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Sample records for human carotid-cardiac baroreflex

  1. Human vagal baroreflex mechanisms in space.

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    Eckberg, Dwain L; Halliwill, John R; Beightol, Larry A; Brown, Troy E; Taylor, J Andrew; Goble, Ross

    2010-04-01

    Although astronauts' cardiovascular function is normal while they are in space, many have altered haemodynamic responses to standing after they return to Earth, including inordinate tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, and uncommonly, syncope. Simulated microgravity impairs vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex function and causes orthostatic hypotension. Actual microgravity, however, has been shown to either increase, or not change vagal baroreflex gain. In this study, we tested the null hypothesis that spaceflight does not impair human baroreflex mechanisms. We studied 11 American and two German astronauts before, during (flight days 2-8), and after two, 9- and 10-day space shuttle missions, with graded neck pressure and suction, to elicit sigmoid, vagally mediated carotid baroreflex R-R interval responses. Baseline systolic pressures tended to be higher in space than on Earth (P = 0.015, repeated measures analysis of variance), and baseline R-R intervals tended to be lower (P = 0.049). Baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relations were displaced downward on the R-R interval axis in space. The average range of R-R interval responses to neck pressure changes declined from preflight levels by 37% on flight day 8 (P = 0.051), maximum R-R intervals declined by 14% (P = 0.003), and vagal baroreflex gain by 9% (P = 0.009). These measures returned to preflight levels by 7-10 days after astronauts returned to Earth. This study documents significant increases of arterial pressure and impairment of vagal baroreflex function in space. These results and results published earlier indicate that microgravity exposure augments sympathetic, and diminishes vagal cardiovascular influences.

  2. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

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    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  3. The carotid baroreflex is reset following prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, E. C.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, N. H.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of arterial pressure may explain the reduction in arterial pressure and left ventricular (LV) function after prolonged exercise. We examined the CBR control of heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), in addition to changes in LV function......, pre- to post-exercise....

  4. Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity under orthostatic stress in humans

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    Masashi eIchinose

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained against the orthostatic stress caused by gravity’s effect on the fluid distribution within the body are important issues in physiology, especially in humans who usually adopt an upright posture. Peripheral vasoconstriction and increased heart rate are major cardiovascular adjustments to orthostatic stress and comprise part of the reflex response elicited via the carotid sinus and aortic baroreceptors (arterial baroreflex: ABR and cardiopulmonary stretch receptors (cardiopulmonary baroreflex. In a series of studies, we have been characterizing the ABR-mediated regulation of cardiovascular hemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA while applying orthostatic stress in humans. We have found that under orthostatic stress, dynamic carotid baroreflex responses are modulated as exemplified by the increases in the MSNA, blood pressure and heart rate responses elicited by carotid baroreflex unloading and the shorter period of MSNA suppression, comparable reduction and faster recovery of MAP and greater heart rate response to carotid baroreflex stimulation. Our results also show that ABR-mediated beat-to-beat control over burst incidence, burst strength and total MSNA is progressively modulated as orthostatic stress is increased until induction of syncope, and that the sensitivity of ABR control over the aforementioned MSNA variables is substantially reduced during the development of syncope. We suggest that in humans, the modulation of ABR function under orthostatic stress may be one of the mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained and orthostatic hypotension limited, and impairment of ABR control over sympathetic vasomotor activity leads to the severe hypotension associated with orthostatic syncope.

  5. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

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    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P regulation of HR within the high-frequency range (from 1.04 +/- 0.06 to 0.54 +/- 0.6 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P body heating reduced high-frequency dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR associated with spontaneous changes in blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  6. A new non-invasive statistical method to assess the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex in humans.

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    Ducher, M; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Cerutti, C; Najem, R; Cuisinaud, G; Laville, M; Pozet, N; Paultre, C Z

    1995-06-01

    1. A new method was developed to evaluate cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. The association of a high systolic blood pressure with a low heart rate or the converse is considered to be under the influence of cardiac baroreflex activity. This method is based on the determination of the statistical dependence between systolic blood pressure and heart rate values obtained non-invasively by a Finapres device. Our computerized analysis selects the associations with the highest statistical dependence. A 'Z-coefficient' quantifies the strength of the statistical dependence. The slope of the linear regression, computed on these selected associations, is used to estimate baroreflex sensitivity. 2. The present study was carried out in 11 healthy resting male subjects. The results obtained by the 'Z-coefficient' method were compared with those obtained by cross-spectrum analysis, which has already been validated in humans. Furthermore, the reproducibility of both methods was checked after 1 week. 3. The results obtained by the two methods were significantly correlated (r = 0.78 for the first and r = 0.76 for the second experiment, P < 0.01). When repeated after 1 week, the average results were not significantly different. Considering individual results, test-retest correlation coefficients were higher with the Z-analysis (r = 0.79, P < 0.01) than with the cross-spectrum analysis (r = 0.61, P < 0.05). 4. In conclusion, as the Z-method gives results similar to but more reproducible than the cross-spectrum method, it might be a powerful and reliable tool to assess baroreflex sensitivity in humans.

  7. 1/f Noise Outperforms White Noise in Sensitizing Baroreflex Function in the Human Brain

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    Soma, Rika; Nozaki, Daichi; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-01

    We show that externally added 1/f noise more effectively sensitizes the baroreflex centers in the human brain than white noise. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to a weak periodic signal introduced via venous blood pressure receptors while adding 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem through bilateral cutaneous stimulation of the vestibular afferents. In both cases, this noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation optimized covariance between the weak input signals and the heart rate responses. However, the optimal level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than with white noise, suggesting a functional benefit of 1/f noise for neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  8. A quantitative method for studying human arterial baroreflexes

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    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Goble, Ross L.

    1991-01-01

    A new system is described that delivers precise, stereotyped pressure changes to the human neck and elicits neurally-mediated heart rate changes. The centerpiece of this system is a Silastic chamber that is strapped to the anterior neck. This chamber is connected to a stepping-motor-controlled bellows assembly. A strain-gauge transducer measures the intensity of pressure changes. The entire system is controlled by microprocessors, and both stimuli and responses are displayed on a digital oscilloscope. The end-product of this system is a reproducible baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relation that can be recorded rapidly and safely in astronauts in space.

  9. Functional stochastic resonance in human baroreflex induced by 1/f-type noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation

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    Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    We hypothesized that 1/f noise is more beneficial than the conventional white noise in optimizing the brain's response to a weak input signal, and showed that externally added 1/f noise outperforms white noise in sensitizing human baroreflex centers in the brain. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor, while adding either 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem by electrically stimulating the bilateral vestibular afferents cutaneously. This stochastic galvanic vestibular stimulation, activating the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway in the brain stem, optimized covariance between weak input signals and the heart rate responses both with 1/f and white noise. Further, the optimal noise level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than that with white noise, suggesting the functional benefit of 1/f noise for the neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  10. Effects of repeated Valsalva maneuver straining on cardiac and vasoconstrictive baroreflex responses.

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    Convertino, Victor A; Ratliff, Duane A; Doerr, Donald F; Ludwig, David A; Muniz, Gary W; Benedetti, Erik; Chavarria, Jose; Koreen, Susan; Nguyen, Claude; Wang, Jeff

    2003-03-01

    We hypothesized that repeated respiratory straining maneuvers (repeated SM) designed to elevate arterial BPs (arterial baroreceptor loading) would acutely increase baroreflex responses. We tested this hypothesis by measuring cardiac baroreflex responses to carotid baroreceptor stimulation (neck pressures), and changes in heart rate and diastolic BP after reductions in BP induced by a 15-s Valsalva maneuver in 10 female and 10 male subjects at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after performing repeated SM. Baroreflex responses were also measured in each subject at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h at the same time on a separate day without repeated SM (control) in a randomized, counter-balanced cross-over experimental design. There was no statistical difference in carotid-cardiac and peripheral vascular baroreflex responses measured across time following repeated SM compared with the control condition. Integrated cardiac baroreflex response (deltaHR/ deltaSBP) measured during performance of a Valsalva maneuver was increased by approximately 50% to 1.1 +/- 0.2 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 1 h and 1.0 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 3 h following repeated SM compared with the control condition (0.7 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at both 1 and 3 h, respectively). However, integrated cardiac baroreflex response after repeated SM returned to control levels at 6 and 24 h after training. These responses did not differ between men and women. Our results are consistent with the notion that arterial baroreceptor loading induced by repeated SM increased aortic, but not carotid, cardiac baroreflex responses for as long as 3 h after repeated SM. We conclude that repeated SM increases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness which may provide patients, astronauts, and high-performance aircraft pilots with protection from development of orthostatic hypotension.

  11. Impairment of the baroreflex control of human respiratory resistance with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafil-Klawe M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism responsible for the central baroreflex resetting with age are an area of limited knowledge. We previously demonstrated that in subjects aged above 50 the airway resistance did not change in response to baroreceptor activation, whereas in younger volunteers the airway resistance significantly decreased. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance, in the course of aging. Materials and methods 80 healthy men, divided in four groups: aged 20-30 (Group I, 31-40 (Group II, 41-50 (Group III, and 51-60 (Group IV were included in the study. The selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Results Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.38 ± 0.01SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level in Group I and by 0.25 ± 0.01 mbar/l/s in Group II. In the two older groups (III and IV respiratory resistance did not change in response to baroreceptors inactivation. Conclusions In humans aged above 40, carotid baroreceptors do not contribute to bronchodilator tone, which causes imbalance between the activities of upper airway and chest wall inspiratory muscles leading to a collapsing effect on the upper airway.

  12. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

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    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P ischemia (-201.9 +/- 20.4 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-142.7 +/- 17.3 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)). No significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. However, both curves shifted during postexercise ischemia to accommodate the elevation in blood pressure and MSNA that occurs with this condition. These data suggest that the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  13. Augmented baroreflex heart rate gain after moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise

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    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Hartwig, T. D.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of a sustained vasodilation and hypotension after acute, dynamic exercise suggests that exercise may alter arterial baroreflex mechanisms. Therefore, we assessed systemic hemodynamics, baroreflex regulation of heart rate, and cardiac vagal tone after 60 min of cycling at 60% peak oxygen consumption in 12 healthy, untrained men and women (ages 21-28 yr). We derived sigmoidal carotid-cardiac baroreflex relations by measurement of R-R interval changes induced by ramped, stepwise, R-wave-triggered changes in external neck pressure from 40 to -65 mmHg. We estimated tonic cardiac vagal control with power spectral analysis of R-R interval variability in the respiratory frequency band (0.2-0.3 Hz) during frequency- and tidal volume-controlled breathing. Both mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance were reduced postexercise [pressure: from 86 +/- 2 (mean +/- SE) to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; resistance: from 23 +/- 2 to 16 +/- 1 units; both P exercise, whereas heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were elevated. Thus moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise increases heart rate and cardiac output, reduces peripheral vascular resistance, and augments baroreflex responsiveness. Our data suggest that augmented baroreflex heart rate gain restrains rather than contributes to postexercise hypotension, which appears to be mediated predominately by vasodilation.

  14. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold pressor test in humans

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    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that baroreceptor modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate is altered during the cold pressor test. Ten subjects were exposed to a cold pressor test by immersing a hand in ice water for 3 min while arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and MSNA were recorded. During the second and third minute of the cold pressor test, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P cold pressor test (-244.9 +/- 26.3 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-138.8 +/- 18.6 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)), whereas no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA and heart rate during a cold pressor test; however, the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated without altering the sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate.

  15. Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Petra; Bauer, Axel; Müller, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) indicates poor prognosis after acute myocardial infarction. Noninvasive BRS assessment is complicated by nonstationarities and noise in electrocardiogram and pressure signals. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a novel signal processing technology overcoming...

  16. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

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    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes.

  17. Baroreflex Function in Rats after Simulated Microgravity

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    Hasser, Eileen M.

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to decreased gravitational forces during spaceflight results in a number of adverse cardiovascular consequences, often referred to as cardiovascular deconditioning. Prominent among these negative cardiovascular effects are orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity. Rat hindlimb unweighting is an animal model which simulates weightlessness, and results in similar cardiovascular consequences. Cardiovascular reflexes, including arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, are required for normal adjustment to both orthostatic challenges and exercise. Therefore, the orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity associated with exposure to microgravity may be due to cardiovascular reflex dysfunction. The proposed studies will test the general hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting in rats results in impaired autonomic reflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. Specifically, we hypothesize that the ability to reflexly increase sympathetic nerve activity in response to decreases in arterial pressure or blood volume will be blunted due to hindlimb unweighting. There are 3 specific aims: (1) To evaluate arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats subjected to 14 days of hindlimb unweighting; (2) To examine the interaction between arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious hindlimb unweighted rats; (3) to evaluate changes in afferent and/or central nervous system mechanisms in baroreflex regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These experiments will provide information related to potential mechanisms for orthostatic and exercise intolerance due to microgravity.

  18. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women.

  19. Development of artificial bionic baroreflex system.

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    Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The baroreflex system is the fastest mechanism in the body to regulate arterial pressure. Because the neural system (i.e., autonomic nervous system) mediates the baroreflex and the system operates under the closed-loop condition, the quantitative dynamic characteristics of the baroreflex system remained unknown until recently despite the fact that a countless number of observational and qualitative studies had been conducted. In order to develop the artificial baroreflex system, i.e., the bionic baroreflex system, we first anatomically isolated the carotid sinuses to open the baroreflex loop and identified the open-loop transfer function of the baroreflex system using white noise pressure perturbations. We found that the baroreflex system is basically a lowpass filter and remarkably linear. As an actuator to implement the bionic baroreflex system, we then stimulated the sympathetic efferent nerves at various parts of the baroreflex loop and identified the transfer functions from the stimulation sites to systemic arterial pressure. We found that the actuator responses can be described remarkably well with linear transfer functions. Since transfer functions of the native baroreflex and of the actuator were identified, the controller that is required to reproduce the native baroreflex transfer function can be easily derived from those transfer functions. To examine the performance of bionic baroreflex system, we implemented it animal models of baroreflex failure. The bionic baroreflex system restored normal arterial pressure regulation against orthostatic stresses that is indistinguishable from the native baroreflex system.

  20. [Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection].

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    Gómez Esteban, J C; Boyero, S; Fernández, C; Sagasta, A; Pérez, T; Velasco, F; Allue, I; Lezcano, E; Zarranz, J J

    2004-10-01

    Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection We present a case of baroreflex failure secondary to a unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The patient was operated for a left-sided chemodectoma in the carotid body. Some months after surgery she started to report presyncopal episodes exacerbated by mental stress and when standing up. During these episodes, the patient presented hypertensive crises and tachycardia. However, blood pressure was below normal ranges at rest. The diagnosis was baroreflex failure secondary to unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The case reported herein illustrates the fact that the presence of a bilateral injury is not essential for the occurrence of this disorder.

  1. Effects of prolonged bed rest on the total peripheral resistance baroreflex

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    Xiao, X.; Mukkamala, R.; Sheynberg, N.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exposure to microgravity continues to be a primary concern of the human space program. Reduced autonomic tone has been demonstrated to contribute to this phenomenon, and the heart rate baroreflex, in particular, has been repeatedly shown to be impaired. However, only the works of Yelle et al. have attempted to address the role of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) baroreflex, a potentially more significant contributor to blood pressure regulation. We applied a previously developed method for estimating the static gains of both the arterial and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes to data obtained before and after 16-day bed rest. Reductions in the estimated static gains of the arterial (statistically significant) and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes were found after bed rest. This study supports the works of Yelle et al, which imply that the TPR baroreflex is reduced after spaceflight.

  2. Neural blockade during exercise augments central command's contribution to carotid baroreflex resetting

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    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine central command's role on carotid baroreflex (CBR) resetting during exercise. Nine volunteer subjects performed static and rhythmic handgrip exercise at 30 and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), respectively, before and after partial axillary neural blockade. Stimulus-response curves were developed using the neck pressure-neck suction technique and a rapid pulse train protocol (+40 to -80 Torr). Regional anesthesia resulted in a significant reduction in MVC. Heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were used as indexes of central command and were elevated during exercise at control force intensity after induced muscle weakness. The CBR function curves were reset vertically with a minimal lateral shift during control exercise and exhibited a further parallel resetting during exercise with neural blockade. The operating point was progressively reset to coincide with the centering point of the CBR curve. These data suggest that central command was a primary mechanism in the resetting of the CBR during exercise. However, it appeared that central command modulated the carotid-cardiac reflex proportionately more than the carotid-vasomotor reflex.

  3. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

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    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  4. Urotensin Ⅱ inhibits carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ming WU; Hong-mei XUE; Lin XIAO; Rui-rong HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of urotensin Ⅱ (UV) on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB). Methods: The functional curve of carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused isolated carotid sinus. Results: UⅡ at the concentration of 3 nmol/L had no effect on the CSB, while at the concentration of 30, 300 and 3000 nmol/L inhibited the CSB, shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right. There was a marked decrease in peak slope and reflex decrease in blood pressure. These effects of UⅡ were concentration-dependent. Pretreatment with verapamil (an antagonist of the L-type calcium channel, 10 μmol/L) partially eliminated the above effects of UⅡ (300 nmol/L) on the CSB. Pretreatment with BIM-23127 (3 μmol/L),an antagonist of human and rat UⅡ receptors, abolished the actions of UⅡ on the CSB. Pretreatment with, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) 100 μmol/L did not affect the inhibitory effects of UⅡ (300 nmol/L) on the CSB. Conclusion: These data suggest that UⅡ exerts an inhibitory action on the isolated CSB. Such an action of UV is predominantly mediated by the UⅡ receptors in vascular smooth muscles, resulting in the opening of L-type calcium channels.

  5. Estimation of arterial and cardiopulmonary total peripheral resistance baroreflex gain values: validation by chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Li, Ying; Sala-Mercado, Javier; Hammond, Robert L; Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Feedback control of total peripheral resistance (TPR) by the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex systems is an important mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. Existing methods for measuring this TPR baroreflex mechanism typically aim to quantify only the gain value of one baroreflex system as it operates in open-loop conditions. As a result, the normal, integrated functioning of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of TPR remains to be fully elucidated. To this end, the laboratory of Mukkamala et al. (Mukkamala R, Toska K, and Cohen RJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284: H947-H959, 2003) previously proposed a potentially noninvasive technique for estimating the closed-loop (dimensionless) gain values of the arterial TPR baroreflex (GA) and the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex (GC) by mathematical analysis of the subtle, beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume. Here, we review the technique with additional details and describe its experimental evaluation with respect to spontaneous hemodynamic variability measured from seven conscious dogs, before and after chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. The technique was able to correctly predict the group-average changes in GA and GC that have previously been shown to occur following chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. That is, reflex control by the arterial TPR baroreflex was virtually abolished (GA = -2.1 +/- 0.6 to 0.3 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex more than doubled (GC = -0.7 +/- 0.4 to -1.8 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex functioning in both humans and animals in health and disease.

  6. Reduced Baroreflex Sensitivity in Cluster Headache Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J; Mehlsen, Jesper; Brinth, Louise

    2015-01-01

    by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in CH patients. METHODS: Twenty-six active CH patients and an equal number of age-, sex-, and BMI-matched controls underwent head-up tilt table test and BRS was determined by the sequence method. RESULTS: Compared with controls, patients exhibited a blunted reactivity of RR...

  7. Baroreflex sensitivity and essential hypertension in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzíková, N; Fiser, B

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for many years that baroreflex sensitivity is lowered in hypertensive patients. There are several known factors implicating this association, e.g. high blood pressure leads to remodeling of the carotid arterial wall, to its stiffness and to a diminished activation of baroreceptors; leptin released from a fatty tissue activates the sympathetic nervous system etc. On the other hand, low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, usually quantified in ms/mmHg) can be inborn. Studies on primary hypertension in children and adolescents have brought new information about the role of baroreflex in the development of an early stage of primary hypertension. BRS lower than 3.9 ms/mmHg was found in 5 % of healthy subjects. This value approaches the critical value for the risk of sudden cardiac death in patients after myocardial infarction and corresponds to the value present in hypertensive patients. A decreased BRS and BRSf (baroreflex sensitivity expressed in mHz/mmHg, index independent of the mean cardiac interval), was found not only in children with hypertension, but also in those with white-coat hypertension. This is in accordance with a single interpretation. The decrease of BRS/BRSf precedes a pathological blood pressure increase. The contribution of obesity and BRS/BRSf to the development of hypertension in adolescents was also compared. Both factors reach a sensitivity and a specificity between 60 % and 65 %, but there is no correlation between the values of the body mass index and BRS either in the group of hypertensive patients or in healthy controls. If a receiver operating curve (sensitivity versus specificity) is plotted for both values together using logistic regression analysis, a sensitivity higher than 70 % and a specificity over 80 % are reached. This means that low baroreflex sensitivity is an independent risk factor for the development of primary hypertension. Studies demonstrate that adolescents with increased blood pressure and with BRS under 7 ms

  8. Comparison of Baroreflex Sensitivity to Fall and Rise in Blood Pressure Induced by the Valsalva Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Singer, Wolfgang; Gehrking, Tonette L.; Sletten, David M.; Schmelzer, James D.; Low, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    The baroreflex plays a key role in human blood pressure (BP) regulation. Its efferent limb consists of a vagal and a sympathetic component. The Valsalva maneuver is widely used to quantify vagal baroreflex function (vagal baroreflex sensitivity, BRS_vagal), but most studies have focused on the R-R interval response to BP decrement, even though the subsequent response to an increment in BP is important and different. We sought to evaluate if BRS_vagal can be determined from the rise in BP during phase III-IV of the Valsalva maneuver (BRSvagalinc), to assess the association between BRSvagalinc and BRS_vagal derived from the preceeding BP decrement (BRSvagaldec), and to validate BRSvagalinc as index of autonomic function. We studied patients with severe autonomic failure (n=49, 25 female), mild autonomic failure (n=25, 11 female), and matched normal controls (n=29, 15 female). BRSvagalinc and BRSvagaldec were calculated as the regression slope of R-R interval and systolic BP during phase III-IV and early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver, respectively, and compared with other autonomic indices across groups. BRSvagalinc could be calculated in all subjects and correlated highly with BRSvagaldec (r=0.72, p<0.001). BRSvagalinc also significantly correlated with BP changes during phase II and IV of the Valsalva maneuver and sympathetic barosensitivity. BRSvagalinc was significantly different between groups, being highest in controls and lowest in patients with severe autonomic failure. Vagal BRS, determined by relating R-R interval to BP increase following phase III, is a valuable autonomic index, provides additional information about vagal baroreflex function, and reflects overall severity of autonomic failure. PMID:24597842

  9. Baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate in near-term fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Gunn, Alistair J; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Davidson, Joanne O; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Bennet, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Late preterm infants, born between 34 and 36 weeks gestation, have significantly higher morbidity than neonates born at full term, which may be partly related to reduced sensitivity of the arterial baroreflex. The present study assessed baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in near-term fetal sheep at 123 ± 1 days gestation. At this age, although fetuses are not fully mature in some respects (term is 147 days), sleep-state cycling is established [between high-voltage, low-frequency (HV) and low-voltage, high-frequency (LV) sleep], and neural myelination is similar to the term human infant. Fetal sheep were instrumented to record blood pressure (BP), HR (n = 15) and RSNA (n = 5). Blood pressure was manipulated using vasoactive drugs, phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. In both HV and LV sleep, phenylephrine was associated with increased arterial BP and decreased HR. In HV sleep, phenylephrine was associated with a fall in RSNA, from 124 ± 14 to 58 ± 11% (P fall in BP after sodium nitroprusside was associated with a significant increase in HR during LV but not HV sleep, and there was no significant effect of hypotension on RSNA. These data demonstrate that in near-term fetal sheep baroreflex activity is only partly active and is highly modulated by sleep state. Critically, there was no RSNA response to marked hypotension; this finding has implications for the ability of the late preterm fetus to adapt to low BP.

  10. Baroreflex failure: a neglected type of secondary hypertension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J.M.; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The arterial baroreflex buffers abrupt transients of blood pressure and prevents pressure from rising or falling excessively. In experimental animals, baroreceptor denervation results in temporary or permanent increases in blood pressure level and variability, depending on the extent of denervation.

  11. Baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-junCAI; Chao-yuMIAO; He-huiXIE; Ding-fengSU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To testify the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis. METHODSAND RESULTS: Experiment 1 : The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was measured in 30 SD rats in conscious state with a computerized blood pressure monitoring system. Four weeks later, the rats were fed with a high-cholesterol diet for 8-week duration to induce atherosclerosis. The hearts and aortae were removed for pathological examination and the scores of coronary and aortic

  12. Impaired baroreflex function in mice overexpressing alpha-synuclein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila eFleming

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, such as orthostatic hypotension consequent to baroreflex failure and cardiac sympathetic denervation, is frequently observed in the synucleinopathy Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, the baroreceptor reflex was assessed in mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn, a genetic mouse model of synucleinopathy. The beat-to-beat change in heart rate, computed from R-R interval, in relation to blood pressure was measured in anesthetized and conscious mice equipped with arterial blood pressure telemetry transducers during transient bouts of hypertension and hypotension. Compared to wildtype, tachycardia following nitroprusside-induced hypotension was significantly reduced in Thy1-aSyn mice. Thy1-aSyn mice also showed an abnormal cardiovascular response (i.e., diminished tachycardia to muscarinic blockade with atropine. We conclude that Thy1-aSyn mice have impaired basal and dynamic range of sympathetic and parasympathetic-mediated changes in heart rate and will be a useful model for long-term study of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction associated with PD.

  13. Baroreflex sensitivity differs among same strain Wistar rats from the same laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Ferreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies evidenced that a portion of normotensive Sprague–Dawley rats spontaneously exhibit lower baroreflex sensitivity, however, it was no yet investigated in Wistar rats. We aimed to compare baroreflex sensitivity among rats from the same strain and the same laboratory. Male Wistar normotensive rats (300-400g were studied. Cannulas were inserted into the abdominal aortic artery through the right femoral artery to measure mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Baroreflex was calculated as the derivative of the variation of heart rate in function of the mean arterial pressure variation (ΔHR/ΔMAP tested with a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (50 μg/kg and with a pressor dose of phenylephrine (8μg/kg in the right femoral venous approach through an inserted cannula. We divided the rats into four groups: i high bradycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain less than -2 tested with phenylephrine; ii low bradycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain between -1 and -2 tested with phenylephrine; iii high tachycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain less than -3 tested with sodium nitroprusside; and iv low tachycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain between -1 and -3 tested with sodium nitroprusside. Approximately 71% of the rats presented a decrease in bradycardic reflex while around half showed an increase in tachycardic reflex. No significant changes in basal mean arterial pressure and heart rate, tachycardic and bradycardic peak and heart rate range were observed. There was a significant change in baroreflex sensitivity among rats from the same strain and the same laboratory.

  14. GABA modulates baroreflex in the ventral tegmental area in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Rasoulpanah, Minoo; Nasimi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    There are some reports demonstrating the cardiovascular functions of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). About 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic, which might play a role in baroreflex modulation. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA(A), GABA(B) receptors and reversible synaptic blockade of the VTA on baroreflex. Drugs were microinjected into the VTA of urethane anesthetized rats, and the maximum change of blood pressure and the gain of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine (Phe) injection were compared with the preinjection and the control values. Microinjection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, into the VTA strongly decreased the Phe-induced hypertension, indicating that GABA itself attenuated the baroreflex. Muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist (30 mM, 100 nl), produced no significant changes. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), moderately attenuated the baroreflex, however phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), had no significant effect. In conclusion, for the first time, we demonstrated that GABA(A) receptors of the VTA strongly attenuate and GABA(B) receptors of the VTA moderately attenuate baroreflex in rat. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Capsaicin facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yi-Xian; Wu, Yu-Ming; Wang, Sheng; He, Rui-Rong

    2004-04-25

    The effects of capsaicin (CAP) on the carotid sinus baroreflex were studied in 30 anaesthetized rats with perfused isolated carotid sinus. The results are as follows. (1) By perfusing the isolated carotid sinus with CAP (1 micromol/L), the functional curve of the baroreflex was shifted to the left and downward, with a peak slope (PS) increasing from 0.34+/-0.01 to 0.42+/-0.01 (PPS and RD induced by capsaicin were dose-dependent. (2) By pretreatment with ruthenium red (RR, 100 micromol/L), an antagonist of vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR(1)), the above effects of CAP on carotid baroreflex were abolished. (3) The CAP-induced change in the baroreflex was also eliminated by pretreatment with glibenclamide (20 microm ol/L), a K(ATP) channel blocker. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that CAP facilitates the carotid baroreflex, an effect of which may be resulted from the opening of K(ATP) channels mediated by VR(1).

  16. Arterial baroreflex function and left ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Chao-Yu; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the arterial baroreflex(ABR)plays a key role in the regulation of heart rate and stabilization of blood pressure.Currently,it appears that ABR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease states.Since the mid-1990s,a number of studies have been carried out in our laboratory to explore the pathological significance of ABR function in cardiovascular damage.This minireview summarizes our research work on the topic of ABR and left ventricular hypertrophy(LVH).On the basis of discussion concerning the importance of ABR dysfunction in hypertensive LVH and sinoaortic denervation-induced LVH,we advance a new strategy for reversal of LVH,that is,restoration of impaired ABR function.We tested this hypothesis in animal models with ABR deficiency.It was found that improvement of impaird ABR function with long-term treatment of ketanserin or candesartan was accompanied by reversal of LVH.The preliminary results indicate that it is feasible to target ABR for treatment of LVH.

  17. System identification of baroreflex response to mild lower body negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Xu, Da; Greaves, Danielle K; Shoemaker, Kevin J; Arbeille, Philippe; Cerutti, Sergio; Hughson, Richard L; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mild lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure (ABP) has long been thought to affect cardiopulmonary baroreflex only, although recent studies have pointed out that arterial baroreceptors may be transiently unloaded too after the rapid onset of mild LBNP. This paper presents a spectral decomposition method for the black box identification of the contribution of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes to beat-by-beat variability of ABP in response to mild LBNP levels. The significant decrease of mean and diastolic arterial pressure and of the arterial baroreflex mediated contribution to overall variability of ABP which was found, suggested that the unloading of arterial baroreceptors may be reflected by an altered dynamic response of arterial baroreflex, too. In addition, arterial baroreflex mediated modulations were found to be the main player in the modulation of beat-by-beat fluctuations of ABP, while the role of cardiopulmonary baroreflex mediated responses appeared to contribute very little.

  18. Changes in plasma volume and baroreflex function following resistance exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz, L. L.; Tatro, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of change in plasma volume (PV) and baroreflex responses have been reported over 24 h immediately following maximal cycle exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if PV and baroreflex showed similar changes for 24 h after resistance exercise. Eight men were studied on 2 test days, 1 week apart. On 1 day, per cent change (% delta) in PV was estimated at 0,3, and 6 h after resistance exercise using haematocrit and haemoglobin. Baseline PV was measured 24 h after exercise using Evans blue dye. The carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response was measured before, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h post-exercise. Each subject performed six sets of the bench press and leg press with 10 repetitions per set with a load that induced failure within each set. On a control day, the protocol was used without exercise. Plasma volume did not change during the control day. There was a 20% decrease in PV immediately post-exercise; the recovery of the PV was rapid and complete within 3 h. PV was 20% greater 24 h post-exercise than on the control day. There were no differences in any of the baroreflex measurements. Therefore, it is suggested that PV shifts may occur without altering baroreflex sensitivity.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin XIAO; Yu-ming WU; Hao ZHANG; Yi-xian LIU; Rui-rong HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To study effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S)on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB).Methods:The functional curve of the carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused carotid sinus.Results:H2S(derived from sodium hydrosulfide)at concentrations of 25,50,and 100 μmol/L facilitated the CSB,shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex downward and to the left.There was a marked increase in peak slope(PS)and reflex decrease in blood pressure(RD).Effects were concentration-dependent.Pretreatment with glibenclamide(20 μmol/L),a KATP channel blocker,abolished the above effects of H2S on CSB.Pretreatment with Bay K8644 (an agonist of calcium channels;500 nmol/L)eliminated the effect of H2S on CSB.An inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase(CSE),DL-propargylglycine(PPG;200 μmol/L),inhibited CSB in male rats and shifted the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right.Conclusion:These data suggest that exogenous H2S exerts a facilitatory role on isolated CSB through opening KATP channels and further closing the calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.Endogenous H2S may activate the activity of the CSB in vivo.

  20. Determination of baroreflex sensitivity during the modified Oxford maneuver by trigonometric regressive spectral analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in spontaneous and drug-induced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS have been attributed to its different operating ranges. The current study attempted to compare BRS estimates during cardiovascular steady-state and pharmacologically stimulation using an innovative algorithm for dynamic determination of baroreflex gain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-five volunteers underwent the modified Oxford maneuver in supine and 60° tilted position with blood pressure and heart rate being continuously recorded. Drug-induced BRS-estimates were calculated from data obtained by bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Spontaneous indices were derived from data obtained during rest (stationary and under pharmacological stimulation (non-stationary using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis (TRS. Spontaneous and drug-induced BRS values were significantly correlated and display directionally similar changes under different situations. Using the Bland-Altman method, systematic differences between spontaneous and drug-induced estimates were found and revealed that the discrepancy can be as large as the gain itself. Fixed bias was not evident with ordinary least products regression. The correlation and agreement between the estimates increased significantly when BRS was calculated by TRS in non-stationary mode during the drug injection period. TRS-BRS significantly increased during phenylephrine and decreased under nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The TRS analysis provides a reliable, non-invasive assessment of human BRS not only under static steady state conditions, but also during pharmacological perturbation of the cardiovascular system.

  1. Four faces of baroreflex failure: hypertensive crisis, volatile hypertension, orthostatic tachycardia, and malignant vagotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketch, Terry; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, RoseMarie; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The baroreflex normally serves to buffer blood pressure against excessive rise or fall. Baroreflex failure occurs when afferent baroreceptive nerves or their central connections become impaired. In baroreflex failure, there is loss of buffering ability, and wide excursions of pressure and heart rate occur. Such excursions may derive from endogenous factors such as stress or drowsiness, which result in quite high and quite low pressures, respectively. They may also derive from exogenous factors such as drugs or environmental influences. METHODS AND RESULTS: Impairment of the baroreflex may produce an unusually broad spectrum of clinical presentations; with acute baroreflex failure, a hypertensive crisis is the most common presentation. Over succeeding days to weeks, or in the absence of an acute event, volatile hypertension with periods of hypotension occurs and may continue for many years, usually with some attenuation of pressor surges and greater prominence of depressor valleys during long-term follow-up. With incomplete loss of baroreflex afferents, a mild syndrome of orthostatic tachycardia or orthostatic intolerance may appear. Finally, if the baroreflex failure occurs without concomitant destruction of the parasympathetic efferent vagal fibers, a resting state may lead to malignant vagotonia with severe bradycardia and hypotension and episodes of sinus arrest. CONCLUSIONS: Although baroreflex failure is not the most common cause of the above conditions, correct differentiation from other cardiovascular disorders is important, because therapy of baroreflex failure requires specific strategies, which may lead to successful control.

  2. Mechanisms of spontaneous baroreflex impairment in lyon hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantelme, P; Cerutti, C; Lo, M; Paultre, C Z; Ducher, M

    1998-09-01

    This experiment aimed at 1) comparing the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (SBRS) in Lyon genetically hypertensive (LH), normotensive (LN), and low blood pressure (LL) rats and 2) assessing some aspects of the mechanisms of its impairment in LH rats. Baroreflex was studied in control animals after an early chronic converting enzyme inhibition with perindopril and after a 4-wk infusion of ANG II in perindopril-treated rats. The SBRS was determined with a previously validated method, using statistical dependence between blood pressure (BP) and heart rate values recorded in freely moving animals. LH rats exhibited high BP, cardiac hypertrophy, and decreased SBRS (LH, 1.3 +/- 0.2; LN, 2.5 +/- 0.4; LL, 2.2 +/- 0.4 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1). Perindopril prevented the development of hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy and normalized SBRS. BP rose in LH and LL rats after ANG II infusion, but only LH rats, which developed a cardiac hypertrophy, had an impaired SBRS (LH, 1.1 +/- 0.2; LN, 2.5 +/- 0.2; LL, 2.8 +/- 0.3 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1). This impairment was partially reversed by an acute ANG II blockade with losartan. These results demonstrate that high BP does not account for the decreased SBRS in LH rats. SBRS impairment could result either from cardiac hypertrophy or from the direct effect of ANG II on the baroreflex loop.

  3. Baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in experimental hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Irigoyen

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial baroreceptor reflex system is one of the most powerful and rapidly acting mechanisms for controlling arterial pressure. The purpose of the present review is to discuss data relating sympathetic activity to the baroreflex control of arterial pressure in two different experimental models: neurogenic hypertension by sinoaortic denervation (SAD and high-renin hypertension by total aortic ligation between the renal arteries in the rat. SAD depresses baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic activity in both the acute and chronic phases. However, increased sympathetic activity (100% was found only in the acute phase of sinoaortic denervation. In the chronic phase of SAD average discharge normalized but the pattern of discharges was different from that found in controls. High-renin hypertensive rats showed overactivity of the renin angiotensin system and a great depression of the baroreflexes, comparable to the depression observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats. However, there were no differences in the average tonic sympathetic activity or changes in the pattern of discharges in high-renin rats. We suggest that the difference in the pattern of discharges may contribute to the increase in arterial pressure lability observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats.

  4. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analy...

  5. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Furthermore, we investigated whether autonomic mechanisms stimulated by chronic baroreflex activation and renal denervation-current therapies in patients with resistant hypertension, who are commonly obese-restore cardiovascular dynamic control. Increases in body weight to ∼150% of control led to a gradual increase in mean arterial pressure to 17 ± 3 mmHg above control (100 ± 2 mmHg) after 4 wk on the high-fat diet. In contrast to the gradual increase in arterial pressure, tachycardia, attenuated chronotropic baroreflex responses, and reduced heart rate variability were manifest within 1-4 days on high-fat intake, reaching 130 ± 4 beats per minute (bpm) (control = 86 ± 3 bpm) and ∼45% and therapy may reduce the risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias as well as lower arterial pressure.

  6. Inter-individual Relationships between Sympathetic Arterial Baroreflex Function and Cerebral Perfusion Control in Healthy Males

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor Witter; Yu-Chieh Tzeng; Terry O'Donnell; Jessica Kusel; Bridget Walker; Mary Berry; Chloe E. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion during normal physiological challenges requires integration between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and systemic blood pressure control mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is inversely related to some measures of cerebral autoregulation. However, interactions between the sympathetic arterial baroreflex and cerebral perfusion control mechanisms have not been explored. To determine the nature and magnitude of the...

  7. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  8. [Comparison of three methods for the estimation of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in normotensive and hypertensive subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Siché, J P; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Pozet, N; Paultre, C; Cerutti, C

    1995-08-01

    This study aimed at comparing estimations of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) obtained with 3 different methods from continuous non-invasive blood pressure recordings in humans. A new method, allowing the quantification of the statistical dependence between values of 2 parameters (Z coefficient), was applied to beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart period (HP) values. SBP and HP values with positive Z coefficient and corresponding to baroreflex activity (SBP and HP values both lower or higher than the modal values) were submitted to a linear regression and the regression coefficient (Zgain) was taken as an index of BRS. Second, cross-spectral analysis of SBP and HP gave a BRS value (Csgain) computed as the average value of transfer function moduli for frequencies between 0.07 and 0.14 Hz, with coherence between SBP and HP greater than 0.5. The third method relies on the analysis of linear sequences (r > 0.97) containing at least 3 values of SBP and HP varying in the same direction. The average regression coefficient obtained from all selected SBP and HP sequences is the index of BRS (Seqgain). SBP and HR were recorded during 1 hour with a Finapres in 10 healthy male volunteers (NT), 23 to 32 year-old (SBP: 123 +/- 2 mmHg) and 10 recent and untreated hypertensive subjects (HT) (SBP: 152 +/- 6 mmHg). [table: see text] These results show that, in both groups, Zgain and Seqgain correlated with Csgain. No correlation was found between Zgain and Seqgain in healthy volunteers whereas the correlation was strong in hypertensives probably due to more heterogeneous SBP levels and BRS values in these subjects. This suggests that these methods are sensitive to different ways of response of the baroreflex.

  9. Beneficial effects of physical activity on baroreflex control in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Pinna, Gian Domenico

    2014-07-01

    The baroreflex mechanisms, by controlling autonomic outflow to the heart and circulation, contribute importantly to neural circulatory control. The main function of the baroreflex is to prevent wide fluctuations in arterial blood pressure and to maintain the physiological homeostasis under basal resting conditions and in response to acute stress. Baroreflex-mediated changes in autonomic outflow affect heart rate, myocardial contractility, and peripheral vascular resistance. The baroreflex control of heart rate is of particular interest in pathological conditions, since it has been associated with increased propensity for cardiac mortality and sudden death. Aging is associated with significant cardiovascular modifications. The changes in baroreflex function that occur with age have been systematically studied by several methodological approaches. The available evidence indicates a reduced arterial baroreflex control of heart rate favoring an increase in sympathetic and a decrease in parasympathetic drive to the heart as well as an impairment in the baroreceptor control of blood pressure. Both kinds of changes have resultant clinical implications. Exercise training can modulate the age-related decline in baroreflex function and the attending abnormalities in autonomic control, thus accounting for some of the beneficial effects of physical activity in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Determination of Vagal Baroreflex sensitivity in Normal Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Singer, Wolfgang; Gehrking, Tonette L.; Sletten, David M.; Schmelzer, James D.; Kihara, Mikihiro; Low, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Valsalva maneuver (VM) is used widely to quantify the sensitivity of the vagal baroreflex loop (vagal baroreflex sensitivity, BRS_v), but most studies have focused on the heart rate (HR) response to blood pressure (BP) decrement (BRS_v↓), even though the subsequent response to an increment in BP following the VM (BRS_v↑) is important and different. Methods We evaluated recordings of HR and BP in 187 normal subjects during the VM and determined both BRS_v↑ determined by relating HR to the BP increase following phase III and BRS_v↓. Results BRS_v↑ was related inversely to age. In addition, BRS_v↓, age, and magnitude of phase IV were independent predictors of BRS_v↑ in a multivariate model, accounting for 47% of the variance of BRS_v↑. Discussion The results indicate that both BRS_v↑ and BRS_v↓ become blunted with increasing age and that these indices relate to each other. PMID:24477673

  11. Biofeedback of baroreflex sensitivity in patients with mild essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhaus, Sabine; Rüddel, Heinz; Curio, Immo; Mussgay, Lutz; Scholz, O Berndt

    2003-01-01

    An attempt was made to reduce blood pressure by increasing the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) via biofeedback. Six patients with mild essential hypertension and 5 normotensive participants were studied during 8 biofeedback sessions. Each session consisted of 5 trials, 5 min each. The first and the last trials served as baselines of heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, and BRS. During the 3 middle trials the BRS was calculated online using the sequencing technique. The resulting value was used as a visual analogue feedback signal. Participants were asked to increase BRS. The mean BRS was 8.3 [ms/mmHg] for the hypertensive patients and 12.2 [ms/mmHg] for the normotensive participants. During biofeedback trials as well as across sessions neither the hypertensive nor the normotensive group showed a statistically significant increase of BRS, only heart rate variability increased significantly. Contrary to expectation blood pressure increased in both groups. One hypertensive subject made significant progress during the training by performing valsalva maneuvers. The data show that BRS is reduced in hypertensive subjects. The increase of the heart rate variability could be a sign of the activation of the baroreflex although the BRS itself did not increase. Despite the successful technical and organizational implementation of this biofeedback approach, it was not effective to systematically reduce blood pressure. A further development in the direction of guiding the patient to use the valsalva breathing pattern and/or a prolonged duration of the biofeedback training might be promising.

  12. Effects of peritoneal dialysis fluid biocompatibility on baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, S G; Selby, N M; McIntyre, C W

    2008-04-01

    Conventional low biocompatibility peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid composition has been driven by manufacturing expediency and cost limitations. PD is associated with significant acute changes in cardiovascular functional parameters, at least in part influenced by fluid composition. Short-term control of blood pressure (BP) is under control of the baroreflex arc. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PD fluid biocompatibility on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). We studied 10 non-diabetic established continuous ambulatory PD patients, in a randomized crossover trial comparing conventional and biocompatible PD fluids. Systemic hemodynamics were continuously monitored using digital pulse-wave analysis. Plasma glucose and insulin were assessed during treatment with both 1.36% and 3.86% glucose-containing fluids. BRS was calculated offline from continuous BP and interbeat interval data. BRS was significantly higher with conventional PD fluid during both 1.36% (Pinsulin concentrations, and ultrafiltration volumes were significantly higher during the 3.86% dwell than the 1.36% dwell, but there were no differences between standard and biocompatible fluids. We have demonstrated for the first time that PD fluid biocompatibility rapidly affects BRS. These changes occur against a background of cardiovascular variability, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia. Further research is needed to explore the mechanism and, more importantly, the consequences of these findings.

  13. Marked sympathetic activation and baroreflex dysfunction in true resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Pini, Claudio; Alimento, Marina; Facchetti, Rita; Spaziani, Domenico; Cuspidi, Cesare; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2014-12-20

    An increase in sympathetic drive to the heart and the peripheral circulation characterizes mild and severe essential hypertension. However, it remains unsettled whether sympathetic cardiovascular influences are potentiated in true resistant hypertension (RHT). In 32 RHT patients treated with 4.6 ± 0.3 drugs (mean ± SEM) and aged 58.6 ± 2.1 years, 35 non-resistant treated hypertensives (HT) and 19 normotensive controls (NT), all age-matched with RHT, we measured clinic, 24-hour ambulatory and beat-to-beat blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR, EKG), muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (MSNA, microneurography) and spontaneous baroreflex MSNA-sensitivity. BP values were markedly greater in RHT patients than in NT and HT (172.2 ± 1.7/100.7 ± 1.2 vs 132.1 ± 1.3/82.1 ± 0.9 and 135.5 ± 1.2/83.6 ± 0.9 mmHg, P < 0.01). This was paralleled by a significant and marked increase in MSNA (87.8 ± 2.0 vs 46.8 ± 2.6 and 59.3 ± 1.7 and bursts/100 heartbeats, P < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis the MSNA increase observed in RHT was significantly related to hemodynamic, hormonal and metabolic variables. It was also significantly related to plasma aldosterone values as well as spontaneous baroreflex MSNA-sensitivity, which were the variables that at the multivariate analysis were more closely related to the adrenergic activation of RHT after adjustment for confounders, including antihypertensive treatment (r(2)partial=0.04405 and r(2)partial=0.00878, P<0.05 for both). These data represent the first evidence that RHT is a state of marked adrenergic overdrive, greater for magnitude than that detectable in HT. They also suggest that impaired baroreflex mechanisms, along with hemodynamic and neurohumoral factors, may be responsible for the phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Baroreflex Sensitivity Decreases During 90-Day Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Arzeno, N. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreases during spaceflight and simulated spaceflight (head down bed rest [BR]). However, previous studies have only examined BRS in response to a limited blood pressure (BP) range or to a single sudden change in BP. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine BRS during 90 days of 6deg head-down tilt BR over a broad range of BP perturbations. METHODS: Nineteen normal volunteers (12M, 7F) were tested one day before BR, and then near BR days 30, 60 and 90. BP was pharmacologically altered by continuous infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Electrocardiogram and continuous BP were collected during 10 min of normal saline (NS), followed by increasing concentrations of PE (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 micro-g/kg/min). After a 20 min break, NS was infused again for 10 min, followed by increasing concentrations of SNP (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 micro-g/kg/min). Baroreceptor sensitivity was measured as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. Spectral heart rate variability (HRV) and mean RR were analyzed using data from only the NS infusions. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of BR and gender. RESULTS: RR decreased (pdecreased with BR (p=0.027) and was lower (p=0.046) in men (0.39+/-0.02, mean+/-SEM) than women (0.48+/-0.02). The spontaneous baroreflex slope, our measure of BRS, increased with PE and decreased with SNP across BR (pdecrease in BRS from pre- to post-BR appeared to be larger in women (43.6+/-7.0%) than in men (31.3+/-3.9%, p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity decrease during 90 days of BR, and BRS tends to diminish more in women than in men.

  15. Ablation of NK1 Receptors in Rat Nucleus Tractus Solitarii Blocks Baroreflexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Jeffrey; Lin, Li-Hsien; Chianca, Jr, Deoclecio A; Talman, William T

    2002-01-01

    .... The neurokinin-1 receptors at which SP may act have been identified in the nucleus tractus solitarii, but there remains uncertainty if the neurons at which SP acts are critical to baroreflex transmission...

  16. Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, A.; Althaus, M.; Hartman, C.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Mindera, R.B.; Hoofdakker, B.J. van den; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cogni

  17. Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, A.; Althaus, M.; Hartman, C.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Minderaa, R.B.; van den Hoofdakker, B.J.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cogni

  18. Cardiac baroreflex function and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in elderly Masters athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aengevaeren, V.L.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Levine, B.D.; Zhang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is stably maintained through the combined effects of blood pressure (BP) regulation and cerebral autoregulation. Previous studies suggest that aerobic exercise training improves cardiac baroreflex function and beneficially affects BP regulation, but may negatively affect ce

  19. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen facilitation of baroreflex heart rate responses in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Xue, Baojian; Newton, Leslie G; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen facilitates baroreflex heart rate responses evoked by intravenous infusion of ANG II and phenylephrine (PE) in ovariectomized female mice. The present study aims to identify the estrogen receptor subtype involved in mediating these effects of estrogen. Baroreflex responses to PE, ANG II, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were tested in intact and ovariectomized estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) with (OvxE+) or without (OvxE-) estrogen replacement. Wild-type (WT) females homozygous for the ERalpha(+/+) were used as controls. Basal mean arterial pressures (MAP) and heart rates were comparable in all the groups except the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. This group had significantly smaller resting MAP, suggesting an effect of estrogen on resting vascular tone possibly mediated by the ERbeta subtype. Unlike the WT females, estrogen did not facilitate baroreflex heart rate responses to either PE or ANG II in the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. The slope of the line relating baroreflex heart rate decreases with increases in MAP evoked by PE was comparable in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-6.97 +/- 1.4 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1)) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+ (-6.18 +/- 1.3) mice. Likewise, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardic responses to ANG II was similar in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-3.87 +/- 0.5) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+(-2.60 +/- 0.5) females. Data suggest that estrogen facilitation of baroreflex responses to PE and ANG II is predominantly mediated by ERalpha subtype. A second important observation in the present study is that the slope of ANG II-induced baroreflex bradycardia is significantly blunted compared with PE in the intact as well as the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ females. We have previously reported that this ANG II-mediated blunting of cardiac baroreflexes is observed only in WT males and not in ovariectomized WT females independent of their estrogen replacement status. The present data suggest that in females lacking ERalpha, ANG II causes blunting of cardiac baroreflexes similar to males and may be

  20. Gender Differences in Baroreflex Sensitivity after Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, M. B.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Lee, S. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Two potential contributing factors to post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance are decreases in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and sympathetic nervous system response. The purpose of this study was to examine the shape of the BRS curve and sympathetic response to a wide range of blood pressures (BP) before and during 6 head-down bed rest (BR). METHODS: Normal volunteers were tested one day before BR (20M, 1 0F) and near BR days 30 (20M, 10F), 60 (16M, 8F), and 90 (1 0M, 5F). BP was pharmacologically manipulated by 10-min infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at 3 increasing concentrations with a 20-min rest between PE and SNP. Electrocardiogram and continuous finger blood pressure were recorded. A blood sample was drawn at the end of each infusion to measure plasma norepinephrine levels. The spontaneous baroreflex slope (SBS), a measure of BRS, was calculated as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP (SBP) and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. The data included saturated responses at the upper but not the lower end of the BP range. Mean response curves were constructed using second-order mixed model analysis. Results are based on term significance in the models. RESULTS RR: RR was lower during BR than pre BR (pgenders were modeled by a linear response; compared to males, females had an attenuated (lower slope) RR response to changes in SBP (p=0.031). SBS: SBS vs SBP analysis showed a lower SBS during BR (pgender and BR. Not only do gender and BR baseline differences exist, but gender and BR also influence the slope and saturation of the BRS curves. Attenuated and saturating RR and SBS responses, as well as differences in baseline values, may contribute to the higher rates of orthostatic intolerance in women and after bed rest.

  1. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS.

  2. Cool dialysate reduces asymptomatic intradialytic hypotension and increases baroreflex variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; McIntyre, Chris W

    2009-04-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients and can be ameliorated by cool temperature HD. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and is essential in the short-term regulation of blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate if the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) response to HD differed between standard and cool-temperature dialysate. Ten patients (mean age 67+/-2 years) prone to IDH were recruited into a randomized, crossover study to compare BRS variation at dialysate temperatures of 37 degrees C (HD(37)) and 35 degrees C (HD(35)). Each patient underwent continuous beat-to-beat BP monitoring during a dialysis session of HD(37) and HD(35). During HD(37) 2 patients developed symptomatic IDH, as opposed to 1 with HD(35). However, asymptomatic IDH occurred with a frequency of 0.4 episodes per session with HD(35) and 6.2 episodes per session during HD(37) (odds ratio15.5; 95%CI 5.6-14.2). Although absolute BRS measurements did not differ between the 2 modalities, BRS variability increased during HD(35). Our study has demonstrated that in IDH-prone patients, cool HD resulted in a reduction in heart rate and a greater reduction in cardiac output and stroke volume. Mean arterial pressure was maintained through a significantly greater increase in total peripheral resistance. Furthermore, although absolute BRS values during HD were not significantly altered by a reduction in dialysate temperature, there was a greater percentage increase in BRS values during cool HD. Understanding the varied causes of, and categorizing impaired hemodynamic responses to HD will enable further individualization of HD prescriptions according to patient need.

  3. Leptin impairs cardiovagal baroreflex function at the level of the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Diz, Debra I

    2009-11-01

    Circulating leptin is elevated in some forms of obesity-related hypertension, associated with impaired baroreflex function. Leptin receptors are present on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus, providing an anatomic distribution consistent with baroreflex modulation. Although solitary tract nucleus microinjection of 144 fmol/60 nL of leptin had no significant effect on baroreflex sensitivity for control of the heart rate in urethane/chloralose-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, 500 fmol of leptin impaired baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in response to increases in pressure (1.15+/-0.04 versus 0.52+/-0.12 ms/mm Hg; P<0.01). Transgenic ASrAOGEN rats with low brain angiotensinogen have an upregulation of the leptin receptor and p85 alpha mRNA in the dorsal medulla relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. Consistent with these observations, the response to leptin was enhanced in ASrAOGEN rats, because both the 144-fmol (1.46+/-0.08 versus 0.75+/-0.10 ms/mm Hg; P<0.001) and 500-fmol (1.36+/-0.32 versus 0.44+/-0.06 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) leptin microinjections impaired baroreflex sensitivity. At these doses, leptin microinjection had no effect on resting pressure, heart rate, or the tachycardic response to decreases in pressure in Sprague-Dawley or ASrAOGEN rats. Thus, exogenous leptin at sites within the solitary tract nucleus impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia induced by increases in arterial pressure, consistent with a permissive role in mediating increases in arterial pressure. Baroreflex inhibition was enhanced in animals with evidence of increased leptin receptor and relevant signaling pathway mRNA.

  4. Uptake blockade of endocannabinoids in the NTS modulates baroreflex-evoked sympathoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozoski, Daniel T; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2005-10-19

    Previous studies supporting a possible physiological role for an endogenous cannabinoid, arachidonylethanolamide (AEA, anandamide), showed a significant increase in AEA content in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) after an increase in blood pressure (BP) and prolonged baroreflex inhibition of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) after exogenous AEA microinjections into the NTS. These results, along with other studies, support the hypothesis that endogenous AEA can modulate the baroreflex through cannabinoid CB(1) receptor activation within the NTS. This study was performed to characterize the physiological role of endogenously released cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) in regulating baroreflex control of RSNA through actions in the NTS. Endocannabinoid effects were assessed by measuring the RSNA baroreflex response to increased pressure after bilateral microinjections of AM404, an endocannabinoid transport inhibitor, into the NTS of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. AM404 blocks uptake of endocannabinoids and enhances the effects of any endocannabinoids released [M. Beltramo, et al., Functional role of high-affinity anandamide transport, as revealed by selective inhibition, Science 277 (5329) (1997) 1094-1097.] into the NTS. Therefore, it was hypothesized that microinjections of AM404 should exhibit effects similar to microinjections of exogenous AEA. In this study, AM404 microinjections into the NTS were found to significantly prolong baroreflex inhibition of RSNA compared to control, similar to effects of exogenous AEA. This effect is thought to result from an increased endocannabinoid presence in the NTS, leading to prolonged CB(1) receptor activation. These results indicate that endocannabinoids released in the NTS have the potential to modulate baroreflex control at this site in the central baroreflex pathway.

  5. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  6. Assessing the strength of cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex controls via transfer entropy during orthostatic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-05-01

    The study assesses the strength of the causal relation along baroreflex (BR) in humans during an incremental postural challenge soliciting the BR. Both cardiac BR (cBR) and sympathetic BR (sBR) were characterized via BR sequence approaches from spontaneous fluctuations of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). A model-based transfer entropy method was applied to quantify the strength of the coupling from SAP to HP and from DAP to MSNA. The confounding influences of respiration were accounted for. Twelve young healthy subjects (20-36 years, nine females) were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30° and 40°. We found that (i) the strength of the causal relation along the cBR increases with tilt table inclination, while that along the sBR is unrelated to it; (ii) the strength of the causal coupling is unrelated to the gain of the relation; (iii) transfer entropy indexes are significantly and positively associated with simplified causality indexes derived from BR sequence analysis. The study proves that causality indexes are complementary to traditional characterization of the BR and suggests that simple markers derived from BR sequence analysis might be fruitfully exploited to estimate causality along the BR. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  7. Baroreflex gain and vasomotor sympathetic modulation in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães Guedes; de Almeida, Leonardo Barbosa; Pereira, Natália Portela; Mira, Pedro Augusto de Carvalho; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the gain and latency of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in patients with resistant hypertension compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects. Eighteen patients with resistant hypertension (56 ± 10 years, mean of four antihypertensive drugs), 17 patients with essential hypertension (56 ± 11 years, mean of two antihypertensive drugs), and 17 untreated normotensive controls (50 ± 15 years) were evaluated by spectral analysis of the spontaneous fluctuations of arterial pressure (beat-to-beat) and heart rate (ECG). This analysis estimated vasomotor and cardiac autonomic modulations, respectively. The transfer function analysis quantified the gain and latency of the response of output signal (RR interval) per unit of spontaneous change of input signal (systolic arterial pressure). The gain was similarly lower in patients with resistant hypertension and patients with essential hypertension in relation to normotensive subjects (4.67 ± 2.96 vs. 6.60 ± 3.30 vs. 12.56 ± 8.81 ms/mmHg; P resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (-4.01 ± 3.19 vs. -2.91 ± 2.10 vs. -1.82 ± 1.09 s; P = 0.04, respectively). In addition, the index of vasomotor sympathetic modulation was significantly increased only in patients with resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (4.04 ± 2.86 vs. 2.65 ± 1.88 vs. 2.06 ± 1.70 mmHg(2); P resistant hypertension have reduced gain and increased latency of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. These patients also have increased vasomotor sympathetic modulation.

  8. A single inhalation exposure to acrolein desensitizes baroreflex responsiveness in Wistar-Kyoto and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arterial baroreflex is one of the body's homeostatic mechanisms that regulate blood pressure (BP) by changing heart rate (HR) and vasoconstriction. Increases in BP reflexively cause HR to decrease, whereas decreases in BP depress the baroreflex and cause HR to rise. As such, baro...

  9. Dynamic aerobic exercise induces baroreflex improvement in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: -1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  10. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex enhances ventricular contractility in awake dogs: a mathematical analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hammond, Robert L; Ichinose, Masashi; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Evan, Sell; O'Leary, Donal S; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2014-08-15

    The cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) by decreasing total peripheral resistance and increasing heart rate (HR) in dogs. However, the direction of ventricular contractility change is not well understood. The aim was to elucidate the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility during normal physiological conditions via a mathematical analysis. Spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations in maximal ventricular elastance (Emax), which is perhaps the best available index of ventricular contractility, CVP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and HR were measured from awake dogs at rest before and after β-adrenergic receptor blockade. An autoregressive exogenous input model was employed to jointly identify the three causal transfer functions relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in CVP to Emax (CVP → Emax), which characterizes the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, ABP to Emax, which characterizes the arterial baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, and HR to Emax, which characterizes the force-frequency relation. The CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.037 ± 0.010 ml(-1) (different from zero; P < 0.05) and an overall time constant of 3.2 ± 1.2 s. Hence, Emax would increase and reach steady state in ∼16 s in response to a step increase in CVP, without any change to ABP or HR, due to the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. Following β-adrenergic receptor blockade, the CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.0007 ± 0.0113 ml(-1) (different from control; P < 0.10). Hence, Emax would change little in steady state in response to a step increase in CVP. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex increases ventricular contractility through β-adrenergic receptor system mediation.

  11. Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Chishaki, Akiko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

  12. RESTING SYMPATHETIC BAROREFLEX SENSITIVITY IN SUBJECTS WITH LOW AND HIGH TOLERANCE TO CENTRAL HYPOVOLEMIA INDUCED BY LOWER BODY NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eHinojosa-Laborde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central hypovolemia elicited by orthostasis or hemorrhage triggers sympathetically-mediated baroreflex responses to maintain organ perfusion; these reflexes are less sensitive in patients with orthostatic intolerance, and during conditions of severe blood loss, may result in cardiovascular collapse (decompensatory or circulatory shock. The ability to tolerate central hypovolemia is variable and physiological factors contributing to tolerance are emerging. We tested the hypothesis that resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS are attenuated in male and female subjects who have low tolerance (LT to central hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP. MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP were recorded in 47 human subjects who subsequently underwent LBNP to tolerance (onset of presyncopal symptoms. LT subjects experienced presyncopal symptoms prior to completing LBNP of -60 mm Hg, and subjects with high tolerance (HT experienced presyncopal symptoms after completing LBNP after -60 mmHg. Contrary to our hypothesis, resting MSNA burst incidence was not different between LT and HT subjects, and was not related to time to presyncope. BRS was assessed as the slope of the relationship between spontaneous fluctuations in DAP and MSNA during 5 min of supine rest. MSNA burst incidence/DAP correlations were greater than or equal to 0.5 in 37 subjects (LT: n= 9; HT: n=28, and BRS was not different between LT and HT (-1.8 ± 0.3 vs. -2.2 ± 0.2 bursts•(100 beats-1•mmHg-1, p=0.29. We conclude that tolerance to central hypovolemia is not related to either resting MSNA or sympathetic BRS.

  13. The Neural Baroreflex Pathway in Subjects With Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoli, Luca; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Estrugo, Nicolas; Escriou, Guillaume; Ketthab, Hakim; Pruny, Jean-Francois; Castellino, Pietro; Laude, Dominique; Thomas, Frederique; Pannier, Bruno; Jouven, Xavier; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms that link metabolic syndrome (MetS) to increased cardiovascular risk are incompletely understood. We examined whether MetS is associated with the neural baroreflex pathway (NBP) and whether any such associations are independent of blood pressure values. This study involved the cross-sectional analysis of data on 2835 subjects aged 50 to 75 years from the Paris Prospective Study 3. The prevalence of MetS was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart Blood and Lung Institute definition. NBP values were calculated from the fluctuation of the common carotid distension rate and heart rate using fast Fourier transformation and cross-spectral analysis. The prevalence of MetS was 20.1% in men and 10.4% in women. Compared with controls, subjects with MetS (≥3 components), and those at risk for MetS (1–2 components) had lower NBP (−5.3% and −2.3%, respectively) and higher carotid stiffness (+13.5% and +6.8%, respectively). The negative association between MetS components and NBP was confirmed, even after adjustment for age, sex, and carotid stiffness. After stratification for blood pressure (BP) levels, NBP was reduced only in MetS subjects and those at risk with high BP. The NBP was positively associated with carotid stiffness in controls and subjects at risk for MetS. This association was lost in subjects with MetS, regardless of BP levels. Subjects with MetS had reduced NBP values. The role of BP is fundamental in the reduction of NBP. The mechanisms that link carotid stiffness and NBP are inactive in subjects with MetS, independent of BP levels. PMID:26765449

  14. Cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent: insights from repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers and the modified Oxford method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Helen M; Peebles, Karen C; Galletly, Duncan C; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac baroreflex gain is usually quantified as the reflex alteration in heart rate during changes in blood pressure without considering the effect of the rate of change in blood pressure on the estimated gain. This study sought to (i) characterize baroreflex gain as a function of blood pressure oscillation frequencies using a repeat sit-to-stand method and (ii) compare baroreflex gain values obtained using the sit-to-stand method against the modified Oxford method. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent the repeated sit-to-stand method in which blood pressure oscillations were driven at 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1 Hz. Sixteen healthy participants underwent the sit-to-stand and modified Oxford methods to examine their agreement. Sit-to-stand baroreflex gain was highest at 0.05 Hz (8.8 ± 3.2 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and lowest at 0.1 Hz (5.8 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)). Baroreflex gains at 0.03 Hz (7.7 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and 0.07 Hz (7.5 ± 3.3 ms·mm Hg(-1)) were not different from the baroreflex gain at 0.05 Hz. There was moderate correlation between phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from 0.52 to 0.75; all frequencies, p sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from -0.07 to 0.22; all p sit-to-stand gain showed poor agreement and a positive proportional bias. These results show that baroreflex gains derived from these 2 methods cannot be used interchangeably. Furthermore, cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent between 0.03 Hz and 0.1 Hz, which challenges the conventional practice of summarizing baroreflex gain as a single number.

  15. Arterial baroreflex function does not influence telomere length in kidney of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei ZHANG; Rui-fang YANG; Jin WANG; Lei ZHAO; Ling LI; Fu-ming SHEN; Ding-feng SU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the relationship between arterial baroreflex (ABR) function and telomere length in kidney of rats.Methods:Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) and sinoaortic denervated rats (SAD) were used as models with depressed arterial baroreflex.In the first experiments,SHR-SP rats were examined at the age of 24 weeks for both sexes and 40 weeks for female rats. In the second experiments,SAD rats were studied 4 and 35 weeks after SAD operation.Blood pressure was continuously recorded for 4 h in a conscious state. After the determination of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS),the terminal restriction fragment (TRF) of rat kidney was analyzed using Southern blot.Results:The TRF length was found shorter in:a) male SHR-SP compared with age-matched female SHR-SP;b) female SHR-SP 40 weeks of age compared with 24 weeks of age; c) in rats 35 weeks after operation compared with rats 4 weeks post operation in both sham-operated and SAD rats.Conclusion:In SHR-SP,the TRF length did not correlate with BRS.In addition.SAD did not affect TRF length at either 4 or 35 weeks post-surgery.It may be concluded that baroreflex function does not influence the terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length in rats.

  16. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity in alcoholic cirrhosis: relations to hemodynamics and humoral systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, Jens S; Henriksen, Jens H;

    2007-01-01

    In cirrhosis, arterial vasodilatation leads to central hypovolemia and activation of the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems. As the liver disease and circulatory dysfunction may affect baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), we assessed BRS in a large group of patients with cirrh...

  17. Baroreflex Sensitivity And Autonomic Nervous System Function In Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in the elderly may be caused by an apparent hypersensitivity in the high pressure baroreflex control of heart rate and blood pressure - carotid sinus hypersensitivity. Previous studies have found ambiguous results regarding the baroreceptor sensitivity in patients with carotid sinus hyper...... sensitivity may not follow the same neuronal pathways as those responding to the crude external pressures applied during carotid sinus massage...

  18. Important GABAergic mechanism within the NTS and the control of sympathetic baroreflex in SHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo

    2011-01-20

    Inhibitory neurotransmission has an important role in the processing of sensory afferent signals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), particularly in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated neurotransmission within the NTS produces an inhibition of the baroreflex response of splanchnic sympathetic nerve discharge (sSND). In urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated and vagotomized male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats we compared baroreflex-response curves evoked after bilateral injections into the NTS of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline (25pmol/50nl) or the GABA-B antagonist CGP 35348 (5nmol/50nl). Baseline MAP in SHR was higher than the WKY rats (SHR: 153±5, vs. WKY: 112±6mm Hg, pNTS induced a transient (5min) reduction in MAP (∆=-26±4 and -41±6mm Hg, respectively vs. saline ∆=+4±3mmHg, pNTS in WKY rats did not change MAP, sSND and sympathetic baroreflex gain. These data indicate that GABAergic mechanisms within the NTS act tonically reducing sympathetic baroreflex gain in SHR.

  19. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S

    2008-01-01

    Previously we showed that pressor and differential regional sympathoexcitatory responses (adrenal > renal >/= lumbar) evoked by stimulation of A(1) adenosine receptors located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) were attenuated/abolished by baroreceptor denervation or blockade of glutamatergic transmission in the NTS, suggesting A(1) receptor-elicited inhibition of glutamatergic transmission in baroreflex pathways. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits/resets baroreflex responses of preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 65) we compared baroreflex-response curves (iv nitroprusside and phenylephrine) evoked before and after bilateral microinjections into the NTS of A(1) adenosine receptor agonist (N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, CPA; 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl). CPA evoked typical dose-dependent pressor and differential sympathoexcitatory responses and similarly shifted baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA toward higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in a dose-dependent manner; the maximal shifts were 52.6 +/- 2.8, 48.0 +/- 3.6, and 56.8 +/- 6.7 mmHg for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA, respectively. These shifts were not a result of simple baroreceptor resetting because they were two to three times greater than respective increases in baseline MAP evoked by CPA. Baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA were additionally shifted upward: the maximal increases of upper and lower plateaus were 41.8 +/- 16.4% and 45.3 +/- 8.7%, respectively. Maximal gain (%/mmHg) measured before vs. after CPA increased for pre-ASNA (3.0 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.3), decreased for RSNA (4.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.3 +/- 0.3), and remained unaltered for LSNA (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.1). Vehicle control did not alter the baroreflex curves. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits

  20. Prolonged Baroreflex Activation Abolishes Salt-Induced Hypertension After Reductions in Kidney Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Drew A; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex produces sustained reductions in sympathetic activity and arterial pressure and is currently being evaluated for therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. However, patients with significant impairment of renal function have been largely excluded from clinical trials. Thus, there is little information on blood pressure and renal responses to baroreflex activation in subjects with advanced chronic kidney disease, which is common in resistant hypertension. Changes in arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate were determined in 5 dogs after combined unilateral nephrectomy and surgical excision of the poles of the remaining kidney to produce ≈70% reduction in renal mass. After control measurements, sodium intake was increased from ≈45 to 450 mol/d. While maintained on high salt, animals experienced increases in mean arterial pressure from 102±4 to 121±6 mm Hg and glomerular filtration rate from 40±2 to 45±2 mL/min. During 7 days of baroreflex activation, the hypertension induced by high salt was abolished (103±6 mm Hg) along with striking suppression of plasma norepinephrine concentration from 139±21 to 81±9 pg/mL, but despite pronounced blood pressure lowering, there were no significant changes in glomerular filtration rate (43±2 mL/min). All variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. These findings indicate that after appreciable nephron loss, chronic suppression of central sympathetic outflow by baroreflex activation abolishes hypertension induced by high salt intake. The sustained antihypertensive effects of baroreflex activation occur without significantly compromising glomerular filtration rate in remnant nephrons. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Protein malnutrition modifies medullary neuronal recruitment in response to intermittent stimulation of the baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Barbosa, Míriam Carmo; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; de Oliveira, Lisandra Brandino; Silva, Fernanda Cacilda Santos; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Gonçalves Fernandes, Luciano; Chianca, Deoclécio Alves

    2012-11-05

    Protein malnutrition after weaning changes the neurotransmission in neural pathways that organize cardiovascular reflexes in rats. The present study evaluates whether protein malnutrition alters the expression of c-fos protein (immediate-early gene expression) in central areas involved in the control of cardiovascular reflexes after intermittent stimulation of the baroreflex. The main nuclei we focused were paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH); nucleus tract solitarii (NTS); rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM); rostral (RVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM). Male Fisher rats at 28 days were submitted to two different isocaloric diets during the subsequent 35 days: control (CT) (15% protein) and malnourished (MN) (6% protein). thirtymin of intermittent (every 3 min) baroreflex stimulation was performed by infusing phenylephrine (Phe-0.25 mM) or, as control, 0.9% NaCl (Sal). Following ninety minutes, animals were anesthetized and perfused. The removed brains were sectioned (35 μm) and used for c-fos immunohistochemistry. Images were analyzed using the software Leica Q Win. Despite not altering the baseline MAP, malnutrition increased baseline HR and expression of c-fos in RVMM. Increases in c-fos expression after intermittent stimulation of baroreflex were evident in the PVH, medial NTS and CVLM in both dietary protocols. Current data further revealed a differential neuronal recruitment to stimulation of baroreflex in the caudal commissural and rostral NTS and RVLM of MN. We conclude that protein malnutrition modifies the cardiovascular control and the pattern of central response to baroreflex stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin acts in the arcuate nucleus to increase lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex function in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Non‐technical summary  Though the pancreatic hormone insulin is known to act in the brain to increase sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity, its specific site of action had yet to be identified...

  3. The Effects of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine on Baroreflex Sensitivity With or Without Respiratory Acidosis and Alkalosis in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Yukinaga; Dohi, Shuji; Iida, Hiroki; Ishiyama, Tadahiko

    1997-01-01

    ...) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis.We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis...

  4. Effects of Interaction Between Ventricular Assist Device Assistance and Autoregulated Mock Circulation Including Frank-Starling Mechanism and Baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Mahmood, Mohammad Nauzef; Müller, Indra; Turnhoff, Lisa Kathrin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2016-10-01

    A mock heart circulation loop (MHCL) is a hydraulic model simulating the human circulatory system. It allows in vitro investigations of the interaction between cardiac assist devices and the human circulatory system. In this study, a preload sensitive MHCL, the MHCLAUTO , was developed to investigate the interaction between the left ventricle and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The Frank-Starling mechanism was modeled by regulating the stroke volume (SV) based on the measured mean diastolic left atrial pressure (MLAPdiast ). The baroreflex autoregulation mechanism was implemented to maintain a constant mean aortic pressure (MAP) by varying ventricular contractility (Emax ), heart rate (HR), afterload/systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and unstressed venous volume (UVV). The DP3 blood pump (Medos Medizintechnik GmbH) was used to simulate the LVAD. Characteristic parameters were measured in pathological conditions both with and without LVAD to assess the hemodynamic effect of LVAD on the MHCLAUTO . The results obtained from the MHCLAUTO show a high correlation to literature data. The study demonstrates the possibility of using the MHCLAUTO as a research tool to better understand the physiological interactions between cardiac implants and human circulation.

  5. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  6. Blood pressure reduction combining baroreflex restoration for stroke prevention in hypertension in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Song

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure reduction is an important and effective strategy in stroke prevention in hypertensives. Recently, we found that baroreflex restoration was also crucial in stroke prevention. The present work was designed to test the hypothesis that a combination of blood pressure reduction and baroreflex restoration may be a new strategy for stroke prevention. In Experiment 1, the effects of ketanserin (0.3, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg, amlodipine (0.3, 1, 2, 3 mg/kg and their combination (1+0.3, 1+1, 1+2, 1+3 mg/kg on blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP were determined under conscious state. It was found that both amlodipine and ketanserin decreased blood pressure dose-dependently. Ketanserin enfanced BRS from a very small dose but amlodipine enfanced BRS only at largest dose used. At the dose of 1 + 2 mg/kg (ketanserin + amlodipine, the combination possessed the largest synergism on blood pressure reduction. In Experiments 2 and 3, SHR-SP and two-kidney, two-clip (2K2C renovascular hypertensive rats received life-long treatments with ketanserin (1 mg/kg and amlodipine (2 mg/kg or their combination (0.5+1, 1+2, 2+4 mg/kg. The survival time was recorded and the brain lesion was examined. It was found that all kinds of treatments prolonged the survival time of SHR-SP and 2K2C rats. The combination possessed a significantly better effect on stroke prevention than mono-therapies. In conclusion, combination of blood pressure reduction and baroreflex restoration may be a new strategy for the prevention of stroke in hypertension.

  7. Predominant role of neural arc in sympathetic baroreflex resetting of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Kawada, Toru; Shimizu, Shuji; Kamiya, Atsunori; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy over whether neural or peripheral factors are the predominant cause of hypertension. The closed-loop negative feedback operation of the arterial baroreflex hampers understanding of how arterial pressure (AP) is determined through the interaction between neural and peripheral factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: A novel analysis of an isolated open-loop baroreceptor preparation to examine sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) and AP responses to changes in carotid sinus pressure (CSP) in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was conducted. In the neural arc (CSP-SNA relationship), the midpoint pressure (128.9±3.8 vs. 157.9±8.1 mmHg, P<0.001) and the response range of SNA to CSP (90.5±3.7 vs. 115.4±7.6%/mmHg, P=0.011) were higher in SHR. In the peripheral arc (SNA-AP relationship), slope and intercept did not differ. A baroreflex equilibrium diagram was obtained by depicting neural and peripheral arcs in a pressure-SNA plane with rescaled SNA (% in WKY). The operating-point AP (111.3±4.4 vs. 145.9±5.2 mmHg, P<0.001) and SNA (90.8±3.2 vs. 125.1±6.9% in WKY, P<0.001) were shifted towards a higher level in SHR. The shift of the neural arc towards a higher SNA range indicated a predominant contribution to baroreflex resetting in SHR. Notwithstanding the resetting, the carotid sinus baroreflex in SHR preserved an ability to reduce AP if activated with a high enough pressure.

  8. Does the Menstrual Cycle Influence the Sensitivity of Vagally Mediated Baroreflexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    infusion of vasoactive drugs , sug- gesting that cardiac vagal control is not influenced by elevated sympathetic nervous activity associated with the normal... diuretics or exercise training does not alter the carotid–cardiac baroreflex [23,24]. Blood volume fluctuations of the order of 10–15% have been reported...endothelium-dependent responses in canine coronary arteries. Am. J. Physiol. 261, R1022–R1027 26 Shan, J., Resnick, L., Wu, X. and Pang, P. (1994) Vascular

  9. Baroreflex mechanisms and response to exercise in patients with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Nagaharu; Kato, Kazuyo; Munakata, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroko; Kato, Yuko; Aisu, Noriko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Mabuchi, Kousuke; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2012-07-01

    Past reports showed that the baroreflex continuously regulates hemodynamics during exercise. However, it is still clinically unclear. If baroreflex mechanism is able to influence actually exercise cardiovascular control, baroreflex sympathetic and/or parasympathetic function relates to response to exercise. Therefore, we examined the relationship of heat rate changes to both blood pressure increment and decrement with tolerance and chronotropic response to peak exercise in patients with heart disease. In 25 male heart disease patients (60 ± 9 years) without decompensated heart failure, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS ms mmHg(-1) ) was measured by reflex heart rate responses to changes in blood pressure after phenylephrine (P-BRS) and nitroglycerin (N-BRS) injection, respectively. Symptom-limited treadmill exercise test was performed according to Bruce's protocol. (i) The absolute values of blood pressure change after the administrations were similar between the agents because the dosages of nitroglycerin and phenylephrine were set to equalize absolute changes in blood pressure. (ii) In this study population, the ratio of N-BRS to P-BRS was not significantly correlated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. (iii) Exercise capacity (METs) (r= -0.626) and heart rate response to exercise per METs (r=0.670) was significantly related to N-BRS but not to P-BRS. We found that the abnormality of baroreflex function in the presence of blood pressure decrements can lead to insufficient capacity and easy sympathetic activation during exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  10. Shortening baroreflex delay in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients – an unknown effect of β-blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarzynska-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Ochotny, Romuald; Oko-Sarnowska, Zofia; Wachowiak-Baszynska, Hanna; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Gwizdala, Adrian; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired diastolic and systolic function. Abnormal sympathetic–parasympathetic balance is a potential stimulus for left ventricular hypertrophy in HCM patients. β-Blockers are routinely used in HCM for their strong negative inotropic effect; however, these drugs also influence the sympathetic–parasympathetic balance. This study aimed to determine the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic effects of β-blockers in HCM patients treated or untreated with β-blockers. Methods Among 51 HCM outpatients (18–70 years old; 29 men) there were 19 individuals with no medication and 32 subjects treated with a β-blocker. Fourteen age- and gender-matched (23–70 years old; nine men) healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Continuous, non-invasive finger blood pressure was recorded during supine rest for 30 min. Autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system was measured by heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex function (cross-correlation sequence method). Results The mean pulse interval, time domain and spectral measures of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were comparable between HCM patients, treated or not with β-blockers, and the control group. However, the delay of the baroreflex was significantly longer in HCM patients who were not treated with β-blockers [2.0 (1.6–2.3) s] in comparison with HCM patients receiving β-blockers [1.4 (1.1–1.8) s; P = 0.0072] or control subjects [1.2 (0.8–1.8) s; P = 0.0025]. This delay did not differ between HCM patients treated with β-blockers and the control group. Conclusions Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not treated with β-blockers is accompanied by prolonged baroreflex delay. The use of β-blockers normalizes this delay. PMID:23126403

  11. Is baroreflex control of sympathetic activity and heart rate active in the preterm fetal sheep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2009-03-01

    The arterial baroreflex is a fundamental reflex that buffers rapid changes in arterial blood pressure (BP) via regulation of the heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity to the vasculature. In adults a sigmoidal relationship between BP and both heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity is well documented. Its role in blood pressure control before birth is unclear. Preterm babies have a high incidence of low BP, especially in the first few days of life, which could be related, in part, to immaturity of the baroreflex. In the present study, we investigated the baroreflex control of fetal heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in preterm fetal sheep in utero (102 +/- 1 days of gestation; term 140 days). Phenylephrine was associated with a significant increase in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 58 +/- 3 mmHg and a decrease in heart rate (HR) from 177 +/- 4 to 116 +/- 8 beats per minute (bpm). Sodium nitroprusside was associated with a significant fall in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 26 +/- 1 mmHg and an increase in HR from 182 +/- 4 to 274 +/- 8 bpm. However, the time between the 50% changes in BP and HR was significantly greater after hypotension than hypertension (31 +/- 8 s vs. 14 +/- 5 s, P < 0.05). No significant changes in RSNA occurred with either stimulus. This suggests that there are different maturational tempos for the components of the central autonomic response to altered blood pressure.

  12. Baroreflex sensitivity as a determinant of responses to hydralazine in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H

    1983-01-01

    In order to evaluate the relation between hypotension induced by hydralazine and the resultant reflex tachycardia, as well as the role of baroreflex sensitivity in determining the magnitude of these responses, the drug was administered orally at a dose of 1 mg/kg to a group of trained conscious normotensive and renal hypertensive dogs. Responses were assessed by measuring blood pressure and heart rate for 8 hr after dosing and integrating the changes observed over time in order to obtain a mean value. Baroreflex gain was calculated as the ratio of heart rate to blood pressure responses. Hypotension was greater in hypertensives, whereas tachycardia was not different between groups. Gain was therefore smaller in hypertensives, but not uniformly so, a portion of these animals having values within the normotensive range. This high gain group responded with less hypotension and more tachycardia than did the low gain group. Differences in pressure and rate responses to repeated administration of hydralazine between the two groups were minimal. It is suggested that baroreflex gain, an innate individual characteristic, is an important determinant of acute pressure responses to hydralazine in dogs, hypertensive animals having less gain than normotensives and showing increased hypotensive responses. Gain appears not to be as important in determining the chronic effects of the drug.

  13. Influence of baroreflex on volume elasticity of heart and aorta in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, T; Seeliger, E; Persson, P B; Harnath, A; Flemming, B

    2002-03-01

    Optimal ventriculoaortic coupling includes tuning of elastic properties. The ratio of effective arterial elastance and left ventricular endsystolic elastance is often taken as a measure for mechanical and energetical efficiency. The present study determined the time course of ventricular and aortic volume elasticity (VE = dp/dV) throughout a complete heartbeat. This was achieved by using changes of eigenfrequency of two catheter-transducer systems under closed chest conditions in rabbits. Short-term VE modulation was studied by a baroreflex response, as induced by pressure changes applied to the carotid sinus. Long-term changes were studied in atherosclerotic rabbits (12 wk of high-cholesterol feeding). The time course and mean values of ventricular and aortic VE were changed by the baroreflex stimulus. Cholesterol feeding diminished the response. The degree of ventriculoaortic coupling, as quantified by VE(Aorta)/VE(Ventricle) ratio, varied during a single ejection period. The large span allows either maximal energetical efficiency or maximal stroke work. Although normal rabbits adjusted their ventriculoaortic coupling during baroreflex input, the cholesterol-fed rabbits failed to do so.

  14. Exercise training fails to modify arterial baroreflex sensitivity in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Naoyoshi; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Nagasaka, Makoto; Ito, Osamu; Ogawa, Mika; Kurosawa, Hajime; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    In men, exercise training attenuates age-related reduction in baroreflex sensitivity, which is related to cardiovascular health. It is unknown, however, if this holds true for post-menopausal women. We examined the effects of exercise training on baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex sensitivity in ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SO) Wistar-Kyoto rats. At the age of 8 weeks, OVX and SO rats were assigned to either sedentary or exercise-trained group. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 days per week. At the age of 20 weeks, baroreflex sensitivity in response to increases in blood pressure (BRSinc) and decreases in blood pressure (BRSdec) were evaluated by injections of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Both BRSinc and BRSdec were significantly reduced in sedentary OVX rats compared with sedentary SO rats. Exercise training decreased resting HR and BRSdec, but had no effect on BRSinc in SO rats. In OVX rats, exercise training decreased resting HR but modified neither BRSdec nor BRSinc. We conclude that withdrawal of female sex hormones in normotensive female rats is associated with reduced baroreflex sensitivity in response to both increase and decrease in blood pressure and that exercise training fails to modulate the decline of BRSinc associated with withdrawal of female sex hormones. To maintain high level of BRSinc in post-menopausal women, hormone replacement therapy may be needed.

  15. Baroreflex deficit blunts exercise training-induced cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, I C; De La Fuente, R N; Mostarda, C; Rosa, K; Flues, K; Damaceno-Rodrigues, N R; Caldini, E G; De Angelis, K; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2010-03-01

    1. Baroreceptors regulate moment-to-moment blood pressure (BP) variations, but their long-term effect on the cardiovascular system remains unclear. Baroreceptor deficit accompanying hypertension contributes to increased BP variability (BPV) and sympathetic activity, whereas exercise training has been associated with an improvement in these baroreflex-mediated changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic, haemodynamic and cardiac morphofunctional effects of long-term sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in trained and sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Rats were subjected to SAD or sham surgery and were then further divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill (five times per week, 50-70% maximal running speed). All groups were studied after 10 weeks. 3. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation in SHR had no effect on basal heart rate (HR) or BP, but did augment BPV, impairing the cardiac function associated with increased cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition. Exercise training reduced BP and HR, re-established baroreflex sensitivity and improved both HR variability and BPV. However, SAD in trained SHR blunted all these improvements. Moreover, the systolic and diastolic hypertensive dysfunction, reduced left ventricular chamber diameter and increased cardiac collagen deposition seen in SHR were improved after the training protocol. These benefits were attenuated in trained SAD SHR. 4. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that the arterial baroreflex mediates cardiac disturbances associated with hypertension and is crucial for the beneficial cardiovascular morphofunctional and autonomic adaptations induced by chronic exercise in hypertension.

  16. Baroreflex function: determinants in healthy subjects and disturbances in diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrapari, Ioanna; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Arterial baroreceptors play an important role in the short-term regulation of arterial pressure, by reflex chronotropic effect on the heart and by reflex regulation of sympathetic outflow. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) represents an index of arterial baroreceptors function. Several methods of measuring BRS are available nowadays. Different factors influence BRS in the healthy population, including sex, age, blood pressure, heart rate, body fatness, arterial stiffness, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as physical activity. Baroreceptors dysfunction is evident in diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The underlying mechanism of BRS attenuation in diabetes or obesity is not yet well known; however, there is increasing evidence that it is at least partly related to autonomic nervous system dysfunction and particularly to sympathetic overactivity that accompanies these diseases. Blunted BRS provides prognostic information for cardiovascular diseases and possibly for diabetes, while its' prognostic information for obesity is not yet established. This review deals with the mechanisms affecting baroreflex function, the newer techniques of BRS estimation and the most recent insights of baroreflex function in the healthy population and in various diseases with emphasis on diabetes and obesity. In addition, the clinical implication of a reduced BRS in these disorders is discussed.

  17. Ovarian hormone deprivation reduces oxytocin expression in Paraventricular Nucleus preautonomic neurons and correlates with baroreflex impairment in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Ulisses De Melo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension increases dramatically in women after menopause, however the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Oxytocinergic (OTergic neurons are largely present within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN. Several studies have shown that OTergic drive from PVN to brainstem increases baroreflex sensitivity and improves autonomic control of the circulation. Since preautonomic PVN neurons express different types of estrogen receptors, we hypothesize that ovarian hormone deprivation causes baroreflex impairment, autonomic imbalance and hypertension by negatively impacting OTergic drive and oxytocin levels in pre-autonomic neurons. Here, we assessed oxytocin gene and protein expression (qPCR and immunohistochemistry within PVN subnuclei in sham-operated and ovariectomized Wistar rats. Conscious hemodynamic recordings were used to assess resting blood pressure and heart rate and the autonomic modulation of heart and vessels was estimated by power spectral analysis. We observed that the ovarian hormone deprivation in ovariectomized rats decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased sympathetic and reduced vagal outflows to the heart and augmented the resting blood pressure. Of note, ovariectomized rats had reduced PVN oxytocin mRNA and protein expression in all pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei. Furthermore, reduced PVN oxytocin protein levels were positively correlated with decreased baroreflex sensitivity and negatively correlated with increased LF/HF ratio. These findings suggest that reduced oxytocin expression in OTergic neurons of the PVN contributes to the baroreflex dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation observed with ovarian hormone deprivation.

  18. Mental stress-induced increase in blood pressure is not related to baroreflex sensitivity in middle-aged healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, J P; Cerutti, C; Quelin, P; Laville, M; Gustin, M P; Paultre, C Z; Ducher, M

    2000-04-01

    The baroreflex that acts to blunt blood pressure (BP) variations through opposite variations in heart rate should limit the BP increase produced by an emotional challenge. However, relations between baroreflex sensitivity and BP reactivity induced by a psychological stress in a large group of adults have never been firmly established. In 280 healthy men, rest (10 minutes) and stress (5 minutes) BP and heart rate were recorded beat to beat by a blood pressure monitor. The mental stress was elicited by a well-standardized computerized version of a word color conflict stress test (Stroop Color Test). Rest and stress baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by the cross-spectral analysis of BP and heart rate and by the sequence method. The stress-induced increase in systolic BP (22.4+/-0.1 mm Hg) was not correlated with resting baroreflex sensitivity but was slightly correlated (r=0.2, P<0.001) with BP variability assessed either by standard deviation or by mid-frequency band spectral power. Our results suggested that a centrally mediated sympathetic stimulation overcame cardiac autonomic regulation and emphasized the role of the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the pressure response at the onset of the stressing stimulation. During the sustained sympathoexcitatory phase, the cardiac baroreflex blunts BP variations but at a lower sensitivity.

  19. Ovarian Hormone Deprivation Reduces Oxytocin Expression in Paraventricular Nucleus Preautonomic Neurons and Correlates with Baroreflex Impairment in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Vitor U.; Saldanha, Rayssa R. M.; Dos Santos, Carla R.; De Campos Cruz, Josiane; Lira, Vitor A.; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Michelini, Lisete C.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension increases dramatically in women after menopause, however the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Oxytocinergic (OTergic) neurons are largely present within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Several studies have shown that OTergic drive from PVN to brainstem increases baroreflex sensitivity and improves autonomic control of the circulation. Since preautonomic PVN neurons express different types of estrogen receptors, we hypothesize that ovarian hormone deprivation causes baroreflex impairment, autonomic imbalance and hypertension by negatively impacting OTergic drive and oxytocin levels in pre-autonomic neurons. Here, we assessed oxytocin gene and protein expression (qPCR and immunohistochemistry) within PVN subnuclei in sham-operated and ovariectomized Wistar rats. Conscious hemodynamic recordings were used to assess resting blood pressure and heart rate and the autonomic modulation of heart and vessels was estimated by power spectral analysis. We observed that the ovarian hormone deprivation in ovariectomized rats decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased sympathetic and reduced vagal outflows to the heart and augmented the resting blood pressure. Of note, ovariectomized rats had reduced PVN oxytocin mRNA and protein expression in all pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei. Furthermore, reduced PVN oxytocin protein levels were positively correlated with decreased baroreflex sensitivity and negatively correlated with increased LF/HF ratio. These findings suggest that reduced oxytocin expression in OTergic neurons of the PVN contributes to the baroreflex dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation observed with ovarian hormone deprivation.

  20. Antihypertensive effect of Carica papaya via a reduction in ACE activity and improved baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Girlandia Alexandre; Ronchi, Silas Nascimento; do Nascimento, Andrews Marques; de Lima, Ewelyne Miranda; Romão, Wanderson; da Costa, Helber Barcellos; Scherer, Rodrigo; Ventura, José Aires; Lenz, Dominik; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of the standardised methanolic extract of Carica papaya, its angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory effects in vivo, its effect on the baroreflex and serum angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and its chemical composition. The chemical composition of the methanolic extract of C. papaya was evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass/mass and mass/mass spectrometry. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory effect was evaluated in vivo by Ang I administration. The antihypertensive assay was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar rats that were treated with enalapril (10 mg/kg), the methanolic extract of C. papaya (100 mg/kg; twice a day), or vehicle for 30 days. The baroreflex was evaluated through the use of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Angiotensin converting enzyme activity was measured by ELISA, and cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by morphometric analysis. The methanolic extract of C. papaya was standardised in ferulic acid (203.41 ± 0.02 µg/g), caffeic acid (172.60 ± 0.02 µg/g), gallic acid (145.70 ± 0.02 µg/g), and quercetin (47.11 ± 0.03 µg/g). The flavonoids quercetin, rutin, nicotiflorin, clitorin, and manghaslin were identified in a fraction of the extract. The methanolic extract of C. papaya elicited angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activity. The antihypertensive effects elicited by the methanolic extract of C. papaya were similar to those of enalapril, and the baroreflex sensitivity was normalised in treated spontaneously hypertensive rats. Plasma angiotensin converting enzyme activity and cardiac hypertrophy were also reduced to levels comparable to the enalapril-treated group. These results may be associated with the chemical composition of the methanolic extract of C. papaya, and are the first step into the development of a new phytotherapic product which could be used in the treatment of hypertension.

  1. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity and pulmonary dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhosis: effect of hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, J.S.; Krag, A.

    2010-01-01

    matched controls underwent hemodynamic and pulmonary investigations. BRS was assessed by cross-spectral analysis of variabilities between blood pressure and heart rate time series. A 100% oxygen test was performed with the assessment of arterial oxygen tensions (Pa(O(2))) and alveolar-arterial oxygen......Patients with cirrhosis exhibit impaired regulation of the arterial blood pressure, reduced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and prolonged QT interval. In addition, a considerable number of patients have a pulmonary dysfunction with hypoxemia, impaired lung diffusing capacity (Dl(CO)), and presence...

  2. The gain of the baroreflex bradycardia is reduced by microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the nucleus tractus solitarii of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigero, M; Bonagamba, L G; Machado, B H

    2000-02-14

    The baroreflex activation with phenylephrine infusion produces a bradycardic response. In the present study, the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the processing of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex was evaluated using acid phosphonivaleric (AP-5), a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. Baroreflex activation was performed before and after bilateral microinjection of AP-5 into the intermediate commissural NTS (0.5 mm lateral to the midline). Microinjection of the vehicle (saline, 0.9%) or a dose of 2 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 into the NTS produced no effect on the gain of the baroreflex while a dose of 10 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 produced a significant reduction in the gain of the baroreflex 2 min after microinjection [-1.43+/-0.22 vs. -0. 43+/-0.03 bpm/mmHg, (n=6)], with a return to control levels 10 min after the microinjections. The dose of 10 nmol/50 nl was selective for NMDA receptors considering that the cardiovascular responses to microinjection of AMPA (0.05 pmol/50 nl), a non-NMDA receptor agonist, were not affected by this dose of AP-5 and the responses to microinjection of NMDA (2 nmol/50 nl) were blocked. The data show that the bradycardic response to baroreflex activation was blocked by AP-5 microinjected into the NTS, indicating that the neurotransmission of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex is mediated by NMDA receptors in the NTS.

  3. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure: Novel Findings and Future Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Brambilla, GianMaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Seravalle, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Congestive heart failure is characterized by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic abnormalities, the latter including an activation of the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral circulation coupled with an impairment of baroreceptor control of autonomic function. Evidence has been provided that both these alterations are hallmark features of the disease with a specific relevance for the disease progression as well as for the development of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a number of studies have documented in heart failure the adverse prognostic role of the sympathetic and baroreflex alterations, which both are regarded as major independent determinants of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This represents the pathophysiological and clinical background for the use of carotid baroreceptor activation therapy in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Promising data collected in experimental animal models of heart failure have supported the recent performance of pilot small-scale clinical studies, aimed at providing initial information in this area. The results of these studies demonstrated the clinical safety and efficacy of the intervention which has been tested in large-scale clinical studies. The present paper will critically review the background and main results of the published studies designed at defining the clinical impact of baroreflex activation therapy in congestive heart failure patients. Emphasis will be given to the strengths and limitations of such studies, which represent the background for the ongoing clinical trials testing the long-term effects of the device in heart failure patients.

  4. Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improve baroreflex function in stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-juan MA; Fu-ming SHEN; Ai-jun LIU; Ke-yong SHI; Ying-liang WU; Ding-feng SU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin on arterial baroreflex (ABR) function in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) and the possible mechanisms involved.Methods: Eighty-one SHR-SP were divided into 7 groups. Four groups weredesignated for the intragastric (ig) administration of clonidine (1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg), moxonidine (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg), folic acid (1.0 mg/kg), and mecobalamin(1.0 mg/kg). Three groups were for the intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of clonidine (4 μg/4 μL), moxonidine (5 μg/4 μL), and mecobalamin (20 μg/4 μL).Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in the conscious state for 30 min and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined respectively before and after drug administration. Results: Clonidine and moxonidine significantly decreased BP,prolonged the heart period (HP), and increased BRS when administered as either ig or icv injections. Both BP and HP were unchanged by ig folic acid or mecobalamin injection. However, BRS was significantly increased by both.Conclusion: Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improved impaired ABR function in SHR-SP. The central mechanism was involved in this effect of either clonidine or moxonidine. Mecobalamin improved ABR function through the peripheral mechanism.

  5. On the integration of the baroreflex control mechanism in a heterogeneous model of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, P J; Trenhago, P R; Fernandes, L G; Feijóo, R A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe the integration of a mathematical model for the baroreceptor reflex mechanism to provide regulatory action into a dimensionally heterogeneous (3D-1D-0D) closed-loop model of the cardiovascular system. Such heterogeneous model comprises a 1D description of the arterial tree, a 0D network for the venous, cardiac and pulmonary circulations and 3D patient-specific geometries for vascular districts of interest. Thus, the detailed topological description of the arterial network allows us to perform vasomotor control actions in a differentiated way, while gaining insight about the effects of the baroreflex regulation over hemodynamic quantities of interest throughout the entire network. Two examples of application are presented. Firstly, we simulate the hemorrhage in the abdominal aorta artery and analyze the action of the baroreflex over the system. Secondly, the self-regulated closed-loop model is applied to study the influence of the control action in the hemodynamic environment that determines the blood flow pattern in a cerebral aneurism in the presence of a regurgitating aortic valve.

  6. 17beta-estradiol modulates baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic tone of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J

    2000-05-12

    The following experiments examine the role of estrogen as a central modulator of autonomic tone and baroreflex sensitivity in the female rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and then supplemented daily for 7 days with a fixed dose of estrogen (5 microg/kg; sc) to produce a stable level of estrogen similar to that present at proestrous (17 pg/ml). The rats were then anaesthetized with sodium thiobutabarbital (100 mg/kg) and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate and both vagal and renal efferent nerve activities. The sensitivity of the cardiac baroreflex was tested using intravenous injection of multiple doses of either phenylephrine hydrochloride or sodium nitroprusside. Estrogen-supplemented female rats exhibited a significantly enhanced BRS as compared to male rats from a previous study (0.78 vs. 0.5). Furthermore, bolus injection of estrogen (1x10(-2) mg/kg; iv) in estrogen-supplemented female rats produced a significant increase in vagal nerve activity and a significant decrease in renal nerve activity which together resulted in a further enhancement of the BRS (0.78 vs. 2.4). Injection of the selective estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, into nucleus ambiguus and the intrathecal space of the spinal cord blocked the respective changes in parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activities indicating that intravenously administered estrogen modulates baseline autonomic tone via the activation of central estrogen receptors.

  7. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity and the risks of new-onset ambulatory hypertension, in an elderly population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauphinot, Virginie; Kossovsky, Michel P.; Gueyffier, Francois; Pichot, Vincent; Gosse, Philippe; Roche, Frederic; Barthelemy, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    / Background: Impairment of the autonomic nervous system activity may be involved in the development of hypertension. Yet the prognostic values of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in the risk of new-onset ambulatory hypertension have not been investigated. We sought to assess the re

  8. Renal responses to long-term carotid baroreflex activation therapy in patients with drug-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnima, Teba; de Leeuw, Peter W; Tan, Frans E S; Kroon, Abraham A

    2013-06-01

    Carotid baroreflex activation has been demonstrated to provide enduring reductions in arterial blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term therapy on renal function. A total of 322 patients were enrolled in the Rheos Pivotal Trial. Group 1 consisted of 236 patients who started baroreflex activation therapy 1 month after device implantation, whereas in the 86 patients from group 2 the device was activated 6 months later. Serum creatinine and urine albumin/creatinine ratio were collected at screening (before device activation), and at months 6 and 12. Multilevel statistical analyses were adjusted for various covariables. Serum creatinine increased from 78 to 84 μmol/L, and glomerular filtration rate decreased from 92 to 87 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) in group 1 at month 6 (Pblood pressure reduction seemed to be significantly related to the change in glomerular filtration rate in both groups. Albumin/creatinine ratio did not change in both groups during follow-up. In conclusion, baroreflex activation therapy in hypertensive patients is associated with an initial mild decrease in glomerular filtration rate, which may be considered as a normal hemodynamic response to the drop in blood pressure. Long-term treatment does not result in further decrease in renal function, indicating baroreflex activation as a safe and effective therapy.

  9. Resting Sympathetic Baroreflex Sensitivity in Subjects with Low and High Tolerance to Central Hypovolemia Induced by Lower Body Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    stress independent of baroreflex control. DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors, and are not to be...is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publica - tion in this journal is cited, in accordance with

  10. Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Lehnig, Luca-Yves; Schroer, Charlotte; Lüders, Stephan; Böhning, Enrico; Müller, Gerhard A; Wachter, Rolf; Koziolek, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) has been demonstrated to decrease office blood pressure (BP) in the randomized, double-blind Rheos trial. There are limited data on 24-hour BP changes measured by ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) using the first generation rheos BAT system suggesting a significant reduction but there are no information about the effect of the currently used, unilateral BAT neo device on ABPM. Patients treated with the BAT neo device for uncontrolled resistant hypertension were prospectively included into this study. ABPM was performed before BAT implantation and 6 months after initiation of BAT. A total of 51 patients were included into this study, 7 dropped out from analysis because of missing or insufficient follow-up. After 6 months, 24-hour ambulatory systolic (from 148 ± 17 mm Hg to 140 ± 23 mm Hg, Phypertension. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate BAT effects on ABPM in patients with resistant hypertension accurately.

  11. Haemodynamic instability during thyroid surgery: a baroreflex-mediated neurogenic phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraei, S A R; Davies, M R; Obholzer, R; Sandhu, G S; Porter, F

    2006-03-01

    We present a case of marked intra-operative blood pressure instability in a euthyroid, fit 33-year-old female undergoing elective hemithyroidectomy. This led to significant haemodynamic compromise, cardiac failure and end-organ damage. There was no evidence of a vasoactive endocrine cause, and the nature and timing of the event strongly pointed towards baroreflex-mediated neurogenic sympathetic dysfunction. This can occur during carotid surgery and neck dissection. Although haemodynamic fluctuations may happen during thyroid surgery, their severity in this case was unusual. We believe this could have been a rebound phenomenon in response to acute decompression of the carotid artery which had been compressed by an enlarging cyst. We suggest that in similar cases blockade of the carotid sinus could attenuate such responses.

  12. Categorization of the hemodynamic response to hemodialysis: the importance of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; Fialova, Jana; Chan, Cian; McIntyre, Chris W

    2010-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and regulates blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) to the pathophysiology of IDH. Thirty-four chronic HD (12 IDH-prone, 22 IDH-resistant) patients underwent BRS measurement during HD with relative blood volume monitoring. During analysis, patients were separated into four age-matched groups according to resting BRS>or=4.5 ms/mmHg and hemodynamic stability. Resting BRS was extremely heterogenous (geometric mean BRS 5.78+/-1.41 [range 1.76-41.41] ms/mmHg). Relative blood volume reduction was well matched in all groups (mean reduction in relative blood volume for all patients -6.74%+/-0.86%, P>0.05). Thirty-seven episodes of IDH occurred in the IDH prone, reduced BRS group. Patients with impaired resting BRS and prone to IDH had markedly different responses to HD as compared to the preserved BRS group, but the total peripheral resistance response was significantly lower than in the IDH-resistant patients (15.9%+/-2.1% vs. 42.4%+/-3.0%, respectively, P<0.001). In those patients prone to IDH and with impaired resting BRS, percentage reduction in cardiac output at the end of HD highly correlated with reduction in relative blood volume (r=0.94, P=0.006). Hypotension during dialysis may be an important source of recurrent cardiac injury and early recognition of those patients prone to relative symptomatic and asymptomatic hypotension remains important. Impaired resting BRS and recognition of a suboptimal peripheral pressor response, appear to predict those patients most likely to undergo hemodynamic instability and may assist in the pursuit of this elusive goal.

  13. Left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses to ketamine and TEE in chronically instrumented monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S. C.; Ludwig, D. A.; Reister, C.; Fanton, J. W.; Ewert, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of prescribed doses of ketamine five minutes after application and influences of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses were investigated to test the hypothesis that ketamine and/or TEE probe insertion alter cardiovascular function. Seven rhesus monkeys were tested under each of four randomly selected experimental conditions: (1) intravenous bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 ml), (2) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min), (3) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min) with TEE, and (4) control (no ketamine or TEE). Monkeys were chronically instrumented with a high fidelity, dual-sensor micromanometer to measure left ventricular and aortic pressure and a transit-time ultrasound probe to measure aortic flow. These measures were used to calculate left ventricular function. A 4-element Windkessel lumped-parameter model was used to estimate total peripheral resistance and systemic arterial compliance. Baroreflex response was calculated as the change in R-R interval divided by the change in mean aortic pressure measured during administration of graded concentrations of nitroprusside. The results indicated that five minutes after ketamine application heart rate and left ventricular diastolic compliance decreased while TEE increased aortic systolic and diastolic pressure. We conclude that ketamine may be administered as either a bolus or continuous infusion without affecting cardiovascular function 5 minutes after application while the insertion of a TEE probe will increase aortic pressure. The results for both ketamine and TEE illustrate the classic "Hawthorne Effect," where the observed values are partly a function of the measurement process. Measures of aortic pressure, heart rate, and left ventricular diastolic pressure should be viewed as relative, as opposed to absolute, when organisms are sedated with ketamine or instrumented with a TEE probe.

  14. Aortic depressor nerve stimulation does not impede dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex in normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Turner, Michael J; Shimizu, Shuji; Fukumitsu, Masafumi; Kamiya, Atsunori; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2017-03-08

    Recent clinical trials in patients with drug-resistant hypertension indicate that electrical activation of the carotid sinus baroreflex (baroreflex activation therapy) can reduce arterial pressure (AP) for more than a year. To examine whether the electrical stimulation from one baroreflex system impedes normal short-term AP regulation via another unstimulated baroreflex system, we electrically stimulated the left aortic depressor nerve (ADN) while estimating the dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY, n=8) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=7). Isolated carotid sinus regions were perturbed for 20 min using a Gaussian white noise signal with a mean of 120 mmHg for WKY and 160 mmHg for SHR. Tonic ADN stimulation (2 Hz, 10 V, 0.1-ms pulse width) decreased mean sympathetic nerve activity (73.4±14.0 vs. 51.6±11.3 arbitrary units in WKY, P = 0.012; and 248.7±33.9 vs. 181.1±16.6 arbitrary units in SHR, P = 0.018) and mean AP (90.8±6.6 vs. 81.2±5.4 mmHg in WKY, P=0.004; and 128.6±9.8 vs. 114.7±10.3 mmHg in SHR, P = 0.009). The slope of dynamic gain in the neural arc transfer function from carotid sinus pressure to sympathetic nerve activity was not different between trials with and without the ADN stimulation (12.55±0.93 vs. 13.03±1.28 dB/decade in WKY, P = 0.542; and 17.37±1.01 vs. 17.47±1.64 dB/decade in SHR, P = 0.946). These results indicate that the tonic ADN stimulation does not significantly modify the dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex.

  15. Baroreflex control of heart rate in man awake and during enflurane and enflurane--nitrous oxide anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, M; Duke, P C; Ong, B

    1980-03-01

    Baroreflex control of heart rate was assessed by means of a pressor test in two groups of subjects while awake and at two levels of anesthesia with enflurane (Group I) and enflurane-nitrous oxide (Group II). In the awake control situation, calculated mean slopes (+/- SD) were 23 +/- 8 (Group I) and 25 +/- 11 (Group II). There was no significant difference between the groups. During enflurane anesthesia (Group I) mean slopes were significantly depressed to 5 +/- 5 at 1 MAC and 6 +/- 6 at 0.8 MAC. During enflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia (Group II), slopes were significantly depressed to 5 +/- 3 at 1 MAC and 6 +/- 4 at 0.9 MAC. There was no significant difference between the extents of depression in the two groups. It is concluded that both enflurane anesthesia and enflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia at 1 MAC produce significant depression of baroreflex control of heart rate in man.

  16. The low frequency power of heart rate variability is neither a measure of cardiac sympathetic tone nor of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Davide; Silvani, Alessandro; McAllen, Robin M; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    The lack of noninvasive approaches to measure cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) has driven the development of indirect estimates such as the low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability (HRV). Recently, it has been suggested that LF HRV can be used to estimate the baroreflex modulation of heart period (HP) rather than cardiac sympathetic tone. To test this hypothesis, we measured CSNA, HP, blood pressure (BP), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) of HP, estimated with the modified Oxford technique, in conscious sheep with pacing-induced heart failure and in healthy control sheep. We found that CSNA was higher and systolic BP and HP were lower in sheep with heart failure than in control sheep. Cross-correlation analysis showed that in each group, the beat-to-beat changes in HP correlated with those in CSNA and in BP, but LF HRV did not correlate significantly with either CSNA or BRS. However, when control sheep and sheep with heart failure were considered together, CSNA correlated negatively with HP and BRS. There was also a negative correlation between CSNA and BRS in control sheep when considered alone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in conscious sheep, LF HRV is neither a robust index of CSNA nor of BRS and is outperformed by HP and BRS in tracking CSNA. These results do not support the use of LF HRV as a noninvasive estimate of either CSNA or baroreflex function, but they highlight a link between CSNA and BRS.

  17. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats

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    Moisés Felipe Pereira Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP; however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. Objective: To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Method: Rats SHR (n = 16 and Wistar (n = 16 at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8; trained control (CT, n = 8; sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8 and trained SHR (HT, n = 8. Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks. Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm. Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP.

  18. Resetting of the carotid arterial baroreflex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norton, K H; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Andersen, Line Strange

    1999-01-01

    alone was performed at 50 and 75% VO(2 max), and L exercise combined with arm (A) exercise (L + A) was performed at 75 and 100% VO(2 max). O(2) consumption and heart rate (HR) increased in direct relation with the increases in exercise intensity. The threshold and saturation pressures of the carotid.......07). Similar changes were observed for the carotid-vasomotor reflex. In addition, as exercise intensity increased, the operating point (the prestimulus blood pressure) of the CBR was significantly relocated further from the centering point (G(max)) of the stimulus-response curve and was at threshold during 100......% VO(2 max). These findings identify the continuous classic rightward and upward resetting of the CBR, without a change in G(max), during increases in dynamic exercise intensity to maximal effort....

  19. Influence of fluvastatin on cardiac function and baroreflex sensitivity in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang XIE; Chao SUN; Li-hua SUN; Jing-yuan LI; Xin CHEN; Hui CHE; Guan-yi LU; Bao-feng YANG; Jing AI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether fluvastatin is able to ameliorate the impaired cardiac function or baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in rats with type 1 diabetes.Methods: Type 1 diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and then administered fluvastatin (1.5,cardiac function and BRS were measured in diabetic rats after fluvastatin treatment for 30 d.Results: The polydipsia, polyphagia and abnormal biochemical indexes of blood were significantly ameliorated by the the 3.0- and 6.0-mg doses of fluvastatin in STZ-induced diabetic rats. FBG was decreased in diabetic rats after fluvastatin treatment for 30 d. The left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and the maximum rate of change of left ventricular pressure in the isovolumic contraction and relaxation period (±dp/dtmax) were elevated, and left ventricular diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was decreased by fluvastatin. The attenuated heart rate responses to arterial blood pressure (ABP) increase induced by phenylephrine (PE) and ABP decrease induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were reversed by the 3.0-mg dose of fluvastatin.Conclusion: Fluvastatin regulates blood lipid levels and decreases the FBG level in diabetic rats. These responses can protect the diabetic heart from complications by improving cardiac function and BRS.

  20. Baroreflexes of the rat. IV. ADN-evoked responses at the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaorui; Dworkin, Barry R

    2007-12-01

    In a long-term (7-21 days) neuromuscular blocked (NMB) rat preparation, using precise single-pulse aortic depressor nerve (ADN) stimulation and stable chronic evoked response (ER) recordings from the dorsal-medial solitary nucleus (dmNTS), two different response patterns were observed: continuous and discrete. For the continuous pattern, activity began approximately 3 ms after the stimulus and persisted for 45 ms; for the discrete pattern, two complexes were separated by a gap from approximately 17 to 25 ms. The early complex was probably transmitted via A-fibers: it had a low stimulus current threshold and an average conduction velocity (CV) of 0.58-5.5 m/s; the high threshold late (HTL) complex had a CV = 0.26-0.58 m/s. The average stimulus amplitude-ER magnitude transduction curves for the A and HTL complexes were sigmoidal. For individual rats, in the linear range, mean r2 = 0.96 +/- 0.03 for both complexes. The average stimulus amplitude vs. the systolic blood pressure change (delta sBP) transduction curve was also approximately linear; however, for individual rats, the relationship was not consistently reliable: mean r2 = 0.48 +/- 0.19. Approximately 90% of recording sites had respiratory, and 50% had cardiac synchronism. The NMB preparation is useful for studying central baroreflex mechanisms that operate on time scales of days or weeks, such as adaptation and other kinds of neural plasticity.

  1. Alterations in the Medullary Endocannabinoid System Contribute to Age-related Impairment of Baroreflex Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaich, Chris L; Shaltout, Hossam A; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F; Gallagher, Patricia E; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2015-05-01

    As they age, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats develop elevated systolic blood pressure associated with impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate. We previously demonstrated in young hypertensive (mRen2)27 rats that impaired BRS is restored by CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade in the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), consistent with elevated content of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in dorsal medulla relative to normotensive SD rats. There is no effect of CB1 receptor blockade in young SD rats. We now report in older SD rats that dorsal medullary 2-AG levels are 2-fold higher at 70 versus 15 weeks of age (4.22 ± 0.61 vs. 1.93 ± 0.22 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.05). Furthermore, relative expression of CB1 receptor messenger RNA is significantly lower in aged rats, whereas CB2 receptor messenger RNA is significantly higher. In contrast to young adult SD rats, microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmole) into the NTS of older SD rats normalized BRS in animals exhibiting impaired baseline BRS (0.56 ± 0.06 baseline vs. 1.06 ± 0.05 ms/mm Hg after 60 minutes; P < 0.05). Therefore, this study provides evidence for alterations in the endocannabinoid system within the NTS of older SD rats that contribute to age-related impairment of BRS.

  2. Baroreflex Sensitivity and its Association with Arrhythmic Events in Chagas Disease

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    Astrid Meireles Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sudden death is the leading cause of death in Chagas disease (CD, even in patients with preserved ejection fraction (EF, suggesting that destabilizing factors of the arrhythmogenic substrate (autonomic modulation contribute to its occurrence. Objective: To determine baroreflex sensitivity (BRS in patients with undetermined CD (GI, arrhythmogenic CD with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT (GII and CD with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia (STV (GIII, to evaluate its association with the occurrence and complexity of arrhythmias. Method: Forty-two patients with CD underwent ECG and continuous and noninvasive BP monitoring (TASK force monitor. The following were determined: BRS (phenylephrine method; heart rate variability (HRV on 24-h Holter; and EF (echocardiogram. Results: GIII had lower BRS (6.09 ms/mm Hg as compared to GII (11.84 and GI (15.23. The difference was significant between GI and GIII (p = 0.01. Correlating BRS with the density of ventricular extrasystoles (VE, low VE density ( 10/h had preserved BRS (p = 0.003. Patients with depressed BRS had higher VE density (p = 0.01, regardless of the EF. The BRS was the only variable related to the occurrence of SVT (p = 0.028. Conclusion: The BRS is preserved in undetermined CD. The BRS impairment increases as disease progresses, being more severe in patients with more complex ventricular arrhythmias. The degree of autonomic dysfunction did not correlate with EF, but with the density and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. Dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure: influence of the heart vs. peripheral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huang-Ku; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Ringwood, John V; Barrett, Carolyn J; Leonard, Bridget L; Nguang, Sing-Kiong; Navakatikyan, Michael A; Malpas, Simon C

    2002-08-01

    The aim in the present experiments was to assess the dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure, to develop an accurate mathematical model that represented this relationship, and to assess the role of dynamic changes in heart rate and stroke volume in giving rise to components of this response. Patterned electrical stimulation [pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS)] was applied to the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) to produce changes in blood pressure under open-loop conditions in anesthetized rabbits. The stimulus provided constant power over the frequency range 0-0.5 Hz and revealed that the composite systems represented by the central nervous system, sympathetic activity, and vascular resistance responded as a second-order low-pass filter (corner frequency approximately 0.047 Hz) with a time delay (1.01 s). The gain between ADN and mean arterial pressure was reasonably constant before the corner frequency and then decreased with increasing frequency of stimulus. Although the heart rate was altered in response to the PRBS stimuli, we found that removal of the heart's ability to contribute to blood pressure variability by vagotomy and beta(1)-receptor blockade did not significantly alter the frequency response. We conclude that the contribution of the heart to the dynamic regulation of blood pressure is negligible in the rabbit. The consequences of this finding are examined with respect to low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure.

  4. Aging process on spectrally determined spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Cerutti, Catherine; Mpio, Ignace; Ducher, Michel

    2007-09-01

    The interindividual age-related decrease in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was reported in many cross-sectional studies. However, the long-term intraindividual decrease in BRS has never been confirmed by longitudinal studies. Data obtained from a 5-year prospective study designed to assess the 5-year stress effects on blood pressure (BP) provided the opportunity to assess longitudinal aging process on spectrally determined BRS (S-BRS) using the cross spectral analysis. This analysis was carried out in 205 men aged between 18 and 50 years who had 2 valid beat to beat BP recordings (Finapress) at a mean 5-year interval. At inclusion and at end of follow-up, S-BRS was significantly correlated with age (r=-0.50, P<0.001, r=-0.33, P<0.001 respectively). Interestingly, the slopes and the intercepts were not significantly different at a 5-year interval. This result is in favor of the good reproducibility of S-BRS. The attenuation with age of S-BRS was calculated at 3.6% a year. This decrease was slightly higher than the one obtained with the baseline data (2.3% per year). This longitudinal study provided, for the first time, an estimate of the slope of the age-related physiological S-BRS decrease in a mid-aged healthy male population. Our findings reinforce the interest of evaluating spontaneous BRS reported to predict hypertension and cardiovascular events in various populations.

  5. Inhibition of cortisol production with metyrapone prevents mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and baroreflex impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Andrew J M; Korszun, Ania; Abdelaal, Eltigani; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Christopher J H; Nash, Gerard B; Ray, Clare; Deanfield, John; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2005-07-19

    This study was designed to investigate the role of cortisol in stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone before subjecting healthy volunteers to mental stress. Mental stress raises cortisol levels and is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, especially from sudden cardiac death. It also causes endothelial dysfunction and impaired BRS. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of endothelial function, and BRS in 36 subjects without CHD risk factors who were then randomized in a double-blind fashion to oral metyrapone 750 mg x 2 or placebo. Five hours later we subjected subjects to mental stress and then remeasured endothelial function and BRS. Prestress cortisol levels were significantly higher in the placebo group at 270.5 (30.9) nmol/l versus 89.1 (11.8) nmol/l (p = 0.01), and the increase with stress was higher at 57.9 (17.9) nmol/l versus 11.2 (2.2) nmol/l (p Analysis of covariation showed a significant effect of metyrapone on change in both FMD (p = 0.009) and BRS (p = 0.024). Stress-related endothelial dysfunction and BRS impairment can be prevented by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone, demonstrating a direct or facilitative role for cortisol in these phenomena and suggesting mechanisms by which stress contributes to CHD and sudden cardiac death.

  6. Baroreflex sensitivity in children and adolescents: physiology, hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzíková, N; Závodná, E

    2016-12-13

    The increased prevalence of obesity in children and its complications have led to a greater interest in studying baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in children. This review of BRS in children and adolescents includes subtopics on: 1. Resting values of BRS and their reproducibility, 2. Genetics of BRS, 3. The role of a primarily low BRS and obesity in the development of hypertension, and 4. Association of diabetes mellitus, BRS, and obesity. The conclusions specific to this age follow from this review: 1. The mean heart rate (HR) influences the measurement of BRS. Since the mean HR decreases during adolescence, HR should be taken into account. 2. A genetic dependency of BRS was found. 3. Low BRS values may precede pathological blood-pressure elevation in children with white-coat hypertension. We hypothesize that low BRS plays an active role in the emergence of hypertension in youth. A contribution of obesity to the development of hypertension was also found. We hypothesize that both factors, a primarily low BRS and obesity, are partially independent risk factors for hypertension in youths. 4. In diabetics, a low BRS compared to healthy children can be associated with insulin resistance. A reversibility of the BRS values could be possible after weight loss.

  7. Analysis of baroreflex sensitivity during undulation pump ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjian; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Xiumin; Song, Hojin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Baba, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yusuke; Imachi, Kou

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), which involves the autonomic nervous system, in a goat with a chronically implanted undulation pump ventricular assist device (UPVAD). The UPVAD involved transforming the rotation of a brushless DC motor into an undulating motion by a disc attached via a special linking mechanism, and a jellyfish valve in the outflow cannula to prevent diastolic backflow. The pump was implanted into the thoracic cavity of a goat by a left thoracotomy, and the inflow and outflow cannulae were sutured to the apex of the left ventricle and to the descending aorta, respectively. The driving cable was wired percutaneously to an external controller. Electrocardiogram and hemodynamic waveforms were recorded at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz. BRS was determined when awake by the slope of the linear regression of R-R interval against mean arterial pressure changes, which were induced by the administration of methoxamine hydrochloride, both with continuous driving of the UPVAD as well as without assistance. BRS values during the UPVAD support and without assistance were 1.60 +/- 0.30 msec/mm Hg and 0.98 +/- 0.22 msec/mm Hg (n = 5, P < 0.05), respectively. BRS was significantly improved during left ventricular assistance. Therefore, UPVAD support might decrease sympathetic nerve activity and increase parasympathetic nerve activity to improve both microcirculation and organ function.

  8. The role of the cholinergic system of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis on the cardiovascular responses and the baroreflex modulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasimi, Ali; Hatam, Masoumeh

    2011-04-22

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is a limbic structure involved in cardiovascular regulation and modulation of responses to stress. The BST contains high levels of muscarinic receptors. This study was performed to find the effects of cholinergic system of the BST on the cardiovascular regulation and the baroreflex modulation in rats. Drugs (50-100nl) were microinjected into the BST of 53 urethane anesthetized male rats. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate changes were measured. The baroreflex gain was evaluated by finding the slope of the reflex bradycardia in response to increases in mean arterial pressure due to phenylephrine injection (i.v.). We found that microinjection of acetylcholine (3 and 6nmol/50nl) into the BST increased mean arterial pressure and had no effect on heart rate. Local microinjection of homatropine abolished the effect of Ach on the cardiovascular responses indicating involvement of muscarinic receptors. Local injection of homatropine did not affect the reflexive bradycardia. Local injection of acetylcholine decreased the slope of the reflexive bradycardia indicating that Ach system of the BST inhibits the baroreflex. Acute ablation of the BST by cobalt chloride also significantly decreased the slope, indicating the excitatory action of the BST on the baroreflex parasympathetic component. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that microinjection of acetylcholine into the BST evokes a pressor response by activating the local muscarinic receptors. Release of Ach into the BST, probably during stress, inhibits the baroreflex, but with no stress, the BST facilitates the baroreflex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Trigonometric regressive spectral analysis reliably maps dynamic changes in baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic tone: the effect of gender and age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Reimann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS has emerged as prognostic tool in cardiology. Although available computer-assisted methods, measuring spontaneous fluctuations of heart rate and blood pressure in the time and frequency domain are easily applicable, they do not allow for quantification of BRS during cardiovascular adaption processes. This, however, seems an essential criterion for clinical application. We evaluated a novel algorithm based on trigonometric regression regarding its ability to map dynamic changes in BRS and autonomic tone during cardiovascular provocation in relation to gender and age. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We continuously recorded systemic arterial pressure, electrocardiogram and respiration in 23 young subjects (25+/-2 years and 22 middle-aged subjects (56+/-4 years during cardiovascular autonomic testing (metronomic breathing, Valsalva manoeuvre, head-up tilt. Baroreflex- and spectral analysis was performed using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis. There was an age-related decline in spontaneous BRS and high frequency oscillations of RR intervals. Changes in autonomic tone evoked by cardiovascular provocation were observed as shifts in the ratio of low to high frequency oscillations of RR intervals and blood pressure. Respiration at 0.1 Hz elicited an increase in BRS while head-up tilt and Valsalva manoeuvre resulted in a downregulation of BRS. The extent of autonomic adaption was in general more pronounced in young individuals and declined stronger with age in women than in men. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The trigonometric regressive spectral analysis reliably maps age- and gender-related differences in baroreflex- and autonomic function and is able to describe adaption processes of baroreceptor circuit during cardiovascular stimulation. Hence, this novel algorithm may be a useful screening tool to detect abnormalities in cardiovascular adaption processes even when

  10. Electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve in conscious rats overcomes the attenuation of the baroreflex in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tomás O C Teixeira; Lataro, Renata M; Castania, Jaci A; Durand, Marina T; Silva, Carlos A A; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2016-04-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by autonomic dysfunction combined with baroreflex attenuation. The hypotensive and bradycardic responses produced by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) were examined in conscious CHF and control male Wistar rats (12-13 wk old). Furthermore, the role of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system in mediating the cardiovascular responses to baroreflex activation was evaluated by selective β1-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor antagonists. CHF was induced by myocardial infarction. After 6 wk, the subjects were implanted with electrodes for ADN stimulation. Twenty-four hours later, electrical stimulation of the ADN was applied for 20 s using five different frequencies (5, 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz), while the arterial pressure was recorded by a catheter implanted into the femoral artery. Electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited progressive and similar hypotensive and bradycardic responses in control (n = 12) and CHF (n = 11) rats, while the hypotensive response was not affected by methylatropine. Nevertheless, the reflex bradycardia was attenuated by methylatropine in control, but not in CHF rats. Atenolol did not affect the hypotensive or bradycardic response in either group. The ADN function was examined under anesthesia through electroneurographic recordings. The arterial pressure-ADN activity relationship was attenuated in CHF rats. In conclusion, despite the attenuation of baroreceptor function in CHF rats, the electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited a stimulus-dependent hypotension and bradycardia of similar magnitude as observed in control rats. Therefore, electrical activation of the aortic baroreflex overcomes both the attenuation of parasympathetic function and the sympathetic overdrive.

  11. Association of exercise training and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator improves baroreflex sensitivity of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P R; Moreira, M C S; Marques, S M; Pinto, I S J; Macedo, L M; Silva, C C; Freiria-Oliveira, A H; Rebelo, A C S; Reis, A A S; Rosa, D A; Ferreira-Neto, M L; Castro, C H; Pedrino, G R

    2016-08-01

    The present study sought to determine cardiovascular effects of aerobic training associated with diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an activator of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs (280-350 g) were either subjected to exercise training or not (sedentary group). The trained group was subjected to 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (five times a week, lasting 60 min at an intensity of 50-60% of maximum aerobic speed). In the last 15 days of the experimental protocol, these groups were redistributed into four groups: i) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (S+D1); ii) trained SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (T+D1); iii) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (S+V); and iv) trained SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (T+V). After treatment, SHRs were anesthetized and subjected to artery and femoral vein cannulation prior to the implantation of ECG electrode. After 24 h, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded; the baroreflex sensitivity and the effect of double autonomic blockade (DAB) were evaluated in non-anesthetized SHRs. DIZE treatment improved baroreflex sensitivity in the T+D1 group as compared with the T+V and S+D1 groups. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and MAP were reduced in T+D1 group as compared with T+V and S+D1 groups. Hence, we conclude that the association of exercise training with DIZE treatment improved baroreflex function and cardiovascular regulation.

  12. Influence of heat stress on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, A J; Proppe, D W

    1982-07-01

    The influence of environmental heat stress on the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) was studied in eight conscious, chronically instrumented baboons. Inflations of balloon occluders around the inferior vena cava (IVC) and thoracic descending aorta (DA) were used to produce acute, graded changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in 5 mm Hg intervals ranging from +/- 5 to +/- 25 mm Hg. After determination of the HR responses to changes in MABP in the normothermic baboon (blood temperature less than or equal to 37.6 degrees C), the animal was subjected to environmental heating to produce hyperthermia. When blood temperature reached approximately 39.5 degrees C, HR responses to graded DA and IVC occlusions were again determined. During hyperthermia, the HR sensitivity (delta HR/ delta MABP) to MABP changes was markedly diminished for reductions in MABP and significantly enhanced for increases in MABP. To determine whether these alterations in the HR response to changes in MABP were due to an alteration of the baroreflex control of HR, full, sigmoid-shaped HR-MABP curves for both the normothermic and hyperthermic states were constructed and characterized by total HR range, estimated slope of the steep portion of the curve, and MABP at the midpoint of the HR range (BP50). During hyperthermia (1) the whole HR-MABP curve shifted significantly upward by 35-40 beats/min, (2) total HR range, the estimated slope, and BP50 did not change, and (3) the control point (pre-occlusion HR-MABP value) curves were also constructed during either beta-adrenergic blockade or cholinergic (Ch)-receptor blockade in the normothermic and hyperthermic state. Similar to that seen for the unblocked heart, the whole HR-MABP curves were also shifted upward during hyperthermia in this group of baboons with no alteration in the total HR range, the estimated slope, or BP50. The upward shift in the HR-MABP curve during Ch-receptor blockade, unlike during beta-receptor blockade, was

  13. Modulation of baroreflex sensitivity by walnuts versus cashew nuts in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Aletta E; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Huisman, Hugo W; Mukuddem-Petersen, Janine; Oosthuizen, Welma; Hanekom, Susanna M; Jerling, Johann C

    2006-06-01

    Impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome. Because lipid abnormalities have been associated with impaired BRS, this study aimed to determine whether diets known to improve the lipid profile, namely a diet high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (walnuts) or monounsaturated fatty acids (cashew nuts), would improve BRS in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). A controlled feeding trial with a randomized, controlled, parallel study design was undertaken, which involved 62 subjects with MS. Subjects were stratified according to gender and age and were randomized into three groups receiving a control diet, or a diet high (20% energy) in walnuts or unsalted cashew nuts for 8 weeks while maintaining body weight. The BRS, C-reactive protein (CRP), and MS components were measured before and after the intervention. After the intervention, BRS in the walnut-fed study group decreased (P = .038) and that in the cashew-fed study group increased (P = .036), but the BRS in the control group did not change (P = .56). The percent change of the walnut versus cashew group differed (P = .019). Body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerol did not change. The fasting glucose concentrations of the cashew group increased (P = .03). The significant improvements in BRS obtained by a diet rich in cashew nuts underline the beneficial cardiovascular effects of nuts. However, the opposite result was obtained with a diet rich in walnuts. These significant changes observed might indicate that BRS is particularly sensitive and influenced by changes in diet without changes in obesity.

  14. Coconut oil supplementation and physical exercise improves baroreflex sensitivity and oxidative stress in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Naiane F B; Porpino, Suênia K P; Monteiro, Matheus M O; Gomes, Enéas R M; Braga, Valdir A

    2015-04-01

    The hypothesis that oral supplementation with virgin coconut oil (Cocos nucifera L.) and exercise training would improve impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and reduce oxidative stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was tested. Adult male SHR and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were divided into 5 groups: WKY + saline (n = 8); SHR + saline (n = 8); SHR + coconut oil (2 mL·day(-1), n = 8); SHR + trained (n = 8); and SHR + trained + coconut oil (n = 8). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded and BRS was tested using phenylephrine (8 μg/kg, intravenous) and sodium nitroprusside (25 μg·kg(-1), intravenous). Oxidative stress was measured using dihydroethidium in heart and aorta. SHR + saline, SHR + coconut oil, and SHR + trained group showed higher MAP compared with WKY + saline (175 ± 6, 148 ± 6, 147 ± 7 vs. 113 ± 2 mm Hg; p coconut oil, SHR + trained group, and SHR + trained + coconut oil groups presented lower MAP compared with SHR + saline group (148 ± 6, 147 ± 7, 134 ± 8 vs. 175 ± 6 mm Hg; p Coconut oil combined with exercise training improved BRS in SHR compared with SHR + saline group (-2.47 ± 0.3 vs. -1.39 ± 0.09 beats·min(-1)·mm Hg(-1); p coconut oil group presented reduced oxidative stress compared with SHR + saline in heart (622 ± 16 vs. 774 ± 31 AU, p coconut oil reduced oxidative stress in SHR compared with SHR + saline group (454 ± 33 vs. 689 ± 29 AU, p coconut oil combined with exercise training improved impaired BRS and reduced oxidative stress in SHR.

  15. Rehabilitation: Periodic somatosensory stimulation increases arterial baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gademan, Maaike G J; Sun, Yiping; Han, Liming; Valk, Vanessa J; Schalij, Martin J; van Exel, Henk J; Lucas, Carolien M H B; Maan, Arie C; Verwey, Harriette F; van de Vooren, Hedde; Pinna, Gian D; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; van der Wall, Ernst E; Swenne, Cees A

    2011-10-20

    One of the beneficial effects of exercise training in chronic heart failure (CHF) is an improvement in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), a prognostic index in CHF. In our hypothesis-generating study we propose that at least part of this effect is mediated by neural afferent information, and more specifically, by exercise-induced somatosensory nerve traffic. To compare the effects of periodic electrical somatosensory stimulation on BRS in patients with CHF with the effects of exercise training and with usual care. We compared in stable CHF patients the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, N = 23, LVEF 30 ± 9%) with the effects of bicycle exercise training (EXTR, N = 20, LVEF 32 ± 7%). To mimic exercise-associated somatosensory ergoreceptor stimulation, we applied periodic (2/s, marching pace) burst TENS to both feet. TENS and EXTR sessions were held during two successive days. BRS, measured prior to the first intervention session and one day after the second intervention session, increased by 28% from 3.07 ± 2.06 to 4.24 ± 2.61 ms/mmHg in the TENS group, but did not change in the EXTR group (baseline: 3.37 ± 2.53 ms/mmHg; effect: 3.26 ± 2.54 ms/mmHg) (P(TENS vs EXTR) = 0.02). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not change in either group. We demonstrated that periodic somatosensory input alone is sufficient and efficient in increasing BRS in CHF patients. This concept constitutes a basis for studies towards more effective exercise training regimens in the diseased/impaired, in whom training aimed at BRS improvement should possibly focus more on the somatosensory aspect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Additive Effects of Heating and Exercise on Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate in Healthy Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peçanha, Tiago; Forjaz, Claudia Lucia de Moraes; Low, David Andrew

    2017-08-31

    This study assessed the additive effects of passive heating and exercise on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) and heart rate variability (HRV). Twelve healthy young men (25±1 yrs, 23.8±0.5 kg/m(2)) randomly underwent two experimental sessions: heat stress (HS; whole-body heat stress using a tube-lined suit to increase core temperature by ~1°C) and normothermia (NT). Each session was composed of a: pre-intervention rest (REST1); HS or NT interventions; post-intervention rest (REST2); and 14 min of cycling exercise [7 min at 40%HRreserve (EX1) and 7 min at 60%HRreserve (EX2)]. Heart rate and finger blood pressure were continuously recorded. cBRS was assessed using the sequence (cBRSSEQ) and transfer function (cBRSTF) methods. HRV was assessed using the indices SDNN (standard deviation of RR intervals) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR intervals). cBRS and HRV were not different between sessions during EX1 and EX2 (i.e. matched heart rate conditions: EX1=116±3 vs. 114±3, EX2=143±4 vs. 142±3 bpm; but different workloads: EX1=50±9 vs. 114±8, EX2=106±10 vs. 165±8 Watts; for HS and NT, respectively; Pheart rates), cBRS and HRV were significantly reduced in HS (cBRSSEQ = 1.6±0.3 vs. 0.6±0.1 ms/mmHg, Pexercise does not affect cBRS and HRV. Alternatively, in workload-matched conditions, the addition of heat to exercise results in reduced cBRS and HRV compared to exercise in normothermia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  17. The Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Mitochondrial Function: Influence on Blood Pressure and Baroreflex in Transgenic Rat Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Nautiyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, and may be associated with an overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Angiotensin (Ang II, a potent vasoconstrictor hormone of the RAS, also impairs baroreflex and mitochondrial function. Most deleterious cardiovascular actions of Ang II are thought to be mediated by NADPH-oxidase- (NOX- derived reactive oxygen species (ROS that may also stimulate mitochondrial oxidant release and alter redox-sensitive signaling pathways in the brain. Within the RAS, the actions of Ang II are counterbalanced by Ang-(1–7, a vasodilatory peptide known to mitigate against increased oxidant stress. A balance between Ang II and Ang-(1–7 within the brain dorsal medulla contributes to maintenance of normal blood pressure and proper functioning of the arterial baroreceptor reflex for control of heart rate. We propose that Ang-(1–7 may negatively regulate the redox signaling pathways activated by Ang II to maintain normal blood pressure, baroreflex, and mitochondrial function through attenuating ROS (NOX-generated and/or mitochondrial.

  18. Nitrosative Stress-Induced Disruption of Baroreflex Neural Circuits in a Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: A DTI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Su, Chia-Hao; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in liver failure is associated with high mortality; the underlying mechanism is undecided. Here we report that in an acute liver failure model employing intraperitoneal administration of thioacetamide in Sprague-Dawley rats, diffusion weighted imaging revealed a progressive reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient in the brain stem. Diffusion tensor imaging further showed that the connectivity between nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the terminal site of baroreceptor afferents in brain stem and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels, was progressively disrupted until its disappearance, coincidental with the irreversible cessation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone signifying clinically the occurrence of brain death. In addition, superoxide, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite and ammonia levels in the NTS or RVLM were elevated, alongside swelling of astroctytes. A scavenger of peroxynitrite, but not an antioxidant, delivered intracisternally reversed all these events. We conclude that nitrosative stress because of augmented peroxynitrite related to accumulation of ammonia and swelling of astrocytes in the NTS or RVLM, leading to cytotoxic edema in the brain stem and severance of the NTS-RVLM connectivity, underpins the defunct baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that accounts for the high mortality associated with HE. PMID:28079146

  19. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  20. Heart rate variability biofeedback as a method for assessing baroreflex function: a preliminary study of resonance in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschillo, Evgeny; Lehrer, Paul; Rishe, Naphtali; Konstantinov, Mikhail

    2002-03-01

    This study describes the use of a biofeedback method for the noninvasive study of baroreflex mechanisms. Five previously untrained healthy male participants learned to control oscillations in heart rate using biofeedback training to modify their heart rate variability at specific frequencies. They were instructed to match computer-generated sinusoidal oscillations with oscillations in heart rate at seven frequencies within the range of 0.01-0.14 Hz. All participants successfully produced high-amplitude target-frequency oscillations in both heart rate and blood pressure. Stable and predictable transfer functions between heart rate and blood pressure were obtained in all participants. The highest oscillation amplitudes were produced in the range of 0.055-0.11 Hz for heart rate and 0.02-0.055 Hz for blood pressure. Transfer functions were calculated among sinusoidal oscillations in the target stimuli, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration for frequencies at which subjects received training. High and low target-frequency oscillation amplitudes at specific frequencies could be explained by resonance among various oscillatory processes in the cardiovascular system. The exact resonant frequencies differed among individuals. Changes in heart rate oscillations could not be completely explained by changes in breathing. The biofeedback method also allowed us to quantity characteristics of inertia, delay, and speed sensitivity in baroreflex system. We discuss the implications of these findings for using heart rate variability biofeedback as an aid in diagnosing various autonomic and cardiovascular system disorders and as a method for treating these disorders.

  1. The effects of bupivacaine and ropivacaine on baroreflex sensitivity with or without respiratory acidosis and alkalosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Dohi, S; Iida, H; Ishiyama, T

    1997-02-01

    Systemic toxicity of local anesthetics causes cardiac and central nervous system (CNS) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis. We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was randomly tested in rats with one of 13 conditions during intravenous administration of saline (control), bupivacaine 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg, or ropivacaine 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg. The effects of bupivacaine (3 mg/kg) or ropivacaine (6 mg/kg) on BRS were also examined during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. The BRS was assessed using a value of delta heart rate/ delta mean arterial pressure after infusion of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/kg). Both bupivacaine and ropivacaine (at the largest dose) significantly suppressed BRS. Acute respiratory acidosis (pHa 7.24 +/- 0.04, Paco2 63 +/- 4 mm Hg) enhanced BRS. The BRS enhanced during acidosis was also suppressed with bupivacaine and ropivacaine, but less so than in the absence of acidosis. The presence of hypocapnic alkalosis (pHa 7.55 +/- 0.03, Paco2 25 +/- 2 mm Hg) did not affect BRS and reversed BRS suppression caused by both drugs. Thus, bupivacaine and ropivacaine affect neuronal control mechanisms for maintaining cardiovascular stability, and acute changes of respiration could significantly modify such suppression.

  2. Effects of Kefir on the Cardiac Autonomic Tones and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Brunella F; Duemke, Licia B; Leal, Marcos A; Friques, Andreia G F; Dantas, Eduardo M; Dalvi, Rodolfo F; Gava, Agata L; Pereira, Thiago M C; Andrade, Tadeu U; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Campagnaro, Bianca P; Vasquez, Elisardo C

    2016-01-01

    It has been previously shown that the probiotic kefir (a symbiotic matrix containing acid bacteria and yeasts) attenuated the hypertension and the endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, the effect of chronic administration of kefir on the cardiac autonomic control of heart rate (HR) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in SHR was evaluated. SHR were treated with kefir (0.3 mL/100 g body weight) for 60 days and compared with non-treated SHR and with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Cardiac autonomic vagal (VT) and sympathetic (ST) tones were estimated through the blockade of the cardiac muscarinic receptors (methylatropine) and the blockade of β1-adrenoceptor (atenolol). The BRS was evaluated by the tachycardia and bradycardia responses to vasoactive drug-induced decreases and increases in arterial blood pressure (BP), respectively. Additionally, spontaneous BRS was estimated by autoregressive spectral analysis. Kefir-treated SHR exhibited significant attenuation of basal BP, HR, and cardiac hypertrophy compared to non-treated SHR (12, 13, and 21%, respectively). Cardiac VT and ST were significantly altered in the SHR (~40 and ~90 bpm) compared with Wistar rats (~120 and ~30 bpm) and were partially recovered in SHR-kefir (~90 and ~25 bpm). SHR exhibited an impaired bradycardic BRS (~50%) compared with Wistar rats, which was reduced to ~40% in the kefir-treated SHR and abolished by methylatropine in all groups. SHR also exhibited a significant impairment of the tachycardic BRS (~23%) compared with Wistar rats and this difference was reduced to 8% in the SHR-kefir. Under the action of atenolol the residual reflex tachycardia was smaller in SHR than in Wistar rats and kefir attenuated this abnormality. Spectral analysis revealed increased low frequency components of BP (~3.5-fold) and pulse interval (~2-fold) compared with Wistar rats and these differences were reduced by kefir-treatment to ~1.6- and ~1.5-fold, respectively

  3. The repeated sit-to-stand maneuver is a superior method for cardiac baroreflex assessment: a comparison with the modified Oxford method and Valsalva maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, H M; Tzeng, Y C; Galletly, D C; Peebles, K C

    2014-12-01

    Baroreflex assessment has diagnostic and prognostic utility in the clinical and research environments, and there is a need for a reliable, simple, noninvasive method of assessment. The repeated sit-to-stand method induces oscillatory changes in blood pressure (BP) at a desired frequency and is suitable for assessing dynamic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). However, little is known about the reliability of this method and its ability to discern fundamental properties of the baroreflex. In this study we sought to: 1) evaluate the reliability of the sit-to-stand method for assessing BRS and compare its performance against two established methods (Oxford method and Valsalva maneuver), and 2) examine whether the frequency of the sit-to-stand method influences hysteresis. Sixteen healthy participants underwent three trials of each method. For the sit-to-stand method, which was performed at 0.1 and 0.05 Hz, BRS was quantified as an integrated response (BRSINT) and in response to falling and rising BP (BRSDOWN and BRSUP, respectively). Test retest reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Irrespective of frequency, the ICC for BRSINT during the sit-to-stand method was ≥0.88. The ICC for a rising BP evoked by phenylephrine (PEGAIN) in the Oxford method was 0.78 and ≤0.5 for the remaining measures. During the sit-to-stand method, hysteresis was apparent in all participants at 0.1 Hz but was absent at 0.05 Hz. These findings indicate the sit-to-stand method is a statistically reliable BRS assessment tool and suitable for the examination of baroreflex hysteresis. Using this approach we showed that baroreflex hysteresis is a frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  4. In vivo expression of angiotensin-(1-7) lowers blood pressure and improves baroreflex function in transgenic (mRen2)27 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2012-08-01

    Transgenic (mRen2)27 rats are hypertensive with impaired baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate compared with Hannover Sprague-Dawley rats. We assessed blood pressure and baroreflex function in male hemizygous (mRen2)27 rats (30-40 weeks of age) instrumented for arterial pressure recordings and receiving into the cisterna magna either an Ang-(1-7) fusion protein or a control fusion protein (CTL-FP). The maximum reduction in mean arterial pressure achieved was -38 ± 7 mm Hg on day 3, accompanied by a 55% enhancement in baroreflex sensitivity in Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Both the high-frequency alpha index (HF-α) and heart rate variability increased, suggesting increased parasympathetic tone for cardiac control. The mRNA levels of several components of the renin-angiotensin system in the dorsal medulla were markedly reduced including renin (-80%), neprilysin (-40%), and the AT1a receptor (-40%). However, there was a 2-fold to 3-fold increase in the mRNA levels of the phosphatases PTP-1b and dual-specificity phosphatase 1 in the medulla of Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Our finding that replacement of Ang-(1-7) in the brain of (mRen2)27 rats reverses in part the hypertension and baroreflex impairment is consistent with a functional deficit of Ang-(1-7) in this hypertensive strain. We conclude that the increased mRNA expression of phosphatases known to counteract the phosphoinositol 3 kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases, and the reduction of renin and AT1a receptor mRNA levels may contribute to the reduction in arterial pressure and improvement in baroreflex sensitivity in response to Ang-(1-7).

  5. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Moisés Felipe Pereira; Borges, Mariana Eiras; Rossi, Vitor de Almeida; Moura, Elizabeth de Orleans C de; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP); however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Rats SHR (n = 16) and Wistar (n = 16) at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8); trained control (CT, n = 8); sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8) and trained SHR (HT, n = 8). Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline) with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks). Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR) was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm). Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg) although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg). Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP. Os barorreceptores atuam como reguladores da pressão arterial (PA); no entanto, sua sensibilidade encontra-se prejudicada em pacientes hipertensos. Dentre as recomendações para a redução da PA, o treinamento f

  6. Diminished baroreflex control of heart rate responses in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi head tilt mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Skala, Karl; Jones, Timothy A; Hay, Meredith

    2004-08-01

    The maintenance of stable blood pressure during postural changes is known to involve integration of vestibular and cardiovascular central regulatory mechanisms. Sensory activity in the vestibular system plays an important role in cardiovascular regulation. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of vestibular gravity receptors in normal baroreflex function. Baroreflex heart rate (HR) responses to changes in blood pressure (BP) in otoconia-deficient head tilt (het) mice (n = 8) were compared with their wild-type littermates (n = 12). The study was carried out in conscious male mice chronically implanted with arterial and venous catheters for recording BP and HR and for the infusion of vasoactive drugs. Resting HR was higher in the het mice (661 +/- 13 beats/min) than in the wild-type mice (579 +/- 20 beats/min). BP was comparable in the het (113 +/- 4 mmHg) and wild-type mice (104 +/- 4 mmHg). The slopes of reflex decreases in HR in response to phenylephrine (PE) were blunted in the het mice (-5.5 +/- 1.5 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) compared with the wild-type mice (-8.5 +/- 0.9 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Likewise, reflex tachycardic responses to decreases in BP with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were significantly blunted in the het mice (-0.8 +/- 0.3 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) versus the wild-type mice (-2.2 +/- 0.6 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Frequency-domain analysis of the HR variability suggests that under resting conditions, parasympathetic contribution was lower in the het versus wild-type mice. Mapping of the expression of immediate-early gene product, c-Fos, in forebrain and brain stem nuclei in response to a BP challenge showed no differences between the wild-type and het mice. These results suggest that tonic activity of gravity receptors modulates and is required for normal function of the cardiac baroreflexes.

  7. Closed-loop spontaneous baroreflex transfer function is inappropriate for system identification of neural arc but partly accurate for peripheral arc: predictability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Kawada, Toru; Shimizu, Shuji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2011-04-01

    Although the dynamic characteristics of the baroreflex system have been described by baroreflex transfer functions obtained from open-loop analysis, the predictability of time-series output dynamics from input signals, which should confirm the accuracy of system identification, remains to be elucidated. Moreover, despite theoretical concerns over closed-loop system identification, the accuracy and the predictability of the closed-loop spontaneous baroreflex transfer function have not been evaluated compared with the open-loop transfer function. Using urethane and α-chloralose anaesthetized, vagotomized and aortic-denervated rabbits (n = 10), we identified open-loop baroreflex transfer functions by recording renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) while varying the vascularly isolated intracarotid sinus pressure (CSP) according to a binary random (white-noise) sequence (operating pressure ± 20 mmHg), and using a simplified equation to calculate closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function while matching CSP with systemic arterial pressure (AP). Our results showed that the open-loop baroreflex transfer functions for the neural and peripheral arcs predicted the time-series SNA and AP outputs from measured CSP and SNA inputs, with r2 of 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.8 ± 0.1, respectively. In contrast, the closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function for the neural arc was markedly different from the open-loop transfer function (enhanced gain increase and a phase lead), and did not predict the time-series SNA dynamics (r2; 0.1 ± 0.1). However, the closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function of the peripheral arc partially matched the open-loop transfer function in gain and phase functions, and had limited but reasonable predictability of the time-series AP dynamics (r2, 0.7 ± 0.1). A numerical simulation suggested that a noise predominantly in the neural arc under resting conditions might be a possible mechanism responsible for our findings. Furthermore

  8. "Regulation of the intracerebroventricular administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on baroreflex function and insulin sensitivity in rats".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Fu; Chan, Yin-Ching; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Hong, Ling-Zong

    2012-06-30

    "In addition to its well-established neurotrophic effects, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been shown to regulate glucose metabolism. The present study was conducted to determine whether BDNF has effects on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and whole-body insulin sensitivity through modulation of autonomic nervous function in normal rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intracerebroventricular BDNF (20 μg per rat, 10μl; BDNF) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (10 μl; control) at an infusion rate of 1 μl/min in conscious state. The whole-body insulin sensitivity was determined by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. BRS in response to phenylephrine (PE-BRS) or sodium nitroprusside (NP-BRS) was assessed using linear regression analysis. The sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on BRS were investigated by pharmacological autonomic blockade. When compared to the control rats, blood glucose levels were slightly but significantly decreased in BDNF-treated rats. However, plasma insulin levels were reduced by about 30%. The whole-body insulin sensitivity was increased in BDNF-treated rats. In addition, blood pressure was increased but heart rate remained unchanged after BDNF treatment. Enhanced PE-BRS was also observed in the BDNF-treated rats, which was attributed to the abnormal parasympathetic activation as revealed by the results of the pharmacological blockade study with methylatropine. Results of the present demonstrate that central BDNF plays an important role in the regulation of whole-body insulin sensitivity and baroreflex function. The data indicate that the alteration of autonomic nervous function may play a role in the effects of BDNF."

  9. Reproduction of continuous flow left ventricular assist device experimental data by means of a hybrid cardiovascular model with baroreflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Jacobs, Steven; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Pałko, Krzysztof Jakub; Bernini, Fabio; Martin, Michael; Claus, Piet; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Górczyńska, Krystyna; Darowski, Marek; Meyns, Bart; Kozarski, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    Long-term mechanical circulatory assistance opened new problems in ventricular assist device-patient interaction, especially in relation to autonomic controls. Modeling studies, based on adequate models, could be a feasible approach of investigation. The aim of this work is the exploitation of a hybrid (hydronumerical) cardiovascular simulator to reproduce and analyze in vivo experimental data acquired during a continuous flow left ventricular assistance. The hybrid cardiovascular simulator embeds three submodels: a computational cardiovascular submodel, a computational baroreflex submodel, and a hydronumerical interface submodel. The last one comprises two impedance transformers playing the role of physical interfaces able to provide a hydraulic connection with specific cardiovascular sites (in this article, the left atrium and the ascending/descending aorta). The impedance transformers are used to connect a continuous flow pump for partial left ventricular support (Synergy Micropump, CircuLite, Inc., Saddlebrooke, NJ, USA) to the hybrid cardiovascular simulator. Data collected from five animals in physiological, pathological, and assisted conditions were reproduced using the hybrid cardiovascular simulator. All parameters useful to characterize and tune the hybrid cardiovascular simulator to a specific hemodynamic condition were extracted from experimental data. Results show that the simulator is able to reproduce animal-specific hemodynamic status both in physiological and pathological conditions, to reproduce cardiovascular left ventricular assist device (LVAD) interaction and the progressive unloading of the left ventricle for different pump speeds, and to investigate the effects of the LVAD on baroreflex activity. Results in chronic heart failure conditions show that an increment of LVAD speed from 20 000 to 22 000 rpm provokes a decrement of left ventricular flow of 35% (from 2 to 1.3 L/min). Thanks to its flexibility and modular structure, the

  10. The Changes of Baroreflex Sensitivity During Head -up Tilt Test and Its Clinical Significance in the Patients with Vasovagal Syncope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兆霆; 吕艳青; 杨钧国

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) during head -up tilt test (HUT) in patients with vasovagal syncope (VS),and to examine the relationship between baroreflex sensitivity and neurohormonal factors. Furthermore, to investigate the effects of the changes of BRS on VS.Methods Forty- two patients with unexplained syncope (Among the 42 patients, there were 22 patients with positive HUT and 20 patients with negative HUT respectively) and 20 healthy volunteers (with negative HUT) underwent passive head-up tilt testing, Antecubital vein blood samples were taken before and after HUT, or at syncope. The fasting plasma endothelin ,serum nitric oxide (NO), serum NE were measured. The BRS was assessed on the basis of the linear regression slope the RR interval versus systolic arterial blood pressure during the increment in blood pressure after intravenous administration of phenylephrine. Results ( 1 )During the syncope, the BRS significantly reduced in HUT( + ) group than baseline. At the end of tilt, the level of plasma ET, serum NO in patients with positive HUT significantly increased compared with baseline or normal controls, and the plasma concentration of NE also had the trend of increase. ( 2 ) By multiple regression analysis, a significant negative correlation was found between baroreceptor sensitivity and the plasma ET, NO at the end of HUT in patients with positive HUT, but there was no relationship between BRS and NE. Conclusions During the syncope occure, the BRS in patients with VS decreased significantly compared with normal controls. The abnormal plasma ET, NO concentration might contribute to the mechanism of VS.

  11. Central exogenous nitric oxide decreases cardiac sympathetic drive and improves baroreflex control of heart rate in ovine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandra, Rohit; Hood, Sally G; May, Clive N

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased cardiac and renal sympathetic drive, which are both independent predictors of poor prognosis. A candidate mechanism for the centrally mediated sympathoexcitation in HF is reduced synthesis of the inhibitory neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO), resulting from downregulation of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). Therefore, we investigated the effects of increasing the levels of NO in the brain, or selectively in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and baroreflex control of CSNA and heart rate in ovine pacing-induced HF. The resting level of CSNA was significantly higher in the HF than in the normal group, but the resting level of RSNA was unchanged. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 500 μg · ml(-1)· h(-1)) in conscious normal sheep and sheep in HF inhibited CSNA and restored baroreflex control of heart rate, but there was no change in RSNA. Microinjection of SNP into the PVN did not cause a similar cardiac sympathoinhibition in either group, although the number of nNOS-positive cells was decreased in the PVN of sheep in HF. Reduction of endogenous NO with intracerebroventricular infusion of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester decreased CSNA in normal but not in HF sheep and caused no change in RSNA in either group. These findings indicate that endogenous NO in the brain provides tonic excitatory drive to increase resting CSNA in the normal state, but not in HF. In contrast, exogenously administered NO inhibited CSNA in both the normal and HF groups via an action on sites other than the PVN. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Influence of a multideficient diet from northeastern Brazil on resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity in conscious, freely moving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M.F. Monteiro

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The "regional basic diet" or RBD is a multideficient diet (providing 8% protein which is known to produce dietary deficiencies in some populations in northeastern Brazil. The present study investigated the effects of RBD-induced malnutrition on resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity in conscious rats. Malnourished rats were obtained by feeding dams the RBD during mating and pregnancy (RBD-1 group or during nursing and a 10-day period after weaning (RBD-2 group. At 90 days of age, only RBD-2 rats weighed significantly (P<0.001 less than control rats born to dams fed a standard commercial diet (23% protein during pregnancy and nursing. Baseline mean arterial pressure and heart rate of both RBD-1 and RBD-2 rats were comparable to those of controls. The slopes for both reflex bradycardia and tachycardia (bpm/mmHg induced by intravenous phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively, were unchanged in either RBD-1 (-2.08 ± 0.11 and -3.10 ± 0.43, respectively or RBD-2 (-2.32 ± 0.30 and -3.73 ± 0.53, respectively rats, when compared to controls (-2.09 ± 0.10 and -3.17 ± 0.33, respectively. This study shows that, after a prolonged period of nutritional recovery, the patterns of resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity of both pre- and postnatally malnourished rats were similar to those of controls. The decreased body weight and the tendency to increased reflex tachycardia in RBD-2 rats may suggest that this type of maternal malnutrition during lactation is more critical than during pregnancy.

  13. Proneness to worry is negatively associated with blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity: further evidence of the blood pressure emotional dampening hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Luis Carlos; Vila, Jaime; Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes differences in blood pressure (BP) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in relation to trait worry. 36 high worry and 21 low worry females were selected from scores on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Cardiovascular parameters were obtained during rest, a self-induced worry period, and defense reflex to intense auditory stimulation. Low worry participants exhibited greater BP during baseline and greater BRS both during baseline and the self-induced worry period than high worry participants. During the defense reflex, low worries present a greater increase in BP. It is concluded that low proneness to worry is associated with greater BP and BRS. Increases in BP during aversive stimulation activated a negative feedback mechanism to inhibit distress and emotional reactivity to negative stimulation. These results support the BP-emotional dampening hypothesis and suggest that the baroreflex can be a relevant mechanism in mediating this effect.

  14. Appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system in 1/R control of the total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Sora; Saito, Itsuro; Isoyama, Takashi; Hara, Shintaro; Yurimoto, Terumi; Li, Xinyang; Murakami, Haruka; Ono, Toshiya; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Abe, Yusuke

    2017-05-17

    1/R control is a physiological control method of the total artificial heart (TAH) with which long-term survival was obtained with animal experiments. However, 1/R control occasionally diverged in the undulation pump TAH (UPTAH) animal experiment. To improve the control stability of the 1/R control, appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system was investigated with frequency analysis and numerical simulation. In the frequency analysis, data of five goats in which the UPTAH was implanted were analyzed with first Fourier transform technique to examine the vasomotion frequency. The numerical simulation was carried out repeatedly changing baroreflex parameters and control time constant using the elements-expanded Windkessel model. Results of the frequency analysis showed that the 1/R control tended to diverge when very low frequency band that was an indication of the vasomotion frequency was relative high. In numerical simulation, divergence of the 1/R control could be reproduced and the boundary curves between the divergence and convergence of the 1/R control varied depending on the control time constant. These results suggested that the 1/R control tended to be unstable when the TAH recipient had high reflex speed in the baroreflex vascular system. Therefore, the control time constant should be adjusted appropriately with the individual vasomotion frequency.

  15. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Masson

    Full Text Available Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training and sedentary (S SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC, NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting, NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg, pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min, decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S. These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold and resting bradycardia (-13% at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28% and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7% only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  16. Medullary Endocannabinoids Contribute to the Differential Resting Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Altered Brain Renin-Angiotensin System Expression.

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    Schaich, Chris L; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2016-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), providing anatomical evidence for their role in arterial baroreflex modulation. To better understand the relationship between the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and endocannabinoid expression within the NTS, we measured dorsal medullary endocannabinoid tissue content and the effects of CB1 receptor blockade at this brain site on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in ASrAOGEN rats with low glial angiotensinogen, normal Sprague-Dawley rats and (mRen2)27 rats with upregulated brain RAS expression. Mass spectrometry revealed higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in (mRen2)27 compared to ASrAOGEN rats (2.70 ± 0.28 vs. 1.17 ± 0.09 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.01), while Sprague-Dawley rats had intermediate content (1.85 ± 0.27 ng/mg tissue). Microinjection of the CB1receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmol) into the NTS did not change cardiac BRS in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (1.04 ± 0.05 ms/mmHg baseline vs. 1.17 ± 0.11 ms/mmHg after 10 min). However, SR141716A in (mRen2)27 rats dose-dependently improved BRS in this strain: 0.36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.43 ± 0.03 to 0.71 ± 0.04 ms/mmHg (P < 0.001), and 36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.47 ± 0.02 to 0.94 ± 0.10 ms/mmHg (P < 0.01). In contrast, 0.36 pmol (1.50 ± 0.12 vs. 0.86 ± 0.08 ms/mmHg; P < 0.05) and 36 pmol (1.38 ± 0.16 vs. 0.46 ± 0.003 ms/mmHg; P < 0.01) of SR141716A significantly reduced BRS in ASrAOGEN rats. These observations reveal differential dose-related effects of the brain endocannabinoid system that influence cardiovagal BRS in animals with genetic alterations in the brain RAS.

  17. Baroreflexes of the rat. V. Tetanus-induced potentiation of ADN A-fiber responses at the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaorui; Dworkin, Barry R

    2007-12-01

    In a long-term neuromuscular blocked (NMB) rat preparation, tetanic stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) enhanced the A-fiber evoked responses (ERs) in the cardiovascular region, the nucleus of the solitary tract (dmNTS). The potentiation persisted for at least several hours and may be a mechanism for adaptive adjustment of the gain of the baroreflex, with functional implications for blood pressure regulation. Using a capacitance electrode, we selectively stimulated A-fibers and acquired a stable 10-h "A-fiber only" ER baseline at the dmNTS. Following baseline, an A+C-fiber activating tetanus was applied to the ADN. The tetanus consisted of 1,000 "high current" pulses (10 trains; 300 mus, 100 Hz, 1 s), with intertrain interval of 9 s. A 10-h A-fiber only posttetanic test phase repeated the stimulus pattern of the baseline. Fourteen tetanus experiments were done in 12 rats. Compared with the baseline before tetanus, the A-fiber ER magnitudes of posttetanus hours were larger [F(13, 247) = 3.407, P ADN A+C fiber-activating tetanus produced increases in the magnitude of the A-fiber ERs in the dmNTS that persisted for several hours. In an additional rat, application of an NMDA receptor antagonist, prior to the tetanus, blocked the potentiation effect. The stimulus protocols, magnitude and duration of the effect, and pharmacology resemble associative long-term potentiation (LTP).

  18. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students: a comparison of quiz-based and conventional teaching strategies in a laboratory exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-06-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with conventional teaching on the immediate learning during a laboratory exercise. We implemented two quizzes in a mandatory 4-h laboratory exercise on baroreflex physiology. A total of 155 second-year medical students were randomized to solve quizzes individually (intervention group I, n = 57), in groups of three to four students (intervention group II, n = 56), or not to perform any quizzes (control; intervention group III, n = 42). After the laboratory exercise, all students completed an individual test, which encompassed two recall questions, two intermediate questions, and two integrated questions. The integrated questions were of moderate and advanced difficulty, respectively. Finally, students completed an evaluation form. Intervention group I reached the highest total test scores and proved best at answering the integrated question of advanced difficulty. Moreover, there was an overall difference between groups for student evaluations of the quality of the teaching, which was highest for intervention group II. In conclusion, solving quizzes individually during a laboratory exercise may enhance learning, whereas solving quizzes in groups is associated with higher student satisfaction.

  19. Blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity are not different in spontaneously hypertensive rats and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-shu ZHAN; Yun-feng GUAN; Ding-feng SU; Chao-yu MIAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate and compare hemodynamic phenotypes of blood pressure (BP), blood pressure variability (BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in genetic hypertensive rats. Methods: BP was recorded continuously in conscious, freely moving rats using a computerized technique. BPV was expressed as the standard deviation of beat-to-beat BP values during a 1-h period. BRS was determined by measuring the heart period prolongation in response to the elevation in BP produced by an intravenous injection of phenylephrine. Results: Body weight and heart period were not different between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) at the age of 15weeks. The BP level was markedly higher in SHR-SP than SHR, whereas there were no significant differences in BPV and BRS. Quantitatively, systolic, diastolic and mean BP were significantly elevated by 36.9%, 42.9% and 39.5%, respectively,in SHR-SP compared with SHR (P<0.01). However, their variabilities were elevated only by 14.0%, 0.4% and 10.1%, respectively, without statistical significance (P>0.05). Conclusion: BPV and BRS were not changed in parallel with the BP alterations in SHR and SHR-SP.

  20. Blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, and end organ damage in hybrid offspring of spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-hui XIE; Fu-ming SHEN; Chao-yu MIAO; Ding-feng SU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the blood pressure (BP), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and organ damage in hybrids of spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats were crossbred, and the F1 hybrids were inbred randomly to produce an F2 generation.At the age of 52 weeks, the F1 and F2 hybrids were tested to determine BP and BRS in a conscious state. Histopathological examinations were carried out after BP recording and BRS studies. Results: BP and BRS were not different in F1 and F2 hybrids. BRS was inversely related to systolic BP (SBP) in male, female, or whole populations of hybrids. Quantitatively, BRS values were one-third determined by SBP level (the determinant coefficient was 0.326). The indexes for left ventricular hypertrophy, aortic hypertrophy, and renal damage were all positively related to BP, and negatively related to BRS. In multiple-regression analysis, left ventricular and aortic hypertrophy and glomerulosclerosis score were all most significantly associated with lower BRS and higher systolic BP. The contribution of BRS to left ventricular and aortic hypertrophy and glomerulosclerosis was greater than that of SBP. Conclusion: The present work with hybrid rats demonstrated quantitatively that the BRS value was one-third determined by SBP level. Both BP level and BRS value contributed greatly to the hypertensive organ damage. However,the contribution of BRS to the hypertensive organ damage was greater than that of BP level in these rats.

  1. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  2. Sex differences in baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, and end organ damage in the TGR(mRen2)27 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan S; DeMarco, Vincent G; Heesch, Cheryl M; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Schneider, Rebecca I; Rehmer, Nathan T; Tilmon, Roger D; Ferrario, Carlos M; Sowers, James R

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate sex differences in baroreflex and heart rate variability (HRV) dysfunction and indexes of end-organ damage in the TG(mRen2)27 (Ren2) rat, a model of renin overexpression and tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system overactivation. Blood pressure (via telemetric monitoring), blood pressure variability [BPV; SD of systolic blood pressure (SBP)], spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, HRV [HRV Triangular Index (HRV-TI), standard deviation of the average NN interval (SDNN), low and high frequency power (LF and HF, respectively), and Poincaré plot analysis (SD1, SD2)], and cardiovascular function (pressure-volume loop analysis and proteinuria) were evaluated in male and female 10-wk-old Ren2 and Sprague Dawley rats. The severity of hypertension was greater in Ren2 males (R2-M) than in Ren2 females (R2-F). Increased BPV, suppression of baroreflex gain, decreased HRV, and associated end-organ damage manifested as cardiac dysfunction, myocardial remodeling, elevated proteinuria, and tissue oxidative stress were more pronounced in R2-M compared with R2-F. During the dark cycle, HRV-TI and SDNN were negatively correlated with SBP within R2-M and positively correlated within R2-F; within R2-M, these indexes were also negatively correlated with end-organ damage [left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)]. Furthermore, within R2-M only, LVH was strongly correlated with indexes of HRV representing predominantly vagal (HF, SD1), but not sympathetic (LF, SD2), variability. These data demonstrated relative protection in females from autonomic dysfunction and end-organ damage associated with elevated blood pressure in the Ren2 model of hypertension.

  3. Decreased baroreflex sensitivity is linked to sympathovagal imbalance, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subha, M; Pal, Pravati; Pal, G K; Habeebullah, S; Adithan, C; Sridhar, M G

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) has been reported as a cardiovascular (CV) risk. We assessed the sympathovagal imbalance (SVI) and the association of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) with CV risks in PIH. A total of 125 pregnant women having a risk factor for PIH were followed till term and the incidence of PIH was observed. Retrospectively, they were divided into two groups: Group I (those who did not develop PIH, n = 82) and Group II (those who developed PIH, n = 43). Blood pressure variability (BPV) parameters including baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), spectral heart rate variability (HRV), autonomic function tests (AFTs), inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, TNF-α, interferon-γ), and OS markers were measured in both the groups. Alterations in parasympathetic and sympathetic components of AFTs were analyzed. Link of various parameters to BRS was assessed by correlation and multiple regression analysis. Parasympathetic components of AFTs were decreased from the early part of pregnancy and sympathetic components were increased toward the later part of pregnancy. Decreased BRS, the marker of CV risk, was more prominent in Group II subjects. Independent contribution of interleukin-6 (β = 0.276, P = 0.020), TNF-α (β = 0.408, P = 0.002), interferon-γ (β = 0.355, P = 0.008), and thiobarbituric-acid reactive substance (β = 0.287, P = 0.015) to BRS was found to be significant. It was concluded that sympathetic overactivity that develops more in the later part (third trimester) of pregnancy contributes to SVI and genesis of PIH. In PIH women, CV risks are present from the beginning of pregnancy that intensifies in the later part of pregnancy. Retrograde inflammation and oxidative stress contribute to the decreased BRS in PIH.

  4. ANG-(1–7) DEFICIENCY AND BAROREFLEX IMPAIRMENT PRECEDE THE ANTENATAL BETAMETHASONE EXPOSURE-INDUCED ELEVATION IN BLOOD PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A.; Rose, James C.; Chappell, Mark C.; Diz, Debra I.

    2014-01-01

    Betamethasone is administered to accelerate lung development and improve survival of premature infants, but may be associated with hypertension later in life. In a sheep model of fetal programming resulting from exposure at 80th day of gestation to Betamethasone (Betaexposed), adult sheep at 6–9 months or 1.8 yrs of age have elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP), and attenuated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS) for control of heart rate compared to age-matched controls, associated with imbalances in angiotensin (Ang) II versus Ang-(1–7) tone. At 6 weeks of age, evoked BRS is already low in the Beta-exposed animals. In this study we assessed the potential contribution of the renin-angiotensin system to the impaired sBRS. Female lambs (6 weeks old) with Beta-exposure in utero had similar MAP to control lambs (78±2 vs 77±2 mm Hg, n = 4–5 per group), but lower sBRS (8±1 vs 16±3 ms/mm Hg; p < 0.05) and impaired heart rate variability (HRV). Peripheral AT1 receptor blockade using candesartan lowered MAP in both groups (~10 mm Hg) and improved sBRS and HRV in Beta-exposed lambs to a level similar to control. AT7 receptor blockade by infusion of D-ala Ang-(1–7) (700 ng/kg/min for 45 min) reduced sBRS 46±10 % in Beta-exposed vs in control lambs (p<0.15) and increased MAP in both groups (~6±2 mm Hg). Our data reveal that Beta-exposure impairs sBRS and HRV at a time point preceding the elevation in MAP via mechanisms involving an imbalance in the Ang II/Ang-(1–7) ratio consistent with a progressive loss in Ang-(1–7) function. PMID:22215705

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7) deficiency and baroreflex impairment precede the antenatal Betamethasone exposure-induced elevation in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2012-02-01

    Betamethasone is administered to accelerate lung development and improve survival of premature infants but may be associated with hypertension later in life. In a sheep model of fetal programming resulting from exposure at day 80 of gestation to Betamethasone (Beta-exposed), adult sheep at 6 to 9 months or 1.8 years of age have elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) and attenuated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS) for control of heart rate compared to age-matched controls associated with imbalances in angiotensin (Ang) II vs Ang-(1-7) tone. At 6 weeks of age, evoked BRS is already low in the Beta-exposed animals. In this study, we assessed the potential contribution of the renin-angiotensin system to the impaired sBRS. Female lambs (6 weeks old) with Beta exposure in utero had similar MAP to control lambs (78±2 vs 77±2 mm Hg, n=4-5 per group), but lower sBRS (8±1 vs 16±3 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired heart rate variability. Peripheral AT1 receptor blockade using candesartan lowered MAP in both groups (≈10 mm Hg) and improved sBRS and heart rate variability in Beta-exposed lambs to a level similar to control. AT7 receptor blockade by infusion of D-ala Ang-(1-7) (700 ng/kg/min for 45 minutes) reduced sBRS 46%±10% in Beta-exposed vs in control lambs (P<0.15) and increased MAP in both groups (≈6±2 mm Hg). Our data reveal that Beta exposure impairs sBRS and heart rate variability at a time point preceding the elevation in MAP via mechanisms involving an imbalance in the Ang II/Ang-(1-7) ratio consistent with a progressive loss in Ang-(1-7) function.

  6. Bivariate phase-rectified signal averaging for assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity: pilot study of the technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Axel; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Barthel, Petra; Müller, Alexander; Ulm, Kurt; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), an index of autonomic function, poses practical challenges. In this pilot study, we propose a novel technique for assessment of spontaneous BRS based on bivariate phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA). This is an extension of the monovariate PRSA technology used for calculation of deceleration capacity. A prospective, observational study was conducted in a training cohort of 146 patients with heart failure (New York Heart Association class 2.7 ± 0.8, left ventricular ejection fraction 23.6% ± 9.0%) presenting with sinus rhythm. In all patients, 10-minute recordings of ECG and arterial and blood pressure were obtained in the supine resting position. The algorithm for BRS assessment based on bivariate PRSA (BRS(PRSA)) included (1) identification of heartbeat intervals occurring at the time of systolic pressure increases, (2) selection of heartbeat adjacent interval sections, (3) alignment and (4) averaging of these segments, and (5) quantification of the average heart beat interval change by Haar wavelet analysis. Primary end point was death of any cause. During mean follow-up of 2.7 ± 1.1 years, 42 patients (28.8%) died. BRS(PRSA) was significantly associated with the primary end point (3.7 ± 5.3 ms vs -0.33 ± 6.6 ms in survivors and nonsurvivors, respectively). BRS(PRSA) yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 69.8% (95% confidence interval, 59.9-79.7), which was comparable to the area under the curve of left ventricular ejection fraction (70.4%; 95% confidence interval, 61.3-79.5). Using the optimum dichotomy for BRS(PRSA) of 1.14 milliseconds, 52 (36%) patients had an abnormal BRS(PRSA). The 3-year mortality risk of these patients was 45.3% compared to 19.0% in patients with normal BRS(PRSA). On multivariate analysis, abnormal BRS(PRSA) was an independent risk factor from left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 30% and New York Heart Association class > II. BRS(PRSA) is an

  7. Acute AT(1)-receptor blockade reverses the hemodynamic and baroreflex impairment in adult sheep exposed to antenatal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A; Rose, James C; Figueroa, Jorge P; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I; Averill, David B

    2010-08-01

    To accelerate lung development and protect neonates from other early developmental problems, synthetic steroids are administered maternally in the third trimester, exposing fetuses that are candidates for premature delivery to them. However, steroid exposure at this point of gestation may lead to elevated blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] during adolescence. We hypothesize that fetal exposure to steroids activates the renin-angiotensin system, inducing an elevation in blood pressure and attenuation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) that is angiotensin II dependent in early adulthood. To test this hypothesis, fetal sheep were exposed to betamethasone (Beta) or vehicle (control) administered to ewes at day 80 of gestation and delivered at full term. At 1.8 yr of age, male offspring were instrumented for conscious recording of MAP, heart rate, and measurement of BRS [as low-frequency-alpha, high-frequency-alpha, sequence (seq) UP, seq DOWN, and seq TOTAL]. Beta-exposed sheep (n = 6) had higher MAP than control sheep (n = 5) (93 + or - 2 vs. 84 + or - 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Acute blockade of angiotensin type 1 receptors with candesartan (0.3 mg/kg iv) normalized MAP in Beta-exposed sheep (85 + or - 4 mmHg), with no effect in control sheep (82 + or - 3 mmHg). Before angiotensin type 1 blockade, BRS maximum gain was significantly lower in Beta-exposed vs. control sheep (11 + or - 3 vs. 26 + or - 3 ms/mmHg, P < 0.0.01). However, 45 min after candesartan injection, BRS was increased in Beta-exposed (21 + or - 5 ms/mmHg) and control (35 + or - 4 ms/mmHg) sheep. Heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) revealed lower HRV (SD of beat-to-beat interval and root mean square of successive beat-to-beat differences in R-R interval duration) and higher BPV (SD of MAP, systolic arterial pressure in low-frequency range) in Beta-exposed sheep. Candesartan partially restored HRV in Beta-exposed sheep and fully corrected BPV. Thus, in utero exposure to

  8. 清醒大鼠动脉压力感受性反射的功能研究%Arterial baroreflex function in conscious rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏定冯; 缪朝玉

    2002-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex (ABR) is a very important mechanism in the regulation of cardiovascular activities. As ABR function is largely inhibited by anesthesia, its measurement in conscious animal becomes important. The present review summarizes the works concerning ABR function in conscious rats completed in our department in the last 10 years. Firstly, a new method was established to measure arterial baroreflex-blood pressure control (ABR-BP).ABR-BP and baroreflex sensitivity measured with classic method are two different parts of the ABR function.Secondly, it was proposed that ABR function predicted the end-organ damage in hypertension. Thirdly, interrup tion of ABR induced severe end-organ damages. Increased blood pressure variability (BPV) and activation ofrenin angiotensin system were involved in the mechanisms underlying organ damages in sinoaortic denervation (SAD)rats. Fourthly, we propose that amelioration of ABR function may serve as a new strategy for improving the prognosis of cardiovascular diseases. Ketanserin improved the impaired ABR function in SHR. Finally, the possi bility to develop a strain of rats with spontaneous deficiency on ABR function is mentioned.%本文综述本室近10年来对清醒自由活动大鼠动脉压力感受性反射(ABR)的功能性研究.首先,建立了ABR对血压的控制(ABR-BP)的测量方法.ABR-BP是与用经典方法测量的ABR功能(ABR-HP)不同的成份.其次,我们的研究表明ABR功能与高血压的器官损伤有关.损毁ABR功能可导致严重的器官损伤.该损伤的机制与血压波动性增高、肾素血管紧张素系统激活有关.酮色林能改善ABR功能.基于对酮色林研究的结果,我们提出改善ABR功能可作为改善某些心血管疾病预后的新策略.最后,提到了我们正在进行中的自发性ABR功能缺陷大鼠的培育.

  9. Dynamic control of maximal ventricular elastance via the baroreflex and force-frequency relation in awake dogs before and after pacing-induced heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Hammond, Robert L.; Ichinose, Masashi; Soltani, Soroor; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    We investigated to what extent maximal ventricular elastance (Emax) is dynamically controlled by the arterial baroreflex and force-frequency relation in conscious dogs and to what extent these mechanisms are attenuated after the induction of heart failure (HF). We mathematically analyzed spontaneous beat-to-beat hemodynamic variability. First, we estimated Emax for each beat during a baseline period using the ventricular unstressed volume determined with the traditional multiple beat method during vena cava occlusion. We then jointly identified the transfer functions (system gain value and time delay per frequency) relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) to Emax (ABP→Emax) and beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate (HR) to Emax (HR→Emax) to characterize the dynamic properties of the arterial baroreflex and force-frequency relation, respectively. During the control condition, the ABP→Emax transfer function revealed that ABP perturbations caused opposite direction Emax changes with a gain value of −0.023 ± 0.012 ml−1, whereas the HR→Emax transfer function indicated that HR alterations caused same direction Emax changes with a gain value of 0.013 ± 0.005 mmHg·ml−1·(beats/min)−1. Both transfer functions behaved as low-pass filters. However, the ABP→Emax transfer function was more sluggish than the HR→Emax transfer function with overall time constants (indicator of full system response time to a sudden input change) of 11.2 ± 2.8 and 1.7 ± 0.5 s (P < 0.05), respectively. During the HF condition, the ABP→Emax and HR→Emax transfer functions were markedly depressed with gain values reduced to −0.0002 ± 0.007 ml−1 and −0.001 ± 0.004 mmHg·ml−1·(beats/min)−1 (P < 0.1). Emax is rapidly and significantly controlled at rest, but this modulation is virtually abolished in HF. PMID:20435845

  10. Effects of glucose-insulin-potassium on baroreflex sensitivity, left ventricular function and ventricular arrhythmia in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Guo; SHU He; SHEN Fu-Ming; MIAO Chao-Yu; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    Objective:Glucose-insulin-potassium(GIK) is clinically used for reducing mortality in acute myocardial infarction(MI). It is known that ventricular arrhythmia, left ventricular dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity(BRS) are the three major determinants for predicting the mortality after acute MI. The present work was designed to study the effects of GIK on BRS, ventricular arrhythmia, and left ventricular function in rats with coronary artery ligature. Sprague-Dawley rats were used and the myocardial infarction was produced by ligature of the left anterior descending artery. Five weeks after coronary artery ligation, BRS was measured in conscious state with a computerized blood pressure monitoring system and left ventricular function and electrocardiogram were determined in the anaesthetized state in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. It was found that GIK did not affect the blood pressure and heart period in both conscious and anaesthetized rats. GIK did not enhance BRS, but reduced ventricular arrhythmia and improved left ventricular function by reducing left ventricular end diastolic pressure in anaesthetized rats with MI. It is proposed that reducing ventricular arrhythmia and improving left ventricular function contribute to the effect of GIK on reducing the mortality after MI.

  11. Dose-response relationship of baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability to individually-tailored exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Ferdinando; Manzi, Vincenzo; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Sposato, Barbara; Massaro, Michele; Cerrito, Anna; Rosano, Giuseppe; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2013-06-20

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Baroreflex Sensitivity (BRS) are impaired in patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and carry negative prognosis. Exercise training improves these parameters. However, the relationship between exercise training with HRV and BRS has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in CHF patients changes in HRV and BRS are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load (TL). Twenty patients with stable postinfarction CHF under optimal medical treatment were randomized to either aerobic continuous training (ACT) or aerobic interval training (AIT) for 12weeks. Individualized TL was monitored by the Training Impulses (TRIMPi) method, which was determined using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test at baseline. HRV (standard deviation of mean R-R interval) and BRS were assessed at rest and 3weeks apart, throughout the study. HRV, BRS and R-R interval increased significantly with training, being very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.75 to 0.96; Pincrease in functional capacity. No significant differences were detected between ACT and AIT in any variable. These results suggest that improvements in HRV and BRS by exercise training in CHF patients are dose related to TL in a non-linear fashion on an individual basis, with optimal results at moderate doses of exercise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. KCa1.1 is potential marker for distinguishing Ah-type baroreceptor neurons in NTS and contributes to sex-specific presynaptic neurotransmission in baroreflex afferent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qu, Mei-Yu; Guo, Xin-Jing; Li, Guo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yang; Ban, Tao; Sun, Hong-Li; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-09-14

    Sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of circulation has been described in baroreflex due largely to the function of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs, 1st-order) in nodose. However, it remains unclear if sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmission could also be observed in the central synapses within nucleus of solitary track (NTS, 2nd-order). According to the principle of no mixed neurotransmission among afferents and differentiation of Ah- and A-types to iberiotoxin (IbTX) observed in nodose, the 2nd-order Ah-type BRNs are highly expected. To test this hypothesis, the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in identified 2nd-order BRNs before and after IbTX using brain slice and whole-cell patch. These results showed that, in male rats, the dynamics of EPSCs in capsaicin-sensitive C-types were dramatically altered by IbTX, but not in capsaicin-insensitive A-types. Interestingly, near 50% capsaicin-insensitive neurons in females showed similar effects to C-types, suggesting the existence of Ah-types in NTS, which may be the likely reason why the females had lower blood pressure and higher sensitivity to aortic depressor nerve stimulation via KCa1.1-mediated presynaptic glutamate release from Ah-type afferent terminals.

  13. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  14. Baroreflex activation therapy provides new chances for resistant hypertension%顽固性高血压新疗法:激活动脉压力感受性反射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 程磊; 苏定冯; 刘爱军

    2013-01-01

    顽固性高血压约占高血压患病总人群的20%~30%,是影响公众健康的一大难题.压力感受性反射激活疗法(BAT)通过电刺激颈动脉窦压力感受器激活压力感受性反射,可明显降低血压、心率等.据此,美国CVRx研发出"Rheos",植入到颈动脉窦附近,可以慢性激活压力感受性反射,用于治疗顽固性高血压和重症心衰.其治疗机制可总结为:通过抑制交感神经和兴奋迷走神经,减少肾素的分泌,缓慢地增加肾脏的排泄功能,同时降低心率,扩张血管减少外周阻力,进而降低了动脉压同时促进钠平衡.%Resistant hypertension is a severe public health problem and about 20% ~ 30% of all hypertensive patients belong to resistant hypertension. Baroreflex activation therapy ( BAT ) can reduce blood pressure and heart rate by electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus barorecepters. Rheos Baroreflex Hypertension Therapy System ( Rheos, by CRVx. Inc, USA ) could be applied to treat resistant hypertension and severe heart failure by chronically activating baroreflex. Its mechanism can be concluded that BAT lowers arterial pressure and reduces heart rate by inhibiting sympathetic nerve and exciting vagus nerve.

  15. Contribution of endothelial nitric oxide to blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Pohar, Bojan; Jordan, Jens; Paranjape, Sachin; Farley, Ginnie; Biaggioni, Italo

    2007-01-01

    Impaired endothelial-derived NO (eNO) is invoked in the development of many pathological conditions. Systemic inhibition of NO synthesis, used to assess the importance of NO to blood pressure (BP) regulation, increases BP by approximately 15 mm Hg. This approach underestimates the importance of eNO, because BP is restrained by baroreflex mechanisms and does not account for a role of neurally derived NO. To overcome these limitations, we induced complete autonomic blockade with trimethaphan in 17 normotensive healthy control subjects to eliminate baroreflex mechanisms and contribution of neurally derived NO. Under these conditions, the increase in BP reflects mostly blockade of tonic eNO. N(G)-Monomethyl-l-arginine (250 microg/kg per minute IV) increased mean BP by 6+/-3.7 mm Hg (from 77 to 82 mm Hg) in intact subjects and by 21+/-8.4 mm Hg (from 75 to 96 mm Hg) during autonomic blockade. We did not find a significant contribution of neurally derived NO to BP regulation after accounting for baroreflex buffering. To further validate this approach, we compared the effect of NOS inhibition during autonomic blockade in 10 normotensive individuals with that of 6 normotensive smokers known to have endothelial dysfunction but who were otherwise normal. As expected, normotensive smokers showed a significantly lower increase in systolic BP during selective eNO blockade (11+/-4.5 versus 30+/-2.3 mm Hg in normotensive individuals; Pstates. Our results suggest that eNO is one of the most potent metabolic determinants of BP in humans, tonically restraining it by approximately 30 mm Hg.

  16. Effect of pioglitazone on arterial baroreflex sensitivity and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Fumio; Yuyama, Reisuke; Murakawa, Kousuke; Miyasaka, Yoko; Yoshida, Susumu; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2012-06-01

    Pioglitazone has been shown to reduce the occurrence of fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the mechanisms of such favorable effects remain speculative. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone on arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in 30 DM patients with recent MI. Patients were randomly assigned to those taking pioglitazone (n = 15) and those not taking pioglitazone (n = 15) at 4 weeks after the onset of MI. BRS, MSNA, calculated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), and plasma adiponectin were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. Pioglitazone increased plasma adiponectin (from 6.9 ± 3.3 μg/dL to 12.2 ± 7.1 μg/dL) and reduced HOMA-IR (from 4.0 ± 2.2 to 2.1 ± 0.9). In the pioglitazone group, MSNA decreased significantly (from 37 ± 7 bursts/min to 25 ± 8 bursts/min) and BRS increased significantly (from 6.7 ± 3.0 to 9.9 ± 3.2 ms/mm Hg) after 12 weeks. Furthermore, a significant relationship was found between the change in MSNA and HOMA-IR (r = 0.6, P = 0.042). Thus, pioglitazone decreased the sympathetic nerve traffic through the improvement of insulin resistance in DM patients with recent MI, which indicate that the sympathoinhibitory effects of pioglitazone may, at least in part, have contributed to the beneficial effects of pioglitazone.

  17. Carotid baroreceptor-muscle sympathetic relation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, R F; Eckberg, D L

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the relation between carotid distending pressure and muscle sympathetic activity in humans. Carotid baroreceptors of nine healthy subjects were compressed or stretched for 5 s with graded neck pressure or suction (+40 to -65 mmHg), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded. The results delineate several features of human baroreflex function. First, the carotid-muscle sympathetic relation is well described by an inverse sigmoid function. Second, a linear relation exists between carotid distending pressure and sympathetic outflow over a range of approximately 25 mmHg. Third, sympathetic responses to changes of carotid pressures are asymmetric; increases of sympathetic activity during carotid compression are much greater than reductions of sympathetic activity during carotid stretch. Fourth, at rest, normal subjects operate near the threshold level for sympathetic excitation. Thus the carotid-muscle sympathetic baroreflex is poised to oppose reductions more effectively than elevations of arterial pressure, and the range of pressures over which the reflex is active is wider than thought hitherto.

  18. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  19. Effects of fentanyl and sufentanil on baroreflex sensitivity in preoperative patients%常用剂量芬太尼与舒芬太尼对术前压力反射敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜唯佳; 陈杰; 王祥瑞

    2011-01-01

    研究临床常用剂量的芬太尼和舒芬太尼对患者术前压力反射敏感性(BRS)的影响.方法 择期全麻剖胸手术患者60例,年龄18~65岁,ASA Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,随机均分为芬太尼组(F组)和舒芬太尼组(S组),组内按照不同用药剂量再分为三个亚组:F1组、F2组、F3组分别输注芬太尼2、4、6 μg/kg,S1组、S2组、S3组分别输注舒芬太尼0.2、0.4、0.6μg/kg.记录入室后和给药后BRS.结果 给药后F3、S2、S3组BRS均显著降低,分别下降(34.1±11.0)%、(33.5±13.0)%、(45.0±15.0)%(P<0.05).结论 临床常用剂量芬太尼和舒芬太尼均能降低BRS,尤以芬太尼>6 μg/kg、舒芬太尼>0.4 μg/kg最明显.等效剂量舒芬太尼较芬太尼对压力反射的抑制作用更显著.%Objective To investigate the effects of fentanyl and sufentanil on baroreflex sensitivity in pre-operative patients. Methods Sixty patients ASA I or Ⅱ , aged 18-65 years, scheduled for elective thoracic surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive fentanyl (group F) or sufentanil (group S). Each group was divided into three subgroups by different doses: group F1 fentanyl 2 μg/kg, group F2 fentanyl 4 μg/kg, group F3 fentanyl 6 μg/kg; group S1 sufentanil 0. 2 μg/kg, group S2 sufentanil 0. 4 μg/kg; group S3 sufentanil 0. 6 fig/kg. Baroreflex response was triggered by bolus intravenous injection of phenylephrine. The quantitative relationship between systolic arterial pressure and subsequent cardiac cycle lengths was evaluated as an index of reflex performance. BRS values were measured before and after fentanyl or sufentanil infusion. Results The BRS in group F3, group S2 and group S3 decreased by (34.1 ± 11. 0)%, (33. 5 ± 13. 0)%, (45. 0±15. 0)%, respectively(P6 μg/kg) or sufentanil 00. 4 μg/kg) can decrease BRS in preoperative patients, and equipotent dose of sufentanil has a greater effect on BRS than that of fentanyl.

  20. The functional role of PI3K in maintenance of blood pressure and baroreflex suppression in (mRen2)27 and mRen2.Lewis rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Exazevia M; Aileru, Azeez A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Averill, David B; Diz, Debra I

    2011-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling pathway in brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats, but not Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, contributes to elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP). The role of PI3K in the regulation of blood pressure or autonomic function in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is yet to be established in other Ang II-dependent models of hypertension. Thus, we microinjected PI3K inhibitors, wortmannin or LY294002, into the NTS, and measured MAP, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for heart rate (HR) control, and HR variability (HRV) in mRen2.Lewis congenic and (mRen2)27 transgenic rats. Bilateral NTS microinjections of wortmannin (100 nmol/L; 50 nL) reduced MAP in (mRen2)27 and mRen2.Lewis rats (33 ± 5 mm Hg, n = 7, and 32 ± 6 mm Hg, n = 9, respectively) for approximately 90 minutes. Spectral and sequence analysis showed improvements in spontaneous BRS and HRV (50%-100%) after treatment in both hypertensive strains. Injections of wortmannin into NTS of Hannover Sprague-Dawley or Lewis control rats failed to alter MAP, BRS, or HRV. In mRen2.Lewis, but not in control Lewis rats, LY294002 (50 μmole/L) reduced MAP and increased BRS and HRV similar to wortmannin. Thus, the pharmacologic blockade of the PI3K signaling pathway in NTS reveals an important contribution to resting MAP and BRS in rats with overexpression of the Ren2 gene.

  1. Reflex influence of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on respiratory resistance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klawe JJ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our previous study demonstrated that selective carotid baroreceptors activation decreases airway resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance. Twenty healthy men aged between 20 and 25 were included in the study. Selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.39 ± 0.01(SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level. We conclude that in humans, carotid baroreceptors might have a background contribution to bronchodilator tone. This observation seems to be important for clinical situations of impairment of baroreflex function.

  2. 清醒大鼠动脉压力感受性反射-血压控制的测定%Determination of arterial baroreflex-blood pressure control in conscious rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏定冯; 陈力; 孔宪波; 程勇

    2002-01-01

    目的:研究清醒大鼠动脉压力感受性反射(ABR)-血压控制(ABR-BP)的测定.方法:用计算机化清醒自由活动大鼠血压连续监测技术,记录动物的血压.ABR-BP测定的原理是比较阻断ABR前后机体对血管活性物质反应的差异.结果:(1)用血管紧张素-Ⅱ测得的ABR-BP值与用新福林测得的ABR-BP值密切相关,在一定范围内药物的剂量不影响结果.(2)ABR-BP与ABR-心动间期控制(ABR-HP)显著相关.(3)麻醉抑制ABR-BP,ABR-BP本身存在昼夜节律性变化.(4)血压波动性与ABR-BP相关,而与ABR-HP不相关.(5)高血压时ABR-BP受损.结论:本项工作使ABR-BP的测定成为可能.ABR-BP在维持血压的稳定性中起重要作用,在高血压时其功能受损.%AIM:To study the determination of arterial baroreflexblood pressure control (ABR-BP) in conscious rats.METHODS:Blood pressure was continuously recorded with a computerized system in conscious freely moving rats.The principle of ABR-BP measurement is to compare the pressor response to a vasoactive drug (angiotensin Ⅱ ) before and after the interruption of this reflex.RESULTS:(1) ABR-BP values revealed by angiotensin Ⅱ were closely correlated with those by phenylephrine.Doses of angiotensin Ⅱ did not influence the results within certain range.(2) ABR-BP was well correlated with arterial baroreflex-heart period control (ABR-HP).(3) Anesthesia inhibited ABR-BP.There existed a circadian variation of ABR-BP in WKY rats.(4) Blood pressure variability was closely related to ABR-BP,but not to ABR-HP.(5) ABR-BP was impaired in hypertensive rots.CONCLUSION:ABRBP is an important parameter to reflect the function of ABR.The present work makes it possible to determine ABR-BP in conscious rats.ABR-BP plays an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability and it is impaired in hypertension.

  3. Efeitos da exposição à fumaça lateral do cigarro sobre o barorreflexo em ratos adultos Efectos de la exposición al humo lateral del cigarrillo sobre el barorreflejo en ratones adultos Sidestream cigarette smoke exposure effects on baroreflex in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor E. Valenti

    2011-02-01

    N: Nuestros datos sugieren que tres semanas de exposición a la HLC no son suficientes para causar daño significativo a los parámetros cardiovasculares y sensibilidad barorreflexa en ratones Wistar normotensos.BACKGROUND: It has been evidenced in the literature that exposure to cigarette smoke causes hypertension in rats; however, it has not been demonstrated if the baroreflex function is impaired before the animal becomes hypertensive. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated short-term effects of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS exposure on baroreflex function in Wistar normotensive rats. METHODS: Rats were exposed to SSCS during three weeks, 180 minutes, five days per week, at a concentration of monoxide carbon between 100-300 ppm. Mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were evaluated through cannulation of the femoral vein and artery. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between control and SSCS groups regarding basal mean arterial pressure and heart rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic components of the baroreflex function. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that three weeks of exposure to SSCS is not enough to significantly impair cardiovascular parameters and baroreflex sensitivity in normotensive Wistar rats.

  4. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving...... questions, and two integrated questions. The integrated questions were of moderate and advanced difficulty, respectively. Finally, students completed an evaluation form. Intervention group I reached the highest total test scores and proved best at answering the integrated question of advanced difficulty....... Moreover, there was an overall difference between groups for student evaluations of the quality of the teaching, which was highest for intervention group II. In conclusion, solving quizzes individually during a laboratory exercise may enhance learning, whereas solving quizzes in groups is associated...

  5. A comparison of autonomic responses in humans induced by two simulation models of weightlessness: lower body positive pressure and 6 degrees head-down tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q; Sugiyama, Y; Kamiya, A; Mano, T

    2000-04-12

    Six-degree head-down tilt (HDT) is well accepted as an effective weightlessness model in humans. However, some researchers utilized lower body positive pressure (LBPP) to simulate the cardiovascular and renal effects of a decreased gravitational stress. In order to determine whether LBPP was a suitable model for simulated weightlessness, we compared the differences between these two methods. Ten healthy males, aged 21-41 years, were subjected to graded LBPP at 10, 20 and 30 mmHg, as well as 6 degrees HDT. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was microneurographically recorded from the tibial nerve along with cardiovascular variables. We found that MSNA decreased by 27% to a similar extent both at low levels of LBPP (10 and 20 mmHg) and HDT. However, at a high level of LBPP (30 mmHg), MSNA tended to increase. Mean arterial pressure was elevated significantly by 11% (10 mmHg) at 30 mmHg LBPP, but remained unchanged at low levels of LBPP and HDT. Heart rate did not change during the entire LBPP and HDT procedures. Total peripheral resistance markedly increased by 36% at 30 mmHg LBPP, but decreased by 9% at HDT. Both stroke volume and cardiac output tended to decrease at 30 mmHg LBPP, but increased at HDT. These results suggest that although both LBPP and HDT induce fluid shifts from the lower body toward the thoracic compartment, autonomic responses are different, especially at LBPP greater than 20 mmHg. We note that high levels of LBPP (>20 mmHg) activate not only cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflexes, but also intramuscular mechanoreflexes, while 6 degrees HDT only activates cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. We conclude that LBPP is not a suitable model for simulated weightlessness in humans.

  6. Influence of cigarette smoking on human autonomic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, O. N.; Smith, M. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Goldstein, D. S.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although cigarette smoking is known to lead to widespread augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity, little is known about the effects of smoking on directly measured human sympathetic activity and its reflex control. METHODS AND RESULTS. We studied the acute effects of smoking two research-grade cigarettes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and on arterial baroreflex-mediated changes of sympathetic and vagal neural cardiovascular outflows in eight healthy habitual smokers. Measurements were made during frequency-controlled breathing, graded Valsalva maneuvers, and carotid baroreceptor stimulation with ramped sequences of neck pressure and suction. Smoking provoked the following changes: Arterial pressure increased significantly, and RR intervals, RR interval spectral power at the respiratory frequency, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Plasma nicotine levels increased significantly, but plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y levels did not change. Peak sympathetic nerve activity during and systolic pressure overshoots after Valsalva straining increased significantly in proportion to increases of plasma nicotine levels. The average carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relation shifted rightward and downward on arterial pressure and RR interval axes; average gain, operational point, and response range did not change. CONCLUSIONS. In habitual smokers, smoking acutely reduces baseline levels of vagal-cardiac nerve activity and completely resets vagally mediated arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Smoking also reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity but augments increases of sympathetic activity triggered by brief arterial pressure reductions. This pattern of autonomic changes is likely to influence smokers' responses to acute arterial pressure reductions importantly.

  7. Avaliação da função barorreflexa em ratos jovens espontaneamente hipertensos Evaluación de la función barorrefleja en ratas jóvenes espontáneamente hipertensas Evaluation of baroreflex function in young spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor E. Valenti

    2009-03-01

    ratas espontáneamente hipertensas como de WKY. Se consideraron estadísticamente significantes diferencias con un valor de p BACKGROUND: The literature describes contradictory data regarding the onset of the baroreflex reduction in spontaneously hypertensive rats. OBJECTIVE:This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the baroreflex function in 13-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats. METHODS:Male Wistar Kyoto (n=15 and spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=15 aged 13 weeks were studied. Cannulas were inserted in the abdominal aortic artery through the right femoral artery to measure mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Baroreflex function was calculated as the derivative of the variation of HR in function of the MAP variation (Δheart rate/Δmean arterial pressure tested with a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (50µg/kg and with a pressor dose of phenylephrine (8µg/kg in the right femoral venous approach through an inserted cannula in awake spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto. Differences with p values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS:Spontaneously hypertensive rats: Δmean arterial pressure=43.5mmHg±5.2, Δheart rate=-59.7ppm±17.9 and Δheart rate/Δmean arterial pressure=1.3ppm/mmHg±0.1 tested with phenylephrine; Wistar Kyoto: Δmean arterial pressure=&56mmHg±3, Δheart rate=*-114.9ppm±11.3 and Δheart rate/Δmean arterial pressure=#1.9ppm/mmHg±0.3 tested with phenylephrine; spontaneously hypertensive rats: Δmean arterial pressure=-45.6mmHg±8.1, Δheart rate=40.1ppm±11.6 and Δheart rate/Δmean arterial pressure=0.9ppm/mmHg±0.5 tested with sodium nitroprusside; Wistar Kyoto: Δmean arterial pressure=-39.8mmHg±6.2, Δheart rate=51.9ppm±21.8 and Δheart rate/Δmean arterial pressure=1.4ppm/mmHg±0.7 tested with sodium nitroprusside (*p<0.05; #p<0.01; &p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that 13-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats presented reduced baroreflex function when tested with phenylephrine.

  8. Influences of hydration on post-exercise cardiovascular control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Halliwill, John R; Morgan, Barbara J; Eisenach, John H; Joyner, Michael J

    2003-10-15

    Dehydration is known to decrease orthostatic tolerance and cause tachycardia, but little is known about the cardiovascular control mechanisms involved. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex sensitivity increases during exercise-induced dehydration, we assessed arterial baroreflex responsiveness in 13 healthy subjects (protocol 1) at baseline (PRE-EX) and 1 h after (EX-DEH) 90 min of exercise to cause dehydration, and after subsequent intravenous rehydration with saline (EX-REH). Six of these subjects were studied a second time (protocol 2) with intravenous saline during exercise to prevent dehydration. We measured heart rate, central venous pressure and arterial pressure during all trials, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during the post-exercise trials. Baroreflex responses were assessed using sequential boluses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine (modified Oxford technique). After exercise in protocol 1 (EX-DEH), resting blood pressure was decreased and resting heart rate was increased. Cardiac baroreflex gain, assessed as the responsiveness of heart rate or R-R interval to changes in systolic pressure, was diminished in the EX-DEH condition (9.17 +/- 1.06 ms mmHg-1 vs. PRE-EX: 18.68 +/- 2.22 ms mmHg-1, P exercise did not alter the increase in HR post-exercise or the decrease in baroreflex gain (EX-REH: 10.20 +/- 1.43 ms mmHg-1; P > 0.10 vs. EX-DEH). Saline infusion during exercise (protocol 2) resulted in less of a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure and a smaller change in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Saline infusion caused a decrease in MSNA in protocol 1. We conclude that exercise-induced dehydration causes post-exercise changes in the baroreflex control of blood pressure that may contribute to, rather than offset, orthostatic intolerance.

  9. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg–1 min–1) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function. PMID:24396060

  10. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-15

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function.

  11. Human See, Human Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  12. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  13. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  14. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards an

  15. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  16. 钩藤总碱对高血压动脉压力感受反射和对高血压靶器官的作用∗%Effects of Total Alkaloids of Rhynchophylline on Baroreflex and Hypertensive Target Organs in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘叶玲; 王中师; 张许

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察钩藤总碱对高血压靶器官的作用。方法自发性高血压模型大鼠40只,随机分为4组,正常对照组、天麻钩藤饮组、钩藤总碱小剂量组和钩藤总碱大剂量组,每组10只,分别口服普通饲料、天麻钩藤饮颗粒(750 mg•d-1)、钩藤总碱2.5,15.0 mg•d-1。采用改良的 Smyth 方法测定各组大鼠的动脉压力感受反射功能,20周后,取大鼠心、脑、肾,进行组织学观察。结果正常对照组、天麻钩藤饮组、钩藤总碱小剂量组和钩藤总碱大剂量组第16周动脉压力感受反射敏感性分别为(0.27±0.05),(0.31±0.06),(0.35±0.08),(0.34±0.08) ms•mmHg-1。正常对照组大鼠动脉压力感受反射功能降低,而其他各用药组没有降低;给药组大鼠可见心肌结构显著优于正常对照组,脑组织和肾小球结构未见显著改善。结论钩藤总碱对高血压靶器官心脏有保护作用。%Objective To investigate the effect of total alkaloids from Rhynchophylline on hypertensive target organs. Methods 40 spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) were divided into 4 groups as follows: normal control group,positive control with Tianma Goutengyin granule at 750 mg•d-1 ,total alkaloids from Rhynchophylline at 2.5 mg•day-1 as low dosage,and at 15.0 mg•d-1 as high dosage.All the rats were fed up for 20 weeks,and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS,in ms•mmHg-1)was determined by revised Smyth’s method.Heart,brain and kidney of the rats were sectioned for histological analysis at the end of 20th week. Results In sixteenth weeks,BRS of positive control,Tianma Goutengyin granule group,total alkaloids at low dosage and high dosage were(0.27±0.05),(0.31±0.06),(0.35±0.08),(0.34±0.08) ms•mmHg-1,respectively.BRS in SHR was not decreased except in the positive control.The treatment groups were superior to the normal control group in structure of heart,but not in the brain and kidney of the rats. Conclusion Total alkaloids from

  17. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation ...... often mentioned post-human condition....

  18. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    . The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...

  19. Modeling the Afferent Dynamics of the Baroreflex Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Mahdi, Adam; Sturdy, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    of mechanoreceptors located in the BR nerve-endings, and modulation of the action potential frequency. The three sub-systems are modeled individually following well-established biological principles. The first submodel, predicting arterial wall deformation, uses blood pressure as an input and outputs circumferential...

  20. Carotid baroreflex function at the onset of cycling in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Thales C; Vianna, Lauro C; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    , with carotid baroreceptor stimulation by neck suction at -60 Torr applied 0-5, 10-15, and 30-35 s after the onset of exercise. Cardiovascular responses to neck suction during cycling were compared with those obtained at rest. An attenuated reflex decrease in heart rate following neck suction was detected...... during moderate-intensity exercise, compared with the response at rest (P suction elicited an augmented decrease in blood pressure at 0-5 and 10-15 s during low-intensity exercise and in all periods during...

  1. Sympathetic activation and baroreflex function during intradialytic hypertensive episodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvora Rubinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of intradialytic increases in blood pressure are not well defined. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of autonomic nervous system activation during intradialytic hypertensive episodes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Continuous interbeat intervals (IBI and systolic blood pressure (SBP were monitored during hemodialysis in 108 chronic patients. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes defined as a period of at least 10 mmHg increase in SBP between the beginning and the end of a dialysis session or hypertension resistant to ultrafiltration occurring during or immediately after the dialysis procedure, were detected in 62 out of 113 hemodialysis sessions. SBP variability, IBI variability and baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS in the low (LF and high (HF frequency ranges were assessed using the complex demodulation technique (CDM. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes were associated with an increased (n = 45 or decreased (n = 17 heart rate. The maximal blood pressure was similar in both groups. In patients with increased heart rate the increase in blood pressure was associated with marked increases in SBP and IBI variability, with suppressed BRS indices and enhanced sympatho-vagal balance. In contrast, in those with decreased heart rate, there were no significant changes in the above parameters. End-of-dialysis blood pressure in all sessions associated with hypertensive episode was significantly higher than in those without such episodes. In logistic regression analysis, predialysis BRS in the low frequency range was found to be the main predictor of intradialytic hypertension. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data point to sympathetic overactivity with feed-forward blood pressure enhancement as an important mechanism of intradialytic hypertension in a significant proportion of patients. The triggers of increased sympathetic activity during hemodialysis remain to be determined. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes are associated with higher end-of-dialysis blood pressure, suggesting that intradialytic hypertension may play a role in generation of interdialytic hypertension.

  2. Modeling the afferent dynamics of the baroreflex control system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Mahdi

    Full Text Available In this study we develop a modeling framework for predicting baroreceptor firing rate as a function of blood pressure. We test models within this framework both quantitatively and qualitatively using data from rats. The models describe three components: arterial wall deformation, stimulation of mechanoreceptors located in the BR nerve-endings, and modulation of the action potential frequency. The three sub-systems are modeled individually following well-established biological principles. The first submodel, predicting arterial wall deformation, uses blood pressure as an input and outputs circumferential strain. The mechanoreceptor stimulation model, uses circumferential strain as an input, predicting receptor deformation as an output. Finally, the neural model takes receptor deformation as an input predicting the BR firing rate as an output. Our results show that nonlinear dependence of firing rate on pressure can be accounted for by taking into account the nonlinear elastic properties of the artery wall. This was observed when testing the models using multiple experiments with a single set of parameters. We find that to model the response to a square pressure stimulus, giving rise to post-excitatory depression, it is necessary to include an integrate-and-fire model, which allows the firing rate to cease when the stimulus falls below a given threshold. We show that our modeling framework in combination with sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation can be used to test and compare models. Finally, we demonstrate that our preferred model can exhibit all known dynamics and that it is advantageous to combine qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.

  3. An Integrated Model of the Human Cardiopulmonary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of the systemic and pulmonic circulations, baroreflex control of arterial pressure, airway and lung mechanics, as well as, gas transport at...study is based on the multi-compartment model of the canine circulation that contains descriptions of heart, systemic circulation and pulmonic ...systemic and pulmonic circulatory loop consists of a group of resistive and elastic vessel segments. (c) The nonlinear pressure- volume (P-V

  4. Bed Rest Affects Ventricular and Arterial Elastances in Monkeys: Implications for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pediatrics , Georgia Prevention Institute, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA (D. A. Ludwig); the Department of Surgical Services, Oregon Regional...52:1552–6. 3. Convertino VA, Adams WC, Shea JD, et al. Impairment of car- otid-cardiac vagal baroreflex in wheelchair -dependent quadri- plegics. Am J

  5. Pial artery and subarachnoid width response to apnoea in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Wolf, Jacek; Swierblewska, Ewa; Kunicka, Katarzyna; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Bieniaszewski, Leszek; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about intracranial pressure (ICP)-cerebral haemodynamic interplay during repetitive apnoea. A recently developed method based on near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) noninvasively measures changes in pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) as well as subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) in humans. We tested the complex response of the pial artery and subarachnoid width to apnoea using this method. The pial artery and subarachnoid width response to consecutive apnoeas lasting 30, 60 s and maximal breath-hold (91.1 ± 23.1 s) were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. The cc-TQ and sas-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), pulsatility index and resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate (HR) and beat-to-beat SBP and DBP blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) was measured using a medical gas analyser. Apnoea evoked a multiphasic response in blood pressure, pial artery compliance and ICP. First, SBP declined, which was accompanied by an increase in cc-TQ and sas-TQ. Directly after these changes, SBP exceeded baseline values, which was followed by a decline in cc-TQ and the return of sas-TQ to baseline. During these initial changes, CBFV remained stable. Towards the end of the apnoea, BP, cc-TQ and CBFV increased, whereas pulsatility index, resistive index and sas-TQ declined. Changes in sas-TQ were linked to changes in EtCO2, HR and SBP. Apnoea is associated with ICP swings, closely reflecting changes in EtCO2, HR and peripheral BP. The baroreflex influences the pial artery response.

  6. Human microbiomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendhran, J.; P. Gunasekaran

    2010-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has driven the study of human biology in a significant way and enabled the genome-wide study to elucidate the molecular basis of complex human diseases. Recently, the role of microbiota on human physiology and health has received much attention. The influence of gut microbiome (the collective genomes of the gut microbiota) in obesity has been demonstrated, which may pave the way for new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies such as bacteriotherapy. The sig...

  7. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  8. Time-frequency methods and voluntary ramped-frequency breathing: a powerful combination for exploration of human neurophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Cooke, William H; Rudas, László; Stefanovska, Aneta; Eckberg, Dwain L

    2013-12-01

    We experimentally altered the timing of respiratory motoneuron activity as a means to modulate and better understand otherwise hidden human central neural and hemodynamic oscillatory mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal carbon dioxide concentrations, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in 13 healthy supine young men who gradually increased or decreased their breathing frequencies between 0.05 and 0.25 Hz over 9-min periods. We analyzed results with traditional time- and frequency-domain methods, and also with time-frequency methods (wavelet transform, wavelet phase coherence, and directional coupling). We determined statistical significance and identified frequency boundaries by comparing measurements with randomly generated surrogates. Our results support several major conclusions. First, respiration causally modulates both sympathetic (weakly) and vagal motoneuron (strongly) oscillations over a wide frequency range-one that extends well below the frequency of actual breaths. Second, breathing frequency broadly modulates vagal baroreflex gain, with peak gains registered in the low frequency range. Third, breathing frequency does not influence median levels of sympathetic or vagal activity over time. Fourth, phase relations between arterial pressure and sympathetic and vagal motoneurons are unaffected by breathing, and are therefore likely secondary to intrinsic responsiveness of these motoneurons to other synaptic inputs. Finally, breathing frequency does not affect phase coherence between diastolic pressure and muscle sympathetic oscillations, but it augments phase coherence between systolic pressure and R-R interval oscillations over a limited portion of the usual breathing frequency range. These results refine understanding of autonomic oscillatory processes and those physiological mechanisms known as the human respiratory gate.

  9. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  10. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic function on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L; Cooke, William H; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Buckey, Jay C; Pawelczyk, James A; Ertl, Andrew C; Cox, James F; Kuusela, Tom A; Tahvanainen, Kari U O; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Levine, Benjamin D; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Robertson, David; Blomqvist, C Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    We studied healthy supine astronauts on Earth with electrocardiogram, non-invasive arterial pressure, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations, breathing depth and sympathetic nerve recordings. The null hypotheses were that heart beat interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are baroreflex mediated, that they persist during apnoea, and that autonomic responses to apnoea result from changes of chemoreceptor, baroreceptor or lung stretch receptor inputs. R-R interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are unlikely to be baroreflex mediated, and disappear during apnoea. The subjects' responses to apnoea could not be attributed to changes of central chemoreceptor activity (hypocapnia prevailed); altered arterial baroreceptor input (vagal baroreflex gain declined and muscle sympathetic nerve burst areas, frequencies and probabilities increased, even as arterial pressure climbed to new levels); or altered pulmonary stretch receptor activity (major breathing frequency and tidal volume changes did not alter vagal tone or sympathetic activity). Apnoea responses of healthy subjects may result from changes of central respiratory motoneurone activity. We studied eight healthy, supine astronauts on Earth, who followed a simple protocol: they breathed at fixed or random frequencies, hyperventilated and then stopped breathing, as a means to modulate and expose to view important, but obscure central neurophysiological mechanisms. Our recordings included the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal volume, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. Arterial pressure, vagal tone and muscle sympathetic outflow were comparable during spontaneous and controlled-frequency breathing. Compared with spontaneous, 0.1 and 0.05 Hz breathing, however, breathing at usual frequencies (∼0.25 Hz) lowered arterial baroreflex gain, and provoked smaller arterial pressure and R-R interval

  11. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    the humanities for decades, starting with research fields such as humanities computing or computational linguistics in the 1950s, and later new media studies and internet studies. The historical development of digital humanities has been characterized by a focus on three successive, but co-existing types......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  12. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  13. Human Rights and Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Possenti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be two different versions of human rights in Western tradition: say Rationalistic and Christian; the former adopted in revolutionary France, the latter highly developed in Renaissance Spain. Current relativistic criticisms attempt to deny the universality of human rights alleging that this theory has been created in Western countries or it has no strong justification, and therefore cannot have universal approach; but this objection can be dismissed with an alternative justification of human rights.

  14. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  15. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  16. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  17. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    , and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become...

  18. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  19. Teaching humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  20. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  1. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary societies, the humanities are under constant pressure and have to justify their existence. In the ongoing debates, Humboldt’s ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’ are often used to justify the unique function of the humanities of ensuring free research and contributing to a vital...... philosophy. Contrary to Humboldt’s idea that the non-practical is the most practical in the long run, philosophical pragmatism recommends to the humanities to situate knowledge in practices and apply knowledge to practices....

  2. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  3. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . The first section of this chapter outlines the complete cause-effect pathway, from emissions of toxic substances to intake by the population up to damages in terms of human health effects. Section 2 outlines the framework for assessing human toxicity in LCIA. Section 3 discusses the contributing substances......This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... – demonstrates the importance to account for both outdoor and indoor exposure, including consumer products. Analysing the variations in intake fraction (the fraction of the emitted or applied chemical that is taken in by the consumer and the general population), effect factor and characterisation factor across...

  4. Human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.; Kasparek, L.; Novicky, O.; Querner, E.P.; Fendeková, M.; Kupczyk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human activities can cause drought, which was not previously reported (man-induced hydrological drought). Groundwater abstractions for domestic and industrial use are a well-known example of such an environmental change

  5. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  6. Human expunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  7. Human babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Gołąb, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes described so far, only some were diagnosed in infected humans, mostly B. microti, B. divergens and B. venatorum (Babesia sp. EU1). Infection in humans is often asymptomatic or mild but is of a particular risk for asplenic individuals, those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiencies, and elderly. Infections transmitted with blood and blood products raise concerns in hemotherapy. Epidemiological situation of babesiosis varies around the world. In Europe, no increase in the number of cases was reported, but in the USA its prevalence is increasing and extension of endemic areas is observed. The aim of this publication is to describe the problems connected with the current epidemiological situation, diagnosis and treatment of human babesiosis with regard to clinical status of patients.

  8. Human energy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the midst of big-oil record profits and growing debate on global warming, the Chevron Corporation launched its “Human Energy” public relations campaign. In television commercials and print advertisements, Chevron portrays itself as a compassionate entity striving to solve the planet’s energy crisis. Yet, the first term in this corporate oxymoron misleadingly reframes the significance of the second, suggesting that the corporation has a renewed focus. In depicting Chevron as a green/human o...

  9. Human Echolocation

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Santani

    2013-01-01

    The use of active natural echolocation as a mobility aid for blind humans has received increased scientific and popular attention in recent years (Engber, 2006; Kreiser, 2006; NPR, 2011), in part due to a focus on several blind individuals who have developed remarkable expertise. However, perhaps surprisingly, the history of empirical human echolocation research is not much younger than the era of echolocation research (cf. Griffin, 1958). Nevertheless, compared to its bat and cetacean count...

  10. Human ehrlichiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Milomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized disease. It is a tick-borne disease caused by several bacterial species of the genhus Erlichia. These are small gram-negative pleomorphic cocci, that are obligatory intracellular bacteria. Tick Ixodes is the principle vector in Europe, and Amblyomma americanum in the United States. Bacterial organisms replicate in a tick, and are transmited from infected cells in a vector to the blood cells of animals or humans. Human ehrlichiosis is a name for a group of diseases caused by different species of Ehrlichia. One of them is the disease named human monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and the other is a human granulocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilia. Case report. We reported a 23-year-old patient admitted for the clinical treatment with the symptoms of high febrility (above 40 °C, headache, vomiting, general weakness and exhaustion, but without data on a tick bite. The patient was treated with trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole for a week when Ehrlichia chaffeensis was confirmed by the immunofluoroscence test, and the therapy contimed with doxacyclin. Conclusion. Human ehrlichiosis is also present in our country, so this disease should be considered everyday, especially in infectology practice.

  11. [Human influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2006-10-01

    Human influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, contributing to approximately one million deaths every year. In Germany, each year between 5.000 and 20.000 individuals die from severe influenza infections. In several countries, the morbidity and mortality of influenza is greatly underestimated. This is reflected by general low immunization rates. The emergence of avian influenza against the background of the scenario of a human influenza pandemic has revived public interest in the disease. According to the World Health Organisation, it is only the question on the beginning of a new influenza pandemic. The virus type of the new pandemic is still uncertain and it is also unclear, if a pandemic spread of the virus may be prevented by consistent controlling of avian influenza.

  12. [Humanized childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2005-06-01

    Childbirth is a major event in a family. The expectant parent's perception of the childbirth experience influences his or her development as a parent. Making childbirth a positive and satisfying experience for women is the responsibility of health care providers. Women want to have physical and emotional privacy during labor and delivery, and to experience both in a friendly, comfortable environment. For women expected to undergo normal deliveries, humanized childbirth is one accessible approach. This article explores the definition and evolution of humanized childbirth and the care practice that it involves. It also explores birth plans and birth experiences, and the improvements necessary to routine labor practices to enable women to participate in decision making about their childbirth experiences. The author emphasizes that when health-care providers recognize the value of humanized childbirth and make changes accordingly, the dignity of women's childbirth experiences will be enhanced.

  13. Beyond Humanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer to the leading question of this paper, namely: ‘what does it mean to go beyond humanisms?’ The conclusion exposes briefly an ethics of hospitality and care from an angeletic perspective.

  14. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  15. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  16. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  17. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  18. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  19. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  20. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  1. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  2. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  3. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  4. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  5. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  6. Non-clinical and Pre-clinical Testing to Demonstrate Safety of the Barostim Neo Electrode for Activation of Carotid Baroreceptors in Chronic Human Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth J. Wilks

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Barostim neo™ electrode was developed by CVRx, Inc.to deliver baroreflex activation therapy (BAT™ to treat hypertension and heart failure. The neo electrode concept was designed to deliver electrical stimulation to the baroreceptors within the carotid sinus bulb, while minimizing invasiveness of the implant procedure. This device is currently CE marked in Europe, and in a Pivotal (akin to Phase III Trial in the United States. Here we present the in vitro and in vivo safety testing that was completed in order to obtain necessary regulatory approval prior to conducting human studies in Europe, as well as an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (IDE to conduct a Pivotal Trial in the United States. Stimulated electrodes (10 mA, 500 μs, 100 Hz were compared to unstimulated electrodes using optical microscopy and several electrochemical techniques over the course of 27 weeks. Electrode dissolution was evaluated by analyzing trace metal content of solutions in which electrodes were stimulated. Lastly, safety testing under Good Laboratory Practice guidelines was conducted in an ovine animal model over a 12 and 24 week time period, with results processed and evaluated by an independent histopathologist. Long-term stimulation testing indicated that the neo electrode with a sputtered iridium oxide coating can be stimulated at maximal levels for the lifetime of the implant without clinically significant dissolution of platinum or iridium, and without increasing the potential at the electrode interface to cause hydrolysis or significant tissue damage. Histological examination of tissue that was adjacent to the neo electrodes indicated no clinically significant signs of increased inflammation and no arterial stenosis as a result of 6 months of continuous stimulation. The work presented here involved rigorous characterization and evaluation testing of the neo electrode, which was used to support its safety for chronic implantation. The testing

  7. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  8. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  9. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  10. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    steroid concentrations cause alterations in endometrial development, affecting oocyte viability in assisted reproductive technology. Furthermore, it has been proposed that elevated progesterone levels have a negative effect on the reproductive outcome of COS. This may arise from an asynchrony between...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  11. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  12. Human Toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Selek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human toxocariasis is an parasitic infection caused by the ingestion of larvae of dog nematode Toxocara canis and less frequently of cat nematode T.cati. Toxocara eggs, shed to environment by infected dogs' and cats' droppings, become infective by embryonation. Humans, particularly children, can be infected by accidentally ingesting embryonated Toxocara eggs. Larvae hatch in the small intestine, penetrate the intestinal wall and migrate to other parts of body via the bloodstream. It is generally a benign, asymptomatic, and self-limiting disease, although migrating larvae can cause damage to tissues and organs, especially brain involvement can cause severe morbidity. The two main clinical presentations of toxocariasis are visceral larva migrans (VLM (a systemic disease caused by larval migration through major organs and ocular larva migrans (OLM (a disease limited to the eyes and optic nerves. There are also two less-severe syndromes which have recently been described, one mainly in children (covert toxocariasis and the other mainly in adults (common toxocariasis. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical signs/symptoms, epidemiological background of the patient and the use of immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot. On the other hand definitive diagnosis is much more challenging, since it requires the demonstration of larvae via biopsy or autopsy. Most cases of toxocariasis clear up without any treatment. VLM is primarily treated with antihelmintic drugs, such as; albendazole or mebendazole. Treatment of OLM is more difficult and usually consists of measures to prevent progressive damage to the eye like steroids. Laser photocoagulation and cryoretinopexy may also be used to treat severe cases. Since eradicating T.canis infection is difficult due to the complexity of its life cycle, prevention of toxocariasis is always preferred. Toxocara eggs have a strong protective layer which makes the eggs able to survive in the environment for months or

  13. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  14. Clinical models of cardiovascular regulation after weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.; Jacob, G.; Ertl, A.; Shannon, J.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1996-01-01

    After several days in microgravity, return to earth is attended by alterations in cardiovascular function. The mechanisms underlying these effects are inadequately understood. Three clinical disorders of autonomic function represent possible models of this abnormal cardiovascular function after spaceflight. They are pure autonomic failure, baroreflex failure, and orthostatic intolerance. In pure autonomic failure, virtually complete loss of sympathetic and parasympathetic function occurs along with profound and immediate orthostatic hypotension. In baroreflex failure, various degrees of debuffering of blood pressure occur. In acute and complete baroreflex failure, there is usually severe hypertension and tachycardia, while with less complete and more chronic baroreflex impairment, orthostatic abnormalities may be more apparent. In orthostatic intolerance, blood pressure fall is minor, but orthostatic symptoms are prominent and tachycardia frequently occurs. Only careful autonomic studies of human subjects in the microgravity environment will permit us to determine which of these models most closely reflects the pathophysiology brought on by a period of time in the microgravity environment.

  15. [Human papillomaviruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  16. Human Development Report 1991: Financing Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    United Nations Development Programme, UNDP

    1991-01-01

    Lack of political commitment rather than financial resources is often the real barrier to human development. This is the main conclusion of Human Development Report 1991 - the second in a series of annual reports on the subject.

  17. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  18. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  19. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  20. Scalability of human models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodarius, C.; Rooij, L. van; Lange, R. de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to create a scalable human occupant model that allows adaptation of human models with respect to size, weight and several mechanical parameters. Therefore, for the first time two scalable facet human models were developed in MADYMO. First, a scalable human male was

  1. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  2. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  3. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Alteration in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In this project we apply a powerful, new method - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system so that effective countermeasures can be developed. CSI involves the mathematical analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in non-invasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV - respiratory activity) in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of all the physiologic mechanisms coupling these signals, CSI provides a model of the closed-loop cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject. The model includes quantitative descriptions of the heart rate baroreflex, autonomic function, as well as other important physiologic mechanisms. We are in the process of incorporating beat-to-beat fluctuations of stroke volume into the CSI technique in order to quantify additional physiologic mechanisms such as those involved in control of peripheral vascular resistance and alterations in cardiac contractility. We apply CSI in conjunction with the two general protocols of the Human Studies Core project. The first protocol involves ground-based, human head down tilt bed rest to simulate microgravity and acute stressors - upright tilt, standing and bicycle exercise - to provide orthostatic and exercise challenges. The second protocol is intended to be the same as the first but with the addition of sleep deprivation to determine whether

  4. From Human Past to Human Future

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic an...

  5. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  6. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLETON, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  7. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth.

  8. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  9. Human assisted robotic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  10. Human Use Index (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  12. Human Use Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  13. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  14. Human Services Offices

    Data.gov (United States)

    Fairfax County, Virginia — This data contains point features representing the human services offices within Fairfax County.“HS_Region” is the office for each human services region, “DFS_Area”...

  15. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  16. The Growing Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  17. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  18. Monogenic human obesity syndromes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    .... This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  19. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    The article puts forward an aesthetic and psychoanalytic analysis of Titian's painting, The Flaying of Marsyas, arguing that the painting is a reflection on the human subject as a being constituted by skin and by a core of non-humanity. The analysis is partly an answer to Melanie Hart's (2007......) article 'Visualizing the mind: Looking at Titian's Flaying of Marsyas', addressing features of the painting not commented on by Hart, and supplementing Hart's (Kleinian) theoretical frame by involving Didier Anzieu's 'skin ego', Slavoj Zizek's concept of the 'non-human', Giorgio Agamben's term...

  20. Human productivity program definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  1. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  2. Human nature and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations.

  3. Human Document Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.; Abelmann, L.; Manz, A.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    “The Human Document Project” is a project which tries to answer all of the questions related to preserving information about the human race for tens of generations of humans to come or maybe even for a future intelligence which can emerge in the coming thousands of years. This document mainly focuss

  4. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  5. Has human evolution stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2010-07-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  6. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...

  7. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  8. Monogenic human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  9. From Human Past to Human Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic and neural detriments and pathologies. Uniformitarian reasoning based on ontogenic homology suggests that the cognitive abilities of hominins are consistently underrated in the unstable orthodoxies of Pleistocene archaeology. A scientifically guided review establishes developmental trajectories defining recent changes in the human genome and its expressions, which then form the basis of attempts to extrapolate from them into the future. It is suggested that continuing and perhaps accelerating unfavorable genetic changes to the human species, rather than existential threats such as massive disasters, pandemics, or astrophysical events, may become the ultimate peril of humanity.

  10. Humanity at the Edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.; Gjødsbøl, Iben M.; Dam, Mie S.

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of anthropology and the social sciences lies a notion of human existence according to which humans and animals share the basic need for food, but only humans have the capacity for morality. Based on fieldwork in a pig laboratory, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a dementia ...... human and animal value and agency with approaches that focus on human experience and virtue ethics, we argue that ‘the human’ at stake in the moral laboratory of feeding precarious lives puts ‘the human’ in anthropology at disposal for moral experimentation....

  11. Jordan Adjusted Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Human Development Index (HDI) and Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) In 1990, the United Nations Development Programme designed a Human Development Index composed of life expectancy at birth, level of education and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. In 2011, the UNDP ranked Jordan 95th out of 187 countries with a human development index of 0.698, up from 0.591 in 1990, making it the leading medium-range country for human development (fig. VIII.1). In 2010, the inequality adj...

  12. Human Beings And Water

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The writer of this paper on this writing is talking about the human beings and water. Water is one of the very fundamentally things that human beings need to keep their lives. Human beings sometimes do not realise that the water is very important for them because they actually cannot live their lives without the present of water. Human beings can keep their lives without rice, but cannot without water. For instances the use of water for human beings are domestic use, cooking, washing, bathing...

  13. Human rights and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  14. Human Milk Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  15. Human Capital and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of sustainability needs to consider the role of all forms of capital—natural, biological, social, technological, financial, cultural—and the complex ways in which they interact. All forms of capital derive their value, utility and application from human mental awareness, creativity and social innovation. This makes human capital, including social capital, the central determinant of resource productivity and sustainability. Humanity has entered the Anthropocene Epoch in which human changes have become the predominant factor in evolution. Humanity is itself evolving from animal physicality to social vitality to mental individuality. This transition has profound bearing on human productive capabilities, adaptability, creativity and values, the organization of economy, public policy, social awareness and life styles that determine sustainability. This article examines the linkages between population, economic development, employment, education, health, social equity, cultural values, energy intensity and sustainability in the context of evolving human consciousness. It concludes that development of human capital is the critical determinant of long-term sustainability and that efforts to accelerate the evolution of human consciousness and emergence of mentally self-conscious individuals will be the most effective approach for ensuring a sustainable future. Education is the primary lever. Human choice matters.

  16. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  17. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  18. Chimeras and human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  19. Human Performance in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  20. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  1. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research......Todays expanding digital landscape constitutes an important research object as well as the research environment for the Humanities at the beginning of the 21st century. Taking this state of affairs as a starting point this inaugural lecture presents a vision for how the digital affects...

  2. Advancing Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2012-2015) was initiated after the successful conclusion of the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-2010).The Chinese government in late July published an assessment report on the implementation of the plan,elaborating on the full implementation of China's first-ever national program on human rights development,which was drafted in April 2009.

  3. Human hemoglobin genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  4. Modern Human Capital Management

    OpenAIRE

    Feldberger, Madita

    2008-01-01

    Title: Modern Human Capital Management Seminar date: 30th of May 2008 Course: Master thesis in Business Administration, 15 ECTS Authors: Madita Feldberger Supervisor: Lars Svensson Keywords: Human capital, SWOT Analysis, Strategic Map, Balanced Scorecard Research Problem: Despite of the success of Human Capital Management (HCM) in research it did not arrive yet in the HR departments of many companies. Numerous firms even have problems to set their strategic goals with focus on HR. The HR Bala...

  5. The effects of exercise and training on human cardiovascular reflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, S E; Bell, C

    2000-07-01

    During physical activity, there is a graded withdrawal of vagal cardiac tone and a graded increase in sympathetic cardiac and vasomotor tone, initiated through both central command from the somatic motor cortex and muscle chemoreceptive and mechanoreceptive inputs. In parallel, there is an upward resetting of the operating point of the arterial baroreflex, with preserved reflex sensitivity. In contrast to the traditional interpretation that blood flow through exercising muscle is independent of vasomotor neural influences because of the dominance of local dilator metabolites, recent evidence suggests that both constrictor and dilator sympathetic neural influences may be involved in determining absolute levels of perfusion. Post-exercise, there is a period of relative hypotension that is associated with decreased peripheral resistance. Some, but not all, evidence indicates a causal role for reduced sympathetic drive. Chronic exercise training appears to reduce resting sympathetic activity, with parallel changes in the gain of a variety of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes initiated from cardiovascular sites. These changes may be attributable at least partly to masking of arterial baroreflexes by the impact of elevated blood volume on low-pressure baroreceptors. The reductions in sympathetic drive that follow training are more pronounced in patients with essential hypertension than in normotensive individuals and are likely to underlie the anti-hypertensive effect of exercise.

  6. Robotics for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  7. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  8. Human Performance Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Biochemistry:Improvements in energy metabolism, muscular strength and endurance capacity have a basis in biochemical and molecular adaptations within the human body....

  9. Extraterritorial Human Rights Obligations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amsinck Boie, Hans Nikolaj; Torp, Kristian

    adequately be addressed without including the approach to the problem taken in practice; Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. The book therefore draws upon the concept of CSR and the approaches developed here and discusses whether states may utilize the CSR-based concept of human rights due diligence...... to fulfil their possible obligations to protect against human rights violations by corporations.......The book addresses the issue of corporate respect for human rights by examining if and how states are obligated to ensure that corporations originating from their jurisdiction respect human rights when they operate abroad. The existence of such a duty is much debated by academics at national...

  10. The psychology of humanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  11. The Human Toolmaker

    OpenAIRE

    Kassuba, Tanja; Kastner, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Do you enjoy building airplanes, cars, houses, or robots with Lego blocks? Humans are the only animal species that can create complicated constructions from simple Lego blocks – our Lego building ability is “human-specific,” since it is only found in human beings. What would our closest relatives, apes or monkeys, do with a box of Lego blocks? They would probably chew on them, and lose interest when they find out that they are not edible! Why are humans the only Lego builders in the animal ki...

  12. Photography after the Human

    OpenAIRE

    Zylinska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    How can we visualise and subsequently reimagine the abstraction that is the extinction of human species while there is still time? The article addresses this question by considering the existence of images – and, in particular, light-induced mechanical images known as photographs – after the human. The “after the human” designation does not just refer to the material disappearance of the human in some kind of distant future, but also to the present imagining of the disappearance of the human ...

  13. Refractoriness in human atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Jespersen, Thomas; Christ, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    drugs. Cardiomyocyte excitability depends on availability of sodium channels, which involves both time- and voltage-dependent recovery from inactivation. This study therefore aims to characterise how sodium channel inactivation affects refractoriness in human atria. METHODS AND RESULTS: Steady......-state activation and inactivation parameters of sodium channels measured in vitro in isolated human atrial cardiomyocytes were used to parameterise a mathematical human atrial cell model. Action potential data were acquired from human atrial trabeculae of patients in either sinus rhythm or chronic atrial...... in pharmacological management of chronic atrial fibrillation....

  14. Baroreflex control of heart rate in the broad-nosed caiman Caiman latirostris is temperature dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagensen, Mette K; Abe, Augusto S; Wang, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that ectothermic vertebrates primarily control blood pressure to protect the pulmonary vasculature from oedema caused by high pressure, while endothermic vertebrates control blood pressure to maintain adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues. In the present study we have char...

  15. Physical exercise performance in temperate and warm environments is decreased by an impaired arterial baroreflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Pires

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether running performance in different environments is dependent on intact arterial baroreceptor reflexes. We also assessed the exercise-induced cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses in animals lacking arterial baroafferent signals. To accomplish these goals, male Wistar rats were subjected to sinoaortic denervation (SAD or sham surgery (SHAM and had a catheter implanted into the ascending aorta to record arterial pressure and a telemetry sensor implanted in the abdominal cavity to record core temperature. After recovering from these surgeries, the animals were subjected to constant- or incremental-speed exercises performed until the voluntary interruption of effort under temperate (25° C and warm (35° C conditions. During the constant-speed exercises, the running time until the rats were fatigued was shorter in SAD rats in both environments. Although the core temperature was not significantly different between the groups, tail skin temperature was higher in SAD rats under temperate conditions. The denervated rats also displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure and double product compared with the SHAM rats; in particular, in the warm environment, these exaggerated cardiovascular responses in the SAD rats persisted until they were fatigued. These SAD-mediated changes occurred in parallel with increased variability in the very low and low components of the systolic arterial pressure power spectrum. The running performance was also affected by SAD during the incremental-speed exercises, with the maximal speed attained being decreased by approximately 20% in both environments. Furthermore, at the maximal power output tolerated during the incremental exercises, the mean arterial pressure, heart rate and double product were exaggerated in the SAD relative to SHAM rats. In conclusion, the chronic absence of the arterial baroafferents accelerates exercise fatigue in temperate and warm environments. Our findings also suggest that an augmented cardiovascular strain accounted for the early interruption of exercise in the SAD rats.

  16. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity and pulmonary dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhosis: effect of hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, Jens S; Krag, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). BRS is reduced at exposure to chronic hypoxia such as during sojourn in high altitudes. In this study, we assessed the relation of BRS to pulmonary dysfunction and cardiovascular characteristics and the effects of hyperoxia. Forty-three patients with cirrhosis and 12 healthy...... to presence of HPS, Pa(O(2)), Dl(CO), or Child-Turcotte score, but BRS correlated with metabolic and hemodynamic characteristics. After 100% oxygen inhalation, BRS and the QT interval remained unchanged in the cirrhotic patients. In conclusion, BRS is significantly reduced in patients with cirrhosis compared...

  17. Baroreflex Sensitivity in Relation to Clinical Characteristics in Subject Aged 40 to 80 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Latif, Tabassam;

    2014-01-01

    in our population comprising one component reflecting the sympathetic activity, the parasympathetic system, and the integrated spontaneous BRS, respectively. The parasympathetic component was the only one correlating with clinical characteristics of declining age, smoking habits, systolic blood pressure...... on the Framingham score. BRS was found to decline with age, but this change disappeared when correcting for the age related increase in systolic blood pressure. We found that the VM-derived indices of sympathetic vascular control declined with age as did the vagally controlled heart rate changes in response to deep...... breathing and VM. We could not demonstrate any correlation between BRS, smoking status, and body size when adjusting for age and gender, whereas spontaneous BRS was reduced with increasing Framingham risk score. Principal component analysis revealed three component explaining 69% of the total variance...

  18. Baroreflex Sensitivity Is Reduced in Adolescents with Probable Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, Nicole S.; O'Leary, Deborah D.; Faught, Brent E.; Chirico, Daniele; Hay, John; Cairney, John

    2012-01-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by poor motor skills leading to a significant impairment in activities of daily living. Compared to typically developing children, those with DCD are less fit and physically active, and have increased body fat. This is an important consequence as both…

  19. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation, sympathetic activity, baroreflex function, and blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusser, K.; Tank, J.; Engeli, S.; Diedrich, A.; Menne, J.; Eckert, S.; Peters, T.; Sweep, F.C.; Haller, H.; Pichlmaier, A.M.; Luft, F.C.; Jordan, J.

    2010-01-01

    In animals, electric field stimulation of carotid baroreceptors elicits a depressor response through sympathetic inhibition. We tested the hypothesis that the stimulation acutely reduces sympathetic vasomotor tone and blood pressure in patients with drug treatment-resistant arterial hypertension.

  20. Physical Exercise Performance in Temperate and Warm Environments Is Decreased by an Impaired Arterial Baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Washington; Wanner, Samuel P.; Lima, Milene R. M.; Fonseca, Ivana A. T.; Fumega, Ubirajara; Haibara, Andrea S.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lima, Nilo R. V.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether running performance in different environments is dependent on intact arterial baroreceptor reflexes. We also assessed the exercise-induced cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses in animals lacking arterial baroafferent signals. To accomplish these goals, male Wistar rats were subjected to sinoaortic denervation (SAD) or sham surgery (SHAM) and had a catheter implanted into the ascending aorta to record arterial pressure and a telemetry sensor implanted in the abdominal cavity to record core temperature. After recovering from these surgeries, the animals were subjected to constant- or incremental-speed exercises performed until the voluntary interruption of effort under temperate (25° C) and warm (35° C) conditions. During the constant-speed exercises, the running time until the rats were fatigued was shorter in SAD rats in both environments. Although the core temperature was not significantly different between the groups, tail skin temperature was higher in SAD rats under temperate conditions. The denervated rats also displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure and double product compared with the SHAM rats; in particular, in the warm environment, these exaggerated cardiovascular responses in the SAD rats persisted until they were fatigued. These SAD-mediated changes occurred in parallel with increased variability in the very low and low components of the systolic arterial pressure power spectrum. The running performance was also affected by SAD during the incremental-speed exercises, with the maximal speed attained being decreased by approximately 20% in both environments. Furthermore, at the maximal power output tolerated during the incremental exercises, the mean arterial pressure, heart rate and double product were exaggerated in the SAD relative to SHAM rats. In conclusion, the chronic absence of the arterial baroafferents accelerates exercise fatigue in temperate and warm environments. Our findings also suggest that an augmented cardiovascular strain accounted for the early interruption of exercise in the SAD rats. PMID:23951278

  1. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research...

  2. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  3. Baropacing as a new option for treatment of resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnima, Teba; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2015-09-15

    Electrical carotid baroreflex activation therapy is an emerging device-based treatment for patients with resistant hypertension. Its blood pressure lowering effect has been demonstrated in several animal and human studies, with prolonged effect over the long-term. The main mechanism of the blood pressure reduction during this therapy is by inhibition of the sympathetic outflow. Yet the question arises whether the inhibition of central sympathetic activity is sufficient to be the sole mechanism behind the sustained reduction in blood pressure. The major focus of this review is to elucidate the mechanisms of action that account for the effects of continuous carotid baroreflex activation on blood pressure in humans. Recent results of baroreflex activation therapy as a treatment for heart failure will also be discussed.

  4. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century

  5. Introduction to human factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  6. Human Capital and Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Alders

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the relation between human capital and retirement when the age of retirement is endogenous. This relation is examined in a life-cycle earnings model. An employee works full time until retirement. The worker accumulates human capital by training- on-the-job and by

  7. Cohabitation: Humans & Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodington, W.

    2012-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Cohabitation of humans and agriculture can be used to improve building climate, human health and the state of the world. It affects building design and requires new building components. This manual explains w

  8. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  9. Human Resource Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An interview is reported which discussed the implications for the hiring, recruiting, screening and development of employees in the light of human resource accounting, here defined as the identification, accumulation and dissemination of information about human resources in dollar terms. (SA)

  10. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.…

  11. The Human Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    with fundamental human values like intuition, vision and sensing; all the qualities the technology, the industrialisation and rationalisation, or in short modernity, has been criticized for having taken away from human existence. What technology has taken away now comes back through new technology as an aid...

  12. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  13. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  14. Human Rights Guaranteed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Report says China’s human rights plan successfully implemented According to a detailed assessment report published by China’s State Council Information Office (SCIO),all the measures outlined in the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-10) had been successfully put into place by the end of 2010.

  15. Defects in Human Nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄靓

    2008-01-01

    By tracing the defects of society back to the defects of human nature, humanity's essence is proved to be inherent evil. Man's natural tendency to do evil remain harnessed through the controls and conventions imposed by civilization, however, when rules or civilization are weakened, man' s dark side is unleashed.

  16. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  17. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues its first white paper on human resources The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September 10, highlighting the country’s policies to cope with employment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents.

  18. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a Colo

  19. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  20. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    Passive humans (sitting or standing) might well be present on flooring-systems, footbridges or other structures that carry humans. An active croud of people might generate structural vibrations, and these might be problematic. The passive crowd of people, however, will interact with the structural...

  1. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  2. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  3. Human Resource Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Centering on strategic objective of reform and development,CIAE formulated its objectives in human resource construction for the 13th Five-year Plan period,and achieved new apparent progress in human resource construction in 2015.1 Implementation of"LONGMA Project"

  4. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  5. Human Rights Improving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues a white paper on its human rights,highlighting freedom of speech on the Interne The Chinese Government released a white paper on its human rights in 2009 on September 26,highlighting the role of Internet freedom and the country’s efforts in safeguarding citizens’legitimate civil and political rights.

  6. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century lib

  7. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... a shared interdisciplinary research and educational collaboration. As a creative research initiative it focuses on change and innovative thinking. The innovativeness is a result of the strongly interdisciplinary perspective which is at the heart of Designing Human Technologies. Designing Human Technologies...

  8. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...... der mellem Human Relations (Hawthorne-eksperimenter ne) og Neo-Human Relations (behovsteorierne), men i denne fremstilling bruges Human Relations som en samlebetegnelse for begge disse – noget forskellige – forskningstraditioner. De har i dag opnået stor udbredelse og er praktisk talt obligatorisk...

  9. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vigeant

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely mode of transmission in this case.

  10. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    OpenAIRE

    Patrice Vigeant; Jack Mendelson; Miller, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely ...

  11. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  12. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation in treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Tank, Jens

    2012-12-24

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is commonly defined as blood pressure that remains above goal in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes. The sympathetic nervous system promotes arterial hypertension and cardiovascular as well as renal damage, thus, providing a logical treatment target in these patients. Recent physiological studies suggest that baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term control of sympathetic activity and blood pressure providing an impetus for the development of electrical carotid sinus stimulators. The concept behind electrical stimulation of baroreceptors or baroreflex afferent nerves is that the stimulus is sensed by the brain as blood pressure increase. Then, baroreflex efferent structures are adjusted to counteract the perceived blood pressure increase. Electrical stimulators directly activating afferent baroreflex nerves were developed years earlier but failed for technical reasons. Recently, a novel implantable device was developed that produces an electrical field stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Carefully conducted experiments in dogs provided important insight in mechanisms mediating the depressor response to electrical carotid sinus stimulation. Moreover, these studies showed that the treatment success may depend on the underlying pathophysiology of the hypertension. Clinical studies suggest that electrical carotid sinus stimulation attenuates sympathetic activation of vasculature, heart, and kidney while augmenting cardiac vagal regulation, thus lowering blood pressure. Yet, not all patients respond to treatment. Additional clinical trials are required. Patients equipped with an electrical carotid sinus stimulator provide a unique opportunity gaining insight in human baroreflex physiology.

  13. Human Power Empirically Explored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-18

    Harvesting energy from the users' muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are convenient and can be environmentally and economically beneficial. This work provides insight into the knowledge required to design human-powered energy systems in consumer products from a scientific perspective. It shows the developments of human-powered products from the first introduction of the BayGen Freeplay radio in 1995 till current products and provides an overview and analysis of 211 human-powered products currently on the market. Although human power is generally perceived as beneficial for the environment, this thesis shows that achieving environmental benefit is only feasible when the environmental impact of additional materials in the energy conversion system is well balanced with the energy demands of the products functionality. User testing with existing products showed a preference for speeds in the range of 70 to 190 rpm for crank lengths from 32 to 95 mm. The muscular input power varied from 5 to 21 W. The analysis of twenty graduation projects from the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering in the field of human-powered products, offers an interesting set of additional practice based design recommendations. The knowledge based approach of human power is very powerful to support the design of human-powered products. There is substantial potential for improvements in the domains energy conversion, ergonomics and environment. This makes that human power, when applied properly, is environmentally and economically competitive over a wider range of applications than thought previously.

  14. Human pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  15. Enhancing human capacities

    CERN Document Server

    Savulescu, Julian; Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing Human Capacities is the first to review the very latest scientific developments in human enhancement. It is unique in its examination of the ethical and policy implications of these technologies from a broad range of perspectives. Presents a rich range of perspectives on enhancement from world leading ethicists and scientists from Europe and North America The most comprehensive volume yet on the science and ethics of human enhancement Unique in providing a detailed overview of current and expected scientific advances in this area Discusses both general conceptual and ethical issues

  16. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  18. Human dignity and bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By opening the field of bioethics followed a new wave of intense debate on the theological, philosophical and legal significance of the concept of human dignity . Exactly ten years ago (December 2003 American bioethicist Ruth Maclin has proposed to divest ourselves of the concept of human dignity because it is vague, useless and redundant and that, without any loss, we can replace it by the ethical principle of personal autonomy. Her article was followed by harsh reactions and opposite views. What is this term in so broad, almost inflationary and opposite use is not a reason to deprive him, but, on the contrary, it shows how important it is and that it should be determined at least outline. As universal values and general concept, the human dignity has no pre-defined and narrow, precise meaning. It is more an evaluation horizon, the guiding principle and regulatory ideas that must constantly define and codify by many guaranted human rights and fundamental freedoms. As generic notion of each reasonable law, it is their foundation and a common denominator, legitimising basis of natural but also of positive law. As intrinsic and static value which means the humaneness, the humanity it is absolute, inherent to every human being without distinction and conditioning, as a unique and unrepeatable creation. In this meaning, the dignity is the obligation and limitation of the state, society and each of us. As an ethical and dynamic category, it is not given to us, but it is assign to us, and it is not in us, but always before us, as a guide of our actions in accordance with virtues, to treat ourselves, each other and the nature in a human way. The century in which we live is named the century of molecular biology and genetic engineering because of the enormous potential but also risks to human dignity. Because of that human dignity has become a central principle in all international documents relating to the human genome, genetics and bioethics, adopted

  19. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  20. Human Capital Tracking Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — AVS is now required to collect, track, and report on data from the following Flight, Business and Workforce Plan. The Human Resource Management’s Performance Target...

  1. Human Research Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strategically, the HRP conducts research and technology development that: 1) enables the development or modification of Agency-level human health and performance...

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to the Centers ... and how to prevent it. How to Prevent HPV: There are 3 types of HPV vaccine: Cervarix , ...

  3. Human Reliability Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  4. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  5. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  6. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  7. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  8. Human Resource Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  9. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  10. CHINESE OF HUMANITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Humanism Education in Language Class,Innovative model university English teaching,Analysis on Information Literacy of College English Teachers Based On Net Environment,Cultural Differences between E-C Idioms and Teaching of English Idioms

  11. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  12. Will Technology Humanize Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    The author considers the question of whether technology will cause humanization or dehumanization in the schools. He concludes that we can not stop tecchnology; we can only give it direction and purpose. (Author/MS)

  13. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September I0, highlighting the coun-try's policies to cope with employ-ment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents."

  14. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence ... stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also known as research or therapeutic cloning), ...

  15. Science and Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Science and humanism are separated so completely as to bring about the creation of two cultures quite distinct from each other within contemporary civilization. Pragmatic, rational attitudes are needed on both sides to bring them together. (DF)

  16. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  17. [Demography and human ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology

  18. Human Resources Accounting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 21 st century will be the epoch of knowled ge economy. Knowledge economy is to develop economy on the basis of knowledge will surely become the major resources of economy development. Therefore, human resources accounting which provides such information as the ebb and follow of hu man resources investment, the size of the human resources employment, will bec ome the main stream of accounting the time of knowledge economy. To face China 's reality, to develop economy, and to flourish enterprise...

  19. Human motricity and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sérgio Vieira e Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available If human motricity science intends to study motor conduct (or actions in which the human being pursues transcendence (or surmounting, it inevitably relates to the large realm of health. What are the aspects it evinces? Transdisciplinarity, solidarity among the various knowledge types (including poetical, complexity, (where the physical is integrated but surmounted and the firm belief that to be healthy is to have in ourselves, alive and working, the capacity for surmounting anything.

  20. Human Happiness Is Sensuous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕静

    2003-01-01

    All human happiness is biological happiness. That is strictly scientific. At the risk of being misunderstood. I must make it clearer: all human happiness is sensuous happiness. The spiritualists will misunderstand me. I am sure; the spiritualists and materialists must forever misunderstand each other, because they don’t talk the same language, or mean by the same word different things. Are we, too, in this problem

  1. Evolution and human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  2. Meeting human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  3. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  4. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  5. A WORLD BEYOND HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Abram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial project to investigate the relationship between magic and traditional medicine as practiced by shamans in Southern rural Asia, the focus of attention gradually shifted to an awareness of the negotiation traditional medicine people or shamans exert between the human community and the larger community of beings. This attentiveness to a more-than-human world does not occur at a supernatural domain above nature or inside her personal self but is the result of the shaman’s special ability to project her consciousness horizontally to other forms of sensibility with which human existence is interwoven. The ecological function of the shaman is to maintain a constant balance between what is taken and what is given from the human community to the larger community. The spirits of indigenous cultures are not defined in opposition to materiality but are essentially those modes of intelligence or awareness that do not possess a human form. By exploring different landscapes, and the sensibility living in them, a new sensitivity is awoken that allows for communication with those intelligences. However, the drowning of these other voices in Western culture, which reduces otherness to an object, creates an uneasiness that is hardly perceived except as an inability to interact with anything more-than-human and its dire consequences in the form of “civilization’s” destructive behavior.

  6. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  7. Human Milk Fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  8. Human Factors Review Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  9. Philosophical foundations of human rights

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    What makes something a human right? What is the relationship between the moral foundations of human rights and human rights law? What are the difficulties of appealing to human rights? This book offers the first comprehensive survey of current thinking on the philosophical foundations of human rights. Divided into four parts, this book focusses firstly on the moral grounds of human rights, for example in our dignity, agency, interests or needs. 'Secondly, it looks at the implications that different moral perspectives on human rights bear for human rights law and politics. Thirdly, it discusses specific and topical human rights including freedom of expression and religion, security, health and more controversial rights such as a human right to subsistence. The final part discusses nuanced critical and reformative views on human rights from feminist, Kantian and relativist perspectives among others. The essays represent new and canonical research by leading scholars in the field. Each part is comprised of a set...

  10. Why Geo-Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  11. [Human ehrlichiosis. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraga-Alvarado, C

    1994-12-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized tick-borne disease. Since 1935 Ehrlichia canis has been known as a cause of illness in dogs and other canine species, and for a few years it was related with human disease. In 1990, Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated from a man suspected of having ehrlichiosis. Partial sequencing of the rRNAS from the human isolate and E. canis, indicated that they are 98.7% related. More recently (May 1994) an "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis" have been reported in USA. PCR amplification and sequence of 16S rDNA, showed that the human isolate was virtually identical to those reported for E. phagocytophila y E. equi, organisms that cause ehrlichiosis in rumiant and in horses. Most patients shows fever, headache, malaise, nausea or vomiting, anorexia and in a minority of cases rash is present. Some of them have complications such as pulmonary infiltrates, gastrointestinal problems, renal dysfunction or failure, hepatoesplenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, DIC and some times death. Leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzyme values have been common findings. Tetracycline and cloramphenicol have been using in adults and children as especific theraphy.

  12. The human serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Psychogios

    Full Text Available Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca.

  13. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  14. NOOSPHERE HUMAN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novozhilova Elena Olegovna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author dwells upon typical features of noosphere human communities, assessing prospects and hazards of genetic engineering, namely of recombinant DNA technology. Background: Socio-historical ecology ushers in a new approach to studying society in its relation to nature. This interrelation is regarded as a series of socio-ecological transformations ending up in certain types of socio-ecological systems being formed. One of such historical types is represented by a noosphere human community [1]. Results: A number of characteristic features of this kind of community have been outlined, namely: its existence and functioning on global scale, major role of information in making up social wealth, creation of living matter. Conclusion: The noosphere human community is currently the latest stage in the sequence of historical types of socio-ecological systems. Widespread use of information and genetic technology may enable noosphere people to create in future a totally man-made world superseding evolutionary biosphere.

  15. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    , men også arbejdssociologien, arbejdspsykologien og human resource development. Den første retning udsprang af de såkaldte Hawthorne-eksperimenter og psykologen Elton Mayos bearbejdelse af resultaterne derfra. Den anden er en løsere gruppering bestående af navne som Abraham Maslow og Frederick Herzberg......Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...

  16. [Human pulmonary trichomonoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboucher, Christophe; Caby, Stéphanie; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Pierce, Raymond; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2007-05-01

    Colonization of human lungs by various Trichomonas species is a frequent occurrence, but is unknown to most physicians. At this site of infection, the parasite develops into an amoeboid form that renders it unrecognizable. For this reason it has been overlooked until recently. Morphological identification is not feasible under these conditions and molecular tools provide the only means of identification. The species involved are not restricted to Trichomonas tenax, a saprophyte of the mouth that is usually cited in the rare cases of pleuropulmonary trichomoniasis reported in the literature. The recent discovery of species previously unknown in humans raises further questions, including the zoonotic potential of these microorganisms and the existence of species of animal origin that have adapted to humans. Anaerobiosis in poorly ventilated alveolar lumen, rather than immunodepression, seems to be the factor that promotes proliferation of this parasite. The diagnosis of trichomoniasis and its treatment by specific drugs will make it possible to evaluate the pathogenicity of these parasites.

  17. Scientists and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  18. Helicopter human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  19. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  20. Reflections on humanizing biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2008-01-01

    Although biomedicine is responsible for the "miracles" of modern medicine, paradoxically it has also led to a quality-of-care crisis in which many patients feel disenfranchised from the health-care industry. To address this crisis, several medical commentators make an appeal for humanizing biomedicine, which has led to shifts in the philosophical boundaries of medical knowledge and practice. In this paper, the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical boundaries of biomedicine and its humanized versions are investigated and compared to one another. Biomedicine is founded on a metaphysical position of mechanistic monism, an epistemology of objective knowing, and an ethic of emotionally detached concern. In humanizing modern medicine, these boundaries are often shifted to a metaphysical position of dualism/holism, an epistemology of subject knowing, and an ethic of empathic care. In a concluding section, the question is discussed whether these shifts in the philosophical boundaries are adequate to resolve the quality-of-care crisis.

  1. HUMAN MISSION OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Miovska Spaseva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the complex role and great responsibility of the education today in development of the moral strength and human values of the children and youth. At the beginning of the article the author reconsiders the pedagogical ideas of Maria Montessori and her concept of education for peace as an instrument for reconstruction of the society and for improvement of the human living. Than the analysis of the moral values in the contemporary society is made and several issues and dilemmas are discussed referring the value disorientation of the youth and the importance of the models of adult’s moral behavior in their search for personal identity. On the basis of this analysis, the human dimension of the education is elaborated enhancing the need for its understanding as support of development, which is based on several crucial elements: love, freedom and spirit of community.

  2. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...... challenging in organizations involved in change processes such as Continuous Improvement (CI), as the technical skills traditionally valued are no longer adequate. These companies are faced with the question: “What competencies should our employees possess in order to contribute to our success, given...... the change processes in which we are engaged?” Without a clear picture of the types of competencies required to implement CI, it is impossible for companies to make informed decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, and training of their workforce. The objective of this paper is therefore to define...

  3. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... and technologies relating to performances and experiences, urban design, climate adaptation, etc. The research takes a process-oriented and participatory approach and involves interaction between different user interests and designs. It is based on empirical, typical case- and action research-oriented studies...

  4. Abortion and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus.

  5. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  6. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  7. [Human rights and procreation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  8. Monogenic obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Until relatively recently, the small number of identifiable inherited human diseases associated with marked obesity were complex, pleiotropic developmental disorders, the molecular basis for which were entirely obscure. The molecular basis for many of these complex syndromes, such as Bardet Beidl syndrome, has been revealed, providing novel insights into processes essential for human hypothalamic function and energy balance. In addition to these discoveries, which were the fruits of positional cloning, the molecular constituents of the signaling pathways responsible for the control of mammalian energy homeostasis have been identified, largely through the study of natural or artificial mutations in mice. We discuss the increasing number of human disorders that result from genetic disruption of the leptin-melanocortin pathways that have been identified. Practical implications of these findings for genetic counseling, prognostication, and even therapy have already emerged.

  9. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  10. Social cognition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Frith, Uta

    2007-01-01

    We review a diversity of studies of human social interaction and highlight the importance of social signals. We also discuss recent findings from social cognitive neuroscience that explore the brain basis of the capacity for processing social signals. These signals enable us to learn about...... the world from others, to learn about other people, and to create a shared social world. Social signals can be processed automatically by the receiver and may be unconsciously emitted by the sender. These signals are non-verbal and are responsible for social learning in the first year of life. Social...... signals can also be processed consciously and this allows automatic processing to be modulated and overruled. Evidence for this higher-level social processing is abundant from about 18 months of age in humans, while evidence is sparse for non-human animals. We suggest that deliberate social signalling...

  11. Human Security Agendas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan Hunter

    2012-01-01

    Ⅰ.IntroductionThe need for governments and international organisations to gain a better understanding of "security" is ever more urgent.For example in the conflict in Libya in early 2011,many security dilemmas were visible:the protection of Libyan civilians,the security of the regime,whether and how the UN or NATO should intervene,whether Europe would be threatened with a massive refugee flow,how to protect or evacuate foreign citizens (including Chinese),how to secure food and medical supplies in the midst of armed conflict.Such events may be termed "complex emergencies" which often raise legal, military and humanitarian issues simultaneously.International law and practice do not provide clear guidelines on such situations,and responses can be random,contingent on a variety of factors.Traditional concepts of security,for example protection of national borders,are certainly still relevant and legally enforceable,but more sophisticated concepts are needed to respond to security dilemmas in today's globalised world.Human security as a concept was first developed within the UN system in the 1990s,and set out,for example,in Human Security Now [1] The first section of this paper tracks the development of Human Security discourse,and also examines the broadening of the "security"concept in recent years.The second section reports on institutions with a specific interest in Human Security,for example within the UN system and in universities.The third section acknowledges some critiques of the Human Security paradigm.The last section reports on new directions that may enrich the Human Security agenda.

  12. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    The need for experimental models is obvious. In animal models it is possible to study vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, c-fos expression etc. However, the pathophysiology of migraine remains unsolved, why results from animal studies not directly can be related to the migraine attack......, which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...

  13. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  14. On human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spijk, Piet

    2015-05-01

    If it is true that health is a priority objective of medicine, then medical practice can only be successful if the meaning of the term "health" is known. Various attempts have been made over the years to define health. This paper proposes a new definition. In addition to current health concepts, it also takes into account the distinction between specifically human (great) health and health as the absence of disease and illness-i.e. small health. The feeling of leading a life that makes sense plays a key role in determining specifically human great health.

  15. Handbook of human computation

    CERN Document Server

    Michelucci, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses the emerging area of human computation, The chapters, written by leading international researchers, explore existing and future opportunities to combine the respective strengths of both humans and machines in order to create powerful problem-solving capabilities. The book bridges scientific communities, capturing and integrating the unique perspective and achievements of each. It coalesces contributions from industry and across related disciplines in order to motivate, define, and anticipate the future of this exciting new frontier in science and cultural evolution. Reade

  16. When computers were human

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, David Alan

    2013-01-01

    Before Palm Pilots and iPods, PCs and laptops, the term ""computer"" referred to the people who did scientific calculations by hand. These workers were neither calculating geniuses nor idiot savants but knowledgeable people who, in other circumstances, might have become scientists in their own right. When Computers Were Human represents the first in-depth account of this little-known, 200-year epoch in the history of science and technology. Beginning with the story of his own grandmother, who was trained as a human computer, David Alan Grier provides a poignant introduction to the wider wo

  17. We Are Human Beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  18. Biodemography of human ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W

    2010-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems...... to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival...... - and healthy survival - to even greater ages....

  19. Understanding digital humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, D

    2012-01-01

    The application of new computational techniques and visualisation technologies in the Arts and Humanities are resulting in fresh approaches and methodologies for the study of new and traditional corpora. This 'computational turn' takes the methods and techniques from computer science to create innovative means of close and distant reading. This book discusses the implications and applications of 'Digital Humanities' and the questions raised when using algorithmic techniques. Key researchers in the field provide a comprehensive introduction to important debates surrounding issues such as th

  20. Artificial human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  1. Post-human Viewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2013-01-01

    to become part of a global cultural flow, thus calling into question the physical connection between viewer and image. This article analyses what happens to that connection when not only the image but also the physical body is mediated and challenged in post-human relations, and examines the ensuing ethical...... implications. The author takes photojournalism and, in particular, mobile phone footage as a starting point for an exploration of the (post-human) body as evidence and sign of authenticity in the modern age of digital communications and journalism....

  2. Ayahuasca and human destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2005-06-01

    In this essay, the author shares his personal reflections gleaned from a lifetime of research with ayahuasca, and speculates on the societal, political, planetary, and evolutionary implications of humanity's aeons-old symbiosis with this shamanic plant. The thesis is developed that at this critical historical juncture, ayahuasca has developed a strategy to broadcast its message to a wider world--a reflection of the urgent need to avert global ecological catastrophe. While ayahuasca has much to teach us, the critical question is, will humanity hear it, and heed it, in time?

  3. Human Factors Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  4. Pragmatic Challenges to Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2007-01-01

    Pragmatism offers a platform for posing relevant questions. This article uses a pragmatic point of departure to question a natural law conception of human rights and to take a closer look at three pressing human rights problems: The human rights situation in states with little or no state capacity......; the revision and adaptation of human rights law; and the not straightforward relationship betweemn human rights and democracy....

  5. Human automation integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, M.; Cosenzo, K.; Galster, s.; Hollnagel, E.; Miller, C.; Parasuraman, R.; Reising, J.; Taylor, R.; Breda, L. van

    2007-01-01

    Many versions of future concept of operations (CONOPS) rely heavily on UMVs. The pressure to take the human out of immediate control of these vehicles is being driven by several factors. These factors include a reduction in cost for the production and maintenance of the vehicle, operational viabilit

  6. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then ...

  7. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID framework, and a sample of 54 HWID related papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009–2014. We group the papers into six topical group...

  8. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  9. Predictors of human rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  10. Humanizing science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, James F.

    2004-09-01

    This paper argues that the diverse curriculum reform agendas associated with science education are strongly and critically associated with the educational characteristics of the humanities. The article begins with a survey of interpretations of the distinctive contribution which the humanities make to educational purposes. From this survey four general characteristics of the humanities are identified: an appeal to an autonomous self with the right and capacity to make independent judgements and interpretations; indeterminacy in the subject matter of these judgements and interpretations; a focus on meaning, in the context of human responses, actions, and relationships, and especially on the ethical, aesthetic, and purposive; and finally, the possibility of commonality in standards of judgement and interpretation, under conditions of indeterminacy. Inquiry and science technology and society (STS) orientated curriculum development agendas within science education are explored in the light of this analysis. It is argued that the four characteristics identified are central to the educational purposes of these and other less prominent modes of curriculum development in science, though not unproblematically so. In the light of this discussion the prognosis and challenges for science curriculum development are explored.

  11. Learning to Be Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  12. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  13. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  14. Parasites and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  15. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  16. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  17. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360

  18. Visible Human Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library of Medicine thanks the men and the women who will their body to science, thereby enabling medical research and development. Further Information General Information A description of The Visible Human Project ® image data and how to obtain it (includes license ...

  19. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  20. Computational human body models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Computational human body models are widely used for automotive crashsafety research and design and as such have significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic injuries and fatalities. Currently crash simulations are mainly performed using models based on crash-dummies. However crash dummies dif

  1. Human Power Empirically Explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Harvesting energy from the users’ muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are conven

  2. Narratology beyond the Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay uses Lauren Groff’s 2011 short story “Above and Below” to explore aspects of a narratology beyond the human, considering how ideas developed by scholars of narrative bear on questions about the nature and scope of human-animal relationships in the larger biosphere. Bringing Groff’s text into dialogue with the concept of “self-narratives” as developed by Kenneth J. Gergen and Mary M. Gergen, anthropological research on the ontologies projected by the members of different cultures, and ideas from literary narratology, I discuss how the structure and narration of Groff’s story reveal a fault line between two competing ontologies in the culture of modernity, one parsimonious and the other prolific when it comes to allocating possibilities for selfhood across species lines. More generally, in addition to illuminating how a given self-narrative locates the human agent in a transspecies constellation of selves, a narratology beyond the human can assist with the construction of new, more sustainable individual and collective self-narratives that situate the self within wider webs of creatural life.

  3. Communicating Humanism Nonverbally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillison, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the importance of nonverbal communication by counselors in expressing humanistic feeling. Notes that facial expression (i.e., smiling) provides immediate feedback to the observer; use of space (i.e., close proximity) communicates warmth and humaneness; and tone of voice can complement spoken words and give them more meaning. (WAS)

  4. Cultivating human nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology claims to offer a unified perspective on human nature and culture, which can serve to further the integration of psychology and the social sciences. I describe four approaches to evolutionary psychology, and note increasing attention to the agency of the individual in constru

  5. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  6. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  7. Lessons in Human Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Joanne Lozar

    2003-01-01

    Explores the importance of relationship literacy--the ability to create good relationships with others--in the next economy and offers perspectives on how business education instructors can help students develop and improve their human relations skills for business success. (Author/JOW)

  8. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of

  9. Human health and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The high quality of most groundwaters, consequent upon the self-purification capacity of subsurface strata, has long been a key factor in human health and wellbeing. More than 50% of the world’s population now rely on groundwater for their supply of drinking water – and in most circumstances a prope...

  10. Humanizing the Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Norman K., Ed.; Saylor, J. Galen, Ed.

    These papers, presented during ASCD-sponsored conference, confront educators with issues in and alternatives for making secondary schools a more humanizing experience for students. The contributors and their articles are: Norman K. Hamilton, "Alternatives in Secondary Education"; Thornton B. Monez and Norman L. Bussiere, "The High School in Human…

  11. Humanism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  12. Assessment of human exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebret, E. [RIVM-National Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    This article describes some of the features of the assessment of human exposure to environmental pollutants in epidemiological studies. Since exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiology studies typically involve professionals from various backgrounds, interpretation of a concepts like `exposure` may vary. A brief descriptions is therefore given by way of introduction

  13. Hauntings of Human Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The central conflicts of Stephen King’s horror novel The Shining are rooted in human nature and reflect evolutionarily recurrent adaptive problems—the problem of balancing conflicting evolved motives, such as motives for selfish status striving versus motives for affiliative nurturing behavior...

  14. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  15. Computational human body models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Computational human body models are widely used for automotive crashsafety research and design and as such have significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic injuries and fatalities. Currently crash simulations are mainly performed using models based on crash-dummies. However crash dummies

  16. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  17. Designers of Human Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  18. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  19. Haptocorrin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Anne Louise; Nexo, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2007-01-01

    knowledge concerning its function and its distribution in adult and foetal life is limited. In this study, we present data on the tissue expression of haptocorrin and on the relation between analogues on haptocorrin and vitamin B(12) status in humans. Methods: Polyclonal antibodies towards haptocorrin were...

  20. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  1. Humanism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  2. Animal and Human Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks…

  3. Conceptualizations of Human Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Rudolf H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents six major methods by which characteristics of environments have been related to indexes of human functioning: (1) ecological dimensions; (2) behavior settings; (3) dimensions of organizational structure; and, (4) dimensions identifying the collective personal and/or behavioral characteristics of the milieu inhabitants; and two others.…

  4. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  5. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  6. Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selenium is an essential element for human health and it is toxic at high concentrations. Selenium is a constituent component of selenoproteins that have enzymatic and structural roles in human biochemistry. Selenium is a best antioxidant and catalyst for production of thyroid hormone. This element has the key role in the immune function; prevention of AIDS progression and the deactivity of toxins. Furthermore, selenium is essential for sperm motility and can reduce abortions. Selenium deficiency was also associated with adverse mood states. The findings regarding cardiovascular disease risk related to selenium deficiency is unclear, though other conditions such as vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and selenium deficiency can cause this disease too. Moreover, consuming of 60 mg of selenium per day may be associated with reduction of cancer risk. In this study, a review of studies has been performed on the biochemical function of selenium toxicity, and its effects on human health. Furthermore, certain identified cancers associated with selenium have been discussed to absorb more attention to the status of this element and also as a guide for further studies. Selenium plays the dual character (useful and harmful in human health, and then it is necessary to determine the concentration of this element in body fluids and tissues. An appropriate method for routine measurement of selenium in clinical laboratories is electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS with very low detection limit and good precision.

  7. Towards International Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Julian

    1971-01-01

    The basic task before the educational profession today is to study and understand the evolutionary-humanist revolution, to follow up its educational implications; and to enable as many as possible of the world's growing minds to be illuminated by its new vision of human destiny. (Author/JB)

  8. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  9. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of hu

  10. Disability and Human Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff McNair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview of models of disability growing out of the field of disability studies and leading to a call for interventions going beyond a simply medical model approach. A brief discussion of human supports/services is provided such that readers engaged in the development of services/supports can base them on best principles.

  11. Human herpesviruses and MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in MS pathogenesis; the human herpesviruses (HHV) are likely candidates for such factors. HHV share a number of properties: they are almost ubiquitous, they are highly prevalent worldwide, they all cause latent infections...

  12. Children Are Human Beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, James H. S.

    2017-01-01

    The basic assumption underlying this article is that the really significant changes in human history are those that occur, not in the mechanical gadgets which men use nor in the institutionalized arrangements by which they live, but in their attitudes and in the values which they accept. The revolutions of the past that have had the greatest…

  13. Ubiquitous Human Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zittrain, Jonathan L.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a thumb tack and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This short essay explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring.

  14. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  15. Human-Centered Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, O.; Kosara, R.; Urquiza, J.; Wassink, I.; Kerren, A.; Ebert, A.; Meyer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Humans have remarkable perceptual capabilities. These capabilities are heavily underestimated in current visualizations. Often, this is due to the lack of an in-depth user study to set the requirements for optimal visualizations. The designer does not understand what kind of information should be vi

  16. Human Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  17. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  18. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  19. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  20. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  1. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  2. The science of unitary human beings and interpretive human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, F

    1993-01-01

    Natural science and human science are identified as the bases of most nursing theories and research programs. Natural science has been disclaimed by Martha Rogers as the philosophy of science that undergirds her work. The question remains, is the science of unitary human beings an interpretive human science? The author explores the works of Rogers through a dialectic with two human scientists' works. Wilhelm Dilthey's works represent the founding or traditional view, and Jurgen Habermas' works represent a contemporary, reconstructionist view. The ways Rogerian thought contributes to human studies but is distinct from traditional and reconstructionist human sciences are illuminated.

  3. Digitalization of the human mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Drita Mehmeti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The human faces with various problems already in its first steps in live, and carriers of such life situations are found in various ages which bring new currents in the way of life. Starting from the ancient Greek thought, the human and its mind made the centre of the world, already orienting the Western thought towards the study of the human mind (namely human reason, since it made the key tool for human survival. Although human problems have been discussed throughout various ages, they have not been able to resolve in full the human problems, and therefore, the same issues were taken by the representatives of the socalled “critical theory”, who used the theory to criticize the way of live Western civilization was offering, known as digitalization of the human mind. The human problems are addressed in a poly-dimensional manner. The factors affecting the human mind are: industrial civilization, technical progress, automation, overtly influence of machinery on humans, substitution of cultural values, which in sum have developed a new World Order, where the ruler is technology. In the modern world, the human fails to recognize himself, since he is out of himself and lives according to the rules set forth by the “remote control”. In the flow of this kind of livelihood, human alienates, or in other words, the human goes out of himself, trying to adapt maximally to the requirements of the new way of life.

  4. Human Integration Design Processes (HIDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Human Integration Design Processes (HIDP) document is to provide human-systems integration design processes, including methodologies and best practices that NASA has used to meet human systems and human rating requirements for developing crewed spacecraft. HIDP content is framed around human-centered design methodologies and processes in support of human-system integration requirements and human rating. NASA-STD-3001, Space Flight Human-System Standard, is a two-volume set of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Agency-level standards established by the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer, directed at minimizing health and performance risks for flight crews in human space flight programs. Volume 1 of NASA-STD-3001, Crew Health, sets standards for fitness for duty, space flight permissible exposure limits, permissible outcome limits, levels of medical care, medical diagnosis, intervention, treatment and care, and countermeasures. Volume 2 of NASASTD- 3001, Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health, focuses on human physical and cognitive capabilities and limitations and defines standards for spacecraft (including orbiters, habitats, and suits), internal environments, facilities, payloads, and related equipment, hardware, and software with which the crew interfaces during space operations. The NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8705.2B, Human-Rating Requirements for Space Systems, specifies the Agency's human-rating processes, procedures, and requirements. The HIDP was written to share NASA's knowledge of processes directed toward achieving human certification of a spacecraft through implementation of human-systems integration requirements. Although the HIDP speaks directly to implementation of NASA-STD-3001 and NPR 8705.2B requirements, the human-centered design, evaluation, and design processes described in this document can be applied to any set of human-systems requirements and are independent of reference

  5. Carotid baroreceptor reflexes in humans during orthostatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, V L; Hainsworth, R

    2001-09-01

    Orthostatic stress, including standing, head-up tilting and lower body suction, results in increases in peripheral vascular resistance but little or no change in mean arterial pressure. This study was undertaken to determine whether the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor reflex was enhanced during conditions of decreased venous return. We studied eight healthy subjects and determined responses of pulse interval (ECG) and forearm vascular resistance (mean finger blood pressure divided by Doppler estimate of brachial artery blood velocity) to graded increases and decreases in carotid transmural pressure, effected by a neck suction/pressure device. Responses were determined with and without the application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -40 mmHg. Stimulus-response curves were determined as the responses to graded neck pressure changes and the differential of this provided estimates of reflex sensitivity. Changes in carotid transmural pressure caused graded changes in R-R interval and vascular resistance. The cardiac responses were unaffected by LBNP. Vascular resistance responses, however, were significantly enhanced during LBNP and the peak gain of the reflex was increased from 1.2 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- S.E.M.) to 2.2 +/- 0.3 units (P < 0.05). The increased baroreflex gain may contribute to maintenance of blood pressure during orthostatic stress and limit the pressure decreases during prolonged periods of such stress.

  6. The effects of human resource flexibility on human resources development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeidMehdi Veise

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human resources are the primary factor for development of competitiveness and innovation and reaching competitive advantage and they try to improve corporate capabilities through various characteristics such as value creation, scarcity and difficulty of imitation. This paper investigates the effect of human resource flexibility and its dimensions on human resource development and its dimensions. The survey was conducted using descriptive-correlation method that intended to describe how human resource flexibility was effective on human resource development. Questionnaire was tool of data collection. The statistical population included one hundred employees of the Electric Company in Ilam province, thus census method was used. Reliability of the questionnaire was measured via Cronbach's alpha equal to 0.96. The findings revealed that flexibility and its dimensions were effective on human resource development and dimensions of it. As a result, human resource flexibility should be considered for development of human resources and employees with the highest flexibility should be selected.

  7. Survey Relationship between Human Resources Roles and Human Resources Competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Darvish

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates relationship between Human resources roles and Human resources competencies in Iranian Petroleum Company. For this study, we were looking for answers to these questions: What are the new required Human Resources competencies For Contemporary organizations? And For Gain these competencies what roles should be played by Human Resources? The study had one main hypothesis and four minor hypotheses. Research method was descriptive, and regression and correlation tests were used to determine the relationship between variables. The populations of this study were managers of Iranian Petroleum Company. This Research showed that Human resources roles have significant effect on Human resources competencies; Strategic partner, Employee champion, and Change agent had significant relationship with all of Human resource competencies; Administrative expert had not significant relationship with none of the Human resource competencies.

  8. Human gliomas contain morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    morphine via high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC peak corresponding to an authentic morphine standard had its morphine level determined via radioimmune assay. The identity of this material was established by Q-TOF-MS analysis. RESULTS: Each glioma exhibited an endogenous morphine presence....... Tumor extractions demonstrated a molecular mass of 286.14 da, identical to authentic morphine. Subsequent fragmentation analysis of this molecule revealed fragment masses of 129.01 da, 183.09 da and 201.07 da, corresponding to authentic morphine fragments. This material was not found in any......BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogenous...

  9. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population.

  10. Human Actions Made Tangible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Caglio, Agnese; Jensen, Lars Christian

    2014-01-01

    projects, it remains a challenge to investigate in detail how people interact with all of their body. Analysis of full-body movement is time consuming, notation techniques are rare, and findings are difficult to share between members of a design team. In this paper we propose tangible video analysis......, a method developed to engage people from different backgrounds in collaboratively analysing videos with the help of physical objects. We will present one of these tools, Action Scrabble, for analysing temporal organisation of human actions. We work with a case of skilled forklift truck driving....... By backtracking our design research experiments, we will unfold how and why the tangible tool succeeds in engaging designers with varied analysis experience to collaboratively focus on human action structures – and even find video analysis fun!...

  11. Philanthropy and Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Øjvind

    2013-01-01

    written about philanthropy from a political, sociological, anthropological and managerial perspective. However, an essential question remains: what does philanthropy mean? In a Greek context, philanthropy is connected to a friendly act towards one’s owns close connections such as family or fellow citizens......, and normally utilized to promote one’s own prestige in the city-state. In Roman context, universal humanism, humanitas, was invented. This universal perspective was also supported by Christianity. It is this universal concept of philanthropy which is the foundation for the different philanthropic traditions...... in Germany, England, France and USA. In each tradition is developed special features of the concept of philanthropy. The four traditions are summarized in the UN universal human rights, which has become the common normative reference for global philanthropy. In this way philanthropy has become, in a modern...

  12. Business and Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the United Nations (UN) Guidelines on Business and Human Rights adopted in 2011 by the UN Human Rights Council from the perspective of transnational business governance interactions (TBGI) analytical framework.1 The article identifies and discusses dimensions of interaction...... and components of regulatory governance which characterize the Guiding Principles, focusing in particular on rule formation and implementation. The article notes that the Guiding Principles actively enrolled other actors for the rule-making process, ensuring support in a politically and legally volatile field...... in several areas of relevance to transnational business governance interaction and indicates the relevance of the TBGI approach to public regulatory transnational business governance initiatives. The analysis of the Guiding Principles as interactional transnational business governance suggests that this form...

  13. Business and Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    This article analyses the United Nations (UN) Guidelines on Business and Human Rights adopted in 2011 by the UN Human Rights Council from the perspective of Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) analytical framework (Eberlein et al. 2014). The article identifies and discusses...... dimensions of interaction and components of regulatory governance which characterise the Guiding Principles, focusing in particular on the rule formation and implementation. The article notes that the Guiding Principles actively enrolled other actors for the rule-making process ensuring support...... that the UN Guiding Principles are unique in several respects of relevance to transnational business governance interaction and indicate the relevance of the TBGI approach to public regulatory transnational business governance initiatives. The analysis of the Guiding Principles as interactional transnational...

  14. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...

  15. Ancient human microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M

    2015-02-01

    Very recently, we discovered a vast new microbial self: the human microbiome. Our native microbiota interface with our biology and culture to influence our health, behavior, and quality of life, and yet we know very little about their origin, evolution, or ecology. With the advent of industrialization, globalization, and modern sanitation, it is intuitive that we have changed our relationship with microbes, but we have little information about the ancestral state of our microbiome, and we therefore lack a foundation for characterizing this change. High-throughput sequencing has opened up new opportunities in the field of paleomicrobiology, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the complex microbial ecologies that inhabit our bodies. By focusing on recent coprolite and dental calculus research, we explore how emerging research on ancient human microbiomes is changing the way we think about ancient disease and how archaeological studies can contribute to a medical understanding of health and nutrition today.

  16. Is human fecundity changing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smarr, Melissa M; Sapra, Katherine J; Gemmill, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Fecundity, the biologic capacity to reproduce, is essential for the health of individuals and is, therefore, fundamental for understanding human health at the population level. Given the absence of a population (bio)marker, fecundity is assessed indirectly by various individual-based (e.g. semen...... quality, ovulation) or couple-based (e.g. time-to-pregnancy) endpoints. Population monitoring of fecundity is challenging, and often defaults to relying on rates of births (fertility) or adverse outcomes such as genitourinary malformations and reproductive site cancers. In light of reported declines...... in semen quality and fertility rates in some global regions among other changes, the question as to whether human fecundity is changing needs investigation. We review existing data and novel methodological approaches aimed at answering this question from a transdisciplinary perspective. The existing...

  17. Serotonin in human skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Qiying Gong; Guiming Li

    2005-01-01

    In this review the authors summarize data of a potential role for serotonin in human skin physiology and pathology. The uncovering of endogenous serotonin synthesis and its transformation to melatonin underlines a putative important role of this pathway in melanocyte physiology and pathology. Pathways of the biosynthesis and biodegradation of serotonin have been characterized in human beings and its major cellular populations. Moreover, receptors of serotonin are expressed on keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts and these mediate phenotypic actions on cellular proliferation and differentiation. And the widespread expression of a cutaneous seorotoninergic system indicates considerable selectivity of action to facilitate intra-, auto-, or paracrine mechanisms that define and influence skin function in a highly compartmentalized manner. Melatonin, in turn, can also act as a hormone, neurotransmitter, cytokine, biological modifier and immunomodulator. Thus, Serotonin local synthesis and cellular localization could thus become of great importance in the diagnosis and management of cutaneous pathology.

  18. Posthumanism: beyond humanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The focal point of posthumanism consists not as such in an a-critical acceptance of the technological promises - like there is for transhumanism - but in a total contamination and hybridization of human beings with other living beings and machines (these are the two main forms of contamination). The change of perspective untaken by posthumanism would be, thus, a paradigmatic shift in anthropology. As with ecologism, posthumanism, in order to obtain total contamination and man's openness to otherness, proposes the elimination and the fluidification of boundaries, thus even denying man's identity, and, with it, the very possibility of openness. However, by denying the identity, one denies the condition of possibility of thought, just as it has been manifested in history until now: hence we understand how, primarily, posthumanism is not configured as an adequate philosophical reflection, but as a narrative that takes origin from certain requirements, which are eminently human, and that discloses its deeply anthropogenic roots.

  19. Human-Forest Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva; Dauksta, D.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between human beings and forests has been important for the development of society. It is based on various productive, ecological, social and cultural functions of forests. The cultural functions, including the spiritual and symbolic role of forests, are often not addressed...... problems. To achieve a deeper understanding of the dependency of society on forests, it is necessary to recognise the role of forests in our consciousness of being human. Giving a historical overview about the cultural bonds between people and forests, the first part of the paper puts focus on non-productive...... with the same attention as the other functions. The aim of this paper is to put a stronger emphasis on the fact that the acknowledgement of cultural bonds is needed in the discussion of sustainable development. Forest should not only be considered as a technical means to solve environmental and economic...

  20. Animals, Humans and Sociability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Tedeschi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses animal studies from the point of view of sociability as an “inter-subjective field of action” and as an agent and builder of society (“doing society”. In sociology, the zoological connection has availed of the theory of borders and critical realism, but, above all, of constructionism, in its interactionist and ethno-methodological sense and both focused on social micro-interaction. The construction of the identity of social actors (both human and animal is especially evident in interaction regarding play, games, sport, daily life and work. In these spheres, analyses shed light on ambivalent and contradictory human experiences that clash with the dominant culture, while highlighting practical resistance against speciesism, which it is well worth to bring to the attention of future research, using open, mixed methodologies.