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Sample records for human carotid arteries

  1. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... results of stenting versus endarterectomy for carotid-artery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2016;374(11):1021- ...

  2. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  3. Activation of calpain-1 in human carotid artery atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luis M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we observed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced death of endothelial cells was calpain-1-dependent. The purpose of the present paper was to study the possible activation of calpain in human carotid plaques, and to compare calpain activity in the plaques from symptomatic patients with those obtained from patients without symptoms. Methods Human atherosclerotic carotid plaques (n = 29, 12 associated with symptoms were removed by endarterectomy. Calpain activity and apoptosis were detected by performing immunohistochemical analysis and TUNEL assay on human carotid plaque sections. An antibody specific for calpain-proteolyzed α-fodrin was used on western blots. Results We found that calpain was activated in all the plaques and calpain activity colocalized with apoptotic cell death. Our observation of autoproteolytic cleavage of the 80 kDa subunit of calpain-1 provided further evidence for enzyme activity in the plaque samples. When calpain activity was quantified, we found that plaques from symptomatic patients displayed significantly lower calpain activity compared with asymptomatic plaques. Conclusion These novel results suggest that calpain-1 is commonly active in carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques, and that calpain activity is colocalized with cell death and inversely associated with symptoms.

  4. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because ... other substances found in the blood. Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood ...

  5. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right- and left-internal carotid arteries, and the right- and left-external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to both the head and brain. Review Date 6/1/2015 Updated by: Daniel ...

  6. Carotid artery stenting; Karotisangioplastie

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    Fiehler, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neuroradiologische Diagnostik und Intervention, Diagnostikzentrum

    2009-09-15

    An ipsilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery is found in 10 - 15 % of all ischemic strokes and indicates an increased risk of a second stroke. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a therapy that is established for many years. CAS reveals complication rates and long-term efficacy comparable to carotid endarterectomy (TEA). Especially younger patients seem to benefit from CAS. Abilities and experiences of the therapist and the choice of the techniques used are critical for patient safety. The efficacy of CAS for treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis is probable but still unproven in prospective-randomized trial. (orig.)

  7. Methodology to study intimal failure mechanics in human internal carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2005-12-01

    While the incidence of blunt carotid artery injuries is low, the mortality rate is extremely high (40%). Clinical evidence indicates that the intimal region of the artery often sustains failure, while maintaining the integrity of the outer layers. This condition may lead to delayed ischemic symptoms, commonly reported in clinical literature. To date, the mechanical properties of the intima relative to the outer vessel layers have not been quantified in the human carotid artery. The purpose of the present study was to develop a methodology to determine the longitudinal mechanical properties of the human internal carotid artery in tension, with an emphasis on intimal failure. This was accomplished by opening the vessel at the mid-diameter level, creating an 'I'-shaped testing specimen, subjecting the specimen to failure loading, documenting the stretch characteristics of the intimal and adventitial sides in the temporal domain, and correlating the synchronized videography with mechanical loading. Intimal failure data were quantified using stress and strain parameters in conjunction with digital videography of the intimal and adventitial sides. The present methodology can be used to determine the mechanical properties of the intima relative to ultimate carotid artery failure. These data will assist in the understanding of blunt carotid artery injuries, its diagnosis and treatment.

  8. In vivo transfer of lipoprotein(a) into human atherosclerotic carotid arterial intima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bo; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the atherogenic potential of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and LDL by measuring the intimal clearance of these two plasma lipoproteins in the atherosclerotic intima of the human carotid artery in vivo. Autologous 131I-Lp(a) and 125I-LDL were mixed and reinjected intr...

  9. Impact of age and sex on carotid and peripheral arterial wall thickness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Munckhof, I; Scholten, R; Cable, N T; Hopman, M T E; Green, D J; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-12-01

    Although previous studies have reported age-related wall thickening in carotid arteries, it is not clear whether this is a systemic phenomenon which is also apparent in peripheral conduit arteries or whether conduit wall thickness (WT) changes occur to a similar degree in men and women. To determine whether sex modifies the impact of ageing on WT or wall-to-lumen ratio (W:L) in atherosclerosis-prone (i.e. carotid artery, femoral, superficial femoral, popliteal artery) and atherosclerosis-resistant (i.e. brachial artery) conduit arteries. We included 30 young (23 ± 2 year; 15M : 15F) and 31 older (70 ± 5 year; 18M : 13F) healthy subjects. High-resolution ultrasound was used to measure diameter, WT and wall-to-lumen ratio (W/L) in all arteries. Older subjects had increased WT and W/L in the carotid, femoral, superficial femoral, popliteal and brachial arteries (all P < 0.05). Compared with women, men demonstrated larger diameter and WT (both P < 0.01) across all arteries. Sex did not impact upon age-related changes in WT or W/L (P = 0.39 and 0.43 respectively). Our data suggest that age-related wall thickening, evident in the carotid artery, is also apparent in the arteries of the upper and lower limbs. The impact of age on wall thickening did not differ between men and women. These data support the presence of systemic increases in WT and W/L with age in apparently healthy humans, independent of sex. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  10. Carotid Artery Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that look for inherited genetic markers linked to disease, and imaging tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body. These ... a risk factor. Risk factors for carotid artery disease include: age high blood pressure diabetes tobacco smoking high cholesterol coronary artery disease (CAD) obesity ...

  11. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis. This final recommendation statement applies to adults who ...

  12. Evidence for shear stress-mediated dilation of the internal carotid artery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Howard Henry; Atkinson, Ceri L; Heinonen, Ilkka H A

    2016-01-01

    Increases in arterial carbon dioxide tension (hypercapnia) elicit potent vasodilation of cerebral arterioles. Recent studies have also reported vasodilation of the internal carotid artery during hypercapnia, but the mechanism(s) mediating this extracranial vasoreactivity are unknown. Hypercapnia ...

  13. Carotid artery stenosis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000717.htm Carotid artery stenosis - self-care To use the sharing features on ... feel their pulse under your jawline. Carotid artery stenosis occurs when the carotid arteries become narrowed or ...

  14. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: I. Model and velocity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J.; Buick, J. M.

    2008-10-01

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool in the investigation of human blood flow and arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is known that near wall velocity and shear are important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper results for a simulation of blood flow in a three-dimensional carotid artery geometry using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented. The velocity fields in the body of the fluid are analysed at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. It is found that the three-dimensional model agrees well with previous literature results for carotid artery flow. Regions of low near wall velocity and circulatory flow are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery, which are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  15. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of carotid-arery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2010;363(1):11- ...

  16. Differential mechanical response and microstructural organization between non-human primate femoral and carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Li, Haiyan; Gleason, Rudolph L.

    2014-01-01

    Unique anatomic locations and physiologic functions predispose different arteries to varying mechanical responses and pathologies. However, the underlying causes of these mechanical differences are not well understood. The objective of this study was to first identify structural differences in the arterial matrix that would account for the mechanical differences between healthy femoral and carotid arteries and second to utilize these structural observations to perform a microstructurally motivated constitutive analysis. Femoral and carotid arteries were subjected to cylindrical biaxial loading and their microstructure was quantified using two-photon microscopy. The femoral arteries were found to be less compliant than the carotid arteries at physiologic loads, consistent with previous studies, despite similar extracellular compositions of collagen and elastin (P > 0.05). The femoral arteries exhibited significantly less circumferential dispersion of collagen fibers (P arteries. Elastin transmural distribution, in vivo axial stretch, and opening angles were also found to be distinctly different between the arteries. Lastly, we modeled the arteries’ mechanical behaviors using a microstructural-based, distributed collagen fiber constitutive model. With this approach, the material parameters of the model were solved using the experimental microstructural observations. The findings of this study support an important role for microstructural organization in arterial stiffness. PMID:24532266

  17. Stiffness Properties of Adventitia, Media, and Full Thickness Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Arteries in the Axial and Circumferential Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Allen H; Teng, Zhongzhao; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Zheyang; Woodard, Pamela K; Billiar, Kristen L; Wang, Liang; Tang, Dalin

    2017-12-01

    Arteries can be considered as layered composite material. Experimental data on the stiffness of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries and their media and adventitia layers are very limited. This study used uniaxial tests to determine the stiffness (tangent modulus) of human carotid artery sections containing American Heart Association type II and III lesions. Axial and circumferential oriented adventitia, media, and full thickness specimens were prepared from six human carotid arteries (total tissue strips: 71). Each artery yielded 12 specimens with two specimens in each of the following six categories; axial full thickness, axial adventitia (AA), axial media (AM), circumferential full thickness, circumferential adventitia (CA), and circumferential media (CM). Uniaxial testing was performed using Inspec 2200 controlled by software developed using labview. The mean stiffness of the adventitia was 3570 ± 667 and 2960 ± 331 kPa in the axial and circumferential directions, respectively, while the corresponding values for the media were 1070 ± 186 and 1800 ± 384 kPa. The adventitia was significantly stiffer than the media in both the axial (p = 0.003) and circumferential (p = 0.010) directions. The stiffness of the full thickness specimens was nearly identical in the axial (1540 ± 186) and circumferential (1530 ± 389 kPa) directions. The differences in axial and circumferential stiffness of media and adventitia were not statistically significant.

  18. Bilateral carotid artery injury response in side impact using a vessel model integrated with a human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Yu, Mao M; Martin, R Shayn; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2009-10-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant's neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  19. Anatomical variations of the carotid arteries in adult Kenyans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the topography and anatomical variations of the carotid arteries among Kenyans. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi. Subjects: Eighty carotid arteries of forty cadavers were dissected. Results: The bifurcation of the commonest ...

  20. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Basulto, S D; Montejo-Montejo, J

    Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are infrequent but its clinical behavior, high risk of bleeding and complex anatomic relationships of the sac permit to consider these lesions as a challenge cases. 497 patients harboring intracranial aneurysms were operated on at Manuel Ascunce Domenech Hospital, Camagüey, Cuba between January 1982 to august 2001. We utilized microsurgical procedures, optical magnification, specialized neuroanesthesia and Intensive Care Unit postoperatory following. All patients were evaluated clinically with World Federation Neurological Surgeon Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale. There were 16 patients with intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms (3.2 %). 12 patients were under 40 years and 50% were between 16 and 30 years old. All patients present intracranial bleeding. There was 87.5% of total or partial recuperation. There was one death only. Postoperative deficit were observed at 44% but 31% disappeared three month later. Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are complex anatomoclinical lesions. Clinically, we observed high tendency to bleed and multiplicity. Anatomically, these sacs have complex arterial relationship that difficult dissection and clipping. They have frequent postoperative morbidity. Multiple or bilateral aneurysmal sacs will be clipped by one surgical procedure.

  2. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart. It also helps you lose weight, control diabetes and reduce stress. Limit alcohol. Control chronic conditions. Managing conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure helps protect your arteries. ...

  3. [Sports-related carotid artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouschot, J; Bormann, A; Routsi, D; Stoll, A

    2009-09-01

    Sports-related carotid artery dissection are very rare and were described in different kinds of sports. We report on a 45-year old man who suffered bilateral brain infarctions caused by bilateral extracranial internal carotid artery dissection after excessive weight lifting in a gym. As possible trigger factors for the dissections we assumed the abrupt extension of the neck during weight lifting and the frequent Valsalva manoeuvers with massive rise in the pressure in the carotid artery system. The patient underwent angioplasty and stenting of the stenosis of right carotid artery, the primarily occluded left carotid artery recanalized spontaneously. Secondary prevention was established by platelet aggregation inhibitors. The patient recovered completely. The pathogenesis of sports-related dissections is multifactorial. In addition to sporting activities hereditary or acquired structural aberrations in the arterial walls could be discussed. Acute focal neurological symptoms after sport should always focus on carotid or vertebral artery dissection. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  4. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C

    2015-01-01

    characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). SUBJECTS/METHODS: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters...... the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could represent an additional biomarker, depicting the impact of altered hemodynamics on arterial wall....

  5. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  6. Carotid artery stenting : a 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, Clark J.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of patients with significant carotid stenosis and has proven its value over the past decades. Endovascular techniques have evolved, and carotid artery stenting (CAS) is challenging CEA to become

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 60. Read More Carotid artery disease Carotid artery surgery Recovering after stroke Risks of tobacco Smoking - tips on how to quit Stent Stroke ...

  8. Medical treatment in carotid artery intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkert, J. L.; Meerwaldt, R.; Lefrandt, Johan; Geelkerken, R. H.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical treatment has a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with occlusive carotid artery disease. Large trials have provided the justification for operative treatment besides medical treatment in patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis two decades ago. Since then, medical

  9. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  10. Variant termination of the common carotid artery: Cases of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In all cases of trifurcation, superior thyroid artery was the third branch. The common carotid artery quadrifurcated into external, internal carotid, superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries. The pentafurcations comprised internal carotid, external carotid, superior thyroid, occipital and posterior auricular arteries.

  11. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid artery...

  12. Differential effects of carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy on external carotid artery patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Edward Y; Karmacharya, Jagajan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Skelly, Christopher L; Fairman, Ronald M

    2007-04-01

    To determine the effect of stent coverage of the external carotid artery (ECA) after carotid artery stenting (CAS) compared to eversion endarterectomy of the ECA after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The records of 101 CAS and 165 CEA procedures performed over 2 years were reviewed. Duplex velocities and history and physical examinations were taken prior to the procedure, at 1 month, and at 6-month intervals subsequently. CAS was performed by extending the stent across the internal carotid artery (ICA) lesion into the common carotid artery (CCA) thereby covering the ECA. CEA was performed with eversion endarterectomy of the ECA. The mean peak systolic velocities (PSV) in the ICA pre-CAS and pre-CEA were 361 and 352 cm/s, respectively. In terms of CAS, there was a significant increase in ECA velocities versus baseline at 12 (p = 0.009), 18 (p = 0.00001), and 24 (p = 0.005) months. In the CEA group, there was a significant decrease in ECA velocities versus baseline at 1 (p = 0.01) and 6 (p = 0.004) months. There were 2 occluded ECAs in follow-up in the CAS group and none in the CEA group. No significant differences were noted when comparing preprocedural ICA or ECA velocities. However, at the 1-, 6-, and 12-month intervals, the ECA velocities in the CAS group were significantly higher than in the CEA group (p = 0.03, p = 0.001, and p = 0.0004, respectively). There were no neurological symptoms in any patients during the study period. Although progressive stenosis of the ECA is noted during CAS, the ECA usually does not occlude. Furthermore, there are no associated neurological symptoms. Thus, apprehension for progressive ECA occlusion should not be a contraindication to CAS. In addition, concern for ECA coverage should not deter stent extension from the ICA to the CCA during CAS.

  13. Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the ... artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed ...

  14. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  15. Fusiform aneurysm model in rabbit carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinald, Nicoleta; Fournier, Benjamin; Naveau, Adrien; Couty, Ludovic; Lemitre, Mathilde; Seguier, Sylvie; Coulomb, Bernard; Gogly, Bruno; Lafont, Antoine; Durand, Eric

    2010-01-01

    To develop a reproducible and accessible model of elastase-induced fusiform aneurysm in carotid rabbit arteries. Elastase, at a concentration of 1-30 U, was incubated into the lumen of carotid rabbit arteries. Four weeks later, angiography, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry and zymography were performed. The optimal concentration of elastase in this model was 3 U according to the balance between mortality and thrombosis rates. Indeed, at 3 U, external carotid diameter increased from 1.9 +/- 0.1 to 3.1 +/- 0.4 mm (p < 0.0001) associated with degradation of elastic fibers, matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, apoptosis and macrophage infiltration. Our study underlines that abdominal aortic aneurysm can be reliably duplicated in an elastase-induced aneurysm in carotid artery, a much more accessible vessel. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Pulsatility Index of Blood Echogenicity of the Human Radial and Common Carotid Arteries: Relation with Age and Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bok, Tae Hoon; Kong, Qi; Nam, Kweon Ho; Choi, Jay Chol; Paeng, Dong Guk [Department of Ocean System Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In the present paper, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both the human radial artery(RA) and common carotid artery(CCA), depending on the age, and the pulsatility index of blood echogenicity(PIBE) was analyzed. In addition, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both RA and CCA of both the stroke patients and the control group, and PIBE was compared. PIBE of RA for the young group was similar with that for the old group (0.13{+-}0.21 and 0.16{+-}0.03). PIBE of CCA for the young group, however, was larger than that for the old group (0.70{+-}0.21 and 0.32{+-}0.01), and was more variable depending on the subject. Similarly, the fibrinogen concentrations of the patients (336{+-}61 and 340{+-}126 mg/dl) were more than that of the control group (264{+-}38 and 43 mg/dl), for both RA and CCA. The results indicate the possibility of the ultrasonic test on the correlation between erythrocyte aggregation and stroke, and it is expected that the in-vivo EA measurement would be clinically useful.

  17. Data on consistency among different methods to assess atherosclerotic plaque echogenicity on standard ultrasound and intraplaque neovascularization on contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in human carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Cattaneo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide the correlation among different carotid ultrasound (US variables to assess echogenicity n standard carotid US and to assess intraplaque neovascularization on contrast enhanced US. We recruited 45 consecutive subjects with an asymptomatic≥50% carotid artery stenosis. Carotid plaque echogenicity at standard US was visually graded according to Gray–Weale classification (GW and measured by the greyscale median (GSM, a semi-automated computerized measurement performed by Adobe Photoshop®. On CEUS imaging IPNV was graded according to the visual appearance of contrast within the plaque according to three different methods: CEUS_A (1=absent; 2=present; CEUS_B a three-point scale (increasing IPNV from 1 to 3; CEUS_C a four-point scale (increasing IPNV from 0 to 3. We have also implemented a new simple quantification method derived from region of interest (ROI signal intensity ratio as assessed by QLAB software. Further information is available in “Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of intraplaque neovascularization and its correlation to plaque echogenicity in human carotid arteries atherosclerosis (M. Cattaneo, D. Staub, A.P. Porretta, J.M. Gallino, P. Santini, C. Limoni et al., 2016 [1].

  18. Straight artery sign in extracranial carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Suwanwela, Nitaya

    2003-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become generally accepted as a non-invasive method to provide the definitive diagnosis of cervicocerebral vessel dissection. The finding of an intramural hematoma on axial MR images is the characteristic sign of the disease. However, there has been no previous report of the characteristic magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) findings. The authors retrospectively reviewed MRI and MRA findings of patients with spontaneous extracranial carotid dissection. The most striking finding on MRA was the straightness of the affected artery when compared to the non-affected side of the same patient. For quantitative measurement, "Carotid Straightness Index (CSI)" was developed to measure the straightness of the arteries and compared the indices of both extracranial internal carotid arteries in the same patient. The patients' age range was from 21-55 years (mean 38 years). There were 6 males and 3 females. All patients had the classical "Straight artery sign" on the MRA. The carotid straightness index was significantly higher in the affected artery when compared to the normal side of the same patient. The straight artery sign and the carotid straightness index can be very useful for early detection of the extracranial carotid dissection. It can be found in early stage disease or in less severe forms of carotid dissection where significant narrowing is not demonstrated.

  19. Wall shear stress evolution in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The steady flow in an anatomically realistic human carotid bifurcation was simulated numerically. Main parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), velocity profiles and pressure distributions are investigated in the carotid artery, namely in bifurcation and sinusoidal enlargement regions. Flow in the carotid sinus is dominated by a single secondary vortex motion accompanied by a strong helical flow. This type of flow is induced primarily by the curvature and asymmetry of the in vivo geometry. Low wall shear stress concentration occurs at both the anterior and posterior aspects of the proximal internal bulb.

  20. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Fell, G.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Van Schil, P.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; De Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verhelst, R.; DeJaegher, L.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J-F; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M-F; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L-H; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Alback, A.; Harno, H.; Ijas, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepantalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruininckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Nieholt, G. J. Lycklama A.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; De Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. Bart; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sorensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennoe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gimenez Gaibar, A.; Perendreu, J.; Bjorses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T-B; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Bonati, L. H.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E-W; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, N.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Bradbury, A. W.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H-C; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dolman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Beard, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Gaines, P.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Clifton, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Brown, M. M.; Jaeger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Wong, J.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.; Rogers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  1. Resetting of the carotid arterial baroreflex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norton, K H; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Andersen, Line Strange

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that at the onset of low-to-moderate-intensity leg cycling exercise (L) the carotid baroreflex (CBR) was classically reset in direct relation to the intensity of exercise. On the basis of these data, we proposed that the CBR would also be classically reset ...

  2. Location of the internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasin Hamarat

    2017-10-06

    Oct 6, 2017 ... There are some published results of OA anatomical studies [18,20-22]. .... right eye) and the depth of intracranial segment of ophthal- mic artery ... internal carotid artery and segments of ophthalmic artery in high tension glaucoma patients. No. of glaucoma patients. Eye. ICA edge, mm. IOA, mm. EOA, mm.

  3. Oxidative stress in carotid arteries of patients submitted to carotid endarterectomy. The role of aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Márcio Luís; Carraro, Cristina Campos; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Kalil, Antônio Nocchi; Aerts, Newton

    2016-08-01

    To evaluated the role of oxidative stress on aging process in patients submitted to carotid endarterectomy. Twenty patients were divided into two groups: older group (≥ 70 years old); and the younger group (aging is associated with increased concentrations of oxygen species and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity as so as nitrite reduction in human carotid artery specimens. Maybe therapies that block NADPH oxidase activity and enhance nitrite stores would be a good strategy to reduce the effect of oxidative stress in arterial aging.

  4. Apolipoprotein E and carotid artery atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, AJC; Bots, ML; Havekes, LM; del Sol, AI; Cruts, M; Grobbee, DE; Hofman, A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Witteman, JCM; van Duijn, CM

    Background and Purpose-Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a strong predictor for future stroke. It is yet unclear whether the apolipoprotein E polymorphism (APOE) is related to atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of APOE in carotid artery

  5. Acute internal carotid artery occlusion after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yunoki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of acute carotid artery (CA occlusion following carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Case 1: a 58-year-old man was admitted with transient right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR angiography (MRA revealed cerebral infarction in the left cerebral hemisphere and left CA stenosis. Ten days after admission, he underwent CEA. 24 h after surgery, he developed right hemiplegia. MRI and MRA demonstrated a slightly enlarged infarction and left internal carotid artery (ICA occlusion. Emergency reoperation was performed and complete recanalization achieved. The patient made a clinically significant recovery. Case 2: a 65 year-old man underwent a right-sided CEA for an asymptomatic 80% CA stenosis. 48 h after surgery, his family noticed he was slightly disorientated. MRI and MRA revealed multiple infarctions and right ICA occlusion. He was treated with antiplatelet therapy without reoperation because sufficient cross-flow from the left ICA through the anterior communicating artery was demonstrated by angiography, and his neurological symptoms were mild. His symptoms gradually alleviated and he was discharged 14 days after surgery. With ICA occlusion after CEA, immediate re-operation is mandatory with severe neurological symptoms, whereas individualized judgement is needed when the symptoms are mild.

  6. Fate of the external carotid artery following carotid interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kevin; Zhou, Wei; Tedesco, Maureen M; Al-Khatib, Weesam K; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Bech, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    The external carotid artery (ECA) is an important collateral pathway for cerebral blood flow. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) typically crosses the ECA, while carotid endarterectomy (CEA) includes deliberate ECA plaque removal. The purpose of the present study was to compare the long-term patency of the ECA following CAS and CEA as determined by carotid duplex ultrasound. Duplex ultrasounds and hospital records were reviewed for consecutive patients undergoing CAS between February 2002 and April 2008, and were compared with those undergoing CEA in the same time period. Preoperative and postoperative ECA peak systolic velocities were normalized to the common carotid artery (CCA) as ECA/CCA ratios. A significant (80% or greater) ECA stenosis was defined as an ECA/CCA ratio of 4.0. A change of ratio by more than 1 was defined as significant. Data were analyzed using Student's t test and χ(2) analysis. A total of 86 CAS procedures in 83 patients were performed (81 men, mean age 69.9 years). Among them, 38.4% of patients had previous CEA, 9.6% of whom had contralateral internal carotid artery occlusion. Sixty-seven CAS and 65 CEA patients with complete duplex data in the same time period were included in the analyses. There was no difference in the incidence of severe ECA stenosis on preoperative ultrasound evaluations. During a mean follow-up of 34 months (range four to 78 months), three postprocedure ECA occlusions were found in the CAS group. The likelihood of severe stenosis or occlusion following CAS was 28.3%, compared with 11% following CEA (PECA status. Reduction in the patient's degree of ECA stenosis was observed in 9.4% of CAS versus 26.6% of CEA patients. Overall, immediate postoperative ratios of both groups were slightly improved, but there was a trend of more disease progression in the CAS group during follow-up. CAS is associated with a higher incidence of post-procedure ECA stenosis. Despite the absence of neurological symptoms, a trend toward late

  7. Simple classification of carotid bifurcation: is it possible to predict twisted carotid artery during carotid endarterectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Tomoya; Nomura, Motohiro; Tamase, Akira; Mori, Kentaro; Seki, Shunsuke; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-12-01

    The internal carotid artery (ICA) usually runs posterolaterally to the external carotid artery (ECA), but occasionally we encounter the twisted carotid bifurcation, a variant in which the ICA courses medially to the ECA during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Prediction of this anomaly in the preoperative evaluation is mandatory, although descriptions in the literature are limited. We reviewed the clinical features of patients who underwent CEA and analyzed preoperative cerebral angiography, especially the anteroposterior (AP) view to determine whether it could be a predictive modality. In 58 consecutive CEA cases, we simply classified them into three groups; type 1 (the ICA runs laterally and the ECA runs medially), type 2 (the ICA and ECA run to overlap each other), and type 3 (the ICA runs medially and the ECA runs laterally), based on the findings of AP view of cerebral angiography. We compared the clinical features and intraoperative findings of these groups. Of 58 cases, types 1-3 were 24, 30, and four cases, respectively. Twisted carotid bifurcations were recognized in seven cases (12.4 %), including three cases in type 2 and four in type 3, and all twisted cases were found on the right side. Twisted carotids and right-sided lesion were significantly frequent in type 3, but no statistical differences of coexisting diseases were recognized among the three groups. CEAs of twisted carotid bifurcations were performed successfully with correction of the carotid position in three and as it was in four cases. Twisted carotid bifurcations were observed during operation in 10 % in type 2 and 100 % in type 3. CEA of twisted carotid bifurcations can be performed safely with or without correction of the carotid position. AP view of cerebral angiography could be useful for preoperative evaluation.

  8. Association between internal carotid artery dissection and arterial tortuosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Radiology, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Siotto, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), Department of Radiology, di Cagliari (Italy); Sumer, Suna; Wintermark, Max [Neuroradiology Division, Neuroradiology, UVA Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Raz, Eytan [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Vascular Surgery, di Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-18

    Carotid artery dissection is an important cause of ischemic stroke in all age groups, particularly in young patients. The purpose of this work was to assess whether there is an association between the presence of an internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and the arterial tortuosity. This study considered 124 patients (72 males and 52 females; median age 57 years) with CT/MR diagnosis of ICAD of the internal carotid artery were considered in this multi-centric retrospective study. The arterial tortuosity was evaluated and, when present, was categorized as elongation, kinking, or coiling. For each patient, both the right and left sides were considered for a total number of 248 arteries in order to have the same number of cases and controls. Fisher's exact test was applied to test the association between elongation, kinking, coiling, dissection, and the side affected by CAD. Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant association between the ICAD and kinking (p = 0.0089) and coiling (p = 0.0251) whereas no statistically significant difference was found with arterial vessel elongation (p = 0.444). ICAD was more often seen on the left side compared to the right (p = 0.0001). These results were confirmed using both carotid arteries of the same patient as dependent parameter with p = 0.0012, 0.0129, and 0.3323 for kinking, coiling, and elongation, respectively. The presence of kinking and coiling is associated with ICAD. (orig.)

  9. Enhanced Phenylephrine Contractions in Rabbit Carotid Arteries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carotid arteries were isolated from rabbits and cut into 2mm rings, suspended in 20ml organ baths and bubbled with 95% O2, 5% CO2 and isometric ... There were no significant differences in PE contractions following exposure to intact erythrocytes and ghosts from subjects with different Hb genotypes; however, exposure ...

  10. Haemodynamic evaluation of carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia in the region of an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may be caused by embolism or cerebral hypoperfusion. A severe ICA stenosis may be well compensated by collateral blood supply, however, in some patients the capacity of the collateral blood supply is insufficient. Studi...

  11. Carotid artery revascularization : Surgical and endovascular developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, G.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Carotid artery revascularization. Surgical and endovascular developments. Stroke is among the most disabling chronic diseases and the third major cause of death in the Western world. In the Netherlands around 12 per 1000 inhabitants suffers a stroke, and in 2005 over 10.000 people died as a result

  12. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Goor, van Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood.

  13. Variations in branching pattern of external carotid artery in a black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and twenty-four common carotid arteries of 112 black adult Kenyans were exposed by cadaveric dissection at Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, Kenya. The sternocleidomastoid muscle and body of mandible were removed and the external carotid artery and its branches exposed.

  14. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  15. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Brzost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63×55×88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible.

  16. Stenosis of calcified carotid artery detected on Panoramic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, So Yang; Oh, Won Mann; Yoon, Suk Ja; Yoon, Woong; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol [School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan M. [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2009-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery with calcification detected on panoramic radiographs. This study used fifty carotid arteries of 36 dental patients whose panoramic radiograph and computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the presence of carotid artery calcification. A neuroradiologist interpreted CTA to determine the degree of stenosis of the internal carotid arteries. The degree of stenosis was stratified in four stages; normal (no stenosis), mild stenosis (1-49%), moderate stenosis (50-69%) and severe stenosis (70-99%). Among the fifty carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA, 20 carotid arteries (40%) were normal, 29 carotid arteries (18%) had mild stenosis, 1 carotid artery (2%) had moderate stenosis, and there was none with severe stenosis. Sixty percent of the carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA had internal luminal stenosis, and two percent had moderate stenosis. When carotid atheroma is detected on panoramic radiograph, it is possible that the dental patient has luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery.

  17. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  19. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiburger, Kristen M; Molinari, Filippo [Biolab, Department of Electronics, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Acharya, U Rajendra [Department of ECE, Ngee Ann Polytechnic (Singapore); Saba, Luca [Department of Radiology, A.O.U. di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Rodrigues, Paulo [Department of Computer Science, Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Liboni, William [Neurology Division, Gradenigo Hospital, Torino (Italy); Nicolaides, Andrew [Vascular Screening and Diagnostic Centre, London (United Kingdom); Suri, Jasjit S, E-mail: filippo.molinari@polito.it [Fellow AIMBE, CTO, Global Biomedical Technologies Inc., CA (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge(TM) systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 {+-} 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 {+-} 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  20. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  1. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  2. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  3. Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting utilization trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerritt, Matthew R; Block, Robert C; Pearson, Thomas A; Young, Kate C

    2012-03-29

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been the standard in atherosclerotic stroke prevention for over 2 decades. More recently, carotid artery stenting (CAS) has emerged as a less invasive alternative for revascularization. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an increase in stenting parallels a decrease in endarterectomy, if there are specific patient factors that influence one intervention over the other, and how these factors may have changed over time. Using a nationally representative sample of US hospital discharge records, data on CEA and CAS procedures performed from 1998 to 2008 were obtained. In total, 253,651 cases of CEA and CAS were investigated for trends in utilization over time. The specific data elements of age, gender, payer source, and race were analyzed for change over the study period, and their association with type of intervention was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. Rates of intervention decreased from 1998 to 2008 (P use displayed a significant downward trend (P use over the study period (P time, the proportion of white patients who received intervention decreased significantly (P gender, white race, and earlier in the study period were significant positive predictors of CEA use. Rates of carotid revascularization have decreased over time, although this has been the result of a reduction in CEA despite an overall increase in CAS. Among the specific patient factors analyzed, age, gender, race, and time were significantly associated with the utilization of these two interventions.

  4. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  5. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation in treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Tank, Jens

    2012-12-24

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is commonly defined as blood pressure that remains above goal in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes. The sympathetic nervous system promotes arterial hypertension and cardiovascular as well as renal damage, thus, providing a logical treatment target in these patients. Recent physiological studies suggest that baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term control of sympathetic activity and blood pressure providing an impetus for the development of electrical carotid sinus stimulators. The concept behind electrical stimulation of baroreceptors or baroreflex afferent nerves is that the stimulus is sensed by the brain as blood pressure increase. Then, baroreflex efferent structures are adjusted to counteract the perceived blood pressure increase. Electrical stimulators directly activating afferent baroreflex nerves were developed years earlier but failed for technical reasons. Recently, a novel implantable device was developed that produces an electrical field stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Carefully conducted experiments in dogs provided important insight in mechanisms mediating the depressor response to electrical carotid sinus stimulation. Moreover, these studies showed that the treatment success may depend on the underlying pathophysiology of the hypertension. Clinical studies suggest that electrical carotid sinus stimulation attenuates sympathetic activation of vasculature, heart, and kidney while augmenting cardiac vagal regulation, thus lowering blood pressure. Yet, not all patients respond to treatment. Additional clinical trials are required. Patients equipped with an electrical carotid sinus stimulator provide a unique opportunity gaining insight in human baroreflex physiology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  7. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions...... and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24-159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects...... without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). RESULTS: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile...

  8. Carotid Artery Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and high blood pressure.  High Blood Pressure: Excess pressure on the arteries can cause them to weaken and become more prone to damage.  High Cholesterol: Having a high LDL and low HDL can increase fat in the blood stream.  ...

  9. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  10. Relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases.METHODS: The clinical data of 30 cases(37 eyesof patients with ischemic eye diseases were collected from November 2010 to May 2014, and they were accepted the fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, transcranial Doppler(TCDultrasonic blood vessels of the eye, neck vascular color Doppler flow imaging(CDFI, the neck CT angiography(CTAand carotid artery digital subtraction angiography(DSAexamination, and then the ischemic eye disease patients with ocular symptoms were analyzed. The peak systolic velocity(PSVand resistance index(RIof ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery were compared. Correlation between the internal carotid artery intima-media thickness(IMTand ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery PSV and RI correlation risk; ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV and RI; PSV and RI associated ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery were analyzed. RESULTS: Eye symptoms: a black dim, reduced vision, the eyes flash, and around the eye pain were 75.7%, 83.8%, 51.4% and 32.4%; The eye signs: the dilatation of retinal vein, retinal hemorrhage, arterial stenosis and cotton spot and the contralateral side were regarded as main signs. Ophthalmic artery PSV and RI value of the differences were statistically significant(PPP>0.05; The ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV had no correlation with RI values(P>0.05; PSV and RI and the ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery had no correlation(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: The incidence of ischemic eye diseases and internal carotid artery stenosis is associated with very close, the clinical can regard the degree of internal carotid artery stenosis as an important basis for diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases.

  11. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kamacı Şener

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  12. Endothelial shear stress: a critical determinant of arterial remodeling and arterial stiffness in humans--a carotid 3.0-T MRI study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, R.; Bavel, E. van; Groot, E. de; Stroes, E.S.; Disselhorst, J.A.; Hutten, B.A.; Lameris, J.S.; Kastelein, J.J.; Nederveen, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low endothelial shear stress (ESS) elicits endothelial dysfunction. However, the relationship between ESS and arterial remodeling and arterial stiffness is unknown in humans. We developed a 3.0-T MRI protocol to evaluate the contribution of ESS to arterial remodeling and stiffness.

  13. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. Cerebellar arteries originating from the internal carotid artery: angiographic evaluation and embryologic explanations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Gyu; Chang, Ki Hyun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Jong [Kyunghee Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Ho [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Asan(Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To find and describe the cerebellar arteries arising from the internal carotid artery, explain them embryologically, and evaluate their clinical implication. To determine the point in the internal carotid artery from which the cereballar artery arose anomalously, consecutive angiographic studies performed in the last three years were reviewed. The distribution of such anomalous cerebellar arteries, the point in the internal carotid artery from which the anomalous vessels originated, and associated findings were analyzed. Five anomalous origins of cerebellar arteries arising arising directly from the internal carotid artery were found in five patients. Three anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICA) and one common trunk of an AICA and a posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were found to originate from the internal carotid artery at a point close to the origin of the primitive trigeminal artery. A PICA arose from an artery presenting a course similar to the proatlantal intersegmental artery. Intracranial aneurysms in two patients, Moyamoya disease in one, and facial arteriovenous malformation in one. In our series, AICAs supplied from the arteries considered to be persistent trigeminal artery variants were the most common type. A correlation between type of anomalous cerebellar artery and type of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis may exist. Cerebellar arteries originating anomalously from the internal carotid artery seem to occur as a result of the persistence of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses associated with incomplete fusion of the longitudinal neural arteries. An understanding of these anomalous cerebellar arteries may help prevent accidents during therapeutic embolization and surgical treatment, as well as misinterpretation.

  2. Endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting : the quest continues part two

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkert, Joe L.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    BACKGROUND: Although randomized trials on carotid artery stenting (CAS) could not establish its equivalence to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with symptomatic carotid disease, CAS is rapidly evolving. Data on long-term outcome after CAS from randomized trials have now become available and

  3. Endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting : the quest continues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Michiel G.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is still considered the "gold-standard" of the treatment of patients with significant carotid stenosis and has proven its value during past decades. However, endovascular techniques have recently been evolving. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is challenging CEA

  4. Carotid angioplasty with stenting for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Tanasawa, Toshihiko; Okada, Takeshi; Endo, Otone; Yamamoto, Naohito [Kainan Hospital Aichi Prefectural Welfare Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives, Department of Neurosurgery, Aichi (Japan); Miyachi, Shigeru; Hattori, Kenichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    Carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is becoming accepted as an effective and reliable treatment option for severe carotid artery stenosis. However, it is rarely applied for carotid occlusion, especially in its chronic stage. We report our experience of CAS for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion representing compromised cerebral blood flow using various protection methods. A 77-year-old woman, who was already diagnosed with severe left internal carotid artery stenosis, suddenly had right hemiparesis and aphasia. At that time, she was treated conservatively because her neurological status was quite good, in spite of left carotid artery occlusion. Her symptoms improved in the short term, except slight aphasia, but deteriorated again 18 days from the onset, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed new ischemic lesions. CAS was then performed for the occluded carotid artery on the 23rd day from the first onset. Using the proximal protection technique, the occluded lesion was crossed carefully with a microguidewire. Stents were also placed successfully with the distal protection technique. The occluded carotid artery was completely recanalized without any unfavorable events or neurological deterioration. In this patient, CAS was successfully to treat chronic carotid artery occlusion. These procedures and techniques are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  5. The relation of carotid calcium volume with carotid artery stenosis in symptomatic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H. A.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Smagge, L.; Kurvers, A. G.; Gratama van Andel, H. A.; van den Berg, R.; Nederkoorn, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research showed a strong correlation of calcium volume scores with degree of stenosis, suggesting that calcium volume could be used in the diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis. We investigated the accuracy of the use of calcium volume scores to diagnose carotid artery stenosis in our target

  6. EXTERNAL CAROTID-ARTERY REVASCULARIZATION - INDICATIONS, OPERATIVE TECHNIQUES AND RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOONTJE, AH

    1992-01-01

    The external carotid artery (ECA) is an important collateral pathway in patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and recurrent symptoms. An ipsilateral ECA revascularization can improve cerebral perfusion or eliminate an embolic source. In the past 11 years 11 patients

  7. Carotid artery stenting vs carotid endarterectomy: meta-analysis and diversity-adjusted trial sequential analysis of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Kumar, Sunil; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    The role of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is controversial, with recent trials showing an increased risk of harm with CAS.......The role of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is controversial, with recent trials showing an increased risk of harm with CAS....

  8. The history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-biao ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that, after the results of large cohort, multicenter, randomized clinical trials, including North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST, were reported in 1991, the important role of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for the surgical treatment of carotid atherosclerosis had already been confirmed. Although it has a late start in China, CEA has a bright and promising future.

  9. Early control of distal internal carotid artery during carotid endarterectomy: does it reduce cerebral microemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Das, M; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Krings, T; Mess, W H; Schiefer, J; Jacobs, M J

    2010-06-01

    According to the results of the large trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), this type of surgery is only warranted if perioperative mortality and morbidity are kept considerably low. Less attention has been paid to methods of cerebral protection during CEA, although intraoperative transcranial Doppler (TCD) can visualise intracerebral microemboli (MES) during routine carotid dissection, although MES occur throughout the CEA, only those during dissection are related to neurological outcome. Prevention of MES by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery dislodging from the carotid artery plaque during dissection is very likely the mechanism behind an eventual benefit from this approach. Hence, the amount of MES might serve as a surrogate parameter for the risk of periprocedural neurological events. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether early control of the distal carotid artery during CEA is capable of reducing the number of MES by means of a prospective randomised trial. Twenty-eight patients (29 procedures) could be prospectively included in our study. Before surgery we randomly assigned the patients to two groups: group A (N.=12): CEA by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery; group B (N.=17): CEA with dissection of the total carotid bifurcation before clamping the arteries. Periprocedurally, we continuously monitored the cerebral blood flow in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery by means of TCD. Pre- and postoperative morbidity were independently verified by a neurologist control of the distal internal carotid artery did not reduce the occurrence of MES during dissection of the carotid bifurcation. Also, the total number of MES throughout the procedure and postoperatively was comparable between both groups. The procedure related times as well as the clinical outcome did not differ significantly. Thus, early control of the distal internal carotid artery has got no advantage but also no disadvantage

  10. Associations between Carotid Artery Plaque Score, Carotid Hemodynamics and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The carotid artery plaque score (PS is an independent predictor of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. This study aims to evaluate the combination of PS and carotid hemodynamics to predict CHD. Methods: A total of 476 patients who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary angiography were divided into two groups depending on the presence of CHD. PS, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid blood flow were measured. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to establish the best prediction model for CHD presence. Results: Age, sex, carotid intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery and carotid bifurcation, PS, peak systolic velocity (PSA of right internal carotid artery (RICA, and most resistance index data were significantly related with the presence of CHD. The area under the curve for a collective model, which included factors of the PS, carotid hemodynamics and age, was significantly higher than the other model. Age, PS, and PSA of RICA were significant contributors for predicting CHD presence. Conclusions: The model of PS and PSA of RICA has greater predictive value for CHD than PS alone. Adding age to PS and PSA of RICA further improves predictive value over PS alone.

  11. Associations between Carotid Artery Plaque Score, Carotid Hemodynamics and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Liu, Mengxue; Ren, Tiantian; Wang, Xiangqian; Liu, Dandan; Xu, Mingliang; Han, LingFei; Wu, Zewei; Li, Haibo; Zhu, Yu; Wen, Yufeng; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The carotid artery plaque score (PS) is an independent predictor of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). This study aims to evaluate the combination of PS and carotid hemodynamics to predict CHD. Methods: A total of 476 patients who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary angiography were divided into two groups depending on the presence of CHD. PS, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid blood flow were measured. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to establish the best prediction model for CHD presence. Results: Age, sex, carotid intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery and carotid bifurcation, PS, peak systolic velocity (PSA) of right internal carotid artery (RICA), and most resistance index data were significantly related with the presence of CHD. The area under the curve for a collective model, which included factors of the PS, carotid hemodynamics and age, was significantly higher than the other model. Age, PS, and PSA of RICA were significant contributors for predicting CHD presence. Conclusions: The model of PS and PSA of RICA has greater predictive value for CHD than PS alone. Adding age to PS and PSA of RICA further improves predictive value over PS alone. PMID:26569275

  12. Cognitive changes after carotid artery stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Struffert, T.; Krick, C.; Backens, M. [University of the Saarland, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Supprian, T.; Falkai, P.; Reith, W. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Homburg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to test changes in cognitive performance after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Ten patients were neuropsychologically tested at least 24 h before and 48 h after CAS. To diminish thromboembolic events, we used a proximal protection device. The following neuropsychological tests were selected: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), symbol digit test and subtests of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery (verbal fluency, constructional practice, word list memory and delayed recall). Affective state was determined by the Beck Depression Score (BDS). No patient suffered from depression (BDS <1) or dementia (MMSE 29.9{+-}1.5). Nine of the ten patients (P=0.12) showed increased speed in the Number Connection Test (NCT) (corresponding to trail making test). Most patients showed better or similar results concerning delayed recall (P=0.31). No change was observed in the symbol digit test, word list memory, verbal fluency or constructional practice. Better results concerning NCT and delayed recall after carotid stenting might be due to improved brain perfusion. After CAS, cognitive and memory performance seem to improve. Further studies with different time intervals and more refined testing, as well as perfusion-weighted imaging, are needed. (orig.)

  13. Unprotected carotid artery stenting in modern practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Jay; Yeh, Robert W; Kennedy, Kevin F; Hawkins, Beau M; Weinberg, Ido; Weinberg, Mitchell D; Parikh, Sahil A; Garasic, Joseph; Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Embolic protection devices (EPD) may provide a mechanism to reduce peri-procedural strokes. They are advocated by consensus guidelines and mandated for Medicare reimbursement. However, outcomes data remain mixed. We aimed to characterize the population of patients undergoing unprotected carotid artery stenting (CAS) and assess the utility of distal filter EPD (F-EPD) in elective CAS. We analyzed patients enrolled in the CARE Registry® undergoing CAS between May, 2005 and January, 2012. We assessed the relationship between distal F-EPD use versus no use (No-EPD) and the composite of in-hospital death or stroke (MAE) in unadjusted and 1:3 propensity-matched analyses. Embolic protection was not attempted in a total of 579 out of 13,263 cases performed (4.4%). Patients in the No-EPD group had worse preprocedure neurologic risk factors including higher rates of acute evolving stroke, prior TIA/stroke, symptomatic lesion status, spontaneous carotid artery dissection, and use of general anesthesia intraprocedurally (all Standardized Differences{sd} >10). After exclusion of nonelective cases there was no significant difference in MAE between the No-EPD and F-EPD groups (1.6% vs. 2.3%, sd = 4.72). Additionally, after propensity matching, rates of MAE did not differ between the No-EPD (n = 355) and F-EPD (n = 1065) groups (1.7% vs. 2.5%, sd = 5.87). Patients selected to undergo unprotected CAS in contemporary practice have high rates of adverse preprocedure neurologic risk factors. Our propensity-matched analysis did not demonstrate evidence of significant benefit or harm associated with use of F-EPD in elective CAS patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The importance of internal carotid artery occlusion tolerance test in carotid endarterectomy under locoregional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaretti, Marcos; de Vasconcelos, Laura T; Dourado, Jules; de Souza, Renata F; Fontoura, Renato R; de Sousa, Atos A

    2016-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is considered a safe and effective method for preventing stroke in the short and long term in patients with severe carotid stenosis. The internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion tolerance test was performed to evaluate cerebral tolerance during temporary carotid occlusion, defined as the capacity of the cerebral hemisphere to maintain adequate cerebral blood flow during occlusion of the ICA. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the importance of this test in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. From August 2008 to May 2015, 115 consecutive patients (39 female, 77 male) were referred for carotid endarterectomy at the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte by the main author. Of the 115 patients who participated in the study, 107 were submitted to carotid endarterectomy. Morbi-mortality was 2.7 %. The presence of deficits during the ICA occlusion tolerance test in less than 30 s was associated with the presence of complications. Among the 104 patients who showed no deficits during the test, only one case (0.9 %) presented complications, while among the three cases that showed deficits during the test and who were submitted to carotid endarterectomy, two cases presented complications (p carotid endarterectomy under locoregional anesthesia is a safe surgical procedure. The internal carotid artery occlusion tolerance test can help identify high-risk patients who have been assigned this treatment.

  15. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of carotid arteries: Early results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolić Momčilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Treatment of carotid stenosis could be surgical: eversion endarterectomy, conventional endarterectomy and patch-plasty, resection with graft interposition and bypass procedure or, in the past few years, carotid artery angioplasty (PTA with stent implantation. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to present early results of carotid artery angioplasty and stenting, as well as to identify indications for this procedure. METHOD Twenty-three patients with stenosis of internal carotid artery were included in the prospective study which was performed in the period from July 2006 to July 2007. For PTA and stenting of the carotid artery we used Balloon dilatation catheter Ultra-softTM SV and Carotid WallstentTM MonorailTM. During the procedure, brain protection by embolic protection system Filter Wire EZ was essentially performed. Descriptive statistical methods were performed to present and describe the patient characteristics, risk factors and results. RESULTS 23 patients were examined. In four (17.39% cases there was asymptomatic, while in 19 (82.61% there was symptomatic homodynamic significant stenosis of the internal carotid artery. Four of these 19 patients (17.39% had late restenosis following carotid endarterectomy, four (17.39% important respiratory failure, and 11 (47.83% important heart disease. Patients were followed up for the first 30 postopertive days. In that period, there were no mortality and no needs for surgical conversions. In one case (4.35%, residual stenosis of 30% remained. Two patients (8.70% had TIA and one (4.35% had CVI. CONCLUSION Main indications for PTA and stenting of carotid arteries are: surgically inaccessible lesions (at or above C2; or subclavial; radiation-induced carotid stenosis; prior ispilateral radical neck dissection; prior carotid endarterectomy (restenosis, severe cardiac and pulmonary conditions. Limitations and contraindications to carotid angioplasty and stentning include: significant

  16. Low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease in Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery bypass grafting ranks as one of the most frequent operations worldwide. The presence of carotid artery stenosis may increase the stroke rate in the perioperative period. Routine preoperative noninvasive assessment of the carotid arteries are recommended in many institutions to reduce the stroke rate. Methods 271 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Shaheed Madani hospital of Tabriz, Iran (age, 58.5 Y; 73.1% male underwent preoperative ultrasonography for assessment of carotid artery wall thickness. Results Plaque in right common, left common, right internal and left internal carotid arteries was detected in 4.8%, 7.4%, 43.2% and 42.1% of patients respectively. 5 patients (1.8% had significant ( Conclusion Consecutive Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery show a very low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease.

  17. [Risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery during surgical resection of carotid body tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Wang, J S; Yao, C; Chang, G Q; Yin, H H; Li, S Q; Lü, W M; Hu, Z J; Wang, S M

    2017-06-13

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery resection during carotid body tumor resection and to summarize our treatment experience. Methods: During the period from 1991 to 2016, rupture of internal carotid artery occurred in 27 patients (28 tumors) during surgical resection of carotid body tumor in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. Their clinical and follow-up data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. For all patients underwent surgical resection during this period, Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors of intraoperative rupture of internal carotid artery. Results: Of these 28 tumors, there were 15 (53.6%) tumors with diameter≥5 cm and 20 (71.4%) Shamblin Ⅲ tumors. Intraoperatively, shunt was applied for 8 (28.6%) cases. Thirteen (46.4%) patients underwent ligation of external carotid artery, while 2 (7.1%) patients accepted resection of cranial nerves. Direct closure/patchplasty, autologous vessels or graft reconstruction was used in 16, 10 and 2 cases, respectively. Postoperatively, stroke occurred in 4(14.3%) cases and cranial nerve deficit in 15 (53.6%) cases. During a median length of 36 (14-125) months, cranial nerve deficit persisted in 5 cases. Follow-up radiologic examination indicated 3 (10.7%) cases of targeted vessel occlusion. However, no new-onset stroke was identified. Among all patients underwent surgical resection of carotid body tumor, female (OR=3.650, P=0.012), age≤25 years old (OR=3.710, P=0.013) and Shamblin Ⅲ tumor (OR=4.631, P=0.008) increase the risks of intraoperative carotid artery rupture. Conclusions: Shamblin Ⅲ tumor is the predictor of rupture of internal carotid artery. Intraoperative, properly increased blood pressure, intraoperative heparinization and use of shunt for those cases without well-compensated cranial collateral arteries are likely to decreasing the incidence of stroke.

  18. Ultrasound Evaluation of Intima-Media Thickness of Carotid Arteries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ultrasound measured Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) is a simple and inexpensive tool for assessing the cumulative effects of hypertension on the carotid arterial walls. It is also an independent predictor of future myocardial infarctionand stroke risk. Objectives: This study compared ultrasound measured ...

  19. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-11-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred.

  20. Internal carotid artery stenting for blunt carotid artery injuries with an associated pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, John D; Reuland, Kurt R; Villarreal, David H; McGovern, Thomas M; Rowe, Stephen A; Norwood, Scott H

    2008-02-01

    Blunt carotid artery injuries (BCI) are being recognized and treated with increasing frequency because of improved screening protocols. Recent advances in endovascular techniques using microcoils, angioplasty, and stenting offer a new treatment strategy for those patients with traumatic pseudoaneurysms (PA) (BCI and PA). Experience with these techniques is limited because of the rarity of these injuries. Early anticoagulation (AC) or antiplatelet (AP) therapy combined with carotid artery stenting is a safe alternative to AC alone for the treatment of grade III carotid artery injuries (BCI and PA). Prospective cohort study. A rural, community Level I trauma center. All patients with a nonocclusive BCI and PA during a 5.5 year period from June 23, 2000 to December 31, 2005 were included in the study. : Eleven patients with grade BCI and PA underwent endovascular repair. Nine patients (81%) had associated traumatic intracranial hemorrhage. AC (heparin drip) or AP therapy (clopidogrel or aspirin or both) was initiated in all patients within 48 hours of diagnosis of BCI. Time from admission to AC or AP was 21 +/- 9.5 hours (mean +/- SD). Mortality rate was 18% (2 of 11). One death was attributed to severe brain injury. The other was attributed to a stroke from the carotid injury. No patient had radiologic progression of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on head computed tomography despite AP or AC. One patient sustained a mild embolic cerebrovascular ischemic event before stenting. No other survivors developed a stroke or any other evidence of cerebral ischemic symptoms. Two recurrent PAs developed during hospitalization and were successfully managed with an additional stent. All survivors were discharged with a good neurologic outcome. Seven patients had follow-up from 6 months to 4 years: one developed asymptomatic 50% stenosis at 6 months requiring successful angioplasty. All others showed complete healing without stenosis. Carotid artery stenting is safe and

  1. Treatment of a symptomatic intrathoracic internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Brown

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcations are an anatomic anomaly with such rarity that only six cases have been reported to date. The true incidence of and preferred treatment options for a diseased intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcation or internal carotid artery (ICA have not been clearly described. This case report describes a 72-year-old man who experienced a postoperative right hemispheric stoke after an aortic valve replacement, radiofrequency maze procedure, and left atrial appendage clip. Postoperative cerebrovascular evaluation revealed a severely diseased intrathoracic ICA that was treated by ligation of the diseased proximal ICA and transposition of the distal ICA to the disease-free external carotid artery. The patient provided written consent to present the history, data, and images in this manuscript.

  2. Novel flow quantification of the carotid bulb and the common carotid artery with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    complexity. A secondary aim was to establish accuracy parameters to detect flow changes/patterns in the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bulb (CB). The right carotid bifurcation including the CCA and CB of eight healthy volunteers were scanned in a longitudinal plane with vector flow ultrasound...... and by vector concentration calculation. A vortex with complex flow was found in all carotid bulbs, whereas the CCA had mainly laminar flow. The medical experts evaluated the flow to be mainly laminar in the CCA (0.82 +/- 0.14) and mainly complex (0.23 +/- 0.22) in the CB. Likewise, the estimated vector...

  3. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  4. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries with basilar aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briganti, F.; Tortora, F.; Elefante, A. [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Cattedra di Neuroradiologia, 80131, Napoli (Italy); Maiuri, F. [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Department of Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery Service, Napoli (Italy)

    2004-10-01

    We report a rare case of bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries with an associated aneurysm of the basilar tip, studied by CT angiography, MR angiography and digital angiography. The patient became symptomatic with an episode of loss of consciousness, likely due to reduced blood perfusion. The other 20 reported cases of bilateral carotid hypoplasia (only four of which with an associated aneurysm) are reviewed. The findings of noninvasive procedures (including narrowing of the carotid canals on CT) may lead to a correct diagnosis before angiography is performed; they may also help to differentiate angiographic narrowing of the hypoplastic internal carotids from the string sign often observed in some acquired conditions. (orig.)

  5. Stroke caused by a myxoma stenosing the common carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Vicente, Elena; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Bellmunt, Sergi; Borras, Xavier F; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Bagué, Silvia; Camps-Renom, Pol; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of stroke due to stenosis caused by a myxoma in the common carotid artery with no evidence of a cardiac origin. Only 1 such case has been reported previously in the literature. A previously healthy 37-year-old woman presented with repeated episodes of acute focal deficits together with motor, sensory, and language symptoms typical of left internal carotid territory involvement. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute and subacute ischemic lesions in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery and border zone infarcts (middle cerebral artery with anterior and posterior cerebral arteries). Magnetic resonance angiography showed a filling defect in the distal portion of the left common carotid artery causing stenosis over 70%. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no embolic sources. Blood tests ruled out a prothrombotic state. The image was initially interpreted as a possible subacute thrombus and anticoagulation was started. No changes were observed in the follow-up carotid ultrasound examination after 12 days of treatment. A gelatinous mass was removed during carotid surgery. No subjacent lesion was observed in the vessel wall. Pathology examination showed a spindle cell fibromyxoid tissue with fibrinoid material typical of myxoma. We hypothesize that the myxoma originated in the vessel, or alternatively, that a cardiac myxoma embolized without leaving a residual cardiac tumor. Although exceptional, myxoma should be added to the list of unusual causes of carotid artery stenosis causing stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Occlusion of Internal Carotid Artery in Kimura's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique case of Kimura's disease in which cerebral infarction was caused by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. A 25-year-old man with Kimura's disease was admitted to our hospital because of left hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed infarction in the right frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebral angiography demonstrated right internal carotid artery occlusion affecting the C1 segment, with moyamoya-like collateral vessels arising from the right opthalamic artery. Kimura's disease is a chronic disease characterized by the clinical triad of slowly enlarging subcutaneous masses with lymphoid hyperplasia in the head and neck. It often occurs in young Asian men. In our patient, the pathogenesis of internal carotid artery occlusion was unknown. There have only been a few case reports in which occlusion of the internal carotid artery was associated with autoimmune disease, and no previous cases of internal carotid occlusion associated with Kimura's disease have been reported. We suspected that occlusion of this patient's internal carotid artery may be caused by the autoimmune mechanism that underlies Kimura's disease.

  7. Estimation of an image derived input function with MR-defined carotid arteries in FDG-PET human studies using a novel partial volume correction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Hasan; Erlandsson, Kjell; Law, Ian

    2017-01-01

    segmentation of the carotid arteries from MR images. The simulation study results showed that at least 92% of the true intensity could be recovered after the partial volume correction. Results from 19 subjects showed that the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose calculated using arterial samples and partial...... volume corrected image derived input function were 26.9 and 25.4 mg/min/100 g, respectively, for the grey matter and 7.2 and 6.7 mg/min/100 g for the white matter. No significant difference in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate of glucose values was observed between arterial samples and corrected......Kinetic analysis of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data requires an accurate knowledge the arterial input function. The gold standard method to measure the arterial input function requires collection of arterial blood samples and is an invasive method. Measuring an image...

  8. Diabetes Mellitus with Chronic Complications in Relation to Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbala, Oluwole; Martin, Kimberly D; Otuada, David; Akinyemiju, Tomi

    2017-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting are effective treatment procedures for carotid artery stenosis. Although diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent among patients undergoing these revascularization procedures, few studies have examined their impact on periprocedural outcomes. The study aimed to determine whether perioperative outcomes among patients undergoing carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy varied depending on the presence of diabetes with or without chronic complications. We examined adults aged 45 and above hospitalized between 2007 and 2011 in U.S. hospitals who underwent carotid artery revascularization procedures. We used data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample and evaluated the influence of diabetes with or without chronic complications on outcomes. Among patients receiving carotid artery stenting, diabetic patients with chronic complications had significantly increased odds of acute kidney injury (odds ratio [OR]: 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.31-4.35) and longer hospital stay (β: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.58-2.38) compared with nondiabetic patients. Diabetic patients with chronic complications receiving carotid endarterectomy experienced increased odds of myocardial infarction (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: .90-1.40), stroke (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: .97-1.72), perioperative infection (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.29-4.65), mortality (OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.01-2.16), and longer hospital stay (β (days): 2.05, 95% CI: 1.90-2.20) compared with nondiabetic patients. No significant increased odds of perioperative outcomes were observed among diabetic patients without chronic complications. Uncomplicated diabetes did not appear to convey a higher odds of perioperative outcomes among patients undergoing revascularization. However, the presence of diabetes with chronic complications is an important risk factor in the carotid endarterectomy category. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier

  9. Closure of carotid artery puncture site with a percutaneous device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massière, Bernardo; von Ristow, Arno; Cury, José Mussa; Gress, Marcus; Vescovi, Alberto; Pedron, Cleoni; Medina, Antônio Luiz; Masques, Marcos Areas; Silveira, Paulo Roberto; Jeha, Salim

    2009-03-01

    The surgical treatment of traumatic neck injuries in patients with hostile anatomy is associated with higher risk of complications, due to the technical challenge and associated clinical conditions. The use of a percutaneous closure device for removal of a 7.5 Fr sheath, nonintentionally implanted into the carotid artery, is reported. The right common carotid sheath was removed after introducing a 0.035-inch guidewire; the Angioseal 8 Fr device was then introduced over the wire, successfully sealing the puncture site. Duplex scan control showed patency of the carotids, sealing of the puncture, and adequate flow in the jugular vein and carotid arteries. This maneuver allowed the safe placement of a percutaneous arterial device (Angioseal) to close the puncture site.

  10. Coronary Artery Disease and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Japanese Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naomi Mitsuhashi; Tomio Onuma; Sayaka Kubo; Naoko Takayanagi; Motoe Honda; Ryuzo Kawamori

    2002-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Japanese Type 2 Diabetic Patients Naomi Mitsuhashi , MD , Tomio Onuma , MD , Sayaka Kubo , MD , Naoko Takayanagi , MD , Motoe Honda...

  11. Carotid Artery Occlusion by Rhinoorbitocerebral Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is the third most common invasive fungal infection that particularly occurs in immunocompromised patients. Intracranial and extracranial arteriovenous vasculopathy is a complication that makes this disease more complex and difficult to treat. We describe a 23-year-old female, who presented to her local hospital with acute blindness and diabetic ketoacidosis-induced coma requiring intensive care treatment. She was found to have lesions in the nasal sinuses, orbit, and frontal base. The left carotid artery was occluded from its origin in the neck to the supraclinoid segment and left cavernous sinus involvement. No cerebral infarction was noted. Biopsies obtained by endonasal debridement confirmed mucormycosis. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, she underwent several multidisciplinary approaches to treat her disease. Multiple endonasal, and cranial procedures were done including bilateral orbital exenteration. After prolonged treatment on the intensive care unit she made a remarkable recovery to the point where she was communicating verbally and had normal limb movements and later discharged home. She remained alive and well for two months, but later succumbed to a recurrence of her disease. In conclusion, mucormycosis-induced vasculopathy is a complex problem, which merits aggressive treatment of this invasive disease. It is normally regarded as an indicator of grave prognosis.

  12. Assessment of the contribution of the external carotid artery to brain perfusion in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, Peter Jan; van der Grond, Jeroen; Bremmer, Jochem P; Klijn, Catharina J M; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the contribution of the ipsilateral external carotid artery (ECA) to cerebral perfusion in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. Thirty functionally independent patients (24 men, 6 women; mean age, 63 years) with an angiographically proven unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion and transient or minor disabling ischemic attacks ipsilateral to the side of the internal carotid artery occlusion were included. Grading of ECA collateral flow was performed with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography. The contribution of the ECA to regional cerebral blood flow was assessed with selective arterial spin labeling MRI. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were analyzed with Student t test. Twenty percent of the patients had ECA Grade 0 collateral flow (no filling of ophthalmic artery), 20% Grade 1 (filling of carotid siphon), and 60% Grade 2 (filling of anterior and/or middle cerebral artery) as demonstrated on digital subtraction angiography. Although in the Grade 1 group, the ECA supplied a smaller region of the brain compared with the Grade 2 group, the mean regional cerebral blood flow of the perfusion territory supplied by the ECA is similar (P=0.70) in the Grade 1 group (mean+/-SD 57+/-16 mL/min/100 g) and the Grade 2 group (60+/-12 mL/min/100g). In patients with symptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion, focal brain regions may strongly depend on the contribution to cerebral perfusion of the ECA ipsilateral to the side of the internal carotid artery occlusion, even in patients with limited ECA collateral supply as demonstrated on digital subtraction angiography.

  13. [Is there a role for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis screening?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2014-08-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is highly controversial Many surgeons routinely screen their patients for carotid disease prior to major operations, yet the benefit of such practice was never demonstrated. The treatment of symptomatic patients has not changed much during the last twenty years, since the publication of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET). However, in contrast, the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS) and the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST) failed to get the same acceptance among the multidisciplinary group treating CAS.The prevalence of asymptomatic 60-99% carotid artery stenosis among the general population is about 1%. Neither ACAS nor ACST showed that stenosis severity was associated with increasing stroke risk. The 'realpolitik' is that mass interventions in asymptomatic patients will probably only ever prevent about 1% of all strokes. This is even truer regarding patients scheduLed for major operation, in which the incidence of stroke is less than 1%. Moreover the current evidence in the literature suggests that the best medicaL treatment (BMT) results in 0.5% strokes per year, better than resuLts which can be offered by surgery. According to the current evidence, it seems that asymptomatic carotid artery screening should be discontinued, since it is a major waste of resources.

  14. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. Regional Topography of the Internal Carotid Artery | Kipyator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the extra cranial portion of the internal carotid artery and structures associated with it, which are vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical approach to the neck region in 18 individuals. Distances from the origin of the artery to hypoglossal nerve and posterior belly of digastric muscle were measured.

  10. Surgical treatment of internal carotid and posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikus, H J; Heros, R C

    1998-10-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the subarachnoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are very common. Although some of the aneurysms arising from the subarachnoid ICA have earned the reputation of easy to treat surgically, aneurysms in this region may be complex and quite difficult to repair. Even a simple aneurysm associated with the posterior communicating artery may harbor surprises for the unwary or inexperienced surgeon. This article details the pertinent anatomy of the subarachnoid internal carotid artery and associated saccular aneurysms, provides a guide to their diagnosis and surgical treatment, and briefly reviews some of the published surgical results. Pitfalls and technique tips are highlighted.

  11. Isolated origin of the left internal carotid artery from the pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Michael C; Nguyen, Pamela H; DiPatri, Arthur J; Shaibani, Ali

    2008-09-01

    The authors describe what is, to their knowledge, the first reported case of the anomalous origin of an internal carotid artery from the pulmonary artery. An otherwise asymptomatic 6-year-old girl, who presented with headaches and hypertension, underwent a comprehensive workup that revealed extensive meningeal and cerebral artery anastomoses to the left internal carotid artery--itself arising from the origin of the left pulmonary artery. This unique anatomical anomaly, caused by a disturbed pattern of aortic arch regression, resulted in a right-to-left vascular shunt into the pulmonary artery and a disturbance of intracranial artery flow patterns, complicating the management options.

  12. Effect of internal carotid artery stenting on superior thyroid artery Doppler flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Akdemir, Ramazan; Varim, Perihan; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Kilic, Harun

    2014-10-01

    Patients with carotid disease are frequently referred for carotid artery stenting based on the results of carotid duplex studies. During carotid artery stenting, the stent is usually extended into the common carotid artery, thereby crossing the external carotid artery. Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding internal carotid stenting and external carotid artery flow velocities, but the effect of stenting on ipsilateral superior thyroid artery velocities has not been defined. This study examined the effect of internal carotid angioplasty and stenting on the ipsilateral superior thyroid artery Doppler-derived flow parameters. We prospectively studied preinterventional and postinterventional duplex scans obtained from 41 patients (mean age ± SD, 64 ± 10 years) who underwent carotid artery stenting. The Doppler-defined preprocedural peak systolic velocity (PSV) end-diastolic velocity (EDV), resistive index (RI), and pulsatility index (PI) in the ipsilateral external carotid and superior thyroid arteries were compared with postprocedural values. Among patients with stenting, the preprocedural PSV, EDV, RI, and PI in the ipsilateral superior thyroid artery were 30 ± 11 cm/s, 13 ± 6 cm/s, 0.62 ± 0.11, and 1.04 ± 0.28,respectively; after stenting, they were 36 ± 8 cm/s, 14 ± 9 cm/s, 0.71 ± 0.07, and 1.11 ± 0.19. The preprocedural PSV, EDV, RI, and PI in the ipsilateral external carotid artery were 79 ± 24 cm/s, 17 ± 7 cm/s, 0.77 ± 0.26, and 1.27 ± 0.22; after stenting, they were 94 ± 31 cm/s, 20 ± 6 cm/s, 0.80 ± 0.4, and 1.25 ± 0.31. Despite a slight increase in superior thyroid and external carotid artery flow, there was no statistically significant change from before to after stenting. This study showed no differences in blood velocity profiles in the ipsilateral superior thyroid and external carotid arteries after stenting. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Carotid endarterectomy in patients with occlusion of the contralateral carotid artery. Perioperative risk and late results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T; Rasmussen, L

    1987-01-01

    Recent reports on the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in patients with contralateral occlusion have been conflicting. Therefore, we reviewed 51 cases identified, among 675 consecutive carotid endarterectomies. A perioperative mortality of 2% and a permanent morbidity rate of 16% was observed...... severe strokes when compared to patients with only minor reduction in CPP. In addition, the internal carotid artery blood flow following endarterectomy was significantly higher in the low pressure group (P less than 0.02). No patients were lost during follow-up, for a mean of 34 months. The cumulative....... Compared with a complication rate of about 5% previously reported from this institution, this clearly indicates contralateral carotid occlusion as a major risk factor in carotid surgery. Though not statistically significant, patients with severely reduced cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) had suffered more...

  14. Low level termination of external carotid artery and its clinical significance: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Devadasa Shetty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The external carotid arterial system is a complex vascular system providing nourishment to the territorial areas of the head and neck. The branches of the external carotid artery are the key landmarks for adequate exposure and appropriate placement of cross-clamps on the carotid arteries during carotid endarterectomy. Knowledge of anatomical variation of the external carotid artery is important in head and neck surgeries. Variations in the branching pattern of the external carotid artery are well known and documented. We report a rare case of low-level termination of the external carotid artery. It terminated by dividing into maxillary and superficial temporal arteries deep into the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, one inch below the angle of the mandible. The occipital and posterior auricular arteries arose from a common trunk given off by the external carotid artery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 160-163

  15. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR, 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI, 1.010 - 1.059, HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225, and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051 were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  16. Antiplatelet Therapy in Carotid Artery Stenting and Carotid Endarterectomy in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, A; Halliday, A; Bulbulia, R; Coppi, G; de Borst, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151

    OBJECTIVE: Strokes are infrequent but potentially serious complications following carotid intervention, but antiplatelet therapy can reduce these risks. There are currently no specific guidelines on dose or duration of peri-procedural antiplatelet treatment for patients undergoing carotid

  17. The baboon (Papio anubis extracranial carotid artery: An anatomical guide for endovascular experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufer Ilya

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As novel endovascular strategies are developed for treating neurological disease, there is an increasing need to evaluate these techniques in relevant preclinical models. The use of non-human primates is especially critical given their structural and physiological homology with humans. In order to conduct primate endovascular studies, a comprehensive understanding of the carotid anatomy is necessary. We therefore performed a detailed examination of the vessel lengths, lumen diameters and angles of origin of the baboon extracranial carotid system. Methods We characterized the extracranial carotid system often male baboons (Papio anubis, range 15.1–28.4 kg by early post-mortem dissection. Photographic documentation of vessel lengths, lumen diameters, and angles of origin were measured for each segment of the carotid bilaterally. Results The common carotid arteries averaged 94.7 ± 1.7 mm (left and 87.1 ± 1.6 mm (right in length. The average minimal common carotid lumen diameters were 3.0 ± 0.3 mm (left and 2.9 ± 0.2 mm (right. Each animal had a common brachiocephalic artery arising from the aorta which bifurcated into the left common carotid artery and right braciocephalic artery after 21.5 ± 1.6 mm. The vascular anatomy was found to be consistent among animals despite a wide range of animal weights. Conclusions The consistency in the Papio anubis extracranial carotid system may promote the use of this species in the preclinical investigation of neuro-interventional therapies.

  18. Case report: Thrombosed giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm secondary to cervical internal carotid artery dissection: An unusual entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S Baldawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous thrombosis of a giant intracranial aneurysm with parent artery occlusion is known. The exact mechanism is however unclear and various theories have been proposed. We present an unusual case of an angiographically documented cervical internal carotid artery (ICA dissection, which led to total occlusion of the ICA distal to the dissected site, with acute cessation of forward blood flow. This resulted in acute upstream thrombosis of the giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm and an acute cavernous sinus syndrome-like presentation.

  19. AnAtomicAl vAriAtions of the cArotid Arteries in Adult KenyAns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-05

    May 5, 2008 ... Adult KenyAns d. anangwE, H. saidi, J. ogEng'o and K.o. awori. ABstrAct. Objective: to describe the topography and anatomical variations of the carotid arteries among. Kenyans. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: department of human Anatomy, university of nairobi. Subjects: eighty carotid ...

  20. For-Profit Hospital Status and Carotid Artery Stent Utilization in US Hospitals Performing Carotid Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Justin V; George, Benjamin P; Kelly, Adam G; Holloway, Robert G

    2017-11-01

    Carotid artery stenting may be an economically attractive procedure for hospitals and physicians. We sought to identify the association of hospital ownership (nonprofit versus for-profit) on carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy utilization in US hospitals. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample admissions for cerebrovascular disease from 2008 to 2011, we identified all private, nonfederal US hospitals performing at least 20 carotid revascularization procedures annually, including carotid artery stenting (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision 00.63) or carotid endarterectomy (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision 38.12). We used a multilevel multivariable logistic regression controlling for patient demographics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics, to assess the effect of hospital ownership on CAS use. Across 723 hospitals (600 nonprofit, 123 for-profit), 66 731 carotid revascularization admissions were identified. Approximately 1 in 5 (n=11 641; 17.4%) revascularizations received CAS. The mean CAS rate among nonprofit hospitals was 17.5 per 100 revascularizations (median, 11.5; interquartile range, 5.2-24.5), and the mean CAS rate among for-profit hospitals was 24.2 per 100 revascularizations (median, 16.0; interquartile range, 6.7-33.3; Pprofit hospital designation was associated with greater odds of CAS (adjusted odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.98). For-profit hospital ownership is associated with a higher rate of CAS compared to nonprofit hospitals in those receiving carotid revascularization. Further research is needed to understand the individual- and system-level factors driving this difference. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Association between blood viscosity and common carotid artery elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; De Franceschi, Maria Serena; Scavelli, Faustina; Della Valle, Elisabetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Elastic properties of the vessel wall are associated with atherosclerosis and major cardiovascular events. Several physiological and pathological conditions can affect arterial elasticity, but few studies have considered the role of hemorheological parameters. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between hemorheological parameters and vascular stiffness in the carotid artery district. One hundred and two individuals were enrolled. Blood and plasma viscosity were measured by a cone-plate viscometer (Wells-Brookfield DV-III, Stoughton, U.S.A.). Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). The association between hemorheological parameters and carotid elasticity indexes was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. In simple correlation analysis, only blood viscosity was directly associated with β-stiffness index (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) and inversely with strain (r =-0.26, p = 0.01) and distensibility (r =-0.34, p = 0.001). After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, blood viscosity, but not plasma viscosity or hematocrit, was independently associated carotid arterial measures, together with age, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The results of the present study demonstrate a strong association between blood viscosity and common carotid elasticity indexes.

  2. Incident stroke is associated with common carotid artery diameter and not common carotid artery intima-media thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Joseph F; Sacco, Ralph L; Post, Wendy S; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Arnan, Martinson Kweku; O'Leary, Daniel H

    2014-05-01

    The common carotid artery interadventitial diameter is measured on ultrasound images as the distance between the media-adventitia interfaces of the near and far walls. It is associated with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass and might therefore also have an association with incident stroke. We studied 6255 individuals free of coronary heart disease and stroke at baseline with mean age of 62.2 years (47.3% men), members of a multiethnic community-based cohort of whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese. Ischemic stroke events were centrally adjudicated. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter and IMT were measured. Cases with incident atrial fibrillation (n=385) were excluded. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were generated with time to ischemic event as outcome, adjusting for risk factors. There were 115 first-time ischemic strokes at 7.8 years of follow-up. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter was a significant predictor of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.17 per millimeter) and remained so after adjustment for risk factors and common carotid IMT with a hazard ratio of 1.52/mm (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.88). Common carotid IMT was not an independent predictor after adjustment (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-1.19). Although common carotid IMT is not associated with stroke, interadventitial diameter of the common carotid artery is independently associated with first-time incident ischemic stroke even after adjusting for IMT. Our hypothesis that this is in part attributable to the effects of exposure to blood pressure needs confirmation by other studies. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00063440.

  3. Relationship between increased carotid artery stiffness and idiopathic subjective tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, C; Taşolar, S

    2017-05-01

    Tinnitus is defined as perception of sound with no external stimulus, and can separate into pulsatile and non-pulsatile types. Arterial stiffness is a parameter that can predict the cardiovascular event and associated with incidence of stroke. It has been shown that increased arterial stiffness may lead to microvascular damage in brain. Our aim was to assess the arterial stiffness of the carotid system in the development and severity of idiopathic subjective tinnitus. Forty subjective tinnitus patients and 40 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The parameters obtained from the participants included pure tone hearing (dB), serum lipid profile (mg/dl), fasting glucose (mg/dl), blood pressure (mmHg), and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2). The common carotid artery (CCA) stiffness index, Young's elastic modulus (YEM), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), vessel diameter, mean velocity (MV), and volume flow (VF) were measured in both the right and left common carotid arteries in both groups. The CCA stiffness index, YEM measurements, right CIMT, and left PI were found to be significantly higher in the patients than those in the control group (p tinnitus and the patient characteristics, there was a significant positive correlation with the CCA stiffness index, YEM measurements, left CIMT, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). However, only the right and left CCA stiffness parameters were found to be statistically significant in the multivariate analysis as independent predictors of a moderate to high degree of tinnitus. The increased stiffness index of the common carotid arteries was significantly associated with the formation and severity of tinnitus. Therefore, an assessment of the carotideal system may be helpful in these patients.

  4. The surgical challenge of carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in chronic ear disease: a pitfall for endoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauna, H F; Monsanto, R C; Schachern, P A; Costa, S S; Kwon, G; Paparella, M M; Cureoglu, S

    2017-04-01

    Endoscopic procedures are becoming common in middle ear surgery. Inflammation due to chronic ear disease can cause bony erosion of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals, making them more vulnerable during surgery. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not chronic ear disease increases dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals. Comparative human temporal bone study. Otopathology laboratory. We selected 78 temporal bones from 55 deceased donors with chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma and then compared those two groups with a control group of 27 temporal bones from 19 deceased donors with no middle ear disease. We analysed the middle ear, carotid artery canal and Fallopian canal, looking for signs of dehiscence of its bony coverage, using light microscopy. We found an increased incidence in dehiscence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canals in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease. The size of the carotid artery canal dehiscence was larger in the middle ear-diseased groups, and its bony coverage, when present, was also thinner compared to the control group. Dehiscence of the carotid artery canal was more frequently located closer to the promontory. The incidence of Fallopian canal dehiscence was significantly higher in temporal bones from donors older than 18 years with chronic middle ear disease. The increased incidence of the carotid artery and Fallopian canal dehiscence in temporal bones with chronic middle ear disease elevates the risk of adverse events during middle ear surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European...... modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting in the US Medicare Population, 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Jones, Michael R; Leifheit, Erica C; Sheffet, Alice J; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K; Howard, Virginia J; Wang, Yun; Curtis, Jeptha; Brott, Thomas G

    2017-09-19

    Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting are the leading approaches to revascularization for carotid stenosis, yet contemporary data on trends in rates and outcomes are limited. To describe US national trends in performance and outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and stenting among Medicare beneficiaries from 1999 to 2014. Serial cross-sectional analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older from 1999 to 2014 using the Medicare Inpatient and Denominator files. Spatial mixed models adjusted for age, sex, and race were fit to calculate county-specific risk-standardized revascularization rates. Mixed models were fit to assess trends in outcomes after adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and symptomatic status. Carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. Revascularization rates per 100 000 beneficiary-years of fee-for-service enrollment, in-hospital mortality, 30-day stroke or death, 30-day stroke, myocardial infarction, or death, 30-day all-cause mortality, and 1-year stroke. During the study, 937 111 unique patients underwent carotid endarterectomy (mean age, 75.8 years; 43% women) and 231 077 underwent carotid artery stenting (mean age, 75.4 years; 49% women). There were 81 306 patients who underwent endarterectomy in 1999 and 36 325 in 2014; national rates per 100 000 beneficiary-years decreased from 298 in 1999-2000 to 128 in 2013-2014 (P endarterectomy and from 61% to 70% among patients who underwent stenting) and the proportion of symptomatic patients (all P endarterectomy and 1.13% (95% CI, 0.71% to 1.54%) among patients who underwent stenting; an absolute decrease from 1999 to 2014 was observed for endarterectomy (1.4%; 95% CI, 1.2% to 1.5%) but not stenting (-0.1%; 95% CI, -0.5% to 0.4%). Rates for 1-year ischemic stroke decreased after endarterectomy (absolute decrease, 3.5% [95% CI, 3.2% to 3.7%]; adjusted annual decrease, 2.17% [95% CI, 2.00% to 2.34%]) and stenting (absolute decrease, 1

  15. Case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-08-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one.

  16. Carotid canal dehiscence in the human skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor Vazquez, J.F.; Gil Verona, J.A. [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid, Ramon y Cajal, 7, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Garcia Porrero, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid (Spain)

    1999-06-01

    Abnormalities of the floor of the carotid canal have been studied in 538 skulls. These abnormalities range from a fissure to total absence of the floor. This variation may be caused by abnormalities of the internal carotid artery or deficiencies in ossification of the skull base. CT suggests that these changes should be taken into account by surgeons working on the skull base. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  17. A Lumped Parameter Method to Calculate the Effect of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion on Anterior Cerebral Artery Pressure Waveform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Numerical modeling of biological structures would be very helpful tool to analyze hundreds of human body phenomena and also diseases diagnosis. One physiologic phenomenon is blood circulatory system and heart hemodynamic performance that can be simulated by utilizing lumped method. In this study, we can predict hemodynamic behavior of one artery of circulatory system (anterior cerebral artery when disease such as internal carotid artery occlusion is occurred. Method: Pressure-flow simulation is one the leading common approaches for modeling of circulatory system behavior and forecasts of hemodynamic in numerous physiological conditions. In this paper, by using lumped model (electrical analogy, CV system is simulated in MATLAB software (SIMULINK environment. Results: The performance of healthy blood circulation and heart is modeled and the obtained results used for further analyses. The stenosis of internal carotid artery at different rates was, then, induced in the circuit and the effects are studied. In stenosis cases, the effects of internal carotid artery occlusion on left anterior cerebral artery pressure waveform are investigated. Conclusion: The findings of this study may have implications not only for understanding the behavior of human biological system at healthy condition but also for diagnosis of diseases in circulatory and cardiovascular system of human body.

  18. Doppler examination of the periorbital arteries adds valuable hemodynamic information in carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T; Steenberg, H J

    1987-01-01

    The periorbital flow direction and internal carotid artery (ICA) angiogram were compared to the ICA pressure gradient across the stenosis and the distal ICA pressure in 51 patients subjected to carotid endarterectomy. All 17 patients with inverted periorbital flow had stenoses exceeding 50...

  19. Estimation of an image derived input function with MR-defined carotid arteries in FDG-PET human studies using a novel partial volume correction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hasan; Erlandsson, Kjell; Law, Ian; Larsson, Henrik Bw; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; Atkinson, David; Hutton, Brian F

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic analysis of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data requires an accurate knowledge the arterial input function. The gold standard method to measure the arterial input function requires collection of arterial blood samples and is an invasive method. Measuring an image derived input function is a non-invasive alternative but is challenging due to partial volume effects caused by the limited spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography scanners. In this work, a practical image derived input function extraction method is presented, which only requires segmentation of the carotid arteries from MR images. The simulation study results showed that at least 92% of the true intensity could be recovered after the partial volume correction. Results from 19 subjects showed that the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose calculated using arterial samples and partial volume corrected image derived input function were 26.9 and 25.4 mg/min/100 g, respectively, for the grey matter and 7.2 and 6.7 mg/min/100 g for the white matter. No significant difference in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate of glucose values was observed between arterial samples and corrected image derived input function (p > 0.12 for grey matter and white matter). Hence, the presented image derived input function extraction method can be a practical alternative to noninvasively analyze dynamic 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose data without the need for blood sampling.

  20. Application of pressure wire in carotid artery stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Tao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowad ays, critical carotid stenosis lacks appropriate treatment standards, and carotid artery stenting (CAS needs more direct guidance. This study aims to investigate the possibility of applying pressure wire in CAS, and the guidance of pressure gradients in choosing indications of CAS. Methods From May 2012 to October 2012, 32 consecutive cases with carotid stenosis undergoing CAS were enrolled. Preoperative and postoperative carotid ultrasound and CT perfusion imaging were performed, and intraoperative measurements of endovascular pressure gradients before and after stent implantation were recorded to evaluate intracranial circulation compensation. Results Preopera tive carotid ultrasound showed the rate of stenosis in 32 cases was≥70% or nearly total occlusion. Doppler measurement of peak systolic velocity (PSV of the stenosed vessel ranged 184-718 cm/s. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA examination showed the stenosis rates were 50%-70% in 7 cases, 70%-90% in 16 and > 90% in 9. The coincidence rate of carotid ultrasound and DSA was 84.38% (27/32, and the acquisition rate of intraoperative carotid pressure gradients was 100%. Pressure gradients before stent implantation were 10-92 mm Hg, with an average of (41.45 ± 25.50 mm Hg, and pressure gradients after stent implantation were 0-15 mm Hg, with an average of (3.44 ± 3.47 mm Hg. DSA revealed 4 cases with good intracranial circulation compensation and 28 cases with poor intracranial circulation compensation. Conclusion Pressure wire can be safely and effectively used in CAS to acquire pressure gradients between the two ends of stenosis segment. For carotid artery stenosis patients lacking of intracranial circulation compensation, pressure gradients become higher as stenosis rate increases within a certain range. Therefore, CAS for stenosis with lower pressure gradients should be reconsidered.

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Carotid Artery Stenting Versus Carotid Endarterectomy Among Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Jessica J; Nguyen, Louis L; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Kumamaru, Hiraku; Chen, Chih-Ying; Williams, Lauren A; Liu, Jun; Rothman, Andrew T; Jaff, Michael R; Seeger, John D; Benenati, James F; Schneider, Peter A; Aronow, Herbert D; Johnston, Joseph A; Brott, Thomas G; Tsai, Thomas T; White, Christopher J; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-05-01

    Effectiveness of carotid artery stenting (CAS) relative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) among Medicare patients has not been established. We compared effectiveness of CAS versus CEA among Medicare beneficiaries. We linked Medicare data (2000-2009) to the Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry (2005-2008) and the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's (NCDR) Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry (2006-2008/2009). Medicare patients were followed up from procedure date until death, stroke/transient ischemic attack, periprocedural myocardial infarction, or a composite end point for these outcomes. We derived high-dimensional propensity scores using registry and Medicare data to control for patient factors and adjusted for provider factors in a Cox regression model comparing CAS with CEA. Among 5254 Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry (1999 CAS; 3255 CEA) and 4055 Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry (2824 CAS; 1231 CEA) Medicare patients, CAS patients had a higher comorbidity burden and were more likely to be at high surgical risk (Society for Vascular Surgery's Vascular Registry: 96.7% versus 44.5%; Carotid Artery Revascularization and Endarterectomy Registry: 71.3% versus 44.7%). Unadjusted outcome risks were higher for CAS. Mortality risks remained elevated for CAS after adjusting for patient-level factors (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.46). After further adjustment for provider factors, differences between CAS and CEA were attenuated or no longer present (hazard ratio for mortality, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.37). Performance was comparable across subgroups defined by sex and degree of carotid stenosis, but there was a nonsignificant trend suggesting a higher risk of adverse outcomes in older (>80) and symptomatic patients undergoing CAS. Outcomes after CAS and CEA among Medicare beneficiaries were comparable after adjusting for both patient- and provider

  2. Objective Validation of Perfusion-Based Human Cadaveric Simulation Training Model for Management of Internal Carotid Artery Injury in Endoscopic Endonasal Sinus and Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jasper; Hur, Kevin; Zhang, Zhipeng; Minneti, Michael; Pham, Martin; Wrobel, Bozena; Zada, Gabriel

    2017-12-29

    The emergence of minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has necessitated reproducible and realistic simulators of rare vascular injuries. To assess the face and content validity of an innovative perfusion-based cadaveric model developed to simulate internal carotid artery (ICA) injury during endoscopic surgery. Otolaryngology and neurosurgery trainees attempted 3 consecutive trials of endoscopic control of a parasellar ICA injury, with standardized technical feedback. Time to hemostasis (TTH) and blood loss were trended. All participants completed validated questionnaires using a 5-point Likert scale to assess the domains of confidence gain, face validity, content validity, and curriculum applicability. Among all participants (n = 35), TTH and mean blood loss significantly decreased between first vs second attempt (P = .005), and first vs third attempt (P = .03). Following the first attempt, trainees experienced an average 63% reduction in blood loss and 59% reduction in TTH. In the quartile of most improved participants, average blood loss reduction was 1115 mL (84% reduction) and TTH of 259 s (84% reduction). There were no significant differences between trainees of varying postgraduate year or specialty. Average pre and postprocedural confidence scores were 1.38 and 3.16, respectively (P < .0001). All trainees reported model realism, which achieved mean face validity 4.82 ± 0.41 and content validity 4.88 ± 0.33. The perfusion-based human cadaveric ICA injury model achieves high ratings of face and content validity across all levels of surgical trainees, and enables safe, realistic simulation for standardized skull base simulation and future curriculum development. Objective improvements in performance metrics may translate to improved patient outcomes.

  3. Allicin improves carotid artery intima-media thickness in coronary artery disease patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De-Shan; Wang, Shu-Li; Li, Jun-Mei; Liang, Er-Shun; Yan, Ming-Zhong; Gao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an important and independent risk factor for atherosclerotic diseases, such as coronary artery disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is a non-invasive marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Allicin treatment may decrease serum Hcy levels and improve impaired endothelial function in rats with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy). The present study hypothesized that allicin has an anti-atherosclerotic effect in coronary heart disease and tested the effects of allicin treatment on carotid artery IMT and plasma Hcy levels in coronary heart disease patients with HHcy. Sixty-two coronary heart disease patients with HHcy were randomly divided into an allicin group and a control group. All patients underwent diagnostic assessment, plasma Hcy assay, blood lipid measurement and B-mode ultrasound of the carotid artery prior to and after treatment. Plasma Hcy levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Carotid artery IMT was calculated using an automated algorithm based on a validated edge-detection technique. After 12 weeks, significant decreases in carotid artery IMT, plasma Hcy levels, total cholesterol and triglycerides were observed in the allicin group (all Pallicin group were significantly greater than those in the control group (all PAllicin was able to decrease Hcy levels, total cholesterol and triglycerides as well as carotid artery IMT.

  4. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    a significant improvement in baseline flow occur. Flow reserve determined by cerebral vasodilation, however, will improve in most patients with hemodynamic failure. In addition, some patients in the low-pressure group develop marked, but temporary, hyperperfusion after reconstruction of very high grade carotid...

  5. An unusual case of common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common carotid artery (CCA) pseuoaneurysms are most commonly a result of traumatic injuries. CCA pseudoaneurysm due to migration of ingested foreign body is an unusual occurrence. Here we report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented with a pulsatile swelling in the right lower neck for 2 months.

  6. Level-Set Based Carotid Artery Segmentation for Stenosis Grading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bemmel, C.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Viergever, M.A.; Niessen, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A semi-automated method is presented for the determination of the degree of stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiograms. Hereto, we determined the central vessel axis (CA), which subsequently is used as an initialization for a level-set based segmentation

  7. Carotid artery exteriorization in brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira) for an experimental study of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munerato, Marina Salles; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Marques, José Antônio

    2009-09-01

    This report evaluates the carotid artery exteriorization technique to allow repeated percutaneous artery catheterization in six brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira). Repeated percutaneous catheterization of the carotid artery was possible for periods of 3 mo to obtain arterial blood and monitor arterial blood pressure of deer without risk of arterial rupture. The artery pulse was easily palpable for periods up to 15 mo. Postoperative complication and/or arterial damage was not observed.

  8. Meta-analysis of the costs of carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, E E; Baldew, V G M; den Ruijter, H M; de Borst, G J

    2017-09-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is currently associated with an increased risk of 30-day stroke compared with carotid endarterectomy (CEA), whereas both interventions seem equally durable beyond the periprocedural period. Although the clinical outcomes continue to be scrutinized, there are few data summarizing the costs of both techniques. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases in August 2016 identifying articles comparing the costs or cost-effectiveness of CAS and CEA in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Combined overall effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. The in-hospital costs were specified to gain insight into the main heads of expenditure associated with both procedures. The literature search identified 617 unique articles, of which five RCTs and 12 cohort studies were eligible for analysis. Costs of the index hospital admission were similar for CAS and CEA. Costs of the procedure itself were 51 per cent higher for CAS, mainly driven by the higher costs of devices and supplies, but were balanced by higher postprocedural costs of CEA. Long-term cost analysis revealed no difference in costs or quality of life after 1 year of follow-up. Hospitalization and long-term costs of CAS and CEA appear similar. Economic considerations should not influence the choice of stenting or surgery in patients with carotid artery stenosis being considered for revascularization. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients.

  10. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population.

  11. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  12. Prevalence of significant carotid artery stenosis in patients with transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rappeport, Yael; Simonsen, Lene; Christiansen, Hanne Hjertmann

    2002-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is one of the risk factors for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis and the prevalence of candidates for carotid endarterectomy in a hospital-based cohort of TIA patients under 71...

  13. MRI of the carotid artery at 7 Tesla: Quantitative comparison with 3 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Wouter; De Rotte, Alexandra A J; Bluemink, Johanna J.; Van Der Velden, Tijl A.; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, DWJ; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 7 Tesla (T) MRI of the carotid arteries, as quantitatively compared with 3T. Materials and Methods: The 7T MRI of the carotid arteries was performed in six healthy subjects and in two patients with carotid stenosis. The healthy group was scanned at 3T and at 7T, using

  14. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  15. Unusual looping of the internal carotid artery in relation to an enlarged lymph node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak SB

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of internal carotid artery is important to surgeons doing head and neck surgery as well as to radiologists doing imaging and invasive techniques. In the current case, the right internal carotid artery showed a characteristic loop at its beginning. An abnormal, enlarged lymph node was found at the carotid bifurcation, which was projecting into the loop. The left internal carotid artery was normal. The unusual looping of internal carotid artery at its beginning might result in altered blood flow to the brain and may lead to confusions in surgical, imaging and invasive techniques.

  16. Surgical techniques and curative effect of carotid endarterectomy for carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min HAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the surgical techniques of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for treating carotid artery stenosis, in order to improve the surgical efficacy and reduce intraoperative adverse events and complications after operation. Methods Retrospective analysis was carried out on surgical data of 53 cases who were performed CEA from October 2010 to October 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. There were 39 males and 14 females, aged from 40 to 78 years old and mean age (60.34 ± 8.92 years old; the course of disease was from 2 d to 4 years. Twenty-six cases were diagnosed as right carotid stenosis, 15 cases left carotid stenosis and 12 cases double-sided carotid stenosis. Among all of those cases, 35 cases were diagnosed as moderate stenosis (30%-69%, 16 cases severe stenosis (70%-99% , and 2 cases complete occlusion. Results Among 53 patients, 50 patients underwent CEA; 2 cases underwent CEA and aneurysm clipping; one case underwent stent removal surgery and CEA because restenosis was found after carotid artery stenting (CAS. Postoperative neck CTA and fMRI showed good morphology of carotid artery, fluent blood flow and improved cerebral perfusion after operation. All of those patients were followed up for 3 to 24 months. One case died of myocardial infarction; 2 cases appeared skin numbness on the operating side of the neck, and the symptom disappeared 3 months later; one case appeared hoarseness after operation; 3 cases experienced mild transient ischemic attack (TIA and the symptom disappeared 2 months later. No case of stroke was found. Conclusions CEA is a safe and effective surgical approach to treat carotid stenosis. Correct and reasonable choices of the surgical indications and skilled surgical technique are the key to ensure the success of operation and to improve efficacy of the therapy. doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.006Video: http://www.cjcnn.org/index.php/cjcnn/pages/view/v14n2a6

  17. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    . Examination of periorbital flow direction or oculoplethysmography could be used as a screening procedure. Negative tests most certainly rule out any severe pressure gradient across the stenosis, irrespective of the luminal reduction. A positive result, on the other hand, should be further quantified since...... a significant improvement in baseline flow occur. Flow reserve determined by cerebral vasodilation, however, will improve in most patients with hemodynamic failure. In addition, some patients in the low-pressure group develop marked, but temporary, hyperperfusion after reconstruction of very high grade carotid...

  18. Agenesis of the internal carotid artery with a large hemangioma of the tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murotani, K.; Hiramoto, M.

    1985-07-01

    Total developmental absence of the internal carotid artery is relatively rare, with only 54 cases previously reported. Most, being without neurological symptoms, were found by chance. For this patient with cavernous hemangiomas in the facial, oral and cervical regions, conventional treatment would be embolization of the feeding vessels, combined with ligation of the external carotid artery. Angiography, however, revealed agenesis of the left internal carotid artery, abnormal origin of the aortic arch and azygos anterior cerebral artery.

  19. Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring May Detect Carotid Occlusion Intolerance during Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Furuse, Motomasa; Yagi, Ryokichi; Ohmura, Tomohisa; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Naokado; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Kawabata, Shinji; Miyachi, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2018-02-05

    The frequency of the occurrence of adverse events associated with carotid artery stenting (CAS) is usually low, but serious adverse events such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may occur. Real-time monitoring is ideal for the early detection of adverse events during the surgical procedure. This study aimed to evaluate continuous blood glucose (BG) monitoring for the detection of adverse events during CAS. Forty patients undergoing scheduled CAS were prospectively enrolled. An artificial pancreas was used for continuous BG monitoring (once per minute), using venous blood extracted at a rate of 2 mL/hr during CAS. The primary endpoint was a correlation between BG change and adverse events. CAS was discontinued in 1 patient, and BG was not measured in 5 patients (12.5%) because of the inability to extract blood. Among 34 evaluable patients, no patient developed CHS, but 3 patients (9%) experienced carotid occlusion intolerance. During CAS, BG was significantly higher in patients with carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 5 mg/dL) than in patients without carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 0 mg/dL) (P = 0.0221). A cutoff BG value ≥4 mg/dL during CAS showed 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of carotid occlusion intolerance. There was no significant correlation between BG change and other adverse events. BG elevation may help detect carotid occlusion intolerance although it is still unknown whether BG monitoring can detect CHS. Further studies should validate that a cutoff BG elevation value of ≥4 mg/dL during CAS indicates carotid occlusion intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Research Progress on the Risk Factors and Outcomes of Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiang-Dong; Xiong, Wei-Dong; Xiong, Shang-Shen; Chen, Gui-Hai

    2017-03-20

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that results in complex lesions or plaques that protrude into the arterial lumen. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture, with distal atheromatous debris embolization, causes cerebrovascular events. This review aimed to explore research progress on the risk factors and outcomes of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention. We searched the PubMed database for recently published research articles up to June 2016, with the key words of "risk factors", "outcomes", "blood components", "molecular mechanisms", "cellular mechanisms", and "human carotid atherosclerotic plaques". The articles, regarding the latest developments related to the risk factors and outcomes, atherosclerotic plaque composition, blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention, were selected. This review described the latest researches regarding the interactive effects of both traditional and novel risk factors for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, novel insights into human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Carotid plaque biology and serologic biomarkers of vulnerability can be used to predict the risk of cerebrovascular events. Furthermore, plaque composition, rather than lesion burden, seems to most predict rupture and subsequent thrombosis.

  1. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo, who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression.

  2. Geometry of the carotid arteries and tilt-up hypotension in subjects with essential arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, M; Antonelli, G; Di Venere, N; Campaniello, M; di Noia, D; Rizzon, P

    1996-09-01

    Dysfunction of the baroreceptor structures located in the carotid bulb is considered responsible for hypotensive responses to orthostatic posture in hypertensive subjects. Because of a recurrent vascular impairment in essential hypertensives, the authors hypothesized that in these cases the baroreceptive dysfunction could be related to some peculiar vascular disarrangement of the carotid arteries, at the level of the bulb. To test this, they compared two groups of mild essential hypertensives, divided into group A--15 subjects considered hyporeacting because of a decrease in mean blood pressure > or = 10 mmHg at the first minute of a passive orthostatic stress--and group B--15 subjects considered normoreacting because of an increase in mean blood pressure > or = 5 mmHg. They evaluated by high definition echo Doppler ultrasonography: (1) an arterial compliance index, (2) the volume of the carotid bulb, and (3) a score expressing the degree of arteriopathy at the level of the carotid arteries. In group A, results demonstrated a significant impairment of the carotid artery structure, expressed by an increase in volume of the carotid bulb (389.4 +/- 134.7 vs 233.2 +/- 116.5 mm3, P < 0.05) and a higher vascular score (2.7 vs 1, P < 0.001), while the index of arterial compliance was similar in the two groups. In conclusion, in mild essential hypertension a baroreceptor dysfunction could be strictly linked to a derangement of the carotid artery structure, while arterial compliance does not seem to involve the baroreceptor function.

  3. Intima-Media Thickness in the Carotid and Femoral Arteries for Detection of Arteriosclerosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Emmanuelle Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; Brandt, Carlos Teixeira; Lacerda, Heloisa Ramos; Godoi, Jocelene Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; Oliveira, Dinaldo Cavalcanti de; Costa, Gabriela Farias Araujo Sousa; Santos Junior, Gerson Gomes Dos; Leite, Kaliene Maria Estevão; Godoi, Juannicelle Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; Vasconcelos, Adriana Ferraz de

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerosis is higher in HIV-positive people, who also experience it earlier than the general population. To assess and compare the prevalence of atherosclerosis evaluated by the intima-media thickness of carotid and femoral arteries, and by the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) in HIV patients treated or not treated with protease inhibitors (PIs) and controls. Eighty HIV+ subjects (40 using PIs and 40 not using PIs) and 65 controls were included in the study. Atherosclerosis was diagnosed by (carotid and femoral) ITM measurement and ABPI. Classical risk factors for atherosclerosis and HIV were compared between the groups by statistical tests. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. An IMT > P75 or the presence of plaque was higher in the HIV+ than in the control group (37.5% vs 19%, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis showed a significant difference (p=0.014) in carotid IMT between HIV+ with PIs (0.71 ± 0.28 mm), without PIs 0.63 ± 0.11 mm and, and controls (0.59 ± 0.11 mm). There was no significant difference in femoral IMT between the groups or in ABPI between HIV+ subjects and controls. However, a significant difference (p=0.015) was found between HIV+ patients not treated with PIs (1.17 [1.08 - 1.23]), and controls 1.08 [1.07 - 1.17]). In HIV patients, atherosclerosis is more prevalent and seems to occur earlier with particular characteristics compared with HIV-negative subjects.

  4. Three-dimensional X-ray angiography of the carotid arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, F.; Belgrano, M.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Babic, D. [Cardio/Vascular Department, Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    DSA plays an important role in the preoperative management of carotid stenosis, and in endovascular treatment such as carotid stenting. Accurate 3D representation of the affected artery, before and after the procedure, is of great value.

  5. A CT study of the prevalence of carotid artery calcification in dental patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Woong [Chonnam National Univ. Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Korea. Atherosclerotic disease in the carotid artery bifurcation is the most common cause of stroke. The carotid artery calcification is easily appreciated by CT(Computed tomography). CT is often taken in a dental hospital for the diagnosis of inflammation. injury, cyst or tumor on maxillofacial region. However, there was no report of carotid artery calcification on CT in dental patients. The presence of carotid artery calcification was evaluated by an experienced radiologist on CT scans of 287 patients (166 males, 121 females, average age 42, range 6 to 86 years) and the medical history of the patient and the interpretation of CT were reviewed. Carotid artery calcification was detected on CT scans of 57 patients (19.8%; 35 males, 22 females). All the male patients with carotid artery calcification were older than 50, and all the female patients with carotid artery calcification were older than 60. Among the 57 patients, 10 had Diabetes mellitus, 20 had cardiovascular disease, 3 had history of stroke and 3 underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Carotid artery calcification was not included in the interpretation of CT of dental patients except one patient. The prevalence of carotid artery calcification on CT of dental patients was about 20% in this study. Carotid artery calcification should be included in the interpretation of CT of dental patients.

  6. Intercavernous portion of internal carotid artery occlusion resulting from snowboarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudiptamohan Mukhopadhyay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sudiptamohan Mukhopadhyay1, Awen Iorwerth21Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: A 33-year-old gentleman who was otherwise fit and healthy suffered repetitive low impact head injuries while snowboarding in Austria over a period of one week. During the fall he had several hyperextension injuries and presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness (felt ‘drunk’ on Friday night despite not being drunk, diplopia, abnormal pupillary signs. A Horner’s syndrome was diagnosed and on investigation, the left intercavernous portion of internal carotid artery (ICA was found to be thrombosed. The symptoms gradually settled after conservative treatment for a month. Blunt head trauma is a recognized cause of carotid dissection and thrombosis and many neuromechanics studies have attempted to calculate the wall shear stress involved. Physicians treating snowboarders should be aware of the condition and should look for Horner’s syndrome and consider the possibility of carotid occlusion. With a thorough PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE search using ‘snowboarding’, ‘carotid dissection’, ‘Horner’s syndrome’ no such case was found to be reported. Proper training for such sport activities is essential to avoid serious consequences.Keywords: snowboarding, carotid dissection, Horner’s syndrome

  7. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  8. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  9. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ULTRASOUND AND STENOSIS OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

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    Vojko Flis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of the ultrasound structure of the atherosclerotic plaque in stenosis of internal carotid artery may have important implications for carotid surgery. This study compares the ability of computer derived 3D ultrasound gray scale volumetric measurements to diferentiate between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid plaque causing more than 70% stenosis.Methods. Eightysix internal carotid artery stenoses (70–99%, 45 symptomatic, 41 asymptomatic were imaged with 3D ultrasound to obtain the whole volume of the atherosclerotic plaque. Digitalized sonograms were computerized and normalized to the gray scale median (GSM of blood (0 and vessel adventitia (200. Plaque GSM was obtained for the whole volume by computing the volume ratio between echolucent and echogenic areas. The plaque heterogeneity was obtained by computing the density of echogenic areas per volume unit. Parametric t test was used for statistic analysis.Results. Minimum volume GSM ratio (determining echolucency was higher for asymptomatic plaque (0.6 – CI 0.48– 0.91 versus 0.3 – CI 0.21–0.75: p = 0.002. Greater GSM heterogeneity was present in symptomatic plaque (6.8 – CI 2.5– 18.3 versus 0.41 – CI 0.2–3.4;.p = 0.0001.Conclusions. Volume ultrasound imaging that enables objective assessment of whole ultrasonic plaque structure is more sensitive that single longitudinal view sonography for differentiating between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque.

  11. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köklü, Erkan, E-mail: drerkankoklu@gmail.com; Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Cardiology (Turkey); Koç, Pınar [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Radiology (Turkey)

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  12. 18FDG PET and ultrasound echolucency in carotid artery plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Pedersen, Sune F; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate inflammation in echolucent carotid artery plaques. BACKGROUND: Ultrasound echolucency of carotid artery plaques has been proven to differentiate patients at high risk of stroke. On the other hand, positron emission tomography (PET) of plaques with the use...... for ultrasound and PET imaging. Plaque standardized gray scale medians (GSM) were measured in longitudinal ultrasound images to quantitate echolucency, and GSM values were compared with FDG PET uptake quantified by maximum standardized uptake values (SUV). Symptomatic plaques were compared with contralateral...... plaques ranged from high to low inflammatory activity, as depicted with PET. Quantitative FDG SUV differentiated asymptomatic from symptomatic plaques, whereas GSM values did not. There was a positive correlation between CD68 expression and FDG uptake (r = 0.50, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Our results...

  13. Bilateral Carotid Artery Dissection after High Impact Road Traffic Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 58 year old man was involved in a high impact road traffic incident and was admitted for observation. Asymptomatic for the first 24 hours, he collapsed with symptoms and signs consistent with a cerebrovascular accident. Computed tomography angiogram (CTA and Magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA demonstrated bilateral internal carotid artery dissections and a left middle cerebral artery infarct. It was not considered appropriate to attempt stenting or other revascularistation. The patient was treated with heparin prior to starting warfarin. He made a partial recovery and was discharged to a rehabilitation facility. This case is a reminder of carotid dissection as an uncommon but serious complication of high speed motor vehicle accident, which may be silent initially. Literature Review suggests risk stratification before relevant radiological screening at risk patients. Significant advances in CTA have made it the diagnostic tool of choice, but ultrasound is an important screening tool.

  14. Experimental model for creation of carotid artery aneurysms in dogs

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    Kim, Sung Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Kyu; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To describe the detailed technique for producing experimental carotid aneurysms in dogs and the success rate, cause of failure and remedy, based on our experience. Fourteen male dogs weighing 12-15kg were anesthetized with inhalation of 1-2% halothane and 50% nitrous oxide. Each surgical procedure was performed under sterile condition with the aid of an operating microscope. A paramidline incision 7-8cm in length was made parallel to and medial to the external jugular vein in the dog's neck. The external jugular vein was harvested as a 1cm vein pouch by ligation and division of the proximal and distal ends. The ipsilateral common carotid artery was exposed and clamped at both ends by a vascular clamp. A 5-mm long elliptical arteriotomy was made at the mid portion of the artery, and then end to side anastomosis between the artery and vein sac was performed by using interrupted 7-0 monofilament prolene sutures. Carotid arteriography or Doppler sonography was performed 1-6 weeks after aneurysm construction. Twenty experimental aneurysms were constructed, and 17 aneurysms were patent on follow up study, but one dog with two aneurysms died from hemorrhagic pneumonia 17 days after surgery. The overall patency rate was 75%. We demonstrated the feasibility of creating experimental aneurysm models in the dog and expect that the technique presented will help to avoid failure in the construction of aneurysms.

  15. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

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    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  16. The impact of contralateral carotid artery stenosis on outcomes after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, Alexander B; Soden, Peter A; Fokkema, Margriet; Zettervall, Sara L; Deery, Sarah E; Bodewes, Thomas C F; de Borst, Gert J; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2017-12-01

    Patients with contralateral carotid occlusion (CCO) have been excluded from randomized clinical trials because of a deemed high risk for adverse neurologic outcomes with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Evidence for this rationale is limited and conflicting. Therefore, we aimed to compare outcomes after CEA between patients with and without CCO and varying degrees of contralateral carotid stenosis (CCS). We identified patients undergoing CEA from 2003 to 2015 in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) registry. Patients were stratified by preoperative symptom status and presence of CCO. Multivariable analysis was used to account for differences in demographics and comorbidities. Our primary outcome was 30-day stroke/death risk. Of 15,487 patients we identified who underwent CEA, 10,377 (67%) were asymptomatic. CCO was present in 914 patients, of whom 681 (75%) were asymptomatic. Overall, the 30-day stroke/death was 2.0% for symptomatic patients (CCO: 2.6%) and 1.1% for asymptomatic patients (CCO: 2.3%). After adjustment, including symptom status, CCO was associated with higher 30-day stroke/death (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3; P = .001), any in-hospital stroke (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6; P carotid artery stenting than after CEA. We believe that CEA remains a valid and safe option for patients with CCO and that CCO should not be applied as a criterion to promote carotid artery stenting per se. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Intraluminal Thrombus in Internal Carotid Artery Successfully Treated with Adjuvant Anticoagulant Therapy Followed by Carotid Endarterectomy:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Hisato; Hayashi, Yutaka; Ueno, Megumi

    2016-10-01

    An intraluminal thrombus in the carotid artery is relatively rare. A high frequency of perioperative symptomatic stroke has been reported in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, and no standard therapy has yet been developed. A 69-year-old woman, with no history of trauma, presented with ischemic stroke and mild right hemiparesis. Computed tomography and MRI showed an infarction in the left parietal region. A carotid Doppler study showed carotid stenosis on the left side. Further investigation with digital subtraction angiography confirmed significant carotid artery stenosis with an intraluminal thrombus in the left internal carotid artery. She was treated with initial intravenous anticoagulant therapy followed by carotid endarterectomy with thrombus removal 14 days after admission(subacute phase). There was no postoperative complication and she had uneventful course over 3 years of follow-up. Initial adjuvant anticoagulant therapy for symptomatic intraluminal thrombus followed by carotid revascularization is an effective surgical strategy. A meticulous surgical procedure is required to perform a carotid endarterectomy in patients with an intraluminal thrombus.

  18. The presence of some cytokines and Chlamydia pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic carotid plaque in patients with carotid artery stenosis

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    Dariusz Janczak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last few years the role of microorganisms in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been widely discussed. Chlamydia pneumoniae activates immune cells to produce cytokines that are responsible for the formation of atheromatous carotid lesions.Material and methods: The study was carried out at the Department of Vascular, General and Transplantation Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, in 2002-2003, on 100 consecutive symptomatic patients with internal carotid stenosis, who underwent an endarterectomy procedure. Each patient had their carotid artery sampled in order to find C. pneumoniae DNA using the nested PCR method and some cytokines (TGF-β, VEGF, FGF, TNF-α using immunohistochemical examination. The control group consisted of 20 young organ donors who had been diagnosed with brain death and who had their healthy carotid artery harvested. Analogous genetic and immunohistochemical tests were performed.Results: We did not confirm the presence of either cytokines or C. pneumoniae in the healthy carotid arteries. The presence of FGF was probably due to intima fibroblast activity, which is responsible for elastin and collagen synthesis for the extracellular matrix. C. pneumoniae was discovered in 68% of patients with carotid plaques. Three cytokines (TGF-β, FGF, TNF-α were detected in atherosclerotic internal carotid arteries as well.Conclusion: Chronic infection by C. pneumoniae may exacerbate carotid plaque development and may lead to its destabilization.

  19. Attenuation Correction and Normalisation for Quantification of Contrast Enhancement in Ultrasound Images of Carotid Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing Keung; Gujral, Dorothy M; Shah, Benoy N; Chahal, Navtej S; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Cosgrove, David O; Eckersley, Robert J; Harrington, Kevin J; Senior, Roxy; Nutting, Christopher M; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-07-01

    An automated attenuation correction and normalisation algorithm was developed to improve the quantification of contrast enhancement in ultrasound images of carotid arteries. The algorithm first corrects attenuation artefact and normalises intensity within the contrast agent-filled lumen and then extends the correction and normalisation to regions beyond the lumen. The algorithm was first validated on phantoms consisting of contrast agent-filled vessels embedded in tissue-mimicking materials of known attenuation. It was subsequently applied to in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) images of human carotid arteries. Both in vitro and in vivo results indicated significant reduction in the shadowing artefact and improved homogeneity within the carotid lumens after the correction. The error in quantification of microbubble contrast enhancement caused by attenuation on phantoms was reduced from 55% to 5% on average. In conclusion, the proposed method exhibited great potential in reducing attenuation artefact and improving quantification in contrast-enhanced ultrasound of carotid arteries. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Elasticity of the carotid artery walls as a prognostic factor for the occurrence of restenosis after a surgery for internal carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Andrzej; Madycki, Grzegorz; Hendiger, Włodzimierz; Staszkiewicz, Walerian; Lewszuk, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of carotid artery patency is one of the most frequently performed operations in vascular surgery. One of the most important problems that occur both short- and long-term after carotid endarterectomy is recurrent stenosis. Despite advances in imaging studies and better knowledge of the mechanisms of atherogenesis, the mechanism of restenosis remains unclear. Patients with internal carotid artery atherosclerosis experience decreased elasticity of the intima-media complex, resulting in increased vessel wall stiffness. In the future, measurement of carotid artery elasticity may become a marker for the development of post-surgical stenosis occurring after endarterectomy of both the carotid artery and other peripheral vessels. To assess the elasticity of carotid artery walls as a prognostic factor for the occurrence of restenosis after a surgery for common carotid artery stenosis. Classic carotid artery endarterectomy was performed in 180 patients selected on the basis of standard, ultrasound- based recommendations. The phenomenon of restenosis was examined using ultrasound techniques at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the surgery. Measurements of carotid artery elasticity were performed using a Vascular Echo Doppler device, and patients were divided into two groups depending on the occurrence (or non-occurrence) of restenosis. Group I (without restenosis) included 156 (86.6%) patients, and Group II (with restenosis) included 24 (13.4%) patients. At 3 and 6 months after the surgery, an increase of the elasticity of vessel walls (coefficient a) was observed in both groups, but the differences in the elasticity of the carotid arteries were not significant. At 12 months after the surgery, all patients in Group II (with restenosis) had significantly increased coefficient a values as compared to Group I patients (p elasticity as measured using coefficient a may be associated with the process leading to the occurrence of restenosis after the surgery. Further research

  1. Prevalence of significant carotid artery stenosis in Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghabili K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abolhassan Shakeri Bavil1, Kamyar Ghabili2, Seyed Ebrahim Daneshmand3, Masoud Nemati3, Moslem Shakeri Bavil4, Hossein Namdar5, Sheyda Shaafi61Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2Medical Philosophy and History Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3Department of Radiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 5Department of Cardiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 6Neuroscience Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: Generalized screening for carotid artery stenosis with carotid duplex ultrasonography in patients with peripheral arterial disease is controversial.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of significant internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis in a group of Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease.Methods: We prospectively screened 120 patients with a known diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease for carotid artery stenosis. Based on the angiographic assessment of abdominal aorta and arteries of the lower extremities, patients with stenosis greater than 70% in the lower extremity arteries were included. A group of healthy individuals aged ≥50 years was recruited as a control. Risk factors for atherosclerosis including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease were recorded. Common carotid arteries (CCAs and the origins of the internal and external arteries were scanned with B-mode ultrasonogaphy. Significant ICA stenosis, >70% ICA stenosis but less than near occlusion of the ICA, was diagnosed when the ICA/CCA peak systolic velocity ratio was ≥3.5.Results: Ninety-five patients, with a mean age of 58.52 ± 11.04 years, were studied. Twenty-five patients had a history of smoking, six

  2. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  3. Comparison between outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting in treating elderly patients

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    Yan-fei CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To review the clinical data of elderly patients treated by carotid endarterectomy (CEA and carotid artery stenting (CAS, and analyze the safety of two kinds of surgery. Methods A total of 691 patients with carotid artery stenosis underwent CEA (121 cases and CAS (570 cases respectively. The risk factors, clinical symptoms and postoperative complications in 2 groups of patients were analyzed, and the safety of two kinds of surgery were assessed. Results After 30 d of operation, no significant difference was found between 2 groups in death rate (0.83% vs 1.05%, P = 1.000, stroke rate (4.13% vs 1.93% , P = 0.258 or myocardial infarction rate (0.83% vs 0, P = 0.175. Heart complications and cranial nerve injury rate in CEA group was significantly higher than that in CAS group (8.26% vs 1.05%, P = 0.000; 4.96% vs 0, P = 0.000, while sinus bradycardia or hypotension rate in CEA group was significantly lower than that in CAS group (0 vs 7.54%, P = 0.002. Conclusions Both CEA and CAS are safe for the elderly patients. However, the conditions of elderly patients should be evaluated before operation in order to reduce occurence of complications after operation.

  4. Effect of treatment temperature on collagen structures of the decellularized carotid artery using high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Decellularized tissues have attracted a great deal of attention as regenerating transplantation materials. A decellularizing method based on high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been developed, and the preparation of many types of decellularized tissues has been investigated, including aorta, cornea, and dermis. The preparation of a small-diameter vascular graft was studied using a carotid artery from the viewpoint of collagen denaturation and leakage. After HHP, the carotid artery was washed at two washing temperatures (37 and 4°C). Histological evaluation, collagen content measurement and circular dichroism (CD) measurement indicated that the washing temperatures clearly affected the collagen structure of the decellularized carotid artery. The amount of collagen decreased in the carotid artery decellularized by HHP washed at 37°C (HHP/37°C). On the other hand, the amount and structure of collagen were preserved in the carotid artery washed at 4°C after HHP (HHP/4°C). In rat carotid artery syngeneic transplantation, the HHP/37°C decellularized carotid artery occluded after 2 weeks, but the HHP/4°C decellularized one did not. These results indicate that collagen denaturation and leakage of the decellularized carotid artery affect the in vivo performance of the carotid artery.

  5. Targeted particle tracking in computational models of human carotid bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ian

    2011-12-01

    A significant and largely unsolved problem of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of flow in anatomically relevant geometries is that very few calculated pathlines pass through regions of complex flow. This in turn limits the ability of CFD-based simulations of imaging techniques (such as MRI) to correctly predict in vivo performance. In this work, I present two methods designed to overcome this filling problem, firstly, by releasing additional particles from areas of the flow inlet that lead directly to the complex flow region ("preferential seeding") and, secondly, by tracking particles both "downstream" and "upstream" from seed points within the complex flow region itself. I use the human carotid bifurcation as an example of complex blood flow that is of great clinical interest. Both idealized and healthy volunteer geometries are investigated. With uniform seeding in the inlet plane (in the common carotid artery (CCA)) of an idealized bifurcation geometry, approximately half the particles passed through the internal carotid artery (ICA) and half through the external carotid artery. However, of those particles entering the ICA, only 16% passed directly through the carotid bulb region. Preferential seeding from selected regions of the CCA was able to increase this figure to 47%. In the second method, seeding of particles within the carotid bulb region itself led to a very high proportion (97%) of pathlines running from CCA to ICA. Seeding of particles in the bulb plane of three healthy volunteer carotid bifurcation geometries led to much better filling of the bulb regions than by particles seeded at the inlet alone. In all cases, visualization of the origin and behavior of recirculating particles led to useful insights into the complex flow patterns. Both seeding methods produced significant improvements in filling the carotid bulb region with particle tracks compared with uniform seeding at the inlet and led to an improved understanding of the complex

  6. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette F

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at comparing PET/MR to PET/CT for imaging the carotid arteries in patients with known increased risk of atherosclerosis. Six HIV-positive men underwent sequential PET/MR and PET/CT of the carotid arteries after injection of 400 MBq of (18)F-FDG. PET/MR was performed a median of 131...... between PET data acquired using the PET/MR system compared to the PET/CT system. The mean difference for SUVmean was -0.18 (p PET/MR system. The 95% limits of agreement were -0.55 to 0.......20 for SUVmean and -0.93 to 0.65 for SUVmax. The image quality of the PET/MR allowed for delineation of the carotid vessel wall. The correlations between (18)F-FDG uptake from ROI including both vessel wall and vessel lumen to ROI including only the wall were strong (r = 0.98 for SUVmean and r = 1.00 for SUVmax...

  7. Paramagnetic Manganese in the Atherosclerotic Plaque of Carotid Arteries

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    Yury Chelyshev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for adequate markers of atherosclerotic plaque (AP instability in the context of assessment of the ischemic stroke risk in patients with atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries as well as for solid physical and chemical factors that are connected with the AP stability is extremely important. We investigate the inner lining of the carotid artery specimens from the male patients with atherosclerosis (27 patients, 42–64 years old obtained during carotid endarterectomy by using different analytical tools including ultrasound angiography, X-ray analysis, immunological, histochemical analyses, and high-field (3.4 T pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR at 94 GHz. No correlation between the stable and unstable APs in the sense of the calcification is revealed. In all of the investigated samples, the EPR spectra of manganese, namely, Mn2+ ions, are registered. Spectral and relaxation characteristics of Mn2+ ions are close to those obtained for the synthetic (nano hydroxyapatite species but differ from each other for stable and unstable APs. This demonstrates that AP stability could be specified by the molecular organization of their hydroxyapatite components. The origin of the obtained differences and the possibility of using EPR of Mn2+ as an AP stability marker are discussed.

  8. Shear-mediated dilation of the internal carotid artery occurs independent of hypercapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Smith, Kurt J; Carter, Howard Henry

    2017-01-01

    the hypothesis that, after a 30-s transient increase in arterial CO2 tension and consequent increase in internal carotid artery shear stress, internal carotid artery diameter would increase, indicating shear-mediated dilation, in the absence of concurrent hypercapnia. In 27 healthy participants, partial...... pressures of end-tidal O2 and CO2, ventilation (pneumotachography), blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography), heart rate (electrocardiogram), internal carotid artery flow, diameter, and shear stress (high-resolution duplex ultrasound), and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (transcranial Doppler......) were measured during 4-min steady-state and transient 30-s hypercapnic tests (both +9 mmHg CO2). Internal carotid artery dilation was lower in the transient compared with steady-state hypercapnia (3.3 ± 1.9 vs. 5.3 ± 2.9%, respectively, P internal carotid artery shear stress...

  9. [Restenosis of carotid arteries after carotid endarterectomy: current aspects of the problem: (local and systemic risk factors). Part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, R Z; Kulikova, A N; Bakhmet'ev, A S

    2012-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is currently the most effective surgical means of preventing ischaemic stroke. Despite the fact that this type of intervention is widely used, there seems to be no tendency toward decreased incidence of such a complication as restenosis of carotid arteries.The present review deals with the results of analyzing the literature on the problem concerning carotid artery restenosis after carotid endarterectomy. Considered herein are the problems of epidemiology and prevalence of the complication involved. Special attention is paid to local and systemic risk factors for the development of restenosis. Studying risk factors of restenosis after carotid endarterectomy is of considerable importance for both prevention and choice of pathogenetically targeted treatment of patients presenting with atherosclerotic lesions of brachiocephalic vessels.

  10. Carotid Stenting Versus Endarterectomy for Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresoli, Paola; Habib, Bettina; Reynier, Pauline; Secrest, Matthew H; Eisenberg, Mark J; Filion, Kristian B

    2017-08-01

    There is no consensus on the comparative efficacy and safety of carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. To evaluate CAS versus CEA in asymptomatic patients, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing CAS to CEA in asymptomatic patients using a pre-specified protocol. Two independent reviewers identified randomized controlled trials meeting our inclusion/exclusion criteria, extracted relevant data, and assessed quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effects models with inverse-variance weighting were used to estimate pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing the incidences of periprocedural and long-term outcomes between CAS and CEA. We identified 11 reports of 5 randomized controlled trials for inclusion (n=3019) asymptomatic patients. The pooled incidences of any periprocedural stroke (RR, 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-3.40), periprocedural nondisabling stroke (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 0.98-3.89), and any periprocedural stroke or death (RR, 1.72; 95% CI, 0.95-3.11) trended toward an increased risk after CAS. We could not rule out clinically significant differences between treatments for long-term stroke (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.76-2.03) and the composite outcome of periprocedural stroke, death or myocardial infarction, or long-term ipsilateral stroke (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.70-1.21). Although uncertainty surrounds the long-term outcomes of CAS versus CEA, the potential for increased risks of periprocedural stroke and periprocedural stroke or death with CAS suggests that CEA is the preferred option for the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Common carotid artery occlusion presenting with recurrent syncopal episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Kader

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic common carotid artery (CCA occlusion is an uncommon occurrence that may require surgical intervention. We aim to describe a case of CCA occlusion that presented with the unusual symptom of recurrent syncope. A 69-year-old lady presented with a history of recurrent syncopal episodes and amaurosis fugax associated with left leg weakness. She was found to have a right CCA occlusion on duplex ultrasound and angiography. She underwent a right common carotid endarterectomy and intraoperative findings revealed a heavily calcified plaque in the CCA just proximal to the bifurcation with organised thrombus filling the CCA proximally. CCA occlusion can rarely present with recurrent syncopal episodes. Surgery may be curative.

  12. Aberrant internal carotid artery in the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Keun Tak; Kang, Hyun Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The knowledge about the aberrant internal carotid artery (ICA) in the middle ear is essential for clinicians, because a misdiagnosis of the aberrant ICA could have serious consequences such as excessive aural bleeding during a middle ear surgery. A 38-year-old woman presented with tinnitus and hearing difficulties of the left ear that had started 5 years ago. During otoscopy, an anteroinferior bluish mass was seen in the tympanic space. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left-side aberrant ICA with bony dehiscence of the carotid canal in the middle ear and a reduced diameter of the tympanic ICA. Herein we report a case of an aberrant ICA in the middle ear. We also review the literature regarding this important vascular anomaly of the temporal bone which may lead to disastrous surgical complications.

  13. Carotid versus coronary atherosclerosis burdens in acute compared with chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Stéphanie; Bibeau, Karine; Bertrand, Olivier F; Lévesque, Valérie; Deschênes St-Pierre, Béatrice; Pibarot, Philippe; Després, Jean-Pierre; Larose, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Prediction of coronary events remains elusive. Carotid atherosclerosis may be a surrogate for coronary risk, as carotid and coronary diseases occur simultaneously - albeit at times with a weak association - depending on clinical presentation. We investigated carotid and coronary atherosclerosis in men with new-onset unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) vs. long-standing severe chronic stable angina (CSA). Bilateral carotid artery and 3-vessel coronary artery atherosclerosis burdens were measured within 1 month, respectively, by 3D-volumetric carotid magnetic resonance imaging and coronary angiography-derived modified CASS-50 score. Men with STEMI (n = 50) and long-standing CSA (n = 50), matched for age, were enrolled (58.6 ± 8.8 years). All of them had carotid atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis burden was greater in the carotid arteries of STEMI vs. CSA (wall volume: 196.2 ± 44.4 vs. 169.2 ± 38.0 mm3/4 mm, p = 0.002), but greater in the coronary arteries of CSA vs. STEMI (modified CASS-50 score: 3 vs. 1, p < 0.0001). Normalized wall index (NWI) of internal carotid was associated with modified CASS-50 score in STEMI (ρ = 0.40, p = 0.022) and in CSA (ρ = -0.39, p = 0.031). Carotid atherosclerosis was observed in all CAD patients, and atherosclerosis burden in carotid and in coronary arteries varied according to clinical presentation.

  14. Bilateral internal carotid artery agenesis with artery compression of the brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jihong; Jiang, Dingyao; Zhang, Shizheng

    2008-09-15

    Bilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly. The most common type of collateral circulation is developed through the circle of Willis via the basilar and posterior communicating arteries. Both anterior circulations are usually supplied by enlarged posterior communicating arteries (PCOMs). We present an unusual case of bilateral ICA agenesis, which is associated with dolichoectatic left PCOM and left posterior cerebral artery (PCA) compression of left basal ganglia and thalamus. These complex cerebral and vascular anomalies can be noninvasively revealed and evaluated by CT and MR.

  15. Severity and presence of atherosclerosis signs within the segments of internal carotid artery: CBCT's contribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damaskos, S.; da Silveira, H.L.D.; Berkhout, E.W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to assess with cone-beam computed tomography the distribution and interrelation of the presence of calcifications along the course of the internal carotid artery and to associate their severity with their allocation within the segments of internal carotid artery, gender,

  16. Comparison of CT and CMR for detection and quantification of carotid artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujaj, Blerim; Lorza, Andrés M. Arias; van Engelen, Arna

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid artery atherosclerosis is an important risk factor for stroke. As such, quantitative imaging of carotid artery calcification, as a proxy of atherosclerosis, has become a cornerstone of current stroke research. Yet, population-based data comparing the computed tomography (CT) a...

  17. Carotid endarterectomy in cervical block anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilijevski Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of modern carotid surgery is relief of symptoms, stroke prevention, improvement in quality of life, prevention of vascular dementia, and prolongation of lifetime. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper was to compare the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in cervical block vs. general anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA. METHOD: One hundred patients (76 male, 24 female, mean age 60.81 years with occluded contralateral ICA were operated from 1997-2000. Neurological symptomatology, deficiency and stroke incidence were preoperatively analyzed in two groups. Duplex-scanning, angiograms and CT-scan confirmed the diagnosis. Risk factors analysis included hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, smoking and history of CAD, CABG and PAOD. Morbidity and mortality were used to compare the outcome of surgery in two groups. RESULTS There was no difference of age, gender and symptomatology between the groups. Paresis, TIA and dysphasia were most frequent. 70%-90% of ICA stenosis was seen in the majority of patients. Hypertension and smoking were dominant risk factors in these two groups. Eversion carotid end arterectomy was the most frequent technique used. In three cases out of nine that were operated under cervical block, the neurological symptoms developed just after clamping, so the intra-luminal shunt was placed. Postoperative morbidity was 12% and mortality was 8%. Conclusion: There was no difference of preoperative parameters, surgical technique and outcome in these two groups. Without other intraoperative monitoring, cervical block anesthesia might be an option in patients with the occlusion of the contralateral ICA. However, prospective studies involving more patients are needed.

  18. Prevalence of Carotid Artery Disease among Ambulatory Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazum, Shirit; Eisen, Alon; Lev, Eli I; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Solodky, Alejandro; Hasdai, David; Kornowski, Ran; Mager, Aviv

    2016-02-01

    Concomitant carotid artery disease (CaAD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with worse cardiac and neurologic outcomes. The reported prevalence and risk factors for concomitant CaAD in CAD patients varied among previous studies. To examine these factors in ambulatory patients with CAD and well-documented cholesterol levels treated with cholesterol-lowering medications. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 325 unselected patients with CAD (89 women, mean age 68.8 ± 9.9 years) undergoing routine evaluation at the coronary clinic of our hospital. The low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) was < 100 mg/dl in 292 patients (90%). Age at onset of CAD symptoms was 59.4 ± 10.8 years. Carotid stenosis ≥ 50% was seen in 83 patients (25.5%) and between 30% and 49% in 55 patients (17%) (duplex method). Carotid stenosis was significantly associated with hypertension (P = 0.032), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.002) and number of coronary arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis (P = 0.002), and showed a borderline association with age at CAD onset (P = 0.062) and diabetes mellitus (P = 0.053). On linear regression analysis, independent predictors of CaAD were peripheral vascular disease (OR 3.186, 95% CI 1.403-7.236, P = 0.006), number of coronary arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis (OR 1.543, 95% CI 1.136-2.095, P = 0.005), and age at CAD onset (OR 1.028, 95% CI 1.002-1.054, P = 0.003). None of the variables studied predicted freedom from CaAD. Carotid atherosclerosis is very common in stable ambulatory patients with CAD regularly taking statins. The risk is higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease, a greater number of involved coronary arteries, and older age at onset of CAD.

  19. Classical surgical approach and treatment with clips of extracranial internal carotid artery berry aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Vukas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We can define extracranial carotid artery aneurysm (ECAA as bulb dilatation greater than 200% of the diameter of the internal carotid artery (ICA or in a case of common carotid artery (CCA greater than 150% of the diameter. Surgical intervention is required for the treatment of this disease.Case report: This study presents an open vascular surgical procedure to resolve ECAA. We report a case of 61 years old woman with an extracranial internal carotid artery berry aneurysm, presented with a headache and dizziness when turning the head aside. Classic open surgery was performed and the lumen of berry aneurysm was separated with three clips from the lumen of ICA.Conclusions: The open surgical approach is the method of choice for the treatment of extracranial internal carotid artery pathological conditions.

  20. Altered structural and mechanical properties in decellularized rabbit carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Liao, J.; Joyce, E.M.; Wang, B.; Leach, J.B.; Sacks, M.S.; Wong, J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, major achievements in creating decellularized whole tissue scaffolds have drawn considerable attention to decellularization as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Decellularized tissues are expected to have mechanical strength and structure similar to the native tissues from which they are derived. However, numerous studies have shown that mechanical properties change after decellularization. Often, tissue structure is observed by histology and electron microscopy, but the structural alterations that may have occurred are not always evident. Here, a variety of techniques were used to investigate changes in tissue structure and relate them to altered mechanical behavior in decellularized rabbit carotid arteries. Histology and scanning electrom microscopy revealed that major extracellular matrix components were preserved and fibers appeared intact, although collagen appeared looser and less crimped after decellularization. Transmission electrom microscopy confirmed the presence of proteoglycans (PG), but there was decreased PG density and increased spacing between collagen fibrils. Mechanical testing and opening angle measurements showed that decellularized arteries had significantly increased stiffness, decreased extensibility and decreased residual stress compared with native arteries. Small-angle light scattering revealed that fibers had increased mobility and that structural integrity was compromised in decellularized arteries. Taken together, these studies revealed structural alterations that could be related to changes in mechanical properties. Further studies are warranted to determine the specific effects of different decellularization methods on the structure and performance of decellularized arteries used as vascular grafts. PMID:19135421

  1. Characteristics of duplex sonographic parameters over time after successful carotid artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Esther S H; Sun, Zhiyuan; Kapadia, Samir; Bajzer, Christopher; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L

    2012-08-01

    Carotid duplex sonography is the primary tool for surveillance after carotid artery stenting, but the course of sonographic velocities over time after successful stenting is unclear. The purpose of this study was to describe carotid duplex sonographic velocity parameters after successful carotid artery stenting and to determine the predictors of poststent sonographic velocities. We queried institutional carotid stent and noninvasive vascular laboratory databases for internal carotid artery stents placed between January 2004 and June 2007. We included patients with stenosis of 20% or less on completion angiograms who had carotid duplex sonography within 30 days before and 7 days after stenting. The prestent peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), internal-to-common carotid artery PSV ratio, contralateral internal carotid artery velocities, stent type, open- versus closed-cell stent design, and days of follow-up were tested as potential predictors of poststent velocities. Eighty-two of 498 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean PSV and PSV ratio decreased from 423.6 cm/s and 7.1 before stenting to 98.5 cm/s and 1.3 after stenting (both P PSV, EDV, and PSV ratio) were dependent on prestent ipsilateral and contralateral velocities. The poststent EDV was dependent on the type of stent. The upper range for 0% to 20% stenosis in the stented internal carotid artery was a PSV of 141 cm/s, an EDV of 42 cm/s, and a PSV ratio of 2.1 or lower. With a median follow-up of 1 year, the PSV and PSV ratio remained stable over time in successfully stented carotid arteries. Deviations in sonographic parameters after initial poststent carotid duplex sonography should prompt an investigation for possible in-stent restenosis.

  2. Rapid Formation of Cerebral Microbleeds after Carotid Artery Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Kakumoto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies reported that cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, i.e. small areas of signal loss on T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GE imaging, could develop rapidly after acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that CMBs rapidly emerge after carotid artery stenting (CAS. Objective: We investigated the frequency of and predisposing factors for CMBs after CAS. Methods: We retrospectively examined MRI before and after CAS in 88 consecutive patients (average age: 71.7 ± 7.2 years, average rates of carotid stenosis: 72.6 ± 12.8% who underwent CAS for carotid artery stenosis between March 1, 2009, and September 30, 2010. We defined new CMBs as signal losses that newly appeared on the follow-up GE. We examined the association of new CMBs with demographics, risk factors, and baseline MBs. Results: Among 88 patients, 18 (20.5% had CMBs initially, and 7 (8.0% developed new CMBs right after CAS. New CMBs appeared on the same side of CAS in all of the 7 patients. New CMBs appeared significantly more frequently in the CMB-positive group than in the CMB-negative one (22% vs. 4%, p = 0.03 on the pre-CAS MRI. Multivariate analysis also revealed that the presence of CMBs before CAS was an independent predictor of new development of CMBs after CAS (odds ratio: 8.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.39–47.1. Conclusion: CMBs can develop rapidly after CAS, especially in patients with pre-existing CMBs. Since the existence of CMBs prior to CAS suggests a latent vascular damage which is vulnerable to hemodynamic stress following CAS, particular attention should be paid to the prevention of intracerebral hemorrhage due to hyperperfusion after CAS.

  3. Penetrating neck injury: Collaterals for another life after ligation of common carotid artery and subclavian artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annu Babu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neck, being not protected by skeleton, is vulnerable to external trauma and injury which involves blood vessels, trachea, esophagus and other endocrine and nervous system organs. Vascular injuries can not only cause potentially life-threatening hemorrhage but also need profound surgical expertise in management. Development of collateral circulation in neck is well known; however, there is scarcity of literature on the role of collateral formation in neck trauma. Here, we present a unique case of penetrating gunshot injury to neck with right common carotid and right subclavian artery injury with hemorrhagic shock managed with ligation of these vessels as a life-saving procedure. The patient presented with no neurological or motor deficits in immediate postoperative period owing to the collateral circulation between right vertebral artery and right common carotid and right subclavian artery.

  4. Carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis on MR angiography: a university hospital-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Kaiji [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Rarely in the anterior circulation, an anastomosis of the carotid and anterior cerebral arteries occurs when an anomalous branch arises from the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery and anastomoses with the A1-A2 junction of the anterior communicating artery. Right-side predominance is known. To our knowledge, the incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis has not been reported, so we researched cases in our institution records to determine incidence and investigated characteristic features of the condition on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. To isolate such cases, we retrospectively reviewed cranial MR angiographic images of 3,491 consecutive patients in our institution. We found three cases with carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis (two men, one woman), representing an incidence of 0.086%. The anastomosis was on the right in all three cases. A normal A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was present in two cases but could not be identified in the remaining case on MR angiographic images that included source images. Two of the three patients demonstrated associated arterial variations in their carotid systems. On MR angiography, we observed a 0.086% incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis in our institution and reaffirmed the right-side predominance of this anomaly. We found a high frequency of other associated arterial variations in the carotid system. (orig.)

  5. Combined interventional and surgical treatment of tandem middle cerebral artery embolus and internal carotid artery occlusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Mark B; Renfrow, Jaclyn J; Singh, Jasmeet; Garg, Nitin; Wolfe, Stacey Q

    2017-11-17

    Tandem internal carotid artery (ICA) origin occlusion and middle cerebral artery (MCA) thromboembolism is a life-threatening condition with poor neurological outcome. The authors report on a patient presenting with acute ischemic stroke from a tandem ICA and MCA occlusion with penumbra. Emergency MCA mechanical thrombectomy was performed through percutaneous cervical ICA access due to the inability to cross the cervical carotid occlusion. Emergency carotid endarterectomy to reperfuse the poorly collateralized hemisphere and repair the ICA access site was performed 2 hours after completion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) infusion. This case illustrates the shortest reported interval between tPA infusion and open surgical intervention for carotid revascularization, as well as the role of direct carotid artery access for mechanical thrombectomy. The authors also describe the use of a temporizing femoral artery-to-ICA shunt to maintain cerebral perfusion in the setting of ICA occlusion.

  6. Increased expression of TFPI in human carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavik, Benedicte; Holm, Sverre; Espada, Sandra; Iversen, Nina; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Bjerkeli, Vigdis; Dahl, Tuva Børresdatter; Sandset, Per Morten; Skjelland, Mona; Espevik, Terje; Skretting, Grethe; Halvorsen, Bente

    2017-07-01

    Tissue factor (TF) pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is the physiological inhibitor of TF induced blood coagulation and two isoforms exists, TFPIα and TFPIβ. In atherosclerotic plaques, TFPI may inhibit TF activity and thrombus formation, which is the main cause of ischemic stroke in carotid artery disease. We aimed to identify the isoforms of TFPI present in human carotid plaques and potential sources of TFPI. Human atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomies were used for mRNA and immunohistochemistry analyses. hPBMCs isolated from buffy coats and THP-1 cells were differentiated and polarized into M1 or M2 macrophages, and subsequently cultured with or without cholesterol crystals (CC). mRNA and protein expression were measured with qRT-PCR and ELISA, respectively, and procoagulant activity was assessed using a two-stage chromogenic assay. TFPIα and TFPIβ mRNA levels were significantly increased in carotid plaques, whereas TF levels were unchanged as compared to healthy arteries. Antibodies against total TFPI showed elevated levels compared to antibodies against free TFPIα, both by immunohistochemical and ELISA detection in plaques. The antibody against total TFPI also co-localized with CD68 and the M1 and M2 markers CD80 and CD163, respectively. The TFPI mRNA expression was elevated and the procoagulant activity was decreased in M2 compared to M1 polarized human macrophages. TFPI was present in early foam cell formation and CC treatment increased the TFPI mRNA expression even further in M2 macrophages. Our data indicate that both isoforms of TFPI are present in advanced plaques and that anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages may be a potential source of TFPI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kidney function during common carotid artery occlusion in anaesthetized cats: influence of vagotomy, constant ventilation, blood pressure stabilization, and carotid body chemoreceptor inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, A; Schmidt, M; Arndt, H; Hanus, U; Kranz, G; Rogoll, I

    1985-01-01

    The reactions of kidney function elicited by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion were studied in six groups of chloralosed cats in which the Nn. vagi, the breathing reaction, the increase of the mean systemic arterial blood pressure, and the carotid body chemoreceptors were excluded successively. Carotid occlusion in the control animals caused a rise of the mean systemic arterial blood pressure, hyperventilation, and an increase in renal sodium and water excretion, resulting from an inhibition of tubular reabsorption. Bilateral cervical vagotomy, relaxation and constant artificial ventilation only slightly modified this renal response. Inactivation of the carotid body chemoreceptors in vagotomized and constantly ventilated cats attenuated the natriuresis due to carotid occlusion regardless of the behaviour of the renal perfusion pressure. On the other hand, keeping the mean arterial blood pressure during carotid occlusion constant by the bleeding technique also reduced the natriuretic reaction. Cats with both inactivated carotid body chemoreceptors and constant renal perfusion pressure exhibited an antinatriuretic reaction during carotid clamping. From these data it is concluded that in narcotized cats the natriuretic response during carotid occlusion is the result of both a stimulation of the carotid body chemoreceptors and the rise of the renal perfusion pressure. In contrast, in dogs this so-called carotid-sinus-polyuria seems to be induced solely by the increase of the systemic arterial blood pressure. The findings additionally indicated that the arterial chemoreceptors may be involved in the physiological daily control of renal sodium excretion already at normal arterial oxygen tension under sea-level conditions.

  8. Ocular and cerebral ischemic mechanisms in disease of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R T; Morrow, I M

    1984-05-01

    Stenosis of the internal carotid artery reduces the flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery. Lowered velocity permits increased red cell aggregation and decreased red cell deformability which increases viscosity. Contrary to the theory of remotely originating emboli, this is an alternate hypothesis regarding transient attacks of ocular and cerebral ischemia. The ophthalmic artery circulation time was measured in two groups of patients. The circulation time was defined as the interval between the appearance of contrast media in the siphon of the internal carotid artery and in the ocular choroid. The measurement was made on 151 angiograms of 108 subjects. These vessels were normal. An additional 76 patients had 108 angiograms which showed various amounts of internal carotid artery stenosis. These 76 patients had transient ischemic attacks; retinal, cerebral, or both. There is a significant difference in the ophthalmic artery circulation time in the two groups. The slowing in the ophthalmic artery is related to the degree of internal carotid artery narrowing. The circulation time in a cerebral branch of the internal carotid was not measured. It is presumed that stenosis of the internal carotid artery would have the same effect on a cerebral artery as on the ophthalmic artery.

  9. Asymptomatic carotid lesions after endarterectomy of contralateral carotid artery. Five-year follow-up study and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Helgstrand, U J; Egeblad, M R

    1987-01-01

    Of 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy five years ago, 135 had a patent asymptomatic contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA). During follow-up (median, 59 months), 36 patients developed new neurologic symptoms (18 strokes and 18 transient ischemic attacks). Thirtee...... of stroke without warning was increased in these subgroups, we did not consider the risk high enough to warrant prophylactic endarterectomy. An exception enough to warrant prophylactic endarterectomy. An exception may be the patient with a more than 90% stenosis....

  10. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Chris L; Fekkes, Stein; Nederveen, Aart J; Manniesing, Rashindra; Hansen, Hendrik Rik H G

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to rupture and thus to induce an ischemic event is directly related to its composition. Consequently, characterization of the plaque composition and its proneness to rupture are of crucial importance for risk assessment and treatment strategies. The carotid is an excellent artery to be imaged with ultrasound because of its superficial position. In this review, ultrasound-based methods for characterizing the mechanical properties of the carotid wall and atherosclerotic plaque are discussed. Using conventional echography, the intima media thickness (IMT) can be quantified. There is a wealth of studies describing the relation between IMT and the risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Also the carotid distensibility can be quantified with ultrasound, providing a surrogate marker for the cross-sectional mechanical properties. Although all these parameters are associated with CVD, they do not easily translate to individual patient risk. Another technique is pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment, which measures the propagation of the pressure pulse over the arterial bed. PWV has proven to be a marker for global arterial stiffness. Recently, an ultrasound-based method to estimate the local PWV has been introduced, but the clinical effectiveness still needs to be established. Other techniques focus on characterization of plaques. With ultrasound elastography, the strain in the plaque due to the pulsatile pressure can be quantified. This technique was initially developed using intravascular catheters to image coronaries, but recently noninvasive methods were successfully developed. A high correlation between the measured strain and the risk for rupture was established. Acoustic

  11. Multimodal optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy of human carotid atheroma

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    Markus Seeger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a main cause of stroke. Understanding atherosclerosis biology is critical in the development of targeted prevention and treatment strategies. Consequently, there is demand for advanced tools investigating atheroma pathology. We consider hybrid optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy for the integrated and complementary interrogation of plaque tissue constituents and their mutual interactions. Herein, we visualize human carotid plaque using a hybrid multimodal imaging system that combines optical resolution optoacoustic (photoacoustic microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy, and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Our data suggest more comprehensive insights in the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and destabilization, by enabling congruent visualization of structural and biological features critical for the atherosclerotic process and its acute complications, such as red blood cells and collagen.

  12. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in patients with severe peripheral vascular diseases

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    Rasoul Mirsharifi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS in the  eneral population is not high enough to justify screening programs. This study was done to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS among patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD.
    • METHODS: Between March 2005 and February 2006, 54 consecutive  atients with severe PVD admitted at a vascular surgery unit and underwent carotid duplex scanning in a prospective study. A  uestionnaire was used to collect data concerning known risk factors. Significant CAS was defined as a stenosis of 70% or greater.
    • RESULTS: The mean age was 62.5 years (51-72. Out of 54 patients, 2 (3.7% had an occluded internal carotid artery. Significant CAS was found in 9 (16.7% and its presence was correlated with diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, coronary artery disease, severity of symptoms, ankle-brachial index, and carotid bruit. On multivariate analysis, only hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit seemed to have independent influence.
    • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of significant ACAS is higher among  atients with severe PVD. This patient population may indicate a  uitable subgroup for screening of ACAS, especially when hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit are present.
    • KEYWORDS: Carotid artery stenosis, duplex ultrasound scanning, peripheral vascular disease, carotid endarterectomy,
    • cerebrovascular accident.

  13. Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Tortuosity and Body Mass Index

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    Hai-Feng Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundExtracranial internal carotid artery (eICA tortuosity may trigger cerebral ischemia, and body mass index (BMI is a measure of body mass based on height and weight. The main purpose of this study is to determine the influence of BMI on the tortuosity of eICA.MethodsA total of 926 carotid artery angiograms were performed in 513 patients, of which 116 cases and matched controls were selected. Arterial tortuosity was defined as simple tortuosity, kinking, or coiling. The severity of tortuosity was measured by tortuosity index, formula: [(actual length/straight-line length − 1 × 100].ResultsBMIs were different between the two groups [tortuosity: 27.06 kg/m2 (SD 2.81 kg/m2 versus none: 23.3 kg/m2 (SD 2.78 kg/m2; p < 0.001]. BMI was independently and significantly associated with eICA tortuosity (odds ratio 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.35–1.86; p < 0.001. eICA tortuosity index is linearly associated with BMI (exponential coefficient β = 1.067, p < 0.001. The optimal predictive threshold of BMI for eICA tortuosity was 25.04 kg/m2. The physiological mechanism underlying the reasons why higher BMI has negative influence on extracranial carotid artery tortuosity may be an intra-abdominal hypertension caused by a much higher amount of body fat stored in visceral adipose tissue.ConclusionOur result reveals a novel role for greater BMI on the presence of eICA tortuosity. For each increase in BMI of 1 kg/m2, there is a corresponding 1.59-fold increase in the risk of developing eICA tortuosity. The severity of eICA tortuosity increases linearly with increased BMI.

  14. MR coil sensitivity inhomogeneity correction for plaque characterization in carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Olivier; Hillenbrand, Claudia; Suri, Jasjit; Wilson, David L.

    2004-05-01

    We are involved in a comprehensive program to characterize atherosclerotic disease using multiple MR images having different contrast mechanisms (T1W, T2W, PDW, magnetization transfer, etc.) of human carotid and animal model arteries. We use specially designed intravascular and surface array coils that give high signal-to-noise but suffer from sensitivity inhomogeneity. With carotid surface coils, challenges include: (1) a steep bias field with an 80% change; (2) presence of nearby muscular structures lacking high frequency information to distinguish bias from anatomical features; (3) many confounding zero-valued voxels subject to fat suppression, blood flow cancellation, or air, which are not subject to coil sensitivity; and (4) substantial noise. Bias was corrected using a modification of the adaptive fuzzy c-mean method reported by Pham et al. (IEEE TMI, 18:738-752), whereby a bias field modeled as a mechanical membrane was iteratively improved until cluster means no longer changed. Because our images were noisy, we added a noise reduction filtering step between iterations and used about 5 classes. In a digital phantom having a bias field measured from our MR system, variations across an area comparable to a carotid artery were reduced from 50% to images were qualitatively improved and large regions of skeletal muscle were relatively flat. Other commonly applied techniques failed to segment the images or introduced strong edge artifacts. Current evaluations include comparisons to bias as measured by a body coil in human MR images.

  15. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

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    Karp Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5% had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test. However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008, as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8% had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test. Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644

  16. Intracranial cerebral artery stenosis with associated coronary artery and extracranial carotid artery stenosis in Turkish patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com; Kizilkilic, Osman; Yildirim, Tulin [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Atalay, Hakan [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Although it has been demonstrated that there is a high prevalence of extracranial carotid artery stenosis (ECAS) in patients with severe coronary artery disease, intracranial cerebral artery stenosis (ICAS) is rarely mentioned. We evaluated the prevalence of ICAS in patients with ECAS having elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery to determine the relations between ICAS, ECAS and atherosclerotic risk factors. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the digital subtraction angiography findings of 183 patients with ECAS {>=} 50% preparing for CABG surgery. The analyses focused on the intracranial or extracranial location and degree of the stenosis. The degree of extracranial stenoses were categorized as normal, <50%, 50-69%, 70-89%, and 90-99% stenosis and occluded. The degree of intracranial stenosis was classified as normal or {<=}25%, 25-49%, and {>=}50% stenosis and occluded. Traditional atherosclerotic risk factors were recorded. Results: ECAS < 70% in 42 patients and ECAS {>=} 70% in 141 patients. ICAS was found in 51 patients and ICAS {>=} 50% in 30 patients. Regarding risk factors, we found hypertension in 135 patients, diabetes mellitus in 91 patients, hyperlipidemia in 84 patients, and smoking in 81 patients. No risk factor was significant predictors of intracranial atherosclerosis. The severity of ICAS was not significantly associated with that of the ECAS. Conclusions: We found ICAS in 27.8% of the patients with ECAS > 50% on digital subtraction angiography preparing for CABG. Therefore a complete evaluation of the neck vessels with magnetic resonance or catheter angiography seems to be indicated as well as intracranial circulation for the risk assessment of CABG.

  17. Modified technique for common carotid artery transposition in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Heidi; Argüelles, David; Gracia-Calvo, Luis A; Raekallio, Marja

    2017-01-01

    To describe a modified technique for permanent translocation of the common carotid artery (CCA) to a subcutaneous position in standing horses. Experimental study. Healthy adult Standardbred and Warmblood horses (n = 8). Surgery was performed with the horses standing under sedation and with local anesthesia. A combination of previously described techniques was used modifying the approach and closure of the incision. The right CCA was approached through a linear skin incision dorsal and parallel to the jugular vein and through the brachiocephalicus and omohyoideus muscles. The artery was dissected free of its sheath and elevated to the skin incision with Penrose drains. The brachiocephalicus muscle was sutured in two layers underneath the artery leaving it in a subcutaneous position. The horses were allowed to heal for 3 weeks prior to catheterization of the artery. The transposed CCA was successfully used for repeated catheterization in six of eight horses for a period of 10 weeks. None of the horses had intraoperative complications. Two horses developed mild peri-incisional edema that resolved spontaneously. Right-sided laryngeal hemiplegia was observed endoscopically in two horses postoperatively. Two horses developed complications (surgical site infection and excessive periarterial fibrosis) that compromised the patency of the CCA and precluded catheterization. Permanent translocation of the CCA in standing horses was successful in six out of eight horses. Upper airway endoscopy postoperatively may be warranted as laryngeal hemiplegia may ensue. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Management and outcomes of carotid artery extension of aortic dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, Adriana; Drucker, Charles B; Harris, Donald G; Flohr, Tanya; Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Sarkar, Rajabrata; Taylor, Bradley; Crawford, Robert S

    2017-08-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is the most common aortic catastrophe. Carotid artery dissection due to extension of AD (CAEAD) is one severe complication of this condition. Despite years of refinement in the techniques for repair of AD, the optimal management strategy for CAEAD remains yet to be described. We hypothesized that CAEAD eventually resolves on antiplatelet therapy with a low but not insignificant risk of cerebrovascular accident (CVA). This was a single-institution retrospective review of patients admitted with nontraumatic coincident aortic and carotid dissection between 2001 and 2013. CAEAD was present in 38 patients (24 men [53%]). The median age was 59.5 years (range, 25-85 years). A Stanford type A AD was diagnosed in 36 patients (95%). CVA or transient ischemic attack was identified in 11 patients (29%). Eight were potentially attributable to the carotid lesion. Two of these eight strokes resulted in death. Of the 11 CVAs and transient ischemic attacks, 8 were evident at presentation, 2 were diagnosed postoperatively during hospitalization, and 1 was diagnosed during early follow-up. Only one of these three postadmission strokes was attributable to the carotid lesion. Nonoperative management of aortic and carotid dissections was pursued in 9 patients (24%), 26 (68%) underwent open repair, and 4 (11%) had endovascular management of AD (2 thoracic endovascular aortic repair, 2 endovascular fenestrations), including 1 patient with a staged hybrid procedure (frozen elephant trunk). There were eight inpatient deaths (21%) and nine deaths in the follow-up period. Of the 30 patients who survived to discharge, 24 (80%) were managed with antiplatelet therapy. At a median follow-up of 14.5 months in 22 patients with follow-up computed tomography scans available, a minority of lesions had resolved, and only one CVA was reported. This study found that CAEAD was associated almost exclusively with type A AD, was typically unilateral, most often on the left, and

  19. Determination of bilateral symmetry of carotid artery structure and function in children and adolescents

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    Uithoven KE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Katelyn E Uithoven,1 Justin R Ryder,2 Roland Z Brown,3 Kyle D Rudser,3 Nicholas G Evanoff,1 Donald R Dengel,1,2 Aaron S Kelly2,4 1School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, 3Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 4Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: The carotid artery represents an ideal location for noninvasive assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in youth. Examination of arterial structure and function is generally conducted in the left common carotid. However, if the left common carotid is inaccessible or provides a poor acoustic window, it is unknown if the right common carotid can provide comparable values. The symmetry of carotid arteries in youth with high-resolution ultrasound was compared. Participants (N=230 [121 females], 13.8±2.9 years old were assessed for carotid intima media thickness (cIMT, carotid lumen diameter (cLD, carotid incremental elastic modulus (cIEM, carotid diameter compliance (cDC, carotid cross-sectional compliance (cCSC, carotid diameter distensibility (cDD, and carotid cross-sectional distensibility (cCSD. No significant differences (P>0.05 all were found for cIMT (0.49±0.09 vs 0.49±0.08 mm, cIEM (1095±382 vs 1116±346 mmHg, cDC (0.01±0.0 vs 0.01±0.0 mm/mmHg, cCSC (0.01±0.001/mmHg vs 0.01±0.001/mmHg, cDD (14.0%±3.16% vs 13.7%±3.18%, and cCSD (30.1%±7.37% vs 29.4%±7.36%. Significant differences were found for cLD (6.06±0.62 mm vs 6.33±0.64 mm, P<0.001. The majority of measures for arterial structure and function are comparable between the left and right common carotid arteries. There were differences present for cLD; however, these discrepancies are likely due to anatomical differences between the left and right common carotid arteries. Therefore, if the left common carotid is unable to be assessed properly, the right common

  20. Long-Term Outcomes of Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting for Carotid Artery Stenosis: Real-World Status in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahori, Taichiro; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Fujita, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Mizowaki, Takashi; Miyake, Shigeru; Kimura, Hidehito; Kohta, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    We investigated long-term outcomes of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS) in our institute to evaluate the outcomes of real-world practice in Japan. Between August 2006 and July 2013, 203 consecutive carotid revascularizations with either CEA or CAS were performed in our institute. The initial treatment was regarded as the starting point in the cases of the patients who received treatment by bilateral carotid artery stenosis or retreatment. We assessed the long-term outcomes with survival analyses. A total of 182 patients (CEA 111, CAS 71), including 86 symptomatic patients, were included in the current study with a mean follow-up period of 42.9 months. The periprocedural stroke/death/myocardial infarction (MI) rate was 3.6% for CEA and 5.6% for CAS groups (P = .71). Estimates of the 4-year event-free rate from the primary end point (the composite of any stroke, death, or MI within 30 days, and any ipsilateral stroke thereafter) using competing risk analysis were 3.6% for CEA and 7.1% for CAS (P = .156). Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 4-year event-free rate from the secondary end point (the composite of any stroke, death, or MI within 30 days, and any stroke or death thereafter) were 13.8% for CEA and 19.1% for CAS (P = .072). Age was the only significant predictor for the primary end point. Both age and CAS were significant predictors for the secondary end point. The current study on real-world practices demonstrated perioperative and long-term outcomes that were comparable to previous major studies of large numbers of patients. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of ultrasound parameters to assess collateral flow via ophthalmic artery in internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomotaka; Doijiri, Ryosuke; Saito, Kozue; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Kotaro; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the flow patterns using ultrasound (US) in the external carotid artery (ECA) in patients with total occlusion of internal carotid artery (ICA) and characterize collateral retrograde flow through the ophthalmic artery (OA, secondary collateral, internalization). This study was performed on 45 patients who were retrospectively selected with total occlusion of the ICA, who underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and US (43 men; mean age 68.1 ± 7.9 years). Collateral retrograde flow and collateral flow through the circle of Willis (primary collateral) were determined by DSA and MRA. We compared several US parameters such as ECA peak systolic velocity, mean velocity, end-diastolic (ED) velocity, pulsatility index (PI), and pulsatility transmission index (PTI). PTI was defined as the ratio of ipsilateral ECA PI to the ipsilateral common carotid artery (CCA). In this patient group, 27 patients showed retrograde flow through OA as assessed by DSA. The presence of primary collateral flow was significantly lower in patients with retrograde flow than without (P ECA ED velocity was significantly higher, and PI and PTI were significantly lower with retrograde flow through OA than without (P ECA because a collateral pathway through OA in cases of ICA occlusion had less primary collateral pathways. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation of dental pulp stones, carotid artery and renal calcifications using digital panoramic radiography and ultrasonography

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    Garima Yeluri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human tissues continuously undergo modification as deposition of calcium (CA salts either in an organized or disorganized pattern. The latter pattern usually occurs in the soft tissues such as in arteries, brain, kidneys, lungs, and dental pulp. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification (CDC as a marker for renal calcification and altered serum biomarkers such as serum CA, phosphorus (P, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 50 patients with the presence of pulp stones and suspected CAC were subjected to carotid artery and renal ultrasonography (USG examination for the presence of vascular calcification and also to evaluate the alterations in serum CA, P, and ALP levels. Data were analyzed statistically using Chi-square test. Results: Panoramic radiographs of 50 patients showed 88.28% of teeth with the presence of pulp stones stones and 91% carotid arteries with calcification. The sensitivity of panoramic radiograph was greater than that of USG (93.67%, but the specificity of USG was more than the panoramic radiograph (44.44% in detecting CAC. The prevalence rate of renal calcification on USG was 92%. The statistical difference between the patients with or without alteration in serum Ca levels was not significant (χ2 = 0.581 and P = 0.446. On comparison of serum P and ALP, the difference was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Presence of pulp stones and CAC's on panoramic radiograph have remarkably proved to establish the chances of renal artery calcification associated with alterations in serum CA levels.

  3. Early results after synchronous carotid stent placement and coronary artery bypass graft in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Juan Guillermo; Rojas, Kristin E; Balestrini, Carlos; Espinel, Camilo; Figueredo, Antonio; Saaibi, Jose Federico; Machuca, Santiago; Murcia, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    The optimal management of patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease requiring cardiac surgery is still unknown. Staged carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting (CAS), each followed by coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), are options frequently employed. However, for patients with severe carotid artery disease in urgent need of open cardiac revascularization, staged operations may not be the most appropriate alternative. The aim of this study was to describe our experience using a synchronous CAS-CABG method with minimal interprocedural time. We used this synchronous combination of procedures in patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease admitted for urgent CABG. Patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease scheduled for synchronous CAS and urgent CABG between December 2006 and January 2010 were included in the study. All procedures were performed at a single center: the Cardiovascular Foundation of Colombia, in Floridablanca, Santander, Colombia. The study cohort was characterized according to demographic and clinical characteristics, which included degree of carotid stenosis, presence/absence of preoperative neurological symptoms, and cardiac operative risk profile. All patients underwent CAS under embolic protection devices and then CABG within the next 2 hours. Patients received aspirin pre- and postprocedure but were started on clopidogrel only after CABG. The primary end point of the study was the composite incidence rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death 30 days after CAS-CABG. Fifteen patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease underwent synchronous CAS-CABG. Most patients (60%) were men, and mean (± standard deviation) age was 65.2 (± 8.4) years. Most patients (93%) were neurologically asymptomatic. The median (interquartile range) ejection fraction and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) for the cohort were 55% (36

  4. Tortuous Common Carotid Artery: A Report of Four Cases Observed in Cadaveric Dissections

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    Joe Iwanaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A tortuous common carotid artery poses a high risk of injury during tracheotomy. Preoperative diagnosis is therefore important to avoid serious complications. We found four cases of tortuous common carotid artery during an anatomical dissection course for students. The first case was a 91-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 2 was a 78-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries without arteriosclerosis. Case 3 was an 86-year-old woman who died from bladder cancer and who also had a right tortuous common carotid artery without arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was an 89-year-old woman who had bilateral tortuous common carotid arteries and a tortuous brachiocephalic artery with severe arteriosclerosis. Case 4 was also examined using computed tomography to evaluate the arteriosclerosis. Computed tomography revealed severe calcification of the vascular wall, which was confirmed in the aortic arch and origins of its branches. In all four cases, the tortuosity was located below the level of the thyroid gland. Based on prior study results indicating that fusion between the carotid sheath and visceral fascia was often evident at the level of the thyroid gland, we speculated that the major region in which tortuosity occurs is at the same level or inferior to the level of the thyroid gland.

  5. Carotid artery B-mode ultrasound image segmentation based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarya, I. Made Gede; Yuniarno, Eko Mulyanto; Purnomo, Mauridhi Hery; Sardjono, Tri Arief; Sunu, Ismoyo; Purnama, I. Ketut Eddy

    2017-06-01

    Carotid Artery (CA) is one of the vital organs in the human body. CA features that can be used are position, size and volume. Position feature can used to determine the preliminary initialization of the tracking. Examination of the CA features can use Ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging can be operated dependently by an skilled operator, hence there could be some differences in the images result obtained by two or more different operators. This can affect the process of determining of CA. To reduce the level of subjectivity among operators, it can determine the position of the CA automatically. In this study, the proposed method is to segment CA in B-Mode Ultrasound Image based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction. This study consists of three steps, the data collection, preprocessing and artery segmentation. The data used in this study were taken directly by the researchers and taken from the Brno university's signal processing lab database. Each data set contains 100 carotid artery B-Mode ultrasound image. Artery is modeled using ellipse with center c, major axis a and minor axis b. The proposed method has a high value on each data set, 97% (data set 1), 73 % (data set 2), 87% (data set 3). This segmentation results will then be used in the process of tracking the CA.

  6. The carotid baroreflex is reset following prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, E. C.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, N. H.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of arterial pressure may explain the reduction in arterial pressure and left ventricular (LV) function after prolonged exercise. We examined the CBR control of heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), in addition to changes in LV functi...

  7. Endovascular treatment with angioplasty or stenting versus endarterectomy in patients with carotid artery stenosis in the Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty Study (CAVATAS): long-term follow-up of a randomised trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    Endovascular treatment (angioplasty with or without stenting) is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy for carotid artery stenosis but there are scarce long-term efficacy data showing that it prevents stroke. We therefore report the long-term results of the Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty Study (CAVATAS).

  8. Immediate versus delayed treatment for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis

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    Vladimir Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The timing of surgery for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis remains controversial. Early cerebral revascularization may prevent a disabling or fatal ischemic recurrence, but it may also increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation, or of dislodging a thrombus. This review examined the randomized controlled evidence that addressed whether the increased risk of recurrent events outweighed the increased benefit of an earlier intervention. OBJECTIVES: To assess the risks and benefits of performing very early cerebral revascularization (within two days compared with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register in January 2016, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to 26 January 2016, EMBASE (1974 to 26 January 2016, LILACS (1982 to 26 January 2016, and trial registers (from inception to 26 January 2016. We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, and searched reference lists. There were no language restrictions. We contacted colleagues and pharmaceutical companies to identify further studies and unpublished trials Selection criteria: All completed, truly randomized trials (RCT that compared very early cerebral revascularization (within two days with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Data collection and analysis: We independently selected trials for inclusion according to the above criteria, assessed risk of bias for each trial, and performed data extraction. We utilized an intention-to-treat analysis strategy. MAIN RESULTS: We identified one RCT that involved 40 participants, and addressed the timing of surgery for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. It compared very early surgery with surgery performed after 14 days of

  9. A giant internal carotid artery aneurysm: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilcan Kotan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms greater than 2.5 cm in diameter are classified as giant aneurysms and represent 5-8% of all intracranial aneurysms. Giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrates the clinical course with symptoms related to subarachnoid haemorrhage, mass effect, thromboembolism and seizures. Not only because of their large sizes, but also because of their usually wide and calcified aneurysm neck, existing thrombus within and its proximity to cranial nerves; giant aneurysms causes serious surgical difficulties. Giant aneurysms of the anterior intracranial circulation are rare, slowly progressive vascular abnormalities, often presenting with neuro-ophthalmological symptoms before they rupture. Herein, a case of 77-year-old woman with a giant aneurysm originated from intracavernous segment of internal carotid artery detected in magnetic resonance angiography who presented symptoms due to affected multiple cranial nerves related to mass effect.

  10. Delayed presentation of carotid artery dissection following major orthopaedic trauma resulting in dense hemiparesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Edmundson, S P

    2012-01-31

    We report a 30-year-old patient who was involved in a high-velocity road traffic accident and developed a left-sided hemiparesis, which was noted in the post-operative period following bilateral femoral intramedullary nailing. CT scanning of the brain revealed infarcts in the right frontal and parietal lobes in the distribution of the right middle cerebral artery. CT angiography showed occlusion of the right internal carotid artery consistent with internal carotid artery dissection. He was anticoagulated and nine months later was able to walk independently. An awareness of this injury is needed to diagnose blunt trauma to the internal carotid artery. Even in the absence of obvious neck trauma, carotid artery dissection should be suspected in patients with a neurological deficit in the peri-operative period.

  11. [Anatomic variations of the internal carotid artery: implications for the neurologic endovascular therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Marco; Leeb, Angel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Tortuosity of the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) can hinder navigation intravascular devices for treating intracranial aneurysms and even complex ICA access techniques can fail. Variations in the course of the internal carotid artery are known as coiling, kinking or tortuosity of the vessel. Such failures have clinical relevance. During endovascular procedures these anomalies difficult the intravascular surgical procedure. A potential alternative is the reconstruction of these anatomic anomalies of the carotid artery using neuro-interventional methods. We present a practical review of the literature.

  12. How safe is eptifibatide during urgent carotid artery stenting?

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    Hesham eAllam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycoprotein IIB/IIIA inhibitors are occasionally utilized during carotid artery stenting (CAS in the presence or absence of a visualized intra-operative thrombus. Objective: We assess the hemorrhagic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of eptifibatide during CAS.Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on patients with the diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis underwent CAS in a single center. We identified those who received intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively and compared to the rest of the cohort. Hemorrhagic outcomes included intracerebral hemorrhage or groin hematoma that occurred during the hospital stay. Results: In this analysis, 81 patients had CAS during a 3-year span; 16 of those had received 15 mg of intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively. The mean age of the treated and untreated patients was similar (65.6 ± 13.4 versus 65.4 ± 10.2; P = 0.13. One patient (1.2% in this series had intracerebral hemorrhage in the perioperative period that occurred in the non-eptifibatide group. Five patients (6.2% in this series had groin hematoma; only one in the non-eptifibatide group required surgical repair. No mortality was reported and clinical outcomes including discharge modified Rankin scale, NIH stroke scale, as well as discharge destination were similar in both groups. A stratified analysis among those who underwent an urgent CAS showed no significant differences in the risks of hemorrhages or any clinical outcome (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The use of eptifibatide during CAS is safe. The risk of any hemorrhagic complication is rare in this series; however, a prospective study to validate this observation will be helpful.

  13. How Safe is Eptifibatide during Urgent Carotid Artery Stenting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Hesham; Vora, Nirav; Edgell, Randall C; Callison, R Charles; Al Khalili, Yasser; Storkan, Michelle; Alshekhlee, Amer

    2013-01-01

    Glycoprotein IIB/IIIA inhibitors are occasionally utilized during carotid artery stenting (CAS) in the presence or absence of a visualized intra-operative thrombus. We assess the hemorrhagic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of eptifibatide during CAS. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on patients with the diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis underwent CAS in a single center. We identified those who received intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively and compared to the rest of the cohort. Hemorrhagic outcomes included intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or groin hematoma that occurred during the hospital stay. In this analysis, 81 patients had CAS during a 3-year span; 16 of those had received 15 mg of intravenous eptifibatide intra-operatively. The mean age of the treated and untreated patients was similar (65.6 ± 13.4 versus 65.4 ± 10.2; P = 0.13). One patient (1.2%) in this series had ICH in the perioperative period that occurred in the non-eptifibatide group. Five patients (6.2%) in this series had groin hematoma; only one in the non-eptifibatide group required surgical repair. No mortality was reported and clinical outcomes including discharge modified Rankin scale, NIH stroke scale, as well as discharge destination were similar in both groups. A stratified analysis among those who underwent an urgent CAS showed no significant differences in the risks of hemorrhages or any clinical outcome (P > 0.05). The use of eptifibatide during CAS is safe. The risk of any hemorrhagic complication is rare in this series; however, a prospective study to validate this observation will be helpful.

  14. Persistent dorsal ophthalmic artery arising from the internal carotid artery: Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Hwan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Normally, the ophthalmic artery (OA) arises from the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and enters the orbit via the optic canal. A persistent dorsal OA is a rare variation that originates from the cavernous segment of the ICA and enters the orbit via the superior orbital fissure. To the best of our knowledge, persistent dorsal OA has not been described in the Korean literature. In this paper, we report three cases of persistent dorsal OA with review of the literature on embryogenesis and other origins of the OA.

  15. Angioplasty of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis with intraluminal thrombus: therapeutic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Mayol, A. [Seccion de Neurorradiologia Intervencionista, Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Gil-Peralta, A.; Gonzalez-Marcos, J.R. [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Boza, F. [Servicio de Neurofisiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Ruano, J. [Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain)

    2004-04-01

    Intraluminal thrombus in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is usually found in patients with severe atheromatous stenosis. Having reviewed 300 carotid angioplasties for symptomatic >70% ICA stenosis, we found three patients (1%) with intraluminal thrombus. Conservative treatment with anticoagulants and double antiplatelet coverage can result in lysis of the thrombus without severe risks. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting, preferably with distal protection, can be an excellent alternative to carotid endarterectomy. (orig.)

  16. Association between Carotid Artery Stenosis and Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yue

    Full Text Available To investigate potential associations between carotid artery stenosis and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke and to provide important clinical implications. We measured the degree of carotid artery stenosis and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE at admission in 3116 acute ischemic stroke patients. The association between carotid stenosis and cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE was tested using multivariate regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. After adjusting for age, gender, education level, marriage, alcohol use, tobacco use, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, we found that participants with high-grade stenosis of the carotid artery had a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment compared to those without carotid artery stenosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.05-2.11, p<0.001. Left common carotid artery stenosis was associated with cognitive impairment in the univariate analysis, although this effect did not persist after adjustment for the NIHSS score. Cognitive impairment was associated with high-grade stenosis of the right carotid artery.

  17. Covered Stent-Graft Treatment of a Postoperative Common Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Onur; Celtikci, Pinar; Canyigit, Murat; Birgi, Erdem; Hidiroglu, Mete; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracranial carotid artery pseudoaneurysms are rare cases resulting from trauma, mycotic infection, head and neck carcinomas or complications related to their treatment. Trauma is the most common cause of carotid artery pseudoaneurysms. They can also present after surgery, most commonly following endarterectomy, which is a rare cause with an estimated incidence of 0.3–0.6%. Case Report A 26-year-old male patient was admitted with swelling in his left neck after left carotid endarterectomy. Angiography confirmed pseudoaneursym in the left carotid bulb and it was treated successfully with two heparin-bonded covered stent grafts. Conclusions Endovascular treatment of carotid pseudoaneurysms with covered stent-grafts is a safe and efficient method providing definitive arterial reconstruction. But series with longer follow-up periods are needed to evaluate patient compatibility to lifelong antiplatelet theraphy. PMID:25279023

  18. Validation of a basic neurosonology laboratory for detecting cervical carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz Cosme, C; Dawid Milner, M S; Ojeda Burgos, G; Gallardo Tur, A; Márquez Martínez, M; Segura, T

    2017-03-24

    Most of the cases of ischaemic stroke in our setting are of atherothrombotic origin. Detecting intracranial and cervical carotid artery stenosis in patients with ischaemic stroke is therefore essential. Ultrasonography has become the tool of choice for diagnosing carotid artery stenosis because it is both readily accessibility and reliable. However, use of this technique must be validated in each laboratory. The purpose of this study is to validate Doppler ultrasound in our laboratory as a means of detecting severe carotid artery stenosis. We conducted an observational descriptive study to evaluate diagnostic tests. The results from transcranial and cervical carotid Doppler ultrasound scans conducted by neurologists were compared to those from carotid duplex scans performed by radiologists in patients diagnosed with stroke. Arteriography was considered the gold standard (MR angiography, CT angiography, or conventional arteriography). Our sample included 228 patients. Transcranial and cervical carotid Doppler ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 100% for detection of carotid artery stenosis > 70%, whereas carotid duplex displayed a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 94%. Transcranial carotid Doppler ultrasound achieved a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 98% for detection of intracranial stenosis. Doppler ultrasound in our neurosonology laboratory was found to be a useful diagnostic tool for detecting cervical carotid artery stenosis and demonstrated superiority to carotid duplex despite the lack of B-mode. Furthermore, this technique was found to be useful for detecting intracranial stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurofibromatosis-associated massive right internal carotid artery aneurysm with a coexisting arteriovenous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlin Wayne Causey, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old woman presented with a right cervical mass that had been slowly enlarging for 6 years, causing pulsatile tinnitus and dizziness with compression. Computed tomography angiography demonstrated a partially thrombosed 8-cm right internal carotid artery aneurysm with a coexisting arteriovenous fistula. Conventional angiography demonstrated a vertebrojugular fistula (right vertebral artery to right internal jugular vein and retrograde flow in the right vertebral artery to the fistula. Successful repair was performed in a staged fashion: operative repair of the internal carotid artery aneurysm with interposition bypass, followed by endovascular embolization of the vertebrojugular fistula through a bilateral vertebral artery approach.

  20. Large aneurysm in a nonbifurcating cervical carotid artery: an aneurysm associated with a rare anomaly treated with radial artery graft bypass: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Joji; Yoshida, Kensaku; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Oishi, Hidenori; Arai, Hajime

    2011-03-01

    A nonbifurcating cervical carotid artery is an extremely rare type of carotid artery anomaly. We present a patient with a nonbifurcating cervical carotid artery and a large aneurysm of the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was successfully treated with combined microsurgical and endovascular techniques. We describe this case with reference to the relevant literature. A 66-year-old woman with progressive left external ocular movement dysfunction was found to have a large left cavernous ICA aneurysm. Serial magnetic resonance angiography revealed progressive growth of the lesion. In addition, conventional angiography showed a nonbifurcating cervical carotid artery and a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. The aneurysm was found unsuitable for direct surgery because of its size and location and for endovascular intervention because of extreme tortuosity of both carotid and right vertebral arteries. Surgery was performed in 2 stages. First, we performed an extracranial-intracranial high-flow bypass using radial artery graft, followed by proximal occlusion of the carotid artery. As the second stage, the patient underwent intravascular parent artery occlusion via the radial artery graft bypass to approach the intracranial carotid artery. The carotid artery was successfully coil embolized, and the aneurysm was undetectable on a postprocedure angiogram. Serial follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed thrombosis of the aneurysm. We report a rare case that involves the novel use of the radial artery graft bypass as an approach for parent vessel occlusion.

  1. Long-term outcome of endovascular treatment versus medical care for carotid artery stenosis in patients not suitable for surgery and randomised in the Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty study (CAVATAS).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Optimal treatment of carotid stenosis in patients not suitable for surgery is unclear. The Carotid and Vertebral Artery Transluminal Angioplasty study contained a trial comparing medical and endovascular treatment in patients not suitable for surgery.

  2. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a

  3. Technical options for treatment of in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourier, Vanessa E C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413970310; de Borst, Gert J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151

    2016-01-01

    Objective This review summarizes the available evidence and analyzes the current trends on treatments for carotid in-stent restenosis (ISR) after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Methods An update of a 2010 review of the literature (which included 20 articles) was conducted using PubMed and Embase.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule Accelerates Reendothelialization after Carotid Artery Balloon Injury in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing Song; Chen, Yang Xin; Huang, Qing Sheng; Deng, Bing Qing; Xie, Shuang Lun; Wang, Jing Feng; Nie, Ru Qiong

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM-2), a novel carbon monoxide carrier, on the reendothelialization of carotid artery in rat endothelial denudation model. Male rats subjected to carotid artery balloon injury were treated with CORM-2, inactive CORM-2 (iCORM-2) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The reendothelialization capacity was evaluated by Evans Blue dye and the immunostaining with anti-CD31 antibody. The number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was detected by flow cytometry. The proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were assessed by using [3H]thymidine, Boyden chamber and human fibronectin respectively. The expressions of protein were detected by using western blot analysis. CORM-2 remarkably accelerated the re-endothelialization 5 d later and inhibited neointima formation 28 d later. In addition, the number of peripheral EPCs significantly increased in CORM-2-treated rats than that in iCORM-2 or DMSO-treated rats after 5 d later. In vitro experiments, CORM-2 significantly enhanced the proliferation, migration and adhesion of HUVECs. The levels of Akt, eNOS phosphorylation, and NO generation in HUVECs were also much higher in CORM-2 treated group. Blocking of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway markedly suppressed the enhanced migration and adhesion of HUVECs induced by CORM-2. CORM-2 could promote endothelial repair, and inhibit neointima formation after carotid artery balloon injury, which might be associated with the function changes of HUVECs regulated by PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  5. [Surgical treatment of tumors of the carotid body with reconstruction of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reparaz, L; Magallón, P; Riera, L; Capilla, M T; Merino, M J; Martínez, I; Hernández, A; Sáez, L; Alamo, O; Jiménez Cossío, J A

    1990-01-01

    The experience about treatment in infiltrating tumors of Carotid Corpus, III Degree (Shamblin), is presented. Different methods of carotid reconstruction, and biologic and evolutive characteristics are emphasized, discussing preoperatory study and surgical technics.

  6. "Classical Blalock-Taussig shunt" gone wrong: Confusing the right common carotid with right subclavian artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mohammed Idhrees

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl underwent classical Blalock-Taussig shunt at 5 months of age. Computed tomography evaluation showed "Adachi type H" pattern of aortic arch vessels with the right common carotid artery being anastomosed to the right pulmonary artery mistaking it for the right subclavian artery.

  7. Incidentally diagnosed Takayasu arteritis on thyroid ultrasonography showing prominent collateral vessels of thyroidal arteries and common carotid artery occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Se Jin; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We report a case of middle-aged woman incidentally diagnosed with Takayasu arteritis during the ultrasonography of a thyroid gland nodule. Prominent collaterals of the thyroidal arteries and a thin common carotid artery with mural thickening and deficient intraluminal flow signals were initially depicted on the ultrasonography with color Doppler. Subsequent magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography aortography confirmed the diagnosis with the imaging features of a bilateral long segment common carotid artery occlusion and segmental stenosis of the left subclavian artery in addition to the suggestive physical findings.

  8. Correlation of dental pulp stones, carotid artery and renal calcifications using digital panoramic radiography and ultrasonography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garima Yeluri; C Kumar; Namita Raghav

    2015-01-01

    ...), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 50 patients with the presence of pulp stones and suspected CAC were subjected to carotid artery and renal ultrasonography (USG...

  9. Semi-automatic quantitative measurements of intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis and calcification using CT angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Leslie; Marquering, Henk A.; van den Berg, René; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Majoie, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke. However, its quantitative assessment is not routinely performed in clinical practice. In this diagnostic study, we present and evaluate a novel semi-automatic application to quantitatively measure

  10. Medical decision-making system of ultrasound carotid artery intima-media thickness using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhiyakumari, N; Rajendran, P; Madheswaran, M

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and implement a medical decision-making system for an automated diagnosis and classification of ultrasound carotid artery images. The proposed method categorizes the subjects into normal, cerebrovascular, and cardiovascular diseases. Two contours are extracted for each and every preprocessed ultrasound carotid artery image. Two types of contour extraction techniques and multilayer back propagation network (MBPN) system have been developed for classifying carotid artery categories. The results obtained show that MBPN system provides higher classification efficiency, with minimum training and testing time. The outputs of decision support system are validated with medical expert to measure the actual efficiency. MBPN system with contour extraction algorithms and preprocessing scheme helps in developing medical decision-making system for ultrasound carotid artery images. It can be used as secondary observer in clinical decision making.

  11. Doses to Carotid Arteries After Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M.V.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2013-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at an increased risk of stroke because of carotid artery irradiation. However, for early-stage HL involved node radiation therapy (INRT) reduces the volume of normal tissue exposed to high doses. Here, we evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D......-CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy (PT) delivered as INRT along with the extensive mantle field (MF) by comparing doses to the carotid arteries and corresponding risk estimates....

  12. Mycotic Aneurysm of External Carotid Artery following Traumatic Brain Injury: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Derakhshan, Nima; Malekmohammadi, Zahed; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysm of external carotid artery is extremely rare. We herein report a case of external carotid artery (ECA) aneurysm following severe traumatic brain injury. A 24-year-old man with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a car accident was referred to Rajaee Trauma Center Emergency Room affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran. He underwent ventriculostomy on arrival for intracerebral pressure (ICP) monitoring and for a second time due to hydroceph...

  13. Bayes Clustering and Structural Support Vector Machines for Segmentation of Carotid Artery Plaques in Multicontrast MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of carotid artery plaque in MR images is not only a key part but also an essential step for in vivo plaque analysis. Due to the indistinct MR images, it is very difficult to implement the automatic segmentation. Two kinds of classification models, that is, Bayes clustering and SSVM, are introduced in this paper to segment the internal lumen wall of carotid artery. The comparative experimental results show the segmentation performance of SSVM is better than Bayes.

  14. Circle of Willis Collateral During Temporary Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion II: Observations From Computed Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bill Hao; Leung, Andrew; Lownie, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    The Circle of Willis (CoW) is the most effective collateral circulation to the brain during internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. Carotid stump pressure (CSP) is an established surrogate measure of the cerebral collateral circulation. This study aims to use hemodynamic and computed tomography angiography measurements to determine the strongest influences upon the dependent variable, CSP. These findings could help clinicians noninvasively assess the adequacy of the collateral circulation and facilitate surgical risk assessment in an outpatient setting. CSP and mean arterial pressure were measured during carotid endarterectomy or during carotid balloon test occlusion in 92 patients. Intracranial arterial diameters were measured on computed tomography angiography at 16 different locations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the key factors associated with CSP. In a subgroup of individuals (n=27) with severe (>70% North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial) contralateral stenosis or occlusion, the same analysis was performed. The contralateral anterior cerebral artery proximal to anterior communicating artery (A1) of the CoW had the strongest influence upon CSP, followed by the mean arterial pressure, the contralateral ICA diameter, and the anterior communicating artery diameter (R 2=0.364). In the subgroup with high-grade contralateral ICA stenosis, the ipsilateral posterior communicating artery exerted the strongest influence (R 2=0.620). During ICA occlusion, the anterior CoW dominates in preserving collateral flow, especially the contralateral A1 segment. In individuals with high-grade contralateral carotid stenosis, the posterior communicating artery calibre becomes a dominant influence. The most favourable anatomy consists of large contralateral A1 and anterior communicating arteries, and no contralateral carotid stenosis.

  15. A systematic review of outcomes in patients with staged carotid artery stenting and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Luis A; Costa, Marco A; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Zenni, Martin; Wludyka, Peter; Silliman, Scott; Bass, Theodore A

    2008-02-01

    Although current guidelines state that carotid endarterectomy is probably recommended before or concomitant to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with carotid stenosis, significant controversies to this recommendation still persist. Carotid artery stenting has been recently introduced as an alternative revascularization modality in high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to define, based on the published information, if carotid artery stenting is beneficial in this setting. A search of MEDLINE and a manual search of the literature from selected articles were performed. A total of 6 studies with 277 patients reporting carotid stenting followed by staged CABG were available for this clinical outcome analysis. All were retrospective and single-center studies. The mean age was 69 years; 78% were males. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis was present in 76% of patients. The mean time to CABG was 32 days. The incidence of stroke and death associated with the stent procedure was 4.7%. Only 6 patients (2.2%) developed stroke associated with CABG. The overall combined 30-day event rate after CABG, including all events during carotid artery stenting, were as follows: minor stroke, 2.9%; major stroke, 3.2%; mortality, 7.6%; and combined death and any stroke, 12.3%. In this pooled analysis, the combined incidence of death and stroke in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting and staged CABG remains elevated. These results confirm that the presence of carotid stenosis is per se a marker of risk that might persists independent of its treatment. A systematic or randomized evaluation appears warranted.

  16. Treatment Planning for Minimizing Carotid Artery Dose in the Radiotherapy of Early Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Nam, Ji Ho; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Park, Dal; Kim, Dong Won [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To examine the feasibility of the treatment planning for minimizing carotid artery dose in the radiotherapy of early glottic cancer. From 2007 to 2010, computed tomography simulation images of 31 patients treated by radiotherapy for early glottic cancer were analyzed. The virtual planning was used to compare the parallel-opposing fields (POF) with the modified oblique fields (MOF) placed at angles to exclude the ipsilateral carotid arteries. Planning target volume (PTV), irradiated volume, carotid artery, and spinal cord were analyzed at a mean dose, V{sub 35}, V{sub 40}, V{sub 50} and with a percent dose-volume. The beam angles were arranged 25 degrees anteriorly in 23 patients and 30 degrees anteriorly in 8 patients. The percent dose-volume of PTV shows no statistical difference. Conversely, the cumulative percent dose-volume of carotid artery shows the significant difference (p<0.001). The mean doses of carotid artery were 38.5 Gy for POF and 26.3 Gy for MOF and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.012). Similarly, V{sub 35}, V{sub 40}, and V{sub 50} also showed significant differences between POF and MOF. The modified oblique field was respected to prevent a carotid artery stenosis and reduce the incidence of a stroke based on these results.

  17. Prevalence of calcified carotid artery on panoramic radiographs in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Beigom Taheri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of calcified carotid artery in 50 year-old and older postmenopausal dental outpatients for early diagnosis of individuals at risk of stroke. Materials and methods. This is a descriptive study of 200 panoramic radiographs. These radiographs included postmenopausal women referring to the Department of Oral Medicine at Shahid Beheshti Faculty of Dentistry during 2006-2007. The x-ray machine, developer and film type were the same for all the radiographs. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test. Results. We found 22 calcified carotid arteries. The left and right carotid arteries were involved in 7 and 9 cases, respectively. In 6 cases both carotid arteries were calcified. Four individuals had no vascular risk factor excluding age and others had at least one risk factor. We found significant statistical correlation between hypertension, past history of myocardial infarction, and hypercholesterolemia with calcified carotid artery on panoramic radiographs. Conclusion. Under the limitations of the present study, prevalence of calcified carotid arteries is 11.0 % in 50 year-old and older postmenopausal dental outpatients.

  18. A study on the carotid artery ultrasonography for the metabolic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Hye Jung; Cho, Pyong Kon [Dept. of Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Han [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic University Hospital of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The primary goal of this study was to ascertain the primary factors to the affect for the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and other risks can possibly influence the carotid artery IMT. All patients data (total specimens: 289, male: 197, female: 92) including the carotid artery ultrasonography examination. The all data were analyzed by the use of SPSS software, version 21.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL USA), with the descriptive statistics method. The Results of this study was found to be highly increased in the males than the females. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in all of the participants was 30.5 percentages. The carotid artery IMT in the subjects with metabolic syndrome was significantly high in both genders, compared to the rest, who were without metabolic syndrome. The Pearsons correlation coefficient of metabolic syndrome and CIMT was 0.378(p<0.01). In conclusions, the present study also supports the association between the carotid artery IMT and the metabolic syndromes with cardiovascular risk factors. Usage of B-mode ultrasonography to measure the carotid artery IMT was found to be highly effective in the current analysis.

  19. Assessing the blood pressure waveform of the carotid artery using an ultrasound image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Dept. of Medical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saben, Hazhir [Dept. Radiology, Imaging Center of Imam Khomaini Hospital, Tehran Medical Sciences University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and implement a noninvasive method to derive the carotid artery pressure waveform directly by processing diagnostic sonograms of the carotid artery. Ultrasound image sequences of 20 healthy male subjects (age, 36±9 years) were recorded during three cardiac cycles. The internal diameter and blood velocity waveforms were extracted from consecutive sonograms over the cardiac cycles by using custom analysis programs written in MATLAB. Finally, the application of a mathematical equation resulted in time changes of the arterial pressure. The resulting pressures were calibrated using the mean and the diastolic pressure of the radial artery. A good correlation was found between the mean carotid blood pressure obtained from the ultrasound image processing and the mean radial blood pressure obtained using a standard digital sphygmomanometer (R=0.91). The mean absolute difference between the carotid calibrated pulse pressures and those measured clinically was -1.333±6.548 mm Hg. The results of this study suggest that consecutive sonograms of the carotid artery can be used for estimating a blood pressure waveform. We believe that our results promote a noninvasive technique for clinical applications that overcomes the reproducibility problems of common carotid artery tonometry with technical and anatomical causes.

  20. Successful Coil Embolization of Pediatric Carotid Cavernous Fistula Due to Ruptured Posttraumatic Giant Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Hun Soo; Yokoyama, Shohei; Wada, Takeshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is to occlude the arteriovenous shunt and to preserve the patency of the concerned internal carotid artery. However, for the ipsilateral posttraumatic fragile cerebrum, coil embolization plus parent artery occlusion for the high-flow direct CCF is better for the prevention of hyperperfusion syndrome and intracranial hemorrhage. We experienced such a case and managed it successfully. A 6-year-old boy had severe head trauma caused by being hit by a car. He was transferred to our department and diagnosed as having left acute subdural hematoma and acute brain swelling. Emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed. He was treated for severe brain swelling in the intensive care unit for 2 months. Cranioplasty was performed 3 months after the injury. His right hemiparesis and aphasia persisted, so he was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. However, 2 years after the head injury, he was referred to our department because of abducens nerve palsy. He was diagnosed as having a symptomatic posttraumatic direct CCF, which was caused by a ruptured left cavernous giant internal carotid artery aneurysm. The direct CCF was treated with coil embolization of the giant aneurysm and parent artery occlusion. Coil embolization of the aneurysm and parent artery occlusion for the posttraumatic direct CCF was a good option to manage the abducens nerve palsy and to prevent postoperative hyperperfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Internal carotid artery dissection following chiropractic treatment in a pregnant woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Adam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of internal carotid artery dissection in a pregnant woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE immediately following chiropractic treatment is presented. The literature regarding complications of neck manipulation during pregnancy, spontaneous dissection of craniocervical arteries in pregnancy and the postpartum period, and dissection of craniocervical arteries in SLE are reviewed. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first case of carotid artery dissection following chiropractic treatment in a pregnant woman published in the literature.

  2. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

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    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  3. The Impact of Carotid Artery Stenting on Cerebral Perfusion, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients

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    Tao Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeAsymptomatic carotid artery stenosis can lead to not only stroke but also cognition impairment. Although it has been proven that carotid artery stenting (CAS can reduce the risk of future strokes, the effect of CAS on cognition is conflicting. In recent years, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL MRI and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI have been employed in cognitive impairment studies. For the present study, cognition is evaluated in severe asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing CAS, and the mechanisms underlying the cognitive change are explored by pASL MRI and R-fMRI.Materials and methodsWe prospectively enrolled 24 asymptomatic, severe (≥70%, unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis patients, who were expecting the intervention of CAS. Cognition assessment (including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Minimum Mental State Examination, the Digit Symbol Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Verbal Memory Test and an integrated MRI program (pASL MRI, and R-fMRI were administered 7 days before and 3 months after CAS.Results16 subjects completed the follow-up study. After stenting, significant improvement in the scores of the MMSE, the Verbal Memory test, and the delayed recall was found. No significant difference was found in the scores of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Digit Symbol Test, and the immediate recall. After CAS treatment, asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients showed increased perfusion in the left frontal gyrus, increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF in the right precentral gyrus, and increased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in the right supra frontal gyrus. However, no significant correlations were found between these imaging changes and cognition assessments.ConclusionSuccessful CAS can partly improve cognition in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients. The cognition

  4. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Davagnanam, I.; Worp, H.B. van der; Venables, G.S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Featherstone, R.L.; Brown, M.M.; Jager, H.R.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid

  5. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Davagnanam, Indran; van der Worp, H. Bart; Venables, Graham S.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Featherstone, Roland L.; Brown, Martin M.; Jäger, H. Rolf; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verhelst, R.; DeJaegher, L.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gimenez Gaibar, A.; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, N.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.; Rogers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid endarterectomy.

  6. Role of superior hypophyseal artery in visual function impairment after paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Goto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kodama, Kunihiko; Tsutsumi, Keiji; Ito, Kiyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Although a number of studies have assessed the surgical treatment of paraclinoid-segment carotid artery aneurysms and resulting visual complications, less attention has been given to the results with respect to the superior hypophyseal artery (SHA). The authors evaluated the relationship between the aneurysm, the SHA itself, and postoperative visual function in patients with ruptured and unruptured SHA aneurysms. From January 1991 through December 2013, 181 patients with 190 paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms received treatment at Shinshu University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals. The authors retrospectively analyzed charts, operative records, operative videos, and neuroimaging findings for these patients with or without postoperative visual complications. The authors identified 72 SHA aneurysms in 70 patients (mean age 58 years). Of 69 patients (1 patient died) evaluated, postoperative visual complications occurred in 9 (13.0%). Although the aneurysm size and SHA sacrifice did not lead to postoperative visual impairment, simultaneous treatment of bilateral aneurysms was a risk factor for postoperative visual complications. Unilateral SHA impairment may be safe (i.e., it may not induce ischemia of the optic pathway) for many, but not all, patients with SHA aneurysm.

  7. Range-gated pulsed Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, W D; Carrigan, T A; Dooley, K J; Giddens, D P; Dykes, F D; Lazzara, A; Ray, J L; Ahmann, P A

    1983-02-01

    Range-gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) ultrasonography was utilized to study the effect of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants. Carotid arterial flow velocity studies were performed on 23 preterm infants, sampling right and left carotid arteries. Studies on seven infants after PDA ligation and on seven who developed no evidence of PDA were used as controls. A strong relationship was demonstrated between diastolic reversal in the carotid arteries and PDA. The results of this study indicate that the RGPD flow velocity curve from the carotid artery is more sensitive than M-mode echocardiography or clinical examination in detecting PDA, and that PDA in small preterm infants is associated with a distinct abnormality in the carotid arterial flow pattern.

  8. EXTRACRANIAL NON-ATHEROSCLEROTIC PATHOLOGY OF THE CAROTID ARTERY IN THE CAUSES OF ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Dudanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We present the experience of treatment of patients with cerebral vascular accident by the ischemic type, the cause of which was non-atherosclerotic lesion of brachiocephalic arteries.Materials and methods. During 2011–2015 years 4118 patients with acute ischemic stroke were observed. Of these, 589 patients (14.3% were operated in the acute period of stroke in the period from 4–6 hours to 14 days. The cause of the stroke was various types of pathology of the extracranial divisions of the brachiocephalic arteries (EDBA. Of this number, with atherosclerotic carotid artery stenoses, 336 patients (57.1% were operated on, with non-atherosclerotic pathology of carotid arteries — 253 patients (42.9%. Of these 253 patients, dissection of the intima of the carotid arteries was detected in 10 (3.9% patients, aneurysms in the extracranial segment of the ECA and ICA were detected in 14 (5.5%, and 229 (90.6% revealed various types of tortuosity and kinks carotid arteries and fibrous dysplasia. All patients are operated on. Various types of reconstructions of carotid arteries with a good clinical effect have been performed. There were no lethal outcomes.Concusions. The data obtained in the study confirm the opinion that not only atherosclerotic lesions of the ICA are an indication for surgical treatment at an early date. This stage is an important part of the comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  9. The Relationship between Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dan; Place, Rebecca; Michael, Timothy; Hoffman, Eric; Gordon, Paul M; Visich, Paul

    2017-11-01

    To determine the number of coronary artery disease risk factors and the individual coronary artery disease risk factors that have a negative influence on carotid intima-media thickness in children. One hundred and nineteen children (mean age 10.51 ± 0.52 years; 51% female) participated. Each subject was assessed for carotid intima-media thickness, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), glucose, body mass index (BMI), and resting blood pressure. Surveys assessed family history of cardiovascular disease, and physical activity. Ultrasound assessment was completed on the right and left common carotid arteries. Statistical analyses included the t test, χ2 test, one-way ANOVA, and stepwise regression. An increase in carotid intima-media thickness was observed with 2 vs 0 coronary artery disease risk factors for left carotid intima-media thickness (P media thickness (P media thickness (r = 0.410; P media thickness (r = 0.451; adjusted R2 = 0.190). Compared with children with a healthy and overweight BMI, children in the obese category had greater right (P media thickness (P media thickness is negatively influenced by 2+ coronary artery disease risk factors. Weight status appears to have the greatest negative impact on carotid intima-media thickness in children. These findings support the need for strategies to lower BMI in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A New Anatomic Variation: Coexistence of Both Dandy-Walker Variant and Ophthalmic Artery Originating From Contralateral Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Havan, Nuri; Gedikli, Yusuf; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-06-01

    The authors report on 1 patient of variant origin of right ophthalmic artery (OA) from ophthalmic segment of the left internal carotid artery. A 41-year-old man was performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography. Cerebral MR imaging revealed a Dandy-Walker variant. In MR angiography the authors observed this unusual variant of origin of OA and a complete occlusion of right internal carotid artery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first patient who has coincidence of both Dandy-Walker variant and origin of OA from contralateral internal carotid artery. Careful observation of MR angiography images with maximum intensity projection is very important for detecting rare vascular variations.

  11. Use of bovine carotid artery for buttonhole technique hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Earl; Alexander, Philip; Ronfeld, Amy

    2017-11-08

    Assess the feasibility of using a bovine carotid artery graft for buttonhole technique hemodialysis in patients who are not candidates for a native fistula. Case reports used to demonstrate selection criteria and results for this approach. Criteria include: knowledgeable patient with prior dialysis experience, stable graft in place for 3 months minimum, not a candidate for a native fistula, and able to maintain close follow-up. Both grafts were based on axillary vessels and have been in place for a total of 64 months. They have been used for dialysis via buttonhole for a total of 40 months. There have been three procedures on these patients, post-buttonhole use (.87/year). There have been no infections. These patients were carefully selected based on desire, support, knowledge/experience and ability. Their success suggests that buttonhole technique for hemodialysis on a synthetic semi-biologic graft can be accomplished with morbidity and longevity similar to any graft using non-buttonhole needle access.

  12. Modeling of internal carotid artery aneurysm and blood flow simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingqiang; Zhong, Hua; Duan, Shaoyin

    2015-01-01

    The rupture of aneurysm is quite common in the clinics, and is hazardous to patients. Its occurrence is considered to be related to the hemodynamic abnormalities. To construct the model of internal carotid artery aneurysm (ICA-A), and have a simulation of blood flow. Based on the CTA data from spiral CT scan, the ICA-A model was constructed, and the types of blood flow, wall shear stress (WSS), Von Mises stress (VMS) and pressure were simulated and calculated. ICA-A model has been built and shape is the same morphology as CT 3D-image. In the whole cardiac cycle, the blood flow of aneurysm body is swirl, its velocity is slower than that of aneurysm neck; the maximum deformation, wall shear stress, pressure and von mises stress of aneurysm wall is at the neck, the minimum is at the top. The highest value appeared at 0.52 s in the cardiac cycle of 0.74 s, the lowest is at 0.21 s. It is effective and practical to construct the model of ICA-A base on CTA data. Blood flow simulation of ICA-A will provide new basis for the study on the occurrence and development of aneurysm.

  13. The Diameter of the Left and Right Common Carotid Arteries in a Young Adult Population: An Imaging Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in developing and developed countries. Non-invasive measurement of arterial diameter could become imperative in identifying individuals at risk. Therefore, we aimed to determine the parietal stress and normal values of left and right common carotid arteries in a young adult population and to evaluate their correlation with anthropometric variables (weight, height, BM[, BSA, and age and also determine if sexual dimorphism exists in the values of common carotid artery diameter. Sixty (60 young adults with age range 18-35 were recruited for the study. B-Mode ultrasound was used to assess diameter of carotid arteries. Results showed that the diameter of the common carotid artery increased with age. The right common carotid artery had a larger diameter than the left (P and lt;0.05. Males had larger common carotid diameter in both RCCA and LCCA than the females. The size of the common carotid artery however does not relate to height and blood pressure. Females showed a greater parietal stress than males. The study is the first to establish normal values of diameter of carotid arteries in an African population and will be a guide to further investigations into the possible relationship between the artery and the individuals at risk of carotid aneurysm.

  14. Diagnosis Of The Risk For Carotid Artery Stenos Based On Thermal Model In Infrared Images

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    Fatemeh Valipoori Goodarzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and a common cause of hospitalization in the United States of America and is also an important factor for Inability of patients and carotid stenos is one of the most important factors in creating it. Now, Imaging studies include: Angiography, MRI, CT scan and Doppler ultrasonography , are used to detect carotid artery stenos that is one of the most important causes of ischemic stroke. However, each method has unique advantages and disadvantages, that many of them will have a compromise between performance and accuracy versus easy usage and cost considerations. In contrast, in this paper, thermography is used as a non-invasive and cost effective to detect carotid artery Stenos and thus the risk of stroke. Materials and methods: This study is done on a series of thermal images obtained from the Clinical Center in California. In this imaging, the automatic detection of carotid artery stenos and thus Risk for stroke was done, based on: (1 the difference of average temperature between the right and left carotid arteries in the neck (2 The presence or absence of internal and external carotid arteries. Results: In this study, with the survey conducted by a specialist brain of patients had been previously, the accuracy of this work is confirmed. the techniques and points that are Experimental and  scientifically based  and obtained in this study, can help to doctors for Early detection of Artery disease, based on analysis of thermal images . Conclusion: The method presented in this paper is considered as a non-invasive and cost-effective method that automatically operates to detect the carotid arteries and prevent the Risk for stroke.

  15. Risk Factors for Incident Carotid Artery Revascularization among Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

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    Parveen K. Garg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Population-based risk factors for carotid artery revascularization are not known. We investigated the association between demographic and clinical characteristics and incident carotid artery revascularization in a cohort of older adults. Methods: Among Cardiovascular Health Study participants, a population-based cohort of 5,888 adults aged 65 years or older enrolled in two waves (1989-1990 and 1992-1993, 5,107 participants without a prior history of carotid endarterectomy (CEA or cerebrovascular disease had a carotid ultrasound at baseline and were included in these analyses. Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis was used to determine independent risk factors for incident carotid artery revascularization. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 13.5 years, 141 participants underwent carotid artery revascularization, 97% were CEA. Baseline degree of stenosis and incident ischemic cerebral events occurring during follow-up were the strongest predictors of incident revascularization. After adjustment for these, factors independently associated with an increased risk of incident revascularization were: hypertension (HR 1.53; 95% CI: 1.05-2.23, peripheral arterial disease (HR 2.57; 95% CI: 1.34-4.93, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HR 1.23 per standard deviation [SD] increment [35.4 mg/dL]; 95% CI: 1.04-1.46. Factors independently associated with a lower risk of incident revascularization were: female gender (HR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77 and older age (HR 0.69 per SD increment [5.5 years]; 95% CI: 0.56-0.86. Conclusions: Even after accounting for carotid stenosis and incident cerebral ischemic events, carotid revascularization is related to age, gender, and cardiovascular risk factors. Further study of these demographic disparities and the role of risk factor control is warranted.

  16. Iatrogenic central retinal artery occlusion after carotid body tumor embolization and excision

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    Rangel, Carlos M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report a case of iatrogenic central retinal artery occlusion after embolization and surgical resection of carotid body paraganglioma.Methods: Case report Results: One adult female patient presented with persistent unilateral visual loss after embolization with Embosphere and Contour microparticles of carotid body tumor. Fluorescein angiography revealed intraluminal microspheres in the central retinal artery ramifications. OCT revealed intraretinal spherical, hyporeflective particles with posterior shadowing. Conclusions: Central retinal artery occlusion should be assessed as a possible complication after surgical repair of head and neck paragangliomas.

  17. Treatment and experience of traumatic carotid artery injury with massive epistaxis

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    RAO Hai-cheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective analysis was made on 5 cases who had the traumatic carotid artery injury with massive epistaxis (from September 2007 to June 2011. All of them were finally diagnosed by digital substraction angiography (DSA. Among them, 2 cases of traumatic pesudoaneurysm from internal maxillary artery were embolized with polyvinyl alcohol particles and gelatin sponge. One case was carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF with traumatic pesudoaneurysm located in the sphenoid sinus. This patient's internal carotid artery (ICA and fistula was blocked with balloon, and then ICA was clipped proximal to the posterior communicating artery. One case with injuried ICA was treated with blocking by balloon. The pesudoaneurysm located in ICA cavernous segment of one case was embolized with coil and liquid glue. No recurrence was found after successful surgeries. Patients with massive epistaxis or recurrent epistaxis after craniofacial trauma should undergo CT angiography (CTA or DSA examination so as to get proper diagnosis and treatment as early as possible.

  18. Surgical dissection of the internal carotid artery under flow control by proximal vessel clamping reduces embolic infarcts during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazumichi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ishii, Akira; Takahashi, Jun C; Takagi, Yasushi; Yamagata, Sen; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of flow control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) by the clamping of the common carotid artery, external carotid artery, and superior thyroid artery during surgical ICA dissection to reduce ischemic complications after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Sixty-seven patients (59 men; age, 70.5 ± 6.2 years) who underwent CEA by the same surgeon were retrospectively studied. Both conventional CEA (n = 29) and flow-control CEA (n = 38) were performed with the patient under general anesthesia and with the use of somatosensory-evoked potential and near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring as a guide for selective shunting. The number of new postoperative infarcts was assessed with preoperative and postoperative diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) obtained within 3 days of surgery. In addition to surgical technique, the effects of the following factors on new infarcts also were examined: age, side of ICA stenosis, high-grade stenosis, symptoms, and application of shunting. New postoperative DWI lesions were observed in 7 of 67 patients (10.4%), and none of them was symptomatic. With respect to operative technique, the incidence rate of DWI spots was significantly lower in the flow-control group (2.6%) than in the conventional group (20.7%), odds ratio: 0.069; 95% confidence interval: 0.006-0.779; P = 0.031). On multiple logistic regression analysis, age, side of ICA stenosis, high-grade stenosis, symptoms, and the use of internal shunting did not have significant effects on new postoperative DWI lesions, whereas technique did have an effect. The proximal flow-control technique for CEA helps avoid embolic complications during surgical ICA dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A rare arterial branch distributing to the thymus, ectopic intrathymic parathyroid, and thyroid glands which passed ventral to the right common carotid artery: a case report.

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    Watanabe, Yuko; Terashima, Toshio; Arakawa, Takamitsu

    2017-06-01

    The intrathymic parathyroid has been reported that this variation might be related with the hyperthyroidism. In this study, the arterial pattern supplying the intrathymic parathyroid was examined in detail in the human cadaver (67-year-old, female, right side). The ectopic parathyroid was only detected on the right side, but not on the left side. This ectopic intrathymic parathyroid was supplied by the supernumerary arterial branch that originated from the inferior thyroid artery and passed ventral to the common carotid artery. This supernumerary branch further divided into two thin branches: (1) the one distributing the intrathymic parathyroid and the right lobe of the thyroid gland and (2) the other descending toward the thoracic cavity to supply the mediastinum organs. Other arteries supplying the thyroid gland and thymus of both sides were normal. In the surgical resection of the ectopic intrathymic parathyroid, physicians should pay attention to arteries ventral to the common carotid artery. This supernumerary branch distributing to the intrathymic parathyroid may be caused by incomplete division into the primordium for the inferior parathyroid and the primordium for the thymus on the developmental process.

  20. Genome-wide linkage analysis of carotid artery lumen diameter: the strong heart family study.

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    Bella, Jonathan N; Cole, Shelley A; Laston, Sandy; Almasy, Laura; Comuzzie, Anthony; Lee, Elisa T; Best, Lyle G; Fabsitz, Richard R; Howard, Barbara V; Maccluer, Jean W; Roman, Mary J; Devereux, Richard B; Göring, Harald H H

    2013-10-09

    A significant proportion of the variability in carotid artery lumen diameter is attributable to genetic factors. Carotid ultrasonography and genotyping were performed in the 3300 American Indian participants in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) to identify chromosomal regions harboring novel genes associated with inter-individual variation in carotid artery lumen diameter. Genome-wide linkage analysis was conducted using standard variance component linkage methods, implemented in SOLAR, based on multipoint identity-by-descent matrices. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed a significant evidence for linkage for a locus for left carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameters in Arizona SHFS participants on chromosome 7 at 120 cM (lod = 4.85 and 3.77, respectively, after sex and age adjustment, and lod = 3.12 and 2.72, respectively, after adjustment for sex, age, height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and current smoking). Other regions with suggestive evidence of linkage for left carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameter were found on chromosome 12 at 153 cM (lod = 2.20 and 2.60, respectively, after sex and age adjustment, and lod = 2.44 and 2.16, respectively, after full covariate adjustment) in Oklahoma SHFS participants; suggestive linkage for right carotid artery diastolic and systolic lumen diameter was found on chromosome 9 at 154 cM (lod = 2.72 and 3.19, respectively after sex and age adjustment, and lod = 2.36 and 2.21, respectively, after full covariate adjustment) in Oklahoma SHFS participants. We found significant evidence for loci influencing carotid artery lumen diameter on chromosome 7q and suggestive linkage on chromosomes 12q and 9q. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Robust information gain based fuzzy c-means clustering and classification of carotid artery ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mehdi; Chaudhry, Asmatullah; Khan, Asifullah; Iftikhar, M Aksam

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a robust method is proposed for segmentation of medical images by exploiting the concept of information gain. Medical images contain inherent noise due to imaging equipment, operating environment and patient movement during image acquisition. A robust medical image segmentation technique is thus inevitable for accurate results in subsequent stages. The clustering technique proposed in this work updates fuzzy membership values and cluster centroids based on information gain computed from the local neighborhood of a pixel. The proposed approach is less sensitive to noise and produces homogeneous clustering. Experiments are performed on medical and non-medical images and results are compared with state of the art segmentation approaches. Analysis of visual and quantitative results verifies that the proposed approach outperforms other techniques both on noisy and noise free images. Furthermore, the proposed technique is used to segment a dataset of 300 real carotid artery ultrasound images. A decision system for plaque detection in the carotid artery is then proposed. Intima media thickness (IMT) is measured from the segmented images produced by the proposed approach. A feature vector based on IMT values is constructed for making decision about the presence of plaque in carotid artery using probabilistic neural network (PNN). The proposed decision system detects plaque in carotid artery images with high accuracy. Finally, effect of the proposed segmentation technique has also been investigated on classification of carotid artery ultrasound images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Revascularization of the internal carotid artery for isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calió, Francesco G; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Montesano, Giuseppe; D'Urso, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    The operation for isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking of the internal carotid artery is safe and effective in preventing stroke and relieving the symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A consecutive sample clinical study with a mean follow-up of 44 months. The surgical department of an academic tertiary care center and an affiliated secondary care center. Fifty-four patients with a mean age of 67 years underwent 55 revascularizations of the internal carotid artery. The surgical procedures consisted of the following: shortening and reimplantation in the common carotid artery in 36 cases, bypass grafting in 15 cases, and transposition into the external carotid artery in 4 cases. Cumulative survival, primary patency, and stroke-free and neurologic symptom-free rates expressed by standard life-table analysis. No patients died in the postoperative period. The postoperative stroke rate was 1.8%. The cumulative rates (SEs) at 5 years were as follows: survival, 70% (10.2%); primary patency, 89% (7.8%); overall stroke free, 92% (6.8%); ipsilateral stroke free, 96% (5.3%); neurologic symptom free, 90% (7.5%); and ipsilateral symptom free, 93% (6.5%). Revascularization of the internal carotid artery for the treatment of isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking is safe and effective in preventing stroke and relieving symptoms of cerebrovascular insufficiency.

  3. Dose-Dependent Effect of Statin Pretreatment on Preventing the Periprocedural Complications of Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Sohn, Sung-Il; Kwak, Jaehyuk; Yoo, Joonsang; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kwon, O-Ki; Jung, Cheolkyu; Chung, Inyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2017-07-01

    We investigated whether statin pretreatment can dose dependently reduce periprocedural complications in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting because of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We enrolled a consecutive series of 397 symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (≥50% stenosis on conventional angiography) treated with carotid artery stenting at 2 tertiary university hospitals over a decade. Definition of periprocedural complications included any stroke, myocardial infarction, and death within 1 month after or during the procedure. Statin pretreatment was divided into 3 categories according to the atorvastatin equivalent dose: none (n=158; 39.8%), standard dose (statin use were 12.0%, 4.5%, and 1.2%. After adjustment, a change in the atorvastatin dose category was associated with reduction in the odds of periprocedural complications for each change in dose category (standard-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.81; high-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.96; P for trend=0.01). Administration of antiplatelet drugs was also an independent factor in periprocedural complications (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05-0.69). This study shows that statin pretreatment may reduce the incidence of periprocedural complications dose dependently in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenting. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jeong-Ho [Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Department of Neurology (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Stroke Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Cheolkyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Sung [Soonchunhyang University Medical Center, Biostatistical Consulting Unit (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon-Ku, E-mail: mkhan@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Stroke Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  5. Safety of Simultaneous Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Carotid Endarterectomy Versus Isolated Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, Christian; Bilbilis, Konstantinos; Rekowski, Jan; Holst, Torulv; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Breuer, Martin; Dahm, Manfred; Diegeler, Anno; Kowalski, Arne; Martens, Sven; Mohr, Friedrich W; Ondrášek, Jiri; Reiter, Beate; Roth, Peter; Seipelt, Ralf; Siggelkow, Markus; Steinhoff, Gustav; Moritz, Anton; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Jakob, Heinz; Ose, Claudia; Scherag, Andre; Knipp, Stephan C

    2017-10-01

    The optimal operative strategy in patients with severe carotid artery disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is unknown. We sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of synchronous combined carotid endarterectomy and CABG as compared with isolated CABG. Patients with asymptomatic high-grade carotid artery stenosis ≥80% according to ECST (European Carotid Surgery Trial) ultrasound criteria (corresponding to ≥70% NASCET [North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial]) who required CABG surgery were randomly assigned to synchronous carotid endarterectomy+CABG or isolated CABG. To avoid unbalanced prognostic factor distributions, randomization was stratified by center, age, sex, and modified Rankin Scale. The primary composite end point was the rate of stroke or death at 30 days. From 2010 to 2014, a total of 129 patients were enrolled at 17 centers in Germany and the Czech Republic. Because of withdrawal of funding after insufficient recruitment, enrolment was terminated early. At 30 days, the rate of any stroke or death in the intention-to-treat population was 12/65 (18.5%) in patients receiving synchronous carotid endarterectomy+CABG as compared with 6/62 (9.7%) in patients receiving isolated CABG (absolute risk reduction, 8.8%; 95% confidence interval, -3.2% to 20.8%; PWALD=0.12). Also for all secondary end points at 30 days and 1 year, there was no evidence for a significant treatment-group effect although patients undergoing isolated CABG tended to have better outcomes. Although our results cannot rule out a treatment-group effect because of lack of power, a superiority of the synchronous combined carotid endarterectomy+CABG approach seems unlikely. Five-year follow-up of patients is still ongoing. URL: https://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN13486906. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Optimal MR Plaque Imaging for Cervical Carotid Artery Stenosis in Predicting the Development of Microembolic Signals during Exposure of Carotid Arteries in Endarterectomy: Comparison of 4 T1-Weighted Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Ogasawara, K; Narumi, S; Sasaki, M; Saito, A; Tsushima, E; Namba, T; Kobayashi, M; Yoshida, K; Terayama, Y; Ogawa, A

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative identification of plaque vulnerability may allow improved risk stratification for patients considered for carotid endarterectomy. The present study aimed to determine which plaque imaging technique, cardiac-gated black-blood fast spin-echo, magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo, source image of 3D time-of-flight MR angiography, or noncardiac-gated spin-echo, most accurately predicts development of microembolic signals during exposure of carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy. Eighty patients with ICA stenosis (≥70%) underwent the 4 sequences of preoperative MR plaque imaging of the affected carotid bifurcation and then carotid endarterectomy under transcranial Doppler monitoring of microembolic signals in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. The contrast ratio of the carotid plaque was calculated by dividing plaque signal intensity by sternocleidomastoid muscle signal intensity. Microembolic signals during exposure of carotid arteries were detected in 23 patients (29%), 3 of whom developed new neurologic deficits postoperatively. Those deficits remained at 24 hours after surgery in only 1 patient. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to discriminate between the presence and absence of microembolic signals during exposure of the carotid arteries was significantly greater with nongated spin-echo than with black-blood fast spin-echo (difference between areas, 0.258; P carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy more accurately than other MR plaque imaging techniques. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Denervation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid baro- and chemoreceptors play an important role in blood pressure and blood gas homeostasis. Inadvertent denervation of these receptors in humans has been reported following surgery and radiotherapy in the area of the carotid bifurcation. The resulting syndrome of baroreflex failure is

  8. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Serial MRI of a mycotic aneurysm of the cavernous carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloud, G.C.; Markus, H.S. [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, St George' s Hospital Medical School, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Rich, P.M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley' s Hospital, Copse Hill, London SW20 0NE (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-01

    Cerebral mycotic or infective aneurysms are a rare complication of infectious illness, and such aneurysms of the intracavernous portion of the internal carotid artery are rare. They have been described as a consequence of cavernous sinus infection in an immunocompromised host, but not previously in a renal transplant recipient. We present such a case with serial MRI showing progression from arterial narrowing to aneurysm formation. Transcranial Doppler sonography of the middle cerebral artery showed distal asymptomatic embolisation from the aneurysm. (orig.)

  10. Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosevski M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marijan Bosevski,1 Lily Stojanovska2 1Faculty of Medicine, University Cardiology Clinic, Skopje, Macedonia; 2Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients, the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management. Keywords: carotid IMT, type 2 diabetes, progression of atherosclerosis, risk factors 

  11. A case of Behcet's disease with aneurysms of common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yeon Myung; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Sung Jae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    One case of Behcet's disease with multiple aneurysms in both common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta is presented with brief review of the literatures. A 26-year-old woman had slowly enlarging pulsatile masses in both sides of neck and recurrent ulcerations in oral cavity and genitalia. One day prior to admission, aphasia, right facial nerve palsy and right hemiplegia suddenly developed. Brain CT showed acute infarction in left basal ganglia. Both Carotid Angiography and abdominal Aortography demonstrated multiple aneurysms in both common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta with organizing thrombi and thromboembolism of internal carotid artery.

  12. Cigarette smoking in military pilots and intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovelić Stojan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that smoking is associated with an increase in arterial wall thickness. However, most studies of this problem have been undertaken in age and sex heterogeneous groups, as well as in patients with already present other conventional risk factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cigarette smoking on arterial wall thickness of the common carotid artery in asymptomatic pilots. Methods. The imaging of intima−media thickness of the posterior wall of the distal 1 cm of both common carotid arteries was performed using a B mode ultrasound device, in 39 pilots (37.05 ± 6.66 years, for whom smoking was the single cardiovascular risk factor. Comparisons were made with 49 non-smokers (35.12 ± 7.39 years. Results. The posterior walls of both common carotid arteries were thicker in smokers (left, p < 0.05; right, p > 0,05. Intima-media thickness was significantly lower on the right side than on the left side in both smokers and nonsmokers (p < 0.01. Conclusion. Cigarette smoking as the single cardiovascular risk factor was associated with the wall thickness of the carotid arteries in our study. This finding indicated that early atherosclerosis was already present in pilots - smokers entering middle age.

  13. Automated registration of freehand B-mode ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of the carotid arteries based on geometric features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Diego D. B.; Arias Lorza, Andres Mauricio; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2017-01-01

    An automated method for registering B-mode ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the carotid arteries is proposed. The registration uses geometric features, namely, lumen centerlines and lumen segmentations, which are extracted fully automatically from the images after manual...... that the proposed method can robustly and accurately register US and MR images of the carotid artery, allowing multimodal analysis of the carotid plaque to improve plaque assessment....

  14. The critical role of the external carotid artery in cerebral perfusion of patients with total occlusion of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalainas, I; Avgerinos, E D; Daskalopoulos, M E; Papapetrou, A; Papasideris, C P; Katsikas, V; Xiromeritis, K; Moulakakis, K; Gianakopoulos, T; Liapis, C D

    2012-02-01

    The ipsilateral external carotid artery (ECA) can potentially provide an important collateral pathway for cerebral blood flow in the presence of occlusion or severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA), recovering up to 15% of the middle cerebral arterial flow. The aim of the study is to elucidate the role of ECA in cerebral flow of patients with total ICA occlusion. Retrospective study of prospectively collected data of 139 patients with total ICA occlusions. The patients were divided to symptomatic and asymptomatic and were categorized in four subgroups according to the stenosis rates: A) ipsilateral ECAECA stenosis ECA stenosis ≥70% and contralateral ICA stenosis ECA stenosis ≥70% and contralateral ICA stenosis ≥75%. Fifty eight (41.7%) patients were asymptomatic. The highest rate (48.2%) of asymptomatic patients was in Group A. Among patients with strokes, the highest rate belonged in groups C and D (44.4% and 50% respectively) where ipsilateral ECA stenosis was ≥70% irrespectively of the contralateral ICA patency. Ipsilateral external carotid artery stenosis ≥70% proved to be and independent risk factor for symptom presentation (P=0.013). The study reveals the significant role of ECA patency in cerebral flow in patients with ICA occlusion.

  15. AN ULTRASONOGRAPHIC STUDY OF CAROTID ARTERY PATHOLOGY IN ISCHAEMIC STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puthiya Maliyakkal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Majority of ischaemic strokes are due to extracranial carotid artery disease. Ultrasonography of the carotid arteries is easily available, cost-effective noninvasive method of evaluation in preventing ischaemic strokes. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the carotid artery pathology, and grade the stenotic lesions by ultrasonography in ischaemic stroke patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 25 patients of clinically diagnosed cerebrovascular insufficiency, carotid and vertebral arteries on both sides were examined. The site, size, echogenicity, luminal narrowing and velocity changes at the site of atherosclerotic plaque was recorded. The observations in percentages were compared and analysed. RESULTS Hemiparesis was the commonest presenting complaint. Among these 25 patients, 58% of them had atheromatous plaque. Smoking had a strong association with the development of plaque. 64% of these patients with atheromatous plaque were males with a sex ratio of 1.8:1, 57% of plaques were found at carotid bifurcation predominantly on left side, 57% of these plaques had significant stenosis and one had complete occlusion. Predominant type of these plaque were strongly echogenic with calcification (52%, 35% of these patients had a PSV ratio of 2-4 and 14% >4. CONCLUSION The study showed atheromatous plaque changes with significant stenosis among cerebrovascular insufficiency patients. The findings were consistent with the other studies.

  16. CT angiography and Color Doppler ultrasonography features and sensitivity in detection of carotid arteries diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kamenjaković

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this research was to compare specifi city and sensitivity of Color Doppler ultrasonographywith CT angiography.Methods: A total of one hundred patients suffering from carotid artery disease (n=200 were tested in this research in the period from June till October, 2011. Average age of the patients was 61.5 years, and most of the patients were in the age group ranging from 55 to 65 years. The level of carotid artery stenosis is measured according to Standards of the North America Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trail study,by method of Color Doppler ultrasonography and CT angiography.Results: Stenosis of registering the stenosis to be higher by Color Doppler ultrasonography, than by CT angiography. In the case of the occlusion, there was also the similar observation, with variation of 8% carotid arteries.Conclusion: Extracranial Doppler and color duplex ultrasound enable reliable detection of both stenosis and occlusion of carotid arteries and accordingly they occupy an important place in radiological algorithm. When it comes to CT angiography it can be concluded that it can provide accurate and exact information regarding the condition of blood vessels as good as Digital Subtractive Angiography can.

  17. Carotid artery remodelling in relation to body fat distribution, inflammation and sustained weight loss in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardassis, D; Schönander, M; Sjöström, L; Karason, K

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is known to be associated with carotid artery remodelling, but less is known about how body fat distribution, inflammation and weight loss may affect this relation. Ultrasonography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography were performed to evaluate carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), body composition and fat distribution, respectively. Participants were divided into three matched study groups (n = 44 per group): obese patients with sustained weight loss 10 years after bariatric surgery [surgery group, body mass index (BMI) 31.5 kg m(-2)]; obese patients who maintained stable weight during the same time period (obese group, BMI 42.5 kg m(-2)); and normal weight subjects (lean group, BMI 24.4 kg m(-2)). Patients in the surgery group, compared with those in the obese group, had slightly lower common carotid artery (CCA) IMT (0.75 ± 0.18 vs. 0.78 ± 0.17 mm) and common carotid bulb (CCB) IMT (0.92 ± 0.32 vs. 0.97 ± 0.32 mm); however, these differences were not statistically significant. Lean individuals, compared with those in the surgery group, had significantly lower CCA and CCB IMT values (P Obese patients with long-term sustained weight loss did not have thinner carotid artery walls compared with their weight-stable obese counterparts. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Study on the correlation between carotid artery lesion and fundus arteriosclerosis in patients with cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between carotid artery disease and fundus arteriosclerosis in patients with cerebral infarction. METHODS: Totally 120 patients with acute cerebral infarction were randomly divided into two groups. The patients were diagnosed with bilateral carotid artery and non-mydriatic fundus camera. Fouty-two patients transient ischaemic attack(TIAunderwent cerebral angiography. The data were recorded for analysis. RESULTS: The degree of fundus arteriosclerosis in patients with cerebral infarction was positively correlated with blood pressure(r=0.361, P=0.015. There was a significant correlation between retinal arteriosclerosis grade and carotid atherosclerosis(r=0.392, P=0.011. The degree of fundus arteriosclerosis was correlated with cerebral arteriolar lesion, higher than it with carotid artery disease(r=0.465, 0.392, P=0.037. CONCLUSION: Carotid arteriosclerosis, fundus arteriosclerosis and cerebral arteriolar lesions in patients with cerebral infarction have a significant correlation with hypertension, and fundus arterial examination has important clinical value in judging cerebral arteriosclerosis.

  19. Carotid artery stenting in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a possible primary therapy for symptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Renato; Halliday, Alison; Bianchi, Paolo; Fresa, Emanuele; Silani, Vincenzo; Parati, Gianfranco; Blengino, Simonetta; Cireni, Lea; Adobbati, Laura; Calvillo, Laura; Tolva, Valerio S

    2013-08-01

    To report the results of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in symptomatic patients (stroke/transient ischemic attack) after recent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Between January 2009 and July 2011, 28 consecutive patients (18 women; mean age 66 years, range 42-82) underwent protected CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis following recent PTCA that included bare or drug-eluting stents requiring uninterrupted dual antiplatelet therapy. Primary technical success, neurological complications, major adverse cardiovascular events, and death were evaluated at 30 days and over midterm follow-up. Technical success was 96%; 1 patient suffered a nonfatal major stroke (3.5% 30-day stroke rate) during the procedure. During a median 21.6-month follow-up, 4 (14%) patients died of myocardial infarction (all diabetic smokers with ejection fractions 34 kg/m(2). This preliminary experience demonstrated that CAS is a reasonable, safe, and effective treatment for patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis who were recently treated with coronary stents requiring uninterrupted dual antiplatelet therapy.

  20. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation is unrelated to decrease in external carotid artery blood flow during acute hypotension in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Sørensen, Henrik; Hirasawa, Ai

    2016-01-01

    New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) is impaired by sympathetic blockade, and the external carotid artery (ECA) vascular bed may prevent adequate internal carotid artery blood flow. We examined whether α1-receptor blockade-induced attenuat...

  1. Primary internal carotid artery aneurysm in a 15-year-old male: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Sarac, Timur; Lorenz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysms are a rare entity in the adult population. Very little information is known in the pediatric population. We present a case of a 15-year-old male with an isolated internal carotid artery aneurysm and a review of the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography detection of abnormal carotid artery plaque in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ajay; Gialdini, Gino; Lerario, Michael P; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Giambrone, Ashley; Navi, Babak B; Marshall, Randolph S; Iadecola, Costantino; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of carotid plaque can aid in stroke risk stratification in patients with carotid stenosis. However, the prevalence of complicated carotid plaque in patients with cryptogenic stroke is uncertain, especially as assessed by plaque imaging techniques routinely included in acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging protocols. We assessed whether the magnetic resonance angiography-defined presence of intraplaque high-intensity signal (IHIS), a marker of intraplaque hemorrhage, is associated with ipsilateral cryptogenic stroke. Cryptogenic stroke patients with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of unilateral anterior circulation infarction and without hemodynamically significant (≥50%) stenosis of the cervical carotid artery were identified from a prospective stroke registry at a tertiary-care hospital. High-risk plaque was assessed by evaluating for IHIS on routine magnetic resonance angiography source images using a validated technique. To compare the presence of IHIS on the ipsilateral versus contralateral side within individual patients, we used McNemar's test for correlated proportions. A total of 54 carotid arteries in 27 unique patients were included. A total of 6 patients (22.2%) had IHIS-positive nonstenosing carotid plaque ipsilateral to the side of ischemic stroke compared to 0 patients who had IHIS-positive carotid plaques contralateral to the side of stroke (P=0.01). Stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluations, and prevalence of vascular risk factors were not different between the IHIS-positive and IHIS-negative groups. Our findings suggest that a proportion of strokes classified as cryptogenic may be mechanistically related to complicated, nonhemodynamically significant cervical carotid artery plaque that can easily be detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography acute stroke protocols. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries in systemic lupus erythematosus: frequency and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. No previous study has estimated carotid disease prevalence in such patients in Brazil. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence of atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries, in SLE patients and controls, and to verify possible associations between risk factors and carotid plaque. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina. METHODS: Carotid plaque prevalence was assessed by B-mode ultrasound in 82 female SLE patients of mean age 34.0 years and 62 controls of mean age 35.7 years. Plaque was defined as a distinct area of hyperechogenicity and/or focal protrusion of the vessel wall into the lumen. Risk factors for coronary disease and SLE-related variables were determined. RESULTS: 50% of patients and 29% of controls presented carotid plaque. Older age, longer disease duration, higher Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC score, higher levels of low-density lipoprotein and greater diabetes, obesity, premature ovarian failure and family history of coronary artery disease were found in patients with carotid plaque than in those without plaque. Patients with plaque were younger than controls with plaque. SLE diagnosis, obesity, older age, higher SLICC score and longer disease duration were independent risk factors for carotid plaque. CONCLUSION: Young patients with SLE present higher prevalence of carotid plaque than controls. SLE diagnosis was a significant risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis.

  4. Carotid Artery Stenting Successfully Prevents Progressive Stroke Due to Mobile Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Oomura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of progressive ischemic stroke due to a mobile plaque, in which carotid artery stenting successfully prevented further infarctions. A 78-year-old man developed acute multiple infarcts in the right hemisphere, and a duplex ultrasound showed a mobile plaque involving the bifurcation of the left common carotid artery. Maximal medical therapy failed to prevent further infarcts, and the number of infarcts increased with his neurological deterioration. Our present case suggests that the deployment of a closed-cell stent is effective to prevent the progression of the ischemic stroke due to the mobile plaque.

  5. Goldenhar syndrome associated with contralateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Elisa; Ormitti, Francesca; Crisi, Girolamo; Sesenna, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Congenital absence of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is an extremely rare vascular anomaly. Aplasia and displacement of the horizontal portion of the petrous carotid artery have been described in a patient with mandibulofacial dysostosis. To the best of our knowledge, the association between Goldenhar syndrome and ipsilateral ICA agenesis has emerged only in one case documented in the medical literature to date. We describe here a case that illustrates the association of Goldenhar syndrome with contralateral agenesis of the ICA incidentally detected on brain magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently confirmed on magnetic resonance angiography and high resolution computed tomography.

  6. Early complement activation follows eversion carotid endarterectomy and correlates with the time of clamping of the carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Széplaki, Gábor; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Gombos, Tímea

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complement activation plays an important role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The objective of the present study was to detect the presence and mechanism of complement activation in patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA). METHODS: Complement activation products C1rsC1......-inhibitor, C4d, C3a and SC5b-9 and concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in samples serially taken from 16 patients with eversion CEA and 10 with carotid artery stenting (CAS) in the first 24h post-surgery/intervention. MBL2 genotypes were also determined. RESULTS: In patients with CEA...... an intense increase in C3a levels were observed immediately after surgery (pcarotid...

  7. Carotid artery stenting with emboli protection surveillance study: outcomes at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Theodore L; Strickman, Neil; Davis, Thomas; Kumar, Vinay; Mishkel, Greg; Foster, Malcolm; Donohoe, Dennis; Britto, Suzanne; Ansel, Gary

    2010-06-29

    The CASES-PMS (Carotid Artery Stenting With Emboli Protection Surveillance-Post-Marketing Study) multicenter, prospective, single-arm, surveillance study was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when performed by physicians with varied experience in CAS utilizing a formal training program. Whether the excellent results achieved at 30 days would be sustained to 1 year was the subject of the current investigation. Previously, the pivotal SAPPHIRE (Stenting and Angioplasty with Protection of Patients with High Risk for Endarterectomy) trial demonstrated that CAS was not inferior to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) when performed by physicians experienced in carotid stenting. High surgical-risk patients with de novo atherosclerotic or post-endarterectomy restenotic lesions in native carotid arteries were enrolled at participating centers. Inclusion and exclusion criteria matched those of the SAPPHIRE trial. The primary end point was a composite of 30-day major adverse events (MAE) including death, any stroke, or myocardial infarction. A total of 1,492 patients were enrolled at 73 sites. The primary end point of 30-day MAE was 5.0%, meeting criteria for noninferiority to the prespecified objective performance criteria (OPC) established by the SAPPHIRE trial. The 1-year cumulative percentage of MAE was 12.5% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. All strokes to 30 days plus ipsilateral stroke between 31 and 360 days with CASES-PMS (5.4%) was similar to the rate seen with the SAPPHIRE trial stent cohort (4.9%). There were no significant differences in outcomes at 1 year by symptom status and high-risk status. With the formalized training program utilized in this study, physicians with varied experience in carotid stenting can achieve similar short- and longer-term results to the highly experienced SAPPHIRE Investigators. (Carotid Artery Stenting With Emboli Protection Surveillance-Post-Marketing Study [CASES-PMS]; NCT00231231). Copyright (c) 2010

  8. A RARE CASE OF ORIGIN OF THE SUPERIOR THYROID ARTERY FROM THE RIGHT COMMON CAROTID ARTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y MOHAMADI

    1982-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent l y i n a clas sroom d is sect i on we f ounu an anoma l ou s superior thyroid artery in a 60-year -ol d man . The arte ry originated f rom t he common carotid 31 mm p rox imal t o its bifurcation . Rega r d i ng t o the s ex , the s i de and p lace o f o r i g i n , this could be a unique case , suggesting a need for more awarene s s o f any unpredictable anomal y whi ch may be s een i n th i s a r ter y t o avo id serious problems during s ur ger y on the thyroid gland .

  9. Dotted collar placed around carotid artery induces asymmetric neointimal lesion formation in rabbits without intravascular manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivelä Antti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neointimal formation in atherosclerosis has been subject for intense research. However, good animal models mimicking asymmetrical lesion formation in human subjects have been difficult to establish. The aim of this study was to develop a model which would lead to the formation of eccentric lesions under macroscopically intact non-denuded endothelium. Methods We have developed a new collar model where we placed two cushions or dots inside the collar. Arterial lesions were characterized using histology and ultrasound methods. Results When this dotted collar was placed around carotid and femoral arteries it produced asymmetrical pressure on adventitia and a mild flow disturbance, and hence a change in shear stress. Our hypothesis was that this simple procedure would reproducibly produce asymmetrical lesions without any intraluminal manipulations. Intima/media ratio increased towards the distal end of the collar with the direction of blood flow under macroscopically intact endothelium. Macrophages preferentially accumulated in areas of the thickest neointima thus resembling early steps in human atherosclerotic plaque formation. Proliferating cells in these lesions and underlying media were scarce at eight weeks time point. Conclusion The improved dotted collar model produces asymmetrical human-like atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits. This model should be useful in studies regarding the pathogenesis and formation of eccentric atherosclerotic lesions.

  10. Relationship between the Direction of Ophthalmic Artery Blood Flow and Ocular Microcirculation before and after Carotid Artery Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Ishii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When internal carotid artery stenosis is accompanied by ocular ischemic syndrome, intervention is recommended to prevent irreversible visual loss. In this study, we used laser speckle flowgraphy to measure the ocular microcirculation in the optic nerve head before and after carotid artery stenting (CAS of 40 advanced internal carotid stenosis lesions from 37 patients. The aim was to investigate the relationship between ocular microcirculation and the direction of ophthalmic artery blood flow obtained by angiography. We found that there was a significant increase in blood flow after CAS (P=0.003. Peak systolic velocity as an indicator of the rate of stenosis was also significantly higher in the group with retrograde/undetected flow of the ophthalmic artery than in the group with antegrade flow (P=0.002. In all cases where retrograde flow of the ophthalmic artery was observed before stenting, the flow changed to antegrade after stenting. Through the use of laser speckle flowgraphy, this study found that CAS can improve ocular microcirculation. Furthermore, while patients displaying retrograde flow of the ophthalmic artery before stenting have a poor prognosis, CAS corrected the flow to antegrade, suggesting that visual loss can be prevented by improving the ocular microcirculation.

  11. The effect of menopause on carotid artery remodeling, insulin sensitivity, and plasma adiponectin in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Kozàkovà, Michaela; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2009-01-01

    secretion and sensitivity, plasma adiponectin), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in healthy women. METHODS: In 74 menopausal women (mean age = 51 +/- 3 years, mean duration of menopause = 2.9 +/- 1.2 years) and in 74 nonmenopausal women comparable for age and body mass index (BMI), common carotid...... artery (CCA) luminal diameter, and IMT in different carotid segments were measured in digitized ultrasound images. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin secretion was reconstructed...... by mathematical modeling. RESULTS: CCA diameter (5.55 +/- 0.46 vs. 5.21+/- 0.51 mm, P IMT (608 +/- 78 vs. 576 +/- 74 microm, P IMT/diameter ratio and IMT in other carotid...

  12. Screening with doppler ultrasound for carotid artery stenosis in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tatiana; Hovind, Peter; Iversen, Helle K

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carotid endarterectomy of symptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack reduces the risk of recurrent stroke, particularly if performed within 2 weeks from the first event. We evaluated the efficiency of a screening programme based...... on Doppler ultrasound in patients hospitalized with stroke or transient ischaemic attack in the stroke centre at Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark, concerning timeliness of referral to the vascular surgeon and performance of carotid endarterectomy according to national recommendations. METHODS: Prospective...... stenosis or occlusion was found in 171 patients (12·3%) and was hemisphere related in 78 patients (5·6%). Among these, 68 (87%) were referred to the vascular department, 94% within 4 days of admission. Carotid endarterectomy was performed in 16 patients, all within 14 days from admission...

  13. 3-D registration on carotid artery imaging data: MRI for different timesteps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizopoulos, Paschalis A; Sakellarios, Antonis; Michalis, Lampros K; Koutsouris, Dimitrios D; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2016-08-01

    A common problem which is faced by the researchers when dealing with arterial carotid imaging data is the registration of the geometrical structures between different imaging modalities or different timesteps. The use of the "Patient Position" DICOM field is not adequate to achieve accurate results due to the fact that the carotid artery is a relatively small structure and even imperceptible changes in patient position and/or direction make it difficult. While there is a wide range of simple/advanced registration techniques in the literature, there is a considerable number of studies which address the geometrical structure of the carotid artery without using any registration technique. On the other hand the existence of various registration techniques prohibits an objective comparison of the results using different registration techniques. In this paper we present a method for estimating the statistical significance that the choice of the registration technique has on the carotid geometry. One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) showed that the p-values were <;0.0001 for the distances of the lumen from the centerline for both right and left carotids of the patient case that was studied.

  14. Imaging markers of stroke risk in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Prabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid stenosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. While symptomatic carotid stenosis requires prompt revascularization, there is significant debate about the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS, especially in light of recent advances in medical therapy. As a result, there is an even greater need for reliable predictors of stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Besides clinical factors and stenosis grade, plaque morphology and cerebral hemodynamics may be suitable prognostic tools. High-risk features, using Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI suggest that subpopulations at sufficiently high risk (10% annually can be identified and in whom revascularization would be most beneficial. In this review, imaging tools to aid in stroke risk stratification in patients with ACS are discussed.

  15. Carotid Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  16. Intra-arterial high signals on arterial spin labeling perfusion images predict the occluded internal carotid artery segment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogabe, Shu; Satomi, Junichiro; Tada, Yoshiteru; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Kenji; Yoshioka, Shotaro; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Mure, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Izumi; Kitazato, Keiko T.; Nagahiro, Shinji [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Neurosurgery, Tokushima (Japan); Abe, Takashi; Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Radiology, Tokushima (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuaki; Kaji, Ryuji [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Biomedical Biosciences, Tokushima (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) involves perfusion imaging using the inverted magnetization of arterial water. If the arterial arrival times are longer than the post-labeling delay, labeled spins are visible on ASL images as bright, high intra-arterial signals (IASs); such signals were found within occluded vessels of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The identification of the occluded segment in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is crucial for endovascular treatment. We tested our hypothesis that high IASs on ASL images can predict the occluded segment. Our study included 13 patients with acute ICA occlusion who had undergone angiographic and ASL studies within 48 h of onset. We retrospectively identified the high IAS on ASL images and angiograms and recorded the occluded segment and the number of high IAS-positive slices on ASL images. The ICA segments were classified as cervical (C1), petrous (C2), cavernous (C3), and supraclinoid (C4). Of seven patients with intracranial ICA occlusion, five demonstrated high IASs at C1-C2, suggesting that high IASs could identify stagnant flow proximal to the occluded segment. Among six patients with extracranial ICA occlusion, five presented with high IASs at C3-C4, suggesting that signals could identify the collateral flow via the ophthalmic artery. None had high IASs at C1-C2. The mean number of high IAS-positive slices was significantly higher in patients with intra- than extracranial ICA occlusion. High IASs on ASL images can identify slow stagnant and collateral flow through the ophthalmic artery in patients with acute ICA occlusion and help to predict the occlusion site. (orig.)

  17. A viscoelastic fluid-structure interaction model for carotid arteries under pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjie; Wood, Nigel B; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a fluid-structure interaction model (FSI) incorporating viscoelastic wall behaviour is developed and applied to an idealized model of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow. The shear and bulk moduli of the arterial wall are described by Prony series, where the parameters can be derived from in vivo measurements. The aim is to develop a fully coupled FSI model that can be applied to realistic arterial geometries with normal or pathological viscoelastic wall behaviour. Comparisons between the numerical and analytical solutions for wall displacements demonstrate that the coupled model is capable of predicting the viscoelastic behaviour of carotid arteries. Comparisons are also made between the solid only and FSI viscoelastic models, and the results suggest that the difference in radial displacement between the two models is negligible. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The clinical use of objective quantification of flow disturbance in carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Bitsch, K; Steenberg, H J

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess the accuracy of objective quantification of carotid flow disturbance, 147 carotid arteries were examined with continuous wave (CW) Doppler technique. The systolic spectral broadening index (SBI), determined as (maximum-mean)/maximum frequency, was calculated from the power...... spectrum and together with the peak frequency related to the angiographic degree of stenosis. Receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated and the SBI predicted disease with a specificity of 94%. On the other hand, the ability of the SBI to discriminate minor disease was not satisfactory. Both...... the SBI and the peak frequency were accurate in discriminating between greater or less than 50% stenosis. The study concludes that using CW Doppler the SBI can reliably predict carotid artery stenoses. For exclusion of minor lesions an additional test should be performed, e.g., pulsed Doppler spectral...

  19. Results in a consecutive series of 83 surgical corrections of symptomatic stenotic kinking of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Caliò, Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of evidence to document the safety and efficacy of operative treatment of carotid stenosis, surgical indications for elongation and kinking of the internal carotid artery remain controversial. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of surgical correction of internal carotid artery kinking in patients with persistent hemispheric symptoms despite antiplatelet therapy. A consecutive series of 81 patients (mean age, 64 years) underwent 83 surgical procedures to correct kinking of the internal carotid artery either by shortening and reimplanting the vessel on the common carotid artery, inserting a bypass graft, or transposing the vessel onto the external carotid artery. Mean follow-up was 56 months (range, 15-135 months). Study endpoints were 30-day mortality and any stroke occurring during follow-up. No postoperative death was observed. The postoperative stroke rate was 1%. Primary patency, freedom from neurologic symptoms, and late survival at 5 years (x +/- standard deviation) were 89 +/- 4.1%, 92 +/- 4%, and 71 +/- 6%, respectively. The findings of this study indicate that surgical correction for symptomatic stenotic kinking of the internal carotid artery is safe and effective in relieving symptoms and preventing stroke. Operative correction should be considered as the standard treatment for patients with symptomatic carotid kinking that does not respond to antiplatelet therapy.

  20. Hemicrania continua-like headache associated with internal carotid artery dissection may respond to indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi; Abbas, Muhammad A; Sharma, Dinesh K; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2007-01-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is an idiopathic, chronic disorder characterized by a continuous, strictly unilateral headache associated with ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. The symptoms of HC typically respond dramatically to indomethacin therapy. We describe a patient with traumatic internal carotid artery dissection, who presented with a clinical picture mimicking HC that initially responded to indomethacin. Patients with a clinical picture similar to HC should be managed with a high index of suspicion for a possible cervical arterial dissection.

  1. [Accidental gunshot injury of the common carotid artery in a 19-year-old man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voboril, Z; Hottmar, P

    1990-05-01

    The author describes a case of a gunshot injury of the right common carotid artery in a 19-year-old man. The injury was caused by a single-shot pistol of German make, calibre 6 mm, Flaubert. The patient was operated at the First Surgical Clinic in Hradec Králové, a reconstruction of the injured artery was made, using a venous patch. The patient recovered per primam. The injury left to sequelae.

  2. The subpetrous carotid wall hematoma. A sign of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery on non-enhanced computed tomography. A retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen-Kondering, U. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Neuroradiology; Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Huhndorf, M.; Madjidyar, J.; Jansen, O. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2015-03-15

    Spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery (CAD) is an increasingly recognized cause for stroke especially in young and middle-aged patients. We hypothesized that non-enhanced cranial computed tomography (NECCT) can visualize the subpetrous carotid wall hematoma and thus enable identification of patients with CAD. We retrospectively reviewed patients with confirmed CAD (n=21) and a control group with ischemic symptoms but without CAD (n=42) who received NECCT at admission. Two independent neuroradiologists rated the presence and shape of SPH, density and diameter of the subpetrous internal carotid artery. Additionally, we correlated the shape of the subpetrous carotid wall hematoma with the grade of stenosis on subsequent angiographic imaging. The subpetrous carotid wall hematoma was present in 14 of 21 patients (Cohen's k = 0.67). Mean diameter was 6.95 ± 1.05 mm in dissected vessels and 5.71 ± 1.52 mm in the contralateral vessel (p<0.05). Mean difference in vessel density was 15.05 ± 8.01 HU (p<0.01). Median grade of stenosis was significantly higher in patients with a full moon- shaped (n=11) than crescent-shaped (n=3) subpetrous carotid wall hematoma (21% vs. 80%, p<0.05). Two-thirds of patients with CAD were correctly identified on NECCT. The extracranial carotid artery should be evaluated in patients with symptoms of cerebral ischemia.

  3. Association Between the Presence of Carotid Artery Plaque and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Genetic Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bea, Ana M; Civeira, Fernando; Jarauta, Estíbaliz; Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Marco-Benedí, Victoria; Cenarro, Ana; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío

    2017-07-01

    The equations used in the general population to calculate cardiovascular risk are not useful in genetic hypercholesterolemia (GH). Carotid plaque detection has proved useful in cardiovascular prediction and risk reclassification but there have been no studies of its usefulness in GH. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the presence of carotid artery plaque and the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with GH. This study included 1778 persons with GH. The mean follow-up until the occurrence of cardiovascular events was 6.26 years. At presentation, the presence of carotid artery plaque was studied by high-resolution ultrasound. Carotid artery plaque was found in 661 (37.2%) patients: 31.9% with familial hypercholesterolemia, 39.8% with familial combined hyperlipidemia, 45.5% with dysbetalipoproteinemia, and 43.2% with polygenic hypercholesterolemia. During follow-up, 58 patients had a cardiovascular event. Event rates were 6354/100 000 (95%CI, 4432.4-8275.6) in the group with plaque and 1432/100 000 (95%CI, 730.6-2134.3) in the group without plaque, with significant differences between the 2 groups (P < .001). The relative risk of an event was 4.34 (95CI%, 2.44-7.71; P < .001) times higher in patients with plaque and was 2.40 (95%CI, 1.27-4.56; P = .007) times higher after adjustment for major risk factors. The number of carotid artery plaques was positively associated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Most cardiovascular events occur in a subgroup of patients who can be identified by carotid plaque detection. These results support the use of plaque screening in this population and should help in risk stratification and treatment in GH. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Spontaneous Recanalization of Complete Internal Carotid Artery: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report | Jul-Dec 2010 | Vol-2 | Issue-2. 73. Spontaneous Recanalization of Complete ... up with periodic carotid ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance. Angiography (MRA) or CT angiography, ... identified high-risk predictive factors for delayed stroke in those treated medically (90 to 94% ...

  5. Overestimation of carotid artery stenosis with magnetic resonance angiography compared with digital subtraction angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Elgersma, Otto E. H.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; Eikelboom, Bert C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is generally considered to overestimate the degree of stenosis in the internal carotid artery (ICA) in comparison with the reference standard intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We

  6. Association between the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Steffensen, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    -media thickness (IMT) and protruding plaques in the right carotid artery. Associations between cardiovascular traits and the levels of pSP-D (n = 687) or two coding SFTPD SNPs rs3088308 and rs721917 (n = 396) were investigated using multiple linear regressions and logistic regressions. RESULTS...

  7. Safety and Feasibility of Simultaneous Ipsilateral Proximal Carotid Artery Stenting and Cerebral Aneurysm Coiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Badruddin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coexistence of cerebral aneurysm and carotid artery disease may be encountered in clinical practice. Theoretical increase in aneurysmal blood flow may increase risk of rupture if carotid artery disease is treated first. If aneurysm coiling is performed first, stroke risk may increase while repeatedly crossing the diseased artery. It is controversial which disease to treat first, and whether it is safe to treat both simultaneously via endovascular procedures. We document the safety and feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Review of collected neurointerventional database at our institution was performed for patients who underwent both Carotid artery stenting (CAS and aneurysm coil embolization (ACE simultaneously. All patients underwent carotid stenting followed by aneurysm coiling in the same setting. Demographic, clinical data and outcome measures including success rate and periprocedural complications were collected. Results: 590 aneurysms coiling were screened for patients who underwent combined CAS and ACE. Ten patients were identified. Mean age was 67.7 years (range 51 to 89. The success rate for stenting and coiling was 100% with no immediate complications. No stroke, TIAs, or aneurysmal rebleeding was found on their most recent follow up. Conclusions: Our case series demonstrates that it is safe and feasible to perform CAS and ACE simultaneously as one procedure which may avoid unwanted risk of treating either disease at two separate time sessions.

  8. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  9. Giant cervical internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm in a child: endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeroglu, M.; Arat, A.; Cekirge, S.; Akpinar, E. [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Eryilmaz, A.; Akmansu, H. [Ankara Numune Research and Education Hospital, ENT Department, Ankara (Turkey); Koeroglu, Kale B. [Ankara Numune Research and Education Hospital, Internal Medicine Department, Ankara (Turkey)

    2002-10-01

    We report a child with a giant upper cervical internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm presenting with dysphagia, respiratory distress and a sentinel mild epistaxis, then massive epistaxis. Rupture of the pseudoaneurysm during treatment occurred, as in one reported case. Prompt endovascular treatment yielded a good outcome. (orig.)

  10. Differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules with US elastography using carotid artery pulsation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighe, Manjiri; Bae, Unmin; Richardson, Michael L; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Kim, Yongmin

    2008-08-01

    To explore the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonographic (US) elastography using carotid arterial pulsation as the compression source for differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules. This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the ethics committee of the institution, and all patients provided written informed consent. Fifty-eight patients (13 men and 45 women [mean age, 51 years; range, 20-76 years]) were enrolled. A short US examination and elastography with pulsation of the carotid artery used as the thyroid compression source were performed before fine-needle aspiration. Baseband US data were downloaded for off-line analysis. Elastographic maps and the thyroid stiffness index were calculated. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric rank sum test was used to assess equality of population medians among the different types of thyroid nodules; the R software environment was used for statistical computing and graphics (http://www.r-project.org/). Thyroid stiffness index calculated with elastography using carotid arterial pulsation as the compression source was effective in helping distinguish between papillary carcinomas (n = 10) and other lesions (n = 43) because papillary carcinomas were stiffer than other lesions (P < .0039). It is possible to distinguish between papillary carcinomas and other lesions with the thyroid stiffness index calculated from US elastography using carotid arterial pulsation.

  11. Lower central serotonergic responsivity is associated with preclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Matthew F; Mackey, Rachel H; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Flory, Janine D; Pollock, Bruce G; Manuck, Stephen B

    2007-08-01

    Central nervous system serotonergic neurotransmission appears to play a role in mood disorders, eating habits, and sleep, and also modulates blood pressure and metabolism. This investigation tested a hypothesized association between central serotonergic functioning and preclinical atherosclerosis. Subjects were 244 adults 30 to 55 years of age and free of clinically evident vascular disease (52% men, 84% white). Central serotonergic responsivity was measured as the rise in serum prolactin concentration (area under the curve) over 2.5 hours, adjusted for baseline prolactin, after citalopram administered intravenously at 0.33 mg/kg lean body weight. Carotid artery morphology served as a marker of preclinical atherosclerosis, and carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque occurrence were determined by B-mode ultrasonography. In linear regression models including age, gender, race, and citalopram concentration, a 1 SD lower prolactin response was associated with greater maximum intima-media thickness (+0.016 mm; P=0.006) and with greater mean intima-media thickness (+0.009 mm; P=0.03). The odds ratio for carotid artery plaque corresponding to a 1 SD decrease in prolactin response, adjusted for age, race, sex, and citalopram concentration, was 1.47 (95% CI, 0.98 to 2.19; P=0.06). The metabolic syndrome mediated (Pmedia thickness. In this young and relatively healthy sample, blunted prolactin response to citalopram was associated with carotid artery thickening, suggesting that individual differences in central serotonergic responsivity are inversely related to preclinical vascular disease.

  12. Metabolic and cardiovascular adjustments during psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Cardiovascular reactivity is associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness as early as childhood. Excess cardiovascular responses relative to the metabolic demand during psychological stress have been proposed as a mechanism for this association. It is not known whether measure...

  13. Prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis according to age and sex systematic review and metaregression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, M.; Greving, J.P.; de Jong, A.W.F.; Buskens, E.; Bots, M.L.

    Background and Purpose-In the discussion on the value of population-wide screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS), reliable prevalence estimates are crucial. We set out to provide reliable age- and sex-specific prevalence estimates of ACAS through a systematic literature review and

  14. Endothelial dysfunction, carotid artery plaque burden, and conventional exercise-induced myocardial ischemia as predictors of coronary artery disease prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihara Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While both flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD in the brachial artery (BA, which measures endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and intima-media thickness (IMT in the carotid artery are correlated with the prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD, it is not clear which modality is a better predictor of CAD. Furthermore, it has not been fully determined whether either of these modalities is superior to conventional ST-segment depression on exercise stress electrocardiogram (ECG as a predictor. Thus, the goal of the present study was to compare the predictive value of FMD, IMT, and stress ECG for CAD prognosis. Methods and Results A total of 103 consecutive patients (62 ± 9 years old, 79 men with clinically suspected CAD had FMD and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NTG-D in the BA, carotid artery IMT measurement using high-resolution ultrasound, and exercise treadmill testing. The 73 CAD patients and 30 normal coronary patients were followed for 50 ± 15 months. Fifteen patients had coronary events during this period (1 cardiac death, 2 non-fatal myocardial infarctions, 3 acute heart failures, and 9 unstable anginas. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, only FMD and stress ECG were significant predictors for cardiac events. Conclusion Brachial endothelial function as reflected by FMD and conventional exercise stress testing has comparable prognostic value, whereas carotid artery plaque burden appears to be less powerful for predicting future cardiac events.

  15. Prosthetic bypass for restenosis after endarterectomy or stenting of the carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Belmonte, Romain; Schneider, Fabrice; Pizzardi, Giulia; Calió, Francesco G; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of prosthetic carotid bypass (PCB) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts as an alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in treatment of restenosis after CEA or carotid artery stenting (CAS). From January 2000 to December 2014, 66 patients (57 men and 9 women; mean age, 71 years) presenting with recurrent carotid artery stenosis ≥70% (North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial [NASCET] criteria) were enrolled in a prospective study in three centers. The study was approved by an Institutional Review Board. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. During the same period, a total of 4321 CEAs were completed in the three centers. In these 66 patients, the primary treatment of the initial carotid artery stenosis was CEA in 57 patients (86%) and CAS in nine patients (14%). The median delay between primary and redo revascularization was 32 months. Carotid restenosis was symptomatic in 38 patients (58%) with transient ischemic attack (n = 20) or stroke (n = 18). In this series, all patients received statins; 28 patients (42%) received dual antiplatelet therapy, and 38 patients (58%) received single antiplatelet therapy. All PCBs were performed under general anesthesia. No shunt was used in this series. Nasal intubation to improve distal control of the internal carotid artery was performed in 33 patients (50%), including those with intrastent restenosis. A PTFE graft of 6 or 7 mm in diameter was used in 6 and 60 patients, respectively. Distal anastomosis was end to end in 22 patients and end to side with a clip distal to the atherosclerotic lesions in 44 patients. Completion angiography was performed in all cases. The patients were discharged under statin and antiplatelet treatment. After discharge, all of the patients underwent clinical and Doppler ultrasound follow-up every 6 months. Median length of follow-up was 5 years. No patient died, sustained a stroke, or presented with a

  16. Distensibility of the aorta and carotid artery and left ventricular mass from childhood to early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikola, Hanna; Pahkala, Katja; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma S A; Niinikoski, Harri; Jokinen, Eero; Salo, Pia; Simell, Olli; Juonala, Markus; Raitakari, Olli T

    2015-01-01

    In adults, arterial distensibility decreases with age and relates to changes in cardiac left ventricular mass. Longitudinal data on changes in arterial distensibility from childhood to adulthood are lacking. Our aim was to study the effect of age and sex, and low-saturated fat dietary counseling on arterial distensibility from childhood to early adulthood. In addition, we assessed the association of arterial distensibility with left ventricular mass. Distensibility of the abdominal aorta and common carotid artery was measured repeatedly at ages 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 years (n=395-472) in an atherosclerosis prevention trial (Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project [STRIP]). Aortic and carotid distensibility decreased with age (both PSTRIP was not significantly associated with arterial distensibility. Left ventricular mass increased with age (P<0.0001), and it was greater in boys (P<0.0001). In conclusion, a marked age-related decrease in vascular distensibility was found already at this young age, and this decrease was more pronounced in boys than girls. The longitudinal progression of aortic and carotid distensibility was related with changes in left ventricular mass. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00223600. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Successful surgical repair of impending rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the brachiocephalic artery with prior reconstruction of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Ken; Maeda, Masanobu; Sakai, Yoshimasa; Sakurai, Hajime; Murayama, Hiroomi; Hasegawa, Hiroki [Social Insurance Chukyo Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    We report the successful repair of impending rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the brachiocephalic artery (BCA) in a 70-year-old man. He had undergone a mediastinal tumor resection through a median sternotomy in 1995. Pathological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Two years later, he underwent radiation therapy of 65 Gray for metastasis to the supraclavicular lymph nodes. On January 18, 2000, plastic surgeons planned to perform a pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap to repair a radiation skin ulcer. During the operation, the BCA was lacerated, possibly in an area of radiation tissue damage. We performed a prosthetic graft (10-mm Gelseal) replacement of the BCA. The right subclavian artery had to be ligated. Postoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed excellent reconstruction of the artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the brain showed a deficit in the anterior communicating artery and stenosis of the posterior communicating artery, which indicated that the reconstruction procedure was reasonable. Seven months later, on August 18, 2000, the patient was transferred to our hospital because of swelling of the right neck and oozing from the previous cutaneous wound. CT scan and DSA demonstrated the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the proximal anastomosis site, which required emergency surgery. Before this third sternotomy, a saphenous vein graft was interposed between both external carotid arteries. Removal of the prosthetic graft and resection of the pseudoaneurysm were performed under mild hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass with left common carotid arterial perfusion. Then, the wound was closed completely using a left pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap. The postoperative course was uneventful and DSA showed good patency of the graft and intracranial arteries. The patient was discharged without neurological complications. We conclude that prior reconstruction of the carotid artery is a safe and effective procedure for patients

  18. Long-term outcome in patients with carotid artery stenting and contralateral carotid occlusion: a single neurovascular center prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Aida; Parkhutik, Vera; Tembl, Jose Ignacio; Aparici, Fernando; Mainar, Esperanza; Alcalá, Carmen; Vázquez-Añón, Víctor

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features and early and late outcome of patients treated with carotid artery stenting for carotid stenosis with occlusion of the contralateral vessel (CAS-CCO), and compare them to patients without occlusion (CAS-NO). From 1999 through 2010, 426 patients with 479 procedures were prospectively recorded, 61 patients (14.3%) CAS-CCO, and 365 patients CAS-NO. Immediate CAS complications, complications within the first 30 days and long-term complications were documented through annual clinical and ultrasonological follow-up visits. Stenosis rate was recorded. Patients with mean age of 68.4 years, 80% men had: (1) periprocedural stroke in three cases (0.7%), (2) cumulative 30-day stroke, ischemic cardiopathy, and death in 4.2%, without differences between groups (CAS-CCO 3.3%, CAS-NO 4.4%). Mean follow-up period was 55 ± 32.78 months, median 56 months. (3) Stroke during the follow-up in 8%, without differences between CAS-CCO and CAS-NO groups (3.7% and 8.8%). (4) Myocardial infarction in 11.2% and (5) global mortality in 24.3%, without statistical differences between groups. Of the 254 cases enrolled in the restenosis analysis, 44 patients (17.3%) had restenosis of any grade during a mean follow-up period of 52 months, without statistical differences between CAS-CCO and CAS-NO groups. Only 7.5% presented restenosis ≥ 50%. Its occurrence was statistically associated with previous neck radiation. Periprocedural risks and long-term outcomes of patients treated with CAS and presenting a contralateral carotid occlusion does not differ from regular patients treated with CAS. Based on the low stenosis rate of our study, our results do not give credit to extra surveillance measures in patients with contralateral carotid occlusion.

  19. High-flow venous pouch aneurysm in the rabbit carotid artery: A model for large aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähenbühl, Anna K; Gralla, Jan; Abu-Isa, Janine; Mordasini, Pasquale; Widmer, Hans R; Raabe, Andreas; Reinert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Currently one of the most widely used models for the development of endovascular techniques and coiling devices for treatment of aneurysm is the elastase-induced aneurysm model in the rabbit carotid artery. Microsurgical techniques for creating an aneurysm with a venous pouch have also been established, although both techniques usually result in aneurysms less than 1 cm in diameter. We investigated whether an increase in blood flow toward the neck would produce larger aneurysms in a microsurgical venous pouch model. Microsurgical operations were performed on 11 New Zealand white rabbits. Both carotid arteries and the right jugular vein were dissected, and the right carotid artery was temporarily clipped followed by an arteriotomy. The left carotid artery was also clipped proximally, ligated distally, and sutured onto the proximal half of the arteriotomy in the right carotid artery. The venous graft was sutured onto the distal half of the arteriotomy. Digital subtraction angiography was also performed. Angiography showed patent anastomosed vessels and aneurysms in the seven surviving rabbits. Mean aneurysm measurements among surviving rabbits with patent vessels were: 13.9 mm length, 9.3 mm width, and neck diameter 4.7 mm. The resulting mean aspect ratio was 3.35 and the mean bottleneck ratio was 3.05. A large venous graft and increased blood flow toward the base of the aneurysm seem to be key factors in the creation of large venous pouch aneurysms. These large aneurysms allow testing of endovascular devices designed for large and giant aneurysms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents; Aneurysmabehandlung der Arteria carotis interna mit gecoverten Stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, A.; Alfke, K.; Doerner, L.; Jansen, O. [UKSH Kiel (Germany). Neurochirurgie Neuroradiologie; Bartsch, T.; Stingele, R. [UKSH Kiel (Germany). Neurologie

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of the use of covered stents in treating pseudoaneurysms of the cervical and intracranial/extradural carotid artery and determination of the periprocedural and short- to mid-term complication rate. Materials and Methods: 8 patients with 9 spontaneous dissecting aneurysms of the cervical carotid artery - 5 of which were symptomatic - plus one patient with ofthalmoplegia due to an aneurysm of the cavernous carotid artery were studied. While the latter was treated with a PTFE-covered balloon-mounted stainless steel stent (Jostent/Graftmaster), a self-expanding PTFE-covered Nitonol Stent (Symbiot) was used in all other cases. Intervention was performed with local anesthesia. Aspirin and Clopidogrel were both used as antiplatelet drugs. Clinical signs and symptoms and vascular imaging with DS, MR, CT angiography and ultrasound were recorded during patient follow-up, with a mean follow-up period of 14.6 months (4 - 30). Results: We were able to treat 8 out of 10 aneurysms (80 %) using covered stents. The aneurysms were immediately occluded and the associated stenoses of the parent vessel were eliminated. No clinically relevant complications occurred during the procedure or in the follow-up interval. In two cases, elongation of the carotid artery prevented the stent from being positioned over the aneurysm neck. These cases were shown to be stable with the use of antiplatelet drugs. Conclusion: Covered stents can be used in the treatment of pseudoaneurysms of the carotid artery as an alternative to long-term antithrombotic medication or surgery. In our study treatment was effective (80 %) and free of complications in the short- and mid-term follow-up. Possible indications, technique and the use of imaging modalities for patient follow-up are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Single sweep three-dimensional carotid ultrasound: reproducibility in plaque and artery volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashyan, Hayrapet; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Gibson, Patrick H; Romanchuk, Helen; Saqqur, Maher; Khan, Khurshid; Osborne, Jonathon; Becher, Harald

    2014-02-01

    There is a need for non-invasive and accurate techniques for assessment of severity of atherosclerotic disease in the carotid arteries. Recently an automated single sweep three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) technique became available. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the automated single sweep method in a cohort of patients undergoing clinically indicated carotid ultrasound. Consecutive patients with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and having a plaque in the internal carotid artery (ICA) were recruited for this study. Imaging was performed using a Philips iU 22 ultrasound system equipped with the single sweep volumetric transducer vL 13-5. Analysis was performed offline with software provided by the manufacturer. Two independent observers performed all measurements. Of 137 arteries studied (from 79 patients), plaque and artery volumes could be measured in 106 (77%). Reproducibility of plaque volume measurements was assessed in 82 arteries. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated good inter-observer reproducibility with limits of agreement -0.06 to +0.07 ml. The mean percentage difference between two observers was 5.6% ± 6.0%. Reproducibility of artery volume measurement was assessed in 31 cases. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated limits of agreement from -0.15 to +0.15 ml. The mean percentage difference was 6.4 ± 5.9%. The new automated single sweep 3D ultrasound is feasible in the majority of patients. Good reproducibility in plaque and artery volume measurements makes this technique suitable for serial assessment of carotid plaques. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Common Carotid Artery Diameter and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Overweight or Obese Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly D. Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial diameter is an underutilized indicator of vascular health. We hypothesized that interadventitial and lumen diameter of the common carotid artery would be better indicators of vascular health than carotid plaque or intima media thickness (IMT. Participants were 491 overweight or obese, postmenopausal women who were former or current hormone therapy (HT users, 52–62 years, with waist circumference >80 cm. We evaluated cross-sectional associations of cardiovascular risk factors with carotid measures, by HT status. Former HT users had a worse cardiovascular profile than current HT users: larger adventitial (6.94 mm versus 6.79 mm and lumen diameter (5.44 mm versus 5.31 mm, both P<0.01 independent of cardiovascular risk factors; IMT and plaque were similar. Larger diameters were best explained by former HT use, higher pulse pressure, and greater weight. Independent of potential confounders, overweight and obese postmenopausal former HT users had larger carotid diameters than current HT users. Carotid diameter should be considered in studies of HT.

  3. Morning Glory Syndrome with Carotid and Middle Cerebral Artery Vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezzar, Hachemi; Mbekeani, Joyce N; Dalens, Helen

    2015-12-01

    To report a case of incidental asymptomatic atypical morning glory syndrome (MGS) with concomitant ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral dysgenesis. A 6-year-old child was discovered to have incidental findings of MGS, with atypia. All visual functions were normal including vision and stereopsis. Neuroimaging revealed ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral vascular narrowing without associated collateral vessels or cerebral ischemia commonly seen in Moyamoya disease. Subsequent annual examinations have been stable, without signs of progression. This case demonstrates disparity between structural aberrations and final visual and neurological function and reinforces the association between MGS and intracranial vascular disruption. Full ancillary ophthalmic and neuroimaging studies should be performed in all patients with MGS with interval reassessments, even when the patient is asymptomatic and functionally intact.

  4. Bilateral symmetry of local inflammatory activation in human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetos, Georgios; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Drakopoulou, Maria; Tolis, Elias; Masoura, Constantina; Nikolaou, Charalampia; Tsekoura, Dorothea; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Grassos, Harris; Siores, Elias; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the structural and functional characteristics of carotid arteries bilaterally. Furthermore, there is controversy as to whether inflammation in paired vascular beds is a local or systemic phenomenon. We aimed to examine, in patients with coronary artery disease, whether intra-subject left and right carotid arteries have similar inflammatory status, as determined non-invasively by microwave radiometry (MWR). Consecutive patients (n=200) with significant coronary artery disease were evaluated via an ultrasound echo-colour Doppler (US-ECD) study of both carotid arteries and temperature measurements with MWR. During thermography, thermal heterogeneity (ΔT) was defined as the maximum temperature along the carotid artery minus the minimum temperature. Mean T was similar between the left and right carotid arteries (0.78 ± 0.48 vs. 0.84 ± 0.52°C, p=0.12). Mean right intima-media thickness (IMT) was greater compared to mean left IMT (2.16 ± 1.20 vs. 1.93 ± 0.94 mm, p<0.01). In all carotids, there was a correlation between left and right carotid plaque ΔT (R=0.38, p<0.001) and between left and right IMT (R=0.48, p<0.001). Independent predictors for the presence of bilateral carotid plaques were found to be the extent of coronary artery disease, high ΔT, and therapy with angiotensin II receptor blockers; predictors for the presence of high ΔT bilaterally were bilateral carotid plaques, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. There is bilateral inflammatory activation in the carotid atherosclerotic lesions of patients with coronary artery disease. At this stage of carotid disease, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus are more strongly correlated with bilateral functional abnormalities in carotid plaques than with structural changes.

  5. [Study on correlation between retinal vessel morphology or ocular hemodynamic parameter and internal carotid artery stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Y; Wang, H; Zhang, X J; Feng, Y H; Wang, Z C; Wang, Y L

    2016-12-11

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between retinal vascular calibers, ocular blood flow parameters and internal carotid artery stenosis and to evaluate the effect of internal carotid artery stenosis on ocular blood vessels comprehensively. Methods: A retrospective case-control study. The clinical data of 141 patients who underwent head-and-neck computed tomography (CT) angiography examinations of the ICA were collected at Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2014 to January 2016. According to diagnostic criteria, the patients were divided into four groups: the non-stenosis group, the mild stenosis group, the moderate stenosis group, and the severe stenosis andocclusion group. The retinal vascular caliber was measured in color fundus photograph by IVAN software. Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure the parameters of ocular blood flow, including the peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), resistance index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI). The enumeration data were analyzed with chi-square test, the measurement data were analyzed with rank-sum test, and the correlation test was performed with spearman. Results: The gender ratio of the patients without stenosis, mild stenosis, moderate stenosis, severe stenosis and occlusion was 12/7, 31/19, 28/25, 12/7, χ(2) test was not statistically significant (χ(2)= 0.79, P=0.85); There was no statistically significant difference between the different groups (χ(2)= 0.15, P=0.68), the age of four groups were (64.1±8.3), (54.3±14.3), (68.9±11.8) and (59.1±8.0) y, respectively. In the no internal carotid artery stenosis group, the arteries diameter is (164.5±15.6) μm ,the vein diameter is (245.6±20.0) μm and the arteriovenous ratio is 0.7±0.1. There is no difference among the mild stenosis group, moderate stenosis group and the severe stenosis (χ(2)artery caliber=6.92, Partery caliber=0.08; χ(2)vein diameter=4.16, Pvein diameter=0.25; χ(2)arteriolar

  6. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  7. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking.

  8. The Short-Term Effect of Ketogenic Diet on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Elastic Properties of the Carotid Artery and the Aorta in Epileptic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doksöz, Önder; Güzel, Orkide; Yılmaz, Ünsal; İşgüder, Rana; Çeleğen, Kübra; Meşe, Timur; Uysal, Utku

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the effect of a 6-month-long ketogenic diet on carotid intima-media thickness, carotid artery, and aortic vascular functions. Thirty-eight drug-resistant epileptic patients who were being treated with ketogenic diet were enrolled. Fasting total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and glucose concentrations were measured and echocardiography was performed in all patients before the beginning of ketogenic diet and at the sixth month of treatment. The body weight, height, body mass index, serum levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein increased significantly at month 6 when compared to baseline values (P ketogenic diet has no effect on carotid intima-media thickness and elastic properties of the carotid artery and the aorta. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The role of completion imaging following carotid artery endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Schneider, Fabrice; Illuminati, Giulio; Samson, Russell H

    2013-05-01

    A variety of completion imaging methods can be used during carotid endarterectomy to recognize technical errors or intrinsic abnormalities such as mural thrombus or platelet aggregation, but none of these methods has achieved wide acceptance, and their ability to improve the outcome of the operation remains a matter of controversy. It is unclear if completion imaging is routinely necessary and which abnormalities require re-exploration. Proponents of routine completion imaging argue that identification of these abnormalities will allow their immediate correction and avoid a perioperative stroke. However, much of the evidence in favor of this argument is incidental, and many experienced vascular surgeons who perform carotid endarterectomy do not use any completion imaging technique and report equally good outcomes using a careful surgical protocol. Furthermore, certain postoperative strokes, including intracerebral hemorrhage and hyperperfusion syndrome, are unrelated to the surgical technique and cannot be prevented by completion imaging. This controversial subject is now open to discussion, and our debaters have been given the task to clarify the evidence to justify their preferred option for completion imaging during carotid endarterectomy. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. No Evidence for Retinal Damage Evolving from Reduced Retinal Blood Flow in Carotid Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Heßler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Carotid artery disease (CAD comprising high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis (CAS or carotid artery occlusion (CAO may lead to ipsilateral impaired cerebral blood flow and reduced retinal blood supply. Objective. To examine the influence of chronic CAD on retinal blood flow, retinal morphology, and visual function. Methods. Patients with unilateral CAS ≥ 50% (ECST criteria or CAO were grouped according to the grade of the stenosis and to the flow direction of the ophthalmic artery (OA. Retinal perfusion was measured by transorbital duplex ultrasound, assessing central retinal artery (CRA blood flow velocities. In addition, optic nerve and optic nerve sheath diameter were measured. Optical coherence tomography (OCT was performed to study retinal morphology. Visual function was assessed using high- and low-contrast visual paradigms. Results. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Eyes with CAS ≥ 80%/CAO and retrograde OA blood flow showed a significant reduction in CRA peak systolic velocity (no-CAD side: 0.130±0.035 m/s, CAS/CAO side: 0.098±0.028; p=0.005; n=12. OCT, optic nerve thicknesses, and visual functional parameters did not show a significant difference. Conclusion. Despite assessable hemodynamic effects, chronic high-grade CAD does not lead to gaugeable morphological or functional changes of the retina.

  11. Relationship between haemodynamic impairment and collateral blood flow in carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Petersen, Esben T; Chappell, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    Collateral blood flow plays a pivotal role in steno-occlusive internal carotid artery (ICA) disease to prevent irreversible ischaemic damage. Our aim was to investigate the effect of carotid artery disease upon cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reactivity and whether haemodynamic impairment...... is influenced at brain tissue level by the existence of primary and/or secondary collateral. Eighty-eight patients with steno-occlusive ICA disease and 29 healthy controls underwent MR examination. The presence of collaterals was determined with time-of-flight, two-dimensional phase contrast MRA and territorial...... arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging. Cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity were assessed with ASL before and after acetazolamide. Cerebral haemodynamics were normal in asymptomatic ICA stenosis patients, as opposed to patients with ICA occlusion, in whom the haemodynamics in both hemispheres...

  12. Automatic detection of carotid arteries in computed tomography angiography: a proof of concept protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano Caetano; Joutsen, Atte; Paci, Michelangelo; Salenius, Juha; Eskola, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the leading causes of mortality in the western world. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the conventional imaging method used for pre-surgery assessment of the blood flow within the carotid vessel. In this paper, we present a proof of concept of a novel, fast and operator independent protocol for the automatic detection (seeding) of the carotid arteries in CTA in the thorax and upper neck region. The dataset is composed of 14 patients' CTA images of the neck region. The performance of this method is compared with manual seeding by four trained operators. Inter-operator variation is also assessed based on the dataset. The minimum, average and maximum coefficient of variation among the operators was (0, 2, 5 %), respectively. The performance of our method is comparable with the state of the art alternative, presenting a detection rate of 75 and 71 % for the lowest and uppermost image levels, respectively. The mean processing time is 167 s per patient versus 386 s for manual seeding. There are no significant differences between the manual and automatic seed positions in the volumes (p = 0.29). A fast, operator independent protocol was developed for the automatic detection of carotid arteries in CTA. The results are encouraging and provide the basis for the creation of automatic detection and analysis tools for carotid arteries.

  13. Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous internal carotid artery presenting with massive epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Patricia S; Tampieri, Donatella; Atkinson, Jeffrey D; Daniel, Sam J; Teitelbaum, Jeanne; Shemie, Sam D

    2006-05-01

    To report a case of posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous internal carotid artery presenting with massive epistaxis and to discuss its pathophysiology and management. Case report and literature review. Pediatric intensive care unit in a tertiary-care center. Twelve days after a motor vehicle accident causing a head injury and facial fractures, this patient presented with massive epistaxis due to a pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous internal carotid artery . Nasal packing was performed and subsequent angiography demonstrated the vascular lesion that had dissected into the sphenoid sinus. Endovascular stent and coil occlusion of the vascular lesion was performed, and the patient's condition improved without any ischemic or thromboembolic sequelae. Posttraumatic aneurysms of the intracavernous internal carotid artery can be associated with delayed and sometimes lethal massive epistaxis. This vascular lesion should be considered in patients with traumatic brain injury presenting with basal skull fractures in the region of the carotid canal or cavernous sinus and/or orbital fractures and compromise of the optical nerves. Knowledge of these risk factors and early diagnosis can minimize the high mortality risk.

  14. Congenital horner syndrome with heterochromia iridis associated with ipsilateral internal carotid artery hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Fabrice C; Coulier, Julie; Rommel, Denis; Boschi, Antonella

    2015-04-01

    Horner syndrome (HS), also known as Claude-Bernard-Horner syndrome or oculosympathetic palsy, comprises ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and facial anhidrosis. We report herein the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with congenital HS associated with ipsilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery (ICA), as revealed by heterochromia iridis and confirmed by computed tomography (CT). CT evaluation of the skull base is essential to establish this diagnosis and distinguish aplasia from agenesis/hypoplasia (by the absence or hypoplasia of the carotid canal) or from acquired ICA obstruction as demonstrated by angiographic CT.

  15. The use of virtual reality for training in carotid artery stenting: a construct validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry, M.; Reznick, R.; Lystig, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Given that carotid artery stenosis (CAS) intervention is procedurally difficult, possesses an extensive learning curve, and involves a grave list of potential complications, construct validation of new non-clinical training devices is of increasing importance. Purpose: To evaluate...... difference in video-gaming habits was demonstrated. Conclusion: With the exception of the metrics of performance time and fluoroscopic use, construct validity of the Procedicus-VIST carotid metrics were not confirmed. Virtual reality simulation as a training method was valued more by novices than...

  16. Synchronous Carotid Bifurcation Endarterectomy and Retrograde Kissing Stenting of the Innominate and Left Common Carotid Artery in a Patient with a Bovine Aortic Arch

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Robaldo; Guido Carignano; Alberto Balderi; Claudio Novali

    2017-01-01

    Management of the symptomatic multiple stenosis of supra-aortic vessels (MSSVs) in a “bovine” aortic arch (BAA) configuration is infrequently reported. The optimal treatment choice remains debatable. A successful hybrid treatment for a proximal critical stenosis of the innominate and left common carotid artery was performed in a high-risk patient with a tandem symptomatic lesion in the right carotid bifurcation and a concentric vulnerable plaque in the bovine trunk. This case supports the fea...

  17. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Sheng Yu,1,* Chih-Ming Lin,2,3,* Chi-Kuang Liu,4 Henry Horng-Shing Lu1 1Institute of Statistics and Big Data Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 2Stroke Centre and Department of Neurology, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, 3Graduate Institute of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 4Department of Medical Imaging, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline m

  18. Hemicrania continua in carotid artery dissection - symptomatic cases or linked pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilla, Roland; Pawlowski, Matthias; Evers, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemicrania continua (HC) -like headaches have been rarely reported as symptomatic headaches, including cases secondary to cervical artery dissection. Case series We present five cases of HC-like headaches following cervical artery dissection, in three cases with specific indomethacin response. In two cases, comorbidity of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was noted. Conclusion Carotid artery dissection may result in an HC-like headache syndrome. A specific response to indomethacin does not rule out dissection as underlying pathology. Screening for extracranial manifestations of FMD should be considered, especially in middle-aged females.

  19. Elliptical transection for eversion endarterectomy enables efficient external carotid artery desobliteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Terézia B; Medgyesi, Orsolya; Dorner, Elke; Kindler, Christof

    2016-12-01

    Eversion endarterectomy (EEA) of the internal carotid artery requires less distal surgical exposure than conventional patch reconstruction endarterectomy. However, the technical success after EEA was tremendously contradictive especially with respect to the external carotid artery (ECA) patency rate. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of elliptical EEA on the quality and outcome of external carotid artery desobliteration. Clinical outcome and carotid disease progression at one year were evaluated in thirty patients receiving EEA through short transverse skin incision either in general anesthesia (GA, 22 patients) or locoregional anesthesia (LRA, 8 patients). One patient (GA group) required early revision for bleeding. There was no postoperative stroke, nerve damage or death. At one year, ipsilateral systolic peak velocity (SPV) measurements showed no disease progression in the internal (75.30±19.31; 62.88±28.51 cm/s) or in the external carotid artery (118.92±58.30; 79.00±27.15 cm/s, GA; RLA, respectively). The incidence of ipsilateral ECA stenosis >50% decreased from 64% preoperatively to 16 % at one year (PECA stenosis >50% increased from 27% preoperatively to 56% after one year (p=0.018). On the ipsilateral side, all patients in the RLA group had less than 50% stenosis of ECA at one year after the operation (P=0.021 vs. pre-OP), while in the GA group four patients developed 50-74% stenosis and one patient >75% stenosis of ECA (Pgroups and demonstrated a total of 96.7% ECA patency at one year. Elliptical transsection for EEA enables outstanding ECA revascularization with good patency at one year. Type of anesthesia does not affect the quality of the eversion technique.

  20. Skin Temperature Over the Carotid Artery, an Accurate Non-invasive Estimation of Near Core Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Farsad; Karimi Rouzbahani, Hamid Reza; Goudarzi, Mehrdad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahim Soltani, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    During anesthesia, continuous body temperature monitoring is essential, especially in children. Anesthesia can increase the risk of loss of body temperature by three to four times. Hypothermia in children results in increased morbidity and mortality. Since the measurement points of the core body temperature are not easily accessible, near core sites, like rectum, are used. The purpose of this study was to measure skin temperature over the carotid artery and compare it with the rectum temperature, in order to propose a model for accurate estimation of near core body temperature. Totally, 124 patients within the age range of 2 - 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were selected. Temperature of rectum and skin over the carotid artery was measured. Then, the patients were randomly divided into two groups (each including 62 subjects), namely modeling (MG) and validation groups (VG). First, in the modeling group, the average temperature of the rectum and skin over the carotid artery were measured separately. The appropriate model was determined, according to the significance of the model's coefficients. The obtained model was used to predict the rectum temperature in the second group (VG group). Correlation of the predicted values with the real values (the measured rectum temperature) in the second group was investigated. Also, the difference in the average values of these two groups was examined in terms of significance. In the modeling group, the average rectum and carotid temperatures were 36.47 ± 0.54°C and 35.45 ± 0.62°C, respectively. The final model was obtained, as follows: Carotid temperature × 0.561 + 16.583 = Rectum temperature. The predicted value was calculated based on the regression model and then compared with the measured rectum value, which showed no significant difference (P = 0.361). The present study was the first research, in which rectum temperature was compared with that of skin over carotid artery, to find a safe location with easier

  1. De Novo Vertebral Artery Dissection after Endovascular Trapping for Ruptured Dissecting Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    HORIE, Nobutaka; SADAKATA, Eisaku; IZUMO, Tsuyoshi; HAYASHI, Kentaro; MORIKAWA, Minoru; NAGATA, Izumi

    The authors present an extremely rare case of a 54-year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a rupture of a dissecting internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm, who developed de novo vertebral artery dissection in the spasm period after endovascular trapping of the ICA. Interestingly, postoperative cardiopulmonary monitoring showed high global end-diastolic volume index and mean arterial pressure, which could contribute to this de novo dissection via hemodynamic stress in the cerebral circulation. Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection of more than two arteries is rare, and we believe this is the first case of de novo dissection occurring on a circulating vessel different from that of the initial dissection. The clinical implications are discussed in relation to postoperative hemodynamic stress with a review of the literature. PMID:24418785

  2. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Fekkes, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Manniesing, R.; Hansen, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to

  3. Asymmetric pulsation of rat carotid artery bifurcation in three-dimension observed by ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changzhu; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2016-10-01

    The arterial structure cyclically fluctuates in three-dimensions (3-D) caused by pulsatile blood flow. The evaluation of arterial wall motion and hemodynamics contributes to early diagnosis of carotid atherosclerosis. Ultrasound is one of the most appropriate imaging modalities to evaluate arterial wall motion in real time. Although many previous studies have discussed the mechanical properties of the carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) from the two-dimensional (2-D) view, the spatio-temporal variation of carotid artery geometry in 3-D has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, the 3-D data set of CAB from rats was acquired using a high spatio-temporal resolution ultrasound imaging system with a 40 MHz probe using mechanical sector scanning. A total of 31 slices of cross-section images were stored and a spoke scan algorithm was implemented to radially scan the lumen area in polar coordinates based on a pre-tracked seed point. The boundary of the arterial lumen was segmented using intensity-threshold-based boundary detection and fitted by polynomial regression. Two operators, who were trained with the same protocol to minimize inter- and intra-operator variability, manually segmented the lumen boundary on systolic and diastolic phase from the gray-scale images. Finally, the 3-D lumen geometries of CAB during one cardiac cycle were constructed based on the segmented lumen boundaries. From this constructed 3-D geometry, we observed that the CAB geometry favorably expanded to the anterior/posterior direction, parallel to the sagittal plane; and the manually segmented geometry also confirmed the asymmetrical change in bifurcation geometry. This is the first study on visualization and quantification on the asymmetrical variation of the CAB geometry of a rat in 3-D during a whole cardiac cycle. This finding may be useful in understanding hemodynamic etiology of various cardiovascular diseases such as arterial stenosis and its complications, and also provides

  4. Hyperelastic remodeling in the intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) carotid artery in the near-term fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, R Blair; Rozance, Paul J; Reina-Romo, Esther; Ferguson, Virginia L; Hunter, Kendall S

    2013-03-15

    A constitutive model for a fiber reinforced hyperelastic material was applied to understand arterial fiber remodeling in a sheep model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR). IUGR is associated altered hemodynamics characterized by increased resistance to blood flow in the placenta and elevated fetal arterial pressure and pulsatility. The constitutive model describes the collagen contribution to the mechanics within the arterial wall in both control and IUGR carotid artery through defining the material modulus and the orientation of the microstructure. A sheep model of placental insufficiency induced IUGR (PI-IUGR) was created by exposure of the pregnant ewe to elevated ambient temperatures. Experimental data was collected using pressure-diameter measurements to measure passive compliance in control and PI-IUGR carotid arteries. The constitutive model was optimized to fit the experimental data predicting the material parameters. Specifically, the collagen fiber predicted angle (γ) in the control artery was 49.9° from the circumferential axis while the PI-IUGR was 16.6° with a 23.5% increase in fiber orientation (κ). Quantitative assessment of collagen fiber orientation in secondary harmonic generation images confirmed the shift in orientation between the two groups. Together these suggest vascular remodeling of the ECM fiber orientation plays a major role in arterial stiffening in the PI-IUGR near-term fetal sheep. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Segmentation of common carotid artery with active appearance models from ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; He, Wanji; Fenster, Aaron; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-02-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a new segmentation method is proposed and evaluated for outlining the common carotid artery (CCA) from transverse view images, which were sliced from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) of 1mm inter-slice distance (ISD), to support the monitoring and assessment of carotid atherosclerosis. The data set consists of forty-eight 3D US images acquired from both left and right carotid arteries of twelve patients in two time points who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more at the baseline. The 3D US data were collected at baseline and three-month follow-up, where seven treated with 80mg atorvastatin and five with placebo. The baseline manual boundaries were used for Active Appearance Models (AAM) training; while the treatment data for segmentation testing and evaluation. The segmentation results were compared with experts manually outlined boundaries, as a surrogate for ground truth, for further evaluation. For the adventitia and lumen segmentations, the algorithm yielded Dice Coefficients (DC) of 92.06%+/-2.73% and 89.67%+/-3.66%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/-0.18 mm and 0.22+/-0.16 mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.71+/-0.28 mm and 0.59+/-0.21 mm, respectively. The segmentation results were also evaluated via Pratt's figure of merit (FOM) with the value of 0.61+/-0.06 and 0.66+/-0.05, which provides a quantitative measure for judging the similarity. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can promote the carotid 3D US usage for a fast, safe and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  6. [Study of the hypoplasic internal carotid artery by use of multislice spiral computed tomography. Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra de Grassa, B; Romero-Vidal, F J; Alarcón-Alcaraz, M M; Arenillas-Lara, J F; Fernández-Lara, L J; Coscojuela-Santaliestra, P

    Hypoplastic internal carotid artery (HICA) is a rare benign congenital malformation. Its angiographic image string sign is shared by entities that may be either medically or surgically treated. We report two cases diagnosed by helical computerized tomography (HCT). Case 1: woman diagnosed clinically and by magnetic resonance (MR) of Chiari I malformation with associated syringomyelia. An HCT of the craniocervical junction was done to rule out osseous malformations. An hypoplastic posterior fossa (PF) with small right carotid foramen was diagnosed. An arteriography with HCT was done that showed the carotid string sign. Case 2: a 82 years old hypertensive woman with left hemiparesia and homonymous hemianopsia was diagnosed of right temporooccipital infarct. An HCT arteriography disclosed occlusion of the right posterior cerebral artery, calcification of the left carotid siphon and stenosis of the right siphon. Bi and tridimensional reconstructions of the circle of Willis, cranial base and distal cervical carotid arteries showed an hypoplastic right carotid artery and foramen. Multislice HCT is a recently incorporated diagnostic tool that allows a volumetric study in a short period of time, seconds. An angiographic study can be done intravenously in cases of vascular anomaly suspiction, hypoplastic carotid artery in the reported cases. HCT is the only current imaging tool that can diagnose this anomaly without the aid of other imaging studies.

  7. Intramural location and size of arterial calcification are associated with stenosis at carotid bifurcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeki, E-mail: shigekiyamada3@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery and Stroke Center, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, Otowachinji-cho 2, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8602 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, 25 Shogen-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka 430-8525 (Japan); Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies/Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Oshima, Marie, E-mail: marie@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies/Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshihiko, E-mail: ynabe@magic.odn.ne.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, 25 Shogen-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka 430-8525 (Japan); Ogata, Hideki, E-mail: hidogata@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, 25 Shogen-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka 430-8525 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji, E-mail: hashiken8022@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Kishiwada Municipal Hospital, 1001 Gakuhara-cho, Kishiwada city, Osaka 596-8501 (Japan); Miyake, Hidenori, E-mail: hi-miyake@hamamatsuh.rofuku.go.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, 25 Shogen-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka 430-8525 (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis and intramural location and size of calcification at the ICA origins and the origins of the cervical arteries proximal to the ICA. Method: A total of 1139 ICAs were evaluated stenosis and calcification on the multi-detector row CT angiography. The intramural location was categorized into none, outside and inside location. The calcification size was evaluated on the 4-point grading scale. The multivariate analyses were adjusted for age, serum creatinine level, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcohol habits. Results: Outside calcification at the ICA origins showed the highest multivariate odds ratio (OR) for the presence of ICA stenosis (30.0) and severe calcification (a semicircle or more of calcification at the arterial cross-sectional surfaces) did the second (14.3). In the subgroups of >70% ICA stenosis, the multivariate OR of outside location increased to 44.8 and that of severe calcification also increased to 32.7. Four of 5 calcified carotid plaque specimens extracted by carotid endarterectomy were histologically confirmed to be calcified burdens located outside the internal elastic lamia which were defined as arterial medial calcification. Conclusions: ICA stenosis was strongly associated with severe calcification located mainly outside the carotid plaque. Outside calcification at the ICA origins should be evaluated separately from inside calcification, as a marker for the ICA stenosis. Additionally, we found that calcification at the origins of the cervical arteries proximal to the ICA was significantly associated with the ICA stenosis.

  8. Retrograde Suction Decompression Through Direct Puncture of the Common Carotid Artery for Paraclinoid Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomura, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Arata; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Surgical clipping of paraclinoid aneurysm can be very difficult because strong adhesions may hinder the dissection of the perforators and surrounding anatomical structures from the aneurysm dome. We describe our experience with using retrograde suction decompression during the clipping of paraclinoid aneurysms and discuss the relative advantages and pitfalls. This study included 23 patients with large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms who underwent surgical treatment consisting of direct clipping with suction decompression between March 2004 and August 2014. Direct puncture of the common carotid artery (CCA) was performed with a 20-gauge needle. The aneurysm was temporarily trapped by clamping of the CCA and external carotid artery (ECA), followed by temporary clipping of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) distal to the aneurysm neck. Blood was then gently aspirated through a catheter introduced into the cervical ICA, resulting in collapse of the aneurysm. Therefore, safe aneurysm dissection was feasible during interruption of the blood flow, which could be maintained for up to 5 min. This procedure was repeated until dissection and clipping of the aneurysm were completed. Seven patients were admitted with SAH, 11 with asymptomatic unruptured aneurysm, and 5 with symptomatic unruptured aneurysm. The aneurysms were located on the paraclinoidal segment of the ICA in 15 cases, on the ICA-posterior communicating artery (PComA) in 6, at the ICA bifurcation in 1, and on the anterior wall of the ICA in 1. None of them suffered complications related to the CCA puncture. Surgical outcome was good recovery in 13 patients, moderate disability in 4, severe disability in 4, and vegetative state in 1. Retrograde suction decompression through direct puncture of the common carotid artery is a useful adjunct technique for the clipping of paraclinoid ICA aneurysms.

  9. Relation of cholesterol and lipoprotein parameters with carotid artery plaque characteristics: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) carotid MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Salim S; Catellier, Diane J; Pompeii, Lisa A; Nambi, Vijay; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Wasserman, Bruce A; Coresh, Josef; Mosley, Thomas H; Otvos, James D; Sharrett, A Richey; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2011-12-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding relations of apolipoproteins (apolipoprotein B [ApoB] and apolipoprotein A-1 [Apo A-1]), lipoprotein particle measures (low-density lipoprotein particle concentration [LDLp] and high-density lipoprotein particle concentration [HDLp]), and lipoprotein cholesterol measures (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [non-HDL-C], and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C]) with atherosclerotic plaque burden, plaque eccentricity, and lipid-rich core presence as a marker of high-risk plaques. Carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 1670 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study participants. Vessel wall and lipid cores were measured; normalized wall index (NWI), standard deviation (SD) of wall thickness (measure of plaque eccentricity) were calculated; and lipid cores were detected in vessels with ≥ 1.5mm thickness. Fasting concentrations of cholesterol, ApoB and Apo A-1, and LDLp and HDLp were measured. Measures of plaque burden (carotid wall volume, wall thickness, and NWI) were positively associated with atherogenic cholesterol and lipoproteins (p < 0.05 for total cholesterol, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, ApoB, and LDLp), but not with HDL-C, Apo A-1, or HDLp. SD of wall thickness was associated with total cholesterol (p 0.01) and non-HDL-C (p 0.02). Although measures of atherogenic or anti-atherogenic cholesterol or lipoprotein were not individually associated with detection of a lipid-rich core, their ratios (total cholesterol/HDL-C, non-HDL-C/HDL-C, and LDLp/HDLp) were associated with lipid-rich core presence (p ≤ 0.05). Extent of carotid atherosclerosis is associated with atherogenic cholesterol and lipoproteins. Atherogenic/anti-atherogenic cholesterol or particle ratios were associated with presence of a detectable lipid-rich core. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Prevalence of carotid artery calcifications detected on panoramic radiographs and confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography: Their relationship with systemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Queiroz Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: CACs can be detected in PRJs, and are more frequent in common carotid arteries. No significant associations were detected between the presence of unilateral or bilateral CAC in PRJ and hypertension, diabetes, or obesity.

  11. Carotid Artery Wall Motion Estimation from Consecutive Ultrasonic Images: Comparison between Block-Matching and Maximum-Gradient Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effat Soleimani

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: Both block-matching and maximum-gradient algorithms can be used to extract the radial displacement of the carotid artery wall and in addition, with respect to the pixel size as error, the same results can be obtained.

  12. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque of carotid arteries with histopathological correlation: Vascular wall MR imaging vs. color Doppler ultrasonography (US)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Yuji; Nagayama, Masako; Suga, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Yamagata, Sen; Okumura, Akira; Amoh, Yoshiki; Nakashita, Satoru; Van Cauteren, Marc; Dodo, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether the vessel wall MRI of carotid arteries would differentiate at-risk soft plaque from solid fibrous plaque by identifying liquid components more accurately than color Doppler ultrasonography (US...

  13. Transcarotid Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement as Preferred Alternative Access in a Patient With Bilateral Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Puja B; Loh, Shang; Gruberg, Luis; Patel, Neal; Weinstein, Jonathan; Tannous, Henry; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A 78-year-old man presented with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and a heavily calcified, stenotic aortic valve. Given multiple comorbidities, the heart team agreed on a transcatheter approach via the left common carotid artery.

  14. Changes in Flow-Mediated Dilatation, Cytokines and Carotid Arterial Stenosis During Aggressive Atorvastatin Treatment in Normocholesterolemic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yi Hsu

    2005-02-01

    Conclusion: Atorvastatin effectively reduced plasma concentrations of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, and had beneficial effects on endothelial function, in Chinese patients with carotid arterial stenosis and normal LDL-cholesterol levels.

  15. Aneurysms in Aorta and Bilateral Carotid Arteries in a Patient with Takayasu%u2019s Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to present pre and postoperative angiographies for aneurysms in ascending and toracoabdominal aorta and bilateral common carotid arteries in a patient with Takayasu’ s arteritis

  16. The role of selected chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis and destabilisation of atheromatous plaques in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Konarska-Król

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are cytokines that act selectively on cells and are capable of inducing selective migration of cells in vitro and in vivo. The term was first coined at the 3rd International Symposium on Chemotactic Cytokines in 1992. The name “chemokine” is a contraction of “chemotactic cytokine,” meaning that these molecules combine features of both cytokines and chemotactic factors. They are a family of low-molecular-mass proteins acting on specific membrane receptors. A cell’s overall sensitivity to chemotaxis depends on the expression profile of chemokine receptors. Atherosclerosis is essentially an excessive inflammatory and proliferative response to the damage of arterial walls. It takes place within the wall and leads to the formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Many chemokines have been studied in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of an atheromatous plaque in the carotid arteries, both in animal models and with the use of human tissue. It  seems that molecules that are the most involved in the formation of atheromas in the carotid arteries include: CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5. However, reports are sometimes contradictory, and more research is needed. Finding a marker that could help predict the destabilisation of an atheromatous plaque would be a valuable addition to the standard diagnostic panel of tests used in both the diagnosis and monitoring of vascular pathologies.

  17. Circumferential strain of carotid arteries does not differ between patients with advanced coronary artery disease and group without coronary stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbowska-Drabik, Karina; Cygulska, Kamila; Cieślik-Guerra, Urszula; Uznańska-Loch, Barbara; Rechciński, Tomasz; Trzos, Ewa; Kurpesa, Małgorzata; Kasprzak, Jarosław D

    2016-09-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography is widely used for the analysis of myocardial function. Recently, circumferential strain (CS) of carotid arteries was postulated as novel indicator of vascular function. Our aim was to characterize and compare CS of carotid arteries in patients with advanced coronary artery disease and controls without significant coronary stenoses. We compared CS of both common carotid arteries (CCA) in the 25 patients with three-vessel coronary artery disease (3VD) (mean age 69±9 years, 9 male) and in 16 age-matched subjects without significant coronary lesions (C) (69±8 years, 7 male). Additionally in 11 patients we estimated pulse wave velocity (PWV) and assessed the correlation between PWV and CS. Short-axis images of arteries were acquired for strain analysis with linear probe of echocardiograph. The assessment of CS was performed off-line by two observers. The intraobserver variability for the CS (coefficient of variation) were 4.9 and 5.4% for left and right CCA and interobserver variability were 11.7% and 12.5%, respectively. The mean CS for left and right CCA did not differ between compared groups. We did not find correlation between CS strain and PWV. The only difference was related to the more prevalent plaque presence and thicker intima-media complex (IMT) in 3VD (p=0.0039 for IMT of left CCA and p=0.016 for IMT of right CCA). The global CS of CCA, contrary to IMT, did not allow for differentiation between 3VD and C subjects. Despite good feasibility and concordance of CS measurements its clinical significance remains to be established. Copyright © 2016 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Vasovagal syncope in the Canon of Avicenna: the first mention of carotid artery hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Khalili, Majid; Alakbarli, Farid; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-05-29

    Ibn Sina, known as Avicenna in the West, was a celebrated Persian thinker, philosopher, and physician who is remembered for his masterpiece, The Canon of Medicine. The Canon that served as an essential medical encyclopedia for scholars in the Islamic territories and Europe for almost a millennium consisted of 5 books. In the third book, Avicenna described patients with symptoms of carotid hypersensitivity syndrome. These patients, who had excessive yawning, fatigue, and flushing, dropped following pressure on their carotids. Based on such history, it seems that Avicenna was the first to note the carotid sinus hypersensitivity, which presents with vasovagal syncope following compression of the carotid artery. In this paper, we presented a brief account of Avicenna's life and works and discuss his description of the so-called carotid hypersensitivity syncope. Notwithstanding his loyalty to the Greek theory of humoralism, Avicenna set forth his own version of "theory of spirits" to explain the mechanism of this disease. An account of the theory of spirits is also given.

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  20. Who Is at Risk for Carotid Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  1. Usefulness of the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in predicting the severity of carotid artery stenosis in patients undergoing carotid angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyhun Varım

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotid artery stenosis (CAS is primarily caused by atherosclerotic plaque. Progressive inflammation may contribute to the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. The platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR is a new and simple marker that indicates inflammation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of the PLR to determine the severity of CAS. One hundred forty patients were chosen from among patients who underwent carotid angiography in our institution. Symptomatic patients with stenosis >50% in the carotid arteries and asymptomatic patients with stenosis >80% were diagnosed via carotid angiography as having critical stenosis. Patients were classified into two groups. Group 1 included patients who had critical CAS, whereas Group 2 included patients with noncritical CAS, as determined by carotid angiography. Correlations between the PLR and the severity of CAS were analyzed. There were no significant differences in sex and age between the two groups. The PLR was 162.5 ± 84.7 in the noncritical CAS group patients and 94.9 ± 60.3 in the critical CAS group patients (p < 0.0001. The PLR value of 117.1 had 89% sensitivity and 68% specificity for CAS [95% confidence interval, 0.043–0.159; area under the curve, 0.101 ± 0.03]. In this study, we have shown that PLR values may be associated with critical stenosis in at least one of the carotid arteries. Furthermore, PLR values may be used to predict critical stenosis in the carotid arteries.

  2. Semiautomated and automated algorithms for analysis of the carotid artery wall on computed tomography and sonography: a correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Tallapally, Niranjan; Gao, Hao; Molinari, Filippo; Anzidei, Michele; Piga, Mario; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare automated and semiautomated algorithms for analysis of carotid artery wall thickness and intima-media thickness on multidetector row computed tomographic (CT) angiography and sonography, respectively, and to study the correlation between them. Twenty consecutive patients underwent multidetector row CT angiographic and sonographic analysis of carotid arteries (mean age, 66 years; age range, 59-79 years). The intima-media thickness of the 40 carotid arteries was measured with novel and dedicated automated software analysis and by 4 observers who manually calculated the intima-media thickness. The carotid artery wall thickness was automatically estimated by using a specific algorithm and was also semiautomatically quantified. The correlation between groups was calculated by using the Pearson ρ statistic, and scatterplots were calculated. We evaluated intermethod agreement using Bland-Altman analysis. By comparing automated carotid artery wall thickness, automated intima-media thickness, semiautomated carotid artery wall thickness, and semiautomated intima-media thickness analyses, a statistically significant association was found, with the highest values obtained for the association between semiautomated and automated intima-media thickness analyses(Pearson ρ = 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.95; P = 0.0001). The lowest values were obtained for the association between semiautomated intima-media thickness and automated carotid artery wall thickness analyses (Pearson ρ = 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.66; P = 0.0047). In the Bland-Altman analysis, the better results were obtained by comparing the semiautomated and automated algorithms for the study of intima-media thickness, with an interval of -16.1% to +43.6%. The results of this preliminary study showed that carotid artery wall thickness and intima-media thickness can be studied with automated software, although the CT analysis needs to be further improved.

  3. Hyperuricemia and carotid artery dilatation among young adults without metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswar Krishnan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It is not known if hyperuricemia is associated with early vascular changes signifying arteriosclerosis. We performed a cross sectional study of 163 young adults without metabolic syndrome in Allegheny County, PA, USA. Doppler ultrasound was used to measure two metrics of early arteriosclerosis: carotid artery dimensions and aortic pulse wave velocity. Individuals in the highest quartiles of serum uric acid (>6.2 mg/dL for men and >4.6 for women were more likely to be of younger age, and to possess greater measures of adiposity and an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Higher serum uric acid concentration was associated with larger luminal and adventitial diameters as well as changes in diameters between the phases of the cardiac cycle (P<0.001 but not with carotid intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity, or pressure strain modulus. In multivariable linear regression models where the effects of age, ethnicity, serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure, current alcohol use, body mass index and smoking status were accounted for, the highest quartile of serum uric acid was associated with greater luminal and adventitial diameters and change in luminal diameter between the phases of cardiac cycle (P<0.05, but not with pulse wave velocity, pressure strain modulus or carotid intima media thickness. We can conclude that hyperuricemia is associated with larger carotid artery diameters signifying an early adaptive response to vascular stress. This has implications on the observed link between hyperuricemia and hypertension.

  4. Evaluation of Endarterectomy Recanalization under Ultrasound Guidance in Symptomatic Patients with Carotid Artery Occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Liu

    Full Text Available Rigorous screening and good imaging would help perform surgery on carotid artery occlusion CAO safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate carotid endarterectomy (CEA recanalization in patients with common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO or internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO with color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI. A total of 59 patients undergoing CEA were enrolled. According to the results of CEA, the patients were divided into successful recanalization (group A and unsuccessful recanalization (group B groups. The original diameter, lesion length, proximal-to-distal diameter ratio and echo characteristics of the lesion within the lumen of the carotid artery were recorded before CEA and compared between the two groups. In regards to the achievement of repatency by CEA, the overall success rate was 74.6% (44/59, the success rate in CCAO patients was 75.9% (22/29 and the success rate in ICAO patients was 73.3% (22/30. There was no significant difference in the success rates between the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 0.050, P = 0.824. The overall rate of stroke and death within 30 postoperative days was 5.1% (3/59. For the CCAO patients, the lesion length in group A was shorter than that in group B (t = 3.221, P = 0.004. For the ICAO patients, the original diameter of the distal ICA was broader (t = 6.254, P = 0.000 and the proximal-to-distal ICA diameter ratio was smaller (t = 8.036, P = 0.000 in group A than in group B. The rate of recanalization for lumens with a homogeneous echo pattern (hypoecho or isoecho was significantly higher than that for lumens with echo heterogeneity for both the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 14.477, P = 0.001; χ2 = 10.519, P = 0.003. However, for both the CCAO and ICAO patients, there was no difference in the rate of recanalization between patients with hypoecho and isoecho lesions (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.742; χ2 = 0.836, P = 0.429. The original diameter, proximal-to-distal ICA

  5. Lateral abdominal wall hematoma as a rare complication after carotid artery stenting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Jyunichiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare and life-threatening complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS, but it can occur when activated clotting time is prolonged. We report a right lateral abdominal wall hematoma caused by rupture of the superficial circumflex iliac artery after CAS in a 72-year-old man with severe stenosis of the origin of the right internal carotid artery. We performed CAS for the targeted lesion while activated clotting time exceeded 300 seconds. After 2 hours, he complained of right lateral abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an extensive hematoma in the right lateral abdominal wall. Activated clotting time was 180 seconds at this point. Seven hours later, he developed hypotension and hemoglobin level dropped to 11.3 g/dl. Subsequent computed tomography showed enlargement of the hematoma. Emergent selective angiography of the external iliac artery revealed active bleeding from the right superficial circumflex iliac artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization with Gelfoam and microcoils was performed successfully. With more CAS procedures being performed, it is important for endovascular surgeons and radiologists to consider the possibility of abdominal wall hematoma in this situation.

  6. Lack of age-related increase in carotid artery wall viscosity in cardiorespiratory fit men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Gando, Yuko; Tanimoto, Michiya; Murakami, Haruka; Ohmori, Yumi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2013-12-01

    Age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of arterial elasticity are attenuated in individuals with high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Viscosity is another mechanical characteristic of the arterial wall; however, the effects of age and cardiorespiratory fitness have not been determined. We examined the associations among age, cardiorespiratory fitness and carotid arterial wall viscosity. A total of 111 healthy men, aged 25-39 years (young) and 40-64 years (middle-aged), were divided into either cardiorespiratory fit or unfit groups on the basis of peak oxygen uptake. The common carotid artery was measured noninvasively by tonometry and automatic tracking of B-mode images to obtain instantaneous pressure and diameter hysteresis loops, and we calculated the effective compliance, isobaric compliance and viscosity index. In the middle-aged men, the viscosity index was larger in the unfit group than in the fit group (2533 vs. 2018 mmHg·s/mm, respectively: Pviscosity index was increased with advancing age, but these parameters were unaffected by cardiorespiratory fitness level. These results suggest that the wall viscosity in the central artery is increased with advancing age and that the age-associated increase in wall viscosity may be attenuated in cardiorespiratory fit men.

  7. Combined application of distal and proximal embolic protection devices in endovascular stenting for severe carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hua DU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze and summarize methods and experiences of combined application of distal and proximal embolic protection devices(EPD in endovascular stenting for severe carotid artery stenosis.Methods Five patients with severe stenosis of the common carotid artery or with extracranial segment of the internal carotid artery diagnosed through digital subtraction angiography(DSA from March to July 2010 were involved in the present study.All patients received carotid angioplasty and stenting(CAS,with a combination of distal and proximal EPD via the percutaneous femoral artery approach.Results The operation failed in one patient,whereas technical success with no intraoperative complication was achieved in four patients.The symptoms disappeared or improved in the four cases that achieved technical success.The follow-up duration was one to three months,and no cerebral ischemia was found.Conclusion CAS with the combined application of distal and proximal EPD in some special cases of carotid artery stenosis may surmount the shortage of single EPD,reduce the risk of intraoperative embolization,decrease the time of intraoperative endovascular inflow occlusion,and reduce high-risk operations.CAS may be used as an individualized treatment strategy for patients with carotid artery stenosis.

  8. Outcomes of emergent carotid artery stenting within 6 hours of symptom onset in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Won Gi; Yoon, Woong; Yim, Nam Yeol; Jung, Min Young; Jung, Se Hee; Kang, Heoung Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To investigate clinical outcomes following the emergent carotid artery stenting for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with acute stroke due to atherosclerotic steno-occlusive diseases of extracranial internal carotid artery underwent emergent carotid artery stenting. Of these, 23 patients had tandem intracranial arterial occlusions. Extracranial carotid stenting was successful in all patients. From the 13 patients who underwent intracranial recanalization procedures, successful recanalization occurred in 84.6% (11/13). 57% of patients (16/28) had a good clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0-2) after 3 months. Patients with successful intracranial/extracranial recanalization had a significantly higher rate of good outcome than those without recanalization after 3 months (75% vs. 33%, p = 0.027). Patients without intracranial tandem occlusions had a more favorable clinical outcome than those with intracranial tandem occlusions (100% vs. 48%, p = 0.033). Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in one patient (3.6%). Mortality rate was 0% (0/28) after 3 months. Emergent carotid artery stenting in setting of acute stroke was a safe and effective treatment modality. Successful recanalization (extracranial and intracranial) and absence of intracranial tandem occlusion are significantly associated with a good outcome for our cohort of patients whom undergone emergent carotid artery stenting.

  9. Radioiodine Therapy Does Not Change the Atherosclerotic Burden of the Carotid Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Atherosclerosis evolves or accelerates when arteries are exposed to ionizing radiation, both early and late after exposure. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease exposes the carotid arteries to 4-50 Gy, and may thereby increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Increased risk...... of cerebrovascular events has been reported after radioiodine therapy. This study aimed to examine whether atherosclerosis develops early or late after radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. METHOD: Patients treated for benign thyroid disorders (nontoxic goiter, adenoma, and hyperthyroidism) were examined...... with ultrasound for the main outcome, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and for plaque presence (plaque presence only in late damage). Signs of early damage from radioiodine were studied in 39 radioiodine-treated patients, who were examined before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Late...

  10. Unilateral congenital hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery in a newborn: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Valentino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypoplasia of one or both internal carotid artery (ICA is a rare congenital developmental abnormality. The early neurological presentation of this disorder is rare because many of these cases remain asymptomatic and go undetected due to the presence of collateral vessels. We describe a newborn that presented with seizures at 27 hours after birth. Extended ischemia of the right hemisfere was observed on computed tomography (CT, while the 3D MIP reconstruction showed hypoplasia of right internal carotid artery. After about 3 weeks, the rapid improvement of the newborn’s cerebral ultrasound and EEG allowed to discontinue corticosteroid and sedative therapy. The infant was discharged after 40 days of life in good clinical condition.

  11. HIV Infection and Carotid Artery Intima-media Thickness: Pooled Analyses Across 5 Cohorts of the NHLBI HIV-CVD Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David B; Guo, Mengye; Bůžková, Petra; Miller, Tracie L; Post, Wendy S; Stein, James H; Currier, Judith S; Kronmal, Richard A; Freiberg, Matthew S; Bennett, Siiri N; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Anastos, Kathryn; Li, Yanjie; Tracy, Russell P; Hodis, Howard N; Delaney, Joseph A; Kaplan, Robert C

    2016-07-15

    Age and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment may affect the association of HIV infection with atherosclerosis. We used identical carotid artery B-mode ultrasonographic methods in 5 cohorts participating in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute HIV-CVD Collaborative to measure intima-media thickness of the right far wall of the common carotid artery (CCA-IMT) and carotid artery bifurcation (BIF-IMT) between 2010 and 2013. Participants aged 6-75 years were either HIV infected or uninfected. Linear regression assessed associations of CCA-IMT and BIF-IMT with HIV infection and cardiovascular disease risk factors, within age and HIV treatment groups. Adjustment variables included sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, height, weight, and use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs. We studied 867 HIV-infected and 338 HIV-uninfected male and 696 HIV-infected and 246 HIV-uninfected female participants. Among both middle-aged (30-49 years) and older adults (50-75 years), HIV-infected participants had CCA-IMT and BIF-IMT values that were similar to or lower than those in HIV-uninfected participants. In contrast, among those aged 6-29 years, HIV infection was associated with higher CCA-IMT and BIF-IMT values. Among HIV-infected participants, associations of higher systolic blood pressure and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with Carotid artery intima-media thickness strengthened with age. The effects of HIV on carotid artery structure may differ across the lifespan, with traditional determinants of cardiovascular disease burden playing a larger role and HIV playing a lesser role in older adults than in young adults and children. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Pulsed multigated Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis of carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Bitsch, K R; Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a pulsed multigated Doppler system, 128 carotid arteries were examined. The spectral broadening index was calculated from the power spectrum of a small sample volume located in the center of the stream according to the flow profile and was related to the degree of sten...... by a multigated Doppler system may add valuable information concerning blood flow characteristics not obtainable by single-gated systems....

  13. Exposure to Violence and Carotid Artery Intima?Media Thickness in Mexican Women

    OpenAIRE

    Flores‐Torres, Mario H.; Lynch, Rebekka; Lopez‐Ridaura, Ruy; Yunes, Elsa; Monge, Adriana; Ortiz‐Panozo, Eduardo; Cantu‐Brito, Carlos; Hauksdóttir, Arna; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Lajous, Martín

    2017-01-01

    Background: Violence against women has become a global public health threat. Data on the potential impact of exposure to violence on cardiovascular disease are scarce. Methods and Results: We evaluated the association between exposure to violence and subclinical cardiovascular disease in 634 disease‐free women from the Mexican Teachers' Cohort who responded to violence‐related items from the Life Stressor Checklist and underwent measures of carotid artery intima‐media thickness in 2012 and 20...

  14. Severe optochiasmatic arachnoiditis after rupture of an internal carotid artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ramina

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 24-year-old man with progressive visual loss due to optochiasmatic arachnoiditis is presented. The cause of the arachnoiditis was subarachnoidal bleeding due to rupture of an internal carotid artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was clipped 5 years after the first episode of bleeding. The diagnosis of optochiasmatic arachnoiditis was confirmed during the operation. This case, is presented in order to discuss the causes, the symptoms and the therapeutical possibilities of this rare condition.

  15. Elevated Intraocular Pressure due to Arteriovenous Fistula between External Carotid Artery and Facial Vein

    OpenAIRE

    Halil Huseyin Cagatay; Metin Ekinci; Selam Yekta Sendul; Ceylan Uslu; Mehmet Demir; Sıtkı Mert Ulusay; Ender Uysal; Selma Şeker

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous outflow via the conventional outflow pathway is dependent on the pressure gradient between intraocular pressure (IOP) and episcleral venous pressure (EVP). Elevated IOP resulting from increased EVP is a well-known complication of arteriovenous fistulas, which are usually between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Arteriovenous malformations usually occur spontaneously, after a trauma or from iatrogenic causes, and they manifest with findings of chemosis, dilatation of the con...

  16. Carotid intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Angka, N; Khositseth, A; Vilaiyuk, S; Tangnararatchakit, K; Prangwatanagul, W

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid arterial stiffness index (CASI) act as the surrogate markers of atherosclerosis. We aim to assess CIMT and CASI in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients ≤ 20 years old fulfilling diagnostic criteria for SLE were enrolled. Patients with active smoking, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, arterial thrombosis, family history of hypercholesterolemia, chronic liver disease, or other chronic severe diseases were excluded. The patients were categorized into four groups: active SLE, age- and sex-matched control (control A), inactive SLE, and age- and sex-matched control (control I), according to the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). All subjects underwent ultrasound of carotid arteries to evaluate CIMT and CASI. Results One hundred and two SLE patients (26 active and 76 inactive) and one hundred and three healthy controls (26 control A and 77 control I) were enrolled. The median CIMT in all groups were not significantly different (0.43, 0.41-0.44; 0.43, 0.41-0.44; 0.42, 0.41-0.43; and 0.42, 0.41-0.43 mm, respectively).The CASI in active SLE (13.5, 11.4-17.3) was significantly higher than in control A (8.2, 7.2-9.2) ( p < 0.0001), whereas CASI in inactive SLE (12.7, 10.9-15.7) was significantly higher than in control I (8.9, 7.6-9.8). However, the CASI in active and inactive SLE was not significantly different. Conclusions The higher CASI in active and inactive pediatric SLE, implying functional change of carotid arteries, may be early evidence of increased atherosclerosis in pediatric SLE. This functional dysfunction has been found both in inactive and active SLE.

  17. Web-like malformation of the carotid artery and multicystic encephalomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, K M; Gujrati, M; Husain, A N

    1992-01-01

    Multicystic encephalomalacia and hydranencephaly lie within a spectrum of brain lesions linked to ischemic cerebral damage. Causes include vascular malformation, thrombosis, embolism, infection, and toxins. We describe an infant with multicystic encephalomalacia associated with a peculiar web-like malformation of the right common carotid and left subclavian arteries. We postulate that this luminal bridging is a congenital malformation resulting from defective canalization of the medium-sized blood vessels but could represent organized and recanalized thrombi, the etiology of which remains unknown.

  18. Endovascular embolization of intermittent massive epistaxis secondary to posttraumatic carotid artery pseudoaneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkan, O; Akgül, E; Cekiç, E; Erdoğan, M; Ozdemir, S; Kiroğlu, M

    2012-01-01

    Epistaxis is a very common medical problem in otolaryngology practice and can usually be controlled with conservative interventions. Rarely, uncontrolled and life threatening epistaxis occurs. We present the case of a 29-year-old male who developed intractable intermittent epistaxis due to post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms arising from the cavernous segment of the left internal carotid artery. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular embolization.

  19. Chronic arsenic exposure and risk of carotid artery disease: The Strong Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Grau-Perez, Maria; Pollak, Jonathan S; Moon, Katherine A; Howard, Barbara V; Umans, Jason G; Best, Lyle G; Francesconi, Kevin A; Goessler, Walter; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Guallar, Eliseo; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2017-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic exposure from naturally contaminated groundwater is related to vascular disease. No prospective studies have evaluated the association between arsenic and carotid atherosclerosis at low-moderate levels. We examined the association of long-term, low-moderate inorganic arsenic exposure with carotid arterial disease. American Indians, 45-74 years old, in Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota had arsenic concentrations (sum of inorganic and methylated species, μg/g urine creatinine) measured from baseline urine samples (1989-1991). Carotid artery ultrasound was performed in 1998-1999. Vascular disease was assessed by the carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), the presence of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid, and by the number of segments containing plaque (plaque score). 2402 participants (mean age 55.3 years, 63.1% female, mean body mass index 31.0kg/m2, diabetes 45.7%, hypertension 34.2%) had a median (interquintile range) urine arsenic concentration of 9.2 (5.00, 17.06) µg/g creatinine. The mean CIMT was 0.75mm. 64.7% had carotid artery plaque (3% with >50% stenosis). In fully adjusted models comparing participants in the 80th vs. 20th percentile in arsenic concentrations, the mean difference in CIMT was 0.01 (95% confidence interval (95%CI): 0.00, 0.02) mm, the relative risk of plaque presence was 1.04 (95%CI: 0.99, 1.09), and the geometric mean ratio of plaque score was 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01, 1.09). Urine arsenic was positively associated with CIMT and increased plaque score later in life although the association was small. The relationship between urinary arsenic and the presence of plaque was not statistically significant when adjusted for other risk factors. Arsenic exposure may play a role in increasing the severity of carotid vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebro-retinal ischemia after bilateral occlusion of internal carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogousslavsky, J.; Regli, F.

    1985-05-01

    Six patients with occlusion of internal carotid arteries (ICAs) were prospectively followed during a mean period of 14 months. Prior to demonstration of occlusions, four patients suffered a mild stroke, and three isolated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or amaurosis fugax. All patients remained alive and with an unchanged functional ability. During follow-up, one patient suffered amaurosis fugax and TIAs followed by a mild stroke, three suffered isolated TIAs or amaurosis fugax, two suffered reversible cerebro-retinal ischemia of more than 24 hours, and one remained symptomfree. In three cases, delayed cerebro-retinal ischemia distal to one of the occluded ICAs was systematically triggered by orthostatic, cardiogenic or iatrogenic hypotension, and resolved after adequate medical treatment or restoration of a functional collateral circulation by endarterectomy of a tightly stenosed ipsilateral external carotid artery (ECA), suggesting hemodynamic phenomena. In three cases, micro-emboli originating from a stump or an ulcerated ipsilateral common carotid artery and migrating through well-developed ECA collateral channels explained delayed episodes of ipsilateral TIAs or amaurosis fugax, which disappeared in two cases after adequate anticoagulant therepy was introduced. Bilateral occlusion of ICA may be a relatively benign condition, if the patients are carefully controlled and treated.

  1. Mycotic Aneurysm of External Carotid Artery following Traumatic Brain Injury: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Derakhshan, Nima; Malekmohammadi, Zahed; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2014-04-01

    Mycotic aneurysm of external carotid artery is extremely rare. We herein report a case of external carotid artery (ECA) aneurysm following severe traumatic brain injury. A 24-year-old man with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a car accident was referred to Rajaee Trauma Center Emergency Room affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran. He underwent ventriculostomy on arrival for intracerebral pressure (ICP) monitoring and for a second time due to hydrocephalus following decompressive craniectomy. He developed fulminant meningitis and ventriculitis during his hospital course. A bulged pulsatile lesion under the frontotemporal scalp resulted into the suspicion to underlying vascular pathology. Six-vessel angiography of brain was done which revealed mycotic aneurysm of external carotid artery. The patient underwent a two-week course of a combination of intravenous antibiotics. Follow-up angiography was performed which confirmed successful treatment of mycotic aneurysm of ECA. Mycotic aneurysm of ECA is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mycotic aneurysm of ECA following severe TBI which was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy.

  2. CDKN2B methylation is associated with carotid artery calcification in ischemic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shuyu Zhou; Yumeng Zhang; Li Wang; Zhizhong Zhang; Biyang Cai; Keting Liu; Hao Zhang; Minhui Dai; Lingli Sun; Xiaomeng Xu; Huan Cai; Xinfeng Liu; Guangming Lu; Gelin Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B (CDKN2A/2B) near chromosome 9p21 have been associated with both atherosclerosis and artery calcification, but the underlying mechanisms remained largely unknown. Considering that CDKN2A/2B is a frequently reported site for DNA methylation, this study aimed to evaluate whether carotid artery calcification (CarAC) is related to methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods DNA methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B were mea...

  3. Primary gastric cancer presenting with a metastatic embolus in the common carotid artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ying

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although about 30% of gastric cancers have distant metastasis at the time of initial diagnosis, metastatic tumor embolus in the main blood vessels is not common, especially in the main artery. The report presents, for the first time, an extremely rare clinical case of a metastatic embolus in the common carotid artery (CCA from primary gastric cancer. Metastatic embolus from the primary tumor should be considered when patients present with gastric cancer accompanied by intravascular emboli. The patient should be actively examined further so as to allow early detection and treatment.

  4. Modeling the absorbed dose to the common carotid arteries following radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Hedemann-Jensen, Per; Søgaard-Hansen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    External fractionated radiotherapy of cancer increases the risk of cardio- and cerebrovascular events, but less attention has been paid to the potential side effects on the arteries following internal radiotherapy with radioactive iodine (RAI), i.e. 131-iodine. About 279 per million citizens...... in the western countries are treated each year with RAI for benign thyroid disorders (about 140,000 a year in the EU), stressing that it is of clinical importance to be aware of even rare radiation-induced side effects. In order to induce or accelerate atherosclerosis, the dose to the carotid arteries has...

  5. [Biomechanic shear stress in carotid arteries and atherosclerosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierski, Radosław

    2003-01-01

    One of the major hemodynamic forces acting on blood vessels is shear stress, which is, the friction force between the endothelial cell surface and flowing blood. Arterial shear stress within physiologic range (15-70 dyne/cm2) induces endothelial quiescence and an atheroprotective gene expression profile. Low shear stress ( 70 dyne/cm2) induce prothrombotic state.

  6. Microvasculature of carotid atheromatous plaques: hemorrhagic plaques have dense microvessels with fenestrations to the arterial lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Mie; Nose, Masato; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kohada, Yuki; Yorioka, Soichiro; Suehiro, Satomi; Fukuoka, Erina; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Watanabe, Hideaki; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Masumoto, Junya

    2014-07-01

    Microvessels in atheromatous plaques are well known to play a role in plaque vulnerability associated with intraplaque hemorrhage, but their architecture remains unclear. The morphometry of the microvasculature and hemorrhage of human carotid atheromatous plaques (CAPs) were evaluated, and 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the microvessels was performed. CAPs were obtained by endarterectomy in 42 patients. The specimens were analyzed using light microscopy. Plaque hemorrhage was defined as an area-containing red blood cells (>1 mm2). To determine the histopathologic features of plaque hemorrhage, the plaque area was divided into 4 regions: cap, shoulder, lipid/necrotic core, and media. Then, the density of microvessels and macrophages in each region was quantified. Two representative lesions with either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic plaque were cut into 90 serial sections. The sections were double stained with anti-CD34 and anti-α smooth muscle actin antibodies, scanned using a digital microscope, and reconstructed using TRI-SRF2 software. The hemorrhagic plaques showed a higher density of microvessels than nonhemorrhagic plaques in the shoulder, cap, and lipid/necrotic core (P=.03, .009, and .001, respectively), and there was positive correlations between its density and macrophages in each regions (Pmicrovasculature of plaques with intraplaque hemorrhage was dense, some of which fenestrated to the arterial lumen. The pathologic 3D imaging revealed precise architecture of microvasculature of plaques. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomical nuances of the internal carotid artery in relation to the quadrangular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Ricardo L L; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Goulart, Carlos R; Upadhyay, Smita; Buohliqah, Lamia; Lazarini, Paulo R; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in relation to the quadrangular space (QS) and to propose a classification system based on the results. METHODS A total of 44 human cadaveric specimens were dissected endonasally under direct endoscopic visualization. During the dissection, the anatomical variations of the ICA and their relationship with the QS were noted. RESULTS The space between the paraclival ICAs (i.e., intercarotid space) can be classified as 1 of 3 different shapes (i.e., trapezoid, square, or hourglass) based on the trajectory of the ICAs. The ICA trajectories also directly influence the volumetric area of the QS. Based on its geometry, the QS was classified as one of the following: 1) Type A has the smallest QS area and is associated with a trapezoid intercarotid space, 2) Type B corresponds to the expected QS area (not minimized or enlarged) and is associated with a square intercarotid space, and 3) Type C has the largest QS area and is associated with an hourglass intercarotid space. CONCLUSIONS The different trajectories of the ICAs can modify the area of the QS and may be an essential parameter to consider for preoperative planning and defining the most appropriate corridor to reach Meckel's cave. In addition, ICA trajectories should be considered prior to surgery to avoid injuring the vessels.

  8. A method for automatically constructing the initial contour of the common carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Omran

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a novel method to automatically set the initial contour that is used by the Active contours algorithm.The proposed method exploits the accumulative intensity profiles to locate the points on the arterial wall. The intensity profiles of sections that intersect the artery show distinguishable characterstics that make it possible to recognize them from the profiles of sections that do not intersect the artery walls. The proposed method is applied on ultrasound images of the transverse section of the common carotid artery, but it can be extended to be used on the images of the longitudinal section. The intensity profiles are classified using Support vector machine algorithm, and the results of different kernels are compared. The extracted features used for the classification are basically statistical features of the intensity profiles. The echogenicity of the arterial lumen, and gives the profiles that intersect the artery a special shape that helps recognizing these profiles from other general profiles.The outlining of the arterial walls may seem a classic task in image processing. However, most of the methods used to outline the artery start from a manual, or semi-automatic, initial contour.The proposed method is highly appreciated in automating the entire process of automatic artery detection and segmentation.

  9. Photoacoustic Imaging: A Novel Tool for Detecting Carotid Artery Thrombosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Fu, Cong; Ma, Genshan; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu

    2017-01-01

    Thrombosis is a main cause of acute cardiovascular events, and detecting thrombi in small arteries via noninvasive imaging remains challenging. In this study, we employed a novel imaging method, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), to study thrombosis in a mouse model of ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced arterial thrombosis and compared the ability of this method to detect thrombosis with that of a conventional imaging method, namely, ultrasound. The mice (n = 20) were divided equally into the following 4 groups: (1) a normal group, and (2) 3 experimental groups, in which the left common carotid artery was treated with 20% FeCl3 for 1, 3, or 5 min, respectively. After 24 h, PAI detected thrombi of different sizes and generated images, enabling us to assess the changes in structure. The results of this study suggest that PAI is a useful, noninvasive visualization tool for investigating the mechanism underlying thrombosis development and is suitable for imaging arterial thrombosis in mouse carotid arteries. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Colour Doppler evaluation of extracranial carotid artery in patients presenting with features of cerebrovascular disease: A clinical and radiological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sehrawat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the morphological and hemodynamic changes that take place in carotid arteries by colour Doppler in patients presenting with features of stroke. Background and Objectives: Cerebrovascular accidents constitute a major cause of adult mortality. The principal indication for cerebrovascular Doppler examination is stroke prevention. Colour Doppler sonography is a sensitive method for detection of atherosclerotic plaque and provides considerable information about the extent and severity of plaque as well as the resulting diminution of arterial lumen. The main strengths of sonography of carotid arteries are patient comfort, lack of risk and accuracy in detecting carotid stenosis. Material and Methods: A prospective study of Colour Doppler in carotid arteries was carried out for 12 months from 1 st July 2009 to 1 st July 2010. The study was carried out on 40 individuals, suspected of cerebrovascular insufficiency and having one or the other risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. A detailed clinical history, CNS examination findings and evidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and ischemic heart disease were noted. Carotid Doppler evaluation was done by using Siemens Antares Ultrasound system. The data gathered were grey scale and Doppler findings of common carotid artery, internal carotid artery and external carotid arteries. Doppler findings were correlated with clinical features and risk factors. Results: In our study of 40 patients, the commonest lesion found was the atherosclerotic plaque. Highest incidence of plaque was seen in males 41% in the age group of 60-70 years and in females 37% in age group of 70-80 years. Cigarette smoking was the most common risk factor (60% associated with stroke/ Transient Ischaemic Attacks (TIA. Hemiparesis was the most common presenting symptom (35% among the symptomatic cases. Atheromatous plaque was most commonly found in the right carotid system (60%. Most common site for

  11. Association of circulating omentin-1 level with arterial stiffness and carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Hye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipokines contribute directly to the atherosclerotic process, connecting metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes to cardiovascular disease. Omentin-1 is a recently discovered novel adipokine, so data about the relationship of this adipokine to vascular health in type 2 diabetes is limited. Methods We enrolled 60 people with type 2 diabetes, with or without carotid plaque, and 30 participants with normal glucose tolerance. We measured serum omentin-1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP levels, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, as well as other cardiovascular risk factors. Vascular health was assessed by brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT. Results Serum omentin-1 levels were significantly decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared to normal glucose controls and was further reduced in type 2 diabetes patients with carotid plaque compared to those without carotid plaque. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that age, systolic blood pressure, history of use of statins, angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and serum omentin-1 level were independent factors determining baPWV in people with type 2 diabetes (r2 = 0.637. Furthermore, in multivariate logistic regression analysis, circulating omentin-1 level was an independent decisive factor for the presence of carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes patients, even after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and history of smoking and medication (odds ratio, 0.621; 95% confidence interval, 0.420-0.919; P = 0.017. Conclusions Circulating omentin-1 level was independently correlated with arterial stiffness and carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes, even after adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors and detailed medication history.

  12. Bilateral internal carotid artery occlusion. Comparison among MRI, hemodynamics and clinical feature

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    Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Tsuda, Harumi; Nabatame, Hidehiko; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1987-10-01

    Four cases of bilateral internal carotid occlusion are reported with respect to clinical features, hemodynamics and various image diagnosis. MRI is applied to three cases. The patients comprised 2.08 % of all cerebral occlusive diseases treated during the past five years at our clinic. One case is of abrupt onset and three cases are progressing profiles. In one of these cases, collateral circulation is supplied mainly by leptomeningeal anastomosis of the posterior cerebral artery and posterior pericallosal artery branching from the basilar artery. In two of them, they are supplied through the circle of Willis. Middle cerebral artery occlusion, occlusion supra occlusionem, however, causes decisive ischemic lesion in its teritory. Applying MRI, complicated ischemic lesions, such as lacunar infarction, paraventricular lesion, deep white matter lesion and border zone infarction can clearly be identified. In the case of total aphasia, the lesions responsible are demonstrated clearly by MRI, but only vaguely by X-ray CT.

  13. Laser microdissection-based analysis of hypoxia- and thioredoxin-related genes in human stable carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, Nobuya; Kawamata, Takakazu; Yamamoto, Gou; Okada, Yoshikazu; Hori, Tomokatsu; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Neovascularization in the carotid atherosclerotic plaque is a common pathogenetic feature in carotid artery stenosis. To investigate whether the neovascular region of the stable plaque differentially expresses specific genes, we analyzed the patterns of angiogenesis-related gene expression in regions of the plaque isolated by laser microdissection and examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Carotid plaque samples were obtained by carotid endarterectomy in 27 clinically asymptomatic patients with high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis. Among these 27 plaque samples, 23 plaques were confirmed to be stable pathologically, and 14 stable plaques had neovascularization. The medial, shoulder, and neovascular regions of the 14 carotid plaques were determined by immunohistochemical staining. These 3 regions were microdissected, and total RNA was extracted for real-time RT-PCR analysis. The expressions of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, thioredoxin, and thioredoxin interacting protein were analyzed at mRNA level. Real-time RT-PCR was performed on 42 laser microdissected regions of 14 plaques. The expressions of all four genes examined were significantly lower in the medial region at mRNA level. High expressions were noted in both shoulder and neovascular regions, with no significant difference between the two. Furthermore, these expression patterns were related significantly to macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, hypoxia- and thioredoxin-related genes are significantly overexpressed in human stable carotid atherosclerotic plaques and strongly correlate with macrophage infiltration rather than neovascularization. Macrophage infiltration may lead to overexpression of these genes and promote angiogenesis in stable carotid plaques.

  14. Carotid Artery Longitudinal Displacement, Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Factors: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Gepner

    Full Text Available Associations between carotid artery longitudinal displacement, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and events were evaluated in a large, multi-ethnic cohort.A novel, reproducible protocol was developed for measuring right common carotid artery longitudinal displacement using ultrasound speckle-tracking. Total longitudinal displacement was measured in 389 randomly selected participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis that were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Univariate analyses and Pearson Correlations were used to define relationships between longitudinal displacement with traditional cardiovascular risk factors and traditional measures of arterial stiffness. Hazard ratios of longitudinal displacement for cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease events were compared using Cox proportional hazards models.Participants were a mean (standard deviation 59.0 (8.7 years old, 48% female, 39% White, 26% Black, 22% Hispanic, and 14% Chinese. They had 19 (4.9% cardiovascular disease and 14 (3.6% coronary heart disease events over a mean 9.5 years of follow-up. Less longitudinal displacement was associated with Chinese (β = -0.11, p = 0.02 compared to White race/ethnicity and greater longitudinal displacement was associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness (β = 0.26, p = 0.004. Longitudinal displacement was not associated with other cardiovascular disease risk factors or markers of arterial stiffness. After adjustment for age and sex, and heart rate, Chinese race/ethnicity (β = -0.10, p = 0.04 and carotid intima-media thickness (β = 0.30 p = 0.003 were associated independently with longitudinal displacement. Longitudinal displacement predicted coronary heart disease (Hazard ratio [HR] 3.3, 95% Confidence intervals [CI] 0.96-11.14, p = 0.06 and cardiovascular disease (HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.6-7.3, p = 0.23 events.Less longitudinal displacement is associated with Chinese ethnicity and greater carotid artery

  15. Carotid artery stiffness and hemodynamic pulsatility during cognitive engagement in healthy adults: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Spartano, Nicole L; Augustine, Jacqueline A; Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; Mitchell, Gary F; Jorgensen, Randall S; Gump, Brooks B

    2015-05-01

    The matching of vascular supply to neuronal metabolic demand during cognitive engagement is known as neurovascular coupling (NVC). Arterial stiffness is a prominent determinant of pulsatility in the systemic circulation and may thus indirectly impact NVC. In this pilot investigation, we explored changes in carotid artery stiffness and cerebrovascular hemodynamic pulsatiltiy during cognitive engagement in healthy adults. Twenty-seven adults (age 39 ± 3 years, BMI 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) underwent Doppler ultrasonography of the common carotid artery (CCA) combined with applanation tonometry to derive (i) CCA elastic modulus (Ep) and β-stiffness index; (ii) CCA flow pulsatility index (PI); (iii) CCA pulse pressure, (iv) CCA augmentation index (AIx). Cerebral PI was assessed using transcranial Doppler at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). All measures were made at rest and during an incongruent Stroop task. CCA PI was reduced (1.75 ± 0.06 to 1.57 ± 0.06, P 0.05) during Stroop. Brachial pulse pressure increased during Stroop (43 ± 1 to 46 ± 1 mm Hg, P 0.05). Similarly, CCA Ep (54.5 ± 5.5 to 53.8 ± 4.9 kPa, P > 0.05) and β-stiffness index (4.4 ± 0.4 to 4.2 ± 0.3 aU, P > 0.05) were unchanged. CCA AIx increased (1 ± 4 to 13 ± 4%, P cognitive engagement. Carotid artery stiffness does not change suggesting that factors other than the dynamic elastic properties of the CCA buffer cerebrovascular hemodynamic pulsatility during cognitive engagement. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Endovascular stent-assisted thrombolysis in acute occlusive carotid artery dissection

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    Mourand, Isabelle [Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Department of Neurology, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Department of Neurology, Service de Neurologie, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Brunel, Herve; Vendrell, Jean-Francois; Bonafe, Alain [Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Department of Neuroradiology, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Thouvenot, Eric [Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Department of Neurology, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France)

    2010-02-15

    Internal carotid artery dissection with tandem internal carotid and middle cerebral artery occlusion may be responsible for large cerebral infarction that carries a general poor prognosis. Recanalization of internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection by stent-assisted thrombolysis has been recently proposed. We report two cases of acute symptomatic ICA dissection with tandem occlusion successfully treated with emergent endovascular stent-assisted thrombolysis using new self-expandable intracranial stents. A 37-year-old woman and a 59-year-old man were admitted in our hospital after acute severe symptoms of right-hemispheric stroke with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores of 15 and 18, respectively. In both cases, magnetic resonance angiography showed tandem occlusion and angiography confirmed tandem occlusion with ICA dissection. An extensive mismatch region was diagnosed by Perfusion-diffusion MRI of the brain within 3 h after symptoms onset. Treatment was initiated 4 h after symptom onset by implantation of self-expandable intracranial stents into the dissected ICA and administration of intra-arterial recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Recanalization of the ICA and middle cerebral artery (MCA) was accomplished within 6 h after symptoms onset. In both cases, no periprocedural complication was observed and follow-up CT scan showed only a mild brain infarct in the MCA territory. After, respectively, 12 and 10 months follow-up, patients had a favorable outcome with NIHSS 0 and mRS {<=}1. Endovascular stent-assisted thrombolysis appears to be a promising treatment in tandem occlusion due to ICA dissection. Our work underline the potential use of self-expandable intracranial stents in symptomatic acute ICA dissection. (orig.)

  17. Reduced subclinical carotid vascular disease and arterial stiffness in vegetarian men: The CARVOS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Navarro, Julio; Antoniazzi, Luiza; Oki, Adriana Midori; Bonfim, Maria Carlos; Hong, Valeria; Acosta-Cardenas, Pedro; Strunz, Celia; Brunoro, Eleonora; Miname, Marcio Hiroshi; Filho, Wilson Salgado; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido; Santos, Raul D

    2017-03-01

    Dietary habits play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. The objective of this study was to verify if vegetarian (VEG) diet could be related a better profile of subclinical vascular disease evaluated by arterial stiffness and functional and structural properties of carotid arteries, compared to omnivorous (OMN) diet. In this cross-sectional study, 44 VEG and 44 OMN apparently healthy men ≥35years of age, in order to not have confounding risk factors of subclinical atherosclerosis, were assessed for anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, C reactive protein (CRP), and arterial stiffness determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Also, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and distensibility were evaluated. VEG men had lower body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting serum total cholesterol, LDL and non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, glucose and glycated hemoglobin values in comparison with OMN individuals (all p values <0.05). Markers of vascular structure and function were different between VEG and OMN: PWV 7.1±0.8m/s vs. 7.7±0.9m/s (p<0.001); c-IMT 593±94 vs. 661±128μm (p=0.003); and relative carotid distensibility 6.39±1.7 vs. 5.72±1.8% (p=0.042), respectively. After a multivariate linear regression analysis, a VEG diet was independently and negatively associated with PWV (p value 0.005). A VEG diet is associated with a more favorable cardiovascular diseases biomarker profile and better vascular structural and functional parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A rabbit model of atherosclerosis at carotid artery: MRI visualization and histopathological characterization

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    Ma, Zhan-Long; Teng, Gao-Jun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Cao, Ai-Hong [Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Ni, Yicheng [University Hospitals, Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    To induce a rabbit model of atherosclerosis at carotid artery, to visualize the lesion evolution with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to characterize the lesion types by histopathology. Atherosclerosis at the right common carotid artery (RCCA) was induced in 23 rabbits by high-lipid diet following balloon catheter injury to the endothelium. The rabbits were examined in vivo with a 1.5-T MRI and randomly divided into three groups of 6 weeks (n=6), 12 weeks (n=8) and 15 weeks (n=9) for postmortem histopathology. The lesions on both MRI and histology were categorized according to the American Heart Association (AHA) classifications of atherosclerosis. Type I and type II of atherosclerotic changes were detected at week 6, i.e., nearly normal signal intensity (SI) of the injured RCCA wall without stenosis on MRI, but with subendothelial inflammatory infiltration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells on histopathology. At week 12, 75.0% and 62.5% of type III changes were encountered on MRI and histopathology respectively with thicker injured RCCA wall of increased SI on T{sub 1}-weighted and proton density (PD)-weighted MRI and microscopically a higher degree of plaque formation. At week 15, carotid atherosclerosis became more advanced, i.e., type IV and type V in 55.6% and 22.2% of the lesions with MRI and 55.6% and 33.3% of the lesions with histopathology, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed a significant agreement (p<0.05) between the MRI and histological findings for lesion classification (r=0.96). A rabbit model of carotid artery atherosclerosis has been successfully induced and noninvasively visualized. The atherosclerotic plaque formation evolved from type I to type V with time, which could be monitored with 1.5-T MRI and confirmed with histomorphology. This experimental setting can be applied in preclinical research on atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  19. Genetic basis of variation in carotid artery plaque in the San Antonio Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kelly J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H H; Williams, Jeff T; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; O'Leary, Daniel H; Stern, Michael P

    2002-12-01

    In contrast to the commonly used quantitative marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, namely intima-media thickness, we investigated the extent to which the presence or absence of carotid artery plaque (CAP) was under genetic control. The study population consisted of 750 individuals distributed across 29 randomly ascertained extended Mexican American pedigrees who participated in the second examination cycle of the San Antonio Family Heart Study. Extracranial focal CAP was identified by B-mode ultrasound bilaterally in the internal carotid artery or the carotid bulb. Using a variance decomposition approach implemented in the SOLAR computer program, we performed genetic analysis on the discrete trait CAP (ie, liability to disease) using a threshold model. Covariates considered in the analysis included age, sex, diabetes, current smoking status, lipid levels, and markers of hypertension and obesity. Fifty-one of 461 women and fifty-seven of 289 men with a mean age of 42.1 years had evidence of a plaque in the right and/or left carotid artery. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability (h(2)+/-SE) for CAP was significant (h(2)=0.28+/-0.15, P=0.01). Furthermore, after adjustment for additional covariates that contributed significantly to the model (P<0.05; diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, waist circumference, and smoking status), heritability remained significant (h(2)=0.23+/-0.15, P=0.03). Our data indicate that after established cardiovascular risk factors are controlled for, the variation of the discrete trait CAP is under appreciable additive genetic influences.

  20. Cerebral Lesions in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Relation to Asymptomatic Carotid and Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Schoos, Mikkel; Sillesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and vertebral artery stenosis (VAS) are associated with cerebral infarction after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). It remains unclear whether this association is causal. We investigated the associations between neurologically asymptomatic CAS...... and VAS and the occurrence of subclinical cerebral lesions after CABG verified by magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: CABG patients were included and CAS and VAS were identified by magnetic resonance angiography. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging was performed to identify new post-operative subclinical...... cerebral lesions. The associations between CAS/VAS post-operative cerebral lesions were investigated. RESULTS: Forty-six patients were included in the study. 13% had significant CAS and 11% had significant VAS. Thirty-five percent had new cerebral infarction postoperatively. We found a significant...

  1. Noninvasive detection of increased carotid artery temperature in patients with coronary artery disease predicts major cardiovascular events at one year: Results from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Benetos, Georgios; Koutagiar, Iosif; Barampoutis, Nikolaos; Mitropoulou, Fotini; Davlouros, Periklis; Sfikakis, Petros P; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Siores, Elias; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2017-07-01

    Limited prospective data have been reported regarding the impact of carotid inflammation on cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Microwave radiometry (MWR) is a noninvasive, simple method that has been used for evaluation of carotid artery temperature which, when increased, predicts 'inflamed' plaques with vulnerable characteristics. We prospectively tested the hypothesis that increased carotid artery temperature predicts future cerebro- and cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Consecutive patients from 3 centers, with documented CAD by coronary angiography, were studied. In both carotid arteries, common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque thickness were evaluated by ultrasound. Temperature difference (ΔT), measured by MWR, was considered as the maximal temperature along the carotid artery minus the minimum; ΔT ≥0.90 °C was assigned as high. Major cardiovascular events (MACE, death, stroke, myocardial infarction or revascularization) were recorded during the following year. In total, 250 patients were studied; of them 40 patients (16%) had high ΔT values in both carotid arteries. MACEs occurred in 30% of patients having bilateral high ΔT versus 3.8% in the remaining patients (p<0.001). Bilateral high ΔT was independently associated with increased one-year MACE rate (HR = 6.32, 95% CI 2.42-16.53, p<0.001, by multivariate cox regression hazard model). The addition of ΔT information on a baseline model based on cardiovascular risk factors and extent of CAD significantly increased the prognostic value of the model (c-statistic increase 0.744 to 0.845, p dif  = 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: Carotid inflammation, detected by MWR, has an incremental prognostic value in patients with documented CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Common carotid artery intima media thickness and post-stroke cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talelli, P; Ellul, J; Terzis, G; Lekka, N P; Gioldasis, G; Chrysanthopoulou, A; Papapetropoulos, Th

    2004-08-30

    Acute stroke and other forms of cerebrovascular disease are well-recognized causes of cognitive impairment. Common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT) has been associated with certain forms of cerebrovascular disease, but its association with cognitive impairment of vascular origin has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CCA-IMT is associated with cognitive impairment 1 year after an acute ischemic stroke. A total of 171 consecutive patients with the first ever stroke (mean age 66+/-11.5, 41% female) underwent carotid ultrasonography during hospitalization. Demographic data, vascular risk factors and presenting stroke features were also recorded. One year later, patients' cognitive performance and depression were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive impairment (MMSE score<24) was found in 67 (39%) of the 171 patients. CCA-IMT was significantly associated with cognitive impairment, and this association remained unchanged (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.19-3.18) after adjustment for demographic data, vascular risk factors, stroke features, other carotid ultrasonography measurements and depression. Older age, low education level, large hemispheric lesions, hyperdense carotid plaques and depression were also independently associated with post-stroke cognitive impairment. In this study, CCA-IMT was independently associated with cognitive impairment 1 year after an acute ischemic stroke, and thus, it might help with the screening of stroke patients at risk of cognitive impairment.

  3. Ultrasonographic and histological analysis of atheromatous plaques in carotid arteries and apoplectic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Aleksander; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Wilk, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare a computer assessment of carotid plaques with the quantity and distribution of inflammatory cells in the plaques and to find correlation with the incidence of cerebral stroke. The material consisted of 20 carotid plaques causing stenoses of internal carotid arteries ranging from 70 to 99%. USG images of the plaques were assessed by a computer-assisted program for image analysis. For each plaque a histogram was obtained for which the gray scale median (GSM), a measure of plaque echogenicity, was determined. Then the quantity and distribution of inflammatory cells in plaques taken during endarterectomy were assessed and these data were compared with the GSM and the incidence of stroke. Moreover, grouping of cases according to histometric variables was analyzed. Statistical analysis showed a considerable correlation between low GSM and the incidence of stroke. At the same time, a correlation between the presence of inflammatory cells on the edges of plaque with a low GSM was found and the analysis of clusters demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients with strokes. The use of computer analysis of USG images allows determining the echogenicity of any carotid plaque and can be applied in clinical studies in which the aim is to find characteristic parameters for an unstable plaque.

  4. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Measuring Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) Using Quaternion Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutbay, Uğurhan; Hardalaç, Fırat; Akbulut, Mehmet; Akaslan, Ünsal; Serhatlıoğlu, Selami

    2016-06-01

    This study aims investigating adjustable distant fuzzy c-means segmentation on carotid Doppler images, as well as quaternion-based convolution filters and saliency mapping procedures. We developed imaging software that will simplify the measurement of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) on saliency mapping images. Additionally, specialists evaluated the present images and compared them with saliency mapping images. In the present research, we conducted imaging studies of 25 carotid Doppler images obtained by the Department of Cardiology at Fırat University. After implementing fuzzy c-means segmentation and quaternion-based convolution on all Doppler images, we obtained a model that can be analyzed easily by the doctors using a bottom-up saliency model. These methods were applied to 25 carotid Doppler images and then interpreted by specialists. In the present study, we used color-filtering methods to obtain carotid color images. Saliency mapping was performed on the obtained images, and the carotid artery IMT was detected and interpreted on the obtained images from both methods and the raw images are shown in Results. Also these results were investigated by using Mean Square Error (MSE) for the raw IMT images and the method which gives the best performance is the Quaternion Based Saliency Mapping (QBSM). 0,0014 and 0,000191 mm(2) MSEs were obtained for artery lumen diameters and plaque diameters in carotid arteries respectively. We found that computer-based image processing methods used on carotid Doppler could aid doctors' in their decision-making process. We developed software that could ease the process of measuring carotid IMT for cardiologists and help them to evaluate their findings.

  5. Stroke/Death Rates Following Carotid Artery Stenting and Carotid Endarterectomy in Contemporary Administrative Dataset Registries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, K I; Kalmykov, E L; Naylor, A R

    2016-01-01

    Randomised trials have reported higher stroke/death rates after carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Despite this, the 2011 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines expanded CAS indications, partly because of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial, but also because of improving outcomes in industry sponsored CAS Registries. The aim of this systematic review was: (i) to compare stroke/death rates after CAS/CEA in contemporary dataset registries, (ii) to examine whether published stroke/death rates after CAS fall within AHA thresholds, and, (iii) to see if there had been a decline (over time) in procedural risk after CAS/CEA. PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched according to the recommendations of the PRISMA statement from January 1, 2008 until February 23, 2015 for administrative dataset registries reporting outcomes after both CEA and CAS. Twenty-one registries reported outcomes involving more than 1,500,000 procedures. Stroke/death after CAS was significantly higher than after CEA in 11/21 registries (52%) involving "average risk for CEA" asymptomatic patients and in 11/18 registries (61%) involving "average risk for CEA" symptomatic patients. In another five registries, CAS was associated with higher stroke/death rates than CEA for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, but formal statistical comparison was not reported. CAS was associated with stroke/death rates that exceeded risk thresholds recommended by the AHA in 9/21 registries (43%) involving "average risk for CEA" asymptomatic patients and in 13/18 registries (72%) involving "average risk for CEA" symptomatic patients. In 5/18 registries (28%), the procedural risk after CAS in "average risk" symptomatic patients exceeded 10%. Data from contemporary administrative dataset registries suggest that stroke/death rates following CAS remain significantly higher than after CEA and often exceed accepted AHA

  6. Plasma osteoprotegerin is related to carotid and peripheral arterial disease, but not to myocardial ischemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is frequent in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Plasma osteoprotegerin (OPG) has evolved as a biomarker for CVD. We examined the relationship between plasma OPG levels and different CVD manifestations in type 2 diabetes. Methods Type 2 diabetes patients without known CVD referred consecutively to a diabetes clinic for the first time (n = 305, aged: 58.6 ± 11.3 years, diabetes duration: 4.5 ± 5.3 years) were screened for carotid arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial ischemia by means of carotid artery ultrasonography, peripheral ankle and toe systolic blood pressure measurements, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). In addition, plasma OPG concentrations and other CVD-related markers were measured. Results The prevalence of carotid arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial ischemia was 42%, 15%, and 30%, respectively. Plasma OPG was significantly increased in patients with carotid and peripheral arterial disease compared to patients without (p < 0.001, respectively), however, this was not the case for patients with myocardial ischemia versus those without (p = 0.71). When adjusted for age, HbA1c and U-albumin creatinine ratio in a multivariate logistic regression analysis, plasma OPG remained strongly associated with carotid arterial disease (adjusted OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.22-3.67; p = 0.008), but not with peripheral arterial disease or myocardial ischemia. Conclusions Increased plasma OPG concentration is associated with carotid and peripheral arterial disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, whereas no relation is observed with respect to myocardial ischemia on MPS. The reason for this discrepancy is unknown. Trial registration number at http://www.clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00298844 PMID:21838881

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Patients With Severe Carotid Artery Stenosis Before Carotid Artery Stenting: A Proof-of-Concept, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenbo; Meng, Ran; Ma, Chun; Hou, Baojun; Jiao, Liqun; Zhu, Fengshui; Wu, Weijuan; Shi, Jingfei; Duan, Yunxia; Zhang, Renling; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Yongxin; Zhang, Hongqi; Ling, Feng; Wang, Yuping; Feng, Wuwei; Ding, Yuchuan; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Ji, Xunming

    2017-04-04

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) can inhibit recurrent ischemic events effectively in patients with acute or chronic cerebral ischemia. However, it is still unclear whether RIPC can impede ischemic injury after carotid artery stenting (CAS) in patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. Subjects with severe carotid artery stenosis were recruited in this randomized controlled study, and assigned to RIPC, sham, and no intervention (control) groups. All subjects received standard medical therapy. Subjects in the RIPC and sham groups underwent RIPC and sham RIPC twice daily, respectively, for 2 weeks before CAS. Plasma neuron-specific enolase and S-100B were used to evaluate safety, hypersensitive C-reactive protein, and new ischemic diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were used to determine treatment efficacy. The primary outcomes were the presence of ≥1 newly ischemic brain lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging within 48 hours after stenting and clinical events within 6 months after stenting. We randomly assigned 189 subjects in this study (63 subjects in each group). Both RIPC and sham RIPC procedures were well tolerated and completed with high compliance (98.41% and 95.24%, respectively). Neither plasma neuron-specific enolase levels nor S-100B levels changed significantly before and after treatment. No severe adverse event was attributed to RIPC and sham RIPC procedures. The incidence of new diffusion-weighted imaging lesions in the RIPC group (15.87%) was significantly lower than in the sham group (36.51%; relative risk, 0.44; 96% confidence interval, 0.20-0.91; P<0.01) and the control group (41.27%; relative risk, 0.39; 96% confidence interval, 0.21-0.82; P<0.01). The volumes of lesions were smaller in the RIPC group than in the control and sham groups (P<0.01 each). Ischemic events that occurred after CAS were 1 transient ischemic attack in the RIPC group, 2 strokes in the control group, and 2 strokes and 1 transient ischemic attack in the sham group

  8. Panoramic radiography in the diagnosis of carotid artery atheromas and the associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães Henriques, João César; Kreich, Eliane Maria; Helena Baldani, Márcia; Luciano, Mariely; Cezar de Melo Castilho, Julio; Cesar de Moraes, Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a serious chronic disease, responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide and is characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the arterial walls, associated with the presence of atheromatous plaques. Various risk factors act directly on predisposition to the disease, among which the following are pointed out: diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and inadequate diet and eating habits. More recent researches have elucidated new risk factors acting in the development of this disease, such as, for example: periodontitis, chronic renal disease and menopause. The panoramic radiograph, commonly used in dental practice, makes it possible to see calcified atherosclerotic plaques that are eventually deposited in the carotid arteries. The aim of this review article was to emphasize the dentist's important role in the detection of carotid artery atheromas in panoramic radiographs and the immediate referral of patients affected by these calcifications to doctors. In addition, the study intended to guide the dentist, especially the dental radiologist, with regard to differential diagnosis, which should be made taking into consideration particularly the triticeal cartilage when it is calcified.

  9. Multi-parametric ultrasound criteria for internal carotid artery disease - comparison with CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlinn, Kristian; Kepplinger, Jessica; Siepmann, Timo; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Bodechtel, Ulf; Reichmann, Heinz; Puetz, Volker [Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Neurology, Dresden (Germany); Floegel, Thomas [Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Neurology, Dresden (Germany); Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Kitzler, Hagen H. [Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Alexandrov, Andrei V. [The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The German Society of Ultrasound in Medicine (known by its acronym DEGUM) recently proposed a novel multi-parametric ultrasound approach for comprehensive and accurate assessment of extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease. We determined the agreement between duplex ultrasonography (DUS) interpreted by the DEGUM criteria and CT angiography (CTA) for grading of extracranial ICA steno-occlusive disease. Consecutive patients with acute cerebral ischemia underwent DUS and CTA. Internal carotid artery stenosis was graded according to the DEGUM-recommended criteria for DUS. Independent readers manually performed North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial-type measurements on axial CTA source images. Both modalities were compared using Spearman's correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. A total of 303 acute cerebral ischemia patients (mean age, 72 ± 12 years; 58 % men; median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 4 [interquartile range 7]) provided 593 DUS and CTA vessel pairs for comparison. There was a positive correlation between DUS and CTA (r{sub s} = 0.783, p < 0.001) with mean difference in degree of stenosis measurement of 3.57 %. Bland-Altman analysis further revealed widely varying differences (95 % limits of agreement -29.26 to 22.84) between the two modalities. Although the novel DEGUM criteria showed overall good agreement between DUS and CTA across all stenosis ranges, potential for wide incongruence with CTA underscores the need for local laboratory validation to avoid false screening results. (orig.)

  10. Incidental internal carotid artery calcifications on temporal bone CT in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Bernadette; Jones, Blaise [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Blackham, Aaron [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Incidental internal carotid artery (ICA) calcifications are occasionally noted on CT images of the brain and temporal bone. In adults, incidental calcifications have been correlated with increased incidence of hypercholesterolemia, cardiac disease, diabetes and carotid stenosis. To determine the incidence of incidental calcifications of the carotid siphon on temporal bone CT in children. We retrospectively reviewed 24 months of consecutive temporal bone CT examinations in children aged 18 years and younger. CT examinations on 663 patients were reviewed and the presence or absence of ICA calcifications was ranked as absent, questionable or definitive. In patients in whom definitive calcifications were identified, hospital charts were reviewed for evidence of diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia and chronic renal disease as potential causes of early atherosclerosis. Of the 663 patients, 25% had definitive calcifications within the wall of the ICA: 6% of children younger than 2 years and 28% of children 12-19 years of age. Incidentally noted ICA calcifications are a common finding on temporal bone CT in children, most likely a physiologic response to turbulent flow at natural bends in the artery rather than secondary to underlying disease predisposing to early atherosclerotic calcification. (orig.)

  11. First clinical experience with the GARDEX EPD: a novel embolic protection device for carotid artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Scheinert, Dierk; Borghesi, Raffaello; Cremonesi, Alberto; Rosenschein, Uri; Scheinert, Susanne; Bräunlich, Sven; Bausback, Yvonne; Ulrich, Matthias; Schmidt, Andrej

    2013-01-22

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become an alternative to carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery disease. The use of an embolic protection device (EPD) can reduce the frequency of embolic events during CAS. Difficult vascular anatomy may complicate current generation EPD placement. This problem is addressed by a new EPD, the GARDEX System. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and performance of the GARDEX EPD during CAS. Thirty-eight patients underwent CAS with the GARDEX EPD in two medical centres. All patients were prospectively followed up for 30 days. Device performance and procedural details were collected and analysed prospectively. Vessel anatomy and lesion morphology were evaluated and stratified into a scoring system for anatomic difficulty. More than a third of the patients were considered to have difficult vascular anatomy for CAS. All enrolled patients were successfully treated. There was one (2.6%) minor periprocedural stroke and there were two (5.3%) periprocedural TIAs which resolved within 24 hours. No additional complications were noted during the 30-day follow-up period. In this first experience, CAS under cerebral protection with the GARDEX EPD was safe and feasible. Our data suggest that the use of the GARDEX EPD is simple and shows high success rates even in challenging anatomies. The role of this new device in CAS needs to be further confirmed in a larger patient population.

  12. Incidence of New Ischaemic Brain Lesions After Carotid Artery Stenting with the Micromesh Roadsaver Carotid Artery Stent: A Prospective Single-Centre Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, Maria Antonella, E-mail: mruffino@cittadellasalute.to.it [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Vascular Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy (Italy); Faletti, Riccardo [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Radiology Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Bergamasco, Laura [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Fonio, Paolo [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Radiology Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Righi, Dorico [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Vascular Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    AimsSeveral randomized trials of patients with carotid stenosis show increased adverse neurological events with stenting versus endarterectomy in the 30-day post-procedure. This study examines the incidence of new ischaemic lesions in patients treated in our centre using the new Roadsaver stent.Methods and resultsBetween September 2015 and January 2016, 23 consecutive patients (age 74.3 ± 7.3 years, 17.4 % female) underwent carotid artery stenting with the Roadsaver stent, a nitinol double-layer micromesh device. A distal protection device was used in all cases. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed 24 h before, and 24 h and 30 days after the procedure. The 24-h post-procedure imaging showed 15 new ipsilateral ischaemic lesions in 7 (30.4 %) patients: median volume 0.076 cm{sup 3} (interquartile range 0.065–0.146 cm{sup 3}). All lesions were asymptomatic. The 30-day imaging showed complete resolution of all lesions and no new ischaemic lesions. Follow-up clinical and ultrasound examinations at 30 days and 6 months recorded no adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events.ConclusionsProtected stenting with micromesh Roadsaver stent showed good safety and efficacy in the treatment of carotid stenosis, with a low incidence of delayed embolic events and new ipsilateral ischaemic brain lesions. These preliminary results are encouraging, but need to be confirmed with larger populations.

  13. Vasoconstrictive Responses by the Carotid and Auricular Arteries in goats to Ergot Alkaloid Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Glen; Flythe, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infects most plants of ‘Kentucky 31’ tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) and produces ergot alkaloids that cause persistent constriction of the vascular system in grazing livestock. Consequently, animals undergoing this toxicosis cannot regulate core body temperature and are vulnerable to heat and cold stresses. An experiment was conducted to determine if the caudal and auricular arteries in goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) vasoconstrict in response to ergot alkaloids. Seven, rumen fistulated goats were fed ad libitum orchardgrass (Dactylis glomeratia) hay and ruminally infused with endophtye-free seed (E-) for a 7-day adjustment period. Two periods followed with E- and endophyte-infected (E+) seed being randomly assigned to the 2 goat groups in period 1 and then switching treatments between groups in period 2. Infused E+ and E- seed were in equal proportions to the hay such that concentrations of ergovaline and ergovalanine were 0.80 µg per g dry matter for the E+ treatment. Cross-sections of both arteries were imaged using Doppler ultrasonography on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 in period 1 and on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9 in period 2. Differences from average baseline areas were used to determine presence or absence of alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Carotid arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in both periods, and auricular arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in period 1 and on day 6 in period 2. Luminal areas of the carotid arteries in E+ goats were 46% less than baseline areas in both periods after vasoconstriction occurred, whereas auricular arteries in E+ goats were 52% less than baseline areas in period 1 and 38% in period 2. Both arteries in E+ goats in period 1 relaxed relative to baseline areas by imaging day 2 after they were switched to the E- treatment. Results indicated that goats can vasoconstrict when exposed to ergot alkaloids that could disrupt their thermoregulation.

  14. Vasoconstrictive Responses by the Carotid and Auricular Arteries in goats to Ergot Alkaloid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Eris Aiken

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum infects most plants of ‘Kentucky 31’ tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum and produces ergot alkaloids that cause persistent constriction of the vascular system in grazing livestock. Consequently, animals undergoing this toxicosis cannot regulate core body temperature and are vulnerable to heat and cold stresses. An experiment was conducted to determine if the caudal and auricular arteries in goats (Capra aegagrus hircus vasoconstrict in response to ergot alkaloids. Seven, rumen fistulated goats were fed ad libitum orchardgrass (Dactylis glomeratia hay and ruminally infused with endophtye-free seed (E- for a 7-day adjustment period. Two periods followed with E- and endophyte-infected (E+ seed being randomly assigned to the 2 goat groups in period 1 and then switching treatments between groups in period 2. Infused E+ and E- seed were in equal proportions to the hay such that concentrations of ergovaline and ergovalanine were 0.80 µg per g dry matter for the E+ treatment. Cross-sections of both arteries were imaged using Doppler ultrasonography on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 in period 1 and on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9 in period 2. Differences from average baseline areas were used to determine presence or absence of alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Carotid arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in both periods, and auricular arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in period 1 and on day 6 in period 2. Luminal areas of the carotid arteries in E+ goats were 46% less than baseline areas in both periods after vasoconstriction occurred, whereas auricular arteries in E+ goats were 52% less than baseline areas in period 1 and 38% in period 2. Both arteries in E+ goats in period 1 relaxed relative to baseline areas by imaging day 2 after they were switched to the E- treatment. Results indicated that goats can vasoconstrict when exposed to ergot alkaloids that could disrupt their

  15. [Resection of recurrent neck cancers with replacement of the carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, J-B; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R

    2017-10-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall survival and healthy survival years (QALY) as well as the patency of carotid revascularization after enbloc tumor resection followed by complementary radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2016, 42 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent resection of the tumor associated with reconstruction of the carotid artery with a PTFE prosthesis (n=31) or with a saphenous vein graft (n=11). In 11 cases, resection was associated with musculocutaneous flap coverage. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (20 patients) or of the pharynx (9 patients), undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin (10 patients) and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (3 patients). All patients had postoperative radiotherapy (50-70Gy) supplemented in 16 of them by chemotherapy. Nine patients had metastatic dissemination at the time of reoperation with a recurrent tumor ulcerated to the skin in 5 of them. The combined 30-day mortality and stroke rate was nil. Postoperative morbidity included dysphagia (n=8), vocal cord paralysis (n=6), late wound healing delay (n=2), transient mandibular claudication (n=1) and partial necrosis of the musculocutaneous flap (n=1). No infection and no thrombosis of the bypass were observed during follow-up [median: 31 months, range: 8-167 months]. Twenty-one patients (50%) died from the consequences of the spread of cancer, which had become metastatic, but without local recurrence. The 5-year survival rate was 50.9±8.3%. The median healthy survival year (QALY) was 3.38 [95% CI: 1.70-4.54] with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of reoperation [n=33; QALY=4.02] and those with metastases [n=9; QALY=0.43; P=0.005]. Healthy life expectancy was also significantly longer in patients with laryngeal cancer [n=20, QALY=4.95] compared to

  16. Simultaneous bilateral internal carotid and vertebral artery dissection following chiropractic manipulation: case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadgir, R.N.; Ahmed, T. [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Loevner, L.A.; Moonis, G.; Slawek, K.; Imbesi, S. [Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Chalela, J. [Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Single-vessel cervical arterial dissections typically occur in young adults and are a common cause of cerebral ischemia and stroke. Although the pathogenesis of multivessel dissection is unclear, it is thought to be a consequence of underlying collagen vascular disease. We present a 34-year-old previously healthy man who developed bilateral internal carotid and vertebral artery dissection following chiropractic manipulation. (orig.)

  17. Histological analysis of cobalt-chromium stents with and without Camouflage® polymer coating: experimental porcine carotid artery model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudtner, Marco Aurélio; de Lara Elesbão, Joao Luiz; Gutierrez, Paulo Sérgio; Meyer, Fabíola Schons; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the arterial response to cobalt-chromium stents with and without polymer coating (Camouflage®, Hemoteq AG, Wuerselen, Germany) implanted in pigs. Cobalt-chromium balloon-expandable stents (4 × 16 mm) were implanted in the common carotid arteries of nine pigs. Histological analysis of endothelialization, inflammation and injury was performed one month later. All stents were successfully deployed, and all but one animal survived the 30 study days. All arteries were patent. Endothelialization was nearly complete in most sections of all carotid stents in both groups. There were mild inflammatory infiltrate and mild-to-moderate injury, which were associated with the stent shafts and not significantly different between groups. Our findings suggest that, in porcine carotid arteries, the histological response to balloon-expandable cobalt-chromium stents coated with polymer (Camouflage®, Hemoteq AG) is similar to the response to non-coated cobalt-chromium stents.

  18. Relation of carotid artery diameter with cardiac geometry and mechanics in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhen-Yu; Peng, Ming-Cheng; Yun, Chun-Ho; Lai, Yau-Huei; Po, Helen L; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Wu, Yih-Jer; Bulwer, Bernard E; Yeh, Hung-I; Tsai, Cheng-Ho

    2012-12-01

    Central artery dilation and remodeling are associated with higher heart failure and cardiovascular risks. However, data regarding carotid artery diameter from hypertension to heart failure have remained elusive. We sought to investigate this issue by examining the association between carotid artery diameter and surrogates of ventricular dysfunction. Two hundred thirteen consecutive patients including 49 with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), 116 with hypertension, and an additional 48 healthy participants underwent comprehensive echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries was performed for measurement of intima-media thickness and diameter (CCAD). Cardiac mechanics, including LV twist, were assessed by novel speckle-tracking software. A substantial graded enlargement of CCAD was observed across all 3 groups (6.8 ± 0.6, 7.7 ± 0.73, and 8.7 ± 0.95 mm for normal, hypertension, and HFpEF groups, respectively; ANOVA Pmechanics in individuals with HFpEF.

  19. Trombose de artéria carótida comum: tratamento cirúrgico com anastomose subclávio-carotidea Occlusion of the common carotid artery treated with a subclavian-internal carotid artery bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Dellaretti Filho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos o caso de mulher de 62 anos, com história de vários ataques isquêmicos transitórios. Os exames complementares revelaram oclusão da artéria carótida comum e revascularização da artéria carótida interna (ACI através de anastomose com a artéria tiroidiana inferior, bem como aneurisma na ACI supraclinoidea. A paciente foi tratada com "bypass" entre a artéria subclávia e a artéria carótida interna cervical, ocorrendo regressão completa dos sintomas de isquemia cerebral no pós-operatório.We describe the case of a 62 years old woman with several transient isquemic attacks. The neuroradiological study demonstrated occlusion of the common carotid artery with revascularization of the internal carotid artery by anastomosis with the inferior thyroid artery and an aneurysm of internal carotid artery at the emergency of the anterior choroidal artery. The patient was treated with a bypass between the subclavian artery and the internal carotid artery with complete regression of the symptoms.

  20. Carotid Artery Stenosis Contralateral to Acute Tandem Occlusion: An Independent Predictor of Poor Clinical Outcome after Mechanical Thrombectomy with Concomitant Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Volker; Behme, Daniel; Borggrefe, Jan; Kabbasch, Christoph; Seker, Fatih; Hüseyin, Cicek; Barnikol, Utako Birgit; Yeo, Leonard Leong Litt; Brouwer, Patrick; Söderman, Michael; Möhlenbruch, Markus; Psychogios, Marios Nikos; Liebig, Thomas; Dohmen, Christian; Fink, Gereon Rudolf; Mpotsaris, Anastasios

    2017-11-24

    Cerebral ischemic strokes due to extra-/intracranial tandem occlusions (TO) of the anterior circulation are responsible for causing mechanical thrombectomy (MT). The impact of concomitant contralateral carotid stenosis (CCS) upon outcome remains unclear in this stroke subtype. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 4 international stroke centers between 2011 and 2017. One hundred ninety-seven consecutive patients with anterior TO were treated with MT and acute carotid artery stenting (CAS). Clinical (including demographics and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS]), imaging (including angiographic evaluation of CCS) and procedural data were evaluated. Favorable clinical outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤2 at 90 days. In 186 out of 197 TO patients preinterventional CT angiography was available for analysis, thereof 49 patients (26%) presented with CCS. Median admission NIHSS and procedural timings did not differ between groups. Reperfusion was successful in 38 out of 49 patients (78%) vs. 113 out of 148 patients (76%) without CCS. In stark contrast, rate of favorable outcome at 90 days differed significantly between groups (22 vs. 44%; p 50% is an independent predictor of poor clinical outcome. This most likely cause is due to poorer collateral flow to the affected tissue. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Peripheral obstructive arterial disease and carotid artery stenosis in end stage renal disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilancini, S; Lucchi, M; Mangiafico, R A; Medolla, A; Ferazzoli, F; Bianchi, C; Salvatori, E

    2008-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predominance of carotid stenosis and peripheral obstructive arterial disease (POAD) in a group of patients subject to dialysis compared with a control group. It is a control-case study performed on patients at different hemodialysis facilities; the exams were carried out in ambulatory care. Two groups of patients were examined, the first group was made up of 40 dialysis patients (46.6% men, average age 58.8), the second was the control group made up of 58 subjects matched by age, sex, arterial pressure, presence of diabetes and smoking habits. All patients underwent an Eco-Color Doppler exam on the over aortal trunks and lower extremities and had their Ankle-Brakial-Index (ABI) measured. Carotid stenosis was considered only if equal or over 50%. Twenty percent of dialysis patients showed carotid stenosis (CS) versus 12% in the control group, with an OR of 7.9 (CI 95% 1.3-47.7) adjusted to sex, age and hypertension. The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed large amounts of calcium deposits. Predominance of POAD in dialysis patients was 20% versus 9% in the control group. In dialysis patients the OR adjusted to age, sex and arterial pressure was 6.3 (CI 95%, 1.2-32.6). The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed mainly underpopliteal lesions with ''rosary bead'' calcifications. In diabetic dialysis patients the OR was 7.6 (CI 95% 1.4-46.3).

  2. Delayed rupture of common carotid artery following rugby tackle injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saleh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common Carotid Artery (CCA is an uncommon site of injury following a blunt trauma, its presentation with spontaneous delayed rupture is even more uncommon and a rugby tackle leading to CCA injury is a rare event. What makes this case unique and very rare is combination of all of the above. Case presentation Mr H. presented to the Emergency Department with an expanding neck haematoma and shortness of breath. He was promptly intubated and had contrast CT angiography of neck vessels which localized the bleeding spot on posteromedial aspect of his Right CCA. He underwent emergency surgery with repair of the defect and made an uneventful recovery post operatively. Conclusion Delayed post traumatic rupture of the CCA is an uncommon yet potentially life threatening condition which can be caused by unusual blunt injury mechanism. A high index of suspicion and low threshold for investigating carotid injuries in the setting of blunt trauma is likely to be beneficial.

  3. Internal carotid artery occlusion or subocclusion: Contemporary diagnostic challenges: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Petar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Measurement of vessel stenosis using ultrasonography or magnetic resonance is still the principal method for determining the severity of carotid atherosclerosis and need for endarterectomy. Case Outline. A 56-year-old male was admitted to the Cardiovascular Institute 'Dedinje' due to a clinically asymptomatic restenosis of the operated left internal carotid artery (ICA. Angiography and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in previous hospitalization had revealed occluded right ICA. However, routine duplex ultrasonography revealed a highgrade restenosis (85% of the left ICA and subocclusion of the right ICA by an ulcerated plaque (confirmed on repeated MRA. Conclusion. Selective arteriography examination could misrepresent the degree of stenosis especially in patents with the ICA that seems to be occluded. MRA is considered the method of choice for identifying pseudo-occlusions of ICA.

  4. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): a randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Roland L; Dobson, Joanna; Ederle, Jörg; Doig, David; Bonati, Leo H; Morris, Stephen; Patel, Nishma V; Brown, Martin M

    2016-03-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for the treatment of carotid stenosis, but safety and long-term efficacy were uncertain. To compare the risks, benefits and cost-effectiveness of CAS versus CEA for symptomatic carotid stenosis. International, multicentre, randomised controlled, open, prospective clinical trial. Hospitals at 50 centres worldwide. Patients older than 40 years of age with symptomatic atheromatous carotid artery stenosis. Patients were randomly allocated stenting or endarterectomy using a computerised service and followed for up to 10 years. The primary outcome measure was the long-term rate of fatal or disabling stroke, analysed by intention to treat (ITT). Disability was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). A cost-utility analysis estimating mean costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) was calculated over a 5-year time horizon. A total of 1713 patients were randomised but three withdrew consent immediately, leaving 1710 for ITT analysis (853 were assigned to stenting and 857 were assigned to endarterectomy). The incidence of stroke, death or procedural myocardial infarction (MI) within 120 days of treatment was 8.5% in the CAS group versus 5.2% in the CEA group (72 vs. 44 events) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 to 2.45; p = 0.006]. In the analysis restricted to patients who completed stenting, age independently predicted the risk of stroke, death or MI within 30 days of CAS (relative risk increase 1.17% per 5 years of age, 95% CI 1.01% to 1.37%). Use of an open-cell stent conferred higher risk than a closed-cell stent (relative risk 1.92, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.33), but use of a cerebral protection device did not modify the risk. CAS was associated with a higher risk of stroke in patients with an age-related white-matter changes score of 7 or more (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.29 to 6.93; p = 0.011). After completion of follow-up with a median of 4.2 years, the number

  5. The effect of menopause on carotid artery remodeling, insulin sensitivity, and plasma adiponectin in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscelli, Elza; Kozàkovà, Michaela; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kyriakopoulou, Konstantina; Astiarraga, Brenno D; Glintborg, Dorte; Konrad, Thomas; Favuzzi, Angela; Petrie, Jhon

    2009-04-01

    The mechanisms by which menopause may influence the systemic subclinical atherosclerosis are unexplained. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between early menopause, established cardiovascular (c-v) risk factors, metabolic parameters (insulin secretion and sensitivity, plasma adiponectin), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in healthy women. In 74 menopausal women (mean age = 51 +/- 3 years, mean duration of menopause = 2.9 +/- 1.2 years) and in 74 nonmenopausal women comparable for age and body mass index (BMI), common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter, and IMT in different carotid segments were measured in digitized ultrasound images. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin secretion was reconstructed by mathematical modeling. CCA diameter (5.55 +/- 0.46 vs. 5.21+/- 0.51 mm, P women, whereas CCA IMT/diameter ratio and IMT in other carotid segments did not differ between the groups. By multivariate models, independent predictors of CCA diameter were menopause and body weight (cumulative R2 = 0.37) and independent correlates of CCA IMT were luminal diameter, systolic BP and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (cumulative R2 = 0.48). Fasting insulin, insulin secretion, and sensitivity and plasma adiponectin were similar in the two groups and were not related to carotid IMT. Early menopause is associated with CCA remodeling, characterized by a proportional increase in luminal diameter and wall thickness, independent of atherosclerotic risk factors and metabolic variables.

  6. Development Of An Atherothrombotic Occlusion In The Rabbit Carotid Artery: Accessed By New Computerized B- Mode Ultrasound Image Processing Technology And Histopathology

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    Hossein Mehrad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thrombus formation on a disrupted atherosclerotic soft plaque is a key event that leads to atherothrombosis. Atherothrombosis is one of the leading causes of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke. Our ability to test new protocols for the treatment of atherothrombotic stenosis in humans is limited for obvious ethical reasons; therefore, a precise understanding of the mechanism of atherothrombotic occlusion in human carotid artery, which give rise to thrombosis, emboli and stroke, requires a suitable animal model that would mimic the same characteristics well. Aims: The aim of this study was to generate an easily reproducible and inexpensive experimental rabbit carotid model of atherothrombotic occlusion with morphological similarities to the human disease and the subsequent assessment of the reliability of new computerized B- mode ultrasound image processing technology in the study of lumen area stenosis in this model. Methods: Briefly, male New Zealand white rabbits were submitted to common carotid artery atherothrombotic occlusion by primary balloon injury followed 1.5% cholesterol- rich diet injury for eight weeks and finally perivascularly severe cold injury. All of the rabbits' arteries were imaged by B-mode ultrasound weekly, after which the rabbits were sacrificed, and their vessels were processed for histopathology. Ultrasound longitudinal view images from three cardiac cycles were processed by a new computerized analyzing method based on dynamic programming and maximum gradient algorithm for measurement of instantaneous changes in arterial wall thickness and lumen diameter in sequential ultrasound images. Results: Histopathology results showed progressive changes, from the lipid-laden cells and fibrous connective tissue proliferation, fibrolipid plaque formation, resulting in vessel wall thickening, remodeling, neovascularization and lumen narrowing (before perivascularly severe cold injury using liquid nitrogen up

  7. Predicting ischemic stroke after carotid artery stenting based on proximal calcification and the jellyfish sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Hama, Seiji; Tsuji, Toshio; Soh, Zu; Hayashi, Hideaki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Okazaki, Takahito; Ishii, Daizo; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-07-07

    OBJECTIVE Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been considered to prevent ischemic strokes caused by stenosis of the cervical carotid artery. The most common complication of CAS is new cerebral infarction. The authors have previously reported that the jellyfish sign-the rise and fall of the mobile component of the carotid plaque surface detected by carotid ultrasonography-suggests thinning and rupture of the fibrous cap over the unstable plaque content, such as the lipid-rich necrotic core or internal plaque hemorrhage. The authors' aim in the present study was to evaluate the risk of a new ischemic lesion after CAS by using many risk factors including calcification (size and location) and the jellyfish sign. METHODS Eighty-six lesions (77 patients) were treated with CAS. The presence of ischemic stroke was determined using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Risk factors included calcification of the plaque (classified into 5 groups for size and 3 groups for location) and the jellyfish sign, among others. Multiple linear regression analysis (stepwise analysis and partial least squares [PLS] analysis) was conducted, followed by a machine learning analysis using an artificial neural network (ANN) based on the log-linearized gaussian mixture network (LLGMN). The additive effects of the jellyfish sign and calcification on ischemic stroke after CAS were examined using the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by the Steel-Dwass test. RESULTS The stepwise analysis selected the jellyfish sign, proximal calcification (proximal Ca), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and patient age for the prediction model to predict new DWI lesions. The PLS analysis revealed the same top 3 variables (jellyfish sign, proximal Ca, and LDL cholesterol) according to the variable importance in projection scores. The ANN was then used, showing that these 3 variables remained. The accuracy of the ANN improved; areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of the stepwise analysis, the PLS

  8. Nonenhanced hybridized arterial spin labeled magnetic resonance angiography of the extracranial carotid arteries using a fast low angle shot readout at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Walker, Matthew T; Meyer, Joel R; Murphy, Ian G; Edelman, Robert R

    2016-04-12

    To evaluate ungated nonenhanced hybridized arterial spin labeling (hASL) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the extracranial carotid arteries using a fast low angle shot (FLASH) readout at 3 Tesla. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved and HIPAA-compliant study, we evaluated the image quality (4-point scale) of nonenhanced hASL MRA using a FLASH readout with respect to contrast-enhanced MRA (CEMRA) in 37 patients presenting with neurologic symptoms. Two certified neuroradiologists independently evaluated 407 arterial segments (11 per patient) for image quality. The presence of vascular pathology was determined by consensus reading. Gwet's AC1 was used to assess inter-rater agreement in image quality scores, and image quality scores were correlated with age and body mass index. Objective measurements of arterial lumen area and sharpness in the carotid arteries were compared to values obtained with CEMRA. Comparisons were also made with conventional nonenhanced 2D time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. CEMRA provided the best image quality, while nonenhanced hASL FLASH MRA provided image quality that exceeded 2D TOF at the carotid bifurcation and in the internal and external carotid arteries. All nine vascular abnormalities of the carotid and intracranial arteries detected by CEMRA were depicted with hASL MRA, with no false positives. Inter-rater agreement of image quality scores was highest for CEMRA (AC1 = 0.87), followed by hASL (AC1 = 0.61) and TOF (AC1 = 0.43) (P < 0.001, all comparisons). With respect to CEMRA, agreement in cross-sectional lumen area was significantly better with hASL than TOF in the common carotid artery (intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0.90 versus 0.66; P < 0.05) and at the carotid bifurcation (ICC = 0.87 versus 0.54; P < 0.05). Nonenhanced hASL MRA provided superior arterial sharpness with respect to CEMRA and 2D TOF (P < 0.001). Although inferior to CEMRA in terms of image quality and inter

  9. Effects of 8-week swimming training on carotid arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in young overweight adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wen-Xue; Liu, Hai-Bin; Gao, Feng-Shan; Wang, Yan-Xia; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    Exercise has been found to either reduce or increase arterial stiffness. Land-based exercise modalities have been documented as effective physical therapies to decrease arterial stiffness. However, these land-based exercise modalities may not be suitable for overweight individuals, in terms of risks of joint injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 8-week swimming training and 4-week detraining on carotid arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in young overweight adults. Twenty young male adults who were overweight were recruited and engaged in 8-week of swimming training and 4-week detraining. Five individuals withdrew due to lack of interest and failure to follow the training protocol. Body Fat Percentage (BFP) and carotid hemodynamic variables were measured on a resting day at the following intervals: baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks after swimming training and 4 weeks after detraining. A repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the differences between baseline and each measurement. When significant differences were detected, Tukey's test for post hoc comparisons was used. Eight-week swimming training at moderate intensity decreased BFP, including the trunk and four extremities. Additionally, the BFP of the right and left lower extremities continued to decrease in these overweight adults 4 weeks after ceasing training. Carotid arterial stiffness decreased, while there were no significant changes in arterial diameters. Blood flow velocity, flow rate, maximal and mean wall shear stress increased, while systolic blood pressure and peripheral resistance decreased. No significant differences existed in minimal wall shear stress and oscillatory shear stress. Eight-week swimming training at moderate intensity exhibited beneficial effects on systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness and blood supply to the brain in overweight adults. Moreover, maximal and mean wall shear stress increased after training. It is worth noting that these

  10. Local intra-arterial thrombolysis in the carotid territory: does recanalization depend on the thromboembolus type?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Wilhelm, K.; Flacke, S.; Schild, H.H. [Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Hartmann, A.; Pohl, C.; Klockgether, T. [Department of Neurology, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Omran, H. [Department of Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Little is known about whether recanalization of carotid territory occlusions by local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) depends on the type of the occluding thromboembolus. We retrospectively analysed the records of 62 patients with thromboembolic occlusions of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation or the middle cerebral artery who were undergoing LIT with urokinase within 6 h of symptom onset. We determined the influence of thromboembolus type (according to the TOAST criteria), thromboembolus location, leptomeningeal collaterals, time interval from onset of symptoms to onset of thrombolysis, and patient's age on recanalization. The thromboembolus type was atherosclerotic in six patients, cardioembolic in 29, of other determined etiology in four, and of undetermined etiology in 23 patients. Thirty-three (53%) thromboembolic occlusions were recanalized. The thromboembolus location but not the TOAST stroke type nor other parameters affected recanalization. In the TOAST group of patients with cardioembolic occlusions recanalization occurred significantly less frequently when transoesophageal echocardiography showed cardiac thrombus. The present study underlines the thromboembolus location as being the most important parameter affecting recanalization. The fact that thromboembolic occlusions originating from cardiac thrombi had a lower likelihood of being resolved by thrombolysis indicates the thromboembolus type as another parameter affecting recanalization. (orig.)

  11. Semi-automatic quantitative measurements of intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis and calcification using CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleeker, Leslie; Berg, Rene van den; Majoie, Charles B. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederkoorn, Paul J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Intracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke. However, its quantitative assessment is not routinely performed in clinical practice. In this diagnostic study, we present and evaluate a novel semi-automatic application to quantitatively measure intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) degree of stenosis and calcium volume in CT angiography (CTA) images. In this retrospective study involving CTA images of 88 consecutive patients, intracranial ICA stenosis was quantitatively measured by two independent observers. Stenoses were categorized with cutoff values of 30% and 50%. The calcification in the intracranial ICA was qualitatively categorized as absent, mild, moderate, or severe and quantitatively measured using the semi-automatic application. Linear weighted kappa values were calculated to assess the interobserver agreement of the stenosis and calcium categorization. The average and the standard deviation of the quantitative calcium volume were calculated for the calcium categories. For the stenosis measurements, the CTA images of 162 arteries yielded an interobserver correlation of 0.78 (P < 0.001). Kappa values of the categorized stenosis measurements were moderate: 0.45 and 0.58 for cutoff values of 30% and 50%, respectively. The kappa value for the calcium categorization was 0.62, with a good agreement between the qualitative and quantitative calcium assessment. Quantitative degree of stenosis measurement of the intracranial ICA on CTA is feasible with a good interobserver agreement ICA. Qualitative calcium categorization agrees well with quantitative measurements. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between intracranial internal carotid artery calcification and enlarged cerebral perivascular space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Xiao-Xiao [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); The First People' s Hospital of Wenling, Department of Neurology, Wenling (China); Li, Ge-Fei; Wu, Yi-Lan; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Zhao, Ying; Shi, Yan-Hui; Zhuang, Mei-Ting; Hou, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Xue-Mei; Shen, Ying; Cui, Guo-Hong; Su, Jing-Jing; Chen, Wei [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Tang, Xue-Mei; Sun, Ji; Liu, Jian-Ren [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Shanghai (China)

    2017-06-15

    The association between intracranial internal carotid artery (IICA) calcification and lacunes, white matter hyperintensity (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has been well researched. However, enlarged cerebral perivascular space (PVS) has not yet been reported to correlate with intracranial internal carotid artery calcification. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. A total of 189 patients with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory who presented within 7 days of ictus from 2012 to 2015 were enrolled respectively. All patients were required to have undergone head computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, or computed tomography angiography. Clinical characteristics were recorded. IICA calcification and enlarged PVS were semi-quantitatively evaluated, and the presence of lacunes, WMH, and CMBs was recorded. Of the 189 patients, 63.5% were male. Mean age of the patients was 68.6 ± 12.2 years. There were 104 patients with IICA calcification. Age, diabetes mellitus, lacunes, and white matter hyperintensity were significantly associated with IICA calcification (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age, diabetes mellitus, and lacunes were independent predictors of IICA calcification (P < 0.05). A lower risk of IICA calcification was found in patients with a higher enlarged PVS score (P = 0.004). Higher enlarged PVS scores were associated with a lesser degree of IICA calcification. There appears to be a relationship between reduced risk of IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. (orig.)

  13. A multimodal imaging study on spatial pattern of cerebral perfusion change caused by symptomatic unilateral carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-rui LI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the spatial pattern of cerebral perfusion decrease resulting from symptomatic unilateral carotid artery stenosis and to assess the relationship between degrees of stenosis and cerebral blood flow (CBF.  Methods CT angiography (CTA and arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI cerebral perfusion were performed in 22 patients with symptomatic unilateral carotid artery stenosis. Diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis and measurement of stenosis degrees was performed by using CTA; cerebral perfusion was determined by ASL. Voxel-based analysis (VBA were applied to observe perfusion changes in patients with mild stenosis and moderate to severe stenosis, and spatial pattern of cerebral perfusion changes caused by carotid artery stenosis. Analysis based on region of interest (ROI was used to explore the relationship between degrees of stenosis and CBF. Results Twenty-two patients with symptomatic unilateral carotid artery stenosis (13 in the left side and 9 in the right included 13 cases with mild stenosis and 9 cases with moderate to severe stenosis. Compared to those with mild stenosis, patients with moderate to severe stenosis showed reduced CBF in bilateral (especially in the affected side parietal lobes (t = - 2.382, P = 0.014, frontal lobes (t = - 2.354, P = 0.015 and centrum semiovale (t = - 2.283, P = 0.017, and was basically located in bilateral cerebral watershed area. Furthermore, perfusion in these areas was negatively correlated with the degree of stenosis (r = - 0.479, P = 0.024.  Conclusions Symptomatic unilateral carotid artery stenosis may result in cerebral perfusion decreases in bilateral (particularly in the affected side watershed area and cerebral blood flow is negatively correlated with the degree of stenosis. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.02.006

  14. Analysis of the population at high risk of stroke detected with carotid artery ultrasonography in Tianjin urban communities

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    Wei YUE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the features of carotid atherosclerosis in a population at high risk of stroke in urban communities of Tianjin, so as to provide inspiration for carotid ultrasonography to play a greater role in the prevention and control of stroke.  Methods A total of 956 residents at high risk of stroke were selected from 4 urban communities in Tianjin using cluster random sampling method. Doppler ultrasound screening was performed in bilateral common carotid artery (CCA, internal carotid artery (ICA, external carotid artery (ECA, vertebral artery (VA, subclavian artery (SCA and innominate artery of the population. The intima-media thickness (IMT, atherosclerotic plaque formation and its location and size, vascular stenosis or occlusion, and flow spectrum were detected. The results and features of carotid ultrasound screening were analyzed and compared among different gender and age groups.  Results 1 The detection rate of carotid atherosclerosis was 71.55% (684/956, and the detection rate in males was significantly higher than that in females (79.08% vs 65.87%; χ2 = 20.067, P = 0.000. 2 Among the population with carotid atherosclerosis, the most common manifestation was the formation of atherosclerotic plaques (81.58%, 558/684, secondly intima-media thickening (13.01%, 89/684, followed by moderate to severe stenosis or occlusion (5.41%, 37/684. The proportion of intima-media thickening in males was lower than that in females (7.08% vs 18.38%; χ2 = 19.269, P = 0.000. The proportion of carotid atherosclerotic plaque formation in males was higher than that in females (86.46% vs 77.16%; χ2 = 9.824, P = 0.002. The median rating of carotid atherosclerosis was 1.79, with males higher than females [1.98 (0.70, 3.26 vs 1.52 (0.20, 2.84; Z = 2.304, P = 0.042]. The site of plaque formation was most commonly located in carotid bulb (36.61%, secondly SCA (22.18%. Of the type of carotid stenosis, ICA stenosis was detected in 30 cases, VA

  15. The use of intraoperative monitoring and treatment of symptomatic microemboli in carotid artery stenting: case report and discussion

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    Rangi, P.S.; Clifton, A. [St Georges Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley Wing, Tooting, London (United Kingdom); Markus, H.S.; Punter, M.N.M. [St Georges University of London, Centre for Clinical Neuroscience, Cranmer Terrace, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Carotid artery stenting is a recently introduced treatment in symptomatic atherosclerotic carotid artery disease with acceptable complication rates. The major risk is perioperative embolic stroke. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) can be used to identify embolic signals and guide therapy. We present a case of symptomatic embolization in a 72-year-old female following carotid stent deployment complicated by haemodynamic changes. Despite concurrent dual antiplatelet medication significant symptomatic embolization occurred even after restoration of the blood pressure, and modulation of the rate of embolization was achieved using dextran-40 guided by TCD monitoring. The patient recovered from an initially profound hemiparesis and dysphasia to minor sensory changes. Microemboli are common following carotid artery stenting and there appears to be a threshold phenomenon associated with prolonged embolization and progression to cerebral infarction. TCD can be used to detect particulate microemboli and therefore may be useful in guiding antithrombotic therapy in this setting. Dextran-40 has been shown to reduce the embolic load following carotid endarterectomy and was used to good effect in this patient in terms of both embolic load and clinical outcome. This is the first case of embolization following carotid stenting successfully treated with dextran-40, and offers a further option for therapeutic intervention in microembolism detected by TCD and stresses the importance of perioperative monitoring of embolic load for postoperative stroke risk. (orig.)

  16. Free Floating Thrombus in Carotid Artery in a Patient with Recurrent Strokes

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    Moni Roy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 72-year-old male with reported past medical history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs presenting with myriad of neurological symptoms. Patient was transferred from outlying hospital with complaints of right sided facial droop and dysarthria. Computed tomography angiography (CTA showed high grade proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis along with interesting finding of a free floating thrombus (FFT in the left ICA. After discussion with the neurosurgical team, our case was treated conservatively with combination of antiplatelet therapy with Aspirin and anticoagulation with Warfarin without recurrence of TIAs or strokes on six-month follow-up.

  17. Internal Carotid Artery Ectasia: The Value of Imaging Studies Prior to Biopsy of a Retropharyngeal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Chan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of retropharyngeal tissue mass often raises the suspicion of malignancy, especially in elderly patients. This prompts urgent biopsy to investigate tissue histology. We discuss a case where this is contraindicated as the retropharyngeal mass was illustrated by CT scanning and confirmed with MRI to be a tortuous coursing internal carotid artery. An awareness of this unusual anatomical variation and a careful interpretation of imaging studies both at the stage of differential diagnosis and pre-operative screening are essential to avoid damage to important structures, causing unnecessary complications.

  18. Clinical implications of internal carotid artery tortuosity, kinking and coiling: a systematic review

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    Zenteno M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical variations of the internal carotid artery are diverse. Abnormalities in their geometry and paths are commonly identified by ultrasonography and angiography. The surgical correction of symptomatic CAs is better in preventing stroke compared with best medical therapy, as well as it completely eliminates the symptoms in patients with nonhemispheric symptoms. The ICA anomalies may be dangerous and represent a risk factor for massive bleeding. Suture ligatures can penetrate and occlude torn vessels, scalpels or biting instruments can lacerate vessels, and indirectly conducted electric cauterization can burn the soft of bony tissues

  19. Carotid Artery Stenting Versus Endarterectomy for Stroke Prevention: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Partha; Chatterjee, Saurav; Aronow, Herbert D; Kundu, Amartya; Ramchand, Preethi; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Nairooz, Ramez; Gray, William A; White, Christopher J; Jaff, Michael R; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Giri, Jay

    2017-05-09

    Data conflict regarding the relative effectiveness of carotid artery stenting (CAS) and carotid artery endarterectomy (CEA) for the prevention of stroke due to carotid artery stenosis. The authors performed an updated meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of CAS versus CEA, given recently published clinical trial data. Databases were searched through April 30, 2016. Randomized trials with ≥50 patients, that had exclusive use of embolic-protection devices, and that compared CAS against CEA for the treatment of carotid artery stenosis were selected. We calculated summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects model. We analyzed 6,526 patients from 5 trials with a mean follow-up of 5.3 years. The composite outcome of periprocedural death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or nonperiprocedural ipsilateral stroke was not significantly different between therapies (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.59). The risk of any periprocedural stroke plus nonperiprocedural ipsilateral stroke was higher with CAS (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.84). The risk of higher stroke with CAS was mostly attributed to periprocedural minor stroke (OR: 2.43; 95% CI: 1.71 to 3.46). CAS was associated with significantly lower risk of periprocedural MI (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.75); cranial nerve palsy (OR: 0.07; 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.14); and the composite outcome of death, stroke, MI, or cranial nerve palsy during the periprocedural period (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.60 to 0.93). CAS and CEA were associated with similar rates of a composite of periprocedural death, stroke, MI, or nonperiprocedural ipsilateral stroke. The risk of long-term overall stroke was significantly higher with CAS, and was mostly attributed to periprocedural minor stroke. CAS was associated with lower rates of periprocedural MI and cranial nerve palsy than CEA. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilateral Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysms Presenting as Diplopia in a Young Patient

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    Nikolaos Kopsachilis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bilateral intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms (ICAAs are extremely rare and difficult to treat. Case Report. A 26-year-old female presented in our clinic with acute diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed two heterogeneously enhanced masses indicating bilateral ICAA. An endovascular coil embolization was performed on the left side successfully, resulting in resolution of her symptoms. Conclusion. Thorough systemic evaluation in young patients with diplopia can reveal life-threatening underlying pathology and prevent major complications.

  1. A Bullet Lying Next to the Common Carotid Artery in the Neck of a Young Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Gülpembe; Akpinar, Meltem Esen; Ünsal, Özlem; Coşkun, Berna Uslu

    2017-01-01

    Penetrating neck trauma is most commonly caused by firearm discharge, and is potentially very dangerous, being associated with a high risk of mortality. A 12-year-old patient with a recent history of a gunshot wound to the neck was evaluated in detail; a bullet was located in close proximity to the left common carotid artery. Neck exploration was performed and the foreign body was removed without any complications. The management of the patient is discussed, as are contemporary approaches to the treatment of penetrating neck trauma. However, the choice of treatment for a stable patient with a penetrating neck injury remains controversial.

  2. Elevated Intraocular Pressure due to Arteriovenous Fistula between External Carotid Artery and Facial Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagatay, Halil Huseyin; Ekinci, Metin; Sendul, Selam Yekta; Uslu, Ceylan; Demir, Mehmet; Ulusay, Sıtkı Mert; Uysal, Ender; Seker, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous outflow via the conventional outflow pathway is dependent on the pressure gradient between intraocular pressure (IOP) and episcleral venous pressure (EVP). Elevated IOP resulting from increased EVP is a well-known complication of arteriovenous fistulas, which are usually between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Arteriovenous malformations usually occur spontaneously, after a trauma or from iatrogenic causes, and they manifest with findings of chemosis, dilatation of the conjunctival vessels, exophthalmos, and extraocular motility limitation. In this study, we present a case of elevated IOP due to facial arteriovenous malformations following a functional neck dissection surgery that caused intraocular pressure elevation.

  3. Elevated Intraocular Pressure due to Arteriovenous Fistula between External Carotid Artery and Facial Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Huseyin Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous outflow via the conventional outflow pathway is dependent on the pressure gradient between intraocular pressure (IOP and episcleral venous pressure (EVP. Elevated IOP resulting from increased EVP is a well-known complication of arteriovenous fistulas, which are usually between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Arteriovenous malformations usually occur spontaneously, after a trauma or from iatrogenic causes, and they manifest with findings of chemosis, dilatation of the conjunctival vessels, exophthalmos, and extraocular motility limitation. In this study, we present a case of elevated IOP due to facial arteriovenous malformations following a functional neck dissection surgery that caused intraocular pressure elevation.

  4. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  5. Clinical and imaging features associated with intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications in patients with ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Arda [Mersin University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Akpinar, Erhan [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications (ICAC), a frequent finding on imaging studies, are predictive of future stroke risk in population-based studies. The clinical significance of this observation among ischemic stroke patients is however less clear. In this study, we analyzed ICAC burden in relation to vascular risk factor profile, stroke etiology, and extent of craniocervical vascular calcifications in a consecutive series of ischemic stroke patients. The burden of ICAC was determined both on non-contrast CT and CT-angiography source images by semiquantitative scoring algorithms. The distribution of vascular risk factors, etiologic stroke subtype, and calcification burden in other craniocervical arteries was assessed among patients with no ICAC, mild-moderate ICAC, and severe ICAC. Of 319 patients included into the study, 28 % had no ICAC, 35 % had mild-moderate ICAC, and 37 % had severe ICAC on CT angiography. Independent factors associated with ICAC burden in multivariate analysis included age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.006), and coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a stroke etiology of large artery atherosclerosis or cardioaortic embolism was significantly related to higher ICAC burden (p = 0.006). Patients with severe ICAC were more likely to harbor calcifications in other vascular beds (p < 0.001). All of these findings persisted when analyses were repeated with CT-based ICAC burden assessments. ICAC burden reflects a continuum of atherosclerotic disease involving carotid arteries together with other craniocervical vascular beds. ICAC is significantly associated with stroke of large vessel or cardioembolic origin. This information might help the clinician in prioritizing etiologic work-up in the acute period. (orig.)

  6. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with carotid artery intima-media thickness in hypertensive older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Moatassem S; Elawam, Amal E; Khater, Mohamed S; Omar, Omar H; Mabrouk, Randa A; Taha, Hend M

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major traditional risk factor for atherosclerosis. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is considered to be a noninvasive marker of global atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study is to assess the associati