shRNA induced AMPK stabilization and activation, which led to mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in-activation and RCC cell death/apoptosis. AMPK inhibition, by AMPKα1 shRNA or the dominant negative AMPKα1 (T172A), almost reversed MAGEA6 knockdown-induced RCC cell apoptosis. Conversely, expression of the constitutive-active AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked the actions by MAGEA6 shRNA. In vivo, MAGEA6 shRNA-bearing 786-O tumors grew significantly slower in nude mice than the control tumors. AMPKα1 stabilization and activation as well as mTORC1 in-activation were detected in MAGEA6 shRNA tumor tissues. MAGEA6 knockdown inhibits human RCC cells via activating AMPK signaling. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. DNA damage evaluation of hydroxyapatite on fibroblast cell L929 using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, N F; Yaakob, T A; Ong, B Y; Hamid, M; Ali, A M; Annuar, B O; Inayat-Hussain, S H

    2004-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main component of the bone which is a potential biomaterial substance that can be applied in orthopaedics. In this study, the biocompatibility of this biomaterial was assessed using an in vitro technique. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effect of HA2 and HA3 against L929 fibroblast cell was evaluated using the MTT Assay and Alkaline Comet Assay respectively. Both HA2 and HA3 compound showed low cytotoxicity effect as determined using MTT Assay. Cells viability following 72 hours incubation at maximum concentration of both HA2 and HA3 (200 mg/ml) were 75.3 +/- 8.8% and 86.7 +/- 13.1% respectively. However, the cytotoxicity effect of ZnSO4.7H2O as a positive control showed an IC50 values of 46 mg/ml (160 microM). On the other hand, both HA2 and HA3 compound showed a slight genotoxicity effect as determined using the Alkaline Comet Assay following incubation at the concentration 200 mg/ml for 72 hours. This assay has been widely used in genetic toxicology to detect DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile site. The percentage of the cells with DNA damage for both substance was 27.7 +/- 1.3% and 15.6 +/- 1.0% for HA2 and HA3 respectively. Incubation of the cells for 24 hours with 38 microg/ml (IC25) of positive control showed an increase in percentage of cells with DNA damage (67.5 +/- 0.7%). In conclusion, our study indicated that both hydroxyapatite compounds showed a good biocompatibility in fibroblast cells.

  9. EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING K. Young,* L. Xun,* S. Rothmann,? S. Perreault, ? W. Robbins**University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; ?Fertility Solutions Inc., Cleveland, ...

  10. First application of comet assay in blood cells of Mediterranean loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliani, Ilaria; Campani, Tommaso; Giannetti, Matteo; Marsili, Letizia; Casini, Silvia; Fossi, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the comet assay in erythrocytes of Caretta caretta, a species never investigated for genotoxicity. We studied 31 loggerhead sea turtles from three Italian marine rescue centres. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all the animals and the comet assay applied. All comet cells were analysed using two methods: visual scoring and computer image analysis. The % DNA in tail mean value ± SD and Damage Index were 21.56 ± 15.41 and 134.83 ± 94.12, respectively. A strong and statistically significant statistically correlation between the two analytical methods was observed (r = 0.95; p comet assay is a useful method to detect the possible effects of genotoxic agents in loggerhead sea turtle and to increase the knowledge about the ecotoxicological health status of this threatened species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differing levels of excision repair in human fetal dermis and brain cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    1982-01-01

    The levels of DNA excision repair, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay, were compared in cells derived from human fetal brain and dermal tissues. The level of UDS induced following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was found to be lower (approx. 60%) in the fetal brain cells than in fetal dermal cells. It was determined, using the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay to confirm the UDS observation, that 50% of the dimers induced by UV in fetal dermal cells were repaired in 8 h. while only 15% were removed in the fetal brain cells during the same period of time. Even after 24 h. only 44% of the dimers induced by UV in the fetal brain cells were repaired, while 65% were removed in the dermal cells. These data suggest that cultured human fetal brain cells exhibit lower levels of excision repair compared to cultured human fetal dermal cells. (author)

  12. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population.Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels.The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  13. Vasculature analysis of patient derived tumor xenografts using species-specific PCR assays: evidence of tumor endothelial cells and atypical VEGFA-VEGFR1/2 signalings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Decaudin, Didier; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Vacher, Sophie; Vallerand, David; Richon, Sophie; Hatem, Rana; De Plater, Ludmilla; Dahmani, Ahmed; Némati, Fariba; Angevin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial transdifferentiation and VEGFR1/2 expression by cancer cells have been reported in glioblastoma but remain poorly documented for many other cancer types. To characterize vasculature of patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs), largely used in preclinical anti-angiogenic assays, we designed here species-specific real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays. Human and mouse PECAM1/CD31, ENG/CD105, FLT1/VEGFR1, KDR/VEGFR2 and VEGFA transcripts were analyzed in a large series of 150 PDXs established from 8 different tumor types (53 colorectal, 14 ovarian, 39 breast and 15 renal cell cancers, 6 small cell and 5 non small cell lung carcinomas, 13 cutaneous melanomas and 5 glioblastomas) and in two bevacizumab-treated non small cell lung carcinomas xenografts. As expected, mouse cell proportion in PDXs -evaluated by quantifying expression of the housekeeping gene TBP- correlated with all mouse endothelial markers and human VEGFA RNA levels. More interestingly, we observed human PECAM1/CD31 and ENG/CD105 expression in all tumor types, with higher rate in glioblastoma and renal cancer xenografts. Human VEGFR expression profile varied widely depending on tumor types with particularly high levels of human FLT1/VEGFR1 transcripts in colon cancers and non small cell lung carcinomas, and upper levels of human KDR/VEGFR2 transcripts in non small cell lung carcinomas. Bevacizumab treatment induced significant low expression of mouse Pecam1/Cd31, Eng/Cd105, Flt1/Vegfr1 and Kdr/Vefr2 while the human PECAM1/CD31 and VEGFA were upregulated. Taken together, our results strongly suggest existence of human tumor endothelial cells in all tumor types tested and of both stromal and tumoral autocrine VEGFA-VEGFR1/2 signalings. These findings should be considered when evaluating molecular mechanisms of preclinical response and resistance to tumor anti-angiogenic strategies

  14. Immunodiagnosis of Human Fascioliasis by an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and a Micro-ELISA

    OpenAIRE

    Carnevale, Silvana; Rodríguez, Mónica I.; Santillán, Graciela; Labbé, Jorge H.; Cabrera, Marta G.; Bellegarde, Enrique J.; Velásquez, Jorge N.; Trgovcic, Jorge E.; Guarnera, Eduardo A.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and micro-ELISA were evaluated for their ability to detect anti-Fasciola hepatica antibodies in humans by using excretory-secretory antigen. The sensitivity of each method was 100%, but the specificity was 100% for ELISA and 97% for micro-ELISA. The micro-ELISA could be used as a screening assay and ELISA could be used as a confirmatory method for the serodiagnosis of human fascioliasis.

  15. Genotoxicity of waterpipe smoke in buccal cells and peripheral blood leukocytes as determined by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amrah, Hadba Jar-Allah; Aboznada, Osama Abdullah; Alam, Mohammad Zubair; ElAssouli, M-Zaki Mustafa; Mujallid, Mohammad Ibrahim; ElAssouli, Sufian Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Waterpipe smoke causes DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes and in buccal cells of smokers. To determine the exposure effect of waterpipe smoke on buccal cells and peripheral blood leukocytes in regard to DNA damage using comet assay. The waterpipe smoke condensates were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study was performed on 20 waterpipe smokers. To perform comet assay on bucaal cells of smokers, 10 µl of cell suspension was mixed with 85 µl of pre-warmed 1% low melting agarose, applied to comet slide and electrophoresed. To analyze the effect of smoke condensate in vitro, 1 ml of peripheral blood was mixed with 10 µl of smoke condensate and subjected for comet assay. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4on, nicotine, hydroxymethyl furancarboxaldehyde and 3-ethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde in the smoke condensates. Waterpipe smoking caused DNA damage in vivo in buccal cells of smokers. The tail moment and tail length in buccal cells of smokers were 186 ± 26 and 456 ± 71, respectively, which are higher than control. The jurak and moassel smoke condensates were found to cause DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes. The moassel smoke condensate was more damaging. There is wide misconception that waterpipe smoking is not as harmful as cigarette smoking. This study demonstrated that waterpipe smoke induced DNA damage in exposed cells. Waterpipe smokes cause DNA damage in buccal cells. The smoke condensate of both jurak and moassel caused comet formation suggesting DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes.

  16. Calcein AM release-based cytotoxic cell assay for fish leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke R; Densmore, Christine L; Ottinger, Christopher A

    2004-02-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic cell assay for fish is presented that is based on the release of the activated fluorochrome calcein AM from lysed carp epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. To establish the suitability of treating EPC cells with calcein AM the uptake and spontaneous release of the calcein AM by the EPC cells was evaluated. Incubation of 5 microM calcein AM in culture medium with 1x10(5)EPC cells well(-1)for a minimum of 3 h provided sufficient labelling. Spontaneous release of fluorescence from the labelled EPC cells during 10 h of post labelling incubation ranged from 30 to 39% of the total observed fluorescence. Cytotoxic activity of trout leucocytes was evaluated at three leucocyte to target cell ratios (10:1, 2:1 and 1:1) following incubation (4, 6, 8, and 10 h) with calcein AM-labelled EPC cells at 15 degrees C. In some instances, the monoclonal antibody specific for the NCC surface receptor NCCRP-1 (MAb5C.6) was included in the cultures. The activity of NCC cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of 0.25 microg well(-1)of MAb5C.6 relative to no antibody (Pcell activity of approximately 18% was observed following 8 h of incubation at the 2:1 and 1:1 leucocyte to target cell ratios. Percent cytotoxic cell activity using calcein AM was similar to values reported for rainbow trout leucocytes using the 51Cr-release assay.

  17. Critical elements in the development of cell therapy potency assays for ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Yael; Abraham, Eytan; Karnieli, Ohad; Nahum, Sagi; Woda, Juliana; Zylberberg, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    A successful potency assay for a cell therapy product (CTP) used in the treatment of ischemic conditions should quantitatively measure relevant biological properties that predict therapeutic activity. This is especially challenging because of numerous degrees of complexity stemming from factors that include a multifactorial complex mechanism of action, cell source, inherent cell characteristics, culture method, administration mode and the in vivo conditions to which the cells are exposed. The expected biological function of a CTP encompasses complex interactions that range from a biochemical, metabolic or immunological activity to structural replacement of damaged tissue or organ. Therefore, the requirements for full characterization of the active substance with respect to biological function could be taxing. Moreover, the specific mechanism of action is often difficult to pinpoint to a specific molecular entity; rather, it is more dependent on the functionality of the cellular components acting in a in a multifactorial fashion. In the case of ischemic conditions, the cell therapy mechanism of action can vary from angiogenesis, vasculogenesis and arteriogenesis that may activate different pathways and clinical outcomes. The CTP cellular attributes with relation to the suggested mechanism of action can be used for the development of quantitative and reproducible analytical potency assays. CTPs selected and released on the basis of such potency assays should have the highest probability of providing meaningful clinical benefit for patients. This White Paper will discuss and give examples for key elements in the development of a potency assay for treatment of ischemic disorders treated by the use of CTPs. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of the glycosphingolipids of human-induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säljö, Karin; Barone, Angela; Vizlin-Hodzic, Dzeneta; Johansson, Bengt R; Breimer, Michael E; Funa, Keiko; Teneberg, Susann

    2017-04-01

    High expectations are held for human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) since they are established from autologous tissues thus overcoming the risk of allogeneic immune rejection when used in regenerative medicine. However, little is known regarding the cell-surface carbohydrate antigen profile of hiPSC compared with human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Here, glycosphingolipids were isolated from an adipocyte-derived hiPSC line, and hiPSC and hESC glycosphingolipids were compared by concurrent characterization by binding assays with carbohydrate-recognizing ligands and mass spectrometry. A high similarity between the nonacid glycosphingolipids of hiPSC and hESC was found. The nonacid glycosphingolipids P1 pentaosylceramide, x2 pentaosylceramide and H type 1 heptaosylceramide, not previously described in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC), were characterized in both hiPSC and hESC. The composition of acid glycosphingolipids differed, with increased levels of GM3 ganglioside, and reduced levels of GD1a/GD1b in hiPSC when compared with hESC. In addition, the hESC glycosphingolipids sulf-globopentaosylceramide and sialyl-globotetraosylceramide were lacking in hiPSC. Neural stem cells differentiating from hiPSC had a reduced expression of sialyl-lactotetra, whereas expression of the GD1a ganglioside was significantly increased. Thus, while sialyl-lactotetra is a marker of undifferentiated hPSC, GD1a is a novel marker of neural differentiation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Structure-Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Activity Relationships of Purpurin and Related Anthraquinones in Chemical and Cell Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Nam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinone (9,10-anthraquinone and several hydroxy derivatives, including purpurin (1,2,4-trihydroxyanthraquinone, anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone, and chrysazin (1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone, were evaluated for antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in chemical assays and mammalian cells (murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Several tests were used to assess their activities: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical; ABTS radical cation; hydrogen peroxide scavenging; reduction of potassium ferricyanide; chelation of ferrous ions; inhibition of lipid peroxidation; inhibition of nitric oxide generation; scavenging of the intracellular hydroxyl radical; expression of NLRP3 polypeptide for inflammasome assembly; and quantitation of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β for inflammasome activation. The results show that purpurin, from the root of the madder plant (Rubia tinctorum L., exhibited the highest antioxidative activity in both chemical and cultured cell antioxidant assays. The antioxidative activities of the other three anthraquinones were lower than that of purpurin. In addition, purpurin could down-regulate NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, suggesting that it might protect foods against oxidative damage and prevent in vivo oxidative stress and inflammation. Structure-activity relationships and the significance of the results for food quality and human health are discussed.

  20. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in continuous flow system: optimization and evaluation using human serum albumin as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrebaeck, C; Börjeson, J; Mattiasson, B

    1978-06-15

    Thermometric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TELISA) is described. After the procedure of optimization, human serum albumin was assayed using anti-human serum albumin bound to Sepharose CL 4-B in the enzyme thermistor unit and catalase as label on the free antigen. The model system was used for assays down to 10(-13)M and the preparation of immobilized antibodies was used repeatedly up to 100 times. Comparative studies of the TELISA technique with bromocresol green, immunoturbidimetric and rocket immunoelectrophoretic methods were carried out and showed that TELISA could be used as an alternative method.

  2. Construction of dose-effect curves by irradiating peripheral blood mononuclear cells analyzed with the alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda, Lenin; Rosales Jaime; Leon, Kety; Espinoza, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of the alkaline comet assay to detect levels of DNA damage in human monocytes and lymphocytes under radiation was tested. For this purpose, four dose-effect curves by irradiation of cells isolated from blood samples of 4 young, health and non-smoker donors. A gamma ray source of "6"0Co was used and doses of 0, 2.5, 5 and 7 Gy were delivered to blood cells. The results show good correlation (R2 = 0.973, SD = 0.009) between the radiation dose and DNA damage as measured by the parameter Tail Intensity (percentage of DNA in the tail of the 'comet'). Furthermore, we observe the variability in predicting DNA damage by Gy (7.59, SD = 1.5). Potential use of this technique in the biological dosimetry of ionizing radiations is being evaluated. (author)

  3. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  4. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in