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Sample records for human cationic antimicrobial

  1. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

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    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  2. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18), lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

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    Lim, Ratana; Lappas, Martha; Riley, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18); lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. METHODS: In this case-control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73...... and peripheral blood. Individually, the 3 biomarkers display only modest diagnostic efficiency as assessed by AUC. When combined in a multivariate index assay, however, diagnostic efficiency increases significantly. As such, the utility of the biomarker panel, as an aid in the diagnosis of cancer in symptomatic...... sensitivity and specificity to be implemented as community-based screening tests. The identification of additional biomarkers may improve the diagnostic efficiency of multivariate index assays. The aims of this study were to characterise and compare the ovarian tissue immunohistochemical localisation...

  3. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18, lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

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    Lim Ratana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of gynaecological cancer morbidity and mortality in women. Early stage ovarian cancer is usually asymptomatic, therefore, is often first diagnosed when it is widely disseminated. Currently available diagnostics lack the requisite sensitivity and specificity to be implemented as community-based screening tests. The identification of additional biomarkers may improve the diagnostic efficiency of multivariate index assays. The aims of this study were to characterise and compare the ovarian tissue immunohistochemical localisation and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18; lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. Methods In this case–control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73 controls, including 28 women with benign pelvic masses; 91 cancer, including 21 women with borderline tumours. Localisation of each antigen within the ovary was assessed by immunohistochemistry and serum concentrations determined by ELISA assays. Results Immunoreactive (ir hCAP-18 and lactoferrin were identified in epithelial cells, while CD163 was predominately localised in stromal cells. Tissue ir CD163 increased significantly (PP Conclusions The data obtained in this study establishes the localisation and concentrations of CD163, hCAP-18, and lactoferrin in ovarian tumours and peripheral blood. Individually, the 3 biomarkers display only modest diagnostic efficiency as assessed by AUC. When combined in a multivariate index assay, however, diagnostic efficiency increases significantly. As such, the utility of the biomarker panel, as an aid in the diagnosis of cancer in symptomatic women, is worthy of further investigation in a larger phase 2 biomarker trial.

  4. Cationic antimicrobial peptides disrupt the Streptococcus pyogenes ExPortal.

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    Vega, Luis Alberto; Caparon, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    Although they possess a well-characterized ability to porate the bacterial membrane, emerging research suggests that cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) can influence pathogen behaviour at levels that are sublethal. In this study, we investigated the interaction of polymyxin B and human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1) with the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. At sublethal concentrations, these CAPs preferentially targeted the ExPortal, a unique microdomain of the S. pyogenes membrane, specialized for protein secretion and processing. A consequence of this interaction was the disruption of ExPortal organization and a redistribution of ExPortal components into the peripheral membrane. Redistribution was associated with inhibition of secretion of certain toxins, including the SpeB cysteine protease and the streptolysin O (SLO) cytolysin, but not SIC, a protein that protects S. pyogenes from CAPs. These data suggest a novel function for CAPs in targeting the ExPortal and interfering with secretion of factors required for infection and survival. This mechanism may prove valuable for the design of new types of antimicrobial agents to combat the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  5. S. Typhimurium strategies to resist killing by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

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    Matamouros, Susana; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-11-01

    S. Typhimurium is a broad host range Gram-negative pathogen that must evade killing by host innate immune systems to colonize, replicate, cause disease, and be transmitted to other hosts. A major pathogenic strategy of Salmonellae is entrance, survival, and replication within eukaryotic cell phagocytic vacuoles. These phagocytic vacuoles and gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces contain multiple cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) which control invading bacteria. S. Typhimurium possesses several key mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs which involve sensing CAMPs and membrane damage to activate signaling cascades that result in remodeling of the bacterial envelope to reduce its overall negative charge with an increase in hydrophobicity to decrease binding and effectiveness of CAMPs. Moreover Salmonellae have additional mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs including an outer membrane protease which targets cationic peptides at the surface, and specific efflux pumps which protect the inner membrane from damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  6. Characterization and performance of short cationic antimicrobial peptide isomers.

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    Juba, Melanie; Porter, Devin; Dean, Scott; Gillmor, Susan; Bishop, Barney

    2013-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent an ancient defense mechanism against invading bacteria, with peptides such as the cathelicidins being essential elements of vertebrate innate immunity. CAMPs are typically associated with broad-spectrum antimicrobial potency and limited bacterial resistance. The cathelicidin identified from the elapid snake Naja atra (NA-CATH) contains a semi-conserved repeated 11-residue motif (ATRA motif) with a sequence pattern consistent with formation of an amphipathic helical conformation. Short peptide amides (ATRA-1, -1A, -1P, and -2) generated based on the pair of ATRA motifs in NA-CATH exhibited varied antimicrobial potencies. The small size of the ATRA peptides, coupled with their varied antimicrobial performances, make them interesting models to study the impact various physico-chemical properties have on antimicrobial performance in helical CAMPs. Accordingly, the D- and L-enantiomers of the peptide ATRA-1A, which in earlier studies had shown both good antimicrobial performance and strong helical character, were investigated in order to assess the impact peptide stereochemistry has on antimicrobial performance and interaction with chiral membranes. The ATRA-1A isomers exhibit varied potencies against four bacterial strains, and their conformational properties in the presence of mixed zwitterionic/anionic liposomes are influenced by anionic lipid content. These studies reveal subtle differences in the properties of the peptide isomers. Differences are also seen in the abilities of the ATRA-1A isomers to induce liposome fusion/aggregation, bilayer rearrangement and lysing through turbidity studies and fluorescence microscopy. The similarities and differences in the properties of the ATRA-1A isomers could aid in efforts to develop D-peptide-based therapeutics using high-performing L-peptides as templates.

  7. Cationic Net Charge and Counter Ion Type as Antimicrobial Activity Determinant Factors of Short Lipopeptides

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    Greber, Katarzyna E.; Dawgul, Malgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    To get a better insight into the antimicrobial potency of short cationic lipopeptides, 35 new entities were synthesized using solid phase peptide strategy. All newly obtained lipopeptides were designed to be positively charged from +1 to +4. This was achieved by introducing basic amino acid - lysine - into the lipopeptide structure and had a hydrophobic fatty acid chain attached. Lipopeptides were subjected to microbiological tests using reference strains of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, and fungi: Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Aspergillus brasiliensis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were established for each strain. The toxicity toward human cells was determined by hemolysis tests via minimum hemolytic concentration (MHC) determination. The effect of the trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) counter ion on the antimicrobial activity of lipopeptides was also examined by its removing and performing the antimicrobial tests using counter ion-free compounds. The study shows that lipopeptides are more potent against Gram-positive than Gram-negative strains. It was revealed that positive charge equals at least +2 is a necessary condition to observe significant antimicrobial activity, but only when it is balanced with a proper length of hydrophobic fatty acid chain. The hemolytic activity of lipopeptides strongly depends on amino acid composition of the hydrophilic portion of the molecule as well as fatty acid chain length. Compounds endowed with a greater positive charge were more toxic to human erythrocytes. This should be considered during new lipopeptide molecules design. Our studies also revealed the TFA counter ion has no significant effect on the antimicrobial behavior of cationic

  8. Antimicrobial sand via adsorption of cationic Moringa oleifera protein.

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    Jerri, Huda A; Adolfsen, Kristin J; McCullough, Lauren R; Velegol, Darrell; Velegol, Stephanie B

    2012-01-31

    Moringa oleifera (Moringa) seeds contain a natural cationic protein (MOCP) that can be used as an antimicrobial flocculant for water clarification. Currently, the main barrier to using Moringa seeds for producing potable water is that the seeds release other water-soluble proteins and organic matter, which increase the concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water. The presence of this DOM supports the regrowth of pathogens in treated water, preventing its storage and later use. A new strategy has been established for retaining the MOCP protein and its ability to clarify and disinfect water while removing the excess organic matter. The MOCP is first adsorbed and immobilized onto sand granules, followed by a rinsing step wherein the excess organic matter is removed, thereby preventing later growth of bacteria in the purified water. Our hypotheses are that the protein remains adsorbed onto the sand after the functionalization treatment, and that the ability of the antimicrobial functionalized sand (f-sand) to clarify turbidity and kill bacteria, as MOCP does in bulk solution, is maintained. The data support these hypotheses, indicating that the f-sand removes silica microspheres and pathogens from water, renders adhered Escherichia coli bacteria nonviable, and reduces turbidity of a kaolin suspension. The antimicrobial properties of f-sand were assessed using fluorescent (live-dead) staining of bacteria on the surface of the f-sand. The DOM that can contribute to bacterial regrowth was shown to be significantly reduced in solution, by measuring biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Overall, these results open the possibility that immobilization of the MOCP protein onto sand can provide a simple, locally sustainable process for producing storable drinking water.

  9. Spermicidal efficacy of VRP, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, inducing apoptosis and membrane disruption.

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    Ghosh, Prasanta; Bhoumik, Arpita; Saha, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Ghosh, Jimut K; Dungdung, Sandhya R

    2017-04-14

    Presently available contraceptives are mostly hormonal or detergent in nature with numerous side effects like irritation, lesion, inflammation in vagina, alteration of body homeostasis, etc. Antimicrobial peptides with spermicidal activity but without adverse effects may be suitable alternatives. In the present study, spermicidal activity of a cationic antimicrobial peptide VRP on human spermatozoa has been elucidated. Progressive forward motility of human spermatozoa was instantly stopped after 100 μM VRP treatment and at 350 μM, all kinds of sperm motility ceased within 20 s as assessed by the Sander-Cramer assay. The spermicidal effect was confirmed by eosin-nigrosin assay and HOS test. VRP treatment (100 μM) in human spermatozoa induced both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. TUNEL assay showed VRP treatment significantly disrupted the DNA integrity and changed the mitochondrial membrane permeability as evident from MPTP assay. AFM and SEM results depicted ultra structural changes including disruption of the acrosomal cap and plasma membrane of the head and midpiece region after treatment with 350 μM VRP. MTT assay showed after treatments with 100 and 350 μM of VRP for 24 hr, a substantial amount of Lactobacillus acidophilus (about 90% and 75%, respectively) remained viable. Hence, VRP being a small synthetic peptide with antimicrobial and spermicidal activity but tolerable to normal vaginal microflora, may be a suitable target for elucidating its contraceptive potentiality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

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    Thomas, E L; Lehrer, R I; Rest, R F

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

  11. Phosphoethanolamine substitution of lipid A and resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cationic antimicrobial peptides and complement-mediated killing by normal human serum.

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    Lewis, Lisa A; Choudhury, Biswa; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Martin, Larry E; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A; Stephens, David S; Carlson, Russell; Shafer, William M

    2009-03-01

    The capacity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cause disseminated gonococcal infection requires that such strains resist the bactericidal action of normal human serum. The bactericidal action of normal human serum against N. gonorrhoeae is mediated by the classical complement pathway through an antibody-dependent mechanism. The mechanism(s) by which certain strains of gonococci resist normal human serum is not fully understood, but alterations in lipooligosaccharide structure can affect such resistance. During an investigation of the biological significance of phosphoethanolamine extensions from lipooligosaccharide, we found that phosphoethanolamine substitutions from the heptose II group of the lipooligosaccharide beta-chain did not impact levels of gonococcal (strain FA19) resistance to normal human serum or polymyxin B. However, loss of phosphoethanolamine substitution from the lipid A component of lipooligosaccharide, due to insertional inactivation of lptA, resulted in increased gonococcal susceptibility to polymyxin B, as reported previously for Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast to previous reports with N. meningitidis, loss of phosphoethanolamine attached to lipid A rendered strain FA19 susceptible to complement killing. Serum killing of the lptA mutant occurred through the classical complement pathway. Both serum and polymyxin B resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A were restored in the lptA-null mutant by complementation with wild-type lptA. Our results support a role for lipid A phosphoethanolamine substitutions in resistance of this strict human pathogen to innate host defenses.

  12. Bordetella pertussis lipid A glucosamine modification confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and increases resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

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    Shah, Nita R; Hancock, Robert E W; Fernandez, Rachel C

    2014-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many strategies for evading the human immune system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important Gram-negative bacterial surface structure that activates the immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 and enables susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). We show modification of the lipid A region of LPS with glucosamine increased resistance to numerous CAMPs, including LL-37. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this glucosamine modification increased resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

  13. Dark Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Cationic Phenylene Ethynylene Polymers and Oligomers against Escherichia coli

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    Taylor D. Canady

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of poly(phenylene ethynylene (PPE-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs and oligo-phenylene ethynylenes (OPEs with E. coli cells are investigated to gain insights into the differences in the dark killing mechanisms between CPEs and OPEs. A laboratory strain of E. coli with antibiotic resistance is included in this work to study the influence of antibiotic resistance on the antimicrobial activity of the CPEs and OPEs. In agreement with our previous findings, these compounds can efficiently perturb the bacterial cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, resulting in bacterial cell death. Electron microscopy imaging and cytoplasmic membrane permeability assays reveal that the oligomeric OPEs penetrate the bacterial outer membrane and interact efficiently with the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast, the polymeric CPEs cause serious damage to the cell surface. In addition, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and hemolytic concentration (HC of the CPEs and OPEs are also measured to compare their antimicrobial activities against two different strains of E. coli with the compounds’ toxicity levels against human red blood cells (RBC. MIC and HC measurements are in good agreement with our previous model membrane perturbation study, which reveals that the different membrane perturbation abilities of the CPEs and OPEs are in part responsible for their selectivity towards bacteria compared to mammalian cells. Our study gives insight to several structural features of the PPE-based CPEs and OPEs that modulate their antimicrobial properties and that these features can serve as a basis for further tuning their structures to optimize antimicrobial properties.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity and Cell Selectivity of Synthetic and Biosynthetic Cationic Polymers.

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    Venkatesh, Mayandi; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Anggara, Raditya; Fazil, Mobashar Hussain Urf Turabe; Ng, Alice Jie Ying; Harini, Sriram; Aung, Thet Tun; Fox, Stephen John; Liu, Shouping; Yang, Liang; Barkham, Timothy Mark Sebastian; Loh, Xian Jun; Verma, Navin Kumar; Beuerman, Roger W; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2017-10-01

    The mammalian and microbial cell selectivity of synthetic and biosynthetic cationic polymers has been investigated. Among the polymers with peptide backbones, polymers containing amino side chains display greater antimicrobial activity than those with guanidine side chains, whereas ethylenimines display superior activity over allylamines. The biosynthetic polymer ε-polylysine (εPL) is noncytotoxic to primary human dermal fibroblasts at concentrations of up to 2,000 μg/ml, suggesting that the presence of an isopeptide backbone has greater cell selectivity than the presence of α-peptide backbones. Both εPL and linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) exhibit bactericidal properties by depolarizing the cytoplasmic membrane and disrupt preformed biofilms. εPL displays broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and fungi. εPL elicits rapid bactericidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its biocompatibility index is superior to those of cationic antiseptic agents and LPEI. εPL does not interfere with the wound closure of injured rabbit corneas. In a rabbit model of bacterial keratitis, the topical application of εPL (0.3%, wt/vol) decreases the bacterial burden and severity of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains. In vivo imaging studies confirm that εPL-treated corneas appeared transparent and nonedematous compared to untreated infected corneas. Taken together, our results highlight the potential of εPL in resolving topical microbial infections. Copyright © 2017 Venkatesh et al.

  15. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

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    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10.

  16. Effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides on liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa.

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    Schulze, Martin; Junkes, Christof; Mueller, Peter; Speck, Stephanie; Ruediger, Karin; Dathe, Margitta; Mueller, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are mandatory additives in semen extenders to control bacterial contamination. The worldwide increase in resistance to conventional antibiotics requires the search for alternatives not only for animal artificial insemination industries, but also for veterinary and human medicine. Cationic antimicrobial peptides are of interest as a novel class of antimicrobial additives for boar semen preservation. The present study investigated effects of two synthetic cyclic hexapeptides (c-WFW, c-WWW) and a synthetic helical magainin II amide derivative (MK5E) on boar sperm during semen storage at 16 °C for 4 days. The standard extender, Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS) containing 250 µg/mL gentamicin (standard), was compared to combinations of BTS with each of the peptides in a split-sample procedure. Examination revealed peptide- and concentration-dependent effects on sperm integrity and motility. Negative effects were more pronounced for MK5E than in hexapeptide-supplemented samples. The cyclic hexapeptides were partly able to stimulate a linear progressive sperm movement. When using low concentrations of cyclic hexapeptides (4 µM c-WFW, 2 µM c-WWW) sperm quality was comparable to the standard extender over the course of preservation. C-WFW-supplemented boar semen resulted in normal fertility rates after AI. In order to investigate the interaction of peptides with the membrane, electron spin resonance spectroscopic measurements were performed using spin-labeled lipids. C-WWW and c-WFW reversibly immobilized an analog of phosphatidylcholine (PC), whereas MK5E caused an irreversible increase of PC mobility. These results suggest testing the antimicrobial efficiency of non-toxic concentrations of selected cyclic hexapeptides as potential candidates to supplement/replace common antibiotics in semen preservation.

  17. Effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides on liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa.

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    Martin Schulze

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are mandatory additives in semen extenders to control bacterial contamination. The worldwide increase in resistance to conventional antibiotics requires the search for alternatives not only for animal artificial insemination industries, but also for veterinary and human medicine. Cationic antimicrobial peptides are of interest as a novel class of antimicrobial additives for boar semen preservation. The present study investigated effects of two synthetic cyclic hexapeptides (c-WFW, c-WWW and a synthetic helical magainin II amide derivative (MK5E on boar sperm during semen storage at 16 °C for 4 days. The standard extender, Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS containing 250 µg/mL gentamicin (standard, was compared to combinations of BTS with each of the peptides in a split-sample procedure. Examination revealed peptide- and concentration-dependent effects on sperm integrity and motility. Negative effects were more pronounced for MK5E than in hexapeptide-supplemented samples. The cyclic hexapeptides were partly able to stimulate a linear progressive sperm movement. When using low concentrations of cyclic hexapeptides (4 µM c-WFW, 2 µM c-WWW sperm quality was comparable to the standard extender over the course of preservation. C-WFW-supplemented boar semen resulted in normal fertility rates after AI. In order to investigate the interaction of peptides with the membrane, electron spin resonance spectroscopic measurements were performed using spin-labeled lipids. C-WWW and c-WFW reversibly immobilized an analog of phosphatidylcholine (PC, whereas MK5E caused an irreversible increase of PC mobility. These results suggest testing the antimicrobial efficiency of non-toxic concentrations of selected cyclic hexapeptides as potential candidates to supplement/replace common antibiotics in semen preservation.

  18. Antimicrobial action and cell agglutination by the eosinophil cationic protein are modulated by the cell wall lipopolysaccharide structure.

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    Pulido, David; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Andreu, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Torrent, Marc; Boix, Ester

    2012-05-01

    Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are essential effectors of innate immunity, acting as a first line of defense against bacterial infections. Many AMPs exhibit high affinity for cell wall structures such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin able to induce sepsis. Hence, understanding how AMPs can interact with and neutralize LPS endotoxin is of special relevance for human health. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil secreted protein with high activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. ECP has a remarkable affinity for LPS and a distinctive agglutinating activity. By using a battery of LPS-truncated E. coli mutant strains, we demonstrate that the polysaccharide moiety of LPS is essential for ECP-mediated bacterial agglutination, thereby modulating its antimicrobial action. The mechanism of action of ECP at the bacterial surface is drastically affected by the LPS structure and in particular by its polysaccharide moiety. We have also analyzed an N-terminal fragment that retains the whole protein activity and displays similar cell agglutination behavior. Conversely, a fragment with further minimization of the antimicrobial domain, though retaining the antimicrobial capacity, significantly loses its agglutinating activity, exhibiting a different mechanism of action which is not dependent on the LPS composition. The results highlight the correlation between the protein's antimicrobial activity and its ability to interact with the LPS outer layer and promote bacterial agglutination.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in human sepsis

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    Lukas eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP -1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP-1-3, lactoferrin, BPI and heparin-binding protein (HBP are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11 possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin (talactoferrin alpha, TLF has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe

  20. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

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    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  1. Cationic antimicrobial peptides promote microbial mutagenesis and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

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    Dominique H Limoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of adaptive mutations is essential for microbial persistence during chronic infections. This is particularly evident during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Thus far, mutagenesis has been attributed to the generation of reactive species by polymorphonucleocytes (PMN and antibiotic treatment. However, our current studies of mutagenesis leading to P. aeruginosa mucoid conversion have revealed a potential new mutagen. Our findings confirmed the current view that reactive oxygen species can promote mucoidy in vitro, but revealed PMNs are proficient at inducing mucoid conversion in the absence of an oxidative burst. This led to the discovery that cationic antimicrobial peptides can be mutagenic and promote mucoidy. Of specific interest was the human cathelicidin LL-37, canonically known to disrupt bacterial membranes leading to cell death. An alternative role was revealed at sub-inhibitory concentrations, where LL-37 was found to induce mutations within the mucA gene encoding a negative regulator of mucoidy and to promote rifampin resistance in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mechanism of mutagenesis was found to be dependent upon sub-inhibitory concentrations of LL-37 entering the bacterial cytosol and binding to DNA. LL-37/DNA interactions then promote translesion DNA synthesis by the polymerase DinB, whose error-prone replication potentiates the mutations. A model of LL-37 bound to DNA was generated, which reveals amino termini α-helices of dimerized LL-37 bind the major groove of DNA, with numerous DNA contacts made by LL-37 basic residues. This demonstrates a mutagenic role for antimicrobials previously thought to be insusceptible to resistance by mutation, highlighting a need to further investigate their role in evolution and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

  2. Cationic antimicrobial protein of Mr 37 kDa: a multifunctional inflammatory protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of cationic antimicrobial protein of Mr 37?kDa (CAP37) a neutrophil-derived inflammatory mediator on endothelial cell function. Data sources Endothelial cells used in this study were obtained from human lung microvessels and rat aorta. The latter was a kind gift of Dr. Paula Grammas. The mono-mac 6 cell line used in this study was the generous gift of Dr. H.W. Loms Ziegler-Heitbrock. Study selection and data extraction Endothelial cell proteins kinase C activity was determined by measuring calcium- and phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of histone. Endothelial cell migration was determined using CostarTM Transwell apparatus. Cell surface expression of adhesion molecules, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 was determined using flow cytometry. RT-PCR was used to amplify the CAP37 from endothelial cells treated with LPS. Results We demonstrated that CAP37 which was originally identified as having potent antimicrobial activity and chemotactic activity for monocytes was capable of modulating endothelial cell functions. CAP37 activated endothelial cell protein kinase C in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Importantly CAP37 increased the adhesive properties of the endothelium for monocytes. CAP37 upregulated the well known adhesion molecules, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 in a dose- and time- dependent manner. In addition, CAP37 promoted endothelial cell migration. Further investigations indicated that CAP37 was induced in endothelial cells in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1α as well as inflammatory mediators such as lipopolysaccharide. Unstimulated endothelial cells did not constitutively express CAP37. The cDNA sequence of endothelial CAP37 was determined and found to be highly homologous to the sequence obtained for neutrophil-derived CAP37. Conclusions Our studies strongly suggest that CAP37 plays a pivotal role in monocyte-endothelial interactions and the transmigration of monocytes from

  3. Cationic surfactants derived from lysine: effects of their structure and charge type on antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, A; Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Infante, M R; Pérez, L

    2011-02-24

    Three different sets of cationic surfactants from lysine have been synthesized. The first group consists of three monocatenary surfactants with one lysine as the cationic polar head with one cationic charge. The second consists of three monocatenary surfactants with two amino acids as cationic polar head with two positive charges. Finally, four gemini surfactants were synthesized in which the spacer chain and the number and type of cationic charges have been regulated. The micellization process, antimicrobial activity, and hemolytic activity were evaluated. The critical micelle concentration was dependent only on the hydrophobic character of the molecules. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities were related to the structure of the compounds as well as the type of cationic charges. The most active surfactants against the bacteria were those with a cationic charge on the trimethylated amino group, whereas all of these surfactants showed low hemolytic character.

  4. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-04-08

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions.

  5. Cationic Synthetic Peptides: Assessment of Their Antimicrobial Potency in Liquid Preserved Boar Semen

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Speck; Alexandre Courtiol; Christof Junkes; Margitta Dathe; Karin Müller; Martin Schulze

    2014-01-01

    Various semen extender formulas are in use to maintain sperm longevity and quality whilst acting against bacterial contamination in liquid sperm preservation. Aminoglycosides are commonly supplemented to aid in the control of bacteria. As bacterial resistance is increasing worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) received lively interest as alternatives to overcome multi-drug resistant bacteria. We investigated, whether synthetic cationic AMPs might be a suitable alternative for conventional ...

  6. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J; Dong, He

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.

  7. The dlt operon of Bacillus cereus is required for resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and for virulence in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Khattar, Z; Rejasse, A; Destoumieux-Garzón, D; Escoubas, J M; Sanchis, V; Lereclus, D; Givaudan, A; Kallassy, M; Nielsen-Leroux, C; Gaudriault, S

    2009-11-01

    The dlt operon encodes proteins that alanylate teichoic acids, the major components of cell walls of gram-positive bacteria. This generates a net positive charge on bacterial cell walls, repulsing positively charged molecules and conferring resistance to animal and human cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. AMPs damage the bacterial membrane and are the most effective components of the humoral immune response against bacteria. We investigated the role of the dlt operon in insect virulence by inactivating this operon in Bacillus cereus, which is both an opportunistic human pathogen and an insect pathogen. The Delta dlt(Bc) mutant displayed several morphological alterations but grew at a rate similar to that for the wild-type strain. This mutant was less resistant to protamine and several bacterial cationic AMPs, such as nisin, polymyxin B, and colistin, in vitro. It was also less resistant to molecules from the insect humoral immune system, lysozyme, and cationic AMP cecropin B from Spodoptera frugiperda. Delta dlt(Bc) was as pathogenic as the wild-type strain in oral infections of Galleria mellonella but much less virulent when injected into the hemocoels of G. mellonella and Spodoptera littoralis. We detected the dlt operon in three gram-negative genera: Erwinia (Erwinia carotovora), Bordetella (Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica), and Photorhabdus (the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens TT01, the dlt operon of which did not restore cationic AMP resistance in Delta dlt(Bc)). We suggest that the dlt operon protects B. cereus against insect humoral immune mediators, including hemolymph cationic AMPs, and may be critical for the establishment of lethal septicemia in insects and in nosocomial infections in humans.

  8. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections.

  9. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J.; Dong, He

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would

  10. Role of acetylation and charge in antimicrobial peptides based on human beta-defensin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Emilios Andrew; Hua, Quyen; Sandouk, Aline; Son, U Hyon; Christenson, Andrew James; Van Hoek, Monique Louise; Bishop, Barney Michael

    2009-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are an evolutionarily ancient and essential element of innate immunity in higher organisms. The precise mechanism by which these peptides exert their antimicrobial activity on bacteria is not well understood. Decapeptides based on the C-terminus of human beta-defensin-3 were designed and evaluated to study the role of charge in defining the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of these peptides against Escherichia coli. Acetylated derivatives of these peptides were prepared in order to further evaluate how positively charged primary amines contribute to potency in these small antimicrobial peptides. These peptides enabled us to explore the relationship between net charge, charge distribution and antimicrobial activity. While the results indicate that net charge is a major factor in antimicrobial activity in these peptides, the actual relationship between charge and potency appears to be more complex.

  11. Study on the synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel cationic porphyrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Gui Yu; Dong Hong Li; Cheng He Zhou; Jun Lin Diao

    2009-01-01

    A novel series of quaternary ammonium cationic derivatives based on tetrapyridyl-porphyrin was synthesized.All the compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial activities against S.aureus,E.coli and P aeruginosa,and antifunga activities against C. albicans.where microorganisms were exposed and unexposed to the irradiation.The results revealed that some of these compounds,especially,3a and 4a displayed satisfactory antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and moderate antifungal activity against C. albicans.Unfortunately.Gram-negative bacteria P. aeruginasa was resistant to all compounds.The antimicrobial activity was found to be sensitive to the functional groups attached on the aromatic ring and the complex metal in the porphyrin ring,and decreased with the increase of electron-withdrawing capability of the functional groups.These preliminary results suggested that the remarkable antibacterial efficiency against S.aureus makes these substances promising antimicrobial agents.

  12. Generation of novel cationic antimicrobial peptides from natural non-antimicrobial sequences by acid-amide substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamada Yasushi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are well recognized to be promising as novel antimicrobial and antitumor agents. To obtain novel skeletons of CAMPs, we propose a simple strategy using acid-amide substitution (i.e. Glu→Gln, Asp→Asn to confer net positive charge to natural non-antimicrobial sequences that have structures distinct from known CAMPs. The potential of this strategy was verified by a trial study. Methods The pro-regions of nematode cecropin P1-P3 (P1P-P3P were selected as parent sequences. P1P-P3P and their acid-amide-substituted mutants (NP1P-NP3P were chemically synthesized. Bactericidal and membrane-disruptive activities of these peptides were evaluated. Conformational changes were estimated from far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD spectra. Results NP1P-NP3P acquired potent bactericidal activities via membrane-disruption although P1P-P3P were not antimicrobial. Far-ultraviolet CD spectra of NP1P-NP3P were similar to those of their parent peptides P1P-P3P, suggesting that NP1P-NP3P acquire microbicidal activity without remarkable conformational changes. NP1P-NP3P killed bacteria in almost parallel fashion with their membrane-disruptive activities, suggesting that the mode of action of those peptides was membrane-disruption. Interestingly, membrane-disruptive activity of NP1P-NP3P were highly diversified against acidic liposomes, indicating that the acid-amide-substituted nematode cecropin pro-region was expected to be a unique and promising skeleton for novel synthetic CAMPs with diversified membrane-discriminative properties. Conclusions The acid-amide substitution successfully generated some novel CAMPs in our trial study. These novel CAMPs were derived from natural non-antimicrobial sequences, and their sequences were completely distinct from any categories of known CAMPs, suggesting that such mutated natural sequences could be a promising source of novel skeletons of CAMPs.

  13. pH Dependence of microbe sterilization by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkenhorst, William F; Klein, J Wolfgang; Vo, Phuong; Wimley, William C

    2013-07-01

    We recently described a family of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selected from a combinatorial library that exhibited potent, broad-spectrum activity at neutral pH and low ionic strength. To further delimit the utility and activity profiles of these peptides, we investigated the effects of solution conditions, such as pH and ionic strength, on the efficacy of the peptide antimicrobials against a panel of microorganisms. Peptide minimum sterilizing concentrations (MSCs) varied linearly with pH for each subtype within our family of CAMPs for all organisms tested. The peptides were much less effective against Gram-negative bacteria at high pH, consistent with a decrease in net positive charge on the peptides. A similar trend was observed for the fungus Candida albicans. Surprisingly, the opposite pH trend was observed with the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, an additive ionic strength effect was observed with increasing buffer strengths at identical pH values. The extreme difference in the observed pH behavior between Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms is attributed to the presence of native charged molecules in the much thicker peptidoglycan layer of the Gram-positive organism. The novel species-specific effects of pH observed here have important implications for applications using CAMPs and for the design of novel CAMPs.

  14. Interaction between a cationic bolaamphiphile and DNA: The route towards nanovectors for oligonucleotide antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamusa, Marianna; Resta, Claudio; Barbero, Francesco; Carta, Davide; Codoni, Doroty; Hatzixanthis, Kostas; McArthur, Michael; Berti, Debora

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials is a global threat that requires development of innovative therapeutics that circumvent its onset. The use of Transcription Factor Decoys (TFDs), DNA fragments that act by blocking essential transcription factors in microbes, represents a very promising approach. TFDs require appropriate carriers to protect them from degradation in biological fluids and transfect them through the bacterial cell wall into the cytoplasm, their site of action. Here we report on a bolaform cationic surfactant, [12-bis-THA]Cl2, with proven transfection activity in vivo. By studying the physical-chemical properties of its aqueous solutions with light scattering, cryo-TEM, ζ-potential, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, we prove that the bolaamphiphiles associate into transient vesicles which convert into one-dimensional elongated structures over time. These surfactant assemblies complex TFDs with extremely high efficiency, if compared to common cationic amphiphiles. At Z+/-=11, the nanoplexes are stable and have a size of 120nm, and they form independently of the original morphology of the [12-bis-THA]Cl2 aggregate. DNA is compacted in the nanoplexes, as shown through CD spectroscopy and fluorescence, but is readily released in its native form if sodium taurocholate is added.

  15. Cationic Poly(benzyl ether)s as Self-Immolative Antimicrobial Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergene, Cansu; Palermo, Edmund F

    2017-10-09

    Self-immolative polymers (SIMPs) are macromolecules that spontaneously undergo depolymerization into small molecules when triggered by specific external stimuli. We report here the first examples of antimicrobial SIMPs with potent, rapid, and broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. Their antibacterial and hemolytic activities were examined as a function of cationic functionality. Polymers bearing primary ammonium cationic groups showed more potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, relative to tertiary and quaternary ammonium counterparts, whereas the quaternary ammonium polymers showed the lowest hemolytic toxicity. These antibacterial polycations undergo end-to-end depolymerization when triggered by an externally applied stimulus. Specifically, poly(benzyl ether)s end-capped with a silyl ether group and bearing pendant allyl side chains were converted to polycations by photoinitiated thiol-ene radical addition using cysteamine HCl. The intact polycations are stable in solution, but they spontaneously unzip into their component monomers upon exposure to fluoride ions, with excellent sensitivity and selectivity. Upon triggered depolymerization, the antibacterial potency was largely retained but the hemolytic toxicity was substantially reduced. Thus, we reveal the first example of a self-immolative antibacterial polymer platform that will enable antibacterial materials to spontaneously unzip into biologically active small molecules upon the introduction of a specifically designed stimulus.

  16. Therapeutic use of a cationic antimicrobial peptide from the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana in the control of experimental candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Diego C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial peptides are present in animals, plants and microorganisms and play a fundamental role in the innate immune response. Gomesin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide purified from haemocytes of the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana. It has a broad-spectrum of activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and tumour cells. Candida albicans is a commensal yeast that is part of the human microbiota. However, in immunocompromised patients, this fungus may cause skin, mucosal or systemic infections. The typical treatment for this mycosis comprises three major categories of antifungal drugs: polyenes, azoles and echinocandins; however cases of resistance to these drugs are frequently reported. With the emergence of microorganisms that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, the development of alternative treatments for candidiasis is important. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of gomesin treatment on disseminated and vaginal candidiasis as well as its toxicity and biodistribution. Results Treatment with gomesin effectively reduced Candida albicans in the kidneys, spleen, liver and vagina of infected mice. The biodistribution of gomesin labelled with technetium-99 m showed that the peptide is captured in the kidneys, spleen and liver. Enhanced production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 was detected in infected mice treated with gomesin, suggesting an immunomodulatory activity. Moreover, immunosuppressed and C. albicans-infected mice showed an increase in survival after treatment with gomesin and fluconazole. Systemic administration of gomesin was also not toxic to the mic Conclusions Gomesin proved to be effective against experimental Candida albicans infection. It can be used as an alternative therapy for candidiasis, either alone or in combination with fluconazole. Gomesin's mechanism is not fully understood, but we hypothesise that the peptide acts through the permeabilisation of the yeast membrane leading to death and

  17. Cationic vesicles based on biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants: physicochemical properties, antimicrobial activity, encapsulation efficiency and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, L; Pinazo, A; Abo-Riya, M; Infante, M R; Manresa, M A; Muzzalupo, R; Pérez, L

    2014-08-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of cationic vesicular systems prepared from biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants are investigated. These systems form stable cationic vesicles by themselves and the average diameter of the vesicles decreases as the alkyl chain length of the surfactant increases. The addition of DPPC also modifies the physicochemical properties of these vesicles. Among the drugs these cationic formulations can encapsulate, we have considered Ciprofloxacin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that the percentage of encapsulated drug depends on both the physicochemical properties of the carrier and the type of drug. The capacity of these systems to carry different molecules was evaluated performing in vitro drug release studies. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of empty and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria has been determined. Three bacteria were tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vitro drug release from all formulations was effectively delayed. Empty cationic vesicles showed antimicrobial activity and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles showed similar or higher antimicrobial activity than the free drug solution. These results suggest that our formulations represent a great innovation in the pharmaceutical field, due to their dual pharmacological function: one related to the nature of the vehiculated drug and the other related to the innate antibacterial properties of the surfactant-based carriers.

  18. Preparation, stability and antimicrobial activity of cationic cross-linked starch-iodine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaviciute, Rima; Bendoraitiene, Joana; Rutkaite, Ramune; Siugzdaite, Jurate; Zemaitaitis, Algirdas

    2012-12-01

    Cationic cross-linked starch (CCS)-iodine complexes containing different amounts of quaternary ammonium groups (different degrees of substitution (DS)) and iodine have been obtained by iodine adsorption on CCS from aqueous iodine potassium iodide solution. Equilibrium adsorption studies showed that with an increase of DS the amount of iodine adsorbed on CCS and the affinity of iodine to CCS increased linearly. The influences of the DS of CCS and the amount of adsorbed iodine on the stability of CCS-iodine complexes in a solution of 0.02M sodium acetate and reactivity toward l-tyrosine have been investigated. At the same DS, the stability of CCS-iodine complexes decreased with an increase of the amount of adsorbed iodine. With increasing the DS, the stability of CCS-iodine complexes increased. The iodine consumption in the reaction with l-tyrosine increased significantly with an increase of the amount of adsorbed iodine. The influence of DS on iodine consumption was lower and depended on the amount of adsorbed iodine. The antibacterial activity of CCS-iodine complexes against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli was determined by the broth-dilution and spread-plate methods. The obtained results have demonstrated that an appropriate selection of the CCS-iodine complex composition (the DS of CCS and the amount of adsorbed iodine) could ensure good antimicrobial properties by keeping a low concentration of free iodine in the system. The main advantage of using CCS-iodine complexes as antimicrobial agents is the biodegradability of the polymeric matrix.

  19. Cation-pi interactions stabilize the structure of the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin near membranes: molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    We implemented molecular dynamics simulations of the 13-residue antimicrobial peptide indolicidin (ILPWKWPWWPWRR-NH2) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In DPC, a persistent cation-pi interaction between TRP11 and ARG13 defined the structure of the peptide...... near the interface. A transient cation-pi interaction was also observed between TRP4 and the choline group on DPC lipids. We also implemented simulation of a mutant of indolicidin in the DPC micelle where TRP11 was replaced by ALA11. As a result of the mutation, the boat-shaped conformation is lost...

  20. Molecular cloning, expression and in vitro analysis of soluble cationic synthetic antimicrobial peptide from salt-inducible Escherichia coli GJ1158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawahar Babu Peravali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are the upcoming therapeutic molecules as alternative drugs to the existing antibiotics owing to their potent action against pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, to obtain an antimicrobial peptide with a broad range of activity, the synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed by using in silico tools viz., antimicrobial peptide database, protparam, hierarchical neural network. Later, the peptide was translated back into a core nucleotide sequence and the gene for the peptide was constructed by overlapping PCR. The amplified gene was cloned into pRSET–A vector and transformed into salt inducible expression host E. coli GJ1158. The expression results show high yields of soluble recombinant fusion peptide (0.52 g/L from salt-inducible E. coli. The recombinant peptide was purified by the IMAC purification system and cleaved by enterokinase. The digested product was further purified and 0.12 g/L of biologically active recombinant cationic antimicrobial peptide was obtained. In vitro analysis of the purified peptide demonstrated high antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria devoid of hemolytic activity. Therefore, this synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide could serves as an promising agent over chemical antibiotics. In this study, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed, cloned and expressed from salt-inducible E. coli GJ1158 using cost effective media in the large scale production of antimicrobial peptide and its biological activity was analysed against different Gram positive and negative organisms.

  1. Hydrogen Bond Acceptors and Additional Cationic Charges in Methylene Blue Derivatives: Photophysics and Antimicrobial Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenträger, Ariane; Maisch, Tim; Dobler, Daniel; Späth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) by efficient singlet oxygen photosensitizers might be a beneficial alternative to antibiotics in the struggle against multiresistant bacteria. Phenothiazinium dyes belong to the most prominent classes of such sensitizers due to their intense absorption in the red-light region (λ abs, max ca. 600–680 nm, ε > 50000 L mol−1 cm−1), their low toxicity, and their attachment/penetration abilities. Except simple substituents like alkyl or hydroxyalkyl residues, nearly no modifications of the phenothiaziniums have been pursued at the auxochromic sites. By this, the properties of methylene blue derivatives and their fields of application are limited; it remains unclear if their potential antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced, also to compete with porphyrins. We prepared a set of six mainly novel methylene blue derivatives with the ability of additional hydrogen bonding and/or additional cationic charges to study the substituents' effect on their activity/toxicity profiles and photophysical properties. Direct detection of singlet oxygen was performed at 1270 nm and the singlet oxygen quantum yields were determined. In suspensions with both, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, some derivatives were highly active upon illumination to inactivate S. aureus and E. coli up to 7 log10 steps (99.99999%) without inherent toxicities in the nonirradiated state. PMID:23509728

  2. Production of phytotoxic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells using inducible promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Company

    Full Text Available Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes.

  3. Cationic synthetic peptides: assessment of their antimicrobial potency in liquid preserved boar semen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Speck

    Full Text Available Various semen extender formulas are in use to maintain sperm longevity and quality whilst acting against bacterial contamination in liquid sperm preservation. Aminoglycosides are commonly supplemented to aid in the control of bacteria. As bacterial resistance is increasing worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs received lively interest as alternatives to overcome multi-drug resistant bacteria. We investigated, whether synthetic cationic AMPs might be a suitable alternative for conventional antibiotics in liquid boar sperm preservation. The antibacterial activity of two cyclic AMPs (c-WWW, c-WFW and a helical magainin II amide analog (MK5E was studied in vitro against two Gram-positive and eleven Gram-negative bacteria. Isolates included ATCC reference strains, multi-resistant E. coli and bacteria cultured from boar semen. Using broth microdilution, minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for all AMPs. All AMPs revealed activity towards the majority of bacteria but not against Proteus spp. (all AMPs and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 (MK5E. We could also demonstrate that c-WWW and c-WFW were effective against bacterial growth in liquid preserved boar semen in situ, especially when combined with a small amount of gentamicin. Our results suggest that albeit not offering a complete alternative to traditional antibiotics, the use of AMPs offers a promising solution to decrease the use of conventional antibiotics and thereby limit the selection of multi-resistant strains.

  4. Covalent modification of a ten-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide with levofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos; Papanastasiou, Emilios; Juba, Melanie; Bishop, Barney

    2014-09-01

    The rampant spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria has spurred interest in alternative strategies for developing next-generation antibacterial therapies. As such, there has been growing interest in cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) and their therapeutic applications. Modification of CAMPs via conjugation to auxiliary compounds, including small molecule drugs, is a new approach to developing effective, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with novel physicochemical properties and versatile antibacterial mechanisms. Here, we’ve explored design parameters for engineering CAMPs conjugated to small molecules with favorable physicochemical and antibacterial properties by covalently affixing a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, levofloxacin, to the ten-residue CAMP Pep-4. Relative to the unmodified Pep-4, the conjugate was found to demonstrate substantially increased antibacterial potency under high salt concentrations. Historically, it has been observed that most CAMPs lose antibacterial effectiveness in such high ionic strength environments, a fact that has presented a challenge to their development as therapeutics. Physicochemical studies revealed that P4LC was more hydrophobic than Pep-4, while mechanistic findings indicated that the conjugate was more effective at disrupting bacterial membrane integrity. Although the inherent antibacterial effect of the incorporated levofloxacin molecules did not appear to be substantially realized in this conjugate, these findings nevertheless suggest that covalent attachment of small molecule antibiotics with favorable physicochemical properties to CAMPs could be a promising strategy for enhancing peptide performance and overall therapeutic potential. These results have broader applicability to the development of future CAMP-antibiotic conjugates for potential therapeutic applications.

  5. Cationic synthetic peptides: assessment of their antimicrobial potency in liquid preserved boar semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Stephanie; Courtiol, Alexandre; Junkes, Christof; Dathe, Margitta; Müller, Karin; Schulze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Various semen extender formulas are in use to maintain sperm longevity and quality whilst acting against bacterial contamination in liquid sperm preservation. Aminoglycosides are commonly supplemented to aid in the control of bacteria. As bacterial resistance is increasing worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) received lively interest as alternatives to overcome multi-drug resistant bacteria. We investigated, whether synthetic cationic AMPs might be a suitable alternative for conventional antibiotics in liquid boar sperm preservation. The antibacterial activity of two cyclic AMPs (c-WWW, c-WFW) and a helical magainin II amide analog (MK5E) was studied in vitro against two Gram-positive and eleven Gram-negative bacteria. Isolates included ATCC reference strains, multi-resistant E. coli and bacteria cultured from boar semen. Using broth microdilution, minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for all AMPs. All AMPs revealed activity towards the majority of bacteria but not against Proteus spp. (all AMPs) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 (MK5E). We could also demonstrate that c-WWW and c-WFW were effective against bacterial growth in liquid preserved boar semen in situ, especially when combined with a small amount of gentamicin. Our results suggest that albeit not offering a complete alternative to traditional antibiotics, the use of AMPs offers a promising solution to decrease the use of conventional antibiotics and thereby limit the selection of multi-resistant strains.

  6. Covalent modification of a ten-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide with levofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The rampant spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria has spurred interest in alternative strategies for developing next-generation antibacterial therapies. As such, there has been growing interest in cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs and their therapeutic applications. Modification of CAMPs via conjugation to auxiliary compounds, including small molecule drugs, is a new approach to developing effective, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with novel physicochemical properties and versatile antibacterial mechanisms. Here, we’ve explored design parameters for engineering CAMPs conjugated to small molecules with favorable physicochemical and antibacterial properties by covalently affixing a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, levofloxacin, to the ten-residue CAMP Pep-4. Relative to the unmodified Pep-4, the conjugate was found to demonstrate substantially increased antibacterial potency under high salt concentrations. Historically, it has been observed that most CAMPs lose antibacterial effectiveness in such high ionic strength environments, a fact that has presented a challenge to their development as therapeutics. Physicochemical studies revealed that P4LC was more hydrophobic than Pep-4, while mechanistic findings indicated that the conjugate was more effective at disrupting bacterial membrane integrity. Although the inherent antibacterial effect of the incorporated levofloxacin molecules did not appear to be substantially realized in this conjugate, these findings nevertheless suggest that covalent attachment of small molecule antibiotics with favorable physicochemical properties to CAMPs could be a promising strategy for enhancing peptide performance and overall therapeutic potential. These results have broader applicability to the development of future CAMP-antibiotic conjugates for potential therapeutic applications.

  7. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  8. Arginine-rich cationic proteins of human eosinophil granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, I.; Venge, P.; Spitznagel, J.K.; Lehrer, R.I.

    1977-01-01

    Several arginine-rich cationic proteins previously isolated from granules of leukemic myeloid cells have been found to reside primarily in human eosinophil leukocytes. The major component has a molecular weight of 21,000 and it contains approximately 2.6 moles of zinc per mole of protein. Velocity centrifugation of cytoplasm from leukocytes of patients with marked eosinophilia showed that this group of proteins is packaged in the crystalloid-containing large eosinophil granules. Approximately 30% of the protein content of eosinophil granules belonged to this group of cationic proteins. Bactericidal or esterolytic activities of the cationic proteins were not detected, nor did they inhibit guinea pig anaphylatoxin or histamine-induced contraction. The basic protein previously demonstrated in guinea pig eosinophils may be analogous to the group of basic proteins of human eosinophils but great differences are found for molecular weight and amino acid composition.

  9. Antimicrobial potential of lycosin-I, a cationic and amphiphilic peptide from the venom of the spider Lycosa singorensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H; Ding, X; Meng, S; Liu, C; Wang, H; Xia, L; Liu, Z; Liang, S

    2013-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are significant components of the innate immune system and play indispensable roles in the resistance to bacterial infection. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of lycosin-I, a 24-residue cationic anticancer peptide derived from Lycosa singorensis with high structural similarity to several cationic and amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The antimicrobial activity of lycosin-I against 27 strains of microbes including bacteria and fungi was examined and compared with that of the Xenopus-derived AMP magainin 2 using a microdilution assay. Lycosin-I inhibited the growth of most microorganisms at low micromolar concentrations, and was a more potent inhibitor than magainin 2. Lycosin-I showed rapid, selective and broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and a synergistic effect with traditional antibiotics. In vivo, it showed potent bactericidal activity in a mouse thigh infection model. High Mg2+ concentrations reduced the antibacterial effect of lycosin-I, implying that the peptide might directly interact with the bacterial cell membrane. Uptake of the fluorogenic dye SYTOX and changes in the surface of lycosin-Itreated bacterial cells observed by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that lycosin-I permeabilized the cell membrane, resulting in the rapid bactericidal effect. Taken together, our findings indicate that lycosin-I is a promising peptide with the potential for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

  10. INTERNALIZATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE ACIPENSIN 1 INTO HUMAN TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Umnyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for new compounds providing delivery of drugs into infected or neoplastic cells, is an important direction of biomedical research. Cell-penetrating peptides are among those compounds, due to their ability to translocate through membranes of eukaryotic cells, serving as potential carriers of various therapeutic agents to the target cells. The aim of present work was to investigate the ability of acipensin 1, an antimicrobial peptide of innate immune system, for in vitro penetration into human tumor cells. Acipensin 1 is a cationic peptide that we have previously isolated from leukocytes of the Russian sturgeon, Acipenser gueldenstaedtii. Capability of acipensin 1 to enter the human erytroleukemia K-562 cells has been investigated for the first time. A biotechnological procedure for producing a recombinant acipensin 1 peptide has been developed. The obtained peptide was conjugated with a fluorescent probe BODIPY FL. By means of confocal microscopy, we have shown that the tagged acipensin 1 rapidly enters into K-562 cells and can be detected in the intracellular space within 5 min after its addition to the cell culture. Using flow cytometry technique, penetration kinetics of the labeled peptide into K-562 cells (at nontoxic micromolar concentrations has been studied. We have observed a rapid internalization of the peptide to the target cells, thus confirming the results of microscopic analysis, i.e, the labeled acipensin was detectable in K-562 cells as soon as wihin 2-3 seconds after its addition to the incubation medium. The maximum of fluorescence was reached within a period of approx. 45 seconds, with further “plateau” at the terms of >100 seconds following cell stimulation with the test compound. These data support the concept, that the antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity system possess the features of cell-penetrating peptides, and allow us to consider the studied sturgeon peptide a promising template for development of new

  11. Pharmacology of the human cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part II: inactivation and blocking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L.; Kristensen, Berit I.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents......Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents...

  12. An alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptide selectively modulates macrophage responses to lipopolysaccharide and directly alters macrophage gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M G; Rosenberger, C M; Gold, M R; Finlay, B B; Hancock, R E

    2000-09-15

    Certain cationic antimicrobial peptides block the binding of LPS to LPS-binding protein and reduce the ability of LPS to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by macrophages. To gain a more complete understanding of how LPS activates macrophages and how cationic peptides influence this process, we have used gene array technology to profile gene expression patterns in macrophages treated with LPS in the presence or the absence of the insect-derived cationic antimicrobial peptide CEMA (cecropin-melittin hybrid). We found that CEMA selectively blocked LPS-induced gene expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The ability of LPS to induce the expression of >40 genes was strongly inhibited by CEMA, while LPS-induced expression of another 16 genes was relatively unaffected. In addition, CEMA itself induced the expression of a distinct set of 35 genes, including genes involved in cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, CEMA, a synthetic alpha-helical peptide, selectively modulates the transcriptional response of macrophages to LPS and can alter gene expression in macrophages.

  13. Key Residues of Outer Membrane Protein OprI Involved in Hexamer Formation and Bacterial Susceptibility to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ting-Wei; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Huang, Hsin-Jye; Wang, Iren; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Liao, You-Di

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the host innate defense mechanism against invading pathogens. Our previous studies have shown that the outer membrane protein, OprI from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or its homologue, plays a vital role in the susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria to cationic α-helical AMPs (Y. M. Lin, S. J. Wu, T. W. Chang, C. F. Wang, C. S. Suen, M. J. Hwang, M. D. Chang, Y. T. Chen, Y. D. Liao, J Biol Chem 285:8985–8994, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074...

  14. CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM CATIONS INFLUENCE ON ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIADHESIVE ACTIVITY OF ACINETOBACTER CALCOACETICUS ІMV B-7241 SURFACTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pirog

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the effect of calcium and magnesium cations on NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity (key enzyme of biosynthesis of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ІMV B-7241 surface-active aminolipids followed by modification of medium composition and determining antimicrobial and antiadhesive activity of synthesized surfactants. The strain IMV B-7241 was grown in medium with ethanol. NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity of the cell-free extract was analyzed using the formation of glutamate in the oxidation of NADPH. Surfactants were extracted from supernatant of cultural liquid by mixture of chloroform and methanol (2:1. Antimicrobial against bacteria properties of the surfactants were determined by index of the minimal inhibitory concentration. The number of attached cells and the degree of biofilm destruction were analyzed spectrophotometrically. It was established that in the presence of 10 mM Cа2+ and Mg2 NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity in the cell-free extract increased to 1.5 times in comparison with that without cations. Increasing concentration of magnesium sulfate to 0.2 g/l, or adding CaCl2 (0.1 g/l into cultivation medium of IMV B-7241 strain was accompanied by rise of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity in 2.4 and 3.0 times respectively, as well as increasing antimicrobial and antiadhesive activity of synthesized surfactants. Minimal inhibitory concentration of surfactants synthesized in modified media against some bacteria was in 1.3−3.5 times, adhesion on abiotic surfaces treated with such surfactants in an average of 7−13% lower, and the degree of biofilm destruction in 7−13% higher as compared to indicators for the surfactant produced in the base medium. The obtained results indicated the possibility of regulating antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activity of surfactants under producer cultivation.

  15. Haemophilus ducreyi Is Resistant to Human Antimicrobial Peptides▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mount, Kristy L. B.; Townsend, Carisa A.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to antimicrobial peptides likely to be encountered in vivo during human infection. H. ducreyi was significantly more resistant than Escherichia coli to the bactericidal effects of all peptides tested. Class I and II H. ducreyi strains exhibited similar levels of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi is resistant to human antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Kristy L B; Townsend, Carisa A; Bauer, Margaret E

    2007-09-01

    We examined the susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to antimicrobial peptides likely to be encountered in vivo during human infection. H. ducreyi was significantly more resistant than Escherichia coli to the bactericidal effects of all peptides tested. Class I and II H. ducreyi strains exhibited similar levels of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

  17. Antimicrobial Functions of Lactoferrin Promote Genetic Conflicts in Ancient Primates and Modern Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Barber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is a multifunctional mammalian immunity protein that limits microbial growth through sequestration of nutrient iron. Additionally, lactoferrin possesses cationic protein domains that directly bind and inhibit diverse microbes. The implications for these dual functions on lactoferrin evolution and genetic conflicts with microbes remain unclear. Here we show that lactoferrin has been subject to recurrent episodes of positive selection during primate divergence predominately at antimicrobial peptide surfaces consistent with long-term antagonism by bacteria. An abundant lactoferrin polymorphism in human populations and Neanderthals also exhibits signatures of positive selection across primates, linking ancient host-microbe conflicts to modern human genetic variation. Rapidly evolving sites in lactoferrin further correspond to molecular interfaces with opportunistic bacterial pathogens causing meningitis, pneumonia, and sepsis. Because microbes actively target lactoferrin to acquire iron, we propose that the emergence of antimicrobial activity provided a pivotal mechanism of adaptation sparking evolutionary conflicts via acquisition of new protein functions.

  18. Antimicrobial Functions of Lactoferrin Promote Genetic Conflicts in Ancient Primates and Modern Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Zev; Yandell, Mark; Elde, Nels C.

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a multifunctional mammalian immunity protein that limits microbial growth through sequestration of nutrient iron. Additionally, lactoferrin possesses cationic protein domains that directly bind and inhibit diverse microbes. The implications for these dual functions on lactoferrin evolution and genetic conflicts with microbes remain unclear. Here we show that lactoferrin has been subject to recurrent episodes of positive selection during primate divergence predominately at antimicrobial peptide surfaces consistent with long-term antagonism by bacteria. An abundant lactoferrin polymorphism in human populations and Neanderthals also exhibits signatures of positive selection across primates, linking ancient host-microbe conflicts to modern human genetic variation. Rapidly evolving sites in lactoferrin further correspond to molecular interfaces with opportunistic bacterial pathogens causing meningitis, pneumonia, and sepsis. Because microbes actively target lactoferrin to acquire iron, we propose that the emergence of antimicrobial activity provided a pivotal mechanism of adaptation sparking evolutionary conflicts via acquisition of new protein functions. PMID:27203426

  19. Human Health Consequences of Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Kruse, H.; Grave, K.

    2009-01-01

    industry in many regions of the world and the widespread, intensive, and often unregulated use of antimicrobial agents in this area of animal production, efforts are needed to prevent development and spread of antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture to reduce the risk to human health.......Intensive use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture provides a selective pressure creating reservoirs of drug-resistant bacteria and transferable resistance genes in fish pathogens and other bacteria in the aquatic environment. From these reservoirs, resistance genes may disseminate by horizontal...... gene transfer and reach human pathogens, or drug-resistant pathogens from the aquatic environment may reach humans directly. Horizontal gene transfer may occur in the aquaculture environment, in the food chain, or in the human intestinal tract. Among the antimicrobial agents commonly used...

  20. Two novel non-cationic defensin-like antimicrobial peptides from haemolymph of the female tick, Amblyomma hebraeum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ren; Lomas, Lee O; Jonczy, Jan; Turner, Philip C; Rees, Huw H

    2004-01-01

    Two non-cationic defensin-like antimicrobial peptides, named Amblyomma defensin peptide 1 and Amblyomma defensin peptide 2, were identified from the hard tick, Amblyomma hebraeum, by a combination of suppression subtractive hybridization for differentially expressed genes and proteomics. cDNA clones encoding each of these two defensin-like antimicrobial peptides were isolated from the differentially expressed cDNA library of the tick synganglia (central nervous system). The preproproteins deduced from the cDNA sequences each have 92 amino acid residues. Amblyomma defensin peptide 2 was purified from the haemolymph of fed female ticks. The purified peptide displayed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Amblyomma defensin peptide 1 was further identified by protein chip capture combined with SELDI-TOF (surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight) MS. By screening for differentially expressed proteins, it was found that the expression of Amblyomma defensin peptide 1 was upregulated during 4 days post-feeding. Our findings firstly provide two defensin-like antimicrobial peptides that are particularly novel in being anionic, together with corresponding cDNA sequences, in hard ticks, and prove that the combination of suppression subtractive hybridization and protein profiling is a powerful method to study differentially expressed proteins, especially for organisms without available genome sequence information. PMID:14705963

  1. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide KSL-W on Human Gingival Tissue and C. albicans Growth, Transition and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase (SAPS) 2, 4, 5 and 6 Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    fungi resistance , antimicrobial peptides, cationic peptides, chemical peptides, KSL-W. 3-ACCOMPLISHMENTS: There was no change as to the original...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-2-0025 TITLE: Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide KSL-W on Human Gingival Tissue and C. albicans Growth, Transition...of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of a Cationic Guanidine Compound against Two Pathogenic Oral Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Escamilla-García

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the potential antimicrobial properties of a polyguanidine (CatDex on two oral bacteria. Chlorhexidine gluconate 1340 μmoL L−1 (CHX 0.12% was used as control. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis were grown in BHI media. Bacterial sensitivity and antimicrobial activity were determined by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Kirby-Bauer methods. To study side effects, that is, toxicity, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs were used. Fluorometric cytotoxicity and confocal microscopy assays were used in order to test cell viability. CatDex inhibited growth of S. mutans at all concentrations and growth of P. gingivalis at all concentrations except 25 μmoL L−1. The MIC of CatDex was 50 μmoL L−1 for both S. mutans and P. gingivalis. The inhibition of bacteria exposed for 8 h at 50 μmoL L−1 of CatDex exhibited increased antimicrobial activity over time, with 91% inhibition in both bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of CatDex and CHX were similar when tested on two common bacteria. CatDex was significantly less toxic to DPSCs. CatDex toxicity depended on time and not on concentration. With regard to clinical relevance, CatDex may have potential as a novel antimicrobial agent. Further studies are in progress.

  3. Selective Antimicrobial Activities and Action Mechanism of Micelles Self-Assembled by Cationic Oligomeric Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Wang, Fengyan; Chen, Hui; Li, Meng; Qiao, Fulin; Liu, Zhang; Hou, Yanbo; Wu, Chunxian; Fan, Yaxun; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu; Wang, Yilin

    2016-02-17

    This work reports that cationic micelles formed by cationic trimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric surfactants bearing amide moieties in spacers can efficiently kill Gram-negative E. coli with a very low minimum inhibitory concentration (1.70-0.93 μM), and do not cause obvious toxicity to mammalian cells at the concentrations used. With the increase of the oligomerization degree, the antibacterial activity of the oligomeric surfactants increases, i.e., hexameric surfactant > tetrameric surfactant > trimeric surfactant. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and zeta potential results reveal that the cationic micelles interact with the cell membrane of E. coli through two processes. First, the integrity of outer membrane of E. coli is disrupted by the electrostatic interaction of the cationic ammonium groups of the surfactants with anionic groups of E. coli, resulting in loss of the barrier function of the outer membrane. The inner membrane then is disintegrated by the hydrophobic interaction of the surfactant hydrocarbon chains with the hydrophobic domains of the inner membrane, leading to the cytoplast leakage. The formation of micelles of these cationic oligomeric surfactants at very low concentration enables more efficient interaction with bacterial cell membrane, which endows the oligomeric surfactants with high antibacterial activity.

  4. Design, synthesis and antimicrobial properties of non-hemolytic cationic alpha-cyclopeptoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comegna, Daniela; Benincasa, Monica; Gennaro, Renato; Izzo, Irene; De Riccardis, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    The synthesis and screening of neutral and cationic, linear and cyclic peptoids (N-alkylglycine peptidomimetics) is described. Structure-activity relationship studies show that the in vitro activities of the tested peptoids depend on both cyclization and decoration with cationic groups. The most powerful N-lysine cyclopeptoid derivatives showed good antifungal activity against Candida albicans (ATCC90029 and L21) and Candida famata (SA550, Amph B-resistant) and low hemolytic activity. The effects of the cyclic peptoids on membrane permeabilization were evaluated by the propidium iodide exclusion assay.

  5. New cationic vesicles prepared with double chain surfactants from arginine: Role of the hydrophobic group on the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, A; Petrizelli, V; Bustelo, M; Pons, R; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Manresa, A; Perez, L

    2016-05-01

    Cationic double chain surfactants have attracted much interest because they can give rise to cationic vesicles that can be used in biomedical applications. Using a simple and economical synthetic approach, we have synthesized four double-chain surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths (LANHCx). The critical aggregation concentration of the double chain surfactants is at least one order of magnitude lower than the CMC of their corresponding single-chain LAM and the solutions prepared with the LANHCx contain stable cationic vesicles. Encouragingly, these new arginine derivatives show very low haemolytic activity and weaker cytotoxic effects than conventional dialkyl dimethyl ammonium surfactants. In addition, the surfactant with the shortest alkyl chain exhibits good antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The results show that a rational design applied to cationic double chain surfactants might serve as a promising strategy for the development of safe cationic vesicular systems.

  6. The MprF protein is required for lysinylation of phospholipids in listerial membranes and confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) on Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thedieck, Kathrin; Hain, Torsten; Mohamed, Walid; Tindall, Brian J; Nimtz, Manfred; Chakraborty, Trinad; Wehland, Jürgen; Jänsch, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have to cope with defence mechanisms mediated by adaptive and innate immunity of the host cells. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent one of the most effective components of the host innate immune response. Here we establish the function of Lmo1695, a member of the V

  7. Antimicrobial activity of human prion protein is mediated by its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular prion-related protein (PrP(c is a cell-surface protein that is ubiquitously expressed in the human body. The multifunctionality of PrP(c, and presence of an exposed cationic and heparin-binding N-terminus, a feature characterizing many antimicrobial peptides, made us hypothesize that PrP(c could exert antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intact recombinant PrP exerted antibacterial and antifungal effects at normal and low pH. Studies employing recombinant PrP and N- and C-terminally truncated variants, as well as overlapping peptide 20mers, demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by the unstructured N-terminal part of the protein. Synthetic peptides of the N-terminus of PrP killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, however, no marked helix induction was detected for the PrP-derived peptides in presence of negatively charged (bacteria-mimicking liposomes. PrP furthermore showed an inducible expression during wounding of human skin ex vivo and in vivo, as well as stimulation of keratinocytes with TGF-alpha in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstration of an antimicrobial activity of PrP, localisation of its activity to the N-terminal and heparin-binding region, combined with results showing an increased expression of PrP during wounding, indicate that PrPs could have a previously undisclosed role in host defense.

  8. Chemerin is an antimicrobial agent in human epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Banas

    Full Text Available Chemerin, a chemoattractant ligand for chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1 is predicted to share similar tertiary structure with antibacterial cathelicidins. Recombinant chemerin has antimicrobial activity. Here we show that endogenous chemerin is abundant in human epidermis, and that inhibition of bacteria growth by exudates from organ cultures of primary human skin keratinocytes is largely chemerin-dependent. Using a panel of overlapping chemerin-derived synthetic peptides, we demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of chemerin is primarily mediated by Val(66-Pro(85, which causes direct bacterial lysis. Therefore, chemerin is an antimicrobial agent in human skin.

  9. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants.

  10. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-02-06

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH₂), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17-29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9-21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1-8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17-29) (LL), magainin 2 (9-21) (MA) and cecropin A (1-8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  11. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH2), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17–29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9–21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1–8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17–29) (LL), magainin 2 (9–21) (MA) and cecropin A (1–8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:28178190

  12. Ultrashort cationic naphthalene-derived self-assembled peptides as antimicrobial nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Jones, David S; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembling dipeptides conjugated to naphthalene show considerable promise as nanomaterial structures, biomaterials, and drug delivery devices. Biomaterial infections are responsible for high rates of patient mortality and morbidity. The presence of biofilm bacteria, which thrive on implant surfaces, are a huge burden on healthcare budgets, as they are highly resistant to current therapeutic strategies. Ultrashort cationic self-assembled peptides represent a highly innovative and cost-effective strategy to form antibacterial nanomaterials. Lysine conjugated variants display the greatest potency with 2% w/v NapFFKK hydrogels significantly reducing the viable Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm by 94%. Reducing the size of the R-group methylene chain on cationic moieties resulted in reduction of antibiofilm activity. The primary amine of the protruding R-group tail may not be as readily available to interact with negatively charged bacterial membranes. Cryo-SEM, FTIR, CD spectroscopy, and oscillatory rheology provided evidence of supramolecular hydrogel formation at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Cytotoxicity assays against murine fibroblast (NCTC 929) cell lines confirmed the gels possessed reduced cytotoxicity relative to bacterial cells, with limited hemolysis upon exposure to equine erythrocytes. The results presented in this paper highlight the significant potential of ultrashort cationic naphthalene peptides as future biomaterials.

  13. Cationic membrane-active peptides - anticancer and antifungal activity as well as penetration into human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nhung; Weindl, Günther; Grohmann, Lisa; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; Korting, Hans Christian; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient natural broad-spectrum antibiotics, and several compounds also exhibit anticancer activity. However, most applications pertain to bacterial infections, and treatment for skin cancer is less frequently considered. The cytotoxicity of melittin, cecropin A, protegrin-1 and histatin 5 against squamous skin cancer cell lines and normal human keratinocytes was evaluated and compared to established drugs. The results show that melittin clearly outperforms 5-fluorouracil regarding antitumor activity. Importantly, combined melittin and 5-fluorouracil enhanced cytotoxic effects on cancer cells and reduced toxicity on normal keratinocytes. Additionally, minimum inhibitory concentrations indicate that melittin also shows superior activity against clinical and laboratory strains of Candida albicans compared to amphotericin B. To evaluate its potential for topical applications, human skin penetration of melittin was investigated ex vivo and compared to two non-toxic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) and penetratin. The stratum corneum prevents penetration into viable epidermis over 6 h; however, the peptides gain access to the viable skin after 24 h. Inhibition of digestive enzymes during skin penetration significantly enhances the availability of intact peptide. In conclusion, melittin may represent an innovative agent for non-melanoma skin cancer and infectious skin diseases. In order to develop a drug candidate, skin absorption and proteolytic digestion by skin enzymes need to be addressed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids at the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam

    2014-10-14

    Human meibomian lipids form the outermost lipid layer of the tear film and serve many important functions to maintain its integrity. Although not investigated earlier, these lipids may have antimicrobial properties that help in strengthening the innate host defense of tears at the ocular surface. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids. Ocular pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus 31, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 19, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 20, and Serratia marcescens 35, were grown in the presence and absence of human meibomian lipids in an artificial tear solution at the physiological temperature. Viable counts were obtained to note the number of bacteria surviving the treatment with meibomian lipids. Bacterial cells were imaged using scanning electron microscopy to observe the damages caused by meibomian lipids. Viable count results showed that in the presence of meibomian lipids, growth of all bacteria was considerably lower. Scanning electron microscopy showed that meibomian lipids caused extensive cellular damage to bacteria as manifested in smaller size, loss of aggregation, abnormal phenotype, cellular distortion, damaged cell wall, and cell lysis. This is the first-ever report of the antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids. These lipids possess antimicrobial properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are involved in the innate host defense of tears in protecting the ocular surface against microbial pathogens. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  15. Transport of biguanides by human organic cation transporter OCT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogame, Yoshihisa; Kitamura, Atsushi; Yabuki, Masashi; Komuro, Setsuko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2013-06-01

    Biguanides have the severe side effect of lactic acidosis. Although both metformin and phenformin are biguanide derivatives, there is a difference in the frequency at which they induce lactic acidosis. However, the reasons for the difference are not clear. Metformin has been reported to be mainly excreted into urine by human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2). The present study was designed to investigate the renal transport of metformin and phenformin, focusing on hOCT2, using hOCT2-expressing oocytes. Both biguanides were found to be good substrates for hOCT2. However, phenformin exhibited a higher affinity and transport activity than metformin. The Km values for metformin and phenformin were 235 and 37.4 μM, with CL(int) (V(max)/K(m)) values of 71.9×10⁻³ μL/min per oocyte and 209×10⁻³ μL/min per oocyte, respectively. This is the first report that has compared the transport profiles of these biguanides in hOCT2-expressing oocytes. The results suggest that plasma concentration of phenformin in subjects carrying hOCT2 variant may be higher compared to reference subjects, as reported in metformin. In addition, the relationship between plasma concentration of these biguanides and blood lactate level as well as the possible reasons for the difference in the associated frequency of occurrence of lactic acidosis are discussed.

  16. Pharmacology of the human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel Part I. Activation by clotrimazole and analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barksmann, Trine Lyberth; Kristensen, Berit I.; Christophersen, Palle.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators......Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators...

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Alberto Ccahuana-Vasquez; Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos Santos; Cristiane Yumi Koga-Ito; Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria t...

  18. Augmentation of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Production with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as a Novel Epigenetic Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan D. Yedery

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistance seriously threatens our ability to treat many common and medically important bacterial infections. Novel therapeutics are needed that can be used alone or in conjunction with antibiotics. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are important effectors of the host innate defense that exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms. CAMPs are carried within phagocytic granules and are constitutively or inducibly expressed by multiple cell types, including epithelial cells. The role of histone modification enzymes, specifically the histone deacetylases (HDAC, in down-regulating the transcription of CAMP-encoding genes is increasingly appreciated as is the capacity of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi to block the action of HDACs to increase CAMP expression. The use of synthetic and natural HDACi molecules to increase CAMPs on mucosal surfaces, therefore, has potential therapeutic applications. Here, we review host and pathogen regulation of CAMP expression through the induction of HDACs and assess the therapeutic potential of natural and synthetic HDACi based on evidence from tissue culture systems, animal models, and clinical trials.

  19. Risk assessment of antimicrobial usage in Danish pig production on the human exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria from pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struve, Tina

    to antimicrobials are influenced by the use of antimicrobial agents, and the prudence of antimicrobial use have been emphasized since the Swann report in 1969 recommended that antibiotics used in human medicine should not be used as growth promoters in food-producing animals. In 2007, the World Health Organisation......During the last decades, bacteria with resistance to all commonly used antimicrobial agents have been detected, thereby posing a major threat to public health. In worst case, infections with resistant bacteria can lead to treatment failure and death of humans. The evolution of bacteria resistant...... (WHO) pronounced a list of the antimicrobial classes critically important for the treatment of infectious diseases in humans. On this list occurred among others the third and fourth generation cephalosporins. Cephalosporins have been used increasingly worldwide throughout the recent years to treat...

  20. Food animals and antimicrobials: impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bonnie M; Levy, Stuart B

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobials are valuable therapeutics whose efficacy is seriously compromised by the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The provision of antibiotics to food animals encompasses a wide variety of nontherapeutic purposes that include growth promotion. The concern over resistance emergence and spread to people by nontherapeutic use of antimicrobials has led to conflicted practices and opinions. Considerable evidence supported the removal of nontherapeutic antimicrobials (NTAs) in Europe, based on the "precautionary principle." Still, concrete scientific evidence of the favorable versus unfavorable consequences of NTAs is not clear to all stakeholders. Substantial data show elevated antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with animals fed NTAs and their food products. This resistance spreads to other animals and humans-directly by contact and indirectly via the food chain, water, air, and manured and sludge-fertilized soils. Modern genetic techniques are making advances in deciphering the ecological impact of NTAs, but modeling efforts are thwarted by deficits in key knowledge of microbial and antibiotic loads at each stage of the transmission chain. Still, the substantial and expanding volume of evidence reporting animal-to-human spread of resistant bacteria, including that arising from use of NTAs, supports eliminating NTA use in order to reduce the growing environmental load of resistance genes.

  1. Antimicrobial Properties of an Immunomodulator - 15 kDa Human Granulysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Mu Wei

    Full Text Available Granulysin, a cationic protein expressed by human natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, is a mediator for drug-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and graft-versus-host disease. Some 15 kDa granulysin are processed into 9 kDa forms and sequestered in cytolytic granules, while others are constitutively secreted into body fluids. Both 9 and 15 kDa granulysin have been shown to be a serum marker for cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, 15 kDa is able to activate monocyte differentiation. However, its antimicrobial properties have not been clearly addressed. Here, we report a novel method to prepare both the soluble 9 and 15 kDa granulysin and show that the 15 kDa form is more effective than the 9 kDa form in exerting specific antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa within a range of few micromolars. We also show that the 15 kDa granulysin is able to hyperpolarize the membrane potential and increase membrane permeability of treated bacteria. Interestingly, the bactericidal activity and membrane permeability of the granulysins were markedly reduced at lower pH (pH 5.4 as a result of probable increase in hydrophobicity of the granulysins. Additionally, we've also shown the granulysin to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that the 15 kDa granulysin exhibits a novel mechanism in bacteria killing in a way that's different from most antimicrobial peptides. Our novel granulysin preparation methodology will be useful for further study of action mechanisms of other antimicrobial, cytotoxic and immunomodulating properties in granulysin-mediated diseases.

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF RICINUS COMMUNIS AGAINST SOME HUMAN PATHOGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Kushwah Poonam; Singh Krishan Pratap

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with the antimicrobial activities of seed extracts of Ricinus communis against some human pathogenic bacteria namely Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and two fungal strains namely Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. The aqueous and methanol extracts of seeds were screened for their antibacterial activity using agar disc diffusion method. The aqueous seed extracts were less active but methanol extracts showed high degree zon...

  3. Desirability-based multi-criteria virtual screening of selective antimicrobial cyclic β-hairpin cationic peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Romero, Yansy; Cordeiro, M Natália D S; Borges, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Today, emerging and increasing resistance to antibiotics has become a threat to public health worldwide. Antimicrobial peptides own unique action mechanisms making peptide antibiotics an attractive therapeutic option against resistant bacteria. However, their high haemolytic activity lacks the selectivity required for a human antibiotic. Therefore, additional efforts are needed to develop new antimicrobial peptides that possess greater selectivity for bacterial cells over erythrocytes. In this article, we introduce a chemoinformatics approach to simultaneously deal with these two conflicting properties consisting on a multi-criteria virtual screening strategy based on the use of a desirability-based multi-criteria classifier combined with similarity and chemometrics concepts. Here we propose a new quantitative feature encoding information related to the desirability, the degree of credibility ascribed to this desirability and the similarity of a candidate to a highly desirable query, which can be used as ranking criterion in a virtual screening campaign, the Desirability-Credibility- Similarity (DCS) Score. The enrichment ability of a multi-criteria virtual screening strategy based on the use of the DCS Score it is also assessed and compared to other virtual screening options. The results obtained evidenced that the use of the DCS score seems to be an efficient virtual screening strategy rendering promising overall and initial enrichment performance. Specifically, by using the DCS score it was possible to rank a selective antibacterial peptidomimetic earlier than a biologically inactive or non selective antibacterial peptidomimetic with a probability of ca. 0.9.

  4. Interactions of a cationic antimicrobial (ε-polylysine) with an anionic biopolymer (pectin): an isothermal titration calorimetry, microelectrophoresis, and turbidity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-05-25

    ε-Polylysine (ε-PL) is a food-grade cationic antimicrobial that is highly effective against a range of food pathogens and spoilage organisms. In compositionally complex environments, like those found in most foods and beverages, the antimicrobial activity of cationic ε-PL is likely to be impacted by its interactions with anionic components. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interactions between cationic ε-polylysine and an anionic biopolymer (high methoxyl pectin, HMP) using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), microelectrophoresis (ME), and turbidity measurements. ITC and ME measurements indicated that ε-PL bound to pectin, while turbidity measurements indicated that the complexes formed could be either soluble or insoluble depending on solution composition. Ionic strength and pH were also shown to affect the interactions significantly, highlighting their electrostatic origin. This study demonstrates that ε-PL can form either soluble or insoluble complexes with anionic biopolymers depending on the composition of the system. Our study provides basic knowledge that will facilitate the more rational application of ε-PL in complex food systems.

  5. Human Health Hazards from Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A. M.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2009-01-01

    Because of the intensive use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production, meat is frequently contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Humans can be colonized with E. coli of animal origin, and because of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, these bacteria may...

  6. Increased cation conductance in human erythrocytes artificially aged by glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, Yuliya V; Bhavsar, Shefalee K; Grischenko, Valentin I; Fischer, Uwe R; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    Excessive glucose concentrations foster glycation and thus premature aging of erythrocytes. The present study explored whether glycation-induced erythrocyte aging is paralleled by features of suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell membrane scrambling with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Both are triggered by increases of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), which may result from activation of Ca(2+) permeable cation channels. Glycation was accomplished by exposure to high glucose concentrations (40 and 100 mM), phosphatidylserine exposure estimated from annexin binding, cell shrinkage from decrease of forward scatter, and [Ca(2+)](i) from Fluo3-fluorescence in analysis via fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Cation channel activity was determined by means of whole-cell patch clamp. Glycation of total membrane proteins, immunoprecipitated TRPC3/6/7, and immunoprecipitated L-type Ca(2+) channel proteins was estimated by Western blot testing with polyclonal antibodies used against advanced glycation end products. A 30-48-h exposure of the cells to 40 or 100 mM glucose in Ringer solution (at 37 degrees C) significantly increased glycation of membrane proteins, hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), TRPC3/6/7, and L-type Ca(2+) channel proteins, enhanced amiloride-sensitive, voltage-independent cation conductance, [Ca(2+)](i), and phosphatidylserine exposure, and led to significant cell shrinkage. Ca(2+) removal and addition of Ca(2+) chelator EGTA prevented the glycation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and cell shrinkage after glycation. Glycation-induced erythrocyte aging leads to eryptosis, an effect requiring Ca(2+) entry from extracellular space.

  7. Targeting the S1 and S3 subsite of trypsin with unnatural cationic amino acids generates antimicrobial peptides with potential for oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstad, Rasmus; Isaksen, Geir; Wynendaele, Evelien; Guttormsen, Yngve; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Brandsdal, Bjørn-Olav; Svendsen, John Sigurd; Svenson, Johan

    2012-07-26

    This study investigates how the S1 and S3 site of trypsin can be challenged with cationic amino acid analogues to yield active antimicrobial peptides with stability toward tryptic degradation. It is shown that unnatural analogues can be incorporated to generate stable peptides with maintained bioactivity to allow for a potential oral uptake. Selected peptides were studied using isothermal calorimetry and computational methods. Both stable and unstable peptides were found to bind stoichiometrically to trypsin with dissociation constants ranging 2-60 μM, suggesting several different binding modes. The stability of selected peptides was analyzed in whole organ extracts and the incorporation of homoarginine and 2-amino-(3-guanidino)propanoic acid resulted in a 14- and 50-fold increase in duodenal stability. In addition, a 40- and 70-fold increase in stomach stability is also reported. Overall, these results illustrate how the incorporation of cationic side chains can be employed to generate bioactive peptides with significant systemic stability.

  8. Factors affecting antimicrobial activity of MUC7 12-mer, a human salivary mucin-derived peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Libuse A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC7 12-mer (RKSYKCLHKRCR, a cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the human low-molecular-weight salivary mucin MUC7, possesses potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. In order to evaluate the potential therapeutic application of the MUC7 12-mer, we examined the effects of mono- and divalent cations, EDTA, pH, and temperature on its antimicrobial activity. Methods Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs were determined using a liquid growth inhibition assay in 96-well microtiter plates. MUC7 12-mer was added at concentrations of 1.56–50 μM. MICs were determined at three endpoints: MIC-0, MIC-1, and MIC-2 (the lowest drug concentration showing 10%, 25% and 50% of growth, respectively. To examine the effect of salts or EDTA, a checkerboard microdilution technique was used. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICi was calculated on the basis of MIC-0. The viability of microbial cells treated with MUC7 12-mer in the presence of sodium or potassium was also determined by killing assay or flow cytometry. Results The MICs of MUC7 12-mer against organisms tested ranged from 6.25–50 μM. For C. albicans, antagonism (FICi 4.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and calcium; however, there was synergism (FICi 0.22 between MUC7 12-mer and EDTA, and the synergism was retained in the presence of calcium at its physiological concentration (1–2 mM. No antagonism but additivity or indifference (FICi 0.55–2.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and each K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Zn2+. MUC7 12-mer peptide (at 25 μM also exerted killing activity in the presence of NaCl, (up to 25 mM for C. albicans and up to 150 mM for E. coli, a physiological concentration of sodium in the oral cavity and serum, respectively and retained candidacidal activity in the presence of KCl (up to 40 mM. The peptide exhibited higher inhibitory activity against C. albicans at pH 7, 8, and 9 than at pH 5 and 6, and temperature up to

  9. The interaction between human antimicrobial use and the risk of foodborne zoonotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koningstein, Maike

    animals and the consequent dissemination of antimicrobial drug resistance have been well described in literature. Much less investigated is the association between human antimicrobial drug use and the adverse consequences it may have on human infections. This thesis addresses the relation between......Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common causes of foodborne bacterial infections worldwide. Both bacterial species have many modes for transmission in the food chain through which humans can be infected. The widespread use of antimicrobial drugs for food...... antimicrobial drug use in humans, and the acquisition of infection with antimicrobial resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella, Campylobacter coli (C. coli), and Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni). The main objectives were: 1) To assess if the history of human use of antimicrobial drugs is a risk factor for acquiring...

  10. A comparison of antimicrobial usage in human and veterinary medicine in France from 1999 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Gérard; Cavalié, Philippe; Pellanne, Isabelle; Chevance, Anne; Laval, Arlette; Millemann, Yves; Colin, Pierre; Chauvin, Claire

    2008-09-01

    The antimicrobials allowed and amounts sold in veterinary and human medicine in France were compared to see if the same antimicrobial drugs are used in veterinary and human medicine, and to the same extent. Registers of all approved antimicrobial commercial products, kept by the French Agency for Veterinary Medicinal Products (AFSSA ANMV) for animals and the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) for humans, were compared to determine whether the same antimicrobials were approved in 2007 for use in both human and animal populations. Sales data were collected from pharmaceutical companies between 1999 and 2005 by the AFSSA ANMV and AFSSAPS. Usage of the different antimicrobial anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classes in human and veterinary medicines was recorded. Data were expressed in tonnes of active ingredients and were then related to the animal and human biomasses to compare usages expressed in mg/kg. All antimicrobial ATC classes were used in both human and veterinary medicine. Tetracyclines accounted for the most sales in veterinary medicine. beta-Lactams predominated in human medicine. A decrease in the amounts consumed by both human and animal populations was observed during the study. In 2005, 760 tonnes were used in human medicine and 1320 tonnes in veterinary medicine, corresponding to 199 and 84 mg/kg of live weight in human and animal populations, respectively. The same antimicrobial drugs were used in human and veterinary medicines but the quantitative patterns of use were different. Expression of antimicrobial usage is a key point to address when comparing usage trends.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  12. [Purification and antimicrobial activity of human neutrophil defensins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, X; Wang, A

    1991-11-01

    Neutrophils are one of the weapons of host defenses against microbial infection. Their ability to kill the invading microorganisms depends on two principle mechanisms. One depends on production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by stimulated neutrophils, and the other depends on the delivery of antimicrobial contents of the neutrophils' cytoplasmic granules, oxygen-independent. The defensins have the highest concentration in the neutrophils, and the broadest antimicrobial spectrum, being capable of killing gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, fungi and some envelope viruses. We purified human defensins from the neutrophils' granules by gel permeation chromatography and SDS-preparative acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of human defensins is between 3,000-4,000 daltons. After testing, C. neoformans was susceptible to these defensins. Under condition of 37 degrees C, pH 7.4 and low ionic strength, antifungal activity by human defensins was related to its concentration and incubating time. All of these illustrate that nonoxidative killing mechanism of neutrophils, especially the function of defensins is very important in host defenses.

  13. Quantitative mapping of intracellular cations in the human amniotic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Razafindrabe, L.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of magnesium and taurine on the permeability of cell membranes to monovalent cations has been investigated using the Bordeaux nuclear microprobe. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used to provide quantitative measurements and ion distributions in the isolated amniotic membrane. This physiological model for cellular exchanges allowed us to reveal the distribution of most elements involved in cellular pathways and the modifications under different experimental conditions of incubation in physiological fluids. The PIXE microanalysis provided an original viewpoint on these mechanisms. Following this first study, the amnion compact lamina was found to play a role which was not, up to now, taken into account in the interpretation of electrophysiological experimentations. The release of some ionic species, such as K +, from the epithelial cells, during immersion in isotonic fluids, could have been hitherto underestimated.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa was tested in vitro to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on selected microbial strains. The tested strains were oral clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus spp., Candida albicans, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa ranged from 0.25-5% in Müeller-Hinton agar. Three percent Uncaria tomentosa inhibited 8% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 52% of S. mutans and 96% of Staphylococcus spp. The tested concentrations did not present inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It could be concluded that micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa presented antimicrobial activity on Enterobacteriaceae, S. mutans and Staphylococcus spp. isolates.

  15. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: I. experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on the strong cation exchange resin Fractogel EMD SE Hicap (M) were carried out. Even though human serum albumin was used at high purity, two peaks in gradient elution experiments occurred. The obtained data can be explained by considering that human serum albumin binds to Fractogel EMD SE Hicap (M) in two different binding conformations: the protein adsorbs instantaneously in the first conformation and then changes into the second one with a kinetic limitation. The two-peak behavior of human serum albumin was analyzed in detail, especially at various gradient lengths, concentrations and temperatures. Breakthrough curves were performed at four modifier concentrations and three velocities. The characteristic adsorption behavior, found for gradient experiments, was confirmed by the breakthrough curves. The two-peak elution pattern of human serum albumin was also found for other strong cation exchange resins, but not for weak cation exchange resins. It is concluded that the described behavior is peculiar for the interaction of human serum albumin with the strong cation exchange ligand of the resin.

  16. Antimicrobial Human β-Defensins in the Colon and Their Role in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R. Cobo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available β-defensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides secreted by diverse cell types including colonic epithelial cells. Human β-defensins form an essential component of the intestinal lumen in innate immunity. The defensive mechanisms of β-defensins include binding to negatively charged microbial membranes that cause cell death and chemoattraction of immune cells. The antimicrobial activity of β-defensin is well reported in vitro against several enteric pathogens and in non-infectious processes such as inflammatory bowel diseases, which alters β-defensin production. However, the role of β-defensin in vivo in its interaction with other immune components in host defense against bacteria, viruses and parasites with more complex membranes is still not well known. This review focuses on the latest findings regarding the role of β-defensin in relevant human infectious and non-infectious diseases of the colonic mucosa. In addition, we summarize the most significant aspects of β-defensin and its antimicrobial role in a variety of disease processes.

  17. Antimicrobial use in aquaculture re-examined: its relevance to antimicrobial resistance and to animal and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Felipe C; Godfrey, Henry P; Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Dölz, Humberto; Millanao, Ana; Buschmann, Alejandro H

    2013-07-01

    The worldwide growth of aquaculture has been accompanied by a rapid increase in therapeutic and prophylactic usage of antimicrobials including those important in human therapeutics. Approximately 80% of antimicrobials used in aquaculture enter the environment with their activity intact where they select for bacteria whose resistance arises from mutations or more importantly, from mobile genetic elements containing multiple resistance determinants transmissible to other bacteria. Such selection alters biodiversity in aquatic environments and the normal flora of fish and shellfish. The commonality of the mobilome (the total of all mobile genetic elements in a genome) between aquatic and terrestrial bacteria together with the presence of residual antimicrobials, biofilms, and high concentrations of bacteriophages where the aquatic environment may also be contaminated with pathogens of human and animal origin can stimulate exchange of genetic information between aquatic and terrestrial bacteria. Several recently found genetic elements and resistance determinants for quinolones, tetracyclines, and β-lactamases are shared between aquatic bacteria, fish pathogens, and human pathogens, and appear to have originated in aquatic bacteria. Excessive use of antimicrobials in aquaculture can thus potentially negatively impact animal and human health as well as the aquatic environment and should be better assessed and regulated.

  18. Effect of alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide on the intracellular cations of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J R; Kowalski, M M; Wallas, C H

    1977-08-01

    The adsorption to human erythrocytes of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide treated by mild alkaline hydrolysis (h-LPS) stimulated an increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration and a decrease in the intracellular K+ concentration of the erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated by h-LPS remained responsive to the membrane adenosine triphosphatase inhibitors ouabain and ethacrynic acid, indicating that hLPS did not alter erythrocyte cations be depleting energy intermediates or uncoupling energy metabolism from active cation transport. The h-LPS-treated erythrocytes became non-agglutinable by the lectin concanavalin A prior to the development of changes in intracellular cations. In addition, h-LPS-treated erythrocytes demonstrated a three-fold greater cation response to ethacrynic acid than the untreated erythrocytes; this greater response was probably due to local membrane effects by h-LPS on the ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase. It is suggested that the h-LPS-induced alteration of erythrocyte cation content was secondary to an increase in ion permeability localized to the concanavalin A receptor regions of the erythrocyte membrane, possibly combined with indirect effects of membrane-bound h-LPS on ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase.

  19. Human health hazard from antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals and food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Collignon, P.

    2006-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in the modern farm industry has created a reservoir of resistant bacteria in food animals. Foods of animal origin are often contaminated with enterococci that are likely to contribute resistance genes, virulence factors, or other properties to enterococci IN humans....... The potential hazard to human health from antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals is questioned by some scientists because of evidence of host specificity of enterococci. Similarly, the occurrences of specific nosocomial clones of enterococci in hospitals have lead to the misconception that antimicrobial...... to change the current view that antimicrobial-resistant enterococci from animals pose a threat to human health. On the contrary, antimicrobial resistance genes appear to spread freely between enterococci from different reservoirs, irrespective of their apparent host association....

  20. Identification of Legionella pneumophila rcp, a pagP-like gene that confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and promotes intracellular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, M; O'Connell, W; Cianciotto, N P

    2001-07-01

    In the course of characterizing a locus involved in heme utilization, we identified a Legionella pneumophila gene predicted to encode a protein with homology to the product of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pagP gene. In Salmonella, pagP increases resistance to the bactericidal effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). Mutants with insertions in the L. pneumophila pagP-like gene were generated and showed decreased resistance to different structural classes of CAMPs compared to the wild type; hence, this gene was designated rcp for resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, Legionella CAMP resistance was induced by growth in low-magnesium medium. To determine whether rcp had any role in intracellular survival, mutants were tested in the two most relevant host cells for Legionnaires' disease, i.e., amoebae and macrophages. These mutants exhibited a 1,000-fold-decreased recovery during a Hartmannella vermiformis coculture. Complementation of the infectivity defect could be achieved by introduction of a plasmid containing the intact rcp gene. Mutations in rcp consistently reduced both the numbers of bacteria recovered during intracellular infection and their cytopathic capacity for U937 macrophages. The rcp mutant was also more defective for lung colonization of A/J mice. Growth of rcp mutants in buffered yeast extract broth was identical to that of the wild type, indicating that the observed differences in numbers of bacteria recovered from host cells were not due to a generalized growth defect. However, in low-Mg(2+) medium, the rcp mutant was impaired in stationary-phase survival. This is the first demonstration of a pagP-like gene, involved in resistance to CAMPs, being required for intracellular infection and virulence.

  1. An altered immune response, but not individual cationic antimicrobial peptides, is associated with the oral attenuation of Ara4N-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L Strandberg

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRS to respond to stimuli in the local microenvironment. Upon infection, the Salmonella TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals in the intestinal lumen and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. The PmrA-regulated pmrHFIJKLM operon mediates 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (Ara4N production and attachment to the lipid A of LPS. A ΔpmrF S. Typhimurium strain cannot produce Ara4N, exhibits increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP-mediated killing, and attenuated virulence in mice upon oral infection. CAMPs are predicted to play a role in elimination of Salmonella, and may activate PhoPQ and PmrAB in vivo, which could increase bacterial resistance to host defenses. Competition experiments between wild type (WT and ΔpmrF mutant strains of S. Typhimurium indicated that selection against this mutant first occurs within the intestinal lumen early during infection. However, CRAMP and active cryptdins alone are not responsible for elimination of Ara4N-deficient bacteria in vivo. Investigation into the early immune response to ΔpmrF showed that it differed slightly from the early immune response to WT S. Typhimurium. Further investigation into the early immune response to infection of Peyer's patches suggests a role for IL-13 in the attenution of the ΔpmrF mutant strain. Thus, prominent CAMPs present in the mouse intestine are not responsible for the selection against the ΔpmrF strain in this location, but limited alterations in innate immune induction were observed that affect bacterial survival and virulence.

  2. Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, V.; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Guardabassi, L.

    2016-01-01

    interest to the human gut microbiota. Ingestion of poultry meat contaminated with S. aureus may lead to food poisoning. However, antimicrobial resistance in the toxin -producing strains does not have clinical implications because food poisoning is not managed by antimicrobial therapy. Recently methicillin...

  3. Antimicrobial drug resistance at the human-animal interface in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, V.T.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and E. coli strains isolated from backyard farm chickens and humans in Vietnam. We found that this prevalence was to some extent related to antimicrobial usage. In particular,

  4. The human gut microbiota as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bülow, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the emergence and spread of resistant opportunistic pathogens is compromising the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies. Understanding the emergence and global spread of drug-resistant microorganisms is thus crucial to combat antimicrobial resistance. The human gut harbors a

  5. The human gut microbiota as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bülow, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the emergence and spread of resistant opportunistic pathogens is compromising the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies. Understanding the emergence and global spread of drug-resistant microorganisms is thus crucial to combat antimicrobial resistance. The human gut harbors a

  6. Improvement of outer membrane-permeabilizing and lipopolysaccharide-binding activities of an antimicrobial cationic peptide by C-terminal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piers, K L; Brown, M H; Hancock, R E

    1994-10-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides have been discovered in many different organisms and often possess a broad range of activity. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of actions of melittin and two synthetic peptides, CEME (a cecropin-melittin hybrid) and CEMA, against gram-negative bacteria. CEMA was produced by recombinant DNA procedures and is an analog of CEME with a modified C terminus resulting in two additional positive charges. All three peptides showed good antimicrobial activity against four different gram-negative bacteria, but only CEMA was able to somewhat augment the activity of some conventional antibiotics in synergy studies. Studies using the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae showed that the peptides all possessed the ability to permeabilize bacterial outer membranes to the hydrophobic fluorophor 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine and the protein lysozyme, with CEMA being the most active. CEMA also had the strongest relative binding affinity for bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). These data collectively indicated that these peptides all cross the outer membrane by the self-promoted uptake pathway and that CEMA is the peptide most effective at accessing this pathway.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of cationic antimicrobial peptides against gram-positives: Current progress made in understanding the mode of action and the response of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Omardien

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the membrane is the sole target of AMPs. Progress has been made in clarifying the possible targets of these peptides, which is reported in this review with as focus gram-positive vegetative cells and spores. Numerical estimates are discussed to evaluate the possibility that targets, other than the membrane, could play a role in susceptibility to AMPs. Concerns about possible resistance that bacteria might develop to AMPs are addressed. Proteomics, transcriptomics and other molecular techniques are reviewed in the context of explaining the response of bacteria to the presence of AMPs and to predict what resistance strategies might be. Emergent mechanisms are cell envelope stress responses as well as enzymes able to degrade and/or specifically bind (and thus inactivate AMPs. Further studies are needed to address the broadness of the AMP resistance and stress responses observed.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides against Gram-Positives: Current Progress Made in Understanding the Mode of Action and the Response of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omardien, Soraya; Brul, Stanley; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the membrane is the sole target of AMPs. Progress has been made in clarifying the possible targets of these peptides, which is reported in this review with as focus gram-positive vegetative cells and spores. Numerical estimates are discussed to evaluate the possibility that targets, other than the membrane, could play a role in susceptibility to AMPs. Concerns about possible resistance that bacteria might develop to AMPs are addressed. Proteomics, transcriptomics, and other molecular techniques are reviewed in the context of explaining the response of bacteria to the presence of AMPs and to predict what resistance strategies might be. Emergent mechanisms are cell envelope stress responses as well as enzymes able to degrade and/or specifically bind (and thus inactivate) AMPs. Further studies are needed to address the broadness of the AMP resistance and stress responses observed.

  9. Compositional tuning of epoxide-polyetheramine "click" reaction toward cytocompatible, cationic hydrogel particles with antimicrobial and DNA binding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuangcheng; Huang, Lu; Daniels-Mulholland, Robert J; Dlugosz, Elizabeth; Morin, Emily A; Lenaghan, Scott; He, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The "click" characteristics of nucleophilic opening of epoxide have recently been exploited for the development of a functional hydrogel particle system based on commercially available bisepoxide and triamine polyetheramine monomers. Key features of these particles include high cationic charges and responsiveness to temperature, pH, and oxidation. Despite these advantages, the cytocompatibility of these particles must be considered prior to use in biomedical applications. Here we demonstrate that, by introducing a diamine polyetheramine as a comonomer in the "click" reaction, and tuning its molar ratio with the triamine monomer, cationic nanoparticles with improved cytocompatibility can be prepared. The reduced cytotoxicity is primarily due to the hydrophilic backbone of the diamine comonomer, which has polyethylene glycol as a primary component. The resulting nanoparticles formed from the diamine comonomer exhibited a lower surface charge, while maintaining a comparable size. In addition, the responsiveness of the nanoparticles to temperature, pH, and oxidation was conserved, while achieving greater colloidal stability at basic pH. Results from this study further demonstrated that the nanoparticles were able to encapsulate Nile red, a model for hydrophobic drug molecules, were effective against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, and were capable of binding DNA through ionic complexation. Based on the results from this work, the use of diamine comonomers significantly reduces the cytotoxicity of similarly developed hydrogel nanoparticles, allowing for numerous biomedical applications, including nanocarriers for therapeutic agents with poor water solubility, treatment of bacterial infection, and non-viral vectors for gene therapy. In recent years significant attention has been placed on the development of nanocarriers for numerous biomedical applications. Of particular interest are cationic polymers, which contain high positive surface charges that allow binding of

  10. Development of a novel biosensor using cationic antimicrobial Peptide and nickel phthalocyanine ultrathin films for electrochemical detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampa, Maysa F; Araújo, Inês Maria de S; Dos Santos Júnior, José Ribeiro; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Leite, José Roberto de S A; Eiras, Carla

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin 01 (DS 01), from the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis frogs, was immobilized in nanostructured layered films in conjunction with nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiTsPc), widely used in electronic devices, using layer-by-layer technique. The films were used as a biosensor to detect the presence of dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, with detection limits in the order of 10(-6) mol L(-1). The use of DS 01 in LbL film generated selectivity in the detection of DA despite the presence of ascorbic acid found in biological fluids. This work is the first to report that the antimicrobial peptide and NiTsPc LbL film exhibits electroanalytical activity to DA oxidation. The selectivity in the detection of DA is a fundamental aspect for the development of electrochemical sensors with potential applications in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Development of a Novel Biosensor Using Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Nickel Phthalocyanine Ultrathin Films for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa F. Zampa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin 01 (DS 01, from the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis frogs, was immobilized in nanostructured layered films in conjunction with nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiTsPc, widely used in electronic devices, using layer-by-layer technique. The films were used as a biosensor to detect the presence of dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, with detection limits in the order of 10−6 mol L−1. The use of DS 01 in LbL film generated selectivity in the detection of DA despite the presence of ascorbic acid found in biological fluids. This work is the first to report that the antimicrobial peptide and NiTsPc LbL film exhibits electroanalytical activity to DA oxidation. The selectivity in the detection of DA is a fundamental aspect for the development of electrochemical sensors with potential applications in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries.

  12. Development of a Novel Biosensor Using Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Nickel Phthalocyanine Ultrathin Films for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Zampa, Maysa F.; Araújo, Inês Maria de S.; José Ribeiro dos Santos Júnior; Valtencir Zucolotto; José Roberto S A Leite; Carla Eiras

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin 01 (DS 01), from the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis frogs, was immobilized in nanostructured layered films in conjunction with nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiTsPc), widely used in electronic devices, using layer-by-layer technique. The films were used as a biosensor to detect the presence of dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, with detection limits in the order of 10−6 ...

  13. Influence of organic matter, cations and surfactants on the antimicrobial activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1999-03-01

    The effect of some potentially interfering substances and conditions on the antimicrobial activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was investigated. Agar and broth dilution methods were used to determine minimum inhibitory and cidal concentrations of tea tree oil in the presence and absence of each potentially interfering substance. Activity was determined against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. Minimum inhibitory or cidal concentrations differed from controls by two or more dilutions, for one or more organisms, where Tween-20, Tween-80, skim-milk powder and bovine serum albumin were assessed. These differences were not seen when assays were performed in anaerobic conditions, or in the presence of calcium and magnesium ions. The effect of organic matter on the antimicrobial activity of tea tree oil was also investigated by an organic soil neutralization test. Organisms were exposed to lethal concentrations of tea tree oil ranging from 1-10% (v/v), in the presence of 1-30% (w/v) dry bakers' yeast. After 10 min contact time, viability was determined. At > or = 1%, organic matter compromised the activity of each concentration of tea tree oil against Staphylococcus aureus and C. albicans. At 10% or more, organic matter compromised the activity of each tea tree oil concentration against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Organic matter affected 1 and 2% tea tree oil, but not 4 and 8%, against Escherichia coli. In conclusion, organic matter and surfactants compromise the antimicrobial activity of tea tree oil, although these effects vary between organisms.

  14. Identification and Characterisation of the Antimicrobial Peptide, Phylloseptin-PT, from the Skin Secretion of Phyllomedusa tarsius, and Comparison of Activity with Designed, Cationicity-Enhanced Analogues and Diastereomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitian Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides belonging to the phylloseptin family are mainly found in phyllomedusine frogs. These peptides not only possess potent antimicrobial activity but exhibit low toxicity against eukaryotic cells. Therefore, they are considered as promising drug candidates for a number of diseases. In a recent study, potent antimicrobial activity was correlated with the conserved structures and cationic amphiphilic characteristics of members of this peptide family. A phylloseptin peptide precursor was discovered here in the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa tarsius and the mature peptide was validated by MS/MS sequencing, and was subsequently named phylloseptin-PT. The chemically-synthesized and purified phylloseptin-PT displayed activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Nevertheless, a range of cationicity-enhanced peptide analogues of phylloseptin-PT, which contained amino acid substitutions at specific sites, exhibited significant increases in antimicrobial activity compared to native phylloseptin-PT. In addition, alternative conformers which were designed and chemically-synthesized with d-lysine, showed potent antimicrobial activity and enhanced bioavailability. These data indicate that phylloseptins may represent potential candidates for next-generation antibiotics. Thus, rational design through modification of natural antimicrobial peptide templates could provide an accelerated path to overcoming obstacles en-route to their possible clinical applications.

  15. Different effects of transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob on susceptibility of Escherichia coli to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs): Rob-dependent CAMP induction of the marRAB operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Douglas M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-02-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs), a component of the mammalian immune system, protect the host from bacterial infections. The roles of the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob in susceptibility to these peptides were examined. Overexpression of marA, either in an antibiotic-resistant marR mutant or from a plasmid, decreased bacterial susceptibility to CAMPs. Overexpression of the soxS gene from a plasmid, which decreased susceptibility to antibiotics, unexpectedly caused no decrease in CAMP susceptibility; instead it produced increased susceptibility to different CAMPs. Deletion or overexpression of rob had little effect on CAMP susceptibility. The marRAB operon was upregulated when E. coli was incubated in sublethal amounts of CAMPs polymyxin B, LL-37 or human beta-defensin-1; however, this upregulation required Rob. Deletion of acrAB increased bacterial susceptibility to polymyxin B, LL-37 and human beta-defensin-1 peptides. Deletion of tolC yielded an even greater increase in susceptibility to these peptides and also led to increased susceptibility to human alpha-defensin-2. Inhibition of cellular proton-motive force increased peptide susceptibility for wild-type and acrAB deletion strains; however, it decreased susceptibility of tolC mutants. These findings demonstrate that CAMPs are both inducers of marA-mediated drug resistance through interaction with Rob and also substrates for efflux in E. coli. The three related transcriptional regulators show different effects on bacterial cell susceptibility to CAMPs.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of human salivary mucin-derived peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated: a) relationships between molecular properties and antimicrobial functions of MUC7 peptides, b) effects of host physiological factors on the antimicrobial activity of MUC7 peptides, c) enhancement of antifungal activity by combination of MUC7 peptides with EDTA or other agents, d) an

  17. Removal of Endotoxin from Human Serum Albumin Solutions by Hydrophobic and Cationic Charged Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel matrix of macropore cellulose membrane was prepared by chemical graft, and immobilized the cationic charged groups as affinity ligands. The prepared membrane can be used for the removal of endotoxin from human serum albumin (HSA) solutions. With a cartridge of 20 sheets affinity membrane of 47 mm diameter, the endotoxin level in HSA solution can be reduced to 0.027 eu/mL. Recovery of HSA was over 95%.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunji Emmanuel Oyinloye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs. Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance.

  19. Immobilization of cationic antimicrobial peptides and natural cashew gum in nanosheet systems for the investigation of anti-leishmanial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Bittencourt, Clicia; Oliveira Farias, Emanuel Airton de; Costa Bezerra, Karla; Costa Véras, Leiz Maria [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Ministro Reis Velloso, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piauí, UFPI, Parnaíba, PI 64202020 (Brazil); Costa Silva, Vladimir [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Ministro Reis Velloso, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piauí, UFPI, Parnaíba, PI 64202020 (Brazil); Laboratório de Pesquisas em Leishmanioses, Instituto de Doenças Tropicais Natan Portela–IDTNP, Teresina 64001450 (Brazil); Costa, Carlos Henrique Nery [Laboratório de Pesquisas em Leishmanioses, Instituto de Doenças Tropicais Natan Portela–IDTNP, Teresina 64001450 (Brazil); Bemquerer, Marcelo P. [EMBRAPA Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, 70770-917 Brasília, DF (Brazil); Laboratório de Espectrometria de Massa, LEM, Sala de Nanotecnologia, EMBRAPA, Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, Brasília, DF 70770-917 (Brazil); Silva, Luciano Paulino [EMBRAPA Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, 70770-917 Brasília, DF (Brazil); Souza de Almeida Leite, José Roberto de [Núcleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Ministro Reis Velloso, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piauí, UFPI, Parnaíba, PI 64202020 (Brazil); and others

    2016-02-01

    This report details the development of thin films containing an antimicrobial peptide, specifically, dermaseptin 01 (GLWSTIKQKGKEAAIAAA-KAAGQAALGAL-NH{sub 2}, [DRS 01]), and a natural polysaccharide, for a novel application in detecting the presence of Leishmania cells and maintaining anti-leishmanial activity. The peptide DRS 01 was immobilized in conjunction with natural cashew gum (CG) onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate using the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition technique. The LbL film ITO/CG/DRS 01, containing DRS 01 as the outer layer, was capable of detecting the presence of Leishmania cells and acting as an anti-leishmanial system. Detection was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) in the presence of promastigote cells (0–10{sup 7} cells/mL). The results showed a linear and inversely proportional relation between the concentration of Leishmania infantum protozoan cells and the measured current values obtained for the films, which was attributed to the effect of peptide-induced lysis of the cell membrane, and resulted in freed residues that were adsorbed on the electrode surface. With this, the paper shows a method using thin films with this new material to demonstrate the anti-leishmanial activity in vitro models of carpet-like mechanisms. - Highlights: • Layer-by-Layer films based on a natural polysaccharide (cashew gum) and an antimicrobial peptide (DRS 01) were prepared and characterized. • The films produced were capable of detecting the presence of Leishmania cells, acting as an antileishmanial system.

  20. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  1. Targeting intracellular bacteria with an extended cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Manish; Thangamani, Shankar; Seleem, Mohamed N; Chmielewski, Jean

    2015-06-07

    An extended cationic and amphiphilic polyproline helix (CAPH) is described with a dual mode of action: effective cell penetration of human macrophages, and potent antimicrobial activity in vitro against both Gram-positive and negative pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli O157 and Bacillus anthracis. This dual action was successfully combined to clear pathogenic bacteria (Brucella and Salmonella) residing within macrophages.

  2. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shokryazdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium from humans and production animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; FrimodtMoller, N.

    1997-01-01

    to the State Serum Institute during August 1993 (228 isolates). The animal strains were isolated from clinical or subclinical infections in cattle (48 isolates), pigs (99 isolates) or poultry (98 isolates), all from 1993. All strains were tested against 22 different antimicrobial agents used in both human......: Poultry strains were usually resistant only to ampicillin, white pig and cattle isolates were most often resistant to sulphonamide, tetracycline and streptomycin. Typing of the strains showed that some animal strains and human strains were indistinguishable. In conclusion, while antimicrobial resistance......We have studied the frequency of antimicrobial resistance and epidemiological relatedness among 473 isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp, enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) from human and veterinary sources. The human strains were clinical isolates from patients with diarrhoea sent...

  4. Antimicrobial-Resistant Enterococci in Animals and Meat: A Human Health Hazard?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A.M.; Lester, C.H.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis belong to the gastrointestinal flora of humans and animals. Although normally regarded harmless commensals, enterococci may cause a range of different infections in humans, including urinary tract infections, sepsis, and endocarditis. The use...... clones predominate in certain animal species. This may suggest that antimicrobial-resistant E. faecium from animals could be regarded less hazardous to humans; however, due to their excellent ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes, E. faecium of animal origin may act as donors of antimicrobial...... resistance genes for other more virulent enterococci. For E. faecalis, the situation appears different, as similar clones of, for example, vancomycin-and gentamicin-resistant E. faecalis have been obtained from animals and from human patients. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance...

  5. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities. PMID:26613786

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles and Diversity in Salmonella from Humans and Cattle, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afema, J A; Mather, A E; Sischo, W M

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of long-term anti-microbial resistance (AMR) data is useful to understand source and transmission dynamics of AMR. We analysed 5124 human clinical isolates from Washington State Department of Health, 391 cattle clinical isolates from the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and 1864 non-clinical isolates from foodborne disease research on dairies in the Pacific Northwest. Isolates were assigned profiles based on phenotypic resistance to 11 anti-microbials belonging to eight classes. Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Salmonella Newport (SN) and Salmonella Montevideo (SM) were the most common serovars in both humans and cattle. Multinomial logistic regression showed ST and SN from cattle had greater probability of resistance to multiple classes of anti-microbials than ST and SN from humans (P Salmonella may be due to greater diversity of sources entering the human population compared to cattle or due to continuous evolution in the human environment. Also, AMR diversity was greater in clinical compared to non-clinical cattle Salmonella, and this could be due to anti-microbial selection pressure in diseased cattle that received treatment. The use of bootstrapping techniques showed that although there were shared profiles between humans and cattle, the expected and observed number of profiles was different, suggesting Salmonella and associated resistance from humans and cattle may not be wholly derived from a common population.

  7. Modulation of proinflammatory activity by the engineered cationic antimicrobial peptide WLBU-2 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti M Paranjape

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Host-derived (LL-37 and synthetic (WLBU-2 cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs are known for their membrane-active bactericidal properties. LL-37 is an important mediator for immunomodulation, while the mechanism of action of WLBU-2 remains unclear. Objective: To determine if WLBU-2 induces an early proinflammatory response that facilitates bacterial clearance in cystic fibrosis (CF. Methods: C57BL6 mice were given intranasal or intraperitoneal 1×106 cfu/mL Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA and observed for 2h, followed by instillation of LL-37 or WLBU-2 (2-4mg/kg with subsequent tissue collection at 24h for determination of bacterial colony counts and quantitative RT-PCR measurement of cytokine transcripts. CF airway epithelial cells (IB3-1, ΔF508/W1282X were cultured in appropriate media with supplements. WLBU-2 (25μM was added to the media with RT-PCR measurement of TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts after 20, 30, and 60min. Flow cytometry was used to determine if WLBU-2 assists in cellular uptake of Alexa 488-labeled LPS. Results: In murine lung exposed to intranasal or intraperitoneal WLBU-2, there was a reduction in the number of surviving PA colonies compared to controls. Murine lung exposed to intraperitoneal WLBU-2 showed fewer PA colonies compared to LL-37. After 24h WLBU-2 exposure, PA-induced IL-1β transcripts from lungs showed a twofold decrease (p<0.05, while TNF-α levels were unchanged. LL-37 did not significantly change transcript levels. In IB3-1 cells, WLBU-2 exposure resulted in increased TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts that decreased by 60min. WLBU-2 treatment of IB3-1 cells displayed increased LPS uptake, suggesting a potential role for CAPs in inducing protective proinflammatory responses. Taken together, the cytokine response, LPS uptake, and established antimicrobial activity of WLBU-2 demonstrate its ability to modulate proinflammatory signaling as a protective mechanism to clear infection. Conclusions: The

  8. Antimicrobial resistance in veterinary medicine: mechanisms and bacterial agents with the greatest impact on human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketrin Cristina da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many retrospective and prospective studies have been performed to understand the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The rates of antimicrobial drug resistance among bacterial pathogens are high and now represent a worldwide concern, both in human medicine and veterinary practices. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and the risks associated with antimicrobial use in animal production. Pathogens with major impacts on human and animal health are discussed, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

  9. Cost effective purification of intein based syntetic cationic antimicrobial peptide expressed in cold shock expression system using salt inducible E. coli GJ1158

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    Seetha Ram Kotra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide (SC-AMP is an important and upcoming therapeutic molecule against onventional antibiotics. In this study, an attempt was made to purify the SC-AMP without the enzymatic cleavage of the affinity tag, by using an intein-based system. Methods:The intein sequence was amplified from pTYB11 vector using PCR methodologies and the N-terminal of intein was ligated with SC-AMP. The designed construct, intein-SC-AMP was cloned into MCS region of cold shock expression vector, pCOLDI and the recombinant peptide was purified on a chitin affinity column by cleaving intein with 50 mM DTT without applying enzymatic cleavage. Later the peptide was quantified and its antibacterial activity of the purified peptide was studied using well diffusion method. Results: Initially, intein-SC-AMP was expressed as a fusion protein in both IPTG inducible E. coli BL21(DE3 and salt inducible E. coli GJ1158. Single step purification using CBD (chitin binding domain - intein tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158, yields the SC-AMP in the soluble form at a oncentration of 208 mg/L. The antibacterial activity and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the purified SC-AMP was studied against both Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. Conclusion: For the first time, single step purification of soluble SC-AMP was carried out using chitin-binding domain affinity tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158 without an application of enzymatic cleavage. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(1:13-19

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from animals and humans in Brazil

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    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in Clostridium difficile strains isolated from animals and humans in Brazil. The 54 C. difficile strains used were isolated from stool samples from piglets (n=16, dogs (n=13, humans (n=13, foals (n=8 calves (n=2, an ocelot (n=1 and a maned wolf (n=1. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the serial plate agar dilution method for penicillin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, vancomycin, metronidazole and tylosin. The C. difficile strains assessed were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Florfenicol resistance was rarely observed; 52 (96.4% strains were sensitive to this antimicrobial. Five (9.3%, five (9.3%, 14 (25.9% and 20 (37.0% strains were resistant to oxytetracycline, penicillin, tylosin and erythromycin respectively.

  11. LEAP-1, a novel highly disulfide-bonded human peptide, exhibits antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A; Neitz, S; Mägert, H J; Schulz, A; Forssmann, W G; Schulz-Knappe, P; Adermann, K

    2000-09-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a novel human peptide with antimicrobial activity, termed LEAP-1 (liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide). Using a mass spectrometric assay detecting cysteine-rich peptides, a 25-residue peptide containing four disulfide bonds was identified in human blood ultrafiltrate. LEAP-1 expression was predominantly detected in the liver, and, to a much lower extent, in the heart. In radial diffusion assays, Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus carnosus, and Gram-negative Neisseria cinerea as well as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae dose-dependently exhibited sensitivity upon treatment with synthetic LEAP-1. The discovery of LEAP-1 extends the known families of mammalian peptides with antimicrobial activity by its novel disulfide motif and distinct expression pattern.

  12. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of dentifrices on human oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Zambon, Joseph J; Sreenivasan, Prem K

    2010-01-01

    In vitro testing of antimicrobial agents is an important tool in the testing hierarchy, and may provide interesting insights into their potential clinical efficacy. Agents with demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity may be effective against the same microorganisms in vivo, whereas agents without demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity are unlikely to exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity. In addition, these methods may also be useful in screening antimicrobial agents in product formulations because such agents with both in vitro and in vivo activity may have reduced antimicrobial effects when formulated into a dentifrice. Accordingly, this study examined the in vitro and ex vivo antimicrobial activity of three commercial dentifrices: one formulated with 0.243% sodium fluoride (Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste-Regular); one with 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate (Crest Pro-Health), and one with 0.3% triclosan, 2.0% PVM/MA copolymer, and 0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each dentifrice was determined for resident oral bacterial species, including bacteria that are associated with dental caries; periodontitis, and oral halitosis. Evaluations were performed on individual laboratory strains, and on oral bacteria from supragingival plaque samples obtained from 10 adults and from oral rinse samples obtained from 18 adults. The lowest MICs against the oral strains and human samples, i.e., greatest antimicrobial activity, were seen for the triclosan/ copolymer dentifrice. There was, in general, a four-fold difference in MICs between the triclosan/copolymer dentifrice and the stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate/zinc lactate dentifrice. The triclosan/copolymer dentifrice significantly inhibited periodontal pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. In ex vivo tests measuring antimicrobial effects, the

  13. Antimicrobial photodynamic treatment of gram-negative bacteria with a cationic phenothiazine dye under pulsed light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Yamaguchi, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Saito, Daizo; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2005-08-01

    In-vitro photodynamic inactivation of Ps. aeruginosa with methylene blue under pulsed light excitation was investigated at different pulse repetition rates. Bacterial suspensions were illuminated with 670-nm nanosecond pulsed light with a peak intensity of 2.0 MW/cm2 at pulse repetition rates in the range of 5-30 Hz. Photobactericidal effect increased with increasing pulse repetition rate for the same total light dose; more than two orders in magnitude reduction of bacterial survival fraction was obtained at 30 Hz. Such a positive dependence of photobactericidal effect on pulse repetition rate was inconsistent with our previous results for human lung cancer cells that were photodynamically treated with a lysosomal sensitizer. The reason for the increased photobactericidal effect at the high pulse repetition rate is discussed.

  14. Structural location determines functional roles of the basic amino acids of KR-12, the smallest antimicrobial peptide from human cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Biswajit; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Wang, Guangshun

    2013-11-14

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are recognized templates for developing a new generation of antimicrobials to combat superbugs. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is an essential host defense molecule in human innate immunity. Previously, we identified KR-12 as the smallest antibacterial peptide of LL-37. KR-12 has a narrow activity spectrum since it is active against Gram-negative Escherichia coli but not Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The functional roles of the basic amino acids of KR-12, however, have not yet been elucidated. An alanine scan of cationic amino acids of KR-12 provided evidence for their distinct roles in the activities of the peptides. Bacterial killing and membrane permeation experiments indicate that the R23A and K25A mutants, as well as the lysine-to-arginine mutant, were more potent than KR-12. Another three cationic residues (K18, R19, and R29) of KR-12, which are located in the hydrophilic face of the amphiphathic helix, appeared to be more important in clustering anionic lipids or hemolysis than R23 and K25 in the interfacial region. While the loss of interfacial R23 or K25 reduced peptide helicity, underscoring its important role in membrane binding, the overall increase in peptide activity of KR-12 could be ascribed to the increased peptide hydrophobicity that outweighed the role of basic charge in this case. In contrast, the mutations of interfacial R23 or K25 reduced peptide bactericidal activity of GF-17, an overlapping, more hydrophobic and potent peptide also derived from LL-37. Thus, the hydrophobic context of the peptide determines whether an alanine substitution of an interfacial basic residue increases or decreases membrane permeation and peptide activity.

  15. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: II. model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on a strong cation exchange resin exhibit a peculiar elution pattern: the protein elutes with two peaks in a modifier gradient. This behavior is modeled with a general rate model, where the two elution peaks are modeled with two binding conformations, one of which is at equilibrium conditions, while for the other, the adsorption process is rate limited. Isocratic experiments under nonadsorbing conditions were used to characterize the mass transfer process. The isotherm of both adsorption conformations as well as the kinetic of adsorption and desorption for the second conformation are functions of the modifier concentration. They are evaluated with linear modifier gradient experiments and step experiments with various adsorption times. All experimental features are well reproduced by the proposed modified general rate model.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. from humans, pigs, cattle, and broilers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Nielsen, E. M.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    The MICs of 16 antimicrobial agents were determined for 202 Campylobacter jejuni isolates, 123 Campylobacter coli isolates, and 6 Campylobacter lari isolates from humans and food animals in Denmark. The C.jejuni isolates originated from humans (75), broilers (95), cattle (29), and pigs (3); the C....... coil isolates originated from humans (7), broilers (17), and pigs (99); and the C. lari isolates originated from broilers (5) and cattle (1), All isolates were susceptible to apramycin, neomycin, and gentamicin, Only a few C.jejuni isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents, Resistance...... to tetracycline was more common among C.jejuni isolates from humans (11%) than among C, jejuni isolates from animals (0 to 2%), More resistance to streptomycin was found among C, jejuni isolates from cattle (10%) than among those from humans (4%) or broilers (1%), A greater proportion of C. coil than of C, jejuni...

  17. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of human Brucella melitensis isolates from Qatar between 2014 - 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, A.; Hagen, F.; Sharabasi, O.A.; Abraham, M.; Wilson, G.; Doiphode, S.; Maslamani, M.A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic disease affecting humans and animals and is endemic in many parts of the world including the Gulf Cooperation Council region (GCC). The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of B

  18. Human health hazard from antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals and food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Collignon, P.

    2006-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in the modern farm industry has created a reservoir of resistant bacteria in food animals. Foods of animal origin are often contaminated with enterococci that are likely to contribute resistance genes, virulence factors, or other properties to enterococci IN humans...

  19. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of human Brucella melitensis isolates from Qatar between 2014 - 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, A.; Hagen, F.; Sharabasi, O.A.; Abraham, M.; Wilson, G.; Doiphode, S.; Maslamani, M.A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic disease affecting humans and animals and is endemic in many parts of the world including the Gulf Cooperation Council region (GCC). The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of

  20. Transport of dicationic drugs pentamidine and furamidine by human organic cation transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Ju, Wujian; Wu, Huali; Tidwell, Richard R; Hall, James E; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2009-02-01

    The antiparasitic activity of aromatic diamidine drugs, pentamidine and furamidine, depends on their entry into the pathogenic protozoa via membrane transporters. However, no such diamidine transporter has been identified in mammalian cells. The goal of this study is to investigate whether these dicationic drugs are substrates for human organic cation transporters (hOCTs, solute carrier family 22A1-3) and whether hOCTs play a role in their tissue distribution, elimination, and toxicity. Inhibitory and substrate activities of pentamidine and furamidine were studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The results of [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium uptake study showed that pentamidine is a potent inhibitor for all three OCT isoforms (IC50 pentamidine and furamidine was 4.4- and 9.3-fold greater, respectively, in CHO-hOCT1 cells compared with the mock cells. Ranitidine, an hOCT1 inhibitor, reversed this hOCT1-mediated potentiation of cytotoxicity. This is the first finding that dicationic drugs, such as pentamidine and furamidine, are substrates for hOCT1. In humans, aromatic diamidines are primarily eliminated in the bile but are distributed and cause toxicity in both liver and kidney. These transporters may play important roles in the disposition of aromatic diamidines in humans, as well as resultant drug-drug interactions and toxicity involving diamidine drugs.

  1. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer.

  2. Dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant clones of Salmonella enterica among domestic animals, wild animals, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Gonzalo; Campos, Maria Jorge; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Quesada, Alberto; Píriz, Segundo

    2013-02-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. This work focuses on the identification of Salmonella enterica clonal strains which, presenting a wide distribution potential, express resistance determinants that compromise effectiveness of the antimicrobial therapy. The screening was performed on 506 Salmonella enterica isolates from animals and humans, which were characterized by serovar and phage typing, genome macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and detection of phenotypic and genotypic traits for antimicrobial resistance. A Salmonella Enteritidis strain with strong quinolone resistance is spread on three host environments carrying one of the four variants found for the GyrA protein: (1) Asp87Tyr, the major polymorphism found in 39 Salmonella isolates from human origin and six from poultry; (2) Ser83Phe, with four isolates from human origin and one from white stork (Ciconia ciconia); and (3) Asp87Asn or (4) Asp87Gly, with two isolates each from human origins. Several Salmonella Typhimurium strains that presented int1 elements and the classically associated pentaresistance (ACSSuT) phenotype were found distributed between two host environments: domestic animals and humans, domestics and wild animals, or wild fauna plus humans. This study points out the importance of monitoring gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance from wildlife, in parallel to livestock animals and humans, especially for animal species that are in close contact with people.

  3. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactoferrin-Related Peptides and Applications in Human and Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Bruni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent a vast array of molecules produced by virtually all living organisms as natural barriers against infection. Among AMP sources, an interesting class regards the food-derived bioactive agents. The whey protein lactoferrin (Lf is an iron-binding glycoprotein that plays a significant role in the innate immune system, and is considered as an important host defense molecule. In search for novel antimicrobial agents, Lf offers a new source with potential pharmaceutical applications. The Lf-derived peptides Lf(1–11, lactoferricin (Lfcin and lactoferrampin exhibit interesting and more potent antimicrobial actions than intact protein. Particularly, Lfcin has demonstrated strong antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiparasitic activity with promising applications both in human and veterinary diseases (from ocular infections to osteo-articular, gastrointestinal and dermatological diseases.

  5. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of PDC213, an endogenous peptide from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yazhou; Zhou, Yahui; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Linping; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xing; Ruan, Hongjie; Ji, Chenbo; Cui, Xianwei; Wang, Jiaqin

    2017-02-26

    Human milk has always been considered an ideal source of elemental nutrients to both preterm and full term infants in order to optimally develop the infant's tissues and organs. Recently, hundreds of endogenous milk peptides were identified in human milk. These peptides exhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, immunomodulation, or antimicrobial activity. Here, we report the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of a novel type of human antimicrobial peptide (AMP), termed PDC213 (peptide derived from β-Casein 213-226 aa). PDC213 is an endogenous peptide and is present at higher levels in preterm milk than in full term milk. The inhibitory concentration curve and disk diffusion tests showed that PDC213 had obvious antimicrobial against S. aureus and Y. enterocolitica, the common nosocomial pathogens in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Fluorescent dye methods, electron microscopy experiments and DNA-binding activity assays further indicated that PDC213 can permeabilize bacterial membranes and cell walls rather than bind intracellular DNA to kill bacteria. Together, our results suggest that PDC213 is a novel type of AMP that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and analysis of cation channel homologues in human pathogenic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Prole

    Full Text Available Fungi are major causes of human, animal and plant disease. Human fungal infections can be fatal, but there are limited options for therapy, and resistance to commonly used anti-fungal drugs is widespread. The genomes of many fungi have recently been sequenced, allowing identification of proteins that may become targets for novel therapies. We examined the genomes of human fungal pathogens for genes encoding homologues of cation channels, which are prominent drug targets. Many of the fungal genomes examined contain genes encoding homologues of potassium (K(+, calcium (Ca(2+ and transient receptor potential (Trp channels, but not sodium (Na(+ channels or ligand-gated channels. Some fungal genomes contain multiple genes encoding homologues of K(+ and Trp channel subunits, and genes encoding novel homologues of voltage-gated K(v channel subunits are found in Cryptococcus spp. Only a single gene encoding a homologue of a plasma membrane Ca(2+ channel was identified in the genome of each pathogenic fungus examined. These homologues are similar to the Cch1 Ca(2+ channel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomes of Aspergillus spp. and Cryptococcus spp., but not those of S. cerevisiae or the other pathogenic fungi examined, also encode homologues of the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (MCU. In contrast to humans, which express many K(+, Ca(2+ and Trp channels, the genomes of pathogenic fungi encode only very small numbers of K(+, Ca(2+ and Trp channel homologues. Furthermore, the sequences of fungal K(+, Ca(2+, Trp and MCU channels differ from those of human channels in regions that suggest differences in regulation and susceptibility to drugs.

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Croton macrostachyus Stem Bark Extracts against Several Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie K. Obey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Kenya, leaves and roots from Croton macrostachyus are used as a traditional medicine for infectious diseases such as typhoid and measles, but reports on possible antimicrobial activity of stem bark do not exist. In this study, the antibacterial and antifungal effects of methanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts, and purified lupeol of C. macrostachyus stem bark were determined against important human gram-negative pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes, gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, and a fungus Candida albicans. The most promising broad scale antimicrobial activity against all the studied pathogens was shown by the ethyl acetate extract. The ethyl acetate extract induced the zone of inhibition between 10.1±0.6 mm and 16.0±1.2 mm against S. typhi, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. aerogenes, and L. monocytogenes with weaker antimicrobial activity against C. albicans (zone of inhibition: 5.6±1.0 mm. The antibiotic controls (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, clotrimazole, and cefotaxime showed antimicrobial activity with zones of inhibition within 13.4±0.7–22.1±0.9 mm. The ethyl acetate extract had MIC in the range of 125–250 mg/mL against all the studied bacteria and against C. albicans MIC was 500 mg/mL. The present results give scientific evidence and support the traditional use of C. macrostachyus stem bark as a source for antimicrobials. We show that C. macrostachyus stem bark lupeol is a promising antimicrobial agent against several important human pathogens.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Croton macrostachyus Stem Bark Extracts against Several Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obey, Jackie K.; von Wright, Atte; Orjala, Jimmy; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, leaves and roots from Croton macrostachyus are used as a traditional medicine for infectious diseases such as typhoid and measles, but reports on possible antimicrobial activity of stem bark do not exist. In this study, the antibacterial and antifungal effects of methanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts, and purified lupeol of C. macrostachyus stem bark were determined against important human gram-negative pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes, gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, and a fungus Candida albicans. The most promising broad scale antimicrobial activity against all the studied pathogens was shown by the ethyl acetate extract. The ethyl acetate extract induced the zone of inhibition between 10.1 ± 0.6 mm and 16.0 ± 1.2 mm against S. typhi, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. aerogenes, and L. monocytogenes with weaker antimicrobial activity against C. albicans (zone of inhibition: 5.6 ± 1.0 mm). The antibiotic controls (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, clotrimazole, and cefotaxime) showed antimicrobial activity with zones of inhibition within 13.4 ± 0.7–22.1 ± 0.9 mm. The ethyl acetate extract had MIC in the range of 125–250 mg/mL against all the studied bacteria and against C. albicans MIC was 500 mg/mL. The present results give scientific evidence and support the traditional use of C. macrostachyus stem bark as a source for antimicrobials. We show that C. macrostachyus stem bark lupeol is a promising antimicrobial agent against several important human pathogens. PMID:27293897

  9. The human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part III: Distribution homogeneity and pH dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, P.; Barksmann, T. L.; Christophersen, P.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneity of the distribution of the non-selective voltage-dependent cation channel (the NSVDC channel) in the human erythrocyte, and the pH dependence was investigated. Activation of this channel caused a uniform cellular dehydration, which was characterized by the changes in the erythrocyte...

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance in Non-Typhoidal Salmonella from Humans, Retail Meats and Food Animals: 2002-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitor System (NARMS) tracks antimicrobial susceptibility in enteric bacteria from humans, retail meats and food animals. We analyzed changes in ceftiofur resistance (TioR), nalidixic acid resistance (NalR) and multidrug resistance (MDR-AmpC, define...

  11. Signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein upregulates transforming growth factor-alpha expression in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao-Teng; Kao, Yu-Lin; Wu, Chia-Mao; Fan, Tan-Chi; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Huang, Kai-Ling; Chang, Yuo-Sheng; Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2007-04-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is a major component of eosinophil granule protein that is used as a clinical bio-marker for asthma and allergic inflammatory diseases. Previously, it has been reported that the signal peptide of human ECP (ECPsp) inhibits the cell growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), but not mammalian A431 cells. The inhibitory effect is due to the lack of human signal peptide peptidase (hSPP), a protease located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, in the lower organisms. In this study, we show that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated by the exogenous ECPsp-eGFP as a result of the increased expression of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) at both transcriptional and translational levels in A431 and HL-60 clone 15 cell lines. Furthermore, the N-terminus of ECPsp fragment generated by the cleavage of hSPP (ECPspM1-G17) gives rise to over threefold increase of TGF-alpha protein expression, whereas another ECPsp fragment (ECPspL18-A27) and the hSPP-resistant ECPsp (ECPspG17L) do not show similar effect. Our results indicate that the ECPspM1-G17 plays a crucial role in the upregulation of TGF-alpha, suggesting that the ECPsp not only directs the secretion of mature ECP, but also involves in the autocrine system.

  12. Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolaia, V; Espinosa-Gongora, C; Guardabassi, L

    2016-02-01

    Enterococci and staphylococci are frequent contaminants on poultry meat. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus are also well-known aetiological agents of a wide variety of infections resulting in major healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of the human health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic human pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the risk of food-borne transmission of antimicrobial resistance. In the absence of conclusive evidence of transmission, this risk was inferred using data from scientific articles and national reports on prevalence, bacterial load, antimicrobial resistance and clonal distribution of these three species on poultry meat. The risks associated with ingestion of antimicrobial-resistant enterococci of poultry origin comprise horizontal transfer of resistance genes and transmission of multidrug-resistant E. faecalis lineages such as sequence type ST16. Enterococcus faecium lineages occurring in poultry meat products are distantly related to those causing hospital-acquired infections but may act as donors of quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance and other resistance determinants of clinical interest to the human gut microbiota. Ingestion of poultry meat contaminated with S. aureus may lead to food poisoning. However, antimicrobial resistance in the toxin-producing strains does not have clinical implications because food poisoning is not managed by antimicrobial therapy. Recently methicillin-resistant S. aureus of livestock origin has been reported on poultry meat. In theory handling or ingestion of contaminated meat is a potential risk factor for colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. However, this risk is presently regarded as negligible by public health authorities.

  13. ECDC/EFSA/EMA first joint report on the integrated analysis of the consumption of antimicrobial agents and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from humans and food-producing animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ECDC, the EFSA and the EMA have for the first time jointly explored associations between consumption of antimicrobials in humans and food-producing animals, and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from humans and food-producing animals, using 2011 and 2012 data currently available from their relevant five EU monitoring networks. Combined data on antimicrobial consumption and corresponding resistance in animals and humans for EU MSs and reporting countries were analysed using logistic regression models for selected combinations of bacteria and antimicrobials. A summary indicator of the proportion of resistant bacteria in the main food-producing animal species was calculated for the analysis, as consumption data in food-producing animals were not available at the species level. Comparison of antimicrobial consumption data in animals and humans in 2012, both expressed in milligrams per kilogram of estimated biomass, revealed that overall antimicrobial consumption was higher in animals than in humans, although contrasting situations were observed between countries. The consumption of several antimicrobials extensively used in animal husbandry was higher in animals than in humans, while consumption of antimicrobials critically important for human medicine (such as fluoroquinolones and 3rd- and 4th-generation cephalosporins was higher in humans. In both humans and animals, positive associations between consumption of antimicrobials and the corresponding resistance in bacteria were observed for most of the combinations investigated. In some cases, a positive association was also found between antimicrobial consumption in animals and resistance in bacteria from humans. While highlighting findings of concern, these results should be interpreted with caution owing to current data limitations and the complexity of the AMR phenomenon, which is influenced by several factors besides antimicrobial consumption. Recommendations to address current data

  14. In-vitro effects of the antimicrobial peptide Ala8,13,18-magainin II amide on isolated human first trimester villous trophoblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huppertz Berthold

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs has gained pace toward using their potential to replace conventional antibiotics. These peptides preferentially interact with negatively charged membrane lipids typically seen in bacteria and thereby lead to membrane perturbations and membrane dysfunction. However, one possible disadvantage of AMP drugs is their potential for toxicity, especially to those cells which display externalization of negatively charged moieties to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane during the process of syncytialization. Human placental villous trophoblast is one such cell type. Indeed, intra-vaginal administration of an antimicrobial cationic peptide Ala8,13,18-magainin II amide (AMA which is a synthetic analogue of magainin 2 derived from Xenopus frog has been observed to result in inhibition of pregnancy establishment in monkeys. However, only little is known about the cellular behavior of early placental cytotrophoblasts (CTB in the presence of cationic antimicrobial peptides. It is believed that suitable cell culture approaches using AMA as a representative alpha-helical AMP may yield tangible knowledge in this regard. Methods Immunocytochemical (ICC analyses using confocal microscopy (n = 6 for each treatment sub-group and Western blot (WB method (n = 5 for each treatment sub-group of CTB differentiation based on synthesis of beta-hCG and hPL, and apoptosis based on apoptosis-associated cytokeratin 18 neo-epitope (CK18f were performed for CTB isolated from human first trimester placental villi and grown in serum-free primary culture for 24 h, 48 h and 96 h on rat-tail collagen with and without AMA (1000 ng/ml. Moreover, secretion of beta-hCG and hPL into conditioned media from isolated CTB grown in vitro for 24 h, 48 h and 96 h (n = 6/each sub-group with and without AMA was examined using enzyme immunoassays. Furthermore, TUNEL assay, and cell viability based on LDH leakage into medium (n

  15. Effects of ionic strength on passive and iontophoretic transport of cationic permeant across human nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelly A; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2009-06-01

    Transport across the human nail under hydration can be modeled as hindered transport across aqueous pore pathways. As such, nail permselectivity to charged species can be manipulated by changing the ionic strength of the system in transungual delivery to treat nail diseases. The present study investigated the effects of ionic strength upon transungual passive and iontophoretic transport. Transungual passive and anodal iontophoretic transport experiments of tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) were conducted under symmetric conditions in which the donor and receiver had the same ionic strength in vitro. Experiments under asymmetric conditions were performed to mimic the in vivo conditions. Prior to the transport studies, TEA uptake studies were performed to assess the partitioning of TEA into the nail. Permselectivity towards TEA was inversely related to ionic strength in both passive and iontophoretic transport. The permeability and transference number of TEA were higher at lower ionic strengths under the symmetric conditions due to increased partitioning of TEA into the nail. Transference numbers were smaller under the asymmetric conditions compared with their symmetric counterparts. The results demonstrate significant ionic strength effects upon the partitioning and transport of a cationic permeant in transungual transport, which may be instrumental in the development of transungual delivery systems.

  16. Identification and characterization of human eosinophil cationic protein by an epitope-specific antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, E; Carreras, E; Nikolovski, Z; Cuchillo, C M; Nogués, M V

    2001-06-01

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is a basic secretion protein involved in the immune response system. ECP levels in biological fluids are an indicator of eosinophil-specific activation and degranulation and are currently used for the clinical monitoring and diagnosis of inflammatory disorders. A polyclonal epitope-specific antibody has been obtained by immunizing rabbits with a conjugated synthetic peptide. A sequence corresponding to a large exposed loop in the human ECP three-dimensional structure (D115-Y122) was selected as a putative antigenic epitope. The antibody was purified on an affinity column using recombinant ECP (rECP) as antigen. The antibody (D112-P123 Ab) specifically recognizes rECP and its native glycosylated and nonglycosylated forms in plasma, granulocytes, and sputum. The antibody detects as little as 1 ng of rECP, can be used both in reducing and nonreducing conditions, and does not cross-react with the highly homologous eosinophil-derived neurotoxin or other proteins of the pancreatic ribonuclease superfamily.

  17. Modulation by Divalent Cations of GABAρ1 Receptor From Human Retina Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate functional homooligomeric GABAρ1 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the modulation of divalent cations. Methods GABAρ1 cDNA from human retina was transcribed in vitro to obtain sense ρ1 mRNA, which was microinjected into Xenopus oocytes. Two-electrodes voltage clamp technique was performed to record GABA-induced currents. Results  Expressed receptors were found to have similar properties to GABAC receptors characterized in the retina. Cl-currents induced by GABA were blocked by picrotoxin instead of bicuculline. GABA-induced currents reversed at -19±2.5 mV, and EC50 was 3.3 μmol/L. Zn+ + modulated GABA-induced currents with an IC50=9.6 μ mol/L. Ni+ +, Cu+ + and Cd+ + inhibited GABA ρ1 obviously, too. Their rank order of potency was Zn+ +>Ni+ +>Cu+ +>Cd+ +. Conclusion Zinc(10 μmol/L) inhibited GABA-induced currents in a competitive manner, and its action was sensitive to extracellular pH. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that substitution of a single histidine residue (H44 and H48) failed to affect zinc sensitivity.

  18. The use of versatile plant antimicrobial peptides in agribusiness and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; e Silva Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Sousa, Daniel Amaro; Viana, Juliane Cançado; de Oliveira-Júnior, Nelson Gomes; Miranda, Vívian; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Plant immune responses involve a wide diversity of physiological reactions that are induced by the recognition of pathogens, such as hypersensitive responses, cell wall modifications, and the synthesis of antimicrobial molecules including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These proteinaceous molecules have been widely studied, presenting peculiar characteristics such as conserved domains and a conserved disulfide bond pattern. Currently, many AMP classes with diverse modes of action are known, having been isolated from a large number of organisms. Plant AMPs comprise an interesting source of studies nowadays, and among these there are reports of different classes, including defensins, albumins, cyclotides, snakins and several others. These peptides have been widely used in works that pursue human disease control, including nosocomial infections, as well as for agricultural purposes. In this context, this review will focus on the relevance of the structural-function relations of AMPs derived from plants and their proper use in applications for human health and agribusiness.

  19. World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their importance in human medicine: A critical step for developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter; Powers, John H; Chiller, Tom M; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-07-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals creates an important source of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that can spread to humans through the food supply. Improved management of the use of antimicrobials in food animals, particularly reducing the usage of those that are "critically important" for human medicine, is an important step toward preserving the benefits of antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization has developed and applied criteria to rank antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine. Clinicians, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and other stakeholders can use this ranking when developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals. The ranking allows stakeholders to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine and, thus, need to be addressed most urgently, such as fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins.

  20. World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies for the Use of Antimicrobials in Food Production Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collignon, P.; Powers, J. H.; Chiller, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals creates an important source of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that can spread to humans through the food supply. Improved management of the use of antimicrobials in food animals, particularly reducing the usage of those that are "critically important...... stakeholders can use this ranking when developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals. The ranking allows stakeholders to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine and, thus, need to be addressed......" for human medicine, is an important step toward preserving the benefits of antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization has developed and applied criteria to rank antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine. Clinicians, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and other...

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AMONG ENTERIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN AND ANIMAL WASTES AND IMPACTED SURFACE WATERS: COMPARISON WITH NARMS FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with bacteria exhibiting mono or multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) has been a growing problem in the US, and studies have implicated livestock as a source of MAR bacteria primarily through foodborne transmission routes. However, waterborne transmission of...

  2. Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohynek, Liisa J; Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Kähkönen, Marja P; Heinonen, Marina; Helander, Ilkka M; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta H

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity and mechanisms of phenolic extracts of 12 Nordic berries were studied against selected human pathogenic microbes. The most sensitive bacteria on berry phenolics were Helicobacter pylori and Bacillus cereus. Campylobacter jejuni and Candida albicans were inhibited only with phenolic extracts of cloudberry, raspberry, and strawberry, which all were rich in ellagitannins. Cloudberry extract gave strong microbicidic effects on the basis of plate count with all studied strains. However, fluorescence staining of liquid cultures of virulent Salmonella showed viable cells not detectable by plate count adhering to cloudberry extract, whereas Staphylococcus aureus cells adhered to berry extracts were dead on the basis of their fluorescence and plate count. Phenolic extracts of cloudberry and raspberry disintegrated the outer membrane of examined Salmonella strains as indicated by 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) uptake increase and analysis of liberation of [14C]galactose- lipopolysaccharide. Gallic acid effectively permeabilized the tested Salmonella strains, and significant increase in the NPN uptake was recorded. The stability of berry phenolics and their antimicrobial activity in berries stored frozen for a year were examined using Escherichia coli and nonvirulent Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium. The amount of phenolic compounds decreased in all berries, but their antimicrobial activity was not influenced accordingly. Cloudberry, in particular, showed constantly strong antimicrobial activity during the storage.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serovars of Salmonella from chickens and humans in Ibadan, Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fashae, K; Ogunsola, F; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2010-01-01

    ; S. Virchow (71%) predominated. A high frequency (87%) of reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was observed among the chicken isolates. A high frequency of resistance to tetracycline (93%), nalidixic acid (81%), and sulfamethoxazole (87%) was observed. Rare serovars such as S. Apapa, S. Mouschaui...... locating the reservoirs responsible for invasive salmonellosis in humans are needed. Controls and targeted interventions against S. Virchow and the frequent occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in chickens should be initiated to prevent the spread of this serovar....

  4. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue...

  5. Hybrid Antifouling and Antimicrobial Coatings Prepared by Electroless Co-Deposition of Fluoropolymer and Cationic Silica Nanoparticles on Stainless Steel: Efficacy against Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Chen, Juhong; Nugen, Sam R; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-06-29

    Controlling formation, establishment, and proliferation of microbial biofilms on surfaces is critical for ensuring public safety. Herein, we report on the synthesis of antimicrobial nanoparticles and their co-deposition along with fluorinated nanoparticles during electroless nickel plating of stainless steel. Plating bath composition is optimized to ensure sufficiently low surface energy to resist fouling and microbial adhesion as well as to exert significant (>99.99% reduction) antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The resulting coatings present hybrid antifouling and antimicrobial character, can be applied onto stainless steel, and do not rely on leaching or migration of the antimicrobial nanoparticles to be effective. Such coatings can support reducing public health issues related to microbial cross-contamination in areas such as food processing, hospitals, and water purification.

  6. 阳离子抗菌肽的杀菌及抗药性机制的研究进展%Research Progress on Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Antibacterial and Drug-resistant Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪军; 胡建业

    2012-01-01

    阳离子抗菌肽是生物体抵御外源性病原微生物入侵而产生的一类小分子多肽,广泛分布于生物体内,具有广谱抗菌活性,是生物体先天性免疫防御系统的重要组成部分.除了具有抗细菌功能外,还具有抗真菌、抗原虫、抗病毒及抑制肿瘤细胞等功能,并对正常的真核细胞毒性较低,是新一代抗生素的理想替代品,但是同抗生素一样,部分细菌也能对抗菌肽产生抗药性.作者将从阳离子抗菌肽的杀菌及抗药性机制等方面进行阐述.%Cationic antimicrobial peptides were a class of small peptides with anti-extrogenous pathogen invasion. As an important component of congenital immune defense system against infections, they were widely distributed in vivo. It exhibited potent and broad-spectrum activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, and cancer cells,and normal eukaryotic cells with low toxicity. It was an ideal alternative to a new generation of antibiotics. However, the same as antibiotics, some bacteria were resistant to certain antimicrobial peptides. The antibacterial and drug-resistant mechanism of the cationic antimicrobial peptides were summarized in the article to provide certain reference.

  7. Design of host defence peptides for antimicrobial and immunity enhancing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Joseph B; Scott, Monisha G; Hancock, Robert E W

    2005-05-01

    Host defense peptides are a vital component of the innate immune systems of humans, other mammals, amphibians, and arthropods. The related cationic antimicrobial peptides are also produced by many species of bacteria and function as part of the antimicrobial arsenal to help the producing organism reduce competition for resources from sensitive species. The antimicrobial activities of many of these peptides have been extensively characterized and the structural requirements for these activities are also becoming increasingly clear. In addition to their known antimicrobial role, many host defense peptides are also involved in a plethora of immune functions in the host. In this review, we examine the role of structure in determining antimicrobial activity of certain prototypical cationic peptides and ways that bacteria have evolved to usurp these activities. We also review recent literature on what structural components are related to these immunomodulatory effects. It must be stressed however that these studies, and the area of peptide research, are still in their infancy.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergence and spread of antibacterial resistance, including optimal use of antibiotics in both humans and animals. A global action plan on antimicrobial resistance was adopted by Member States at the ...

  9. Antimicrobial drug use in food-producing animals and associated human health risks: what, and how strong, is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzer, Karin; Wong, Nora; Thomas, Joe; Talkington, Kathy; Jungman, Elizabeth; Coukell, Allan

    2017-07-04

    Antimicrobial resistance is a public health threat. Because antimicrobial consumption in food-producing animals contributes to the problem, policies restricting the inappropriate or unnecessary agricultural use of antimicrobial drugs are important. However, this link between agricultural antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance has remained contested by some, with potentially disruptive effects on efforts to move towards the judicious or prudent use of these drugs. The goal of this review is to systematically evaluate the types of evidence available for each step in the causal pathway from antimicrobial use on farms to human public health risk, and to evaluate the strength of evidence within a 'Grades of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation'(GRADE) framework. The review clearly demonstrates that there is compelling scientific evidence available to support each step in the causal pathway, from antimicrobial use on farms to a public health burden caused by infections with resistant pathogens. Importantly, the pathogen, antimicrobial drug and treatment regimen, and general setting (e.g., feed type) can have significant impacts on how quickly resistance emerges or spreads, for how long resistance may persist after antimicrobial exposures cease, and what public health impacts may be associated with antimicrobial use on farms. Therefore an exact quantification of the public health burden attributable to antimicrobial drug use in animal agriculture compared to other sources remains challenging. Even though more research is needed to close existing data gaps, obtain a better understanding of how antimicrobial drugs are actually used on farms or feedlots, and quantify the risk associated with antimicrobial use in animal agriculture, these findings reinforce the need to act now and restrict antibiotic use in animal agriculture to those instances necessary to ensure the health and well-being of the animals.

  10. Detection and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes in Campylobacter spp. isolated from chickens and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. are common pathogenic bacteria in both veterinary and human medicine. Infections caused by Campylobacter spp. are usually treated using antibiotics. However, the injudicious use of antibiotics has been proven to spearhead the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of this study was to detect the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in Campylobacter spp. isolated from chickens and human clinical cases in South Africa. One hundred and sixty one isolates of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were collected from chickens and human clinical cases and then screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. We observed a wide distribution of the tetO gene, which confers resistance to tetracycline. The gyrA genes that are responsible quinolone resistance were also detected. Finally, our study also detected the presence of the blaOXA-61, which is associated with ampicillin resistance. There was a higher (p < 0.05 prevalence of the studied antimicrobial resistance genes in chicken faeces compared with human clinical isolates. The tetO gene was the most prevalent gene detected, which was isolated at 64% and 68% from human and chicken isolates, respectively. The presence of gyrA genes was significantly (p < 0.05 associated with quinolone resistance. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the presence of gyrA (235 bp, gyrA (270 bp, blaOXA-61 and tetO antimicrobial resistance genes in C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from chickens and human clinical cases. This indicates that Campylobacter spp. have the potential of resistance to a number of antibiotic classes.

  11. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-03-14

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal-associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water.

  12. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2017-01-01

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal–associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water. PMID:28335438

  13. An ecological approach to assessing the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in animal and human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Alison E; Matthews, Louise; Mellor, Dominic J; Reeve, Richard; Denwood, Matthew J; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Brown, Derek J; Coia, John E; Browning, Lynda M; Haydon, Daniel T; Reid, Stuart W J

    2012-04-22

    We examined long-term surveillance data on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (DT104) isolates from concurrently sampled and sympatric human and animal populations in Scotland. Using novel ecological and epidemiological approaches to examine diversity, and phenotypic and temporal relatedness of the resistance profiles, we assessed the more probable source of resistance of these two populations. The ecological diversity of AMR phenotypes was significantly greater in human isolates than in animal isolates, at the resolution of both sample and population. Of 5200 isolates, there were 65 resistance phenotypes, 13 unique to animals, 30 unique to humans and 22 were common to both. Of these 22, 11 were identified first in the human isolates, whereas only five were identified first in the animal isolates. We conclude that, while ecologically connected, animals and humans have distinguishable DT104 communities, differing in prevalence, linkage and diversity. Furthermore, we infer that the sympatric animal population is unlikely to be the major source of resistance diversity for humans. This suggests that current policy emphasis on restricting antimicrobial use in domestic animals may be overly simplistic. While these conclusions pertain to DT104 in Scotland, this approach could be applied to AMR in other bacteria-host ecosystems.

  14. Inhibition of human organic cation transporters by the alkaloids matrine and oxymatrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaolei; Wang, Li; Gründemann, Dirk; Sweet, Douglas H

    2014-01-01

    Human organic cation transporters (hOCTs; SLC22) are expressed in many organs, including intestine, liver, kidney, heart and brain, where they contribute to the absorption, distribution, and elimination of endogenous and exogenous substances. The alkaloids matrine and oxymatrine are widely used in herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer, as well as viral, and cardiac diseases. Their physicochemical properties indicated that they are potential inhibitors for hOCTs, leading to drug-drug interactions in vivo. Therefore, we assessed the inhibitory effects of matrine and oxymatrine on the function of hOCT1 (SLC22A1), hOCT2 (SLC22A2) and hOCT3 (SLC22A3) using stably transfected transporter-expressing cells. At 100-fold excess, oxymatrine exhibited marked inhibition of hOCT1-mediated substrate uptake (pmatrine failed to produce significant inhibition on hOCT1. The IC50 value for oxymatrine on hOCT1 was estimated as 513±132 μM. While there was no significant inhibition of hOCT2 or hOCT3 at 100-fold excess, oxymatrine and matrine showed 42% and 88% inhibition of hOCT3-mediated substrate uptake at 3 and 6mM, respectively. Considering the potential intestinal lumen and reported plasma concentrations of matrine and oxymatrine, these data suggest that drug-drug interactions may occur during hOCT1-mediated hepatic and renal uptake and during hOCT3-mediated intestinal absorption.

  15. Characterization of Cimex lectularius (bedbug) defensin peptide and its antimicrobial activity against human skin microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Akanksha; Gupta, Kajal; van Hoek, Monique L

    2016-02-19

    Antimicrobial peptides are components of both vertebrate and invertebrate innate immune systems that are expressed in response to exposure to bacterial antigens. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily ancient species have been extensively studied and are being developed as potential therapeutics against antibiotic resistant microorganisms. In this study, a putative Cimex lectularius (bedbug, CL) defensin is characterized for its effectiveness against human skin flora including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The bedbug defensin (CL-defensin), belonging to family of insect defensins, is predicted to have a characteristic N-terminal loop, an α-helix, and an antiparallel β-sheet, which was supported by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The defensin was shown to be antimicrobial against Gram-positive bacteria commonly found on human skin (Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium renale, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis); however, it was ineffective against common skin Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii) under low-salt conditions. CL-defensin was also effective against M. luteus and C. renale in high-salt (MIC) conditions. Our studies indicate that CL-defensin functions by depolarization and pore-formation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

  16. Antimicrobial properties of marine seaweed, Sargassum muticum against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Puthamohan Vinayaga Moorthi; Chelliah Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antibacterial efficiency of the seaweed, Sargassum muticum (S. muticum) collected from Pudumadam, Ramanathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods:Crude solvent extracts of S. muticum were obtained by using Soxhlet extraction and the solvents like acetone, methanol and chloroform. These different extracts were tested against different human bacterial pathogens such as Micrococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistance), Salmonella paratyphi B, Staphylococcus epidermis (3615), Enterobacter aerogenus (111), Klebsiella pneumonia (109), Shigella fleschneri (1457) (S. fleschneri), Proteus vulgaris (1771), Staphylococcus aureus (96) and Salmonella typhymurium (SP7) which were obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection, Indian Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh, India. Results:The results revealed that acetone extract had unveiled the maximum of 11 mm zone of inhibition at 40 µL against S. fleschneri. Similar zone of inhibition (11 mm) was also observed at 50 µL against Micrococcus sp. and S. fleschneri. Followed by acetone extract, chloroform extract also contributed 11 mm zone of inhibition against S. fleschneri and Salmonella paratyphi B at 40 and 50 µL respectively. Besides, methanol extracts revealed meager antibacterial activity (9 mm). Conclusions:The present investigation suggests that the phytochemical constituent of the S. muticum might be suitable agents for the control of human deadly diseases.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Listeria monocytogenes human strains isolated from 1970 to 2008 in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhiane Moura Falavina dos Reis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a foodborne illness that affects mainly pregnant women, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. The primary treatment is a combination of ampicillin with an aminoglycoside, in addition to a second-choice drug represented by chloramphenicol, erythromycin, tetracycline and rifampicin. The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of strains isolated from human sources in the last four decades. METHODS: Sixty-eight strains were selected from the culture collection of the Laboratory of Bacterial Zoonoses/LABZOO/FIOCRUZ isolated in different regions of Brazil from 1970 to 2008 and primarily isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and blood culture. Susceptibility tests to antimicrobials drugs were evaluated using the criteria established by Soussy using the Kirby-Bauer method and E-Test strips were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. RESULTS: Among the strains tested, serovar L4b (60.3% was the most prevalent, followed by serovar 1/2a (20.6%, 1/2b (13.2% and the more uncommon serovars 1/2c, 3b and 4ab (5.9%. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalothin, erythromycin, gentamicin, teicoplanin and vancomycin. Only one strain (1.5% showed resistance to rifampin, and two (3% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. MICs with values up to 2μg/ml reinforce the need for microbiological surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated low prevalence of strains resistant to the antimicrobial drugs indicated in the treatment of human listeriosis. Monitoring antimicrobial resistance profile is still very important to determine adequate treatment, especially in immunocompromised patients.

  18. Flagellin delivery by Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids induces the antimicrobial protein psoriasin in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Meyer-Hoffert

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause severe infections in patients suffering from disruption or disorder of the skin barrier as in burns, chronic wounds, and after surgery. On healthy skin P. aeruginosa causes rarely infections. To gain insight into the interaction of the ubiquitous bacterium P. aeruginosa and healthy human skin, the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by P. aeruginosa grown on an ex vivo skin model was analyzed. We show that presence of the P. aeruginosa derived biosurfactant rhamnolipid was indispensable for flagellin-induced psoriasin expression in human skin, contrary to in vitro conditions. The importance of the bacterial virulence factor flagellin as the major inducing factor of psoriasin expression in skin was demonstrated by use of a flagellin-deficient mutant. Rhamnolipid mediated shuttle across the outer skin barrier was not restricted to flagellin since rhamnolipids enable psoriasin expression by the cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 after topical application on human skin. Rhamnolipid production was detected for several clinical strains and the formation of vesicles was observed under skin physiological conditions. In conclusion we demonstrate herein that rhamnolipids enable the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by flagellin in human skin without direct contact of bacteria and responding cells. Hereby, human skin might control the microflora to prevent colonization of unwanted microbes in the earliest steps before potential pathogens can develop strategies to subvert the immune response.

  19. Current Advances in the Antimicrobial Potential of Species of Genus Ganoderma (Higher Basidiomycetes) against Human Pathogenic Microorganisms (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra K; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Nagaonkar, Dipali; dos Santos, Carolina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma spp. are very important therapeutic mushrooms and have been used traditionally for 4000 years in the treatment of various human disorders. Different species of Ganoderma possess bioactive compounds, which have already demonstrated antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. Various bioactive compounds such as triterpenoids, colossolactones, and polysaccharides, which are responsible for the antimicrobial potential of the genus, are discussed here in detail. Some Ganoderma spp. have been reported to be potential agents for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. These nanoparticles have demonstrated antimicrobial activity and also are reviewed herein. The main aim of this review is to discuss the possible use of Ganoderma extracts and their active principles in antimicrobial therapy.

  20. Cationic PEGylated liposomes incorporating an antimicrobial peptide tilapia hepcidin 2-3: an adjuvant of epirubicin to overcome multidrug resistance in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Vivian; Lee, Hsin-Pin; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Lo, Yu-Li

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been recently evaluated as a new generation of adjuvants in cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we designed PEGylated liposomes encapsulating epirubicin as an antineoplastic agent and tilapia hepcidin 2-3, an AMP, as a multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter suppressor and an apoptosis/autophagy modulator in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Cotreatment of HeLa cells with PEGylated liposomal formulation of epirubicin and hepcidin 2-3 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of epirubicin. The liposomal formulations of epirubicin and/or hepcidin 2-3 were found to noticeably escalate the intracellular H2O2 and O2(-) levels of cancer cells. Furthermore, these treatments considerably reduced the mRNA expressions of MDR protein 1, MDR-associated protein (MRP) 1, and MRP2. The addition of hepcidin 2-3 in liposomes was shown to markedly enhance the intracellular epirubicin uptake and mainly localized into the nucleus. Moreover, this formulation was also found to trigger apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, as validated by significant increases in the expressions of cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase, caspase-3, caspase-9, and light chain 3 (LC3)-II, as well as a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. The apoptosis induction was also confirmed by the rise in sub-G1 phase of cell cycle assay and apoptosis percentage of annexin V/propidium iodide assay. We found that liposomal epirubicin and hepcidin 2-3 augmented the accumulation of GFP-LC3 puncta as amplified by chloroquine, implying the involvement of autophagy. Interestingly, the partial inhibition of necroptosis and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition by this combination was also verified. Altogether, our results provide evidence that coincubation with PEGylated liposomes of hepcidin 2-3 and epirubicin caused programmed cell death in cervical cancer cells through modulation of multiple signaling pathways, including MDR transporters, apoptosis, autophagy, and/or necroptosis

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  2. Effects of antimicrobial use in agricultural animals on drug-resistant foodborne salmonellosis in humans: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helke, Kristi L; McCrackin, M A; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2017-02-11

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant meat or dairy-borne non-typhoidal salmonellosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada, and Denmark from January 2010 to July 2014, 858 articles received title and abstract review, 104 met study criteria for full article review with 68 retained for which data are presented. Antibiotic exposure in both cattle and humans found an increased likelihood of Salmonella colonization, whereas in chickens, animals not exposed to antibiotics (organic) were more likely to be Salmonella positive and those that had antibiotic exposure were more likely to harbor antimicrobial resistant Salmonella organisms. In swine literature, only tylosin exposure was examined and no correlation was found among exposure, Salmonella colonization, or antimicrobial resistance. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella from farm to fork.

  3. Cationic liposomal drug delivery system for specific targeting of human cd14+ monocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This invention concerns a liposome comprising lipids and at least one active ingredient, wherein at least one of the lipids is a cationic lipid; said liposome exhibiting a net positive charge at physiological conditions at which said liposome preferentially adheres to monocytes in freshly drawn b......, an infectious disease, an inflammatory disease, an autoimmune disease or allergy....

  4. Antimicrobial activity of human β-defensins against lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fang; Tian, Fei; Cao, Rui-Ming; Li, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Mei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin-1 (hBD-1), human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) against three internationally common probiotic strains of lactic acid bacterium. Our results indicated that hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 at the range of 0.08-10 μg/mL do not have obvious antimicrobial activity against these strains. Viability of Bifidobacterium longum JDM301 (B. longum JDM301), Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (B. lactis HN019) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) were still very high even at concentration of 10 μg hBD/mL. Then, we explored the mechanism of resistance by using carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to inhibit efflux pumps. In the presence of CCCP, hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 exhibited enhanced antibacterial effect against B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019, but not against LGG. Efflux pumps in B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019 may partly contribute to their resistance to hBD-1, hBD-2, and hBD-3.

  5. Campylobacter Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Humans, Broiler Chickens, and Pigs, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Kempf, Isabelle; Lehours, Philippe; Labadi, Leila; Camou, Christine; Denis, Martine; de Valk, Henriette; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Mégraud, Francis

    2007-01-01

    We describe isolates from human Campylobacter infection in the French population and the isolates' antimicrobial drug resistance patterns since 1986 and compare the trends with those of isolates from broiler chickens and pigs from 1999 to 2004. Among 5,685 human Campylobacter isolates, 76.2% were C. jejuni, 17.2% C. coli, and 5.0% C. fetus. Resistance to nalidixic acid increased from 8.2% in 1990 to 26.3% in 2004 (p<10-3), and resistance to ampicillin was high over time. Nalidixic acid resistance was greater for C. coli (21.3%) than for C. jejuni (14.9%, p<10-3). C. jejuni resistance to ciprofloxacin in broilers decreased from 31.7% in 2002 to 9.0% in 2004 (p = 0.02). The patterns of resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones were similar between 1999 and 2004 in human and broiler isolates for C. jejuni. These results suggest a potential benefit of a regulation policy limiting use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals. PMID:17479889

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Typing of Salmonella Stanley Isolated from Humans, Foods, and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaowei; Kuang, Dai; Meng, Jianghong; Pan, Haijian; Shen, Junqing; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Weimin; Chen, Qi; Shi, Xianming; Xu, Xuebin; Zhang, Jianmin

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley is an important serovar that has been increasingly identified in human salmonellosis. The present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of 88 Salmonella Stanley strains isolated from humans (diarrhea patients, n = 64; and healthy carrier, n = 1), foods (aquatic products, n = 16; vegetable, n = 1; and pork, n = 1), and environment (waste water, n = 2; and river water, n = 3) in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2012. Nearly half of the strains were resistant to sulfafurazole (43/88, 48.9%), and many were resistant to streptomycin (35/88, 39.8%), tetracycline (22/88, 25%), and nalidixic acid (19/88, 21.6%). Approximately a quarter of the strains (24/88, 27.3%) were resistant to more than three antimicrobials, and five had ACSSuT resistance type. Six clusters (A-F) were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with 80% similarity. Interestingly, strains in the same cluster identified by PFGE possessed similar antibiotic resistance patterns. PFGE typing also indicated that aquatic products might serve as a transmission reservoir for Salmonella Stanley infections in humans.

  7. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AMPs...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....... of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...

  8. Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrackin, M A; Helke, Kristi L; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-10-02

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.

  9. Determination of ephedrine and codeine in human urine by cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jun Li; Si Guang Li; Hai Yan Li; Zhuo Cai; Hao Cheng

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive method for the determination of ephedrine and codeine in human urine by capillary electrophoresis (CE) was described. In order to improve the sensitivity, two online concentration techniques including cation-selective exhaustive injection (CSEI) and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) were used. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.10 μg/L for ephedrine and 0.80 μg/L for codeine. This method was successfully applied to real urine sample analysis.

  10. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  11. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarestrup, F M; Wegener, H C

    1999-07-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human pathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli.

  12. Structural Features Essential to the Antimicrobial Functions of Human SPLUNC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, William G; Ahmad, Saira; Little, Michael S; Kim, Christine S K; Tyrrell, Jean; Lin, Qiao; Di, Y Peter; Tarran, Robert; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2016-05-31

    SPLUNC1 is an abundantly secreted innate immune protein in the mammalian respiratory tract that exerts bacteriostatic and antibiofilm effects, binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and acts as a fluid-spreading surfactant. Here, we unravel the structural elements essential for the surfactant and antimicrobial functions of human SPLUNC1 (short palate lung nasal epithelial clone 1). A unique α-helix (α4) that extends from the body of SPLUNC1 is required for the bacteriostatic, surfactant, and LPS binding activities of this protein. Indeed, we find that mutation of just four leucine residues within this helical motif to alanine is sufficient to significantly inhibit the fluid spreading abilities of SPLUNC1, as well as its bacteriostatic actions against Gram-negative pathogens Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conformational flexibility in the body of SPLUNC1 is also involved in the bacteriostatic, surfactant, and LPS binding functions of the protein as revealed by disulfide mutants introduced into SPLUNC1. In addition, SPLUNC1 exerts antibiofilm effects against Gram-negative bacteria, although α4 is not involved in this activity. Interestingly, though, the introduction of surface electrostatic mutations away from α4 based on the unique dolphin SPLUNC1 sequence, and confirmed by crystal structure, is shown to impart antibiofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus, the first SPLUNC1-dependent effect against a Gram-positive bacterium reported to date. Together, these data pinpoint SPLUNC1 structural motifs required for the antimicrobial and surfactant actions of this protective human protein.

  13. Human resources needed to perform antimicrobial stewardship teams' activities in French hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coz, P; Carlet, J; Roblot, F; Pulcini, C

    2016-06-01

    In January 2015, the French ministry of Health set up a task force on antibiotic resistance. Members of the task force's "antimicrobial stewardship" group conducted a study to evaluate the human resources needed to implement all the required activities of the multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship teams (AST - antibiotic/infectious disease lead supervisors, microbiologists, and pharmacists) in French healthcare facilities. We conducted an online cross-sectional nationwide survey. The questionnaire was designed based on regulatory texts and experts' consensus. The survey took place between March and May 2015. We used the mailing list of the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF) to send out questionnaires. A total of 65 healthcare facilities completed the questionnaire. The human resources needed to implement all AST's activities were estimated at 3.6 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions/1000 acute care beds for antibiotic/infectious disease lead supervisors, at 2.5 FTE/1000 beds for pharmacists, and at 0.6 FTE/1000 beds for microbiologists. This almost amounts to a total of 2000 FTE positions for all healthcare facilities (public and private) in France and to an annual cost of 200 million euros. Dedicated and sustainable funding for AST is urgently needed to implement comprehensive and functional AST programs in all healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy humans: antimicrobial susceptibility and global genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, Vanesa; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the Pseudomonas aeruginosa faecal carriage rate in 98 healthy humans and to perform the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of recovered isolates. The genetic relatedness among the isolates was analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing that was compared with worldwide epidemic clones. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from eight healthy individuals (8.2%), and two of them remained colonized after 5 months (in one case by the same clone). All 10 isolates (one/sample) were susceptible to 14 tested antipseudomonal agents and lacked integron structures. Six pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and six sequence types (ST245, ST253, ST254, ST274, ST663 and the new one, ST1059) were identified among them. Four groups of OprD alterations were detected based on mutations and deletions related to PAO1 reference strain in our carbapenem-susceptible strains. This is the first study focused on P. aeruginosa from faecal samples of healthy humans that provides additional insights into the antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of P. aeruginosa. Although the isolates were antimicrobial susceptible, most of the sequence types detected were genetically related to Spanish epidemic clones or globally spread sequence types, such as ST274 and ST253.

  15. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Nancy Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+•UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+•UO22+, NpO2+•Th4+, PuO2+•UO22+, and PuO2+•Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ~0.8 M-1.

  16. Short KR-12 analogs designed from human cathelicidin LL-37 possessing both antimicrobial and antiendotoxic activities without mammalian cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Binu; Park, Il-Seon; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Shin, Song Yub

    2013-11-01

    KR-12 (residues 18-29 of LL-37) was known to be the smallest peptide of human cathelicidin LL-37 possessing antimicrobial activity. In order to optimize α-helical short antimicrobial peptides having both antimicrobial and antiendotoxic activities without mammalian cell toxicity, we designed and synthesized a series of KR-12 analogs. Highest hydrophobic analogs KR-12-a5 and KR-12-a6 displayed greater inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α production and higher LPS-binding activity. We have observed that antimicrobial activity is independent of charge, but LPS neutralization requires a balance of hydrophobicity and net positive charge. Among KR-12 analogs, KR-12-a2, KR-12-a3 and KR-12-a4 showed much higher cell specificity for bacteria over erythrocytes and retained antiendotoxic activity, relative to parental LL-37. KR-12-a5 displayed the strongest antiendotoxic activity but almost similar cell specificity as compared with LL-37. Also, these KR-12 analogs (KR-12-a2, KR-12-a3, KR-12-a4 and KR-12-a5) exhibited potent antimicrobial activity (minimal inhibitory concentration: 4 μM) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these KR-12 analogs have the potential for future development as a novel class of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents.

  17. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility among Clostridium difficile isolated from an integrated human and swine population in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Keri N; Scott, Harvey M; Harvey, Roger B; Norby, Bo; Hume, Michael E

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile can be a major problem in hospitals because the bacterium primarily affects individuals with an altered intestinal flora; this largely occurs through prolonged antibiotic use. Proposed sources of increased community-acquired infections are food animals and retail meats. The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial resistance patterns of C. difficile isolated from a closed, integrated population of humans and swine to increase understanding of the bacterium in these populations. Swine fecal samples were collected from a vertically flowing swine population consisting of farrowing, nursery, breeding, and grower/finisher production groups. Human wastewater samples were collected from swine worker and nonworker occupational group cohorts. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 523 C. difficile strains from the population using the commercially available agar diffusion Epsilometer test (Etest(®)) for 11 different antimicrobials. All of the swine and human strains were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam, and vancomycin. In addition, all of the human strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol. The majority of the human and swine strains were resistant to cefoxitin and ciprofloxacin. Statistically significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were found among the swine production groups for ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and clindamycin. No significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were found across human occupational group cohorts. We found that 8.3% of the swine strains and 13.3% of the human strains exhibited resistance to metronidazole. The finding of differences in susceptibility patterns between human and swine strains of C. difficile provides evidence that transmission between host species in this integrated population is unlikely.

  18. Shock waves and DNA-cationic lipid assemblies: a synergistic approach to express exogenous genes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca; Camacho, Giselle; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Tamariz, Elisa; Fernández, Francisco; López-Marín, Luz M; Loske, Achim M

    2014-07-01

    Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) represent a powerful tool for cell transfection; however, their use is still limited by important concerns, including toxicity and poor internalization into deep tissues. In this work, we investigated the use of shock wave-induced acoustic cavitation in vitro for the transfection of lipoplexes in human embryo kidney 293 cells. We selected shock waves with the ability to internalize 10-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran into cells while maintaining survival rates above 50%. Cell transfection was tested using the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid pCX::GFPGPI2. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analyses revealed successful transfection after treatments ranging from 1 to 3 min using 60 to 180 shock waves at peak amplitudes of 12.3 ± 1.5 MPa. Interestingly, the combination of shock waves and lipoplexes induced a 3.1- and 3.8-fold increase in the expression of the reporter gene compared with the use of lipoplexes or shock waves alone, respectively. These results indicate that cationic DNA assembly and shock waves act in a synergistic manner to promote transfection of human cells, revealing a potential approach for non-invasive site-specific gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Introducing the potential of antimicrobial materials for human and robotic spaceflight activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Claudia; Reitz, Guenther; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra; Hans, Michael; Muecklich, Frank

    One major goal of space research is to discover past or present life on foreign planets such as Mars (Horneck et al., 2010). To detect extraterrestrial life on other planets it is important to prevent microbial contamination imported from the Earth, also known as forward contamination. Until now missions to Mars are solely progressed by robots like the Mars Science Laboratory mission with the Curiosity lander. The assembly of spacecraft components is performed in special bioburden controlled clean rooms. Nevertheless, the microbial diversity in these clean rooms is enormous (Vaishampayan et al., 2013). The propagation of microorganisms and in particular the spread of environmental and human-associated species can be facilitated through numerous exposure routes (e.g., air, personal contact, water, excretions, etc.). Besides robotic missions, on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and in (future) space vehicles for long-term journeys to special targets of astrobiological interests in the solar system, astronauts will have the unique opportunity for scientific exploration. The manned exploration of new environments (e.g. asteroids, Mars) require long-term residence in confined stations and habitats (e.g. space stations, spacecraft, vehicles). During these missions, the health of the crew members has to be protected, and the integrity of the materials and facilities should be carefully monitored (van Houdt et al., 2012). A major concern is the microbiological burden in enclosed environments, where human inhabitants are continuously exposed to potential harmful microorganisms over a long-duration, which may affect the health and performance of the human subjects (Horneck et al., 2010) in addition to potential risks by biofilm formation and biocorrosion of materials. In both scenarios, the application of antimicrobial surfaces is an encouraging approach to reduce microorganisms in a straightforward way. Antimicrobial agents and materials are characterized by

  20. Residual antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine digluconate and octenidine dihydrochloride on reconstructed human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G; Langer, J; Siebert, J; Kramer, A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to examine the residual antimicrobial activity after a topical exposure of reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) to equimolar solutions of either chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG, 0.144% w/v) or octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT, 0.1% w/v) for 15 min. RHE-associated antiseptic agents were more effective on Staphylococcus aureus than on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. S. aureus was not detected after 24 h of contact, which demonstrated a microbicidal efficacy of greater than 5-log10 reduction. In contrast, P. aeruginosa was reduced by approximately 2 log10 at the same incubation time, which parallels the growth of the initial inoculum. This result could be interpreted either as a microbiostatic effect or as an adherence of P. aeruginosa to a low positively charged surface. Small amounts of CHG and OCT can penetrate the stratum corneum. Using these antiseptic agents, the viability of keratinocytes was reduced to 65-75% of that of the untreated RHE control following 24 h incubation in the presence of test microorganisms. With consideration of antimicrobial activity and cytotoxic effect, OCT corresponds better to a biocompatible antiseptic agent than CHG. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from seafood and humans in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahzadeh, Esmail; Ojagh, Seyed Mahdi; Hosseini, Hedayat; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah; Irajian, Gholamreza; Naghizadeh Heidarlo, Masoud

    2016-11-01

    Fourteen Listeria monocytogenes isolates previously collected from seafood (n = 7) and human patients (n = 7) were studied for their antimicrobial susceptibility against eight common antimicrobials (ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and cefotaxime). A high resistance level to ampicillin, cefotaxime (100%), and pencillin (57% in seafood isolates and 71.4% in clinical isolates) was observed in this study. However, all of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. Simultaneous resistance was identified in 4 clinical isolates (57.1%). Genotypic characterization of fish isolates (isolated from three fish species) was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A high diversity among fish isolates was observed. PFGE analyses distinguished the 4 isolates into 4 reproducible pulsotypes. There was no correlation between the antibiograms with pulsotypes. In conclusion, the resistance of seafood isolates to the antibiotics commonly used to treat listeriosis could be a potential health hazard for consumers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Uremic Toxins Induce ET-1 Release by Human Proximal Tubule Cells, which Regulates Organic Cation Uptake Time-Dependently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M. S. Schophuizen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal failure, the systemic accumulation of uremic waste products is strongly associated with the development of a chronic inflammatory state. Here, the effect of cationic uremic toxins on the release of inflammatory cytokines and endothelin-1 (ET-1 was investigated in conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC. Additionally, we examined the effects of ET-1 on the cellular uptake mediated by organic cation transporters (OCTs. Exposure of ciPTEC to cationic uremic toxins initiated production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (117 ± 3%, p < 0.001, IL-8 (122 ± 3%, p < 0.001, and ET-1 (134 ± 5%, p < 0.001. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of OCT mediated 4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP+ uptake in ciPTEC at 30 min (23 ± 4%, p < 0.001, which restored within 60 min of incubation. Exposure to ET-1 for 24 h increased the ASP+ uptake significantly (20 ± 5%, p < 0.001. These effects could be blocked by BQ-788, indicating activation of an ET-B-receptor-mediated signaling pathway. Downstream the receptor, iNOS inhibition by (N(G‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine l-NMMA acetate or aminoguanidine, as well as protein kinase C activation, ameliorated the short-term effects. These results indicate that uremia results in the release of cytokines and ET-1 from human proximal tubule cells, in vitro. Furthermore, ET-1 exposure was found to regulate proximal tubular OCT transport activity in a differential, time-dependent, fashion.

  3. World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies to Control Antimicrobial Resistance From Food Animal Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter C; Conly, John M; Andremont, Antoine; McEwen, Scott A; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Agerso, Yvonne; Andremont, Antoine; Collignon, Peter; Conly, John; Dang Ninh, Tran; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Fedorka-Cray, Paula; Fernandez, Heriberto; Galas, Marcelo; Irwin, Rebecca; Karp, Beth; Matar, Gassan; McDermott, Patrick; McEwen, Scott; Mitema, Eric; Reid-Smith, Richard; Scott, H Morgan; Singh, Ruby; DeWaal, Caroline Smith; Stelling, John; Toleman, Mark; Watanabe, Haruo; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2016-10-15

    Antimicrobial use in food animals selects for antimicrobial resistance in bacteria, which can spread to people. Reducing use of antimicrobials-particularly those deemed to be critically important for human medicine-in food production animals continues to be an important step for preserving the benefits of these antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine was recently updated. Antimicrobials considered the highest priority among the critically important antimicrobials were quinolones, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, macrolides and ketolides, and glycopeptides. The updated ranking allows stakeholders in the agriculture sector and regulatory agencies to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine. In particular, the current large-scale use of fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third-generation cephalosporins and any potential use of glycopeptides and carbapenems need to be addressed urgently. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Association Between Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Animals and Blood Stream Isolates from Humans in Europe: An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    Background: In addition to medical antimicrobial usage, the use of antimicrobials in food animals contributes to the occurrence of resistance among some bacterial species isolated from infections in humans. Recently, several studies have indicated that a large proportion of Escherichia coli causing...... infections in humans, especially those resistant to antimicrobials, have an animal origin.Methods: We analyzed the correlation between the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections in humans and in E. coli isolates from poultry, pigs, and cattle between 2005...... and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections.Results: Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r...

  5. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material.

  6. Three new antimicrobial peptides from the scorpion Pandinus imperator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Chun; Zhou, Lingli; Shi, Wanxia; Luo, Xuesong; Zhang, Lei; Nie, Yao; Wang, Jinwei; Wu, Shifen; Cao, Bin; Cao, Hanjun

    2013-07-01

    Three novel cysteine-free venom peptides, which were referred to as Pantinin-1, Pantinin-2 and Pantinin-3, respectively, have been identified from the scorpion Pandinus imperator by cDNA cloning strategy. The precursor of each peptide consists of a signal peptide, a mature peptide with no disulfide bridges, and an acidic propeptide with a typical processing signal. Each of the three peptides is an α-helical, cationic and amphipathic molecule with 13 or 14 amino acid residues. Their amino acid sequences are homologous to those of some 13-mer antimicrobial peptides isolated from scorpions. Antimicrobial assay showed that all the three peptides possess relatively strong activities against Gram-positive bacteria and a fungus, but have very weak antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity assay showed that the three peptides exhibit very low or mild hemolytic activities against human red blood cells. It is interesting to see that Pantinin-3 is able to potently inhibit the growth of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) S13, a pathogen that can cause a number of human infections; this suggests that Pantinin-3 has great potential to be applied in the treatment of VRE infections. Our findings gain new insights into the structure/function relationships of the small linear cationic antimicrobial peptides from scorpions, and provide new templates for designing of antimicrobial agents targeting antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Impact of antibiotic use in adult dairy cows on antimicrobial resistance of veterinary and human pathogens: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2011-03-01

    Antibiotics have saved millions of human lives, and their use has contributed significantly to improving human and animal health and well-being. Use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has resulted in healthier, more productive animals; lower disease incidence and reduced morbidity and mortality in humans and animals; and production of abundant quantities of nutritious, high-quality, and low-cost food for human consumption. In spite of these benefits, there is considerable concern from public health, food safety, and regulatory perspectives about the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals. Over the last two decades, development of antimicrobial resistance resulting from agricultural use of antibiotics that could impact treatment of diseases affecting the human population that require antibiotic intervention has become a significant global public health concern. In the present review, we focus on antibiotic use in lactating and nonlactating cows in U.S. dairy herds, and address four key questions: (1) Are science-based data available to demonstrate antimicrobial resistance in veterinary pathogens that cause disease in dairy cows associated with use of antibiotics in adult dairy cows? (2) Are science-based data available to demonstrate that antimicrobial resistance in veterinary pathogens that cause disease in adult dairy cows impacts pathogens that cause disease in humans? (3) Does antimicrobial resistance impact the outcome of therapy? (4) Are antibiotics used prudently in the dairy industry? On the basis of this review, we conclude that scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among pathogens isolated from dairy cows to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in adult dairy cows and other food-producing animals does contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance

  8. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-04-13

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1-45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance.

  9. Insights into the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Human RNase6: Structural Determinants for Bacterial Cell Agglutination and Membrane Permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human Ribonuclease 6 is a secreted protein belonging to the ribonuclease A (RNaseA) superfamily, a vertebrate specific family suggested to arise with an ancestral host defense role. Tissue distribution analysis revealed its expression in innate cell types, showing abundance in monocytes and neutrophils. Recent evidence of induction of the protein expression by bacterial infection suggested an antipathogen function in vivo. In our laboratory, the antimicrobial properties of the protein have been evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive species and its mechanism of action was characterized using a membrane model. Interestingly, our results indicate that RNase6, as previously reported for RNase3, is able to specifically agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria as a main trait of its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, a side by side comparative analysis with the RN6(1–45) derived peptide highlights that the antimicrobial activity is mostly retained at the protein N-terminus. Further work by site directed mutagenesis and structural analysis has identified two residues involved in the protein antimicrobial action (Trp1 and Ile13) that are essential for the cell agglutination properties. This is the first structure-functional characterization of RNase6 antimicrobial properties, supporting its contribution to the infection focus clearance. PMID:27089320

  10. Factor H-binding protein is important for meningococcal survival in human whole blood and serum and in the presence of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, K L; Serruto, D; Oriente, F; Delany, I; Adu-Bobie, J; Veggi, D; Aricò, B; Rappuoli, R; Pizza, M

    2009-01-01

    Factor H-binding protein (fHBP; GNA1870) is one of the antigens of the recombinant vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis, which has been developed using reverse vaccinology and is the basis of a meningococcal B vaccine entering phase III clinical trials. Binding of factor H (fH), an inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, to fHBP enables N. meningitidis to evade killing by the innate immune system. All fHBP null mutant strains analyzed were sensitive to killing in ex vivo human whole blood and serum models of meningococcal bacteremia with respect to the isogenic wild-type strains. The fHBP mutant strains of MC58 and BZ83 (high fHBP expressors) survived in human blood and serum for less than 60 min (decrease of >2 log(10) CFU), while NZ98/254 (intermediate fHBP expressor) and 67/00 (low fHBP expressor) showed decreases of >1 log(10) CFU after 60 to 120 min of incubation. In addition, fHBP is important for survival in the presence of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 (decrease of >3 log(10) CFU after 2 h of incubation), most likely due to electrostatic interactions between fHBP and the cationic LL-37 molecule. Hence, the expression of fHBP by N. meningitidis strains is important for survival in human blood and human serum and in the presence of LL-37, even at low levels. The functional significance of fHBP in mediating resistance to the human immune response, in addition to its widespread distribution and its ability to induce bactericidal antibodies, indicates that it is an important component of the serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.

  11. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin; Hjort, Karin; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersson, Dan I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AMPs are not fully understood. Objectives We show that in vitro serial passage of a clinical USA300 MRSA strain in a host-mimicking environment containing host-derived AMPs results in the selection of stable AMP resistance. Methods Serial passage experiments were conducted using steadily increasing concentrations of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model of sepsis. Results AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions These findings suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with cross-resistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated. PMID:27650186

  12. Azithromycin Synergizes with Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides to Exert Bactericidal and Therapeutic Activity Against Highly Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance poses an increasingly grave threat to the public health. Of pressing concern, rapid spread of carbapenem-resistance among multidrug-resistant (MDR Gram-negative rods (GNR is associated with few treatment options and high mortality rates. Current antibiotic susceptibility testing guiding patient management is performed in a standardized manner, identifying minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC in bacteriologic media, but ignoring host immune factors. Lacking activity in standard MIC testing, azithromycin (AZM, the most commonly prescribed antibiotic in the U.S., is never recommended for MDR GNR infection. Here we report a potent bactericidal action of AZM against MDR carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii. This pharmaceutical activity is associated with enhanced AZM cell penetration in eukaryotic tissue culture media and striking multi-log-fold synergies with host cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 or the last line antibiotic colistin. Finally, AZM monotherapy exerts clear therapeutic effects in murine models of MDR GNR infection. Our results suggest that AZM, currently ignored as a treatment option, could benefit patients with MDR GNR infections, especially in combination with colistin.

  13. The two-domain LysX protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for production of lysinylated phosphatidylglycerol and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Maloney

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The well-recognized phospholipids (PLs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb include several acidic species such as phosphatidylglycerol (PG, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol and its mannoside derivatives, in addition to a single basic species, phosphatidylethanolamine. Here we demonstrate that an additional basic PL, lysinylated PG (L-PG, is a component of the PLs of Mtb H37Rv and that the lysX gene encoding the two-domain lysyl-transferase (mprF-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (lysU protein is responsible for L-PG production. The Mtb lysX mutant is sensitive to cationic antibiotics and peptides, shows increased association with lysosome-associated membrane protein-positive vesicles, and it exhibits altered membrane potential compared to wild type. A lysX complementing strain expressing the intact lysX gene, but not one expressing mprF alone, restored the production of L-PG and rescued the lysX mutant phenotypes, indicating that the expression of both proteins is required for LysX function. The lysX mutant also showed defective growth in mouse and guinea pig lungs and showed reduced pathology relative to wild type, indicating that LysX activity is required for full virulence. Together, our results suggest that LysX-mediated production of L-PG is necessary for the maintenance of optimal membrane integrity and for survival of the pathogen upon infection.

  14. Vitamin D and the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 enhance group a streptococcus resistance to killing by human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John F; Tran-Winkler, Hien J; Wessels, Michael R

    2012-10-23

    The CsrRS two-component regulatory system of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) responds to subinhibitory concentrations of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. LL-37 signaling through CsrRS results in upregulation of genes that direct synthesis of virulence factors, including the hyaluronic acid capsule and streptolysin O (SLO). Here, we demonstrate that a consequence of this response is augmented GAS resistance to killing by human oropharyngeal keratinocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. LL-37-induced upregulation of SLO and hyaluronic acid capsule significantly reduced internalization of GAS by keratinocytes and phagocytic killing by neutrophils and macrophages. Because vitamin D induces LL-37 production by macrophages, we tested its effect on macrophage killing of GAS. In contrast to the reported enhancement of macrophage function in relation to other pathogens, treatment of macrophages with 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 paradoxically reduced the ability of macrophages to control GAS infection. These observations demonstrate that LL-37 signals through CsrRS to induce a virulence phenotype in GAS characterized by heightened resistance to ingestion and killing by both epithelial cells and phagocytes. By inducing LL-37 production in macrophages, vitamin D may contribute to this paradoxical exacerbation of GAS infection. IMPORTANCE It remains poorly understood why group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes asymptomatic colonization or localized throat inflammation in most individuals but rarely progresses to invasive infection. The human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, which is produced as part of the innate immune response to GAS infection, signals through the GAS CsrRS two-component regulatory system to upregulate expression of multiple virulence factors. This study reports that two CsrRS-regulated GAS virulence factors-streptolysin O and the hyaluronic acid capsule-are critical in LL-37-induced resistance of GAS to killing by human throat epithelial cells

  15. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders.

  16. In-vitro effects of the antimicrobial peptide Ala8,13,18-magainin II amide on isolated human first trimester villous trophoblast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huppertz Berthold; Khan Meraj; Sengupta Jayasree; Ghosh Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) has gained pace toward using their potential to replace conventional antibiotics. These peptides preferentially interact with negatively charged membrane lipids typically seen in bacteria and thereby lead to membrane perturbations and membrane dysfunction. However, one possible disadvantage of AMP drugs is their potential for toxicity, especially to those cells which display externalization of negatively charged moieties t...

  17. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) acting as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruthiviraj, Prakash; Margret, Anita; Krishnamurthy, Poornima Priyadharsani

    2016-04-01

    Production of antimicrobial agents through the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using green technology has been extensively made consistent by various researchers; yet, this study uses the flower bud's aqueous extracts of Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) as a reducing agent for chloroauric acid (1 mM). After 30 min of incubation, synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) was observed by a change in extract color from pale yellow to purple color. Synthesis of AuNps was confirmed in UV-visible spectroscopy at the range of approximately 560 nm. The SEM analysis showed the average nanoparticles size of 12-22 nm. The antimicrobial activity of AuNps was analyzed by subjecting it to human pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Klebsiella pneumonia) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) using disc diffusion method. The broccoli-synthesized AuNps showed the efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of above-mentioned microbes. It was confirmed that AuNps have the best antimicrobial agent compared to the standard antibiotics (Gentamicin and Fluconazole). When the concentrations of AuNps were increased (10, 25, and 50 µg/ml), the sensitivity zone also increased for all the tested microbes. The synthesized AuNps are capable of rendering high antimicrobial efficacy and, hence, have a great potential in the preparation of drugs used against major bacterial and fungal diseases in humans.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Phosphorylation by the WaaY Kinase Affects the Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to the Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bociek, Karol; Ferluga, Sara; Mardirossian, Mario; Benincasa, Monica; Tossi, Alessandro; Gennaro, Renato; Scocchi, Marco

    2015-08-07

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 is a multifunctional host defense peptide with immunomodulatory and antimicrobial roles. It kills bacteria primarily by altering membrane barrier properties, although the exact sequence of events leading to cell lysis has not yet been completely elucidated. Random insertion mutagenesis allowed isolation of Escherichia coli mutants with altered susceptibility to LL-37, pointing to factors potentially relevant to its activity. Among these, inactivation of the waaY gene, encoding a kinase responsible for heptose II phosphorylation in the LPS inner core, leads to a phenotype with decreased susceptibility to LL-37, stemming from a reduced amount of peptide binding to the surface of the cells, and a diminished capacity to lyse membranes. This points to a specific role of the LPS inner core in guiding LL-37 to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Although electrostatic interactions are clearly relevant, the susceptibility of the waaY mutant to other cationic helical cathelicidins was unaffected, indicating that particular structural features or LL-37 play a role in this interaction.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Phosphorylation by the WaaY Kinase Affects the Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to the Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bociek, Karol; Ferluga, Sara; Mardirossian, Mario; Benincasa, Monica; Tossi, Alessandro; Gennaro, Renato; Scocchi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 is a multifunctional host defense peptide with immunomodulatory and antimicrobial roles. It kills bacteria primarily by altering membrane barrier properties, although the exact sequence of events leading to cell lysis has not yet been completely elucidated. Random insertion mutagenesis allowed isolation of Escherichia coli mutants with altered susceptibility to LL-37, pointing to factors potentially relevant to its activity. Among these, inactivation of the waaY gene, encoding a kinase responsible for heptose II phosphorylation in the LPS inner core, leads to a phenotype with decreased susceptibility to LL-37, stemming from a reduced amount of peptide binding to the surface of the cells, and a diminished capacity to lyse membranes. This points to a specific role of the LPS inner core in guiding LL-37 to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Although electrostatic interactions are clearly relevant, the susceptibility of the waaY mutant to other cationic helical cathelicidins was unaffected, indicating that particular structural features or LL-37 play a role in this interaction. PMID:26100635

  20. The antimicrobial role of probiotics in the oral cavity in humans and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Zambori

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been defined in 2001 by the World Health Organization (WHO and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO as "live microorganisms, and as the main bacteria that administered in adequate amounts in humans and animals have beneficial effects on the health of the host". Probiotics are single or mixed cultures of live and non-pathogenic microorganisms that are found in foods (especially acidic dairy yoghurt, kefir, buttermilk, cheese or in nutritional supplements on the form of tablets, capsules or powder. These bacteria have to belong to the normal microbial flora of the host to withstand acidity, to survive the intestinal transit, to adhere to the intestinal mucosa, to produce antimicrobial substances and to maintain the health of the host.  The most often strains that are used as probiotics are: Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus. The objective of this study is to reveal the importance of probiotics on the health of oral cavity in humans and dogs.  

  1. The human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and mimics are potential anticancer drugs

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    Kengo eKuroda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play a critical role in innate host defense against microbial pathogens in many organisms. The human cathelicidin LL-37 has a net positive charge and is amphiphilic, and can eliminate pathogenic microbes directly via electrostatic attraction toward negatively charged bacterial membranes. A number of studies have shown that LL-37 participates in various host immune systems, such as inflammatory responses and tissue repair, in addition to its antibacterial properties. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that it is also involved in the regulation of cancer. Indeed, previous studies have suggested that human LL-37 is involved in carcinogenesis via multiple reporters such as FPR2 (FPRL1, EGFR, and ERBb2, although LL-37 and its fragments and analogues also show anticancer effects in various cancer cell lines. This discrepancy can be attributed to peptide-based factors, host membrane-based factors, and signal regulation. Here, we describe the association between AMPs and cancer with a focus on anticancer peptide functions and selectivity in an effort to understand potential therapeutic implications.

  2. Environmental and human health risks of antimicrobials used in Fenneropenaeus chinensis aquaculture production in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming; Chang, Zhiqiang; Van den Brink, Paul J; Li, Jian; Zhao, Fazhen; Rico, Andreu

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to quantify the environmental fate of antimicrobials applied in Fenneropenaeus chinensis aquaculture production in China and to assess their potential risks for surrounding aquatic ecosystems, for the promotion of antimicrobial resistance in target and non-target bacteria and for consumers eating shrimp products that contain antimicrobial residues. For this, we first used the results of an environmental monitoring study performed with the antimicrobial sulfamethazine to parameterize and calibrate the ERA-AQUA model, a mass balance model suited to perform risk assessments of veterinary medicines applied in aquaculture ponds. Next, a scenario representing F. chinensis production in China was built and used to perform risk assessments for 21 antimicrobials which are regulated for aquaculture in China. Results of the model calibration showed a good correspondence between the predicted and the measured sulfamethazine concentrations, with differences within an order of magnitude. Results of the ecological risk assessment showed that four antimicrobials (levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, ampicillin, sulfadiazine) are expected to have adverse effects on primary producers, while no short-term risks were predicted for invertebrates and fish exposed to farm wastewater effluents containing antimicrobial residues. Half of the evaluated antimicrobials showed potential to contribute to antimicrobial resistance in bacteria exposed to pond water and farm effluents. A withdrawal period of three weeks is recommended for antimicrobials applied via oral administration to F. chinensis in order to comply with the current national and international toxicological food safety standards. The results of this study indicate the need to improve the current regulatory framework for the registration of aquaculture antimicrobials in China and suggest compounds that should be targeted in future aquaculture risk assessments and environmental monitoring studies.

  3. Computational promoter analysis of mouse, rat and human antimicrobial peptide-coding genes

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    Kai Chikatoshi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are effectors of the innate immune response. A multitude of signals coming from pathways of mammalian pathogen/pattern recognition receptors and other proteins affect the expression of AMP-coding genes (AMPcgs. For many AMPcgs the promoter elements and transcription factors that control their tissue cell-specific expression have yet to be fully identified and characterized. Results Based upon the RIKEN full-length cDNA and public sequence data derived from human, mouse and rat, we identified 178 candidate AMP transcripts derived from 61 genes belonging to 29 AMP families. However, only for 31 mouse genes belonging to 22 AMP families we were able to determine true orthologous relationships with 30 human and 15 rat sequences. We screened the promoter regions of AMPcgs in the three species for motifs by an ab initio motif finding method and analyzed the derived promoter characteristics. Promoter models were developed for alpha-defensins, penk and zap AMP families. The results suggest a core set of transcription factors (TFs that regulate the transcription of AMPcg families in mouse, rat and human. The three most frequent core TFs groups include liver-, nervous system-specific and nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs. Out of 440 motifs analyzed, we found that three represent potentially novel TF-binding motifs enriched in promoters of AMPcgs, while the other four motifs appear to be species-specific. Conclusion Our large-scale computational analysis of promoters of 22 families of AMPcgs across three mammalian species suggests that their key transcriptional regulators are likely to be TFs of the liver-, nervous system-specific and NHR groups. The computationally inferred promoter elements and potential TF binding motifs provide a rich resource for targeted experimental validation of TF binding and signaling studies that aim at the regulation of mouse, rat or human AMPcgs.

  4. Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [(3)H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Hopper, Shaun; Conn, P Jeffrey; Scarr, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [(3)H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg(2+) and enhanced by Zn(2+), whereas BQCA effects on [(3)H]NMS, but not [(3)H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  5. Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [3H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Hopper, Shaun; Conn, P Jeffrey; Scarr, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [3H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [3H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn2+, acetylcholine displacement of [3H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg2+ and Zn2+, acetylcholine displacement of [3H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg2+ and enhanced by Zn2+, whereas BQCA effects on [3H]NMS, but not [3H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg2+ and Zn2+. These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:26511338

  6. ROLE OF BIVALENT CATIONS AND CHOLINE IN ATP-INDUCED APOPTOSIS OF HUMAN LYMPHOCYTESWITH P2Z RECEPTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The role of bivalent cations and choli ne in ATP-induced apoptosis via P2Z pur i noceptor was investigated in human leu ke mic lymphocytes. In vitro exposure of le ukemic lymphocytes with P2Z receptor s to 1 mmol/L ATP or 0.1 mmol/L benzoyl benzo ic ATP(BzATP) for 8 h in the prese nce of choline, 1 mmol/L Mg2+ or oth er biva lent cations, and ATP-induced DN A breaks , associated with apoptosis wer e quantif ied by TdT assay. We observed that (1) E xtracellular Mg2+ or Ca2 + stimulat ed ATP-induced DNA fragmenta tion in a do se-dependent manner, and th e compatible evidence was provided by t he inhibition of ATP-induced DNA fragme ntation in the present of EGTA or EDTA; (2) ATP-induced DNA fragmentation was completely inhibi ted by 1 mmol/L Zn2+ ;(3)ATP-induced D NA breaks were not af fected by Ba2+, Sr2+, Co2+ whe n they were substitu ted for extracellul ar Mg2+ or Ca2+ ;(4)Choline, an in hibitor of phospholipa se D(PLD) stimula ted by ATP through P2Z receptor in huma n lymphocytes, was also a partial inhib itor of ATP-induced DNA f ragmentation, and the results were confi rmed by flow cytometric analysis (FCA); (5)ATP-induc ed DNA fragmentation was com pletely obl iterated when the temperature was lower than 10℃. These results sugge st that t he endonuclease and PLD may be involved in ATP-induced apoptosis in hum an lymp hocytes via P2Z receptor.

  7. Environmental and human health risks of antimicrobials used in Fenneropenaeus chinensis aquaculture production in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Ming; Chang, Zhiqiang; Brink, van den Paul J.; Li, Jian; Zhao, Fazhen; Rico, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the environmental fate of antimicrobials applied in Fenneropenaeus chinensis aquaculture production in China and to assess their potential risks for surrounding aquatic ecosystems, for the promotion of antimicrobial resistance in target and non-target bacteria and for

  8. Safety and tolerability of the antimicrobial peptide human lactoferrin 1-11 (hLF1-11

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    Blijlevens Nicole MA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of patients with haematological malignancies by means of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is often accompanied by life threatening infections. With emerging antimicrobial resistance there is an increased need for new agents, with a beneficial safety profile. Therefore we evaluated the safety of the promising new antimicrobial peptide human lactoferrrin 1-11 (hLF1-11 in healthy volunteers and patients. Methods We undertook a sequential, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using ascending single (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 mg and multiple intravenous doses (0.5, 5 mg in healthy volunteers, and open-label, single intravenous 5 mg doses in autologous HSCT recipients. Results Single and multiple doses of hLF1-11 were tolerable up to 5 mg intravenously in healthy volunteers, while 5 mg single dose was tolerable in patients. Elevations in transaminases possibly related to treatment were reversible and not serious. Conclusion The new antimicrobial hLF1-11 is well tolerated in healthy volunteers with repeated daily doses up to 5 mg. The side-effect profile is very favourable for an antimicrobial, the only undesirable effect being a possible elevation of transaminases, which may be related to hLF1-11 although the current data do not allow conclusive interpretation of treatment relationship. A lower dose is recommended for the forthcoming multiple dosing studies in HSCT patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: nct00509938.

  9. Divalent cations control cell-substrate adhesion and laminin expression in normal and malignant human melanocytes in early and late stages of cellular differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, G E; Dixon, W T; Thomas, P D; Jimbow, K

    1995-08-01

    Integrins are a class of adhesion molecules that depends on divalent cations for proper function. This study examined whether human normal melanocytes and malignant (metastatic) melanocytes with early and late stages of cellular differentiation (G361 and SK-MEL-23, respectively) would differ in integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, as well as collagens type I and type IV, and whether divalent cations could influence the strength of adhesion ability. Integrin subunit expression was determined by flow cytometry using integrin subunit-specific antibodies as probes. Integrin-specific adhesion was determined using soluble glycine-arginine-glycine-asparagine-serine peptide and integrin subunit-specific antibodies as functional blocking agents. This study shows that both normal and malignant melanocytes adhere to extracellular matrices in a divalent cation-dependent manner, and adhesion strength varies with the cation species. Integrins can be rapidly activated by small alterations in cation concentration, manganese being the most potent. There were marked differences in substrate adhesion between normal melanocytes and metastatic malignant melanoma cells, but these differences were not related to the stage of cellular differentiation. All the three cell types, however, expressed the same integrin subunits at approximately the same levels. This suggests that substrate adhesion of melanocytes and melanoma cells might involve some integrin-independent mechanisms as well. Manganese, in particular, appears to cause adhesion by activating both integrin-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  10. Antimicrobial effects and human gingival biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite sol-gel coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chine-Wen; Perng, Li-Hsiang; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Chin, Tsung-Shune

    2006-01-01

    The sol-gel method was employed to synthesize hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings modified with Ag or Zn ions onto Ti-6Al-4V substrate. A bacterial strain Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and a human gingival fibroblast (HGF-1) cell line were used to investigate the antimicrobial effect and biocompatibility, respectively. HAp coatings containing 100 ppm Ag(+) ions suppressed the growth of S. mutans. An apparent inhibition zone around the HAp coating was further observed at Ag(+) concentration up to 10,000 ppm. However, for coatings containing Zn(2+) ions, a clear inhibition zone was observed at Zn(2+) concentration of 10,000 ppm. Nevertheless, the results of HGF-1 cultivation demonstrated that the Zn(2+)-modified HAp coatings exhibited better attachment and spread of HGF-1 than did the Ag(+)-modified coatings. Zn(2+) modified HAp coatings also increased the plating efficiency of HGF-1 cells. The cytotoxicity associated with the addition of Ag and the cell-conductive capacity associated with the addition of Zn are proportional to the added concentration, from 100 to 10,000 ppm. The dosages of both Ag(+) and Zn(2+) ions that should be added to HAp coatings were considered to prevent infection and improve biocompatibility. The results of this study ensure that HAp coatings modified with a moderate amount of Ag/Zn efficiently resist microorganisms and improve biocompatibility.

  11. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A; Martin, William F; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Bevins, Charles L; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2013-05-03

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective-released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . The predigestion of milk proteins and the consequent release of antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection.

  12. SP-LL-37, human antimicrobial peptide, enhances disease resistance in transgenic rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Gu; Nou, Ill Sup; Huq, Md. Amdadul; Nogoy, Franz Marielle; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo

    2017-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional antimicrobial peptide of cathelicidin family. It has been shown in recent studies that it can serve as a host’s defense against influenza A virus. We now demonstrate in this study how signal peptide LL-37 (SP-LL-37) can be used in rice resistance against bacterial leaf blight and blast. We synthesized LL-37 peptide and subcloned in a recombinant pPZP vector with pGD1 as promoter. SP-LL-37 was introduced into rice plants by Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Stable expression of SP-LL-37 in transgenic rice plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA analyses. Subcellular localization of SP-LL-37-GFP fusion protein showed evidently in intercellular space. Our data on testing for resistance to bacterial leaf blight and blast revealed that the transgenic lines are highly resistant compared to its wildtype. Our results suggest that LL-37 can be further explored to improve wide-spectrum resistance to biotic stress in rice. PMID:28282452

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of human Campylobacter jejuni isolates and association with phylogenetic lineages

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    Wonhee eCha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen and the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. With the increase of antibiotic resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, the drugs of choice for treatment, C. jejuni was recently classified as a serious antimicrobial resistant threat. Here, we characterized 94 C. jejuni isolates collected from patients at four Michigan hospitals in 2011 and 2012 to determine the frequency of resistance and association with phylogenetic lineages. The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones (19.1% and macrolides (2.1% in this subset of C. jejuni isolates from Michigan was similar to national reports. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates, however, were recovered from patients with a history of foreign travel. A high proportion of these resistant isolates were classified as multilocus sequence type (ST-464, a fluoroquinolone-resistant lineage that recently emerged in Europe. A significantly higher prevalence of tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni was also found in Michigan and resistant isolates were more likely to represent ST-982, which has been previously recovered from ruminants and the environment in the U.S. Notably, patients with tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni infections were more likely to have contact with cattle. These outcomes prompt the need to monitor the dissemination and diversification of imported fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni strains and to investigate the molecular epidemiology of C. jejuni recovered from cattle and farm environments to guide mitigation strategies.

  14. 阳离子抗菌肽在脓毒症免疫应答中的双刃剑作用%Research advances of cationic antimicrobial peptides in the immune response in sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋胜文; 张凯; 方向明

    2014-01-01

    背景 阳离子抗菌肽(cationic antimicrobial peptides,AMPs)是生物在长期进化过程中保留下来的一类天然的小分子多肽,一方面它作为效应分子介导脓毒症的先天性和获得性免疫反应,在机体抵御入侵病原微生物、修复受损组织中发挥重要的作用;另一方面,AMPs作为内源性危险分子在机体创伤、感染时从中性粒细胞细胞,上皮细胞等细胞中释放到局部组织和循环中,通过免疫调控等机制介导机体内环境紊乱和脓毒症的发生发展.目的 重新认识AMPs这类机体内在固有的、重要的分子在脓毒症免疫应答中的作用.内容 系统阐述AMPs在介导脓毒症的先天性和获得性免疫反应中的双刃剑作用,重点突出近年国际上对AMPs作为一类关键的内源性危险分子在促发脓毒症免疫损伤作用的新进展.趋向 为进一步明确AMPs在脓毒症发病机制中作用和发病机制提供科学依据.%Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is one group of small peptides which is retained in the long-term evolutionary process.On the one hand,AMPs mediate the innate and adaptive immune responses of sepsis,play important roles in defending the body against invading microorganisms and repairing damaged tissue; on the other hand,in response to infection or tissue injury,AMPs as endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns released into the local tissue and circulating,cause disorders of the internal environment and development of sepsis.Objective Re-understanding of the role AMPs in the immune response in sepsis.Content Systematically illustrate that AMPs are double-edged swords in modulation of the innate and adaptive immune response of sepsis.And focus on the mechanisms of AMPs medicate the immune injury of sepsis in recent years.Trend To provide scientific basis for further clarify the AMPs in the pathogenesis and mechanisms of sepsis.

  15. Prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from commercial chickens and human clinical isolates from South Africa and Brazil

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    Oliver T. Zishiri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a significant public health concern around the world. The injudicious use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production for treatment, growth promotion and prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of drug resistant strains of Salmonella. The current study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes from Salmonella isolated from South African and Brazilian broiler chickens as well as human clinical isolates. Out of a total of 200 chicken samples that were collected from South Africa 102 (51% tested positive for Salmonella using the InvA gene. Of the overall 146 Salmonella positive samples that were screened for the iroB gene most of them were confirmed to be Salmonella enterica with the following prevalence rates: 85% of human clinical samples, 68.6% of South African chicken isolates and 70.8% of Brazilian chicken samples. All Salmonella isolates obtained were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing with 10 antibiotics. Salmonella isolates from South African chickens exhibited resistance to almost all antimicrobial agents used, such as tetracycline (93%, trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole (84%, trimethoprim (78.4%, kanamycin (74%, gentamicin (48%, ampicillin (47%, amoxicillin (31%, chloramphenicol (31%, erythromycin (18% and streptomycin (12%. All samples were further subjected to PCR in order to screen some common antimicrobial and virulence genes of interest namely spiC, pipD, misL, orfL, pse-1, tet A, tet B, ant (3"-la, sul 1 and sul. All Salmonella positive isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent; however, antimicrobial resistance patterns demonstrated that multiple drug resistance was prevalent. The findings provide evidence that broiler chickens are colonised by pathogenic Salmonella harbouring antimicrobial resistance genes. Therefore, it is evident that there is a need for prudent use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production systems in

  16. Prevalence and genetic relatedness of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from animals, foods and humans in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, T R; Haraldsson, G; Fridriksdottir, V; Kristinsson, K G; Gunnarsson, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of resistant bacteria in food products in Iceland is unknown, and little is known of the prevalence in production animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic relatedness of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli from healthy pigs and broiler chicken, pork, broiler meat, slaughterhouse personnel and outpatients in Iceland. A total of 419 E. coli isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using a microbroth dilution method (VetMIC), and resistant strains were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All samples were screened for enrofloxacin-resistant strains with selective agar plates. The resistance rates among E. coli isolates were moderate to high from caecal and meat samples of pigs (54.1% and 28%), broilers (33.6% and 52%) and slaughterhouse personnel (39.1%), whereas isolates from outpatients showed moderate resistance rates (23.1%). Of notice was resistance to quinolones (minimum inhibitory concentrations: nalidixic acid > or = 32, ciprofloxacin > or = 0.12 and enrofloxacin > or = 0.5), particularly among broiler and broiler meat isolates (18.2% and 36%), as there is no known antimicrobial selection pressure in the broiler production in Iceland. The majority (78.6%) of the resistant E. coli isolates was genotypically different, based on PFGE fingerprint analyses and clustering was limited. However, the same resistance pattern and pulsotype were found among isolates from broiler meat and a slaughterhouse worker, indicating spread of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from animals to humans. Diverse resistance patterns and pulsotypes suggest the presence of a large population of resistant E. coli in production animals in Iceland. This study gives baseline information on the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from production animals, and their food products in Iceland and the moderate to high resistance rates emphasize the need for continuing surveillance. Further studies on the

  17. Simplified in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor using protein folding cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sandeep; Dedaniya, Akshay; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Mallu, Maheswara Reddy; Parupudi, Pavani; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-01-30

    Protein folding-strong cation exchange chromatography (PF-SCX) has been employed for efficient refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). To acquire a soluble form of renatured and purified rhG-CSF, various chromatographic conditions, including the mobile phase composition and pH was evaluated. Additionally, the effects of additives such as urea, amino acids, polyols, sugars, oxidizing agents and their amalgamations were also investigated. Under the optimal conditions, rhG-CSF was efficaciously solubilized, refolded and simultaneously purified by SCX in a single step. The experimental results using ribose (2.0M) and arginine (0.6M) combination were found to be satisfactory with mass yield, purity and specific activity of 71%, ≥99% and 2.6×10(8)IU/mg respectively. Through this investigation, we concluded that the SCX refolding method was more efficient than conventional methods which has immense potential for the large-scale production of purified rhG-CSF.

  18. Cell-penetrating peptide derived from human eosinophil cationic protein inhibits mite allergen Der p 2 induced inflammasome activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Jie Yu

    Full Text Available Newly discovered cell penetration peptides derived from human eosinophil cationic proteins (CPPecp have the characteristic of cell internalization, but the effect of CPPecp on immunomodulation has not been clarified. House dust mite (HDM major allergen, Der p 2, can induce proinflammatory cytokine production which contributes to airway inflammation and allergic asthma. However, the mechanism of Der p 2 on NLRP3 inflammasome activation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effect of CPPecp on inhibition of Der p 2 induced inflammasome activation. We showed that proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly upregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from HDM allergic patients after Der p 2 stimulation. Expression of NLRP3, ASC, Caspase-1, IL-1β and Caspase-1 activity was upregulated in THP-1 cells after Der p 2 stimulation. Proinflammatory cytokine production, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and caspase-1 activity were downregulated in THP-1 cells and CD14+ cells co-cultured with Der p 2 and CPPecp. The immunomodulatory effect of CPPecp was through upregulation of IFN-α production but not induction of autophagy. These results suggested Der p 2 plays an important role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and CPPecp has the potential to be a novel anti-inflammatory agent for allergic inflammation treatment in the future.

  19. Identification of functional amino acid residues involved in polyamine and agmatine transport by human organic cation transporter 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyohei Higashi

    Full Text Available Polyamine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine and agmatine uptake by the human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2 was studied using HEK293 cells transfected with pCMV6-XL4/hOCT2. The Km values for putrescine and spermidine were 7.50 and 6.76 mM, and the Vmax values were 4.71 and 2.34 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Spermine uptake by hOCT2 was not observed at pH 7.4, although it inhibited both putrescine and spermidine uptake. Agmatine was also taken up by hOCT2, with Km value: 3.27 mM and a Vmax value of 3.14 nmol/min/mg protein. Amino acid residues involved in putrescine, agmatine and spermidine uptake by hOCT2 were Asp427, Glu448, Glu456, Asp475, and Glu516. In addition, Glu524 and Glu530 were involved in putrescine and spermidine uptake activity, and Glu528 and Glu540 were weakly involved in putrescine uptake activity. Furthermore, Asp551 was also involved in the recognition of spermidine. These results indicate that the recognition sites for putrescine, agmatine and spermidine on hOCT2 strongly overlap, consistent with the observation that the three amines are transported with similar affinity and velocity. A model of spermidine binding to hOCT2 was constructed based on the functional amino acid residues.

  20. EUCAST recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing applied to the three main Campylobacter species isolated in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifré, Elodie; Salha, Ben Amor; Ducournau, Astrid; Floch, Pauline; Chardon, Hubert; Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter isolates is of great importance for treatment options especially in systemic diseases. The European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recently proposed epidemiological cut-offs (ECOFFs) for a limited number of antimicrobial compounds and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli only. In the present study, the EUCAST method was used after minor modifications to define antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for, 1997 C. jejuni, 419 C. coli and 100 Campylobacter fetus strains received at the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters. Our results show that the ECOFFs defined by EUCAST for tetracycline and ciprofloxacin can be used for C. jejuni and C. coli. The same ECOFF can be used for erythromycin for the three species. The C. jejuni and C. coli ECOFFs for ciprofloxacin however cannot be applied to C. fetus. We also provide data to categorise two 2 β-lactams of interest for systemic diseases, ampicillin and amoxicillin+clavulanate, for the three species.

  1. The European Union Summary Report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial resistance data among zoonotic and indicator bacteria in 2011, submitted by 26 European Union Member States, were jointly analysed by the European Food Safety Authority and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Data covered resistance in zoonotic Salmonella and Campylobacter isolates from humans, food and animals, and in indicator Escherichia coli and enterococci isolates from animals and food. Data on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in animals and food were also presented. Resistance in isolates from humans were mainly interpreted using clinical breakpoints, while animal and food isolate resistance was interpreted using epidemiological cut-off values. Resistance was commonly found in isolates from humans, animals and food, although disparities in resistance were frequently observed between Member States. High resistance levels were recorded to ampicillin, tetracyclines and sulfonamides in Salmonella isolates from humans, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones remained low. In Salmonella and indicator Escherichia coli isolates from fowl, pigs, cattle and meat thereof, resistance to ampicillin, tetracyclines and sulfonamides was also commonly detected, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was low. Moderate to high resistance to (fluoroquinolones was observed in Salmonella isolates from turkeys, fowl and broiler meat. In Campylobacter isolates from human cases, resistance to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and tetracyclines was high, while resistance to erythromycin was low to moderate. High resistance to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and tetracyclines was observed in Campylobacter isolates from fowl, broiler meat, pigs and cattle, whereas much lower levels were observed for erythromycin and gentamicin. Among the indicator enterococci isolates from animals and food, resistance to tetracyclines and erythromycin was commonly detected. The

  2. Subtyping and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078/126 isolates of human and animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, José L; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed; García, Marta E

    2017-02-01

    The Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype complex 078/126 (RT078/126) is often involved in human disease and is also frequently isolated from diverse animal species. The high genetic relatedness between human and animal RT078/126 isolates found in different regions has encouraged discussion about the zoonotic potential of this lineage. We compared for the first time the genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of human and animal C. difficile RT078/126 isolates from Spain. A collection of 96 isolates (50 of human and 46 of animal origin; 63 and 33 of ribotypes 078 and 126, respectively) was subtyped by an improved amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting method and tested for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 67 genotypes were distinguished, three of which grouped together isolates of human and animal origin. Furthermore, two main groups of isolates that mostly correlated with PCR ribotypes could be distinguished in the AFLP dendrogram. Human origin was significantly associated with resistance to ertapenem, erythromycin and moxifloxacin; resistance to clindamycin and erythromycin was associated with RT126 and AFLP group 1. Twenty-nine isolates (30.2% of total) displayed heteroresistance to metronidazole. Substantial differences were observed in the susceptibility profiles of isolates belonging to a same genotype. Altogether, these results provide a valuable baseline for future studies on the epidemiology of C. difficile RT078/126. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the pathogenic potential, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genomic relations of Yersinia enterocolitica strains from food and human origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero-Estrada, Cecilia S M; Soria, José Miguel; Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Escudero, María Esther

    2015-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a food-borne pathogen that causes gastroenteritis with occasional postinfection sequels. This study was aimed to determinate the pathogenic potential, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genomic relationships of Y. enterocolitica strains of different bioserotypes (B/O) isolated from foods and human samples in San Luis, Argentina. Strains obtained by culture were bioserotyped and characterized by phenotypic and genotypic virulence markers, antimicrobial susceptibility, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Yersinia enterocolitica was detected in 9.2% of 380 samples, with a distribution of 10.6% (30/284) for food products and 5.2% (5/96) for human samples. Regarding the pathogenic potential, B1A strains of different serotypes were virF(-) ail(-), of which 72.0% (13/18) were ystB(+) with virulence-related phenotypic characteristics. Among B2/O:9 isolates, 75.0% (9/12) exhibited the genotype virF(+) ail(+) ystB(-) along with phenotypic traits associated with virulence; the same genotype was observed in 80.0% (4/5) of B3/O:3 and B3/O:5 strains. By PFGE, it was possible to separate Y. enterocolitica biotypes into 4 clonal groups (A to D) with 23 genomic types, generating a discriminatory index of 0.96. All isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials used for clinical treatment. This study highlights the presence of pathogenic bioserotypes and the high genomic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica strains isolated in our region.

  5. Patch clamp studies of human sperm under physiological ionic conditions reveal three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, S A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Wilson, S M

    2014-05-01

    Whilst fertilizing capacity depends upon a K(+) conductance (GK) that allows the spermatozoon membrane potential (Vm) to be held at a negative value, the characteristics of this conductance in human sperm are virtually unknown. We therefore studied the biophysical/pharmacological properties of the K(+) conductance in spermatozoa from normal donors held under voltage/current clamp in the whole cell recording configuration. Our standard recording conditions were designed to maintain quasi-physiological, Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) gradients. Experiments that explored the effects of ionic substitution/ion channel blockers upon membrane current/potential showed that resting Vm was dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flowed via channels that displayed only weak voltage dependence and limited (∼7-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. This conductance was blocked by quinidine (0.3 mM), bupivacaine (3 mM) and clofilium (50 µM), NNC55-0396 (2 µM) and mibefradil (30 µM), but not by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM, 4-AP). Progesterone had no effect upon the hyperpolarizing K(+) current. Repolarization after a test depolarization consistently evoked a transient inward 'tail current' (ITail) that flowed via a second population of ion channels with poor (∼3-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. The activity of these channels was increased by quinidine, 4-AP and progesterone. Vm in human sperm is therefore dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flows via channels that most closely resemble those encoded by Slo3. Although 0.5 µM progesterone had no effect upon these channels, this hormone did activate the pharmacologically distinct channels that mediate ITail. In conclusion, this study reveals three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels: Ik, ITail, ICatSper.

  6. Highly Efficient Labeling of Human Lung Cancer Cells Using Cationic Poly-L-lysine-Assisted Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqin Wang; Huiru Zhang; Hongjuan Jing; Liuqing Cui

    2015-01-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) is increasingly a routine approach in the cell-based cancer treatment. However, cell labeling with magnetic IONPs and their leading effects on the biological properties of human lung carcinoma cells remain scarcely reported. Therefore, in the present study the magnetic c-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (MNPs) were firstly synthesized and surface-modified with cationic poly-L-lysine (PLL) to construct the PLL-MNPs, which were then used to magnetically label human A549 lung cancer cells. Cell viability and proliferation were evaluated with propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate double staining and standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-diphe-nyl-tetrazolium) bromide assay, and the cytoskeleton was immunocytochemically stained. The cell cycle of the PLL-MNP-labeled A549 lung cancer cells was analyzed using flow cytometry. Apoptotic cells were fluorescently analyzed with nuclear-specific staining after the PLL-MNP labeling. The results showed that the constructed PLL-MNPs efficiently magnetically labeled A549 lung cancer cells and that, at low concentrations, labeling did not affect cellular viability, proliferation capability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytoskeleton in the treated cells was detected intact in comparison with the untreated counterparts. However, the results also showed that at high concentration (400 lg mL-1), the PLL-MNPs would slightly impair cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis and disrupt the cytoskeleton in the treated A549 lung cancer cells. Therefore, the present results indicated that the PLL-MNPs at adequate concentrations can be efficiently used for labeling A549 lung cancer cells and could be considered as a feasible approach for magnetic targeted anti-cancer drug/gene delivery, targeted diagnosis, and therapy in lung cancer treatment.

  7. Determinants of substrate and cation transport in the human Na+/dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Avner; Sun, Nina N; Colas, Claire; Pajor, Ana M

    2014-06-13

    Metabolic intermediates, such as succinate and citrate, regulate important processes ranging from energy metabolism to fatty acid synthesis. Cytosolic concentrations of these metabolites are controlled, in part, by members of the SLC13 gene family. The molecular mechanism underlying Na(+)-coupled di- and tricarboxylate transport by this family is understood poorly. The human Na(+)/dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC3 (SLC13A3) is found in various tissues, including the kidney, liver, and brain. In addition to citric acid cycle intermediates such as α-ketoglutarate and succinate, NaDC3 transports other compounds into cells, including N-acetyl aspartate, mercaptosuccinate, and glutathione, in keeping with its dual roles in cell nutrition and detoxification. In this study, we construct a homology structural model of NaDC3 on the basis of the structure of the Vibrio cholerae homolog vcINDY. Our computations are followed by experimental testing of the predicted NaDC3 structure and mode of interaction with various substrates. The results of this study show that the substrate and cation binding domains of NaDC3 are composed of residues in the opposing hairpin loops and unwound portions of adjacent helices. Furthermore, these results provide a possible explanation for the differential substrate specificity among dicarboxylate transporters that underpin their diverse biological roles in metabolism and detoxification. The structural model of NaDC3 provides a framework for understanding substrate selectivity and the Na(+)-coupled anion transport mechanism by the human SLC13 family and other key solute carrier transporters.

  8. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Michaela D. J.; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J.; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed. PMID:26002899

  9. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  10. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF® contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting activities suggests that hBD-3 may play a crucial role in wound healing. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of PRGF on hBD-3 expression in human primary keratinocytes in vitro. In addition, we investigated the influence of Vivostat PRF on hBD-3 expression in artificially generated human skin wounds in vivo. PRGF treatment of primary keratinocytes induced a significant, concentration- and time-dependent increase in hBD-3 gene expression which was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. In line with these cell culture data, in vivo experiments revealed an enhanced hBD-3 expression in experimentally produced human wounds after the treatment with Vivostat PRF. Thus, the induction of hBD-3 may contribute to the beneficial effects of thrombocyte concentrate lysates in the treatment of chronic or infected wounds.

  11. An update discussion on the current assessment of the safety of veterinary antimicrobial drug residues in food with regard to their impact on the human intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerniglia, Carl E; Pineiro, Silvia A; Kotarski, Susan F

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract ecosystem consists of complex and diverse microbial communities that have now been collectively termed the intestinal microbiome. Recent scientific breakthroughs and research endeavours have increased our understanding of the important role the intestinal microbiome plays in human health and disease. The use of antimicrobial new animal drugs in food-producing animals may result in the presence of low levels of drug residues in edible foodstuffs. There is concern that antimicrobial new animal drugs in or on animal-derived food products at residue-level concentrations could disrupt the colonization barrier and/or modify the antimicrobial resistance profile of human intestinal bacteria. Therapeutic doses of antimicrobial drugs have been shown to promote shifts in the intestinal microbiome, and these disruptions promote the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in food on human intestinal bacteria, many national regulatory agencies and international committees follow a harmonized process, VICH GL36(R), which was issued by a trilateral organization of the European Union, the USA, and Japan called the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH). The guidance describes a general approach currently used by national regulatory agencies and international committees to assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in animal-derived food on human intestinal bacteria. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this current approach as part of the antimicrobial new animal drug approval process in participating countries, give insights on the microbiological endpoints used in this safety evaluation, and discuss the availability of new information. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  13. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, Brenda A.; David C Coleman; Deasy, Emily C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O’ Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) und...

  14. Equilibrative nucleoside (ENTs) and cationic amino acid (CATs) transporters: implications in foetal endothelial dysfunction in human pregnancy diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanello, Paola; Escudero, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD, characterized by abnormal D-glucose metabolism), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, a disease associated with reduced oxygen delivery (hypoxia) to the foetus), and preeclampsia (PE, a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria and increased vascular resistance), induce foetal endothelial dysfunction with implications in adult life and increase the risk of vascular diseases. Synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and uptake of L-arginine (the NO synthase (NOS) substrate) and adenosine (a vasoactive endogenous nucleoside) by the umbilical vein endothelium is altered in pregnancies with GD, IUGR or PE. Mechanisms underlying these alterations include differential expression of equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs), cationic amino acid transporters (CATs), and NOS. Modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS expression and activity in endothelium involves protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases p42 and p44 (p42/44(mapk)), calcium, and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3k), among others. Elevated extracellular D-glucose and hypoxia alter human endothelial function. However, information regarding the transcriptional modulation of ENTs, CATs, and NOS is limited. This review focuses on the effect of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in the modulation of ENTs and CATs, and NOS expression and activity, and the consequences for foetal endothelial function in GD, IUGR and PE. The available information will contribute to a better understanding of the cell and molecular basis of the altered vascular endothelial function in these pregnancy diseases and will emphasize the key role of this type of epithelium in placental function and the normal foetal development and growth.

  15. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%), followed by Typhimurium (28.7%) and Newport (8.7%). No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  16. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%, followed by Typhimurium (28.7% and Newport (8.7%. No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  17. Prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from commercial chickens and human clinical isolates from South Africa and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zishiri, Oliver T; Mkhize, Nelisiwe; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2016-05-26

    Salmonellosis is a significant public health concern around the world. The injudicious use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production for treatment, growth promotion and prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of drug resistant strains of Salmonella. The current study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes from Salmonella isolated from South African and Brazilian broiler chickens as well as human clinical isolates. Out of a total of 200 chicken samples that were collected from South Africa 102 (51%) tested positive for Salmonella using the InvA gene. Of the overall 146 Salmonella positive samples that were screened for the iroB gene most of them were confirmed to be Salmonella enterica with the following prevalence rates: 85% of human clinical samples, 68.6% of South African chicken isolates and 70.8% of Brazilian chicken samples. All Salmonella isolates obtained were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing with 10 antibiotics. Salmonella isolates from South African chickens exhibited resistance to almost all antimicrobial agents used, such as tetracycline (93%), trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole (84%), trimethoprim (78.4%), kanamycin (74%), gentamicin (48%), ampicillin (47%), amoxicillin (31%), chloramphenicol (31%), erythromycin (18%) and streptomycin (12%). All samples were further subjected to PCR in order to screen some common antimicrobial and virulence genes of interest namely spiC, pipD, misL, orfL, pse-1, tet A, tet B, ant (3")-la, sul 1 and sul. All Salmonella positive isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent; however, antimicrobial resistance patterns demonstrated that multiple drug resistance was prevalent. The findings provide evidence that broiler chickens are colonised by pathogenic Salmonella harbouring antimicrobial resistance genes. Therefore, it is evident that there is a need for prudent use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production systems in order to

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  19. Clinical evaluation of antimicrobial peptide [{sup 99m}Tc/Tricine/HYNIC{sup 0}]ubiquicidin 29-41 as a human-specific infection imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandomkar, Mostafa [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran, 11365-3486 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: msgandomkar@yahoo.com; Najafi, Reza; Shafiei, Mohammad; Mazidi, Mohammad; Goudarzi, Mostafa; Mirfallah, Seyed Hassan [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran, 11365-3486 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Farhad; Heydarpor, Hamid Reza; Abdie, Noroz [Noor Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: Ubiquicidin (UBI) 29-41 is a cationic synthetic antimicrobial peptide fragment that binds preferentially with the anionic microbial cell membrane at the site of infection. This study was conducted to evaluate the potentiality of [{sup 99m}Tc/Tricine/HYNIC{sup 0}]UBI 29-41 prepared from lyophilized kits as an infection imaging agent in humans. Methods: Seven patients (5 males and 2 females; mean age=55 years; age range=35-75 years) with suspected bone or soft-tissue infections participated in this study. [{sup 99m}Tc/Tricine/HYNIC]UBI 29-41, corresponding to activity in the range 555-740 MBq added to 40 {mu}g of peptide obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities >95%, was injected intravenously. A 45-min dynamic study was followed by spot views of the suspected region of infection (target) and a corresponding normal area (nontarget). Whole-body anterior and posterior images were also acquired at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection. True- or false-positive or true- or false-negative images were interpreted upon bacterial culture, radiography, clinical tests and bone scanning. Results: The biodistribution of [{sup 99m}Tc/Tricine/HYNIC]UBI 29-41 in patients showed rapid accumulation of activity in the kidneys in the first 30 min after injection that gradually declined and accumulated in the urinary bladder. There were positive findings in five studies and negative findings in two. Findings were subsequently confirmed to be true positive or negative. Images showed minimal accumulation in nontarget tissues, with an average target/nontarget ratio of 2.10{+-}0.33 in positive lesions at 30 min. Conclusion: Given its favorable clinical characteristics, [{sup 99m}Tc/Tricine/HYNIC]UBI 29-41 shows promise as a tracer for infection imaging that allows early diagnosis (30 min) of infection.

  20. Using antimicrobial host defense peptides as anti-infective and immunomodulatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Thomas; Kristensen, Hans-Henrik

    2008-12-01

    Virtually all life forms express short antimicrobial cationic peptides as an important component of their innate immune defenses. They serve as endogenous antibiotics that are able to rapidly kill an unusually broad range of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Consequently, considerable efforts have been expended to exploit the therapeutic potential of these antimicrobial peptides. Within the last couple of years, it has become increasingly clear that many of these peptides, in addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, also have a wide range of functions in modulating both innate and adaptive immunity. For one class of antimicrobial peptides, such as the human defensins, their primary role may even be as immunomodulators. These properties potentially provide entirely new therapeutic approaches to anti-infective therapy.

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  3. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eMulder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and host defense peptides (HDPs show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their bio-chemical features, selectivity against extra targets and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the development of production and nano-delivery systems for both classes of cationic peptides and perspectives on improving them will be considered.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. from humans, pigs, cattle, and broilers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Nielsen, E. M.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    isolates were resistant to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Isolates were in most cases either coresistant to tylosin, spiramycin, and erythromycin or susceptible to all three antibiotics, More macrolide-resistant isolates were observed among C. coil isolates from swine (79%) than among C. coil...

  5. In vitro antimicrobial effects of two antihalitosis mouth rinses on oral pathogens and human tongue microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raangs, G. C.; Winkel, E. G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of a mouth rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (MR1) with a stannous fluoride-based mouth rinse (MR2) in vitro. Materials and methods: Samples of the tongues from 10 subjects with and 10 subjects witho

  6. Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella spp. from humans in Shanghai, China, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianmin; Jin, Huiming; Hu, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Xiaowei; Xu, Xuebin; Meng, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    A retrospective study conducted on patients with diarrhea in Shanghai, China from 2004-2011, indicated that of 77,600 samples collected, 1,635 (2.1%) tested positive for Shigella. Species isolated included S. sonnei (1,066, 65.1%), S. flexneri (569, 34.7%), and S. boydii (3, 0.2%). Most of the Shigella isolates were found to be resistant to streptomycin (98.7%), trimethoprim (98.0%), ampicillin (92.1%), and nalidixic acid (91.7%). Additionally, many isolates were resistant to tetracycline (86.9%), trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole (80.1%), sulfisoxazole (76.8%) and gentamicin (55.5%). Approximately 80% of the isolates were resistant to at least eight antimicrobial agents, 14% to at least ten antimicrobials tested and 10 isolates to fourteen antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides and β-lactamases. Importantly, co-resistance to fluoroquinolones and the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins was also identified. The high levels of resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in clinical medicine presents a great challenge to treating patients with shigellosis.

  7. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...

  8. In vitro antimicrobial effects of two antihalitosis mouth rinses on oral pathogens and human tongue microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raangs, G. C.; Winkel, E. G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of a mouth rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (MR1) with a stannous fluoride-based mouth rinse (MR2) in vitro. Materials and methods: Samples of the tongues from 10 subjects with and 10 subjects witho

  9. A comparison of non-typhoidal Salmonella from humans and food animals using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases affecting humans. To characterize the relationship between Salmonella causing human infections and their food animal reservoirs, we compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of non-typhoida...

  10. Differential effect of HOE642 on two separate monovalent cation transporters in the human red cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernhardt, Ingolf; Weiss, Erwin; Robinson, Hannah C

    2007-01-01

    Residual K(+) fluxes in red blood cells can be stimulated in conditions of low ionic strength. Previous studies have identified both the non-selective, voltage-dependent cation (NSVDC) channel and the K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger as candidate pathways mediating this effect, although it is possible...... blood cell apoptosis (eryptosis) and disease....

  11. The non-selective voltage-activated cation channel in the human red blood cell membrane: reconciliation between two conflicting reports and further characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestner, Lars; Christophersen, Palle; Bernhardt, Ingolf;

    2000-01-01

    Erythrocyte; Patch-clamp; Non-specific; cation channel; Voltage dependence; Acetylcholin receptor......Erythrocyte; Patch-clamp; Non-specific; cation channel; Voltage dependence; Acetylcholin receptor...

  12. A fish antimicrobial peptide, tilapia hepcidin TH2-3, shows potent antitumor activity against human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyh-Yih; Lin, Wei-Ju; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2009-09-01

    As part of a continuing search for potential anticancer drug candidates from antimicrobial peptides of marine organisms, tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) hepcidin TH2-3 was evaluated in several tumor cell lines. The results indicated that TH2-3, a synthetic 20-mer antimicrobial peptide, specifically inhibited human fibrosarcoma cell (HT1080 cell line) proliferation and migration. The way in which TH2-3 inhibited HT1080 cell growth was then studied. TH2-3 inhibited HT1080 cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner according to an MTT analysis, which was confirmed by a soft-agar assay and AO/EtBr staining. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that TH2-3 caused lethal membrane disruption in HT1080 cancer cells, and a wound healing assay supported that TH2-3 decreased the migration of HT1080 cells. In addition, c-Jun mRNA expression was downregulated after treatment with TH2-3 for 48-96 h compared to the untreated group. These findings suggest a mechanism of cytotoxic action of TH2-3 and indicate that TH2-3 may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent against human fibrosarcoma cells.

  13. Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 inhibits adhesion of Candida albicans by interacting with yeast cell-wall carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Wen Tsai

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the major fungal pathogen of humans. Fungal adhesion to host cells is the first step of mucosal infiltration. Antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the initial mucosal defense against C. albicans infection. LL-37 is the only member of the human cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides and is commonly expressed in various tissues and cells, including epithelial cells of both the oral cavity and urogenital tract. We found that, at sufficiently low concentrations that do not kill the fungus, LL-37 was still able to reduce C. albicans infectivity by inhibiting C. albicans adhesion to plastic surfaces, oral epidermoid OECM-1 cells, and urinary bladders of female BALB/c mice. Moreover, LL-37-treated C. albicans floating cells that did not adhere to the underlying substratum aggregated as a consequence of LL-37 bound to the cell surfaces. According to the results of a competition assay, the inhibitory effects of LL-37 on cell adhesion and aggregation were mediated by its preferential binding to mannan, the main component of the C. albicans cell wall, and partially by its ability to bind chitin or glucan, which underlie the mannan layer. Therefore, targeting of cell-wall carbohydrates by LL-37 provides a new strategy to prevent C. albicans infection, and LL-37 is a useful, new tool to screen for other C. albicans components involved in adhesion.

  14. Antimicrobial compounds in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here.

  15. Serotypes, genotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns of human diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolates circulating in southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Chen, X; Zheng, S; Yu, F; Kong, H; Yang, Q; Cui, D; Chen, N; Lou, B; Li, X; Tian, L; Yang, X; Xie, G; Dong, Y; Qin, Z; Han, D; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Tang, Y-W; Li, L

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) infection is a major health problem in developing countries. The prevalence and characteristics of DEC have not been thoroughly investigated in China. Consecutive faecal specimens from outpatients with acute diarrhoea in nine sentinel hospitals in southeastern China were collected from July 2009 to June 2011. Bacterial and viral pathogens were detected by culture and RT-PCR, respectively. DEC isolates were further classified into five pathotypes using multiplex PCR. The O/H serotypes, sequence types (STs) and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the DEC isolates were determined. A total of 2466 faecal specimens were collected, from which 347 (14.1%) DEC isolates were isolated. DEC was the dominant bacterial pathogen detected. The DEC isolates included 217 EAEC, 62 ETEC, 52 EPEC, 14 STEC, one EIEC and one EAEC/ETEC. O45 (6.6%) was the predominant serotype. Genotypic analysis revealed that the major genotype was ST complex 10 (87, 25.6%). Isolates belonging to the serogroups or genotypes of O6, O25, O159, ST48, ST218, ST94 and ST1491 were highly susceptible to the majority of antimicrobials. In contrast, isolates belonging to O45, O15, O1, O169, ST38, ST226, ST69, ST31, ST93, ST394 and ST648 were highly resistant to the majority of antimicrobials. DEC accounted for the majority of bacterial pathogens causing acute diarrhoea in southeastern China, and it is therefore necessary to test for all DEC, not only the EHEC O157:H7. Some serogroups or genotypes of DEC were highly resistant to the majority of antimicrobials. DEC surveillance should be emphasized.

  16. Mycosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles: Optimization, characterization and antimicrobial activity against human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumaran, M D; Ramachandran, R; Balashanmugam, P; Mukeshkumar, D J; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to isolate soil fungi from Kolli and Yercaud Hills, South India with the ultimate objective of producing antimicrobial nanoparticles. Among 65 fungi tested, the isolate, Bios PTK 6 extracellularly synthesized both silver and gold nanoparticles with good monodispersity. Under optimized reaction conditions, the strain Bios PTK 6 identified as Aspergillus terreus has produced extremely stable nanoparticles within 12h. These nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis. spectrophotometer, HR-TEM, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SAED, ICP-AES and Zetasizer analyses. A. terreus synthesized 8-20 nm sized, spherical shaped silver nanoparticles whereas gold nanoparticles showed many interesting morphologies with a size of 10-50 nm. The presence and binding of proteins with nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR study. Interestingly, the myco derived silver nanoparticles exhibited superior antimicrobial activity than the standard antibiotic, streptomycin except against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The leakage of intracellular components such as protein and nucleic acid demonstrated that silver nanoparticles damage the bacterial cells by formation of pores, which affects membrane permeability and finally leads to cell death. Further, presence of nanoparticles in the bacterial membrane and the breakage of cell wall were also observed using SEM. Thus, the obtained results clearly reveal that these antimicrobial nanoparticles could be explored as promising candidates for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ALKALOIDS OF TRIDAX PROCUMBENS L. AGAINST HUMAN PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jindal et al

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tridax procumbens L. is a well known medicinal plant. In the present study alkaloids from pedicle and buds of the plant were extracted and evaluated for antimicrobial activity by ‘Disc Diffusion Assay’ against selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration and total activity of each active extract were also evaluated. Significant antibacterial activity was recorded by alkaloids of pedicle against P. mirabilis (IZ 20mm, AI 0.83 and same MIC, MBC 0.039 mg/ml and antifungal activity was recorded by buds against C. albicans (IZ 9.2mm, AI 0.92, MIC 0.625 mg/ml and MFC 1.25 mg/ml. MIC ranged from 0.039 mg/ml-0.625 mg/ml and MBC/MFC ranged from 0.039 mg/ml-1.25 mg/ml against susceptible pathogens. It is noteworthy that MIC values of active extracts was found very low (0.039 mg/ml-0.625 mg/ml and was recorded below 1 mg/ml against inhibited pathogens, thus ascertain their strong antimicrobial potential against selected microbes. Thus, the result of the present study advocates the exploitation of alkaloid extracts of T. procumbens for future antimicrobial drugs.

  18. A comparison of non-typhoidal Salmonella from humans and food animals using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol H Sandt

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases affecting humans. To characterize the relationship between Salmonella causing human infections and their food animal reservoirs, we compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from ill humans in Pennsylvania and from food animals before retail. Human clinical isolates were received from 2005 through 2011 during routine public health operations in Pennsylvania. Isolates from cattle, chickens, swine and turkeys were recovered during the same period from federally inspected slaughter and processing facilities in the northeastern United States. We found that subtyping Salmonella isolates by PFGE revealed differences in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and, for human Salmonella, differences in sources and invasiveness that were not evident from serotyping alone. Sixteen of the 20 most common human Salmonella PFGE patterns were identified in Salmonella recovered from food animals. The most common human Salmonella PFGE pattern, Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS, was associated with more cases of invasive salmonellosis than all other patterns. In food animals, this pattern was almost exclusively (99% found in Salmonella recovered from chickens and was present in poultry meat in every year of the study. Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS was associated with susceptibility to all antimicrobial agents tested in 94.7% of human and 97.2% of food animal Salmonella isolates. In contrast, multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents was observed in five PFGE patterns. Typhimurium patterns JPXX01.0003 (JPXX01.0003 ARS and JPXX01.0018 (JPXX01.0002 ARS, considered together, were associated with resistance to five or more classes of antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracycline (ACSSuT, in 92% of human and

  19. The attribution of human infections with antimicrobial resistant Salmonella bacteria in Denmark to sources of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Lo Fo Wong, Danilo M. A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Danish Salmonella surveillance in 2000-2001, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis caused by antimicrobial resistant bacteria. Domestic food products accounted for 53.1% of all cases, mainly caused...... by table eggs (37.6%). A large proportion (19%) of cases were travel related, while 18% could not be associated with any source. Imported food products accounted for 9.5% of all cases; the most important source being imported chicken. Multidrug and quinolone resistance was rarely found in cases acquired...... from Danish food, but was common in cases related to imported products (49.7% and 35.6% of attributable cases) and travelling (26.5% and 38.3% of attributable cases). For most serovars, the quinolone-resistant isolates were found to be associated with relatively more human infections than...

  20. Prevalence, Antimicrobial Resistance and Risk Factors for Thermophilic Campylobacter Infections in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Humans in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komba, E V G; Mdegela, R H; Msoffe, P L M; Nielsen, L N; Ingmer, H

    2015-11-01

    The genus Campylobacter comprises members known to be a leading cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness worldwide. A study was conducted to determine the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter in humans in Morogoro, Eastern Tanzania. Isolation of Campylobacter from stool specimens adopted the Cape Town protocol. Campylobacter isolates were preliminarily identified by conventional phenotypic tests and subsequently confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and polymerase chain reaction. Antimicrobial resistance testing employed the disc diffusion method. A small proportion of the test isolates was also subjected to agar dilution method. Risk factors for human illness were determined in an unmatched case-control study. Thermophilic Campylobacter were isolated from 11.4% of the screened individuals (n = 1195). The agreement between PCR and MALDI-TOF was perfect (κ = 1.0). Symptomatics and young individuals were infected with higher numbers than asymptomatic and adults, respectively. The majority (84.6%) of the isolates were C. jejuni and the remaining were C. coli. Isolates had highest resistance (95.6%) for colistin sulphate and lowest for ciprofloxacin (22.1%). The rates of resistance for other antibiotics (azithromycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, amoxycillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol) ranged from 44.1% to 89%. Comparison between disc diffusion and agar dilution methods indicated a good correlation, and the tests were in agreement to each other (κ ≥ 0.75). Human illness was found to be associated with young age and consumption of chicken meat and pre-prepared salad. Our data indicate the presence of antibiotic-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter in humans in the study area. There is a need for routine investigation of the presence of the organisms in gastroenteritis aetiology, including determination of their antibiotic

  1. Resistência antimicrobiana de coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado Antimicrobial resistance of coliform isolates from expressed human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Reis Novak

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A veiculação de microrganismos potencialmente patogênicos, resistentes aos antibióticos, por meio de leite humano ordenhado, pode ser um fator de risco potencial. Este estudo teve como objetivo contribuir para um melhor conhecimento dos coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado (LHO e de seu perfil de resistência a antimicrobianos. Seguiu-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, utilizando 837 amostras de LHO, nas quais 71 (8,48% estavam contaminadas com coliformes totais, cuja contagem em nenhuma das amostras ultrapassava 1,0x10³NMP/ml. A maioria dos microrganismos isolados (91,6% pertencia a apenas duas espécies, Enterobacter cloacae e Klebsiella pneumoniae. As 71 cepas de coliformes apresentavam resistência a pelo menos um dos antimicrobianos testados. Conclui-se que o LHO coletado e armazenado sob condições higiênico-sanitárias insatisfatórias, pode apresentar coliformes, que desgastam os fatores de proteção, reduzem o valor nutricional e a qualidade do produto.The dispersion of potentially pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant microorganisms via expressed human milk can be considered a risk factor. The aim of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of coliform isolates from expressed human milk and their antimicrobial resistance profiles. The sampling scheme followed a totally randomized design, using 837 samples of expressed human milk. Of these, 71 (8.48% were identified as contaminated with total coliforms, although in none of the samples did the population exceed 1.0x10³ MPN/ml. Most of the microorganisms isolated (91.6% belonged to only two species, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which when subjected to antibiograms, revealed that several strains showed prior resistance to some of the antimicrobials tested. Coliforms may grow in expressed human milk if it is improperly stored, depleting protection factors and reducing the milk's nutritional value.

  2. Characterization of Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Its Association with Virulence Genes Related to Adherence, Invasion, and Cytotoxicity in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolates from Animals, Meat, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Lisette; Gatica, María A; Riquelme, Víctor; Vergara, Constanza; Yañez, José Manuel; San Martín, Betty; Sáenz, Leonardo; Vidal, Maricel; Martínez, María Cristina; Araya, Pamela; Flores, Roberto; Duery, Oscar; Vidal, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to statistically analyze the association between antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance to erythromycine, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline and 11 virulence genes associated with adherence, invasion, and cytotoxicity in 528 isolates of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni obtained from retail meat and fecal samples from food-producing animals and human patients. A high percentage of Campylobacter strains were resistant to antimicrobials, specifically ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. Moreover, we observed a wide distribution of virulence genes within the analyzed strains. C. jejuni strains were more susceptible to antimicrobials, and showed greater number of virulence genes than C. coli strains. Genes related to invasion capability, such as racR, ciaB, and pldA, were associated with antimicrobial-susceptible strains in both species. The genes cdtA and dnaJ, a citotoxin unit and an adherence-related gene, respectively, were associated with antimicrobial-resistant strains in both species. In conclusion, Campylobacter strains show a statistically significant association between antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of virulence genes.

  3. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis.

  4. Polymyxins resistance: old antimicrobials, last therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Girardello

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymyxins are polypeptide antimicrobials that act in the cell membranes and promote decrease of the cell wall integrity. These antimicrobials are used in the clinical practice for treatment of the multi-drug resistant Gram negative bacilli infections as the last therapeutic option. The polymyxin resistance involves lipopolysaccharide modifi cations that decrease the affi nity of the antimicrobial with the cell surface. These modifi cations are regulated by two component systems that are active by environmental infl uences as cation presence, pH or polymyxin exposure. The environmental infl uences initiate the action of the genes that develop the polymyxins resistant phenotype. The polymyxins viability maintenance is essential for the treatment for multi-drug resistant bacilli infections, while new therapeutic options are not available.KEYWORDS polimixins antimicrobial resistance

  5. Common phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns found in a case study of multiresistant E. coli from cohabitant pets, humans, and household surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Liliana Raquel Leite; Pina, Susana Maria Rocha; Simões, Romeo Luís Rocha; de Matos, Augusto José Ferreira; Rodrigues, Pedro; da Costa, Paulo Martins Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles among E. coli strains isolated from cohabitant pets and humans, evaluating the concurrent colonization of pets, owners, and home surfaces by bacteria carrying the same antimicrobial-resistant genes. The authors also intended to assess whether household surfaces and objects could contribute to the within-household antimicrobial-resistant gene diffusion between human and animal cohabitants. A total of 124 E. coli strains were isolated displaying 24 different phenotypic patterns with a remarkable percentage of multiresistant ones. The same resistance patterns were isolated from the dog's urine, mouth, the laundry floor, the refrigerator door, and the dog's food bowl. Some other multiresistant phenotypes, as long as resistant genes, were found repeatedly in different inhabitants and surfaces of the house. Direct, close contact between all the cohabitants and the touch of contaminated household surfaces and objects could be an explanation for these observations.

  6. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli from human and animal sources uncovers multiple resistances from human sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Murinda, Shelton E; Graves, Alexandria K

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli are widely used as indicators of fecal contamination, and in some cases to identify host sources of fecal contamination in surface water. Prevalence, genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility were determined for 600 generic E. coli isolates obtained from surface water and sediment from creeks and channels along the middle Santa Ana River (MSAR) watershed of southern California, USA, after a 12 month study. Evaluation of E. coli populations along the creeks and channels showed that E. coli were more prevalent in sediment compared to surface water. E. coli populations were not significantly different (P = 0.05) between urban runoff sources and agricultural sources, however, E. coli genotypes determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were less diverse in the agricultural sources than in urban runoff sources. PFGE also showed that E. coli populations in surface water were more diverse than in the sediment, suggesting isolates in sediment may be dominated by clonal populations.Twenty four percent (144 isolates) of the 600 isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. Most multiple resistances were associated with inputs from urban runoff and involved the antimicrobials rifampicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. The occurrence of a greater number of E. coli with multiple antibiotic resistances from urban runoff sources than agricultural sources in this watershed provides useful evidence in planning strategies for water quality management and public health protection.

  7. Activity and Mechanism of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Amphiphilic Polymethacrylate Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Kuroda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cationic amphiphilic polymethacrylate derivatives (PMAs have shown potential as a novel class of synthetic antimicrobials. A panel of PMAs with varied ratios of hydrophobic and cationic side chains were synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action. The PMAs are shown to be active against a panel of pathogenic bacteria, including a drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, compared to the natural antimicrobial peptide magainin which did not display any activity against the same strain. The selected PMAs with 47–63% of methyl groups in the side chains showed minimum inhibitory concentrations of ≤2–31 µg/mL, but cause only minimal harm to human red blood cells. The PMAs also exhibit rapid bactericidal kinetics. Culturing Escherichia coli in the presence of the PMAs did not exhibit any potential to develop resistance against the PMAs. The antibacterial activities of PMAs against E. coli and S. aureus were slightly reduced in the presence of physiological salts. The activity of PMAs showed bactericidal effects against E. coli and S. aureus in both exponential and stationary growth phases. These results demonstrate that PMAs are a new antimicrobial platform with no observed development of resistance in bacteria. In addition, the PMAs permeabilized the E. coli outer membrane at polymer concentrations lower than their MIC values, but they did not show any effect on the bacterial inner membrane. This indicates that mechanisms other than membrane permeabilization may be the primary factors determining their antimicrobial activity.

  8. Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, István; Pivarcsi, Andor; Kis, Kornélia; Koreck, Andrea; Bodai, László; McDowell, Andrew; Seltmann, Holger; Patrick, Sheila; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kemény, Lajos

    2006-07-01

    Acne is a common skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. In addition to genetic, hormonal and environmental factors, abnormal colonization by Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the occurrence of acne via the induction of inflammatory mediators. To gain more insight into the role that sebocytes play in the innate immune response of the skin, particularly in acne, we compared the antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression at mRNA and protein levels, as well as the viability and differentiation of SZ95 sebocytes in response to co-culture with representative isolates of P. acnes type IA and type IB as well as Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that, in vitro, P. acnes type IA and IB isolates and LPS induced human beta-defensin-2 and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, and influenced sebocyte viability and differentiation. Our results provide evidence that sebocytes are capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and antimicrobial peptides, which may have a role in acne pathogenesis. Furthermore, since P. acnes types IA and IB differentially affect both the differentiation and viability of sebocytes, our data demonstrate that different strains of P. acnes vary in their capacity to stimulate an inflammatory response within the pilosebaceous follicle.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance and subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from human outbreaks and poultry in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, C S L; Streck, A F; Michael, G B; Marks, F S; Rodrigues, D P; Dos Reis, E M F; Cardoso, M R I; Canal, C W

    2010-07-01

    To investigate antimicrobial resistance, 96 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis strains isolated from salmonellosis outbreaks and poultry-related products obtained in southern Brazil were analyzed. Macrorestriction patterns, obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phage types, were assessed. Although 43.75% of samples were sensitive to all drugs tested, resistance to sulfonamide (34.37%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (25.00%), nalidixic acid (14.58%), streptomycin (2.08%), gentamicin, and tetracycline (1.04%) was identified. Furthermore, 89.60% of strains belonged to phage type 4, and a predominant pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotype represented by 82.29% of the strains was identified, suggesting that a clonal group was distributed in poultry, food, and human isolates. Although it was not possible to associate strains from different sources, the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis strains supports the need to establish monitoring programs to identify the emergence of potential resistance patterns and to direct policies for use of these drugs in food-producing animals.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Salacia chinensis Linn. against human pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    oorthy kannaiyan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate antimicrobial effects of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Salacia chinensis (S. chinensis Linn. against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Methods: The Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus (MTCC 96, Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis (MTCC 435, Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis (MTCC 121, Escherichia coli (E. coli (MTCC 443, Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae (MTCC 432, Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis (MTCC 1429, Salmonella paratyphi A (S. paratyphi A (MTCC 735, Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium (MTCC 98, Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri (MTCC 1457 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa (MTCC 424, Candida albicans (C. albicans (MTCC 183 and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans (clinical isolate were originally obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection Centre, Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh, India. Antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods against pathogens by using crude ethanolic and aqueous extracts. Results: Ethanolic extract of S. chinensis L. leaves showed significant antimicrobial activity against S. epidermidis (33.20 mm, C. albicans (30.40 mm and C. neoformans (18.20 mm mean values were documented. Aqueous extract of leaves showed significant inhibitory activity against C. neoformans (19.8 mm and S. epidermidis (17.80 mm were observed. Based on broth dilution method, the ethanolic extract of crude plant material showed the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values against S. epidermidis, C. neoformans (256 毺 g/mL and C. albicans (512 毺 g/mL, whereas the aqueous extract of S. chinensis L. leaves showed significant inhibitory activity against S. epidermidis (512 毺 g/mL and C. neoformans (1024 毺 g/mL were observed. Conclusions: The present result revealed that ethanolic extract of S. chinensis L. possesses significant antifungal activity when compared as the antibacterial activities.

  11. Antimicrobial peptides as parasiticidal against human trypanosomatids: mechanisms of action and current status in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Samperio, P; de-la-Rosa-Arana, J L

    2013-04-01

    Trypanosomes cause a variety of tropical diseases that affect the livelihood of individuals worldwide. The currently used pharmaceutical treatments rely on chemotherapy. However, many of these drugs are very expensive, and highly toxic. In addition, parasite resistance to several of the therapeutic drugs used is increasing. Therefore, there is a growing need for new control measures for many of these diseases. One new approach is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to disease control, since these peptides can be used as potential anti-parasite effector molecules. This review summarizes and discusses the parasiticidal properties of AMPs for treating trypanosome infections, highlighting their mechanisms of action and current status in development.

  12. Identification of novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1-inhibitory peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun; Watson, Karen M; Peterkofsky, Alan; Buckheit, Robert W

    2010-03-01

    To identify novel anti-HIV-1 peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database (APD; http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php), we have screened 30 candidates and found 11 peptides with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)) of 1, increases in the Arg contents of amphibian maximin H5 and dermaseptin S9 peptides and the database-derived GLK-19 peptide improved the TIs. These examples demonstrate that the APD is a rich resource and a useful tool for developing novel HIV-1-inhibitory peptides.

  13. [Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Resistance Mutations in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolates from Human and Meat Sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Akira; Murakami, Koichi; Etoh, Yoshiki; Sera, Nobuyuki; Horikawa, Kazumi

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in the number of reports of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants in Campylobacter species isolated from meat and human subjects in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Between 2011 and 2013, 55 and 64 isolates were collected from meat (chicken meat and beef liver) and humans, respectively, in this prefecture. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were conducted using the agar dilution method in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, using the following 11 antimicrobial agents : cephalexin, cefoxitin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, minocycline, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin and erythromycin. The susceptibility rates of the isolates to three quinolones (nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin) were 43.7%, 41.2%, 40.3%, respectively. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. Whereas 46.9%-51.6% of the human isolates were resistant to one or more of the quinolones, only 32.7%-34.5% of the meat isolates were resistant to one or more of the drugs. DNA sequencing showed that of the 50 quinolone resistant isolates 44 had position 86 isoleucine (Ile) substituted for threonine (Thr) in the GyrA protein (Thr86Ile). This amino acid substitution resulted from ACA to ATA and ACT to ATT mutations of codon 86 in C. jejuni and C. coli, respectively. Furthermore, two of the four C. jejuni isolates lacking the Thr86Ile mutation had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser substitutions, while the remaining two isolates had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser-Ala 206Val substitutions. These four isolates also had cmeABC sequences that differed from the quinolone sensitive C. jejuni ATCC33560(T) strain. In conclusion, C. jejuni and C. coli have relatively high quinolone resistance, and are resistant to other antibiotics. The new combination of amino acid

  14. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Pesticides Share Facebook Twitter Google+ ... of antimicrobial pesticides (Part 158W) Antimicrobials play an important role in public health and safety. While providing ...

  15. Candida albicans Chitin Increases Arginase-1 Activity in Human Macrophages, with an Impact on Macrophage Antimicrobial Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Donna M.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause a variety of diseases, ranging from superficial mucosal infections to life-threatening systemic infections. Phagocytic cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophages, are important first-line responders to an infection and generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as part of their protective antimicrobial response. During an infection, host cells generate nitric oxide through the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to kill the invading pathogen. Inside the phagocyte, iNOS competes with the enzyme arginase-1 for a common substrate, the amino acid l-arginine. Several pathogenic species, including bacteria and parasitic protozoans, actively modulate the production of nitric oxide by inducing their own arginases or the host’s arginase activity to prevent the conversion of l-arginine to nitric oxide. We report here that C. albicans blocks nitric oxide production in human-monocyte-derived macrophages by induction of host arginase activity. We further determined that purified chitin (a fungal cell wall polysaccharide) and increased chitin exposure at the fungal cell wall surface induces this host arginase activity. Blocking the C. albicans-induced arginase activity with the arginase-specific substrate inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA) or the chitinase inhibitor bisdionin F restored nitric oxide production and increased the efficiency of fungal killing. Moreover, we determined that C. albicans influences macrophage polarization from a classically activated phenotype toward an alternatively activated phenotype, thereby reducing antimicrobial functions and mediating fungal survival. Therefore, C. albicans modulates l-arginine metabolism in macrophages during an infection, potentiating its own survival. PMID:28119468

  16. Improved in vitro evaluation of novel antimicrobials: potential synergy between human plasma and antibacterial peptidomimetics, AMPs and antibiotics against human pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citterio, Linda; Franzyk, Henrik; Palarasah, Yaseelan;

    2016-01-01

    Stable peptidomimetics mimicking natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promising class of potential novel antibiotics. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether the antibacterial activity of two α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics against a range of bacterial pathogens...... was affected by conditions mimicking in vivo settings. Their activity was enhanced to an unexpected degree in the presence of human blood plasma for thirteen pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values typically decreased 2- to 16-fold in the presence of a human plasma concentration...... treatments might be lower than traditionally deduced from MICs determined in laboratory media. Thus, antibiotics previously considered too toxic could be developed into usable last-resort drugs, due to ensuing lowered risk of side effects. In contrast, the activity of the compounds was significantly...

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES: IMPORTANT ROLES IN HUMAN HEALTH AND DISEASES%抗菌肽:人类健康和疾病中的重要角色

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢雪梅; 金小宝; 黎运西; 朱家勇

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides(AMPs)are one kind of polypeptides produced by living organisms' defense system. Substantial evidence accumulated in recent years indicates that AMPs not only possess direct antimicrobial activities but also have multiple immunomodulatory activities. They play an important role in both the innate and adaptive immunity of the host. Their expressions are closely related to many human diseases. Thus, antimicrobial peptides may have potential applications as new therapeutics agents. The intent of this article is to review the structures, expression and bioactivities of defensins and cathelicidin, the main families of AMPs in human. Correlations between human diseases and antimicrobial peptides are also discussed.%抗菌肽是生物体防御系统产生的一类多肽.越来越多的研究表明抗菌肽不仅能够直接抑制和杀灭病原微生物,同时具有多种免疫调节活性,在宿主的天然和适应性免疫中起着重要的作用,因而具有广阔的应用前景.它们的表达水平与人类的许多疾病密切相关.本文对两类主要的人源抗菌肽:防御素和cathelicidin的结构特性、表达和生物活性及其与疾病的关系作一综述.

  18. Polarized secretion of interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 by human airway epithelia 16HBE14o- cells in response to cationic polypeptide challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Wai-ming Chow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The airway epithelium participates in asthmatic inflammation in many ways. Target cells of the epithelium can respond to a variety of inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Damage to the surface epithelium occurs following the secretion of eosinophil-derived, highly toxic cationic proteins. Moreover, the surface epithelium itself is responsible for the synthesis and release of cytokines that cause the selective recruitment, retention, and accumulation of various inflammatory cells. To mimic the damage seen during asthmatic inflammation, the bronchial epithelium can be challenged with highly charged cationic polypeptides such as poly-L-arginine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells, 16HBE14o- cells, were "chemically injured" by exposing them to poly-l-arginine as a surrogate of the eosinophil cationic protein. Cytokine antibody array data showed that seven inflammatory mediators were elevated out of the 40 tested, including marked elevation in interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were elevated as measured with real-time PCR. Cell culture supernatants from apical and basolateral compartments were collected, and the IL-6 and IL-8 production was quantified with ELISA. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by 16HBE14o- epithelia into the apical compartment was significantly higher than that from the basolateral compartment. Using specific inhibitors, the production of IL-6 and IL-8 was found to be dependent on p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly demonstrate that damage to the bronchial epithelia by poly-L-arginine stimulates polarized IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. This apically directed secretion of cytokines may play an important role in orchestrating epithelial cell responses to inflammation.

  19. Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs share phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance with community-dwelling humans and patients with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Kurbasic, Azra; Skjøt-Rasmussen, Line; Ejrnaes, Karen; Porsbo, Lone J; Pedersen, Karl; Jensen, Lars B; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Agersø, Yvonne; Olsen, Katharina E P; Aarestrup, Frank M; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hammerum, Anette M

    2010-05-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Phylogroup B2 and D isolates are associated with UTI. It has been proposed that E. coli causing UTI could have an animal origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance, and their possible associations in E. coli isolates from patients with UTI, community-dwelling humans, broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs in Denmark. A total of 964 geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from UTI patients (n = 102), community-dwelling humans (n = 109), Danish (n = 197) and imported broiler chicken meat (n = 86), Danish broiler chickens (n = 138), Danish (n = 177) and imported pork (n = 10), and Danish pigs (n = 145) were tested for phylogroups (A, B1, B2, D, and nontypeable [NT] isolates) and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phylogroup A, B1, B2, D, and NT isolates were detected among all groups of isolates except for imported pork isolates. Antimicrobial resistance to three (for B2 isolates) or five antimicrobial agents (for A, B1, D, and NT isolates) was shared among isolates regardless of origin. Using cluster analysis to investigate antimicrobial resistance data, we found that UTI isolates always grouped with isolates from meat and/or animals. We detected B2 and D isolates, that are associated to UTI, among isolates from broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs. Although B2 isolates were found in low prevalences in animals and meat, these sources could still pose a risk for acquiring uropathogenic E. coli. Further, E. coli from animals and meat were very similar to UTI isolates with respect to their antimicrobial resistance phenotype. Thus, our study provides support for the hypothesis that a food animal and meat reservoir might exist for UTI-causing E. coli.

  20. Endotoxin, capsule, and bacterial attachment contribute to Neisseria meningitidis resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allison; Geörg, Miriam; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2009-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved numerous mechanisms to evade the human immune system and have developed widespread resistance to traditional antibiotics. We studied the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and present evidence of novel mechanisms of resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. We found that bacteria attached to host epithelial cells are resistant to 10 microM LL-37 whereas bacteria in solution or attached to plastic are killed, indicating that the cell microenvironment protects bacteria. The bacterial endotoxin lipooligosaccharide and the polysaccharide capsule contribute to LL-37 resistance, probably by preventing LL-37 from reaching the bacterial membrane, as more LL-37 reaches the bacterial membrane on both lipooligosaccharide-deficient and capsule-deficient mutants whereas both mutants are also more susceptible to LL-37 killing than the wild-type strain. N. meningitidis bacteria respond to sublethal doses of LL-37 and upregulate two of their capsule genes, siaC and siaD, which further results in upregulation of capsule biosynthesis.

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Mittermayer, H

    2008-03-01

    The aim of antimicrobial management or stewardship programmes is to ensure proper use of antimicrobial agents in order to provide the best treatment outcomes, to lessen the risk of adverse effects (including antimicrobial resistance), and to promote cost-effectiveness. Increasingly, long-term sustainability is found to be the major focus of antimicrobial stewardship. Implementing structural measures in healthcare institutions is therefore a major, but not the sole, focus of attention in promoting prudent use of antibiotics. The problem of antimicrobial resistance requires common strategies at all levels--for the prescribers and at ward, departmental, hospital, national and international levels.

  2. High expression of organic cation transporter 3 in human BAT-like adipocytes. Implications for extraneuronal norepinephrine uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breining, Peter; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Pikelis, Arunas;

    2016-01-01

    with known markers of thermogenic function, e.g. UCP1. When examining neck AT biopsies from 57 individuals we found that OCT3 was expressed at 2.5 ± 0.16 fold higher level in the deep-neck AT compared with subcutaneous AT. UCP1 was found extensively expressed in the deep-neck AT depot and the correlation...... between UCP1 and OCT3 within the deep-neck AT was found highly significant (r(2) = 0.4012, P-value 3-blocker. In conclusion, we found that OCT3 may......Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is activated by extracellular norepinephrine (NE) released by the sympathetic nervous system. The extracellular concentration of NE is additionally regulated by the disappearance/degradation of NE. Recent studies have introduced the organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3...

  3. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  4. Arsenic alters transcriptional responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and decreases antimicrobial defense of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Britton C; Rayack, Erica J; Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-09-15

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water and food threatens the health of hundreds of millions of people worldwide by increasing the risk of numerous diseases. Arsenic exposure has been associated with infectious lung disease in epidemiological studies, but it is not yet understood how ingestion of low levels of arsenic increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to examine the effect of arsenic on gene expression in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and to determine if arsenic altered epithelial cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen. Bronchial epithelial cells line the airway surface, providing a physical barrier and serving critical roles in antimicrobial defense and signaling to professional immune cells. We used RNA-seq to define the transcriptional response of HBE cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and investigated how arsenic affected HBE gene networks in the presence and absence of the bacterial challenge. Environmentally relevant levels of arsenic significantly changed the expression of genes involved in cellular redox homeostasis and host defense to bacterial infection, and decreased genes that code for secreted antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Using pathway analysis, we identified Sox4 and Nrf2-regulated gene networks that are predicted to mediate the arsenic-induced decrease in lysozyme secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that arsenic decreased lysozyme in the airway surface liquid, resulting in reduced lysis of Microccocus luteus. Thus, arsenic alters the expression of genes and proteins in innate host defense pathways, thereby decreasing the ability of the lung epithelium to fight bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  6. Disinfectant and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of the Big Six Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains from Food Animals and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ross C; Franz, Eelco; Bono, James L; Mandrell, Robert E; Fratamico, Pina M; Callaway, Todd R; Andrews, Kathleen; Poole, Toni L; Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2016-08-01

    The disinfectant and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 138 non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains (STECs) from food animals and humans were determined. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was moderate (39.1% of strains) in response to 15 antimicrobial agents. Animal strains had a lower AMR prevalence (35.6%) than did human strains (43.9%) but a higher prevalence of the resistance profile GEN-KAN-TET. A decreasing prevalence of AMR was found among animal strains from serogroups O45 > O145 > O121 > O111 > O26 > O103 and among human strains from serogroups O145 > O103 > O26 > O111 > O121 > O45. One animal strain from serogroups O121 and O145 and one human strain from serogroup O26 had extensive drug resistance. A high prevalence of AMR in animal O45 and O121 strains and no resistance or a low prevalence of resistance in human strains from these serogroups suggests a source other than food animals for human exposure to these strains. Among the 24 disinfectants evaluated, all strains were susceptible to triclosan. Animal strains had a higher prevalence of resistance to chlorhexidine than did human strains. Both animal and human strains had a similar low prevalence of low-level benzalkonium chloride resistance, and animal and human strains had similar susceptibility profiles for most other disinfectants. Benzyldimethylammonium chlorides and C10AC were the primary active components in disinfectants DC&R and P-128, respectively, against non-O157 STECs. A disinfectant FS512 MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml was more prevalent among animal O121 strains (61.5%) than among human O121 strains (25%), which may also suggest a source of human exposure to STEC O121 other than food animals. Bacterial inhibition was not dependent solely on pH but was correlated with the presence of dissociated organic acid species and some undissociated acids.

  7. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  8. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaja S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. Aim The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and time course lethal effects at various pH. Methods A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089 were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Results Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 μg/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance.

  9. Mechanisms of innate immunity: cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes, antimicrobial action, translocation, role, and fate in antimicrobial phagocytosis. Progress report, March 1976--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitznagel, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: characterization of the III f granules of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN); studies on glycosidases using methylumbelliferyl derivatives of the sugars with spectrofluorometry; distribution of proteinases and cationic proteins in human PMN; comparison of granules of eosinophils with those of other PMN; identification of a cyanide-resistant NADPH oxidase in PMN; subcellular localization of superoxide dismutase in PMN; oxygen-independent antimicrobial activities of each granule class; the phagocytic and intraleukocytic killing capacity of PMN deprived of their specific granules with phorbol myristate acetate; and studies on the PMN of an infant with the Chediak Higashi syndrome. (HLW)

  10. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents.

  11. Short cationic lipopeptides as effective antibacterial agents: Design, physicochemical properties and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Fazren; Elliott, Alysha G; Marasini, Nirmal; Ramu, Soumya; Ziora, Zyta; Kavanagh, Angela M; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-05-15

    The spread of drug-resistant bacteria has imparted a sense of urgency in the search for new antibiotics. In an effort to develop a new generation of antibacterial agents, we have designed de novo charged lipopeptides inspired by natural antimicrobial peptides. These short lipopeptides are composed of cationic lysine and hydrophobic lipoamino acids that replicate the amphiphilic properties of natural antimicrobial peptides. The resultant lipopeptides were found to self-assemble into nanoparticles. Some were effective against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains resistant to methicillin, daptomycin and/or vancomycin. The lipopeptides were not toxic to human kidney and liver cell lines and were highly resistant to tryptic degradation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of bacteria cells treated with lipopeptide showed membrane-damage and lysis with extrusion of cytosolic contents. With such properties in mind, these lipopeptides have the potential to be developed as new antibacterial agents against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria.

  12. Effects of chronic triclosan exposure upon the antimicrobial susceptibility of 40 ex-situ environmental and human isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledder, R G; Gilbert, P; Willis, C; McBain, A J

    2006-05-01

    Triclosan (TCS) exposure of Escherichia coli selects for tolerant clones, mutated in their enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI). It has been inferred that this phenomenon is widespread amongst bacterial genera and might be associated with resistance to third party agents. Ex-situ, low passage isolates of enteric, human axilla, human oral origin and bacteria isolated from a domestic drain, together with selected type cultures were exposed to escalating concentrations of TCS over 10 passages using a gradient plate technique. One fresh faecal isolate of E. coli was included as a positive control. TCS susceptibility was determined for all strains before and after exposure, whilst enteric isolates were additionally assessed for susceptibility towards chlorhexidine, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, and the oral isolates towards chlorhexidine, tetracycline and metronidazole. Triclosan exposure of E. coli markedly decreased TCS susceptibility. TCS susceptibility also decreased for Klebsiella oxytoca, Aranicola proteolyticus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Susceptibility of the remaining 35 strains to TCS and the other test agents remained unchanged. These data suggest that selection for high level resistance by TCS exposure is not widespread and appears to be confined to certain enteric bacteria, especially E. coli. Change in TCS susceptibility did not affect susceptibility towards chemically unrelated antimicrobials. Acquired high-level TCS resistance is not a widespread phenomenon.

  13. Regulation of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in primary immune cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowry, Malcolm B; Guo, Chunxiao; Borregaard, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene (hCAP18/LL-37), is regulated by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and is critical in the killing of pathogens by innate immune cells. In addition, secreted LL-37 binds extracellular receptors and modulates the recruitment and activity...... of both innate and adaptive immune cells. Evidence suggests that during infections activated immune cells locally produce increased levels of 1,25D3 thus increasing production of hCAP18/LL-37. The relative expression levels of hCAP18/LL-37 among different immune cell types are not well characterized....... The aim of this study was to determine the relative levels of hCAP18/LL-37 in human peripheral blood immune cells and determine to what extent 1,25D3 increased its expression in peripheral blood-derived cells. We show for the first time, a hierarchy of expression of hCAP18 in freshly isolated cells...

  14. Silver sucrose octasulfate (IASOS™ as a valid active ingredient into a novel vaginal gel against human vaginal pathogens: in vitro antimicrobial activity assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Marianelli

    Full Text Available This in vitro study assessed the antimicrobial properties of a novel octasilver salt of Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS as well as of an innovative vaginal gel containing IASOS (SilSOS Femme, against bacterial and yeast pathogens isolated from human clinical cases of symptomatic vaginal infections. In BHI and LAPT culture media, different ionic silver concentrations and different pHs were tested. IASOS exerted a strong antimicrobial activity towards all the pathogens tested in both culture media. The results demonstrated that salts and organic compounds present in the culture media influenced IASOS efficacy only to a moderate extent. Whereas comparable MBCs (Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations were observed for G. vaginalis (10 mg/L Ag+, E. coli and E. aerogenes (25 mg/L Ag+ in both media, higher MBCs were found for S. aureus and S. agalactiae in LAPT cultures (50 mg/L Ag+ versus 25 mg/L Ag+. No minimal concentration totally inhibiting the growth of C. albicans was found. Nevertheless, in both media at the highest ionic silver concentrations (50-200 mg/L Ag+, a significant 34-52% drop in Candida growth was observed. pH differently affected the antimicrobial properties of IASOS against bacteria or yeasts; however, a stronger antimicrobial activity at pH higher than the physiological pH was generally observed. It can be therefore concluded that IASOS exerts a bactericidal action against all the tested bacteria and a clear fungistatic action against C. albicans. The antimicrobial activity of the whole vaginal gel SilSOS Femme further confirmed the antimicrobial activity of IASOS. Overall, our findings support IASOS as a valid active ingredient into a vaginal gel.

  15. Occurrence, Virulence Factors, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Chicken Products and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bayomi, Rasha M; Ahmed, Heba A; Awadallah, Maysa A I; Mohsen, Rasha A; Abd El-Ghafar, Abeer E; Abdelrahman, Mahmoud A

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus in food is a consequence of inadequate hygienic handling and processing, posing a potential risk to public health. The current study aimed to characterize virulence factors, as well as antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolated from retail chicken products and hand swabs from vendors in Egypt. In addition, genetic relatedness of the isolates from chicken and humans was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using protein A as a target. A total of 110 samples were collected from chicken products (n = 80) and vendors (n = 30). Overall, 30 (37.5%) chicken products samples were positive for S. aureus, whereas hand swabs from meat handlers revealed that 18 (60%) were positive. Ten MRSA strains were characterized by the presence of the mecA gene, comprising seven isolates from chicken and three from humans. Virulence-associated factors were evaluated by PCR, revealing that 31.3% of S. aureus isolates harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, whereas 10.4% were positive for the sea and sed genes each, and only two isolates were positive for γ-hemolysin-associated gene. Genotyping using spa PCR-RFLP showed identical restriction banding patterns of MRSA isolates of human and chicken meat origin, indicating the genetic relatedness of the isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize PVL-positive MRSA from chicken products and to utilize spa-RFLP for evaluating the genetic relatedness between MRSA of human and chicken origin in Egypt.

  16. Short-term effects of ultrahigh concentration cationic silica nanoparticles on cell internalization, cytotoxicity, and cell integrity with human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seog, Ji Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Bokyung [Corning Precision Materials (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongheun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Graham, Lauren M. [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Choi, Joon Sig [Chungnam National University, Department of Biochemistry (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Bok, E-mail: slee@umd.edu [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    High concentrations of cationic colloidal silica nanoparticles (CCS-NPs) have been widely used for the enrichment of plasma membrane proteins. However, the interaction between the CCS-NPs and cells under the required concentration for the isolation of plasma membrane are rarely investigated. We evaluated the internalization and toxicity of the 15 nm CCS-NPs which were exposed at high concentrations with short time in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and colorimetric assays. The NPs were observed throughout the cells, particularly in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, after short incubation periods. Additionally, the NPs significantly influenced the membrane integrity of the MCF-7 cells.

  17. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Natural products of higher plants may possess a new source of antimicrobial agents with possibly novel mechanisms of action. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with conventional antimicrobials. A method using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the morphology of the bacterial and fungal microbes and thus determining antimicrobial activity is presented in the chapter.

  19. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi eRashid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs target anionic lipids (e.g. phosphatidylglycerol (PG and cardiolipins (CL in the cell membrane and anionic components (e.g. lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g. lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1 CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2 delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3 CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction.

  20. Capsule expression in Streptococcus mitis modulates interaction with oral keratinocytes and alters susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukke, H V; Engen, S A; Schenck, K; Petersen, F C

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mitis is a colonizer of the oral cavity and the nasopharynx, and is closely related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both species occur in encapsulated and unencapsulated forms, but in S. mitis the role of the capsule in host interactions is mostly unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine how capsule expression in S. mitis can modulate interactions with the host with relevance for colonization. The S. mitis type strain, as well as two mutants of the type strain, an isogenic capsule deletion mutant, and a capsule switch mutant expressing the serotype 4 capsule of S. pneumoniae TIGR4, were used. Wild-type and capsule deletion strains of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 were included for comparison. We found that capsule production in S. mitis reduced adhesion to oral and lung epithelial cells. Further, exposure of oral epithelial cells to encapsulated S. mitis resulted in higher interleukin-6 and CXCL-8 transcription levels relative to the unencapsulated mutant. Capsule expression in S. mitis increased the sensitivity to human neutrophil peptide 1-3 but reduced the sensitivity to human β-defensin-3 and cathelicidin. This was in contrast with S. pneumoniae in which capsule expression has been generally associated with increased sensitivity to human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Collectively, these findings indicate that capsule expression in S. mitis is important in modulating interactions with epithelial cells, and is associated with increased or reduced susceptibility to AMPs depending on the nature of the AMP.

  1. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides: the role of hydrophobicity in the alpha helical structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandurangan Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a class of molecule obtained from plants, insects, animals, and humans. These peptides have been classified into five categories: 1. Anionic peptide, 2. Linear alpha helical cationic peptide, 3. Cationic peptide, 4. Anionic and cationic peptides with disulphide bonds, and 5. Anionic and cationic peptide fragments of larger proteins. Factors affecting AMPs are sequence, size, charge, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, structure and conformation. Synthesis of these peptides is convenient by using solid phase peptide synthesis by using FMOC chemistry protocol. The secondary structures of three synthetic peptides were determined by circular dichroism. Also, it was compared the stability of the α-helical structure and confirmed the percentage of helix of these peptides by using circular dichroism. Some of these AMPs show therapeutic properties like antimicrobial, antiviral, contraceptive, and anticancer. The formulations of some peptides have been entered into the phase I, II, or III of clinical trials. This article to review briefly the sources, classification, factors affecting AMPs activity, synthesis, characterization, mechanism of action and therapeutic concern of AMPs and mainly focussed on percentage of α-helical structure in various medium.

  3. Selective and Accurate Determination Method of Propofol in Human Plasma by Mixed-Mode Cation Exchange Cartridge and GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS method for the determination of propofol in human plasma has been developed and validated. Propofol was extracted from human plasma by using mixed-mode cation exchange/reversed-phase (MCX cartridges. As propofol easily volatilizes during concentration, 100% methanol was injected directly into GC-MS to elute propofol. Despite avoiding concentration process of the eluted solution, lower limit of quantization (LLOQ of propofol was 25 ng/mL. The validated method exhibited good linearity (R2=0.9989 with accuracy and precision −5.8%~11.7% and 3.7%~11.6%, respectively. The other validation parameters, recovery and matrix effect, ranged from 96.6% to 99.4% and 95.3% to 101.4%, respectively. Propofol standard was quantified to evaluate possible loss due to the concentration processes, nitrogen gas and centrifugal vacuum. These two concentration processes resulted in notable decrease in the quantity of propofol, signifying avoiding any concentration processes during propofol quantification. Also, to confirm suitability of the developed method, authentic human plasma samples were analyzed. The selective assay method using MCX cartridge and GC-MS facilitated quantification of propofol in plasma sample accurately by preventing any losses due to the concentration processes.

  4. Selective and Accurate Determination Method of Propofol in Human Plasma by Mixed-Mode Cation Exchange Cartridge and GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of propofol in human plasma has been developed and validated. Propofol was extracted from human plasma by using mixed-mode cation exchange/reversed-phase (MCX) cartridges. As propofol easily volatilizes during concentration, 100% methanol was injected directly into GC-MS to elute propofol. Despite avoiding concentration process of the eluted solution, lower limit of quantization (LLOQ) of propofol was 25 ng/mL. The validated method exhibited good linearity (R (2) = 0.9989) with accuracy and precision -5.8%~11.7% and 3.7%~11.6%, respectively. The other validation parameters, recovery and matrix effect, ranged from 96.6% to 99.4% and 95.3% to 101.4%, respectively. Propofol standard was quantified to evaluate possible loss due to the concentration processes, nitrogen gas and centrifugal vacuum. These two concentration processes resulted in notable decrease in the quantity of propofol, signifying avoiding any concentration processes during propofol quantification. Also, to confirm suitability of the developed method, authentic human plasma samples were analyzed. The selective assay method using MCX cartridge and GC-MS facilitated quantification of propofol in plasma sample accurately by preventing any losses due to the concentration processes.

  5. Role of the Environment in the Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistance to Humans: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Patricia M C; Blaak, Hetty; de Jong, Mart C M; Graat, Elisabeth A M; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-10-20

    To establish a possible role for the natural environment in the transmission of clinically relevant AMR bacteria to humans, a literature review was conducted to systematically collect and categorize evidence for human exposure to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. in the environment. In total, 239 datasets adhered to inclusion criteria. AMR bacteria were detected at exposure-relevant sites (35/38), including recreational areas, drinking water, ambient air, and shellfish, and in fresh produce (8/16). More datasets were available for environmental compartments (139/157), including wildlife, water, soil, and air/dust. Quantitative data from exposure-relevant sites (6/35) and environmental compartments (11/139) were scarce. AMR bacteria were detected in the contamination sources (66/66) wastewater and manure, and molecular data supporting their transmission from wastewater to the environment (1/66) were found. The abundance of AMR bacteria at exposure-relevant sites suggests risk for human exposure. Of publications pertaining to both environmental and human isolates, however, only one compared isolates from samples that had a clear spatial and temporal relationship, and no direct evidence was found for transmission to humans through the environment. To what extent the environment, compared to the clinical and veterinary domains, contributes to human exposure needs to be quantified. AMR bacteria in the environment, including sites relevant for human exposure, originate from contamination sources. Intervention strategies targeted at these sources could therefore limit emission of AMR bacteria to the environment.

  6. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu state, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okorie-Kanu, O. Josephine; Ezenduka, E. Vivienne; Okorie-Kanu, C. Onwuchokwe; Ugwu, L. Chinweokwu; Nnamani, U. John

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella species in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu State and to determine the resistance of these pathogens to antimicrobials commonly used in human and veterinary practices in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 340 raw table eggs comprising 68 composite samples (5 eggs per composite sample) were collected from five selected farms (13 composite samples from the farms) and 10 retail outlets (55 composite samples from the retail outlets) in the study area over a period of 4-month (March-June, 2014). The eggs were screened for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species following standard procedures within 24 h of sample collection. Isolates obtained were subjected to in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test with 15 commonly used antimicrobials using the disk diffusion method. Results: About 37 (54.4%) and 7 (10.3%) of the 68 composite samples were positive for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species, respectively. The shells showed significantly higher (p0.05). The organisms obtained showed a multiple drug resistance. They were completely resistant to nitrofurantoin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, penicillin G and oxacillin. In addition to these, Salmonella spp. also showed 100% resistance to tetracycline. The pathogenic E. coli isolates obtained were 100% susceptible to gentamicin, neomycin, ciprofloxacin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid while Salmonella spp. showed 100% susceptibility to erythromycin, neomycin, and rifampicin. Both organisms showed varying degrees of resistance to streptomycin, amoxicillin, vancomycin, and doxycycline. Conclusion: From the results of the study, it can be concluded that the raw table eggs marketed for human consumption in Enugu State, Nigeria is contaminated with pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species that showed multiple drug resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in veterinary and human

  7. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Josephine Okorie-Kanu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella species in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu State and to determine the resistance of these pathogens to antimicrobials commonly used in human and veterinary practices in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 340 raw table eggs comprising 68 composite samples (5 eggs per composite sample were collected from five selected farms (13 composite samples from the farms and 10 retail outlets (55 composite samples from the retail outlets in the study area over a period of 4-month (March-June, 2014. The eggs were screened for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species following standard procedures within 24 h of sample collection. Isolates obtained were subjected to in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test with 15 commonly used antimicrobials using the disk diffusion method. Results: About 37 (54.4% and 7 (10.3% of the 68 composite samples were positive for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species, respectively. The shells showed significantly higher (p0.05. The organisms obtained showed a multiple drug resistance. They were completely resistant to nitrofurantoin, sulfamethoxazole/ trimethoprim, penicillin G and oxacillin. In addition to these, Salmonella spp. also showed 100% resistance to tetracycline. The pathogenic E. coli isolates obtained were 100% susceptible to gentamicin, neomycin, ciprofloxacin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid while Salmonella spp. showed 100% susceptibility to erythromycin, neomycin, and rifampicin. Both organisms showed varying degrees of resistance to streptomycin, amoxicillin, vancomycin, and doxycycline. Conclusion: From the results of the study, it can be concluded that the raw table eggs marketed for human consumption in Enugu State, Nigeria is contaminated with pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species that showed multiple drug resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in

  8. An effective zinc phthalocyanine derivative for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhuo, E-mail: zchen@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Li, Linsen [Department of Biochemistry, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyang, Liaoning 110034 (China); Hu, Ping; Chen, Song [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Huang, Mingdong, E-mail: mhuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is a common clinical problem. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria posts a severe challenge to medical practice worldwide. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) uses laser light at specific wavelength to activate oxygen molecule in the human tissue into reactive oxygen species as antimicrobial agent. This activation of oxygen by laser light is mediated through a photosensitizer. Two key properties for potent photosensitizer are its absorbance of light in the infrared region (630–700 nm), which promotes tissue penetration depth, and the selective accumulation on bacteria instead of human tissue. We herein report a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5}) and its antimicrobial effects in vitro and in an animal infection model. This photosensitizer has strong capability to kill bacteria at 670 nm. Chemically, it is a water-soluble and cationic photosensitizer carrying positive charge under physiological pH, and can specifically target to bacteria which usually bears negative charges on its surface. Compared with anionic ZnPc counterparts, ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} shows a higher phototoxicity toward bacteria. PACT studies of ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} in experimental infection animal model showed a significant bacteria inhibition compared to controls, and high selectivity of ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} toward bacteria. These findings suggest ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} is a promising antimicrobial photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases. - Highlights: • Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with water-soluble zinc phthalocyanine derivative offers a promising measure to deal with antibiotic resistance of bacteria. • The use of portable LED light sources that are battery-powered and with low cost may make possible the deployment of systems that can be used for wound decontamination. • ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} is a potent photosensitizer for treatment of infectious diseases.

  9. Human macrophages chronically exposed to LPS can be reactivated by stimulation with MDP to acquire an antimicrobial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Torres, Martha; Arellano, Monserrat; Juárez, Esmeralda

    2017-02-21

    Macrophages are important in host defense and can differentiate into functionally distinct subsets named classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated. In several inflammatory disorders, macrophages become tolerized to prevent deleterious consequences. This tolerization reduces the ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial components (e.g., LPS) maintaining a low level of inflammation but compromising the ability of macrophages to mount an effective immune response during subsequent pathogen encounters. In this study, we aimed to reactivate human monocyte-derived macrophages chronically exposed to LPS by re-stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP). We observed an undefined profile of cell surface marker expression during endotoxin tolerance and absence of TNFα production. Stimulating macrophages chronically exposed to LPS with LPS+MDP restored TNFα, production together with an increased production of IL1, IL6, IFNγ, IL4, IL5 and IL10. These results suggest that macrophages chronically exposed to LPS possess a mixed M1-M2 phenotype with sufficient antimicrobial and homeostatic potential.

  10. The antimicrobial peptide LL37 induces the migration of human pulp cells: a possible adjunct for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Shiba, Hideki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Katsuhiro; Uchida, Yuushi; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2010-06-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL37 has multiple functions, such as the induction of angiogenesis and migration. Pulp cell migration is a key phenomenon in the early stage of pulp-dentin complex regeneration. In this study, we examined the effect of LL37 on the migration of human pulp (HP) cells. HP cells at the sixth passage were exposed to LL37. The migration of HP cells was assessed by a wound-healing assay. The phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was analyzed by immunoblotting. LL37 as well as heparin binding (HB)-EGF, which is an agonist of EGFR, induced HP cell migration. LL37 increased the level of phosphorylated EGFR. An anti-EGFR antibody, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and a JNK inhibitor abolished the migration induced by both LL37 and HB-EGF. Furthermore, the two peptides increased the levels of phosphorylated JNK. LL37 activates EGFR and JNK to induce HP cell migration, and it may contribute to enhancing the regeneration of pulp-dentin complexes. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anionic polymers and 10 nm Fe₃O₄@UA wound dressings support human foetal stem cells normal development and exhibit great antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica; Andrei, Eugen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Maniu, Horia

    2014-03-25

    The aims of this study were the development, characterization and bioevaluation of a novel biocompatible, resorbable and bio-active wound dressing prototype, based on anionic polymers (sodium alginate--AlgNa, carboximethylcellulose--CMC) and magnetic nanoparticles loaded with usnic acid (Fe₃O₄@UA). The antimicrobial activity was tested against Staphylococcus aureus grown in biofilms. The biocompatibility testing model included an endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein and human foetal progenitor cells derived from the amniotic fluid, that express a wide spectrum of surface molecules involved in different vascular functions and inflammatory response, and may be used as skin regenerative support. The obtained results demonstrated that CMC/Fe₃O₄@UA and AlgNa/Fe₃O₄@UA are exhibiting structural and functional properties that recommend them for further applications in the biomedical field. They could be used alone or coated with different bio-active compounds, such as Fe₃O₄@UA, for the development of novel, multifunctional porous materials used in tissues regeneration, as antimicrobial substances releasing devices, providing also a mechanical support for the eukaryotic cells adhesion, and exhibiting the advantage of low cytotoxicity on human progenitor cells. The great antimicrobial properties exhibited by the newly synthesized nano-bioactive coatings are recommending them as successful candidates for improving the implanted devices surfaces used in regenerative medicine.

  12. Identification of structural traits that increase the antimicrobial activity of a chimeric peptide of human β-defensins 2 and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudy, Björn; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Waetzig, Georg H; Grötzinger, Joachim; Jung, Sascha

    2012-10-12

    Antimicrobial peptides participate in the first line of defence of many organisms against pathogens. In humans, the family of β-defensins plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Two human β-defensins, β-defensin-2 and -3 (HBD2 and HBD3), show substantial sequence identity and structural similarity. However, HBD3 kills Staphylococcus (S.) aureus with a 4- to 8-fold higher efficiency compared to HBD2, whereas their activities against Escherichia (E.) coli are very similar. The generation of six HBD2/HBD3-chimeric molecules led to the identification of distinct molecular regions which mediate their divergent killing properties. One of the chimeras (chimera C3) killed both E. coli and S. aureus with an even higher efficacy compared to the wild-type molecules. Due to the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity against many human multidrug-resistant pathogens, this HBD2/HBD3-chimeric peptide represents a promising candidate for a new class of antibiotics. In order to investigate the structural basis of its exceptional antimicrobial activity, the peptide's tertiary structure was determined by NMR spectroscopy, which allowed its direct comparison to the published structures of HBD2 and HBD3 and the identification of the activity-increasing molecular features.

  13. Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-ligand complexes: crystals of different space groups with various cations and combined seeding and co-crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D.-W.; Han, Q.; Qiu, W.; Campbell, R. L.; Xie, B.-X.; Azzi, A.; Lin, S.-X.

    1999-01-01

    Human estrogenic 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD1) is responsible for the synthesis of active estrogens that stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells. The enzyme has been crystallized using a Mg 2+/PEG (3500)/β-octyl glucoside system [Zhu et al., J. Mol. Biol. 234 (1993) 242]. The space group of these crystals is C2. Here we report that cations can affect 17β-HSD1 crystallization significantly. In the presence of Mn 2+ instead of Mg 2+, crystals have been obtained in the same space group with similar unit cell dimensions. In the presence of Li + and Na + instead of Mg 2+, the space group has been changed to P2 12 12 1. A whole data set for a crystal of 17ß-HSD1 complex with progesterone grown in the presence of Li + has been collected to 1.95 Å resolution with a synchrotron source. The cell dimensions are a=41.91 Å, b=108.21 Å, c=117.00 Å. The structure has been preliminarily determined by molecular replacement, yielding important information on crystal packing in the presence of different cations. In order to further understand the structure-function relationship of 17β-HSD1, enzyme complexes with several ligands have been crystallized. As the steroids have very low aqueous solubility, we used a combined method of seeding and co-crystallization to obtain crystals of 17β-HSD1 complexed with various ligands. This method provides ideal conditions for growing complex crystals, with ligands such as 20α-hydroxysteroid progesterone, testosterone and 17β-methyl-estradiol-NADP +. Several complex structures have been determined with reliable electronic density of the bound ligands.

  14. Pharmacokinetic comparison to determine the mechanisms underlying the differential efficacies of cationic diamidines against first- and second-stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sihyung; Wenzler, Tanja; Miller, Patrik N; Wu, Huali; Boykin, David W; Brun, Reto; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2014-07-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a neglected tropical disease, is fatal without treatment. Pentamidine, a cationic diamidine, has been used to treat first-stage (hemolymphatic) HAT since the 1940s, but it is ineffective against second-stage (meningoencephalitic, or central nervous system [CNS]) infection. Novel diamidines (DB75, DB820, and DB829) have shown promising efficacy in both mouse and monkey models of first-stage HAT. However, only DB829 cured animals with second-stage infection. In this study, we aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying the differential efficacies of these diamidines against HAT by conducting a comprehensive pharmacokinetic characterization. This included the determination of metabolic stability in liver microsomes, permeability across MDCK and MDR1-MDCK cell monolayers, interaction with the efflux transporter MDR1 (P-glycoprotein 1 or P-gp), drug binding in plasma and brain, and plasma and brain concentration-time profiles after a single dose in mice. The results showed that DB829, an azadiamidine, had the highest systemic exposure and brain-to-plasma ratio, whereas pentamidine and DB75 had the lowest. None of these diamidines was a P-gp substrate, and the binding of each to plasma proteins and brain differed greatly. The brain-to-plasma ratio best predicted the relative efficacies of these diamidines in mice with second-stage infection. In conclusion, pharmacokinetics and CNS penetration influenced the in vivo efficacies of cationic diamidines against first- and second-stage HAT and should be considered when developing CNS-active antitrypanosomal diamidines.

  15. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Bergamo Estrela

    Full Text Available Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5'-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT, leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado.

  16. Regulation of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in primary immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Malcolm B; Guo, Chunxiao; Borregaard, Niels; Gombart, Adrian F

    2014-09-01

    Production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene (hCAP18/LL-37), is regulated by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and is critical in the killing of pathogens by innate immune cells. In addition, secreted LL-37 binds extracellular receptors and modulates the recruitment and activity of both innate and adaptive immune cells. Evidence suggests that during infections activated immune cells locally produce increased levels of 1,25D3 thus increasing production of hCAP18/LL-37. The relative expression levels of hCAP18/LL-37 among different immune cell types are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the relative levels of hCAP18/LL-37 in human peripheral blood immune cells and determine to what extent 1,25D3 increased its expression in peripheral blood-derived cells. We show for the first time, a hierarchy of expression of hCAP18 in freshly isolated cells with low levels in lymphocytes, intermediate levels in monocytes and the highest levels found in neutrophils. In peripheral blood-derived cells, the highest levels of hCAP18 following treatment with 1,25D3 were in macrophages, while comparatively lower levels were found in GM-CSF-derived dendritic cells and osteoclasts. We also tested whether treatment with parathyroid hormone in combination with 1,25D3 would enhance hCAP18 induction as has been reported in skin cells, but we did not find enhancement in any immune cells tested. Our results indicate that hCAP18 is expressed at different levels according to cell type and lineage. Furthermore, potent induction of hCAP18 by 1,25D3 in macrophages and dendritic cells may modulate functions of both innate and adaptive immune cells at sites of infection.

  17. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi increases sensitivity to human antimicrobial peptides and activates the CpxRA regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Sherri D; Trombley, Michael P; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R; Bauer, Margaret E

    2011-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial.

  18. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Tsz Ying Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs. Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence-associated genes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Muenster, Florian, Omuna, and Noya strains isolated from clinically diarrheic humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia M; Marouf, Sherif H; Alatfeehy, Nayerah

    2013-10-01

    Four serotypes recovered from clinically diarrheic human faecal samples (Salmonella Muenster, Salmonella Florian, Salmonella Omuna and Salmonella Noya) were investigated for the presence of 11 virulence genes (invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB, gipA, sodC1, sopE1, spvC, and bcfC) and their association with antibiotic resistance. The 4 Salmonella serotypes lacked virulence genes gipA and spvC. Resistance to 7 of the 14 antimicrobials was detected. The frequency of resistance, to lincomycin and streptomycin (100% of the Salmonella Muenster [2/5], Salmonella Florian [1/5], Salmonella Omuna [1/5], and Salmonella Noya [1/5] isolates), chloramphenicol (100% of the Salmonella Muenster [2/5] and Salmonella Florian [1/5] isolates) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (100% of the Salmonella Florian [1/5] and Salmonella Omuna [1/5] isolates) was an outstanding feature. With the rest of the antibiotics, the four Salmonella serotypes exhibited a great diversity in their resistance patterns. Overall, the four Salmonella serotypes were resistant to more than one antimicrobial. The antimicrobials to which the Salmonella Muenster, Salmonella Florian, and Salmonella Omuna isolates were resistant, contributed to five different antimicrobial resistance profiles. The virulence associated genes invA, ssaQ, siiD, sopB, and bcfC genes were 100% associated with certain antimicrobial resistance phenotypes (streptomycin and lincosamide) not recorded previously, and secondly, the presence of invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB, and bcfC was associated with resistance to chloramphenicol. The results of this study will help in understanding the spread of virulence genotypes and antibiotic resistance in Salmonella in the region of study.

  20. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...... of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....

  1. Antimicrobial nisin acts against saliva derived multi-species biofilms without cytotoxicity to human oral cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae M.; Ateia, Islam; Paulus, Jefrey R.; Liu, Hongrui; Fenno, J. Christopher; Rickard, Alexander H.; Kapila, Yvonne L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nisin is a lantibiotic widely used for the preservation of food and beverages. Recently, investigators have reported that nisin may have clinical applications for treating bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ultra pure food grade Nisin ZP (>95% purity) on taxonomically diverse bacteria common to the human oral cavity and saliva derived multi-species oral biofilms, and to discern the toxicity of nisin against human cells relevant to the oral cavity. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of taxonomically distinct oral bacteria were determined using agar and broth dilution methods. To assess the effects of nisin on biofilms, two model systems were utilized: a static and a controlled flow microfluidic system. Biofilms were inoculated with pooled human saliva and fed filter-sterilized saliva for 20–22 h at 37°C. Nisin effects on cellular apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated using acridine orange/ethidium bromide fluorescent nuclear staining and lactate dehydrogenase activity assays. Results: Nisin inhibited planktonic growth of oral bacteria at low concentrations (2.5–50 μg/ml). Nisin also retarded development of multi-species biofilms at concentrations ≥1 μg/ml. Specifically, under biofilm model conditions, nisin interfered with biofilm development and reduced biofilm biomass and thickness in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of pre-formed biofilms with nisin resulted in dose- and time-dependent disruption of the biofilm architecture along with decreased bacterial viability. Human cells relevant to the oral cavity were unaffected by the treatment of nisin at anti-biofilm concentrations and showed no signs of apoptotic changes unless treated with much higher concentrations (>200 μg/ml). Conclusion: This work highlights the potential therapeutic value of high purity food grade nisin to inhibit the growth of oral bacteria and the development of

  2. Antimicrobial Nisin Acts Against Saliva Derived Multi-Species Biofilms without Cytotoxicity to Human Oral Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorraine Kapila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nisin is a lantibiotic widely used for the preservation of food and beverages. Recently, investigators have reported that nisin may have clinical applications for treating bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ultra pure food grade Nisin ZP (> 95% purity on taxonomically diverse bacteria common to the human oral cavity and saliva derived multi-species oral biofilms, and to discern the toxicity of nisin against human cells relevant to the oral cavity. Methods: The MICs and MBCs of taxonomically distinct oral bacteria were determined using agar and broth dilution methods. To assess the effects of nisin on biofilms, two model systems were utilized: a static and a controlled flow microfluidic system. Biofilms were inoculated with pooled human saliva and fed filter-sterilized saliva for 20-22 h at 37°C. Nisin effects on cellular apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated using acridine orange/ethidium bromide fluorescent nuclear staining and lactate dehydrogenase activity assays. Results: Nisin inhibited planktonic growth of oral bacteria at low concentrations (2.5 – 50 μg/ml. Nisin also retarded development of multi-species biofilms at concentrations ≥ 1 μg/ml. Specifically, under biofilm model conditions, nisin interfered with biofilm development and reduced biofilm biomass and thickness in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of pre-formed biofilms with nisin resulted in dose- and time-dependent disruption of the biofilm architecture along with decreased bacterial viability. Human cells relevant to the oral cavity were unaffected by the treatment of nisin at anti-biofilm concentrations and showed no signs of apoptotic changes unless treated with much higher concentrations (> 200 μg/ml. Conclusions: This work highlights the potential therapeutic value of high purity food grade nisin to inhibit the growth of oral bacteria and the development of biofilms relevant to oral diseases.

  3. Antimicrobial Compounds from Eukaryotic Microalgae against Human Pathogens and Diseases in Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaise, Charlotte; François, Cyrille; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Morga, Benjamin; Haure, Joël; Tremblay, Réjean; Turcotte, François; Pasetto, Pamela; Gastineau, Romain; Hardivillier, Yann; Leignel, Vincent; Mouget, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-02

    The search for novel compounds of marine origin has increased in the last decades for their application in various areas such as pharmaceutical, human or animal nutrition, cosmetics or bioenergy. In this context of blue technology development, microalgae are of particular interest due to their immense biodiversity and their relatively simple growth needs. In this review, we discuss about the promising use of microalgae and microalgal compounds as sources of natural antibiotics against human pathogens but also about their potential to limit microbial infections in aquaculture. An alternative to conventional antibiotics is needed as the microbial resistance to these drugs is increasing in humans and animals. Furthermore, using natural antibiotics for livestock could meet the consumer demand to avoid chemicals in food, would support a sustainable aquaculture and present the advantage of being environmentally friendly. Using natural and renewable microalgal compounds is still in its early days, but considering the important research development and rapid improvement in culture, extraction and purification processes, the valorization of microalgae will surely extend in the future.

  4. Antimicrobial Compounds from Eukaryotic Microalgae against Human Pathogens and Diseases in Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Falaise

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel compounds of marine origin has increased in the last decades for their application in various areas such as pharmaceutical, human or animal nutrition, cosmetics or bioenergy. In this context of blue technology development, microalgae are of particular interest due to their immense biodiversity and their relatively simple growth needs. In this review, we discuss about the promising use of microalgae and microalgal compounds as sources of natural antibiotics against human pathogens but also about their potential to limit microbial infections in aquaculture. An alternative to conventional antibiotics is needed as the microbial resistance to these drugs is increasing in humans and animals. Furthermore, using natural antibiotics for livestock could meet the consumer demand to avoid chemicals in food, would support a sustainable aquaculture and present the advantage of being environmentally friendly. Using natural and renewable microalgal compounds is still in its early days, but considering the important research development and rapid improvement in culture, extraction and purification processes, the valorization of microalgae will surely extend in the future.

  5. Antimicrobial Compounds from Eukaryotic Microalgae against Human Pathogens and Diseases in Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaise, Charlotte; François, Cyrille; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Morga, Benjamin; Haure, Joël; Tremblay, Réjean; Turcotte, François; Pasetto, Pamela; Gastineau, Romain; Hardivillier, Yann; Leignel, Vincent; Mouget, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel compounds of marine origin has increased in the last decades for their application in various areas such as pharmaceutical, human or animal nutrition, cosmetics or bioenergy. In this context of blue technology development, microalgae are of particular interest due to their immense biodiversity and their relatively simple growth needs. In this review, we discuss about the promising use of microalgae and microalgal compounds as sources of natural antibiotics against human pathogens but also about their potential to limit microbial infections in aquaculture. An alternative to conventional antibiotics is needed as the microbial resistance to these drugs is increasing in humans and animals. Furthermore, using natural antibiotics for livestock could meet the consumer demand to avoid chemicals in food, would support a sustainable aquaculture and present the advantage of being environmentally friendly. Using natural and renewable microalgal compounds is still in its early days, but considering the important research development and rapid improvement in culture, extraction and purification processes, the valorization of microalgae will surely extend in the future. PMID:27598176

  6. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Werner, P; Friedrich, A W; Fegeler, C; Becker, K

    2016-01-01

    The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospit

  7. Improved in vitro evaluation of novel antimicrobials: potential synergy between human plasma and antibacterial peptidomimetics, AMPs and antibiotics against human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Linda; Franzyk, Henrik; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Andersen, Thomas Emil; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Stable peptidomimetics mimicking natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promising class of potential novel antibiotics. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether the antibacterial activity of two α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics against a range of bacterial pathogens was affected by conditions mimicking in vivo settings. Their activity was enhanced to an unexpected degree in the presence of human blood plasma for thirteen pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values typically decreased 2- to 16-fold in the presence of a human plasma concentration that alone did not damage the cell membrane. Hence, MIC and MBC data collected in these settings appear to represent a more appropriate basis for in vivo experiments preceding clinical trials. In fact, concentrations of peptidomimetics and peptide antibiotics (e.g. polymyxin B) required for in vivo treatments might be lower than traditionally deduced from MICs determined in laboratory media. Thus, antibiotics previously considered too toxic could be developed into usable last-resort drugs, due to ensuing lowered risk of side effects. In contrast, the activity of the compounds was significantly decreased in heat-inactivated plasma. We hypothesize that synergistic interactions with complement proteins and/or clotting factors most likely are involved.

  8. Determinants of Substrate and Cation Transport in the Human Na+/Dicarboxylate Cotransporter NaDC3*

    OpenAIRE

    Schlessinger, A; Sun, NN; Colas, C; Pajor, AM

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic intermediates, such as succinate and citrate, regulate important processes ranging from energy metabolism to fatty acid synthesis. Cytosolic concentrations of these metabolites are controlled, in part, by members of the SLC13 gene family. The molecular mechanism underlying Na+-coupled di- and tricarboxylate transport by this family is understood poorly. The human Na+/dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC3 (SLC13A3) is found in various tissues, including the kidney, liver, and brain. In a...

  9. Antimicrobial Activity, Growth Inhibition of Human Tumour Cell Lines, and Phytochemical Characterization of the Hydromethanolic Extract Obtained from Sapindus saponaria L. Aerial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N. Rashed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydromethanolic extract of Sapindus saponaria L. aerial parts was investigated for antimicrobial activity (against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi and capacity to inhibit the growth of different human tumor cell lines as also nontumor liver cells. The evaluated extract was further characterized in terms of phytochemicals using UV, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectroscopic tools. The extract has shown a significant antimicrobial activity on all tested bacterial and fungal species. The best activity was achieved against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus among bacteria and against all three Penicillium species tested. It also revealed cytotoxicity against human colon (HCT-15, cervical (HeLa, breast (MCF-7, and lung (NCI-H460 carcinoma cell lines, with HeLa being the most susceptible tumor cell line. The extract was not toxic for nontumor liver cells. Chromatographic separation of the extract resulted in the isolation and identification of stigmasterol, oleanolic acid, luteolin, luteolin 8-C-β-glucoside (orientin, luteolin 6-C-β-glucoside (isoorientin, luteolin 7-O-β-glucuronide, and rutin. The results of the present findings may be useful for the discovery of novel antitumor and antimicrobial agents from plant origin.

  10. Antimicrobial and Anticoagulant Activities of N-Chlorotaurine, N,N-Dichloro-2,2-Dimethyltaurine, and N-Monochloro-2,2-Dimethyltaurine in Human Blood

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential application of N-chlorotaurine (NCT), N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-422), and N-monochloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-612) as catheter lock solutions for the prevention of catheter blockage and catheter-related bloodstream infections by testing their anticoagulant and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities in human blood. NCT, NVC-422, NVC-612, and control compounds were serially diluted in fresh human blood to evaluate the effects o...

  11. Anti-microbial Activity of Tulsi {Ocimum Sanctum (Linn.)} Extract on a Periodontal Pathogen in Human Dental Plaque: An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, C.G.; Agarwal, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tulsi is a popular healing herb in Ayurvedic medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of several systemic diseases because of its anti-microbial property. However, studies documenting the effect of Tulsi on oral disease causing organisms are rare. Hence, an attempt was made to determine the effect of Tulsi on a periodontal microorganism in human dental plaque. Aim To determine if Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) has an anti-microbial activity (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and zone of inhibition) against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human dental plaque and to compare the antimicrobial activity of Ocimum sanctum(Linn.) extract with 0.2% chlorhexidine as the positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as the negative control. Materials and Methods A lab based invitro experimental study design was adopted. Ethanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) was prepared by the cold extraction method. The extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide, to obtain ten different concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 6%, 7%, 8%, 9%, 10%) of extract. Plaque sample was collected from 05 subjects diagnosed with periodontal disease. Isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from plaque samples was done using Tryptic Soy Serum Bacitracin Vancomycin agar (TSBV) medium. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was done based on cultural, microscopic, biochemical characterization and multiple drug resistance patterns. Anti-microbial activity of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract was tested by agar well-diffusion method against 0.2% chlorhexidine as a positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as a negative control. The zone of inhibition was measured in millimeters using Vernier callipers. Results At the 6% w/v concentration of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract, a zone of inhibition of 22 mm was obtained. This was the widest zone of inhibition observed among all the 10 different concentrations tested. The zone of inhibition for positive control

  12. Novel hybrids of metronidazole and quinolones: synthesis, bioactive evaluation, cytotoxicity, preliminary antimicrobial mechanism and effect of metal ions on their transportation by human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sheng-Feng; Peng, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Rasheed, Syed; Vijaya Kumar, Kannekanti; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2014-10-30

    A novel series of hybrids of metronidazole and quinolones as antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. Furthermore, these highly active metronidazole-quinolone hybrids showed appropriate ranges of pKa, log P and aqueous solubility to pharmacokinetic behaviors and no obvious toxicity to A549 and human hepatocyte LO2 cells. Their competitive interactions with metal ions to HSA revealed that the participation of Mg(2+) ion in compound 7d-HSA association could result in a concentration increase of free compound 7d. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 7d with DNA suggested that possible antibacterial mechanism might be in relation with multiple binding sites between bioactive molecules and topo IV-DNA complex.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of α-triazolyl chalcones as a new type of potential antimicrobial agents and their interaction with calf thymus DNA and human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ben-Tao; Yan, Cong-Yan; Peng, Xin-Mei; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Rasheed, Syed; Geng, Rong-Xia; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2014-01-01

    A series of α-triazolyl chalcones were efficiently synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds showed effective antibacterial and antifungal activities. Noticeably, α-triazolyl derivative 9a exhibited low MIC value of 4 μg/mL against MRSA and Micrococcus luteus, which was comparable or even superior to reference drugs. The further research revealed that compound 9a could effectively intercalate into Calf Thymus DNA to form 9a-DNA complex which might block DNA replication to exert their powerful antimicrobial activities. Competitive interactions between 9a and metal ions to Human Serum Albumin (HSA) suggested the participation of Fe(3+), K(+) and Mg(2+) ions in 9a-HSA system could increase the concentration of free 9a, shorten its storage time and half-life in the blood, thus improving its antimicrobial efficacy.

  14. Block copolymer mixtures as antimicrobial hydrogels for biofilm eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ashlynn L Z; Ng, Victor W L; Wang, Weixin; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan

    2013-12-01

    -delivery of antimicrobial polycarbonates with a conventionally-used antifungal agent, fluconazole. These hydrogels also displayed excellent compatibility with human dermal fibroblasts with cell viability >80% after treatment with hydrogels loaded with cationic polymers and/or fluconazole at minimum biocidal concentrations (MBC).

  15. Rapid Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles from Quercus incana and Their Antimicrobial Potential against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Sarwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In current study, bioreduction of tetrachloroauric acid (HAuCl4·3H2O was carried out using leaves extract of Quercus incana for nanoparticle synthesis. The nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectrum (UV, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. The gold nanoparticles (GNPs were generally clumpy agglomerates of polydispersed particles, with an average size in the range 5.5–10 nm. The Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS qualitative analysis and FT-IR data supported the presence of bioactive compounds, which are responsible for the metal reduction and nanoparticles stabilization. The biocompatibility of synthesized GNPs was evaluated via antibacterial activity by using human bacterial pathogens. The results showed that synthesized GNPs showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all bacterial pathogens.

  16. Ru(CO)3Cl(Glycinate) (CORM-3): A Carbon Monoxide–Releasing Molecule with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial and Photosensitive Activities Against Respiration and Cation Transport in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jayne Louise; Jesse, Helen E.; Hughes, Bethan; Lund, Victoria; Naylor, Kathryn; Davidge, Kelly S.; Cook, Gregory M.; Mann, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Carbon monoxide (CO) delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas. The metal carbonyl Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) is a novel, potent antimicrobial agent. Here, we established its mode of action. Results: CORM-3 inhibits respiration in several bacterial and yeast pathogens. In anoxic Escherichia coli suspensions, CORM-3 first stimulates, then inhibits respiration, but much higher concentrations of CORM-3 than of a classic protonophore are required for stimulation. Proton translocation measurements (H+/O quotients, i.e., H+ extrusion on pulsing anaerobic cells with O2) show that respiratory stimulation cannot be attributed to true “uncoupling,” that is, dissipation of the protonmotive force, or to direct stimulation of oxidase activity. Our data are consistent with CORM-3 facilitating the electrogenic transmembrane movement of K+ (or Na+), causing a stimulation of respiration and H+ pumping to compensate for the transient drop in membrane potential (ΔΨ). The effects on respiration are not mimicked by CO gas or control Ru compounds that do not release CO. Inhibition of respiration and loss of bacterial viability elicited by CORM-3 are reversible by white light, unambiguously identifying heme-containing oxidase(s) as target(s). Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of the antimicrobial action of a CO-RM. Noteworthy are the demonstration of respiratory stimulation, electrogenic ion transport, and photosensitive activity, establishing terminal oxidases and ion transport as primary targets. Conclusion: CORM-3 has multifaceted effects: increased membrane permeability, inhibition of terminal oxidases, and perhaps other unidentified mechanisms underlie its effectiveness in tackling microbial pathogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 497–509. PMID:23186316

  17. Expressions of Antimicrobial Peptides LL-37, Human Beta Defensin-2 and-3 in the Lesions of Cutaneous Tuberculosis and Tuberculids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhao; Zhang-Lei Mu; Xi-Wan Liu; Xiao-Jing Liu; Jun Jia; Lin Cai; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Antimicrobial peptides,including cathelicidin LL-37,human beta defensin (HBD)-2,and HBD-3,are important elements of the innate immune response and involved in modulation of the adaptive immunity,and they also play an important role in cutaneous defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Methods:The fresh skin tissues and paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from three cutaneous tuberculosis,two tuberculids,and ten healthy individuals were collected.The expressions of LL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 mRNA in the lesions of three cutaneous tuberculosis and two tuberculids were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction;the protein expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting methods.Results:The expressions of LL-37 mRNA and protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.The expression of HBD-2 mRNA had an increasing trend in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids compared with that of normal skin;however,the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis had a decreasing trend compared with that of normal skin,and the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of tuberculids was similar to that of normal skin.The expressions of HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.Conclusions:Our study indicated that the expression of HBD-2 and HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis may be not consistent with that oftuberculids.However,an inherent limitation of the present study was that the sample size was small,and the roles and regulation mechanisms ofLL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids need to be further investigated.

  18. N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Deofix) - a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series metal cations with significant deodorant, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Karl; Zaklad, Haim; Simhon, Elliot D; Klein, Joseph Y; Cyjon, Rosa L; Winchell, Harry S

    2003-01-01

    Deofix, N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, is a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series cations such as iron, zinc, manganese, and copper. A 1% solution in 50% ethanol was found to be significantly better at reducing underarm malodor than a solution of 0.3% Triclosan in 50% ethanol. Compared to a 50% alcohol control, Deofix was found to produce a significant reduction in malodor for at least 48 hours. Deofix appears to work by reducing the concentration of first transition series metal ions below the levels needed for microbial cell reproduction and by inhibiting oxidative processes by interfering with catalytic formation of free radicals. Deofix has very low levels of toxicity when measured via a number of screening techniques.

  19. Extreme antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade A. Loutet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia species are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance.

  20. Assessment of Size-Dependent Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Properties of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale silver has been increasingly applied to commercial products for their antimicrobial function as antibiotics and disinfectants. In this work, the different sizes of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were studied not only in Methylobacterium spp. for their antimicrobial potential but also in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs for their cytotoxicity in order to determine responses dependent on their particle size. Size controlled silver particles were prepared by chemical reduction of silver cations (Ag+ and then dispersed in water for their physicochemical characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and zeta potential measurements. To ascertain antimicrobial response, water-soluble silver nanoparticles were mixed into Methylobacterium spp. cultured for two days and the sample from the broth was spread on the agar plate for colony counting. 10 nm nanoparticles showed more antimicrobial activity than 100 nm particles at which concentrations were equivalently controlled. Increased cytotoxic effect of smaller silver nanoparticles was also observed in PBMCs cocultured with particles. Silver ions released from 10 nm particles might be correlated with upregulated antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties of AgNPs.

  1. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA CARMONA-RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  2. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, A M

    2000-01-01

    Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  3. Evaluation of antimicrobial properties of four plant extracts against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anjali Rawani; Sudin Pal; GoutamChandra

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activity of the extracts of Alternanthera philoxeroides (A. philoxeroides), Plumeria obtusa (P. obtusa), Polyalthia cerasoides (P. cerasoides) and Ixoraacuminate (I. acuminate) against human pathogens. Methods: Aqueous and chloroform: methanol (1:1) extracts of the dried leaf of A. philoxeroides, flowers of P. obtusa, fruits of P. cerasoides and flowers of I. acuminate were tested in vitro by the disk diffusion method against four bacterial strains, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonasaeruginosa. Susceptibility of four reference bacterial strains to some antibiotics in nutrient agar was also tested. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined and qualitative phytochemical analysis of the crude extract of the tested plant parts was done. Results: Both the aqueous and the chloroform: methanol (1:1) extracts of P. cerasoides showed the strongest activity, followed by flowers of P. obtusa, leaves of A. philoxeroides and flowers of I. acuminate. Aqueous extracts of all the plant parts appeared to have less antibacterial activity than the chloroform:methanol (1:1) extracts. The result of phytochemical analysis of the crude extract of the tested plants showed that flavonoid was absent from all plant parts whereas steroid was present in all tested plant parts. Conclusions: The results support that these plant extracts can be used for the treatment of bacterial diseases.

  4. Deciphering the contribution of human meningothelial cells to the inflammatory and antimicrobial response at the meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Rogers, Andrew J; Wooldridge, Karl G; Tighe, Patrick; Mahdavi, Jafar; Rittig, Michael G; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the response of primary human meningothelial cells to Neisseria meningitidis. Through a transcriptome analysis, we provide a comprehensive examination of the response of meningothelial cells to bacterial infection. A wide range of chemokines are elicited which act to attract and activate the main players of innate and adaptive immunity. We showed that meningothelial cells expressed a high level of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and, using a gene silencing strategy, we demonstrated the contribution of this pathogen recognition receptor in meningothelial cell activation. Secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL10, and CCL5 was almost exclusively TLR4 dependent and relied on MyD88 and TRIF adaptor cooperation. In contrast, IL-8 induction was independent of the presence of TLR4, MyD88, and TRIF. Transcription factors NF-κB p65, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1), IRF3, and IRF7 were activated after contact with bacteria. Interestingly, the protein kinase IRAK4 was found to play a minor role in the meningothelial cell response to Neisseria infection. Our work highlights the role of meningothelial cells in the development of an immune response and inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to meningococcal infection. It also sheds light on the complexity of intracellular signaling after TLR triggering.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of chloramphenicol homodimers: molecular target, antimicrobial activity, and toxicity against human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ourania N Kostopoulou

    Full Text Available As fight against antibiotic resistance must be strengthened, improving old drugs that have fallen in reduced clinical use because of toxic side effects and/or frequently reported resistance, like chloramphenicol (CAM, is of special interest. Chloramphenicol (CAM, a prototypical wide-spectrum antibiotic has been shown to obstruct protein synthesis via binding to the bacterial ribosome. In this study we sought to identify features intensifying the bacteriostatic action of CAM. Accordingly, we synthesized a series of CAM-dimers with various linker lengths and functionalities and compared their efficiency in inhibiting peptide-bond formation in an Escherichia coli cell-free system. Several CAM-dimers exhibited higher activity, when compared to CAM. The most potent of them, compound 5, containing two CAM bases conjugated via a dicarboxyl aromatic linker of six successive carbon-bonds, was found to simultaneously bind both the ribosomal catalytic center and the exit-tunnel, thus revealing a second, kinetically cryptic binding site for CAM. Compared to CAM, compound 5 exhibited comparable antibacterial activity against MRSA or wild-type strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and E. coli, but intriguingly superior activity against some CAM-resistant E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Furthermore, it was almost twice as active in inhibiting the growth of T-leukemic cells, without affecting the viability of normal human lymphocytes. The observed effects were rationalized by footprinting tests, crosslinking analysis, and MD-simulations.

  6. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yuma; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harashima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain) as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell). We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  7. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyoshi Harashima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell. We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  8. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Marks

    Full Text Available The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this

  9. The Human Milk Protein-Lipid Complex HAMLET Sensitizes Bacterial Pathogens to Traditional Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R.; Clementi, Emily A.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  10. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Clementi, Emily A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  11. LL-37 complexation with glycosaminoglycans in cystic fibrosis lungs inhibits antimicrobial activity, which can be restored by hypertonic saline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergsson, Gudmundur

    2009-07-01

    There is an abundance of antimicrobial peptides in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Despite this, individuals with CF are susceptible to microbial colonization and infection. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial response within the CF lung, focusing on the human cathelicidin LL-37. We demonstrate the presence of the LL-37 precursor, human cathelicidin precursor protein designated 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein, in the CF lung along with evidence that it is processed to active LL-37 by proteinase-3. We demonstrate that despite supranormal levels of LL-37, the lung fluid from CF patients exhibits no demonstrable antimicrobial activity. Furthermore Pseudomonas killing by physiological concentrations of exogenous LL-37 is inhibited by CF bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid due to proteolytic degradation of LL-37 by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin D. The endogenous LL-37 in CF BAL fluid is protected from this proteolysis by interactions with glycosaminoglycans, but while this protects LL-37 from proteolysis it results in inactivation of LL-37 antimicrobial activity. By digesting glycosaminoglycans in CF BAL fluid, endogenous LL-37 is liberated and the antimicrobial properties of CF BAL fluid restored. High sodium concentrations also liberate LL-37 in CF BAL fluid in vitro. This is also seen in vivo in CF sputum where LL-37 is complexed to glycosaminoglycans but is liberated following nebulized hypertonic saline resulting in increased antimicrobial effect. These data suggest glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 complexes to be potential therapeutic targets. Factors that disrupt glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 aggregates promote the antimicrobial effects of LL-37 with the caveat that concomitant administration of antiproteases may be needed to protect the now liberated LL-37 from proteolytic cleavage.

  12. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of N-chlorotaurine, N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine, and N-monochloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, C; Hammerer-Lercher, A; Zuck, M; Jekle, A; Debabov, D; Anderson, M; Nagl, M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential application of N-chlorotaurine (NCT), N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-422), and N-monochloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-612) as catheter lock solutions for the prevention of catheter blockage and catheter-related bloodstream infections by testing their anticoagulant and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities in human blood. NCT, NVC-422, NVC-612, and control compounds were serially diluted in fresh human blood to evaluate the effects on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, and direct thrombin inhibition. Quantitative killing assays against pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans, were performed in the presence of heparin and human blood. NCT and NVC-612 (1.38 mM each) and 1.02 mM NVC-422 prolonged prothrombin time (Quick value, 17 to 30%), activated partial thromboplastin time 3- to 4-fold to 76 to 125 s, and thrombin time 2- to 4-fold to 34 to 68 s. Fibrinogen decreased from 258 to 283 mg/dl (range of controls) to NVC-422 or NVC-612. Heparin did not influence the bactericidal activity of NCT. The microbicidal activities of NCT, NVC-422, and NVC-612 were maintained in diluted human blood. NCT, NVC-612, and NVC-422 have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in blood and anticoagulant activity targeting both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of the coagulation system. These properties support their application as catheter lock solutions.

  13. Evaluation of biological value and appraisal of polyphenols and glucosinolates from organic baby-leaf salads as antioxidants and antimicrobials against important human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Alfredo; Marques, Esperança; Carvalho, Rosa; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2013-04-19

    The present investigation has been carried out to investigate the biological role of four different types of baby-leaf salads and to study their potential as natural sources of antioxidants and antimicrobials against several isolates from important human pathogenic bacteria. Four single types of salads (green lettuce, red lettuce, rucola and watercress) and two mixtures [(1) red lettuce+green lettuce; (2) green lettuce + red lettuce + watercress + rucola] were assayed. The HPLC analysis revealed interesting levels of polyphenols and glucosinolates. The results showed a significant variation (p polyphenols and glucosinolates with plant material. Nine different types of polyphenols grouped in three major classes were found: gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and dicaffeoyltartaric acid (phenolic acids); quercitin-3-O-rutinoside, quercitin-3-O-rhamnoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and isorhamnetin (flavonoids); and cyanidin-3-glucoside (anthocyanins). Only three different glucosinolates were found: glucoraphanin; gluconasturtiin and 4-methoxy-glucobrassicin. A positive correlation was detected between polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity. Red lettuce and mixture 1 were the baby-leaf salads with the highest antioxidant potential. As for the antimicrobial activity, the results showed a selective effect of chemicals against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus were the bacteria most affected by the phytochemicals. Based on the results achieved baby-leaf salads represent an important source of natural antioxidants and antimicrobial substances.

  14. Evaluation of Biological Value and Appraisal of Polyphenols and Glucosinolates from Organic Baby-Leaf Salads as Antioxidants and Antimicrobials against Important Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Saavedra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has been carried out to investigate the biological role of four different types of baby-leaf salads and to study their potential as natural sources of antioxidants and antimicrobials against several isolates from important human pathogenic bacteria. Four single types of salads (green lettuce, red lettuce, rucola and watercress and two mixtures [(1 red lettuce+green lettuce; (2 green lettuce + red lettuce + watercress + rucola] were assayed. The HPLC analysis revealed interesting levels of polyphenols and glucosinolates. The results showed a significant variation (p < 0.05 of polyphenols and glucosinolates with plant material. Nine different types of polyphenols grouped in three major classes were found: gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and dicaffeoyltartaric acid (phenolic acids; quercitin-3-O-rutinoside, quercitin-3-O-rhamnoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and isorhamnetin (flavonoids; and cyanidin-3-glucoside (anthocyanins. Only three different glucosinolates were found: glucoraphanin; gluconasturtiin and 4-methoxy-glucobrassicin. A positive correlation was detected between polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity. Red lettuce and mixture 1 were the baby-leaf salads with the highest antioxidant potential. As for the antimicrobial activity, the results showed a selective effect of chemicals against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus were the bacteria most affected by the phytochemicals. Based on the results achieved baby-leaf salads represent an important source of natural antioxidants and antimicrobial substances.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides: key components of the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Life-threatening infectious diseases are on their way to cause a worldwide crisis, as treating them effectively is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form an ancient type of innate immunity found universally in all living organisms, providing a principal first-line of defense against the invading pathogens. The unique diverse function and architecture of AMPs has attracted considerable attention by scientists, both in terms of understanding the basic biology of the innate immune system, and as a tool in the design of molecular templates for new anti-infective drugs. AMPs are gene-encoded short (antimicrobial activity. AMPs have been the subject of natural evolution, as have the microbes, for hundreds of millions of years. Despite this long history of co-evolution, AMPs have not lost their ability to kill or inhibit the microbes totally, nor have the microbes learnt to avoid the lethal punch of AMPs. AMPs therefore have potential to provide an important breakthrough and form the basis for a new class of antibiotics. In this review, we would like to give an overview of cationic antimicrobial peptides, origin, structure, functions, and mode of action of AMPs, which are highly expressed and found in humans, as well as a brief discussion about widely abundant, well characterized AMPs in mammals, in addition to pharmaceutical aspects and the additional functions of AMPs.

  16. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Frequency of resistance to methicillin and other antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pigs and their human handlers in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gordon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged recently worldwide in production animals, particularly pigs and veal calves, which act as reservoirs for MRSA strains for human infection. The study determined the prevalence of MRSA and other resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from the anterior nares of pigs and human handlers on pig farms in Trinidad. Methods: Isolation of S. aureus was done by concurrently inoculating Baird-Parker agar (BPA and Chromagar MRSA (CHROM with swab samples and isolates were identified using standard methods. Suspect MRSA isolates from Chromagar and BPA were subjected to confirmatory test using Oxoid PBP2 latex agglutination test. The disc diffusion method was used to determine resistance to antimicrobial agents. Results: The frequency of isolation of MRSA was 2.1% (15 of 723 for pigs but 0.0% (0 of 72 for humans. Generally, for isolates of S. aureus from humans there was a high frequency of resistance compared with those from pigs, which had moderate resistance to the following antimicrobials: penicillin G (54.5%, 51.5%, ampicillin (59.1%, 49.5%, and streptomycin (59.1%, 37.1%, respectively. There was moderate resistance to tetracycline (36.4%, 41.2% and gentamycin (27.2%, 23.7% for human and pig S. aureus isolates, respectively, and low resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4.5%, 6.2% and norfloxacin (9.1%, 12.4%, respectively. The frequency of resistance to oxacillin by the disc method was 36.4 and 34.0% from S. aureus isolates from humans and pigs, respectively. Out of a total of 78 isolates of S. aureus from both human and pig sources that were resistant to oxacillin by the disc diffusion method, only 15 (19.2% were confirmed as MRSA by the PBP'2 latex test kit. Conclusions: The detection of MRSA strains in pigs, albeit at a low frequency, coupled with a high frequency of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents in pig and humans could have zoonotic and therapeutic

  18. 76 FR 4120 - The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System... public comment of a document for The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) entitled... systems monitoring antimicrobial resistance in other countries. Foodborne diseases are an important cause...

  19. 76 FR 16795 - The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System... National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) entitled ``NARMS Strategic Plan 2011-2015... obtain documents at either http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/AntimicrobialResistance...

  20. Genetic diversity, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from food and humans over a 24-year period in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Fábio; Moratto Bergamini, Alzira Maria; Falcão, Juliana P

    2012-12-01

    Salmonellosis is a major health problem worldwide. Serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of Salmonella outbreaks in many countries. In Brazil, few molecular typing studies have been performed. The aims of this study were to molecularly type Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated in Brazil in order to determine the genetic relationship between strains of food and human origin, as well as, to assess their pathogenic potential and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 128 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from human feces (67) and food (61) between 1986 and 2010 were studied. The genotypic diversity was assessed by ERIC-PCR and PFGE using XbaI, the antimicrobial resistance by the disc-diffusion assay and the presence of the SPI-1, SPI-2 and pSTV virulence genes assessed by PCR. The ERIC-PCR results revealed that 112 strains exhibited a similarity of >85.4% and the PFGE that 96 strains exhibited a similarity of >80.0%. Almost all strains (97.6%) harbored all 13 virulence genes investigated. Thirty-six strains (28.12%) were resistant to nalidixic acid. In conclusion, the nalidixic acid resistance observed after 1996 is indicative of an increase in the use of this drug. It may be suggested that these 128 strains might have descended from a common ancestor that differed little over 24 years and has been both contaminating food and humans and causing disease for more than two decades in Brazil.

  1. Alfalfa endophytes as novel sources of antimicrobial compounds that inhibit the growth of human and plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes may contribute to plant health and disease protection, yet little is known about their various roles in alfalfa. Also, endophytes from several plant species produce novel antimicrobial compounds that may be useful clinically. We isolated endophytic fungi from over 50 samples from s...

  2. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of piperazinium- and guanidinium-based ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Shanshan; Dai, Yitong; Lu, Xiaoxing; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun, E-mail: qflei@zju.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Twelve piperazinium- and guanidinium-based ionic liquids were synthesized and characterized. • Antimicrobial activities of the ionic liquids against E. coli and S. aureus were investigated. • Cytotoxicity on the rat C6 glioma cells (C6) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) were evaluated. • The ionic liquids with the [BF{sub 4}]{sup −} anion and with benzene ring on cation exhibit relatively high toxicity. - Abstract: Twelve piperazinium- and guanidinium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized, and characterized by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity have been investigated to provide the information whether the newly synthesized ILs are toxic or not. The antimicrobial effects of these ILs on gram negative and gram positive bacteria are evaluated on the basis of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements. The membrane damages of bacteria in the presence of ILs are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity data of the ILs on HEK-293 and C6 cells are obtained by MTT cell viability assay. The disruption of cell cycle is analyzed by the flow cytometry. The results show that most of the ILs exhibit low toxicity, and the ILs with tetrafluoroborate anion and with benzene ring on cation are the species with relatively high toxicity among the studied ILs. The fundamental data and results can provide some useful information for the further studies and applications of the ILs.

  3. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Shiang Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries.

  4. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Shu-Ling; Chen, Cheng-You; Lu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries.

  5. Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Ole E.; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Jensen, Vibeke F.; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Skov, Robert L.; Agersø, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian T.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Muller, Arno; Hovgaard, Karin; Ajufo, Justin; Bager, Flemming; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Wegener, Henrik C.; Monnet, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries. PMID:18217544

  6. Longitudinal surveillance of outpatient β-lactam antimicrobial use in Canada, 1995 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiona K Glass-Kaastra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: β-lactam antimicrobials are the most commonly prescribed group of antimicrobials in Canada, and are categorized by the WHO as critically and highly important antimicrobials for human medicine. Because antimicrobial use is commonly associated with the development of antimicrobial resistance, monitoring the volume and patterns of use of these agents is highly important.

  7. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown.

  8. Downregulation of organic cation transporters OCT1 (SLC22A1 and OCT3 (SLC22A3 in human hepatocellular carcinoma and their prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heise Michael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organic cation transporters (OCT are responsible for the uptake and intracellular inactivation of a broad spectrum of endogenous substrates and detoxification of xenobiotics and chemotherapeutics. The transporters became pharmaceutically interesting, because OCTs are determinants of the cytotoxicity of platin derivates and the transport activity has been shown to correlate with the sensitivity of tumors towards tyrosine kinase inhibitors. No data exist about the relevance of OCTs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods OCT1 (SLC22A1 and OCT3 (SLC22A3 mRNA expression was measured in primary human HCC and corresponding non neoplastic tumor surrounding tissue (TST by real time PCR (n = 53. Protein expression was determined by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological parameters of HCCs. Results Real time PCR showed a downregulation of SLC22A1 and SLC22A3 in HCC compared to TST (p ≤ 0.001. A low SLC22A1 expression was associated with a worse patient survival (p SLC22A1 was less frequently downregulated in tumors with lower stages who underwent transarterial chemoembolization (p SLC22A1 expression (SLC22A3 expression compared to HCC with high SLC22A1 expression (p SLC22A3 expression. In the western blot analysis we found a different protein expression pattern in tumor samples with a more diffuse staining in the immunofluorescence suggesting that especially OCT1 is not functional in advanced HCC. Conclusion The downregulation of OCT1 is associated with tumor progression and a worse patient survival.

  9. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T).

  10. Effect of transfection with human interferon-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes in combination with 5-fluorouracil on the growth of human esophageal cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoo, Hideo; Komura, Sadaaki; Ohishi, Nobuko; Yajima, Haruyoshi; Akiyama, Seiji; Kasai, Yasushi; Ito, Katsuki; Nakao, Akimasa; Yagi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    When human esophageal cancer cells were transfected with the human interferon-beta (hIFN-beta) gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes, the growth of all cancer cells tested was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes ranged from 16 to 176 ng plasmid DNA/ml culture medium. Among the 10 cell lines examined, NUEC3, NUEC4, TE-3 and WSSC cell lines were highly susceptible to transfection with this gene entrapped in the liposomes. The IC50 values of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes with respect to cell growth were positively-correlated with those of exogenous cytokine hIFN-beta, suggesting that the antiproliferative effect of hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes can be mainly ascribed to the function of hIFN-beta produced by cells transfected with the gene. Two days after transfection with the liposome-entrapped gene, the concentration of hIFN-beta secreted into the medium was determined. Even though the level of hIFN-beta observed in the medium was lower than that of the IC50 of exogenously added hIFN-beta, the inhibitory potency of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes on the cell growth was remarkable. When the esophageal cancer cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the presence of a low concentration of liposome-entrapped-gene, the rate of growth inhibition of these cells increased over that caused by either 5-FU or hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes alone. All these data suggest that combination therapy with the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes and the anticancer drug 5-FU would be beneficial for preoperative treatment of carcinoma of the esophagus.

  11. Evaluation of virulence and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from humans and chicken- and egg-associated sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Gokulan, Kuppan; Barnette, Dustyn; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Deck, Joanna; Nayak, Rajesh; Stefanova, Rossina; Hart, Mark E; Foley, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading cause of salmonellosis throughout the world and is most commonly associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry and egg products. Salmonella Enteritidis has enhanced ability to colonize and persist in extraintestinal sites within chickens. In this study, 54 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from human patients (n=28), retail chicken (n=9), broiler farms (n=9), and egg production facilities (n=8) were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, plasmid analysis, genetic relatedness using XbaI and AvrII pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the presence of putative virulence genes. Nine isolates were evaluated for their abilities to invade and survive in intestinal epithelial and macrophage cell lines. Overall, 56% (n=30) of isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent tested, yet no isolates showed resistance to more than three antimicrobials. All isolates carried a common ∼55-kb plasmid, with some strains containing additional plasmids ranging from 3 to 50 kb. PFGE analysis revealed five XbaI and AvrII clusters. There were significant overlaps in the PFGE patterns of the isolates from human, chicken, and egg houses. All isolates tested PCR positive for iacP, purR, ttrB, spi4H, rmbA, sopE, invA, sopB, spvB, pagC, msgA, spaN, orgA, tolC, and sifA, and negative for iss, virB4, and sipB. Of the isolates selected for virulence testing, those containing the iron acquisition genes, iutA, sitA, and iucA, and ∼50-kb plasmids demonstrated among the highest levels of macrophage and epithelial cell invasion, which may indicate their importance in pathogenesis.

  12. Identification of a new antimicrobial lysine-rich cyclolipopeptide family from Xenorhabdus nematophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Maxime; Aumelas, André; Thaler, Jacques-Olivier

    2009-06-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria of the genus Xenorhabdus are known to be symbiotically associated with soil dwelling nematodes of the Steinernematidae family. These bacteria are transported by their nematode hosts into the hemocoel of the insect larvae, where they proliferate and produce insecticidal proteins, inhibitors of the insect immune system and antimicrobial molecules. In this study, we describe the discovery of a new family (PAX) of five antimicrobial compounds produced by fermentation of the Xenorhabdus nematophila F1 strain and purified by cation exchange chromatography and reversed phase chromatography. The chemical structure of PAX 3, a lysine-rich cyclolipopetide, was obtained from the analysis of homo and heteronuclear 2D NMR and confirmed by MS-MS experiments. The five members of the PAX family showed significant activity against plants and human fungal pathogens and moderate activity against few bacteria and yeast. No cytotoxicity was observed on CHO or insect cells.

  13. AmyI-1-18, a cationic α-helical antimicrobial octadecapeptide derived from α-amylase in rice, inhibits the translation and folding processes in a protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Fukuda, Shun; Sato, Teppei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we used a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on Escherichia coli lysate, for evaluating the inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis by pyrrhocoricin. In this study, using an RTS, we evaluated the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18, an antimicrobial octadecapeptide. We found that, similarly to pyrrhocoricin, AmyI-1-18 inhibited GFP synthesis in the RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the blockage of transcription and translation steps in the RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine the mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of GFP synthesis by AmyI-1-18 did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step. Furthermore, we assessed the inhibition of DnaK-mediated refolding of chemically denatured luciferase by AmyI-1-18; AmyI-1-18 inhibited the protein folding activity of the ATP-dependent DnaK/DnaJ molecular chaperone system in a concentration-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that AmyI-1-18 strongly bound to RNA with a KD value of 1.4 × 10(-8) M but not to DNA and that AmyI-1-18 specifically bound to DnaK with a KD value of 4.4 × 10(-6) M. These SPR analysis results supported the results obtained in both the RTS and the molecular chaperone system. These results demonstrated that both RNA and DnaK are most likely the target of AmyI-1-18 in the protein synthesis system. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial and antifouling hydrogels formed in situ from polycarbonate and poly(ethylene glycol) via Michael addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao Qiong; Yang, Chuan; Huang, Yuan; Ding, Xin; Li, Yan; Fan, Wei Min; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2012-12-18

    A novel class of antimicrobial cationic polycarbonate/PEG hydrogels are designed and synthesized by Michael addition chemistry. These hydrogels demonstrate strong broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against various clinically isolated multidrug-resistant microbes. Moreover, they exhibit nonfouling properties and prevent the substrate from microbial adhesion. These antimicrobial and antifouling gels are promising materials as catheter coatings and wound dressings to prevent infections.

  15. The safety of antimicrobial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ćupić Vitomir; Jezdimirović Milanka; Dobrić Silva; Ivanović Saša; Ćupić-Miladinović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of antimicrobial drugs in clinical practice has been recorded as one of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine. The application of these drugs, made a big, almost revolutionary upheaval in treatment of many infectious diseases. Its significance for the humanity lies in the fact that hundreds of thousands of people, until then condemned to a certain death, has been saved now. However, it was shown that antimicrobi...

  16. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  17. Rapid Method To Determine Intracellular Drug Concentrations in Cellular Uptake Assays: Application to Metformin in Organic Cation Transporter 1-Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Huan-Chieh; Zur, Arik A; Maurer, Tristan S; Yee, Sook Wah; Tolsma, John; Jasper, Paul; Scott, Dennis O; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    Because of the importance of intracellular unbound drug concentrations in the prediction of in vivo concentrations that are determinants of drug efficacy and toxicity, a number of assays have been developed to assess in vitro unbound concentrations of drugs. Here we present a rapid method to determine the intracellular unbound drug concentrations in cultured cells, and we apply the method along with a mechanistic model to predict concentrations of metformin in subcellular compartments of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Intracellular space (ICS) was calculated by subtracting the [(3)H]-inulin distribution volume (extracellular space, ECS) from the [(14)C]-urea distribution volume (total water space, TWS). Values obtained for intracellular space (mean ± S.E.M.; μl/10(6) cells) of monolayers of HEK cells (HEK-empty vector [EV]) and cells overexpressing human organic cation transporter 1 (HEK-OCT1), 1.21± 0.07 and 1.25±0.06, respectively, were used to determine the intracellular metformin concentrations. After incubation of the cells with 5 µM metformin, the intracellular concentrations were 26.4 ± 7.8 μM and 268 ± 11.0 μM, respectively, in HEK-EV and HEK-OCT1. In addition, intracellular metformin concentrations were lower in high K(+) buffer (140 mM KCl) compared with normal K(+) buffer (5.4 mM KCl) in HEK-OCT1 cells (54.8 ± 3.8 μM and 198.1 ± 11.2 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Our mechanistic model suggests that, depending on the credible range of assumed physiologic values, the positively charged metformin accumulates to particularly high levels in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. This method together with the computational model can be used to determine intracellular unbound concentrations and to predict subcellular accumulation of drugs in other complex systems such as primary cells.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of a Halocidin-Derived Peptide Resistant to Attacks by Proteases ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Pyo; Park, Ho Jin; Shin, Seo Hwa; Lee, Young Shin; Park, Seungmi; Jo, Sungho; Lee, Yong Ho; Lee, In Hee

    2010-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted a great deal of interest as a promising candidate for a novel class of antibiotics that might effectively treat recalcitrant infections caused by a variety of microbes that are resistant to currently available drugs. However, the AMPs are inherently limited in that they are inevitably susceptible to attacks by proteases generated by human and pathogenic microbes; this vulnerability severely hinders their pharmaceutical use in human therapeutic protocols. In this study, we report that a halocidin-derived AMP, designated HG1, was found to be resistant to proteolytic degradation. As a result of its unique structural features, HG1 proved capable of preserving its antimicrobial activity after incubation with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and human matrix metalloprotease 7 (MMP-7). Additionally, HG1 was observed to exhibit profound antimicrobial activity in the presence of fluid from human skin wounds or proteins extracted from the culture supernatants of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Greater understanding of the structural motifs of HG1 required for its protease resistance might provide feasible ways to solve the problems intrinsic to the development of an AMP-based antibiotic. PMID:20385874

  19. Cloning of Humanα-defensin-1(HNP-1) Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionDefensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that function in the host's innate immune system. The human defensin family includes three small peptides from the azurophil granules of polymorphonuclear cells named human neutrophil peptide (HNP)-1, HNP-2, HNP-3, which consist 5%-7% of the protein of human neutrophil. HNP-4 is approximately one hundred times less abundant. They demonstrate antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties in vitro. HNPs are important component of nonoxidat...

  20. Review of assessments of the human health risk associated with the use of antimicrobial agents in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailar, John C; Travers, Karin

    2002-06-01

    To our knowledge, no comprehensive risk assessment of agricultural uses of antimicrobial agents has been published. The published risk assessments of antimicrobial use in farm settings are all subject to multiple, serious limitations in scope, including (1) limitation to one species of microorganism; (2) limitation to one or a very few related antimicrobial agents; (3) limitation to a single outcome (death, hospital days, number of illnesses, etc.); (4) limitation to one species of farm animal (e.g., chicken or swine); and (5) limitation to therapeutic use, despite reason for concern about misstated, off-label, or illegal use. In addition, all of the risk assessments reviewed overlooked important issues by accepting 2 further limitations: (6) limiting the scope of the analysis to what has already happened and ignoring the effects of continuing the practices of recent years; and (7) examining only the effects on the species of microorganism that was initially affected and ignoring the cross-species spread of resistance by plasmid transfer. After our review of the risk assessments now available, we propose a comprehensive scheme for organizing existing knowledge and dealing with critical gaps.

  1. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  2. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.;

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolated from humans in the community (98 and 65 isolates), broilers (126 and 122), and pigs (102 and 88) during 1998 were tested for susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents and for the presence of selected genes encoding resistance using PCR...... of the 38 human fecal samples examined using selective enrichment. All vancomycin resistant isolates contained the vanA gene, all chloramphenicol resistant isolates the catpIP501 gene, and all five gentamicin resistant isolates the aac6-aph2 gene. Sixty-one (85%) of 72 erythromycin resistant E. faecalis...... examined and 57 (90%) of 63 erythromycin resistant E. faecium isolates examined contained ermB. Forty (91%) of the kanamycin resistant E. faecalis and 18 (72%) of the kanamycin resistant E. faecium isolates contained aphA3. The tet(M) gene was found in 95% of the tetracycline resistant E. faecalis and E...

  3. Distribution of phylogroups and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli isolated from healthy humans and from patients with bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.; Porsbo, Lone Jannok;

    In 2002-03, 31 ampicillin resistant faecal isolates were collected from healthy humans. Moreover, 31 ampicillin resistant blood isolates from patients with bacte-raemia were collected in 2000-02. All isolates were tested positive for the pres-ence of blaTEM. Isolates were characterized by minimum...... inhibitory concentration to antimicrobial agents and examined by PCR to determine their phylogroups. The phylotyping grouped the faecal samples into A (13%), B1 (10%), B2 (42%), D (19%), NT (16%) while the blood isolates grouped into A (16%), B1 (0%), B2 (48%), D (32%) and NT (3%). The frequency...... of resistance in faecal and blood isolates (F/B) was: tetracycline (48%/48%), gentamicin (0%/10%), ciprofloxacin (3%,13%), sulfonamide (68%/77%) and trimethoprim (39%/39%). Conclusion: B2 was the most prevalent phylogroup found both in faecal isolates collected from healthy humans and in blood isolates from...

  4. Selectivity in the potentiation of antibacterial activity of α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics and antimicrobial peptides by human blood plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M.; Franzyk, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for novel antibiotics; however, their activity is often compromised under physiological conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the activity of alpha-peptide/beta-peptoid peptidomimetics and AMPs against Escherichia coli...... and Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of human blood-derived matrices and immune effectors. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of two peptidomimetics against E. coli decreased by up to one order of magnitude when determined in 50% blood plasma as compared to MHB media. The MIC of a membrane-active AMP......, LL-I/3, also decreased, whereas two intracellularly acting AMPs were not potentiated by plasma. Blood serum had no effect on activity against E. coli and neither matrix had an effect on activity against S. aureus. Unexpectedly, physiological concentrations of human serum albumin did not influence...

  5. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from human hepatitis B virus core protein arginine-rich domain (ARD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Li Chen

    Full Text Available The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV. In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II-IV (HBc153-176 and ARD I-III (HBc147-167 were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that

  6. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from human hepatitis B virus core protein arginine-rich domain (ARD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng-Li; Su, Pei-Yi; Chang, Ya-Shu; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, You-Di; Yu, Hui-Ming; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chang, Kaichih; Shih, Chiaho

    2013-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc) contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD) at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV). In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I-IV (HBc147-183) has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E)-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II-IV (HBc153-176) and ARD I-III (HBc147-167) were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I-IV (HBc147-183) had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that HBc ARD

  7. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG5-PCR and ERIC-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fardsanei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7% was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1–P7 were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin.

  8. De novo design and synthesis of ultra-short peptidomimetic antibiotics having dual antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran N Murugan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Much attention has been focused on the design and synthesis of potent, cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, their development into therapeutic agents has been limited mainly due to their large size (12 to 50 residues in length and poor protease stability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to overcome the issues described above, a set of ultra-short, His-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAMPs has been developed for the first time. Through systematic tuning of pendant hydrophobic alkyl tails at the N(π- and N(τ-positions on His, and the positive charge of Arg, much higher prokaryotic selectivity was achieved, compared to human AMP LL-37. Additionally, the most potent HDAMPs showed promising dual antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA activity and proteolytic resistance. Our results from transmission electron microscopy, membrane depolarization, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, and calcein-dye leakage experiments propose that HDAMP-1 kills microbial cells via dissipation of the membrane potential by forming pore/ion channels on bacterial cell membranes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of the ultra-short size, high-prokaryotic selectivity, potent anti-MRSA activity, anti-inflammatory activity, and proteolytic resistance of the designed HDAMP-1, -3, -5, and -6 makes these molecules promising candidates for future antimicrobial therapeutics.

  9. Antimicrobial surface coatings for a permanent percutaneous passage in the concept of osseointegrated extremity prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliess, Tilman; Sluszniak, Magda; Winkel, Andreas; Pfaffenroth, Cornelia; Dempwolf, Wibke; Heuer, Wieland; Menzel, Henning; Windhagen, Henning; Stiesch, Meike

    2012-12-01

    The clinical implementation of percutaneous implants is still limited owing to infections at the side of the stoma. In our concept, this issue is addressed by designing copolymer surface coatings possessing biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity to improve the maintenance of a physiological skin seal at the skin-implant interface. Different copolymers with surface-active phosphonate and antimicrobial cationic groups were designed. Thus, coated titanium samples were cultured with bacterial strains or fibroblasts, respectively. Antimicrobial impact was evaluated by imaging the reduction of bacterial adherence. Biocompatibility was displayed by fibroblast proliferation and morphology. A variety of copolymers of 4-vinylpyridine with vinylbenzylphosphonate or dimethyl(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) phosphonate were prepared by free radical polymerization. The optimized polymer coating (copolymer D) showed a reduction of adherent bacteria up to 95%, with only a slight reduction in the adherence of human fibroblasts compared with blank titanium controls. In this study, we demonstrate in vitro that polymer surface coatings can be simultaneously antimicrobial and biocompatible. We consider this to be a promising technology for the realization of a permanent aseptic percutaneous passage as needed for the advancement of osseointegrated limb prosthesis.

  10. In vitro toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes in cultured human hepatocyte (HepG2) and lung epithelial (A549) cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roursgaard, Martin; Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cationic micelle and liposome drug delivery systems on liver and lung cells in a toxicological in vitro screening model, with observations on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. A screening battery was established for assessment of a broad range...

  11. Differential transport of platinum compounds by the human organic cation transporter hOCT2 (hSLC22A2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Burger (Herman); A. Zoumaro-Djayoon (Adja); A.W.M. Boersma (Anton); J. Helleman (Jozien); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); W.J. Loos (Walter); E.A.C. Wiemer (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Solute carriers (SLCs), in particular organic cation transporters (OCTs), have been implicated in the cellular uptake of platinum-containing anticancer compounds. The activity of these carriers may determine the pharmacokinetics and the severity of side effects, inc

  12. Spotlight on Human LL-37, an Immunomodulatory Peptide with Promising Cell-Penetrating Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Ferdinand Lensink

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are major components of innate immunity and help control the initial steps of the infectious process. They are expressed not only by immunocytes, but also by epithelial cells. They share an amphipathic secondary structure with a polar cationic site, which explains their tropism for prokaryote membranes and their hydrophobic site contributing to the destructuration of these membranes. LL-37 is the only cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from human cathelicidin. LL-37 can also cross the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, probably through special domains of this membrane called lipid rafts. This transfer could be beneficial in the context of vaccination: the activation of intracellular toll-like receptors by a complex formed between CpG oligonucleotides and LL-37 could conceivably play a major role in the building of a cellular immunity involving NK cells.

  13. Antimicrobial seafood packaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman; Ho Lee, Myung; Park, Lnsik; Shin, Yangjai; Lee, Youn Suk

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are the major cause of spoilage in most seafood products; however, only few microbes, called the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), contribute to the offensive off-flavors associated with seafood spoilage. In food, microbial degradation manifests itself as spoilage, or changes in the sensory properties of a food product, rendering it unsuitable for human consumption. The use of antimicrobial substances can control the general microflora as well as specific microorganisms related to spoilage to provide products with higher safety and better quality. Many antimicrobial compounds have been evaluated in film structures for use in seafood, especially organic acids and their salts, enzymes, bacteriocins; some studies have considered inorganic compounds such as AgSiO2, zinc oxide, silver zeolite, and titanium oxide. The characteristics of some organic antimicrobial packaging systems for seafood and their antimicrobial efficiency in film structures are reviewed in this article.

  14. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  15. Antimicrobial Activities of a Plethora of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Hydrolates against Human Pathogens and Their Potential to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonné Lemuh Njimoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infections till date remain a scourge of humanity due to lack of vaccine against some infections, emergence of drug resistant phenotypes, and the resurgence of infections amongst others. Continuous quest for novel therapeutic approaches remains imperative. Here we (i assessed the effects of extracts/hydrolates of some medicinal plants on pathogenic microorganisms and (ii evaluated the inhibitory potential of the most active ones in combination with antibiotics. Extract E03 had the highest DZI (25 mm. Extracts E05 and E06 were active against all microorganisms tested. The MICs and MBCs of the methanol extracts ranged from 16.667 × 103 μg/mL to 2 μg/mL and hydrolates from 0.028 to 333333 ppm. Extract E30 had the highest activity especially against S. saprophyticus (MIC of 6 ppm and E. coli (MIC of 17 ppm. Combination with conventional antibiotics was shown to overcome resistance especially with E30. Analyses of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, steroids, phenols, and saponins. These results justify the use of these plants in traditional medicine and the practice of supplementing decoctions/concoctions with conventional antibiotics. Nauclea pobeguinii (E30, the most active and synergistic of all these extracts, and some hydrolates with antimicrobial activity need further exploration for the development of novel antimicrobials.

  16. Epinecidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish (Epinephelus coioides) which has an antitumor effect like lytic peptides in human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ju; Chien, Yi-Lun; Pan, Chia-Yu; Lin, Tai-Lang; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hui, Cho-Fat

    2009-02-01

    Epinecidin-1, a synthetic 21-mer antimicrobial peptide originally identified from grouper (Epinephelus coioides), specifically exhibited high antimicrobial activities against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the current study we report on the in vitro cytotoxicity of the peptide, an important factor before it can be considered for further applications in cancer therapy. The cytotoxicity of epinecidin-1 was investigated against several cancer cells (A549, HA59T/VGH, HeLa, HepG2, HT1080, RAW264.7, and U937) and normal cells (AML-12, NIH3T3, and WS-1) with the MTT assay, and the inhibition of cancer cell growth was confirmed by a soft agar assay and scanning electron microscopy. However, cell variations were detected with AO/EtBr staining, while apoptosis and necrosis gene expressions in HT1080 cells after treatment with the epinecidin-1 peptide and Nec-1 showed that epinecidin-1 had an anti-necrosis function in HT1080 cells. The data presented here indicate that epinecidin-1 has in vitro antitumor activity against the HT1080 cell line, and functions like lytic peptides. In addition, our results suggest that epinecidin-1 may prove to be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for human fibrosarcoma cells in the future.

  17. Antimicrobial use in food and companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, John F

    2008-12-01

    The vast literature on antimicrobial drug use in animals has expanded considerably recently as the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis in human medicine leads to questions about all usage of antimicrobial drugs, including long-term usage in intensively managed food animals for growth promotion and disease prevention. Attention is also increasingly focusing on antimicrobial use and on bacterial resistance in companion animals, which are in intimate contact with the human population. They may share resistant bacteria with their owners, amplify resistant bacteria acquired from their owners, and act as a reservoir for human infection. Considerable effort is being made to describe the basis of AMR in bacterial pathogens of animals. Documentation of many aspects of use of antimicrobials in animals is, however, generally less developed and only a few countries can describe quantities of drugs used in animals to kg levels annually. In recent years, many national veterinary associations have produced 'prudent use guidelines' to try to improve antimicrobial drug use and decrease resistance, but the impact of guidelines is unknown. Within the evolving global movement for 'antimicrobial stewardship', there is considerable scope to improve many aspects of antimicrobial use in animals, including infection control and reduction of use, with a view to reducing resistance and its spread, and to preserving antimicrobial drugs for the future.

  18. Normal Human Gingival Epithelial Cells Sense C. parapsilosis by Toll-Like Receptors and Module Its Pathogenesis through Antimicrobial Peptides and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Bahri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the interaction between C. parapsilosis and human epithelial cells using monolayer cultures and an engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM. C. parapsilosis was able to adhere to gingival epithelial cells and to adopt the hyphal form in the presence of serum. Interestingly, when cultured onto the engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM, C. parapsilosis formed small biofilm and invaded the connective tissue. Following contact with C. parapsilosis, normal human gingival epithelial cells expressed high levels of Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4, and -6, but not TLR-9 mRNA. The upregulation of TLRs was paralleled by an increase of IL-1β, TNFα, and IFNγ mRNA expression, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the defense against infection with C. parapsilosis. The active role of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infection was enhanced by their capacity to express high levels of human beta-defensin-1, -2, and -3. The upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptide expression may explain the growth inhibition of C. parapsilosis by the gingival epithelial cells. Overall results provide additional evidence of the involvement of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infections.

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  5. [Insect antimicrobial peptides: structures, properties and gene regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Peng; Lai, Ren

    2010-02-01

    Insect antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of insect innate immunity effectors. Insect AMPs are cationic and contain less than 100 amino acid residues. According to structure, insect AMPs can be divided into a limited number of families. The diverse antimicrobial spectrum of insect AMPs may indicate different modes of action. Research on the model organism Drosophila indicate that insect AMPs gene regulation involves multiple signaling pathways and a large number of signaling molecules.

  6. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a s...... activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries....... a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research......Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish...

  7. Trends in occcurrence of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni isolates from broiler chickens, broiler chicken meat, and human domestically acquired cases and travel associated cases ind Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Rasmussen, Line; Ethelberg, Steen; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2009-01-01

    through 2007, C. jejuni isolates were obtained from The Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) and susceptibility tested for ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. Erythromycin resistance was at a low level in all the reservoirs during...... the study period. Resistance to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline was significantly higher in C. jejuni from imported broiler chicken meat compared to Danish broiler chicken meat. In domestically acquired human C. jejuni isolates, resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid was for most...... years significantly higher compared to the level found in isolates from Danish broiler chicken meat, whereas the resistance level was similar to the level found in isolates from imported broiler chicken meat. Imported broiler chicken meat may therefore contribute to the high level of ciprofloxacin...

  8. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de ...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance issues in beef production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial resistance threats to human health as identified have been recognized as a critical global public health concern. Linkage of some threats to beef production is discussed. The relevance to beef production of recent government actions will be examined. Prominent antimicrobial resistance ...

  11. NMR Structure and CD Titration with Metal Cations of Human Prion α2-Helix-Related Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ronga

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The 173–195 segment corresponding to the helix 2 of the C-globular prion protein domain could be one of several “spots” of intrinsic conformational flexibility. In fact, it possesses chameleon conformational behaviour and gathers several disease-associated point mutations. We have performed spectroscopic studies on the wild-type fragment 173–195 and on its D178N mutant dissolved in trifluoroethanol to mimic the in vivo system, both in the presence and in the absence of metal cations. NMR data showed that the structure of the D178N mutant is characterized by two short helices separated by a kink, whereas the wild-type peptide is fully helical. Both peptides retained these structural organizations, as monitored by CD, in the presence of metal cations. NMR spectra were however not in favour of the formation of definite ion-peptide complexes. This agrees with previous evidence that other regions of the prion protein are likely the natural target of metal cation binding.

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ...

  15. Residual Antimicrobial Activity of MTAD(® in Human Dentin After Obturation with Gutta-Percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE at Different Time Intervals; An Ex Vivo Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Bolhari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate microorganisms that are responsible for pulpal and periapical infections and to prevent reinfection of the root canal system an effective chemomechanical preparation by irrigants with sustained antimicrobial activity is beneficial. Hereby, we evaluated the residual antibacterial activity of MTAD after canal obturation at different time intervals.A total of 120 human single-canalled anterior teeth were selected. The root canals were instrumented to a standardized apical size. Among all, 90 teeth received final irrigation with MTAD and were divided into three groups according to their obturation materials; i.e. gutta-percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. All these groups were divided into three 1-, 3- and 6-week time interval subgroups. Thirty teeth as negative control had no final irrigation with MTAD, but were obturated with gutta-percha/AH26 or Resilon/RealSealSE. Dentin powder was prepared after 1, 3 and 6 weeks. Dentin powder was exposed to Enterococcus faecalis for 24h and then cultured. Colony Forming Unit (CFU was counted.Residual antimicrobial activity of MTAD in the teeth obturated with guttapercha/AH26 was significantly higher than the teeth obturated with Resilon/RealSeal SE (p<0.001. It also showed a time dependent decrease in MTAD antimicrobial activity for all groups. The highest antimicrobial activity of MTAD was found in the 1-week positive control and 1-week gutta-percha/AH26 specimens. The lowest antimicrobial activity of MTAD was found in 6-week Resilon/RealSeal SE samples and then the negative controls.MTAD had antimicrobial activity even at the sixth week, although it had a time-dependent decrease. Resilon/Epiphany SE significantly decreased antimicrobial activity of MTAD at all time points.

  16. Co-cultivation of keratinocyte-human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) on sericin loaded electrospun nanofibrous composite scaffold (cationic gelatin/hyaluronan/chondroitin sulfate) stimulates epithelial differentiation in hMSCs: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sirsendu; Scharnweber, Dieter; Koul, Veena

    2016-05-01

    Fortifying the scaffold with bioactive molecules and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), is an efficient way to design new generation tissue engineered biomaterials. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of electrospun nanofibrous composite scaffold (cationic gelatin/hyaluronan/chondroitin sulfate) loaded with sericin and, contact co-culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)-keratinocytes on hMSCs' differentiation towards epithelial lineage. Cationic gelatin is prepared with one step novel synthesis process by grafting quaternary ammonium salts to the backbone of gelatin. Release kinetics studies showed that Fickian diffusion is the major release mechanism for both GAGs and sericin/gelatin. In vitro biocompatibility of the electrospun scaffold was evaluated in terms of LDH and DNA quantification assay on human foreskin fibroblast, human keratinocyte and hMSC. Significant proliferation (∼ 4-6 fold) was detected after culturing all three cell on the electrospun scaffold containing sericin. After 5 days of contact co-culture, results revealed that electrospun scaffold containing sericin promote epithelial differentiation of hMSC in terms of several protein markers (keratin 14, ΔNp63α and Pan-cytokeratin) and gene expression of some dermal proteins (keratin 14, ΔNp63α). Findings of this study will foster the progress of current skin tissue engineering scaffolds by understanding the skin regeneration and wound healing process.

  17. 77 FR 44177 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... addressing the judicious use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals (Ref. 2... information about the extent of antimicrobial drug use in food-producing animals. Specifically, the Agency is... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 514 Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales...

  18. 阳离子多肽CEMA导入棉花引起表型异常及叶绿体降解%Introduction of a Cationic Peptide, CEMA, into Cotton Caused Abnormal Phenotype and Chloroplast Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-long GUO; Xiao-ying LUO; Ming-yang LI; Yan PEI; Hao ZHANG

    2002-01-01

    @@ As a strategy for phytopathogen control through transgenic way, antimicrobial peptide genes have been employed over the last two decades.CEMA is a cationic antimicrobial chimeric peptide, which is produced by fusing eight amino acid residues from the antimicrobial peptide ceropin A with a modified meltin. Three transgenic cotton plants were generated by bombardment of cotton shoot tips using BioRad particle gun. The gold particles were coated with a cationic peptide, CEMA, DNA.

  19. Construction of a Mammary-specific Expression Vector of Humanα-defensin-1 (HNP-1) Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionDefensins, also called human neutrophil peptides(HNP), are small cationic peptides with broad antimicrobial activity~([1]). Human defensins are highly abundant in the cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Alpha-defensin-1 is an important mediator in either innate immunity or anti-infection. It can be developed to be an ideal new type antibiotic and may provide a better solution for the present situation of extensive antibiotics-resistence. It is difficult to achieve amount of ...

  20. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of human and mouse sodium-dependent citrate transporters (NaCT/SLC13A5) reveal species differences with respect to substrate sensitivity and cation dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Peeva, Polina M; Rong, James X; Sher, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    The citric acid cycle intermediate citrate plays a crucial role in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, glucose metabolism, and β-oxidation. Citrate is imported from the circulation across the plasma membrane into liver cells mainly by the sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT; SLC13A5). Deletion of NaCT from mice led to metabolic changes similar to caloric restriction; therefore, NaCT has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we expressed mouse and human NaCT into Xenopus oocytes and examined some basic functional properties of those transporters. Interestingly, striking differences were found between mouse and human NaCT with respect to their sensitivities to citric acid cycle intermediates as substrates for these transporters. Mouse NaCT had at least 20- to 800-fold higher affinity for these intermediates than human NaCT. Mouse NaCT is fully active at physiologic plasma levels of citrate, but its human counterpart is not. Replacement of extracellular sodium by other monovalent cations revealed that human NaCT was markedly less dependent on extracellular sodium than mouse NaCT. The low sensitivity of human NaCT for citrate raises questions about the translatability of this target from the mouse to the human situation and raises doubts about the validity of this transporter as a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic diseases in humans.

  2. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert E. W.; Scott, Monisha G.

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  3. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Shu-Ling; Chen, Cheng-You; Lu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013....

  4. Curbing the menace of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa Anibal; Tapha-Sosseh Ndey; Nweneka Chidi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Several reports suggest that antimicrobial resistance is an increasing global problem; but like most pandemics, the greatest toll is in the less developed countries. The dismally low rate of discovery of antimicrobials compared to the rate of development of antimicrobial resistance places humanity on a very dangerous precipice. Since antimicrobial resistance is part of an organism's natural survival instinct, total eradication might be unachievable; however, it can be reduced to a le...

  5. Mechanism of bacterial membrane poration by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Mishra, Abhijit

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is a major health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), an important component of mammalian immune system, are thought to utilize non-specific interactions to target common features on the outer membranes of pathogens; hence development of resistance to such AMPs may be less pronounced. Most AMPs are amphiphilic and cationic in nature. Most AMPs form pores in the bacterial membranes causing them to lyse, however, the exact mechanism is unknown. Here, we study the AMP CHRG01 (KSSTRGRKSSRRKK), derived from human β defensin 3 (hBD3) with all Cysteine residues substituted with Serine. Circular Dichorism studies indicate that CHRG01 shows helicity and there is change in helicity as it interacts with the lipid membrane. The AMP was effective against different species of bacteria. Leakage of cellular components from bacterial cells observed by SEM and AFM indicates AMP action by pore formation. Confocal microscopy studies on giant vesicles incubated with AMP confirm poration. The effect of this AMP on model bacterial membranes is characterized using Small Angle X-ray scattering and Fluorescence spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism behind antimicrobial activity.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenback, Barbara A

    2015-09-25

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18-46 amino acids), usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent-the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection.

  7. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter...... to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...... reduced the total use of antimicrobials by more than 50% and markedly reduced levels of resistance. There is an urgent need to implement globally, WHO principles for prudent use of antimicrobials in food animals. Use of antimicrobials as growth promoters could and should be terminated completely....

  8. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A McManus

    Full Text Available This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu and companion animals (CpA (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA. All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%. SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9% and CpA (54.5%. Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4] was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof, mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  10. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  11. Antimicrobial and phytochemical evaluation of the leaf, stem bark and root extracts of Cyathula prostrata (L Blume against some human pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Ikechukwu Ogu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activities of aqueous (cold and hot and ethanolic extracts of leaf stem bark and root of Cyathula prostrata were investigated against some human clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, and Candida albicans using the Agar well diffusion method at extract concentration of 25mg/ml. Ciprofloxacin(5 and #956;g/ml and Fluconazole (20 and #956;g/ml drugs was used as positive reference standards to determine the sensitivity of the strains. Results obtained showed that all the test isolates were inhibited by various fractions of the leaf, root and stem bark extracts. The antimicrobial activities of the different plant parts were not significantly different (P<0.05, though the greatest activities were observed with the ethanolic fractions (14.0-25.5 mm, followed by the hot water (12.0-24.2 mm and cold extracts (13.0-18.5 mm. An inhibition range of 24.0-25.5mm and 28.5mm were observed from ciprofloxacin and fluconazole drugs respectively. The percentage susceptibility of the most sensitive bacterial isolate (E. coli, was 95.9% while the least (K. pneumoniae had 40.0% sensitivity. Candida albicans had a percentage susceptibility of 57.5%. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ranged between 400 and 800 and #956;g/ml. The observed phytochemical compounds were saponins, tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides and steroids. This study has justified the applications of Cyathula prostrata in the traditional herbal medicines and therefore holds a promise as a potential source of novel broad spectrum drug for treating infectious diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 35-43

  12. Biological responses of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs in an innovative co-culture model with Streptococcus mitis to thermosets coated with a silver polysaccharide antimicrobial system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sancilio

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the in vitro biological response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs co-coltured with Streptococcus mitis to bisphenol A glycidylmethacrylate/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (BisGMA/TEGDMA thermosets coated with Chitlac-nAg, a nanocomposite system with antimicrobial properties. To avoid bacterial adhesion to dental devices and to reduce cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells, we coated BisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylic thermosets with a new material, Chitlac-nAg, formed by stabilizing silver nanoparticles, which have well-known antimicrobial properties, with a polyelectrolyte solution containing Chitlac. Cytotoxicity, cell morphology, cell migration and inflammatory interleukine-6 (IL-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 secretion were evaluated. Our results showed that the cytotoxicity exerted on HGFs by our nanocomposite material was absent in our co-culture model, where fibroblasts are able to adhere and migrate. After 24 h thermosets coated with Chitlac as well as those coated with Chitlac-nAg exerted a minimal cytotoxic effect on HGFs, while after 48 h LDH release rises up 20%. Moreover the presence of S. mitis reduced this release in a greater amount with Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets. The secretion of IL-6 was significant in both Chitlac and Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets, but PGE2 production was minimal, suggesting that the IL-6 production was not related to an inflammatory response. Co-culture and the addiction of saliva did not influence IL-6 and PGE2 secretion. Data obtained in the present work suggest that Chitlac n-Ag coated thermosets could significantly improve the success rates of restorative dentistry, since they limit bacterial adhesion and are not toxic to HGFs.

  13. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids.

  14. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in veal calf farming: human MRSA carriage related with animal antimicrobial usage and farm hygiene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitske Graveland

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recently a specific MRSA sequence type, ST398, emerged in food production animals and farmers. Risk factors for carrying MRSA ST398 in both animals and humans have not been fully evaluated. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated factors associated with MRSA colonization in veal calves and humans working and living on these farms. METHODS: A sample of 102 veal calf farms were randomly selected and visited from March 2007-February 2008. Participating farmers were asked to fill in a questionnaire (n = 390 to identify potential risk factors. A nasal swab was taken from each participant. Furthermore, nasal swabs were taken from calves (n = 2151. Swabs were analysed for MRSA by selective enrichment and suspected colonies were confirmed as MRSA by using slide coagulase test and PCR for presence of the mecA-gene. Spa types were identified and a random selection of each spa type was tested with ST398 specific PCR. The Sequence Type of non ST398 strains was determined. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Human MRSA carriage was strongly associated with intensity of animal contact and with the number of MRSA positive animals on the farm. Calves were more often carrier when treated with antibiotics, while farm hygiene was associated with a lower prevalence of MRSA. CONCLUSION: This is the first study showing direct associations between animal and human carriage of ST398. The direct associations between animal and human MRSA carriage and the association between MRSA and antimicrobial use in calves implicate prudent use of antibiotics in farm animals.

  15. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammue, B P; Thevissen, K; Hendriks, M; Eggermont, K; Goderis, I J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F; Kader, J C

    1995-10-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibits all 12 tested plant pathogenic fungi at concentrations below 10 micrograms mL-1. Its antifungal activity is either not at all or is weakly affected by the presence of different cations at concentrations approximating physiological ionic strength conditions. Ace-AMP1 is also active on two Gram-positive bacteria but is apparently not toxic for Gram-negative bacteria and cultured human cells. In contrast to nsLTPs such as those isolated from radish or maize seeds, Ace-AMP1 was unable to transfer phospholipids from liposomes to mitochondria. On the other hand, lipid transfer proteins from wheat and maize seeds showed little or no antimicrobial activity, whereas the radish lipid transfer protein displayed antifungal activity only in media with low cation concentrations. The relevance of these findings with regard to the function of nsLTPs is discussed.

  16. A Tetravalent Sub-unit Dengue Vaccine Formulated with Ionizable Cationic Lipid Nanoparticle induces Significant Immune Responses in Rodents and Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Gokul; Thoryk, Elizabeth A; Cox, Kara S; Smith, Jeffrey S; Wolf, Jayanthi J; Gindy, Marian E; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-10-05

    Dengue virus has emerged as an important arboviral infection worldwide. As a complex pathogen, with four distinct serotypes, the development of a successful Dengue virus vaccine has proven to be challenging. Here, we describe a novel Dengue vaccine candidate that contains truncated, recombinant, Dengue virus envelope protein from all four Dengue virus serotypes (DEN-80E) formulated with ionizable cationic lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Immunization studies in mice, Guinea pigs, and in Rhesus macaques, revealed that LNPs induced high titers of Dengue virus neutralizing antibodies, with or without co-administration or encapsulation of a Toll-Like Receptor 9 agonist. Importantly, LNPs were also able to boost DEN-80E specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Cytokine and chemokine profiling revealed that LNPs induced strong chemokine responses without significant induction of inflammatory cytokines. In addition to being highly efficacious, the vaccine formulation proved to be well-tolerated, demonstrating no elevation in any of the safety parameters evaluated. Notably, reduction in cationic lipid content of the nanoparticle dramatically reduced the LNP's ability to boost DEN-80E specific immune responses, highlighting the crucial role for the charge of the LNP. Overall, our novel studies, across multiple species, reveal a promising tetravalent Dengue virus sub-unit vaccine candidate.

  17. A Tetravalent Sub-unit Dengue Vaccine Formulated with Ionizable Cationic Lipid Nanoparticle induces Significant Immune Responses in Rodents and Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Gokul; Thoryk, Elizabeth A.; Cox, Kara S.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Jayanthi J.; Gindy, Marian E.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus has emerged as an important arboviral infection worldwide. As a complex pathogen, with four distinct serotypes, the development of a successful Dengue virus vaccine has proven to be challenging. Here, we describe a novel Dengue vaccine candidate that contains truncated, recombinant, Dengue virus envelope protein from all four Dengue virus serotypes (DEN-80E) formulated with ionizable cationic lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Immunization studies in mice, Guinea pigs, and in Rhesus macaques, revealed that LNPs induced high titers of Dengue virus neutralizing antibodies, with or without co-administration or encapsulation of a Toll-Like Receptor 9 agonist. Importantly, LNPs were also able to boost DEN-80E specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Cytokine and chemokine profiling revealed that LNPs induced strong chemokine responses without significant induction of inflammatory cytokines. In addition to being highly efficacious, the vaccine formulation proved to be well-tolerated, demonstrating no elevation in any of the safety parameters evaluated. Notably, reduction in cationic lipid content of the nanoparticle dramatically reduced the LNP’s ability to boost DEN-80E specific immune responses, highlighting the crucial role for the charge of the LNP. Overall, our novel studies, across multiple species, reveal a promising tetravalent Dengue virus sub-unit vaccine candidate. PMID:27703172

  18. Genome-Wide Identification of Antimicrobial Intrinsic Resistance Determinants in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Leng, Bingfeng; Haaber, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    that confer intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents may be explored for alternative antimicrobial therapies, by potentiating the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. In this study, we identified the intrinsic resistome to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials in the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. We...

  19. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, D.C.; Jaarsma, A.D.C.; Gugten, van der A.C.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A

  20. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, D. C.; Jaarsma, A. D C; van der Gugten, A. C.; Verheij, T. J M; Wagenaar, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A tho

  1. Determinants Associated with Veterinary Antimicrobial Prescribing in Farm Animals in the Netherlands : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, D. C.; Jaarsma, A. D. C.; van der Gugten, A. C.; Verheij, T. J. M.; Wagenaar, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A tho

  2. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    -the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general...... practitioners, and respiratory tract infections are the leading reason for prescribing. Multifaceted interventions to reduce overuse of antibiotics have been found to be effective and better than single initiatives. Interventions should encompass the enforcement of the policy of prohibiting the over...

  3. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  4. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Köck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4–6 months. Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7% were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99% susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact.

  5. Interplay between Bladder Microbiota and Urinary Antimicrobial Peptides: Mechanisms for Human Urinary Tract Infection Risk and Symptom Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhouse, Vanessa; Gao, Xiang; Dong, Qunfeng; Nelson, David E.; Toh, Evelyn; McKinley, Kathleen; Schreckenberger, Paul; Shibata, Noriko; Fok, Cynthia S.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Resident bacterial communities (microbiota) and host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are both essential components of normal host innate immune responses that limit infection and pathogen induced inflammation. However, their interdependence has not been investigated in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI) susceptibility. Here, we explored the interrelationship between the urinary microbiota and host AMP responses as mechanisms for UTI risk. Using prospectively collected day of surgery (DOS) urine specimens from female pelvic floor surgery participants, we report that the relative abundance and/or frequency of specific urinary microbiota distinguished between participants who did or did not develop a post-operative UTI. Furthermore, UTI risk significantly correlated with both specific urinary microbiota and β-defensin AMP levels. Finally, urinary AMP hydrophobicity and protease activity were greater in participants who developed UTI, and correlated positively with both UTI risk and pelvic floor symptoms. These data demonstrate an interdependency between the urinary microbiota, AMP responses and symptoms, and identify a potential mechanism for UTI risk. Assessment of bacterial microbiota and host innate immune AMP responses in parallel may identify increased risk of UTI in certain populations. PMID:25486068

  6. Physiologically-Relevant Modes of Membrane Interactions by the Human Antimicrobial Peptide, LL-37, Revealed by SFG Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Soblosky, Lauren; Nguyen, Khoi; Geng, Junqing; Yu, Xinglong; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2013-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could become the next generation antibiotic compounds which can overcome bacterial resistance by disrupting cell membranes and it is essential to determine the factors underlying its mechanism of action. Although high-resolution NMR and other biological studies have provided valuable insights, it has been a major challenge to follow the AMP-membrane interactions at physiologically-relevant low peptide concentrations. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to overcome this major limitation by performing Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic experiments on lipid bilayers containing an AMP, LL-37. Our results demonstrate the power of SFG to study non-linear helical peptides and also infer that lipid-peptide interaction and the peptide orientation depend on the lipid membrane composition. The observed SFG signal changes capture the aggregating process of LL-37 on membrane. In addition, our SFG results on cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers indicate the inhibition effect of cholesterol on peptide-induced membrane permeation process.

  7. Interplay between bladder microbiota and urinary antimicrobial peptides: mechanisms for human urinary tract infection risk and symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhouse, Vanessa; Gao, Xiang; Dong, Qunfeng; Nelson, David E; Toh, Evelyn; McKinley, Kathleen; Schreckenberger, Paul; Shibata, Noriko; Fok, Cynthia S; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J; Radek, Katherine A

    2014-01-01

    Resident bacterial communities (microbiota) and host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are both essential components of normal host innate immune responses that limit infection and pathogen induced inflammation. However, their interdependence has not been investigated in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI) susceptibility. Here, we explored the interrelationship between the urinary microbiota and host AMP responses as mechanisms for UTI risk. Using prospectively collected day of surgery (DOS) urine specimens from female pelvic floor surgery participants, we report that the relative abundance and/or frequency of specific urinary microbiota distinguished between participants who did or did not develop a post-operative UTI. Furthermore, UTI risk significantly correlated with both specific urinary microbiota and β-defensin AMP levels. Finally, urinary AMP hydrophobicity and protease activity were greater in participants who developed UTI, and correlated positively with both UTI risk and pelvic floor symptoms. These data demonstrate an interdependency between the urinary microbiota, AMP responses and symptoms, and identify a potential mechanism for UTI risk. Assessment of bacterial microbiota and host innate immune AMP responses in parallel may identify increased risk of UTI in certain populations.

  8. Extracellular DNA chelates cations and induces antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, bacterial polysaccharides and proteins, which are up to 1000-fold more antibiotic resistant than planktonic cultures. To date, extracellular DNA has been shown to function as a structural support to maintain Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm architecture. Here we show that DNA is a multifaceted component of P. aeruginosa biofilms. At physiologically relevant concentrations, extracellular DNA has antimicrobial activity, causing cell lysis by chelating cations that stabilize lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the outer membrane (OM. DNA-mediated killing occurred within minutes, as a result of perturbation of both the outer and inner membrane (IM and the release of cytoplasmic contents, including genomic DNA. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of DNA created a cation-limited environment that resulted in induction of the PhoPQ- and PmrAB-regulated cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance operon PA3552-PA3559 in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, DNA-induced expression of this operon resulted in up to 2560-fold increased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and 640-fold increased resistance to aminoglycosides, but had no effect on beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. Thus, the presence of extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix contributes to cation gradients, genomic DNA release and inducible antibiotic resistance. DNA-rich environments, including biofilms and other infection sites like the CF lung, are likely the in vivo environments where extracellular pathogens such as P. aeruginosa encounter cation limitation.

  9. Mechanisms and consequences of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, D I; Hughes, D; Kubicek-Sutherland, J Z

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ongoing clinical studies aimed at modulating the expression of AMPs to boost the human innate immune response. In this review we discuss the potential problems associated with these therapeutic approaches. There is considerable experimental data describing mechanisms by which bacteria can develop resistance to AMPs. As for any type of drug resistance, the rate by which AMP resistance would emerge and spread in a population of bacteria in a natural setting will be determined by a complex interplay of several different factors, including the mutation supply rate, the fitness of the resistant mutant at different AMP concentrations, and the strength of the selective pressure. Several studies have already shown that AMP-resistant bacterial mutants display broad cross-resistance to a variety of AMPs with different structures and modes of action. Therefore, routine clinical administration of AMPs to treat bacterial infections may select for resistant bacterial pathogens capable of better evading the innate immune system. The ramifications of therapeutic levels of exposure on the development of AMP resistance and bacterial pathogenesis are not yet understood. This is something that needs to be carefully studied and monitored if AMPs are used in clinical settings.

  10. “Specificity Determinants” Improve Therapeutic Indices of Two Antimicrobial Peptides Piscidin 1 and Dermaseptin S4 Against the Gram-negative Pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqing Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new class of antimicrobial agents with lower rates of resistance and different targets is urgently needed because of the rapidly increasing resistance to classical antibiotics. Amphipathic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent such a class of compounds. In our previous studies, using a 26-residue de novo designed antimicrobial peptide, we proposed the concept of “specificity determinant(s”: positively charged residue(s in the center of the non-polar face of AMPs that could decrease hemolytic activity/toxicity but increase or maintain the same level of antimicrobial activity to increase dramatically the therapeutic index. In the current study, we used d-enantiomers of two AMPs, Piscidin 1 isolated from fish and dermaseptin S4 isolated from frog. We substituted different positions in the center of the hydrophobic face with one or two lysine residue(s (one or two “specificity determinant(s”. This simple modification not only maintained or improved antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii (11 strains and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6 strains, but also dramatically decreased hemolytic activity of human red blood cells, as predicted. Therapeutic indices improved by 55-fold and 730-fold for piscidin 1 (I9K and dermaseptin S4 (L7K, A14K, respectively, against A. baumannii. Similarly, the therapeutic indices improved 32-fold and 980-fold for piscidin 1 (I9K and dermaseptin S4 (L7K, A14K, respectively, against P. aeruginosa.

  11. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs.

  12. Assessment of Annona reticulata Linn. leaves fractions for invitro antioxidative effect and antimicrobial potential against standard human pathogenic strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad G. Jamkhande

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since from long time the plant, Annona reticulata Linn. is known for its beneficial effects. Leaves of A. reticulata were screened for phytochemicals and in vitro antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activity. The shade dried leaves were extracted with methanol and aqueous methanolic extract was partitioned successively with n-butanol, chloroform and acetone solvents. Methanolic extract was subjected to antioxidant screening using DPPH free radical scavenging activity and H2O2 scavenging activity. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of extract and fractions were analyzed on eight different clinical bacterial and fungal strains using agar well diffusion method and broth dilution method (MIC and MMC determination. The antioxidant activity showed that the extracts exhibited scavenging effect in concentration-dependent manner. The extract showed potent inhibitory effect against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacterial strains while in case of fungal strains the maximum effect was observed against Candida blanki. The maximum zone of inhibition of n-butanol, chloroform and acetone fractions was observed against B. subtilis, and E. coli respectively while all fractions exhibited potent inhibitory effect against C. blanki. MIC and MBC values were determined for active samples, methanol extract a