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Sample records for human c-peptide levels

  1. Human C-peptide. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beischer, W.; Keller, L.; Maas, M.; Schiefer, E.; Pfeiffer, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic human C-peptide bearing a tyrosine group at its amino end is labelled with 125 iodine using chloramin T or hydrogen peroxide and lactoperoxidase. The results of the two methods are compared. Antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide (without tyrosine), which was partially coupled to rabbit albumin, is raised in guinea pigs and goats. Goats show to be superior to guinea pips concerning antibody production. The so-called 'hook effect' phenomenon is observed when setting up the standard curves for the radioimmunoassay. Monotonically decreasing standard curves are obtained on dilution of antiserum with a high antibody titer which was produced by repeated immunization in goats. Free C-peptide and C-peptide bound to antiserum are separated using the anion exchange resin amberlite. Using this separation technique we excluded unspecific binding of labelled C-peptide to protein fractions in serum of diabetics. The sensitivity of our radioimmunoassay is approx. 0.3 ng C-peptide/ml serum. Intra- and interassay variability are below 10%. Human proinsulin is the only substance found to crossreact with the antiserum. (orig.) [de

  2. Human C-peptide. Pt. 1. Radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beischer, W; Keller, L; Maas, M; Schiefer, E; Pfeiffer, E F [Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Innere Medizin, Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel

    1976-08-01

    Synthetic human C-peptide bearing a tyrosine group at its amino end is labelled with /sup 125/iodine using chloramin T or hydrogen peroxide and lactoperoxidase. The results of the two methods are compared. Antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide (without tyrosine), which was partially coupled to rabbit albumin, is raised in guinea pigs and goats. Goats show to be superior to guinea pips concerning antibody production. The so-called 'hook effect' phenomenon is observed when setting up the standard curves for the radioimmunoassay. Monotonically decreasing standard curves are obtained on dilution of antiserum with a high antibody titer which was produced by repeated immunization in goats. Free C-peptide and C-peptide bound to antiserum are separated using the anion exchange resin amberlite. Using this separation technique we excluded unspecific binding of labelled C-peptide to protein fractions in serum of diabetics. The sensitivity of our radioimmunoassay is approx. 0.3 ng C-peptide/ml serum. Intra- and interassay variability are below 10%. Human proinsulin is the only substance found to crossreact with the antiserum.

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum C-peptide levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guohong; Xu Ruiji; Zhang Zhongshu; Wang Xiaoji

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical meanings of changes of serum C-peptide levels and insulin/C-peptide ratio. Methods: Serum insulin and C-peptide levels were determined with RIA in 171 patients with DM-2 of all ages (31-50, n= 50, 51-60, n=60, over 60, n=61) and 50 patients with renal insufficiency. The insulin/C-peptide ratio were calculated. Results: The serum C-peptide and insulin levels in patients with renal insufficiency were significantly higher than those in diabetics of all age groups and the insulin/C-peptide ratio were significantly lower than those in diabetics (P 0.05), but the serum C-peptide levels increased as the age of patients increased with decrease of insulin/C-peptide ratio (P<0.01). Conclusion: Abnormal changes of C-peptide levels and insulin/C-peptide ratio in diabetics (the age-factor corrected) might reflect renal dysfunction. (authors)

  4. Insulin and C-peptide in human brain neurons (insulin/C-peptide/brain peptides/immunohistochemistry/radioimmunoassay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.; Bernstein, H.G.; Rinne, A.; Hahn, H.J.; Ziegler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The regional distribution and cellular localization of insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivities were studied in human cadaver brains using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and radioimmunoassay. Products of the immune reactions to both polypeptides were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined. Immunostaining was mainly restricted to the cell soma and proximal dendrites. Radioimmunoassay revealed that human brain contains insulin and C-peptide in concentrations much higher than the blood, the highest being in the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that the 'brain insulin' is - at least in part - produced in the CNS. (author)

  5. Basal C-peptide Level as a Surrogate Marker of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Sung-Tae Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that C-peptide induces smooth muscle cell proliferation and causes human atherosclerotic lesions in diabetic patients. The present study was designed to examine whether the basal C-peptide levels correlate with cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients.MethodsData was obtained from 467 patients with T2DM from two institutions who were followed for four years. The medical findings of all patients were reviewed, and patients with creatinine >1.4 mg/dL, any inflammation or infection, hepatitis, or type 1 DM were excluded. The relationships between basal C-peptide and other clinical values were statistically analyzed.ResultsA simple correlation was found between basal C-peptide and components of metabolic syndrome (MS. Statistically basal C-peptide levels were significantly higher than the three different MS criteria used in the present study, the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III of the National Cholesterol Education Program's (NCEP's, World Health Organization (WHO, and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria (NCEP-ATP III, P=0.001; IDF, P<0.001; WHO, P=0.029. The multiple regression analysis between intima-media thickness (IMT and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide significantly correlated with IMT (P=0.043, while the analysis between the 10-year coronary heart disease risk by the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide did not correlate with IMT (P=0.226.ConclusionBasal C-peptide is related to cardiovascular predictors (IMT of T2DM, suggesting that basal C-peptide does provide a further indication of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Circulating Dopamine and C-Peptide Levels in Fasting Nondiabetic Hypertensive Patients

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    Tomaschitz, Andreas; Ritz, Eberhard; Kienreich, Katharina; Pieske, Burkert; M?rz, Winfried; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Drechsler, Christiane; Meinitzer, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accumulating evidence supports a potential role for dopamine in the regulation of insulin secretion. We examined the association between circulating dopamine and C-peptide concentrations using data from the Graz Endocrine Causes of Hypertension (GECOH) study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After 12 h of fasting, we measured plasma dopamine and serum C-peptide levels and established determining factors of insulin secretion in 201 nondiabetic hypertensive patients (mean age 48.1 ? 16.0 y...

  7. Changes of serum leptin and c-peptide level in children with type 1 diabetic mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Wang Zizheng; Sun Junjiang; Wang Shukui; Qi Shaokang

    2001-01-01

    To deplore the relationship between leptin and c-peptide in children with type 1 diabetic mellitus (DM). The levels of serum leptin and c-peptide (C-P) in 65 type 1 DM children (including 31 before and after insulin treatment) and 30 normal controls were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results found that there was significant differences (P < 0.01) in leptin and C-P between DM children and normal controls, also in 31 DM children before and after treatment. It showed a positive correlation between leptin and C-P. The changes of the leptin/C-P ratio in DM children compared with normal controls and that before and after treatment were also significantly different. It suggested that leptin may have close relationship in the development, progress and the occurrence of complications in children with DM and also provide a new clue for their diagnosis treatment and complication occurrence

  8. Insulin and C peptide response, and antibody levels in hepatitis C related chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Z.; Tariq, N.; Iqbal, M.; Shah, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Patients with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (HC) have an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. The pathogenic mechanism by which HC predisposes to DM is not clear. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin and C-peptide response to 75 gram oral glucose load and measure anti phospholipid antibody levels in patients with chronic liver disease due to HC. Design: a prospective study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted at the department of medicine, Jinnah postgraduate medical centre over period of three months. Subjects and methods: An analytical case control study was carried out on 37 patients (m-18,f=19); none of these patients had received interferon. They were divided into four groups: (a) HC cirrhosis with DM (n=9 ), (b) HC cirrhosis without DM (n=11), (c) hepatitis B (HB) cirrhosis without DM (n=7), (d) chronic hepatitis C without DM (n=10). Group C and D were taken as controls. Fasting blood samples were taken and repeated after 2 hours of 75 gram oral glucose load (2 h PG). Result: mean ages of group A,B,C and D were (yr +- SD) 51.3 +- 7.6,48.9 +- 2.4, 33.7 +-10.8 and 31.7 +- 8.8 respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the age, Pugh score and body mass index of HC cirrhotic patients with and without DM. Patients of group A had higher fasting and 2 h PG glucose levels (P=0.003 and 0.000) and higher fasting insulin level (p=0.045). However, increments in insulin and c peptide levels 2 h PG were much less (p=0.048 and 0.003). HB cirrhotics without diabetes (group C behaved just like HC cirrhotic without diabetes (group B). Patients of group D had normal glucose tolerance and insulin and C peptide levels. All four groups had normal anti phospholipid antibody levels. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis due to HC nd HB show evidence of glucose intolerance in spite of hyperinsulinaemia probably due to insulin resistance. HC cirrhotics with diabetes have fasting hyperglycemia in spite of

  9. Measurement of insulin and C-peptide excitatory test levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Wang Zizheng

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the function of islet β cells in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), serum insulin and C-peptide (C-P) excitatory test levels were measured dynamically by radioimmunoassay in 41 patients with GDM and 30 normal pregnant controls. The results showed that there were significant difference in insulin and C-peptide excitatory test levels between normal pregnancy for 32-40 weeks and patients with GDM (P < 0.001). The secretory peak of insulin occurred at 60 min in normal pregnancy, while at 120 min in patients with GDM, and the recovery postponed in patients with GDM. The peak time for C-P was just as same as that of insulin, but the peak error for C-P between normal pregnant controls and patients with GDM was more larger than that for insulin and it recovered more slowly. It suggested that majority of islet β cells in patients with GDM were good enough for response to islet resistance factors and big stress from pregnancy, and also suggested a relation between pregnancy and islet β cells function

  10. Preserved C-peptide levels in overweight or obese compared with underweight children upon diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Hyeoh Won Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWe hypothesized that overweight or obese children might develop type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM early despite residual beta-cell function. Factors independently associated with preservation of C-peptide level were analyzed.MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the medical data of 135 children aged 2.1-16.5 years with autoimmune T1DM. Body mass index (BMI, pubertal stage, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and C-peptide levels were evaluated. Patients were assigned to underweight (22.2%, normal weight (63.7%, and overweight or obese (14.1% groups according to their BMI.ResultsPreservation of serum C-peptide levels (≥0.6 ng/mL was found in 43.0% of subjects. With increasing BMI, the proportions of children with preserved C-peptide levels increased from 33.3% to 41.9% to 63.2%, with marginal significance (P=0.051. Interaction analysis indicated no effect of BMI score on age at onset associated with serum C-peptide levels. The lower the C-peptide level, the younger the age of onset (P<0.001, after adjustment for BMI z-score and HbA1c level. However, no significant relationship between BMI z-score or category and onset age was evident. Upon multivariate-adjusted modeling, the odds that the C-peptide level was preserved increased by 1.2 fold (P=0.001 per year of life, by 3.1 folds (P=0.015 in children presenting without (compared to with ketoacidosis, and by 5.0 folds (P=0.042 in overweight or obese (compared to underweight children.ConclusionOverweight or obese children had slightly more residual beta-cell function than did underweight children. However, we found no evidence that obesity temporally accelerates T1DM presentation.

  11. Islet Cell Associated Autoantibodies and C-Peptide Levels in Patients with Diabetes and Symptoms of Gastroparesis

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    Elias S. Siraj

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIndividuals with diabetes are at increased risk for complications, including gastroparesis. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder resulting in decreased beta-cell function. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 antibody (GADA is the most commonly used test to assess autoimmunity while C-peptide level is used to assess beta-cell function. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, who are GADA positive, are labeled latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA.ObjectiveTo characterize patients with T1 and T2DM who have symptoms of gastroparesis using GADA and C-peptide levels and to look for association with the presence of gastroparesis and its symptom severity.Design113 T1DM and 90 T2DM patients with symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis were studied. Symptom severity was assessed using Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI. Serum samples were analyzed for GADA and C-peptide.ResultsDelayed gastric emptying was present in 91 (81% of T1DM and 60 (67% of T2DM patients (p = 0.04. GADA was present in 13% of T2DM subjects [10% in delayed gastric emptying and 20% in normal gastric emptying (p = 0.2]. Gastric retention and GCSI scores were mostly similar in GADA positive and negative T2DM patients. GADA was present in 45% of T1DM subjects [46% in delayed gastric emptying and 41% in normal gastric emptying (p = 0.81]. Low C-peptide levels were seen in 79% T1DM patients and 8% T2DM. All seven T2DM patients with low C-peptide were taking insulin compared to 52% of T2DM with normal C-peptide.ConclusionGADA was present in 13% while low C-peptide was seen in 8% of our T2DM patients with symptoms of gastroparesis. Neither did correlate with degree of delayed gastric emptying or symptom severity.ClinicalTrials.gov IdentifierNCT01696747.

  12. C-peptide increases Na,K-ATPase expression via PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent activation of transcription factor ZEB in human renal tubular cells.

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    Dana Galuska

    Full Text Available Replacement of proinsulin C-peptide in type 1 diabetes ameliorates nerve and kidney dysfunction, conditions which are associated with a decrease in Na,K-ATPase activity. We determined the molecular mechanism by which long term exposure to C-peptide stimulates Na,K-ATPase expression and activity in primary human renal tubular cells (HRTC in control and hyperglycemic conditions.HRTC were cultured from the outer cortex obtained from patients undergoing elective nephrectomy. Ouabain-sensitive rubidium ((86Rb(+ uptake and Na,K-ATPase activity were determined. Abundance of Na,K-ATPase was determined by Western blotting in intact cells or isolated basolateral membranes (BLM. DNA binding activity was determined by electrical mobility shift assay (EMSA. Culturing of HRTCs for 5 days with 1 nM, but not 10 nM of human C-peptide leads to increase in Na,K-ATPase α(1-subunit protein expression, accompanied with increase in (86Rb(+ uptake, both in normal- and hyperglycemic conditions. Na,K-ATPase α(1-subunit expression and Na,K-ATPase activity were reduced in BLM isolated from cells cultured in presence of high glucose. Exposure to1 nM, but not 10 nM of C-peptide increased PKCε phosphorylation as well as phosphorylation and abundance of nuclear ERK1/2 regardless of glucose concentration. Exposure to 1 nM of C-peptide increased DNA binding activity of transcription factor ZEB (AREB6, concomitant with Na,K-ATPase α(1-subunit mRNA expression. Effects of 1 nM C-peptide on Na,K-ATPase α(1-subunit expression and/or ZEB DNA binding activity in HRTC were abolished by incubation with PKC or MEK1/2 inhibitors and ZEB siRNA silencing.Despite activation of ERK1/2 and PKC by hyperglycemia, a distinct pool of PKCs and ERK1/2 is involved in regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression and activity by C-peptide. Most likely C-peptide stimulates sodium pump expression via activation of ZEB, a transcription factor that has not been previously implicated in C-peptide

  13. Levels of 25(OHD3, IL-2, and C-peptide in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM Receiving Vitamin D3 Supplementation

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    Tjahyo Suryanto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM has become a health problem in many countries. T1DM is the consequence of autoimmune destruction process of β cells. There was relationship between vitamin D deficiency with T1DM. The destruction process was caused by an imbalance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. One of the pro-inflammatory cytokines is IL-2. C-peptide examination to see the function of beta cells due to destruction of pancreatic beta cell. Administration of vitamin D3 supplementation still cause controversy and give varying results. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the levels of 25(OHD3, IL-2, and C-peptide in people with T1DM who received vitamin D3 supplementation. The subjects were 26 children with T1DM, divided into K1 group (received vitamin D3 supplementation and K2 group (received placebo. The results showed higher levels of 25(OHD3 in the K1 group and statistically found a significant difference (p = 0.00. Higher levels of IL-2 and lower C-peptide were obtained in the K1 group and no statistically significant differences were found (p = 0.76 and p= 0.26. The insignificant relationship and the negative correlation were found between 25(OHD3 and IL-2 (p = 0.71; r = - 0.12, 25(OHD3 and C-peptide (p = 0.59; r = -0.16, also levels of IL-2 and C-peptide (p = 0.13; r = -0.44 in children with type 1 diabetes who received vitamin D3 supplementation. From this study can be concluded that administration vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with T1DM can increase levels 25(OHD3 significantly. This increase has not significantly lowered levels of IL-2 and increased levels of C-peptide. However, there was an absolute decrease in the rate of slower C-peptide in the supplemented group than in the placebo group.

  14. Analysis of changes of serum leptin, C-peptide levels and peripheral fat tissue leptin receptor expression in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of obesity and obesity accompanied type two diabetes mellitus by investigating changes of serum leptin, C-peptide (C-P) levels and leptin receptor expression in peripheral adipose tissues. Methods: Peripheral leptin receptor density was measured via radio-ligand binding method, serum leptin and C - P levels were measured via radioimmunoassay in 91 cases (38 in obesity group, 23 in over weight, and 30 in normal controls). Results: With the increase of body mass index (BMI), the peripheral leptin receptor density of the over weight and obese cases decreased and was mash less than that of normal cases (both p<0.01, respectively). There was no statistical differences for Kd value among the three groups, suggesting no associated change between the binding ability of leptin receptor to its ligand. There was a negative correlation between BMI and leptin receptor density (r = -0.70, p < 0.01). The serum leptin and C-P levels in weight excess and obese subjects with type two DM were both increased, but significantly higher in obese group than those in weight excess group (p < 0.01). The increase of C-P was much marked than that of leptin. Serum C-P level was positively correlated with BMI. Conclusion: Changes of serum leptin, C-P levels and peripheral leptin receptor expression in cases with simple obesity and obesity accompanied with type two DM were related closely with BMI. Type 2 DM in obese subjects was related with leptin resistance and insulin resistance

  15. Preoperative Fasting Plasma C-Peptide Levels as Predictors of Remission of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenmao; Bai, Rixing; Yan, Ming; Song, Maomin

    2017-12-01

    The study evaluated the predictive role of preoperative fasting C-peptide, hemoglobin (Hb)A1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) levels on diabetes remission in patients with type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery. Medline, PubMed, Central, and Google Scholar databases of up to September 7, 2016 were searched using the following terms: type 2 diabetes mellitus, gastric bypass, Roux-en-Y, anastomosis, C-peptide, weight loss, HbA/HbA1c, predictive/predictor. Meta-analysis of the pooled data indicated that fasting C-peptide was predictive of increased chance of remission of type 2 diabetes (pooled difference in means = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.61 to 1.25, p fasting plasma C-peptide was associated with increased type 2 diabetes remission after bariatric surgery, whereas baseline HbA1c and FPG levels were associated with reduced chance of remission. These parameters may be used as a guideline in weighing the risks and benefits for surgical intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  17. Diagnostic value of C-peptide determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, G.; Rainer, O.H.

    1983-01-01

    C-peptide and insulin serum determinations were performed in 94 glucagon-stimulated diabetics and in 15 healthy persons. A minimal increase of 1.5 ng C-peptide/ml serum after glucagon injection (1 mg i.v.) was found to be a useful parameter for the differentiation of insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetics. The maximal response to glucagon occurred during the first 10-minutes after the injection (blood was drawn at 2-minutes intervals). Serum insulin levels and basal C-peptide concentrations were of no value in predicting insulin-dependency. Basal C-peptide levels were significantly different from control in juvenile insulin dependent diabetics (decrease) only. (Author)

  18. Effects of Clear Kefir on Biomolecular Aspects of Glycemic Status of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM Patients in Bandung, West Java [Study on Human Blood Glucose, c Peptide and Insulin

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    Judiono J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM triggers an excessive reaction of free-radicals. It increases reactive oxygen species and reduces antioxidants status as well as the β cell damage. Clear kefir was used for DM therapies, however it limited biomolecular exploration of its bioactive roles. Research aimed to investigate the effects of clear kefir on the biomolecular nature of the glycemic status of T2DM in Bandung. Methods: The randomized pretest-posttest control group was conducted by 106 T2DM patients. Research was done in several hospitals in Bandung and Cimahi, West Java from 2012–2013. Samples were divided randomly into three groups: (1 T2DM with HbA1c 7 fed standard diet and supplemented 200 ml/day by clear kefir, (3 T2DM with HbA1c was fed a standard diet as a control group. Dose response was obtained from a preeliminary vivo study, and then converted to human dosage by year 2011. Intervention was effectively done for 30 days. HbA1c was measured by HPLC. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and Postprandial blood glucose levels (PBG were measured by enzymes levels. C Peptide and insulin were measured by Elisa. Data was analyzed by a statictics programme by significance p<0,05. Study was approved by ethic committee. Results : HbA1c was significantly reduced in delta level (p<0.01 and FBG (p<0.015 among kefir groups. PBG was not significantly reduced among groups. C-Peptide was significantly increased in delta level, except in control group (p<0.014. Insulin was reduced significantly, except in control group (p<0.003. Conclusions : Supplementation of clear kefir reduced blood glucose levels (HbA1c, FBG, PBG and increased c-peptide. Clear kefir’s biomolecular mechanisms and chemistry characterization is a challenge for future studies.

  19. Cross-validation of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay for porcine C-peptide concentration measurements in non-human primate serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresch, Sarah C; Mutch, Lucas A; Janecek, Jody L; Hegstad-Davies, Rebecca L; Graham, Melanie L

    2017-09-01

    C-peptide concentration is widely used as a marker of insulin secretion and is especially relevant in evaluating islet graft function following transplantation, because its measurement is not confounded by the presence of exogenous insulin. To address the shortage of human islet donors, the use of porcine islets has been proposed as a possible solution and the stringent pig-to-non-human primate (NHP) model is often the most relevant for pre-clinical evaluation of the potential for diabetes reversal resulting from an islet xenograft. The Millipore radioimmunoassay (RIA) was exclusively used to measure porcine C-peptide (PCP) until 2013 when the assay was discontinued and subsequently a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from Mercodia has been widely adopted. Both assays have been used in pre-clinical trials evaluating the therapeutic potential of xenograft products in reversing diabetes in the pig-to-NHP model, to interpret data in a comparable way it may be useful to perform a harmonization of C-peptide measurements. We performed a method comparison by determining the PCP concentration in 620 serum samples collected from 20 diabetic cynomolgus macaques transplanted with adult porcine islets. All analyses were performed according to manufacturer instructions. With both assays, we demonstrated an acceptable detection limit, precision, and recovery. Linearity of the ELISA met acceptance criteria at all concentrations tested while linearity of the RIA only met acceptance criteria at five of the eight concentrations tested. The RIA had a detection limit of 0.16 ng/mL, and recovery ranged from 82% to 96% and met linearity acceptance criteria at 0.35 ng/mL and from 0.78 to 2.33 ng/mL. The ELISA had a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL, and recovery ranged from 81% to 115% and met linearity acceptance criteria from 0.08 to 0.85 ng/mL. Both assays had intra-assay precision assay precision ELISA demonstrated a significant correlation with RIA (R

  20. Influence of C-Peptide on Glucose Utilisation

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    B. Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the recent years, multiple studies demonstrated that C-peptide is not an inert peptide, but exerts important physiological effects. C-peptide binds to cell membranes, stimulates the Na,K-ATPase and the endothelial nitric oxide (NO synthase. Moreover, there is evidence that C-peptide decreases glomerular hyperfiltration and increases glucose utilisation. Nevertheless, there is still limited knowledge concerning mechanisms leading to an increased glucose utilisation either in rats or in humans. The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the published studies regarding C-peptide and glucose metabolism from in vitro studies to longer lasting studies in humans.

  1. Immunological half-life of porcine proinsulin C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, H; Horino, M; Matsumura, S [Kawasaki Medical Coll., Kurashiki (Japan). Div. of Endocrinology; Kobayshi, K; Suetsugu, N [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    Immunological half-lifes of injected porcine C-peptide and insulin with RIA were studied and calculated as 9.8 and 8.0 minutes. Higher circulating levels of C-peptide as compared to insulin in normal young swines lead to speculation about a longer half-life of C-peptide. This hypothesis was verified in this study. Immunological half-lifes of porcine proinsulin and insulin in the pig were 20 and 6 minutes, respectively.

  2. Human c-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) in blood and urine - evaluation of a radioimmunoassay method and its clinical applications

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    Kuzuya, T; Matsuda, A; Saito, T; Yoshida, S

    1976-01-01

    A double-antibody radioimmunoassay method, using synthetic human connecting peptide as an immunizing antigen and standard, was evaluated for clinical assay of blood and urine samples. Normal fasting blood connecting peptide immunoreacivity (CPR) was 2.45 +- 0.96 ng/ml, increasing promptly after a 50 g oral glucose load, but somewhat slower than insulin. Molar concentration of CPR exceeded that of insulin. CPR responses to glucose were subnormal in diabetics, very low in juvenile-type cases, and often poor in patients on insulin treatment. Fasting CPR levels were elevated in patients on corticosteroid treatment and with uraemia. A patient with insulin 'auto-antibody' had high serum CPR. A considerable amount of CPR appeared in urine. Normal daily excretion of CPR was 1.52 +- 0.55 ..mu..g/kg or 55.1 +- 18.2 ng/mg creatinine. Urine CPR was very low in juvenile-type diabetics, and elevated in patients on corticosteroid treatment. The results confirm that blood and urine CPR are useful measures of the endocrine pancreatic function.

  3. Identification and accurate quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in synthetic human C-peptide by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Josephs, Ralf D; Daireaux, Adeline; Choteau, Tiphaine; Westwood, Steven; Wielgosz, Robert I; Li, Hongmei

    2018-06-04

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of biomarkers and pharmaceuticals. The accurate purity characterization of peptide calibrators is critical for the development of reference measurement systems for laboratory medicine and quality control of pharmaceuticals. The peptides used for these purposes are increasingly produced through peptide synthesis. Various approaches (for example mass balance, amino acid analysis, qNMR, and nitrogen determination) can be applied to accurately value assign the purity of peptide calibrators. However, all purity assessment approaches require a correction for structurally related peptide impurities in order to avoid biases. Liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-hrMS) has become the key technique for the identification and accurate quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in intact peptide calibrator materials. In this study, LC-hrMS-based methods were developed and validated in-house for the identification and quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in a synthetic human C-peptide (hCP) material, which served as a study material for an international comparison looking at the competencies of laboratories to perform peptide purity mass fraction assignments. More than 65 impurities were identified, confirmed, and accurately quantified by using LC-hrMS. The total mass fraction of all structurally related peptide impurities in the hCP study material was estimated to be 83.3 mg/g with an associated expanded uncertainty of 3.0 mg/g (k = 2). The calibration hierarchy concept used for the quantification of individual impurities is described in detail. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  4. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Remi Sonoda

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI. This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  5. Diagnostic value of C-peptide determination. [Radioimmunoassay

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    Kober, G; Rainer, O H [Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt (Austria). Nuklearmedizinische Abt.

    1983-01-01

    C-peptide and insulin serum determinations were performed in 94 glucagon-stimulated diabetics and in 15 healthy persons. A minimal increase of 1.5 ng C-peptide/ml serum after glucagon injection (1 mg i.v.) was found to be a useful parameter for the differentiation of insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetics. The maximal response to glucagon occurred during the first 10-minutes after the injection (blood was drawn at 2-minutes intervals). Serum insulin levels and basal C-peptide concentrations were of no value in predicting insulin-dependency. Basal C-peptide levels were significantly different from control in juvenile insulin dependent diabetics (decrease) only.

  6. DNA methylation mediates the effect of maternal cognitive appraisal of a disaster in pregnancy on the child's C-peptide secretion in adolescence: Project Ice Storm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cao-Lei

    Full Text Available Animal and human studies suggest that prenatal exposure to stress is associated with adverse health outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Epigenetic modification, such as DNA methylation, is considered one possible underlying mechanism. The 1998 Quebec ice storm provides a unique opportunity to study an independent prenatal stressor on child outcomes. C-peptide is the best measure of endogenous insulin secretion and is widely used in the clinical management of patients with diabetes. The objectives of this study are to determine 1 the extent to which prenatal exposure to disaster-related stress (maternal objective hardship and maternal cognitive appraisal influences children's C-peptide secretion, and 2 whether DNA methylation of diabetes-related genes mediates the effects of prenatal stress on C-peptide secretion. Children's (n = 30 C-peptide secretion in response to an oral glucose tolerance test were assessed in blood at 13½ years. DNA methylation levels of selected type 1 and 2 diabetes-related genes were chosen based upon the genes associated with prenatal maternal objective hardship and/or cognitive appraisal levels. Bootstrapping analyses were performed to determine the mediation effect of DNA methylation. We found that children whose mothers experienced higher objective hardship exhibited higher C-peptide secretion. Cognitive appraisal was not directly associated with C-peptide secretion. DNA methylation of diabetes-related genes had a positive mediation effect of objective hardship on C-peptide secretion: higher objective hardship predicted higher C-peptide secretion through DNA methylation. Negative mediation effects of cognitive appraisal were observed: negative cognitive appraisal predicted higher C-peptide secretion through DNA methylation. However, only one gene, LTA, remained a significant mediator of cognitive appraisal on C-peptide secretion after the conservative Bonferroni multiple corrections. Our findings suggest that DNA

  7. Fasting serum C-peptide is useful for initial classification of diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Cho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWith rising obesity rates in children, it is increasingly difficult to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM on clinical grounds alone. Using C-peptide as a method of classifying diabetes mellitus (DM has been suggested. This study aimed to find a correlation between fasting C-peptide level and DM types in children and adolescents.MethodsA total of 223 diabetic children, newly diagnosed at 5 hospitals between January 2001 and December 2012, were enrolled in this study. Initial DM classification was based on clinical and laboratory data including fasting C-peptide at diagnosis; final classification was based on additional data (pancreatic autoantibodies, human leukocyte antigen type, and clinical course.ResultsOf 223 diabetic children, 140 were diagnosed with T1DM (62.8% and the remaining 83 with T2DM (37.2%. The mean serum C-peptide level was significantly lower in children with T1DM (0.80 ng/mL than in children with T2DM (3.91 ng/mL. Among 223 children, 54 had a serum C-peptide level 3.0 ng/mL; 48 of them (97.9% were diagnosed with T2DM.ConclusionIn this study, we found that if the C-peptide level was 3.0 ng/mL, a T1DM diagnosis is unlikely. This finding suggests that serum fasting C-peptide level is useful for classifying DM type at the time of diagnosis in youth.

  8. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  9. Application of reaction type of C-peptide release test in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Duan Wenruo; He Juan; Lu Zhenfang

    2001-01-01

    The author is to confirm the effect of C-peptide release test and types of release reaction in appraisal of pancreas function of β-cell and selection of treatment for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. The serum C-peptide release test of 67 normal controls and 217 DM patients were determined by RIA, and the results were analyzed and compared. C-peptide release test can reflect the pancreas function of β-cell better, the peak of C-peptide ≥ 0.6 nmol/L after lunch can be the limit of whether to reduce the level of blood glucose only by oral drug. The authors should adjust the treatment through analyzing the type of C-peptide release reaction. C-peptide release test is very important in evaluating the pancreas function of β-cell, classifying the type of DM and selecting the treatment

  10. The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Maghsoudi, S; Fisker, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term (30 months) metabolic effects of recombinant human GH (rhGH) given in a mean dose of 6.7 microg/kg x day (= 1.6 IU/day), in 11 patients with adult GH deficiency. Glucose metabolism was evaluated by an oral glucose tolerance test and an iv...... (frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test) glucose tolerance test, and body composition was estimated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Treatment with rhGH induced persistent favorable changes in body composition, with a 10% increase in lean body mass (P ... in glucose tolerance, beta-cell response was still inappropriate. Our conclusion is that long-term rhGH-replacement therapy in GH deficiency adults induced a significant deterioration in glucose tolerance, profound changes in kinetics of C-peptide, and insulin and prehepatic insulin secretion, despite...

  11. Development of SI-traceable C-peptide certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6901-a using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based amino acid analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinumi, Tomoya; Goto, Mari; Eyama, Sakae; Kato, Megumi; Kasama, Takeshi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) is a higher-order calibration material used to enable a traceable analysis. This paper describes the development of a C-peptide CRM (NMIJ CRM 6901-a) by the National Metrology Institute of Japan using two independent methods for amino acid analysis based on isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. C-peptide is a 31-mer peptide that is utilized for the evaluation of β-cell function in the pancreas in clinical testing. This CRM is a lyophilized synthetic peptide having the human C-peptide sequence, and contains deamidated and pyroglutamylated forms of C-peptide. By adding water (1.00 ± 0.01) g into the vial containing the CRM, the C-peptide solution in 10 mM phosphate buffer saline (pH 6.6) is reconstituted. We assigned two certified values that represent the concentrations of total C-peptide (mixture of C-peptide, deamidated C-peptide, and pyroglutamylated C-peptide) and C-peptide. The certified concentration of total C-peptide was determined by two amino acid analyses using pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and hydrophilic chromatography-mass spectrometry following acid hydrolysis. The certified concentration of C-peptide was determined by multiplying the concentration of total C-peptide by the ratio of the relative area of C-peptide to that of the total C-peptide measured by liquid chromatography. The certified value of C-peptide (80.7 ± 5.0) mg/L represents the concentration of the specific entity of C-peptide; on the other hand, the certified value of total C-peptide, (81.7 ± 5.1) mg/L can be used for analyses that does not differentiate deamidated and pyroglutamylated C-peptide from C-peptide itself, such as amino acid analyses and immunochemical assays.

  12. A high-throughput mass spectrometry assay to simultaneously measure intact insulin and C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven W; Clarke, Nigel J; Chen, Zhaohui; McPhaul, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of fasting levels of insulin and C-peptide are useful in documenting insulin resistance and may help predict development of diabetes mellitus. However, the specific insulin and C-peptide levels associated with specific degrees of insulin resistance have not been defined, owing to marked variability among immunoassays and lack of standardization. Herein, we describe a multiplexed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for intact insulin and C-peptide. Insulin and C-peptide were enriched from patient sera using monoclonal antibodies immobilized on magnetic beads and processed on a robotic liquid handler. Eluted peptides were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Bovine insulin and a stable isotopically-labeled (13C/15N) C-peptide were utilized as internal standards. The assay had an analytical measurement range of 3 to 320 μIU/ml (18 to 1920 pmol/l) for insulin and 0.11 to 27.2 ng/ml (36 to 9006 pmol/l) for C-peptide. Intra- and inter-day assay variation was less than 11% for both peptides. Of the 5 insulin analogs commonly prescribed to treat diabetes, only the recombinant drug insulin lispro caused significant interference for the determination of endogenous insulin. There were no observed interferences for C-peptide. We developed and validated a high-throughput, quantitative, multiplexed LC-MS/MS assay for intact insulin and C-peptide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of plasma canine C peptide by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besch, W; Woltanski, K P; Fischer, U; Kohnert, K D; Ziegler, M

    1985-12-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for canine C peptide (CCP) was established using synthetic CCP, a specific antiserum, and rabbit anti-guinea pig serum. Radioiodination was performed according to a modified chloramine T method. Tracer preparations have been used for 6 weeks after iodination. The standard curve ranges from 0.028 to 3.0 nmol/l. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3-5% and the inter-assay CV was 6-9% in the optimal range between 0.3 and 0.8 nmol/l. The average recovery of CCP added to plasma samples was 100.6% (n = 9). Canine insulin, porcine proinsulin, bovine proinsulin, and human C peptide exhibited no cross-reactivity. The mean fasting plasma CCP concentration was 0.089 +- 0.021 nmol/l in normal dogs and -0.005 +- 0.007 nmol/l (mean +- SEM) in diabetic dogs, respectively.

  14. Association between low C-peptide and fragility fractures in postmenopausal women without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Y; Russo, C; Russo, D; Gazzaruso, C; Coppola, A; Gallotti, P; Zambianchi, V; Fodaro, M; Romeo, S; Galliera, E; Marazzi, M G; Romanelli, M M C; Giannini, S; Pujia, A; Montalcini, T

    2017-10-01

    C-peptide has been shown to exert several, previously unknown, biological effects. A recent cross-sectional study demonstrated an association between low C-peptide serum levels and low lumbar bone density of postmenopausal women not affected by diabetes. To date, very little research attention has been directed toward the association between C-peptide and osteoporotic fractures. To contribute toward filling this gap, we investigated the association between C-peptide and fractures in postmenopausal women. A cohort of 133 non-diabetic postmenopausal women with and without a history of fractures was evaluated in this cross-sectional investigation. Standardized interviews were performed to gather information on the patients' fracture history. All of the participants underwent a bone mineral density assessment by DXA, radiographs, and a serum C-peptide measurement. Thirty-four women presented fractures. Bivariate analysis revealed an inverse correlation between C-peptide and fractures (r = -0.27, p = 0.002). A significant difference in mean C-peptide levels was also found between women with vs. without fractures (p = 0.01, adjusted for age, BMI and glucose). Logistic regression analysis showed that C-peptide levels, femoral and vertebral BMD were all negatively associated with fracture status (B = -1.097, ES = 0.401, p = 0.006, 95% CI 0.15-0.73; B = -15.6, SE = 4.17, p C-peptide levels and a history of fractures in postmenopausal women without diabetes. These results suggest that C-peptidemay exert an effect on bone mineral density. However, further large-scale studies are needed to corroborate this finding and investigate the potential underlying mechanisms involved.

  15. Fundamental studies on the development of C-peptide radioimmunoassay kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, N; Maki, K; Ogawa, H; Ikeda, O [Daiichi Radioisotope Labs. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-05-01

    We have studied the development of the C-peptide radioimmunoassay kit which is usable in the pancreatic function test with satisfactory results. The C-peptide antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbits with synthetic human connecting peptide. The antiserum revealed no cross reaction with any C-peptides other than human C-peptide, porcine insulin and gastrointestinal hormone, and showed high specificity to human C-peptide. We adopted the double antibody method in B,F separation, and chose 4/sup 0/C, 48 hrs. for 1st. incubation and 4/sup 0/C, 24 hrs. for 2nd. incubation. On this kit, the assay range was 0.5 ng/ml-30 ng/ml, the recovery rate was 98.4%-107.8% in the recovery test, the coefficient of variance was 6.2% in the intra assay and was 7.6% in the inter assay. We think this kit is sufficiently usable to assay C-peptide in blood.

  16. Fundamental studies on the development of C-peptide radioimmunoassay kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Maki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Osamu

    1976-01-01

    We have studied the development of the C-peptide radioimmunoassay kit which is usable in the pancreatic function test with satisfactory results. The C-peptide antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbits with synthetic human connecting peptide. The antiserum revealed no cross reaction with any C-peptides other than human C-peptide, porcine insulin and gastrointestinal hormone, and showed high specificity to human C-peptide. We adopted the double antibody method in B,F separation, and chose 4 0 C, 48 hrs. for 1st. incubation and 4 0 C, 24 hrs. for 2nd. incubation. On this kit, the assay range was 0.5 ng/ml-30 ng/ml, the recovery rate was 98.4%-107.8% in the recovery test, the coefficient of variance was 6.2% in the intra assay and was 7.6% in the inter assay. We think this kit is sufficiently usable to assay C-peptide in blood. (auth.)

  17. Fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide, and urinary C-peptide in relation to clinical type of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Faber, O K

    1989-01-01

    with a fasting plasma C-peptide value less than 0.20 nmol/l, a glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide value less than 0.32 nmol/l, and a urinary C-peptide value less than 3.1 nmol/l, or less than 0.54 nmol/mmol creatinine/24 h, or less than 5.4 nmol/24 h mainly were Type 1 diabetic patients; while patients with C...

  18. Expression and Purification of C-Peptide Containing Insulin Using Pichia pastoris Expression System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed N. Baeshen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the incidence of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM among people from developed and developing countries has created a large global market for insulin. Moreover, exploration of new methods for insulin delivery including oral or inhalation route which require very high doses would further increase the demand of cost-effective recombinant insulin. Various bacterial and yeast strains have been optimized to overproduce important biopharmaceuticals. One of the approaches we have taken is the production of recombinant human insulin along with C-peptide in yeast Pichia pastoris. We procured a cDNA clone of insulin from Origene Inc., USA. Insulin cDNA was PCR amplified and cloned into yeast vector pPICZ-α. Cloned insulin cDNA was confirmed by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing. pPICZ-α-insulin clone was transformed into Pichia pastoris SuperMan5 strain. Several Zeocin resistant clones were obtained and integration of insulin cDNA in Pichia genome was confirmed by PCR using insulin specific primers. Expression of insulin in Pichia clones was confirmed by ELISA, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis. In vivo efficacy studies in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice confirmed the activity of recombinant insulin. In conclusion, a biologically active human proinsulin along with C-peptide was expressed at high level using Pichia pastoris expression system.

  19. C-peptide comparative radioimmunoassays: a study of three commercial kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaume, C.; Beck, B.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) was measured in 18 fasting subjects with three different commercial kits (RIA-mat C-peptide-, Byk-Mallinckrodt; RIA-gnost-hC-peptide, Hoechst-Behring; human C-peptide radioimmunoassay kit, Novo) The subjects were chosen as to cover a wide range of CPR concentrations (five healthy subjects, six obese subjects, three insulin-dependent diabetics, four normal subjects whose plasmas had been kept at - 20 0 C for periods of 16 or 36 months). CPR was measured with the Novo kit in eight other plasmas which were kept over a period of 36 months, with or without aprotinin. Good correlations have been established among the values found with the three kits. However, absolute concentration values for each subject as well as the dispersion of all plasma C-peptide values varied as a function of the kit used because of antibody specificity differences and because of the various separation methods. The normal range proposed changes with each kit and the blood CPR of a subject can be a normal, reduced or increased one, depending on the kit used. After several months of storage, plasma CPR degradation is observed with the three kits. A protease-inhibitor is necessary in order to avoid this C-peptide degradation due to the apparent existence of a plasma proteolytic enzyme

  20. Pathological consequences of C-peptide deficiency ininsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Ghorbani; Reza Shafiee-Nick

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with several complicationssuch as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy andcardiovascular diseases. Currently, insulin is the mainused medication for management of insulin-dependentdiabetes mellitus (type-1 diabetes). In this metabolicsyndrome, in addition to decrease of endogenous insulin,the plasma level of connecting peptide (C-peptide) is alsoreduced due to beta cell destruction. Studies in the pastdecade have shown that C-peptide is much more than abyproduct of insulin biosynthesis and possess differentbiological activities. Therefore, it may be possible thatC-peptide deficiency be involved, at least in part, in thedevelopment of different complications of diabetes. It hasbeen shown that a small level of remaining C-peptide isassociated with significant metabolic benefit. The purposeof this review is to describe beneficial effects of C-peptidereplacement on pathological features associated withinsulin-dependent diabetes. Also, experimental andclinical findings on the effects of C-peptide on wholebodyglucose utilization, adipose tissue metabolism andtissues blood flow are summarized and discussed. Thehypoglycemic, antilipolytic and vasodilator effects ofC-peptide suggest that it may contribute to fine-tuningof the tissues metabolism under different physiologic orpathologic conditions. Therefore, C-peptide replacementtogether with the classic insulin therapy may prevent,retard, or ameliorate diabetic complications in patientswith type-1 diabetes.

  1. Variables associated with persistence of C-Peptide secretion among patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abbood Zaboon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-peptide is a reliable method for estimating the beta-cell residual function. The objective of this study to assess the variables associated with persistence of C-peptide secretion among patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted from October 2015 to September 2016. This study enrolled patients with T1DM with at least 1 year or more duration. Random C-peptide with concomitant plasma glucose at least 144 mg/dl (8 mmol/l was measured and at this cutoff considered as a stimulated value. Variables that were assessed were age at the time of enrollment, age at the diagnosis of diabetes, gender, family history of diabetes, duration of diabetes, frequency of insulin per day, insulin dose (units/kg/day, type of insulin, devices delivery, body mass index (BMI at enrollment, blood pressure, glucose (plasma, lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, thyrotropin (TSH, and antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO, and tissue transglutaminase antibodies-IgA (anti-TTG-IgA. Results: A total 324 patients were included in the study. A higher level of C-peptide has been seen if the disease acquired at the age of 18 years and older with detectable C-peptide observed among 17.7% of those diagnosed at age <18 years versus 31.7% for those aged 18 years or above. The more the duration of diabetes, the more is the loss of C-peptide. On logistic regression analysis, only duration of diabetes <6 years, and insulin dose <1 U/kg/day were statistically significantly associated with the detectable level of C-peptide in this cohort of T1DM. Conclusion: Diagnosis of TIDM at a late age, positive family history of diabetes, those requiring <1 U of insulin per kg per day, and higher fasting glucose was associated with higher and more detectable C-peptide. On multivariable analysis, the only duration of diabetes <6 years and insulin dose <1 U of insulin

  2. C-Peptide Is a Sensitive Indicator for the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects from Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Porchia, Leonardo M; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Pulido-Pérez, Patricia; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is associated with elevated risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key component of MetS is the development of insulin resistance (IR). The homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) model can determine IR by using insulin or C-peptide concentrations; however, the efficiency of insulin and C-peptide to determine MetS has not been compared. The aim of the study was to compare the efficiency of C-peptide and insulin to determine MetS in Mexicans. Anthropometrics, glucose, insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins were determined in 156 nonpregnant females and 114 males. Subjects were separated into normal or positive for MetS. IR was determined by the HOMA2 calculator using insulin or C-peptide. Correlations were calculated using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ). Differences between correlations were determined by calculating Steiger's Z. The sensitivity was determined by the area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis. Independent of the MetS definition [Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), or World Health Organization (WHO)], C-peptide and insulin were significantly higher in MetS subjects (P indicator of MetS. Since C-peptide has recently emerged as a biomolecule with significant importance for inflammatory diseases, monitoring C-peptide levels will aid clinicians in preventing MetS.

  3. Insulin and C-peptide secretion in non-obese patients with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabeer, S; Jialal, I; Norman, R J; Naidoo, C; Reddi, K; Joubert, S M

    1989-09-01

    Plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) were assessed in 11 non-obese patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) and 11 reference subjects matched for age, height and weight. Also, 6 patients with PCOD and 6 normal women were subjected to intravenous glucose tolerance testing (ivGTT) On oGTT, all subjects exhibited normal glucose tolerance; however, PCOD patients had significantly higher mean plasma glucose levels at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min and higher mean incremental glucose areas. In addition the patients with polycystic ovaries showed higher mean basal IRI and C-peptide levels, higher mean glucose stimulated IRI and C-peptide levels and higher mean incremental IRI and C-peptide values. The molar ratios of C-peptide/IRI were significantly lower in the PCOD group at all time intervals after glucose stimulation when compared to the normal women. During ivGTT, there were significantly higher mean glucose levels at 5, 40, 50 and 60 min in the PCOD group when compared to the reference group. The IRI response to intravenous glucose in the PCOD women was similar to the reference group. The findings on oGTT suggest that non-obese patients with PCOD have increased pancreatic IRI secretion as well as impaired hepatic extraction of the hormone.

  4. Correlation of the sectetion of insulin and C-peptide in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modnikov, O.P.; Lomtev, N.G.

    1983-01-01

    Insulin and C-peptide levels were studied with a radioimmunoassay in the peripheral blood serum of 44 patients with gastric and cervical cancer and 22 healthy persons. Hyperfunction of the pancreatic insular apparatus was shown in cancer patients which was expressed in a statistically significant increase in the C-peptide level. In gastric cancer patients hyperfunction of the insular apparatus was accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, and in cervical cancer patients by hormoinsulinemia. An analysis has shown that the ratio insulin/C-peptide in gastric and cervical cancer patients was about the same and significantly lower than the control. A conclusion has been made that in spite of difference in the initial insulin concentration, the same phenomenon - acceleration of the metabolic clearance of insulin - occurs in patients with cancer of the above sites. The C-peptide level decreased, the ratio insulin/C-peptide increased, i.e. hyperfunction of the insular apparatus disappeared and the metabolic clearance of insulin slowed down

  5. Correlation of the secretion of insulin and C-peptide in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modnikov, O P; Lomtev, N G [Kirgizskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Frunze (USSR)

    1983-08-01

    Insulin and C-peptide levels were studied with a radioimmunoassay in the peripheral blood serum of 44 patients with gastric and cervical cancer and 22 healthy persons. Hyperfunction of the pancreatic insular apparatus was shown in cancer patients which was expressed in a statistically significant increase in the C-peptide level. In gastric cancer patients hyperfunction of the insular apparatus was accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, and in cervical cancer patients by hormoinsulinemia. An analysis has shown that the ratio insulin/C-peptide in gastric and cervical cancer patients was about the same and significantly lower than the control. A conclusion has been made that in spite of difference in the initial insulin concentration, the same phenomenon - acceleration of the metabolic clearance of insulin - occurs in patients with cancer of the above sites. The C-peptide level decreased, the ratio insulin/C-peptide increased, i.e. hyperfunction of the insular apparatus disappeared and the metabolic clearance of insulin slowed down.

  6. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landreh, Michael; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Willander, Hanna; Söder, Olle; Johansson, Jan; Jörnvall, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. ► C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. ► C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. ► C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by β-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic β-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  7. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  8. Relation of muscle indices with metabolic parameters and C-peptide in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzun, S.; Oner, C.; Dabak, M.R.; Kasikci, H.O.; Sargin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relation between bioimpedance measurements and metabolic parameters and C-peptide in patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Kartal Dr Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research Hospital, Pendik Kaynarca Diabetes Center, Exercise and Metabolism Unit, between January and March 2015. Methodology: Patients with DM, aged less than 65 years, were assessed for bioimpedance analysis, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, C-peptide levels, triglyceride levels, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol levels. Skeletal muscle index, total muscle index, skeletal muscle percentage, and total muscle percentage were used for muscle-related analyses. Mann-Whitney U-test or independent t-test were used to compare differences between two independent groups. Pearson correlation test or Spearman correlation test were used to find out correlation between variables. Results: A total of 359 DM patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 51.6+-8.0 years, and 278 (77.7%) of the participants were females. After adjusting age and gender variables, there was no relation between muscle-related measurements and FPG, triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol (p>0.05). However, there was muscle-related indexes (MRI) positively correlation with C-peptide and inversely associated with HDL-cholesterol (p<0.05). Conclusion: Muscle-related indices positively correlated with C-peptide, which showed endogenous insulin reserve. (author)

  9.  Pleiotropic action of proinsulin C-peptid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Usarek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Proinsulin C-peptide, released in equimolar amounts with insulin by pancreatic β cells, since its discovery in 1967 has been thought to be devoid of biological functions apart from correct insulin processing and formation of disulfide bonds between A and B chains. However, in the last two decades research has brought a substantial amount of data indicating a crucial role of C-peptide in regulating various processes in different types of cells and organs. C-peptide acts presumably via either G-protein-coupled receptor or directly inside the cell, after being internalized. However, a receptor binding this peptide has not been identified yet. This peptide ameliorates pathological changes induced by type 1 diabetes mellitus, including glomerular hyperfiltration, vessel endothelium inflammation and neuron demyelinization. In diabetic patients and diabetic animal models, C-peptide substitution in physiological doses improves the functional and structural properties of peripheral neurons and protects against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis, promoting neuronal development, regeneration and cell survival. Moreover, it affects glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscles. In vitro C-peptide promotes disaggregation of insulin oligomers, thus enhancing its bioavailability and effects on metabolism. There are controversies concerning the biological action of C-peptide, particularly with respect to its effect on Na /K -ATPase activity. Surprisingly, the excess of circulating peptide associated with diabetes type 2 contributes to atherosclerosis development. In view of these observations, long-term, large-scale clinical investigations using C-peptide physiological doses need to be conducted in order to determine safety and health outcomes of long-term administration of C-peptide to diabetic patients.

  10. C-Peptide Decline in Type 1 Diabetes Has Two Phases: An Initial Exponential Fall and a Subsequent Stable Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Beverley M; McDonald, Timothy J; Oram, Richard; Hill, Anita; Hudson, Michelle; Leete, Pia; Pearson, Ewan R; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2018-06-07

    The decline in C-peptide in the 5 years after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes has been well studied, but little is known about the longer-term trajectory. We aimed to examine the association between log-transformed C-peptide levels and the duration of diabetes up to 40 years after diagnosis. We assessed the pattern of association between urinary C-peptide/creatinine ratio (UCPCR) and duration of diabetes in cross-sectional data from 1,549 individuals with type 1 diabetes using nonlinear regression approaches. Findings were replicated in longitudinal follow-up data for both UCPCR ( n = 161 individuals, 326 observations) and plasma C-peptide ( n = 93 individuals, 473 observations). We identified two clear phases of C-peptide decline: an initial exponential fall over 7 years (47% decrease/year [95% CI -51%, -43%]) followed by a stable period thereafter (+0.07%/year [-1.3, +1.5]). The two phases had similar durations and slopes in patients above and below the median age at diagnosis (10.8 years), although levels were lower in the younger patients irrespective of duration. Patterns were consistent in both longitudinal UCPCR ( n = 162; ≤7 years duration: -48%/year [-55%, -38%]; >7 years duration -0.1% [-4.1%, +3.9%]) and plasma C-peptide ( n = 93; >7 years duration only: -2.6% [-6.7%, +1.5%]). These data support two clear phases of C-peptide decline: an initial exponential fall over a 7-year period, followed by a prolonged stabilization where C-peptide levels no longer decline. Understanding the pathophysiological and immunological differences between these two phases will give crucial insights into understanding β-cell survival. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Role of C-peptide in Altered Lipid Profile among Apparently Healthy Adults of Vijayapura City, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas M.Kulkarni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-peptide is produced in equimolar concentration during insulin production as inactive molecule by beta islet cells of Langerhans. C-peptide is most useful biomarker of endogenous insulin production. Aim and Objectives: To predict metabolic syndrome in advance by estimation of C-peptide and lipid profile in healthy adults. Material and Methods: Serum C-peptide, fasting blood glucose and lipid profile of 128 healthy individuals were estimated. Adults in the age group of 18 to 60 years of both sexes were included in study. Results: C-peptide levels were increased in 27%, Serum cholesterol in 30%, LDL Cholesterol in 55% and triglyceride levels in 21% of healthy individuals. Significant correlation was observed between C peptide, age, serum cholesterol, LDL and cholesterol LDL ratio in male subjects only. In our study group most of the subjects (both males and females fell in overweight group. Conclusion: Cpeptide level and lipid profile may be considered as useful biomarkers to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in advance, possibly due to insulin resistance.

  12. Effect of gestational age and blood glucose on C-peptide excretion rate and clearance in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Emma R; Soelbeck, Mikkel K; Reith, David M; Wheeler, Benjamin J; Broadbent, Roland S; Medlicott, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure urinary C-peptide concentrations, and then calculate C-peptide clearance (Cl), and excretion rate (UER) in neonates. In addition, the effect of gestational age (GA) and blood glucose levels (BGL) on C-peptide UER were investigated. Insulin concentrations in plasma and C-peptide concentrations were measured in plasma and urine, in 20 neonates. Chemiluminescent immunoassays were used for insulin and C-peptide measurements, with urine diluted to 40% with bovine serum albumin 1% in phosphate buffered saline. Urine volume and time of collection were recorded and used to calculate UER and Cl. The mean Cl of C-peptide was 0.309 ± 0.329 mL/min/kg, and UER was 0.0329 ± 0.0342 pmol/min/kg. Correlations between Cl or UER and GA were not significant (P > 0.05). No significant correlation was shown between Cl or UER and BGL (P > 0.05). Both Cl and UER were highly variable in neonates, but were not correlated with GA. Additionally, BGL did not appear to affect C-peptide UER and Cl. As GA and BGL did not appear to affect Cl and UER, urinary C-peptide may provide a non-invasive method of measuring insulin production in neonates. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. Automatic computation of radioimmunoassay data. Insulin and C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, T; Kudo, M; Abe, K [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Kawamata, F; Uehata, S

    1975-09-01

    Radioimmunoassay provided dose response curves which showed linearity by the use of logistic transformation (Rodbard). This transformation which was applicable to radioimmunoassay should be useful for the computer processing of insulin and C-peptide assay. In the present studies, standard curves were analysed by testing the fit of analytic functions to radioimmunoassay of insulin and C-peptides. A program for use in combination with the double antibody technique was made by Dr. Kawamata. This approach was evidenced to be useful in order to allow automatic computation of data derived from the double antibody assays of insulin and C-peptides. Automatic corrected calculations of radioimmunoassay data of insulin was found to be satisfactory.

  14. Elevated C-peptide and insulin predict increased risk of colorectal adenomas in normal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Adriana C; Keku, Temitope O; Lund, Pauline Kay; Hoyo, Cathrine; Galanko, Joseph; Burcal, Lauren; Holston, Rachel; Massa, Berri; Omofoye, Oluwaseun; Sandler, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Lower concentrations of the insulin–like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and elevated concentrations of insulin or C-peptide have been associated with an increase in colorectal cancer risk (CRC). However few studies have evaluated IGFBP-1 and C-peptide in relation to adenomatous polyps, the only known precursor for CRC. Between November 2001 and December 2002, we examined associations between circulating concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, IGFBP-1 and apoptosis among 190 individuals with one or more adenomatous polyps and 488 with no adenomatous polyps using logistic regression models. Individuals with the highest concentrations of C-peptide were more likely to have adenomas (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-4.0) than those with the lowest concentrations; associations that appeared to be stronger in men (OR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.7-10.9) than women. Individuals with high insulin concentrations also had a higher risk of adenomas (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.7-7.4), whereas higher levels of IGFBP-1 were associated with a reduced risk of adenomas in men only (OR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7). Overweight and obese individuals with higher C-peptide levels (>1 st Q) were at increased risk for lower apoptosis index (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 0.9-7.1), an association that remained strong in overweight and obese men (OR = 6.3, 95% CI 1.0-36.7). Higher levels of IGFBP-1 in overweight and obese individuals were associated with a reduced risk of low apoptosis (OR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-1.0). Associations between these peptides and the apoptosis index in overweight and obese individuals, suggest that the mechanism by which C-peptide could induce adenomas may include its anti-apoptotic properties. This study suggests that hyperinsulinemia and IGF hormones predict adenoma risk, and that outcomes associated with colorectal carcinogenesis maybe modified by gender

  15. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1977-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7+-3.4, 48.3+-9.8, 40.4+-6.7, 37.4+-6.5 and 26.0+-4.2 uU/ml (Mean+-S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9+-0.3, 3.9+-0.6, 6.3+-0.6, 5.7+-0.5 and 4.0+-0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9+-12.3, 59.5+-12.3, 59.2+-17.1, 56.1+-20.0 and 48.4+-17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5+-0.4, 6.8+-0.5, 7.9+-0.8, 7.9+-0.8 and 7.8+-2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1+-4.9, 44.1+-6.0, 37.3+-6.6, 35.5+-8.1 and 34.7+-10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7+-0.4, 4.9+-0.7, 6.5+-0.5, 7.0+-0.3 and 6.7+-1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1+-7.9, 80.0+-19.3, 108.0+-27.0, 62.0+-17.6 and 55.5+-10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2+-0.4, 8.0+-1.0, 10.4+-1.6, 10.4+-1.7 and 10.1+-1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0+-3.8, 12.1+-3.5, 16.8+-4.6, 19

  16. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C

    1992-01-01

    is induced in the transformed heterogeneous rat islet cell clone, NHI-6F, by transient in vivo passage. During this process a transfected human insulin gene is coactivated with the endogenous nonallelic rat insulin I and II genes. Newly established cultures from NHI-6F insulinomas having a high frequency...

  17. Correlations between fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon-stimulated plasma C-peptide, and urinary C-peptide in insulin-treated diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Frøland, A

    1987-01-01

    This study correlated fasting plasma C-peptide (CP), plasma CP 6 min after stimulation with 1 mg glucagon i.v., and the mean of three 24-h urinary excretions of C-peptide (UCP)/creatinine in 132 insulin-treated diabetics. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, stimulated CP less than 0.......06 nM (n = 51); group 2, stimulated CP 0.06-0.60 nM (n = 48); and group 3, stimulated CP greater than 0.60 nM (n = 33). In all patients fasting CP was closely correlated to stimulated CP (r = .988, P less than .001), whereas the correlations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .904, P less than .001......) and stimulated CP r = .902, P less than .001) were slightly less pronounced. The associations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .716, P less than .001) and stimulated CP (r = .731, P less than .001) were modest in group 2, and even more so in group 3 (r = .557, P less than .001 and r = .641, P less than .001...

  18. Connecting peptide (c-peptide) and the duration of diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: C-peptide is derived from proinsulin and it is secreted in equimolar concentration with insulin. Plasma C-peptide is more stable than insulin and it provides an indirect measure of insulin secretory reserve and beta cell function. To determine relationship between C-peptide and duration of diabetes mellitus, age, ...

  19. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    for antibody binding to the immunizing antigen. Antisera to C-peptide 2, stained islet beta-cells on mouse and rat, but not monkey pancreas sections in immunocytochemical analysis. Preabsorption to the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the synthetic mouse and rat C-peptide 1 abolished staining. In conclusion we......Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did...... not seem to increase the end point titre as tested in direct ELISA. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by competitive ELISA and histochemistry on pancreas sections. Only the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the homologous synthetic C-peptide 1 from mouse and rat competed efficiently in ELISA...

  20. C peptide and insulin releasing RIA test for the investigation of β cell function in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Ailan; Zhu Chengmo; Wang Qiyu; Wang Ping

    1993-01-01

    Results of C-peptide releasing RIA test in 15 normals, and 100 diabetes were summarized and compared with glucose tolerance test and serum insulin for investigating the characteristics in different types of diabetes and evaluating the functional state of islet β cell. In 36 cases of IDDM the fasting blood sugar was significantly increased, and further elevated after eating of bread, but its peak time delay in 2 hours (normalin 1 hour). The level of basal C-peptide is very low, but shows slightly weak on no response after bread stimulating test, all of this denotes that β cell function of islets severely injured. The increasing of fasting blood sugar in 64 cases of NIDDM was lower than those of IDDM. Fasting C-peptide and insulin was normal or increased, their peak value increased after bread stimulation with peak time delayed also at 2 hours. Above results demonstrated that the function of islets B cell decreased but not fully deprived. It is concluded that C-peptide and insulin stimulating test, together with OGTT can accurately assess the islets β cell function, and also have important significance in the pathogenesis, classification and staging, prognostic evaluation and monitoring of therapeutic effects in diabetes

  1. The Association between Newborn Regional Body Composition and Cord Blood Concentrations of C-Peptide and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Carlsen

    Full Text Available Third trimester fetal growth is partially regulated by C-peptide and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I. Prenatal exposures including maternal obesity and high gestational weight gain as well as high birth weight have been linked to subsequent metabolic disease. We evaluated the associations between newborn regional body composition and cord blood levels of C-peptide and IGF-I.We prospectively included obese and normal-weight mothers and their newborns; cord blood was collected and frozen. Analyses of C-peptide and IGF-I were performed simultaneously, after recruitment was completed. Newborn regional body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA within 48 hours of birth.Three hundred thirty-six term infants were eligible to participate in the study; of whom 174 (52% infants had cord blood taken. Total, abdominal and arm and leg fat mass were positively associated with C-peptide (p < 0.001. Arm and leg fat mass was associated with IGF-I concentration: 28 g [95% confidence interval: 4, 53] per doubling of IGF-I. There was no association between total or abdominal fat mass and IGF-I. Fat-free mass was positively associated with both C-peptide (p < 0.001 and IGF-I (p = 0.004.Peripheral fat tissue accumulation was associated with cord blood C-peptide and IGF-I. Total and abdominal fat masses were related to C-peptide but not to IGF-I. Thus, newborn adiposity is partially mediated through C-peptide and early linear growth is associated with IGF-I.

  2. Protective effect of C-peptide on experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy and the possible link between C-peptide and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbassuoni, Eman A; Aziz, Neven M; El-Tahawy, Nashwa F

    2018-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy one of the major microvascular diabetic complications. Besides hyperglycemia, other factors contribute to the development of diabetic complications as the proinsulin connecting peptide, C-peptide. We described the role of C-peptide replacement therapy on experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy, and its potential mechanisms of action by studying the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator of C-peptide effects by in vivo modulating its production by N G -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Renal injury markers measured were serum urea, creatinine, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and angiotensin II, and malondialdehyde, total antioxidant, Bcl-2, and NO in renal tissue. In conclusion, diabetic induction resulted in islet degenerations and decreased insulin secretion with its metabolic consequences and subsequent renal complications. C-Peptide deficiencies in diabetes might have contributed to the metabolic and renal error, since C-peptide treatment to the diabetic rats completely corrected these errors. The beneficial effects of C-peptide are partially antagonized by L-NAME coadministration, indicating that NO partially mediates C-peptide effects.

  3. The Association of Fasting Glucose, Insulin, and C-Peptide, with 19-Year Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease in Older Japanese-American Men; the Honolulu Heart Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazneem Wahab

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of fasting glucose, insulin levels, and C-peptide in coronary heart disease (CHD in non-diabetic individuals remains uncertain. We examined the association between fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide with the long-term incidence of CHD in Japanese-American men. In 1980–1982, from a random sample of the Honolulu Heart Program men (n = 1378, aged 61–81 years, data on several CHD and metabolic risk factors were obtained to examine the relation of fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide to 19-year CHD incidence. Age-adjusted incidence of CHD increased with increasing quintiles of glucose, insulin and C-peptide. Age-adjusted CHD rates in the glucose quintiles were 11.9, 11.6, 14.4, 18.1 and 24.1 per 1000 person-years (trend p < 0.001. In individual Cox models (lowest quintiles of glucose, insulin and C-peptide as reference the relative risks (95% confidence interval of CHD incidence for the glucose quintiles adjusting for age, smoking, hypertension, cholesterol, physical activity, and body mass index, were 0.9 (0.6–1.4, 1.2 (0.8–1.8, 1.4 (0.9–2.2, and 1.7 (1.1–2.6, respectively (trend p = 0.004. Insulin and C-peptide were not significantly associated with CHD on multivariate analysis. Fasting glucose remained the only significant predictor of increased CHD risk (p = 0.003 in a model combining all 3 metabolic variables. In this cohort, only fasting glucose independently predicts long-term incidence of CHD. Age-adjusted insulin and C-peptide levels were associated with CHD incidence, but after adjustment for other risk factors, do not independently predict CHD.

  4. Diurnal Variations in Serum Glucose, Insulin and C-Peptide of Normal Korean Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Du Hyok; Chung, June Key; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Hong, Kee Suk

    1983-01-01

    It is already well known that many factors are involved in maintaining normal blood glucose level. The amount and components of meal are also thought to be some of the factors which affect the blood glucose and insulin levels. It is reported that as for Koreans sugar takes up over 75% out of 2,098 kcal, the average daily calorie intake per adult. It implies that Koreans take a high-sugar diet compared with Westerners who take 40-50% of sugar out of their total average daily calorie. For the purpose of studying diurnal variations in serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide of normal Koreans adults based on ordinary Korean diet, we selected 13 normal Korean male adults and divided them into two groups, Group I (7 persons) and Group II (6 persons). We put Group I on 3,100 kcal and 75% sugar diet, and Group II on 2,100 kcal and 69% sugar diet per day for over 4 days. Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide were checked every 30 minutes or every hour throughout 2 hour. Results are as follows: 1. As for serum glucose level, in the preprandial fasting state in the morning, mean±S.D. of Group I was 91.1±3.2 mg%, while that of Group II is 82.5±4.4 mg%. Both groups showed peaks of increased glucose level t postprandial 1 hour after each meal. The peak returned to the level shown during the fasting state at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast while the relatively high glucose levels were maintained respectively even for 2 or 3 hours after lunch and dinner. 2. As for serum insults level, Group I showed mean±S.D. of 14.7±3.0 μU/ml while Group II shows that of 7.0±2.6 μU/ml in the fasting state. Group I particularly showed the largest peak from preprandial a half or one and half an hour to postprandial one hour of lunch, and made relatively small peaks (47.7±10.8 μU/ml) at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast and dinner. No such large peak was marked in Group II, though it showed relatively similar patterns of peak after each meal. 3. As for C-peptide, in the fasting state

  5. Diurnal Variations in Serum Glucose, Insulin and C-Peptide of Normal Korean Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Du Hyok; Chung, June Key; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kee Suk [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    It is already well known that many factors are involved in maintaining normal blood glucose level. The amount and components of meal are also thought to be some of the factors which affect the blood glucose and insulin levels. It is reported that as for Koreans sugar takes up over 75% out of 2,098 kcal, the average daily calorie intake per adult. It implies that Koreans take a high-sugar diet compared with Westerners who take 40-50% of sugar out of their total average daily calorie. For the purpose of studying diurnal variations in serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide of normal Koreans adults based on ordinary Korean diet, we selected 13 normal Korean male adults and divided them into two groups, Group I (7 persons) and Group II (6 persons). We put Group I on 3,100 kcal and 75% sugar diet, and Group II on 2,100 kcal and 69% sugar diet per day for over 4 days. Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide were checked every 30 minutes or every hour throughout 2 hour. Results are as follows: 1. As for serum glucose level, in the preprandial fasting state in the morning, mean+-S.D. of Group I was 91.1+-3.2 mg%, while that of Group II is 82.5+-4.4 mg%. Both groups showed peaks of increased glucose level t postprandial 1 hour after each meal. The peak returned to the level shown during the fasting state at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast while the relatively high glucose levels were maintained respectively even for 2 or 3 hours after lunch and dinner. 2. As for serum insults level, Group I showed mean+-S.D. of 14.7+-3.0 muU/ml while Group II shows that of 7.0+-2.6 muU/ml in the fasting state. Group I particularly showed the largest peak from preprandial a half or one and half an hour to postprandial one hour of lunch, and made relatively small peaks (47.7+-10.8 muU/ml) at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast and dinner. No such large peak was marked in Group II, though it showed relatively similar patterns of peak after each meal. 3. As for C-peptide, in the fasting state

  6. Canine C-peptide for characterization of experimental diabetes in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Besch, W.; Freyse, E.-J.

    1985-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of canine C-peptide (CCP) was developed for the characterization of endogenous beta cell function in experimentally diabetic dogs. The animals were rendered diabetic by subtotal pancreatectomy and intrasurgical infusion of 2 mg/kg streptozotocin into the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. After an average duration of diabetes of 5 months the animals showed zero peripheral venous fasting CCP levels with no response to feeding, OGTT/i.v. glucagon loading or i.v. glucose tolerance testing. The data on CCP levels entirely coincided with simultaneously measured plasma IRI levels. In non-diabetic control animals clear-cut CCP increases were observed after all stimuli. The experimental model provided an IDDM-type diabetes without toxic symptoms but with a sufficient exocrine pancreatic function. The comparison showed that plasma IRI analyses would also allow reliable characterization of insulinogenic functions in these animals. (author)

  7. Prediction of Impending Type 1 Diabetes through Automated Dual-Label Measurement of Proinsulin:C-Peptide Ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelien Van Dalem

    Full Text Available The hyperglycemic clamp test, the gold standard of beta cell function, predicts impending type 1 diabetes in islet autoantibody-positive individuals, but the latter may benefit from less invasive function tests such as the proinsulin:C-peptide ratio (PI:C. The present study aims to optimize precision of PI:C measurements by automating a dual-label trefoil-type time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TT-TRFIA, and to compare its diagnostic performance for predicting type 1 diabetes with that of clamp-derived C-peptide release.Between-day imprecision (n = 20 and split-sample analysis (n = 95 were used to compare TT-TRFIA (AutoDelfia, Perkin-Elmer with separate methods for proinsulin (in-house TRFIA and C-peptide (Elecsys, Roche. High-risk multiple autoantibody-positive first-degree relatives (n = 49; age 5-39 were tested for fasting PI:C, HOMA2-IR and hyperglycemic clamp and followed for 20-57 months (interquartile range.TT-TRFIA values for proinsulin, C-peptide and PI:C correlated significantly (r2 = 0.96-0.99; P<0.001 with results obtained with separate methods. TT-TRFIA achieved better between-day %CV for PI:C at three different levels (4.5-7.1 vs 6.7-9.5 for separate methods. In high-risk relatives fasting PI:C was significantly and inversely correlated (rs = -0.596; P<0.001 with first-phase C-peptide release during clamp (also with second phase release, only available for age 12-39 years; n = 31, but only after normalization for HOMA2-IR. In ROC- and Cox regression analysis, HOMA2-IR-corrected PI:C predicted 2-year progression to diabetes equally well as clamp-derived C-peptide release.The reproducibility of PI:C benefits from the automated simultaneous determination of both hormones. HOMA2-IR-corrected PI:C may serve as a minimally invasive alternative to the more tedious hyperglycemic clamp test.

  8. Clinical significance of the radioimmunological determination of C-peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudczak, R.; Waldhaeusl, W.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of metabolic control to insulinogenic reserve in insulin-dependent diabetics. Thus, the secretory reserve of the pancreatic beta cell was estimated in insulin-dependent diabetics by measuring changes in peripheral serum immunoreactive C-peptide (IRCP) concentrations in response to intravenous arginine (n = 19; 0.5 g/kg,t = 30 min) or glibenclamide-glucose (n = 6; 2 mg HB 419 - 0.33 g/kg intravenously). In the majority of ''stable'' diabetics a small secretory reserve of the beta cell was demonstrated, but both the absolute and relative increase in IRCP was reduced after intravenous arginine or glibenclamide-glucose in comparison with normal controls. In ''unstable'' diabetics a decreased basal concentration of IRCP, significantly smaller than that seen in ''stable'' diabetics (p < 0.01), was accompanied by a complete lack of IRCP release on intravenous arginine administration. Thus, we conclude that the radioimmunological determination of IRCP is of clinical interest in assessing the residual secretory capacity of the beta cell in insulin-dependent diabetics. In revealing a lack of insulin this diagnostic tool seems to detect a group of potentially ''unstable'' diabetics in need of strict observation, which would minimize the risks of bad metabolic control. (author)

  9. Clinical significance of the radioimmunological determination of C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudczak, R; Waldhaeusl, W [Vienna Univ. (Austria). 1. Medizinische Klinik

    1979-10-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of metabolic control to insulinogenic reserve in insulin-dependent diabetics. Thus, the secretory reserve of the pancreatic beta cell was estimated in insulin-dependent diabetics by measuring changes in peripheral serum immunoreactive C-peptide (IRCP) concentrations in response to intravenous arginine (n = 19; 0.5 g/kg,t = 30 min) or glibenclamide-glucose (n = 6; 2 mg HB 419 - 0.33 g/kg intravenously). In the majority of stable diabetics a small secretory reserve of the beta cell was demonstrated, but both the absolute and relative increase in IRCP was reduced after intravenous arginine or glibenclamide-glucose in comparison with normal controls. In unstable diabetics a decreased basal concentration of IRCP, significantly smaller than that seen in stable diabetics (p < 0.01), was accompanied by a complete lack of IRCP release on intravenous arginine administration. Thus, we conclude that the radioimmunological determination of IRCP is of clinical interest in assessing the residual secretory capacity of the beta cell in insulin-dependent diabetics. In revealing a lack of insulin this diagnostic tool seems to detect a group of potentially unstable diabetics in need of strict observation, which would minimize the risks of bad metabolic control.

  10. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki

    1977-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7±3.4, 48.3±9.8, 40.4±6.7, 37.4±6.5 and 26.0±4.2 uU/ml (Mean±S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9±0.3, 3.9±0.6, 6.3±0.6, 5.7±0.5 and 4.0±0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9±12.3, 59.5±12.3, 59.2±17.1, 56.1±20.0 and 48.4±17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5±0.4, 6.8±0.5, 7.9±0.8, 7.9±0.8 and 7.8±2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1±4.9, 44.1±6.0, 37.3±6.6, 35.5±8.1 and 34.7±10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7±0.4, 4.9±0.7, 6.5±0.5, 7.0±0.3 and 6.7±1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1±7.9, 80.0±19.3, 108.0±27.0, 62.0±17.6 and 55.5±10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2±0.4, 8.0±1.0, 10.4±1.6, 10.4±1.7 and 10.1±1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0±3.8, 12.1±3.5, 16.8±4.6, 19

  11. Urinary C-peptide: a useful tool for evaluating the endogenous insulin reserve in cohort and longitudinal studies of diabetes in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaufort, C E; den Boer, N C; Bruining, G J; Eilers, G A; van Strik, R; Weterings, T

    1988-09-01

    Increasing research into the remission phase of type I diabetes mellitus stresses the importance of a non-traumatic and reliable method for the evaluation of endogenous insulin production. We compared 24-h urinary C-peptide excretion (UCE) with plasma C-peptide values before and after stimulation with 1 mg glucagon in 24 type I diabetic children. Fasting plasma C-peptide values and stimulated plasma C-peptide values showed a linear correlation with 24 h UCE. Mean plasma C-peptide levels correlated inversely with the exogenous insulin dose. A slightly better correlation was found between the exogenous insulin dose and 24 h UCE. Control data of 24 h UCE were obtained from healthy siblings. A linear correlation with age was found up to 10 years of age above which UCE values seem to reach a plateau. This effect of age, as well as the frequency of sampling was taken into account in the derivation of 95% reference intervals for UCE. The measurement of 24 h UCE appears to be a useful parameter to assess endogenous insulin production in diabetic children, provided that age is taken into account.

  12. Pregnancy-induced rise in serum C-peptide concentrations in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Rehfeld, Jens F; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pregnancy induces increased insulin production as a marker of improved beta-cell function in women with long-term type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of 90 consecutive pregnant women with type 1.......85). Multivariate regression analysis revealed a positive association between the absolute increase in C-peptide concentrations during pregnancy and decreased A1C from 8 to 33 weeks (P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: A pregnancy-induced increase in C-peptide concentrations in women with long-term type 1 diabetes...... in 35 women. RESULTS: C-peptide concentrations gradually increased throughout pregnancy regardless of serum glucose concentrations in the 90 women with a median duration of diabetes of 17 years (range 1-36 years). Among 35 women with paired recordings of stimulated C-peptide, C-peptide production...

  13. Intraportal injection of insulin-producing cells generated from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells decreases blood glucose level in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Jiun; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lin, Chi-Hung; Weng, Zen-Chung; Chen, Tien-Hua; Shyu, Jia-Fwu

    2014-01-01

    We studied the process of trans-differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) into insulin-producing cells. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat model was used to study the effect of portal vein transplantation of these insulin-producing cells on blood sugar levels. The BM-MSCs were differentiated into insulin-producing cells under defined conditions. Real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry and glucose challenge were used to evaluate in vitro differentiation. Flow cytometry showed that hBM-MSCs were strongly positive for CD44, CD105 and CD73 and negative for hematopoietic markers CD34, CD38 and CD45. Differentiated cells expressed C-peptide as well as β-cells specific genes and hormones. Glucose stimulation increased C-peptide secretion in these cells. The insulin-producing, differentiated cells were transplanted into the portal vein of STZ-induced diabetic rats using a Port-A catheter. The insulin-producing cells were localized in the liver of the recipient rat and expressed human C-peptide. Blood glucose levels were reduced in diabetic rats transplanted with insulin-producing cells. We concluded that hBM-MSCs could be trans-differentiated into insulin-producing cells in vitro. Portal vein transplantation of insulin-producing cells alleviated hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) suppresses ghrelin levels in humans via increased insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Dirk; Holst, Jens Juul; Gethmann, Arnica

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide predominantly secreted by the stomach. Ghrelin plasma levels rise before meal ingestion and sharply decline afterwards, but the mechanisms controlling ghrelin secretion are largely unknown. Since meal ingestion also elicits the secretion...... of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), we examined whether exogenous GLP-1 administration reduces ghrelin secretion in humans. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 14 healthy male volunteers were given intravenous infusions of GLP-1(1.2 pmol x kg(-1) min(-1)) or placebo over 390 min. After 30 min, a solid test...... meal was served. Venous blood was drawn frequently for the determination of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1 and ghrelin. RESULTS: During the infusion of exogenous GLP-1 and placebo, GLP-1 plasma concentrations reached steady-state levels of 139+/-15 pmol/l and 12+/-2 pmol/l, respectively (p

  15. Pengaruh Transplantasi Allograf Pancreatic Stem Cell terhadap Kadar Insulin dan C-Peptide Tikus Putih Penderita Diabetes Melitus Tipe I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boedi Setiawan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the degenerative diseases in which the therapy still remains unresolved and is still a serious threat to the global health, including to the health of Indonesian people. The aim of this study was to describe the level of insulin and C-peptide in diabetes mellitus type I white rats treated with pancreatic stem cell allograft through intrapancreatic laparotomy. This study was conducted at the Institute of Tropical Diseases, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya in a 6 month period (July–December 2014. Twelve male white rats Rattus novergicus Wistar strain, were randomly divided into two groups. The first group (P0 was injected by alloxan, 150 mg/kg body weight, without stem cell therapy. Another group was injected by alloxan, 150 mg/kg body weight, and was treated with 1x106/kg body weight pancreatic stem cell throughintrapancreatic laparotomy (P1. The experiment was finalized on the 31th day of the experiment. The results showed that the blood glucose levels at the end of experiment were highly significantly different p<0.01 between the treatment group that received stem cell therapy (P1 and P0 positive control, although the average value of blood glucose levels was not as normal as on the first day. C-peptide and insulin levels of P0 and P1 group differed significantly (p<0.01. It can be concluded that stem cell therapy through intrapancreatic laparotomy can reduce blood glucose levels and increase the levels of C-peptide and insulin.

  16. Meta-genome-wide association studies identify a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region for serum C-peptide in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Gubitosi-Klug, Rose; Bull, Shelley B; Canty, Angelo J; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; King, George L; Keenan, Hillary A; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Maahs, David M; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Orchard, Trevor J; Costacou, Tina; Weedon, Michael N; Oram, Richard A; Paterson, Andrew D

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with beta cell function in type 1 diabetes, as measured by serum C-peptide levels, through meta-genome-wide association studies (meta-GWAS). We performed a meta-GWAS to combine the results from five studies in type 1 diabetes with cross-sectionally measured stimulated, fasting or random C-peptide levels, including 3479 European participants. The p values across studies were combined, taking into account sample size and direction of effect. We also performed separate meta-GWAS for stimulated (n = 1303), fasting (n = 2019) and random (n = 1497) C-peptide levels. In the meta-GWAS for stimulated/fasting/random C-peptide levels, a SNP on chromosome 1, rs559047 (Chr1:238753916, T>A, minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.24-0.26), was associated with C-peptide (p = 4.13 × 10 -8 ), meeting the genome-wide significance threshold (p C>T, MAF 0.07-0.10, p = 8.43 × 10 -8 ). In the stimulated C-peptide meta-GWAS, rs61211515 (Chr6:30100975, T/-, MAF 0.17-0.19) in the MHC region was associated with stimulated C-peptide (β [SE] = - 0.39 [0.07], p = 9.72 × 10 -8 ). rs61211515 was also associated with the rate of stimulated C-peptide decline over time in a subset of individuals (n = 258) with annual repeated measures for up to 6 years (p = 0.02). In the meta-GWAS of random C-peptide, another MHC region, SNP rs3135002 (Chr6:32668439, C>A, MAF 0.02-0.06), was associated with C-peptide (p = 3.49 × 10 -8 ). Conditional analyses suggested that the three identified variants in the MHC region were independent of each other. rs9260151 and rs3135002 have been associated with type 1 diabetes, whereas rs559047 and rs61211515 have not been associated with a risk of developing type 1 diabetes. We identified a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region, at least some of which were distinct from type 1 diabetes risk loci, that were associated with C-peptide

  17. Low-cost production of proinsulin in tobacco and lettuce chloroplasts for injectable or oral delivery of functional insulin and C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyhan, Diane; Daniell, Henry

    2011-06-01

    Current treatment for type I diabetes includes delivery of insulin via injection or pump, which is highly invasive and expensive. The production of chloroplast-derived proinsulin should reduce cost and facilitate oral delivery. Therefore, tobacco and lettuce chloroplasts were transformed with the cholera toxin B subunit fused with human proinsulin (A, B, C peptides) containing three furin cleavage sites (CTB-PFx3). Transplastomic lines were confirmed for site-specific integration of transgene and homoplasmy. Old tobacco leaves accumulated proinsulin up to 47% of total leaf protein (TLP). Old lettuce leaves accumulated proinsulin up to 53% TLP. Accumulation was so stable that up to ~40% proinsulin in TLP was observed even in senescent and dried lettuce leaves, facilitating their processing and storage in the field. Based on the yield of only monomers and dimers of proinsulin (3 mg/g leaf, a significant underestimation), with a 50% loss of protein during the purification process, one acre of tobacco could yield up to 20 million daily doses of insulin per year. Proinsulin from tobacco leaves was purified up to 98% using metal affinity chromatography without any His-tag. Furin protease cleaved insulin peptides in vitro. Oral delivery of unprocessed proinsulin bioencapsulated in plant cells or injectable delivery into mice showed reduction in blood glucose levels similar to processed commercial insulin. C-peptide should aid in long-term treatment of diabetic complications including stimulation of nerve and renal functions. Hyper-expression of functional proinsulin and exceptional stability in dehydrated leaves offer a low-cost platform for oral and injectable delivery of cleavable proinsulin. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1135 - C-peptides of proinsulin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Measurements of C-peptides of proinsulin are used in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with abnormal insulin secretion, including diabetes mellitus. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  19. Fall in C-Peptide During First 2 Years From Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Carla J.; Beam, Craig A.; Boulware, David; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Gottlieb, Peter A.; Herold, Kevan C.; Lachin, John M.; McGee, Paula; Palmer, Jerry P.; Pescovitz, Mark D.; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Skyler, Jay S.; Sosenko, Jay M.

    2012-01-01

    Interpretation of clinical trials to alter the decline in β-cell function after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes depends on a robust understanding of the natural history of disease. Combining data from the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet studies, we describe the natural history of β-cell function from shortly after diagnosis through 2 years post study randomization, assess the degree of variability between patients, and investigate factors that may be related to C-peptide preservation or loss. We found that 93% of individuals have detectable C-peptide 2 years from diagnosis. In 11% of subjects, there was no significant fall from baseline by 2 years. There was a biphasic decline in C-peptide; the C-peptide slope was −0.0245 pmol/mL/month (95% CI −0.0271 to −0.0215) through the first 12 months and −0.0079 (−0.0113 to −0.0050) from 12 to 24 months (P < 0.001). This pattern of fall in C-peptide over time has implications for understanding trial results in which effects of therapy are most pronounced early and raises the possibility that there are time-dependent differences in pathophysiology. The robust data on the C-peptide obtained under clinical trial conditions should be used in planning and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:22688329

  20. C-Peptides for diagnostics and therapy: a veterinary medicine point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A. Rosenfield

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Empirical studies proved that C-peptides are performing numerous intrinsic biological roles, and serve as a marker for pancreatic performance analysis. Since the last decade, C-peptide assays for differential diagnosis in veterinary diabetic patients are becoming more available, but still only for a very limited number of species. Studies on C-peptide as a diagnostic tool, therapy for associated complications, or as replacement therapies for C-peptide deficiency still showed not to be a common practice in veterinary medicine. This review was conducted to determine the potential importance of C-peptide in Veterinary Medicine, relevant in the diagnosis of diabetes and for other metabolic processes, as well as its proposed therapeutic benefits. Numerous articles were identified that reported positive results in their experimental studies, whether C-peptide as a biomarker for pancreatic performance in dogs, cats, and horses, as a non-invasive method to monitor nutritional status in primates, or to investigate its potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes-related illnesses.

  1. Energetic consumption levels and human development indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boa Nova, Antonio Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The article overviews the energetic consumption levels and human development indexes. The human development indexes are described based on the United Nations Development Programme. A comparison between the energetic consumption levels and human development indexes is also presented

  2. Socioecological correlates of energy balance using urinary C-peptide measurements in wild female mountain gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueter, Cyril C; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Fawcett, Katie; Robbins, Martha M

    2014-03-29

    Maintaining a balanced energy budget is important for survival and reproduction, but measuring energy balance in wild animals has been fraught with difficulties. Female mountain gorillas are interesting subjects to examine environmental correlates of energy balance because their diet is primarily herbaceous vegetation, their food supply shows little seasonal variation and is abundant, yet they live in cooler, high-altitude habitats that may bring about energetic challenges. Social and reproductive parameters may also influence energy balance. Urinary C-peptide (UCP) has emerged as a valuable non-invasive biomarker of energy balance in primates. Here we use this method to investigate factors influencing energy balance in mountain gorillas of the Virunga Volcanoes, Rwanda. We examined a range of socioecological variables on energy balance in adult females in three groups monitored by the Karisoke Research Center over nine months. Three variables had significant effects on UCP levels: habitat (highest levels in the bamboo zone), season (highest levels in November during peak of the bamboo shoot availability) and day time (gradually increasing from early morning to early afternoon). There was no significant effect of reproductive state and dominance rank. Our study indicates that even in species that inhabit an area with a seemingly steady food supply, ecological variability can have pronounced effects on female energy balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucose, insulin and C-peptide secretion in obese and non obese women with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabeer, S; Naidoo, C; Joubert, S M

    1990-06-01

    Plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide responses during oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) were evaluated in 10 non obese women with polycystic ovarian disease (NOB-PCOD) and 10 obese women with polycystic ovarian disease (OB-PCOD). Mean plasma glucose response at 120 minutes in OB-PCOD showed impaired glucose tolerance. Also in this group, 1 patient had frank diabetes mellitus, whilst 3 other patients had impaired glucose tolerance 1 NOB-PCOD patient had impaired glucose tolerance. Mean plasma glucose levels and mean incremental glucose areas were higher in the OB-PCOD at all time intervals and reached statistical significance at 60 and 90 minutes. Mean plasma IRI levels were also higher in OB-PCOD at all time intervals, and reached statistically significant higher levels at 0, 60 and 90 minutes. Mean serum C-peptide valves were also higher at all time intervals in OB-PCOD. The relationship between acanthosis nigricans, obesity and PCOD was also analysed. It is evident from this study that obesity has a significant negative impact on the overall carbohydrate status in women with PCOD.

  4. C-peptide prevents SMAD3 binding to alpha promoters to inhibit collagen type IV synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanning; Zhong, Yan; Gong, Wenjian; Gao, Xuehan; Qi, Huanli; Liu, Kun; Qi, Jinsheng

    2018-07-01

    Activation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1)/SMAD3 signaling may lead to additional synthesis of collagen type IV (COL4), which is a major contributor to extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can attenuate fibrosis to have unique beneficial effects in DN. However, whether and how C-peptide affects TGFB1/SMAD3-activated COL4 synthesis is unclear. In this study, pathological changes, expression of COL4 a1-a5 chains ( Col4a1-a5 ), COL4 distribution and protein and TGFB1 and SMAD3 protein were first assessed in a rat model of diabetes. Then, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and/or C-peptide to investigate the underlying mechanism. Col4a1-a5 expression, COL4 protein and secretion, TGFB1 protein, SMAD3 nuclear translocation and binding of SMAD3 to its cognate sites in the promoters of Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 were measured. It was found that C-peptide attenuated glomerular pathological changes and suppressed renal Col4a1 -a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and TGFB1 protein content. C-peptide had a dose-dependent effect to inhibit Col4a1-a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and secretion, in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In addition, the HG-induced increase in TGFB1 protein content was significantly reduced by C-peptide. Although not apparently affecting SMAD3 nuclear translocation, C-peptide prevented SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In conclusion, C-peptide could prevent SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters, to inhibit COL4 generation. These results may provide a mechanism for the alleviation of fibrosis in DN by C-peptide. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. C-Peptide Is Independently Associated with an Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in T2DM Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingshu Wang

    Full Text Available C-peptide has been reported to be a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients, whereas its role in coronary artery disease (CAD has not been clarified, especially in diabetics with differing body mass indices (BMIs.This cross-sectional study included 501 patients with T2DM. First, all subjects were divided into the following two groups: CAD and non-CAD. Then, binary logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors for CAD for all patients. To clarify the role of obesity, we re-divided all subjects into two additional groups (obese and non-obese based on BMI. Finally, binary logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors for CAD for each weight group.The patients with CAD showed a higher BMI and fasting C-peptide level in addition to an increased prevalence of traditional risk factors for CAD, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, higher cholesterol, cysteine-C (Cys-C and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Logistic regression analysis showed that fasting C-peptide (OR=1.513, p=0.005, insulin treatment (OR=1.832, p=0.027 hypertension (OR=1.987, p=0.016 and hyperlipidemia (OR=4.159, p<0.001 significantly increased the risk of clinical CAD in the T2DM patients independent of age, gender, diabetes duration, smoking and alcohol statuses, fasting insulin and glucose, hypoglycemic episodes, UA and eGFR. Additionally, in both of the obese (OR=1.488, p=0.049 and non-obese (OR=1.686, p=0.037 DM groups, C-peptide was associated with an increased risk of CAD after multiple adjustments.C-peptide is associated with an increased CAD risk in T2DM patients, no matter whether they are obese or not.

  6. Stability and reproducibility of a single-sample urinary C-peptide/creatinine ratio and its correlation with 24-h urinary C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tim J; Knight, Bridget A; Shields, Beverley M; Bowman, Pamela; Salzmann, Maurice B; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2009-11-01

    C-peptide measurement in blood or 24-h urine samples provides useful information regarding endogenous insulin secretion, but problems related to the rapid degradation of C-peptide in blood and difficulty of 24-h urine collection have limited widespread routine clinical use of this test. We assessed the feasibility of measuring urinary C-peptide (UCP) with correction for creatinine concentration in single urine samples. We analyzed UCP using a routine electrochemiluminescence immunoassay in samples from 21 healthy volunteers. We investigated the stability of UCP with different preservatives and storage conditions and compared the reproducibility of urinary C-peptide/creatinine ratio (UCPCR) in first- and second-void fasting urines, then assessed correlations with 24-h collections. UCPCR was unchanged at room temperature for 24 h and at 4 degrees C for 72 h even in the absence of preservative. UCPCR collected in boric acid was stable at room temperature for 72 h. UCPCR remained stable after 7 freeze-thaw cycles but decreased with freezer storage time and dropped to 82%-84% of baseline by 90 days at -20 degrees C. Second-void fasting UCPCRs were lower than first-void (median 0.78 vs 1.31, P = 0.0003) and showed less variation (CV 33% vs 52%), as second-void UCPCRs were not influenced by evening food-related insulin secretion. Second-void fasting UCPCR was highly correlated with 24-h UCP (r = 0.8, P = 0.00006). Second-void fasting UCPCR is a reproducible measure that correlates well with 24-h UCP in normal samples. The 3-day stability of UCPCR at room temperature greatly increases its potential clinical utility.

  7. Kinetics of circulating endogenous insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin in fasting nondiabetic man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Tronier, B; Bülow, J B

    1987-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin were measured in different vascular beds in order to determine renal, hepatic, and systemic kinetics of the endogenous peptides in the fasting condition. Nineteen nondiabetic subjects were studied, two were normal, nine had minor vascular...

  8. The effect of oral and intravenous dextrose on C-peptide secretion in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M A; van Haeften, J J; Sillence, M N

    2016-02-01

    Managing equine hyperinsulinemia is crucial for preventing laminitis, but our understanding of the mechanisms involved in insulin dysregulation in this species is incomplete. C-peptide is co-secreted with insulin but is resistant to hepatic metabolism and can be used to study insulin dysregulation. This study examined C-peptide secretion in serial blood samples collected after oral and i.v. dextrose (0.75 g/kg) administration to 9 ponies (BCS, 7.1 ± 0.5). The ponies were designated as hyperinsulinemic (HI) or normoinsulinemic (NI) responders before the study, using oral glucose tests and fasted glucose-to-insulin ratios, and responses were compared between the 2 groups. C-peptide concentrations increased ( dextrose, with similar area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for both tests and a significant correlation with AUC. The AUC was similar in HI and NI ponies after i.v. dextrose, indicating similar pancreatic capacity for both groups. However, for oral dextrose, the AUC and the AUC were markedly higher ( < 0.05) in the HI ponies, indicating a greater secretion rate of these peptides. Slower insulin clearance might have also contributed to the larger AUC in HI ponies, but this hypothesis requires further investigation with specific measures of hepatic insulin clearance.

  9. A study on the C-peptide radioimmunoassay with synthetized connecting peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shoichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Nakayama, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Takuji; Aoki, Shin

    1976-01-01

    A method of C-peptide radioimmunoassay with the synthetized connecting peptide by Yanaihara was tested for the determination of serum C-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) in normal people and in diabetics with or without insulin treatment. The CPR value obtained by this method was not interfered with by the presence of serum proteins or by the insulin of people with or without insulin treatment judged by the dilution test and the recovery test. The normal fasting CPR was 2.80 +- 0.78 ng/ml with the synthetized C-peptide as a standard. The CPR value increased and reached a maximum 90 minutes after the ingestion of 50 g of glucose. The increase after the glucose loading reduced corresponding to the severity of diabetes, and some juvenile-onset diabetes showed no response. Adult-type diabetics under insulin treatment, however, showed weak but significant CPR response. The increment of CPR and immunoreactive insulin after glucose loading in normal people and non-treated diabetics was well correlated (γ=0.8262). Judged from the above mentioned results, CPR determination in insulin-treated diabetics was thought to be a useful method for the assessment of the insulin-secreting ability of beta-cells of the pancreas. (J.P.N.)

  10. Study on the C-peptide radioimmunoassay with synthetized connecting peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, S; Sasaki, T; Nakayama, H; Watanabe, T; Aoki, S [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-01-01

    A method of C-peptide radioimmunoassay with the synthetized connecting peptide by Yanaihara was tested for the determination of serum C-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) in normal people and in diabetics with or without insulin treatment. The CPR value obtained by this method was not interfered with by the presence of serum proteins or by the insulin of people with or without insulin treatment judged by the dilution test and the recovery test. The normal fasting CPR was 2.80 +- 0.78 ng/ml with the synthetized C-peptide as a standard. The CPR value increased and reached a maximum 90 minutes after the ingestion of 50 g of glucose. The increase after the glucose loading reduced corresponding to the severity of diabetes, and some juvenile-onset diabetes showed no response. Adult-type diabetics under insulin treatment, however, showed weak but significant CPR response. The increment of CPR and immunoreactive insulin after glucose loading in normal people and non-treated diabetics was well correlated (..gamma..=0.8262). Judged from the above mentioned results, CPR determination in insulin-treated diabetics was thought to be a useful method for the assessment of the insulin-secreting ability of beta-cells of the pancreas.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of seric C-peptide. Practical value in the study of insulin secretion. Results of 140 stimulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafflart, Jean.

    1977-10-01

    C-peptide, which appears as a by-product of insulin synthesis, is secreted with this latter in equimolar quantities but is not degraded in the liver. It thus reflects indirectly the insulin secreted. After the structure of C-peptide was determined in 1971 by OYER it was synthesized by YANAIHARA and a radioimmunoassay was developed by KANEKO in 1974. This work was made possible by the recent commercialisation of a Japanese analysis kit, the 'DAIICHI' kit, and its availability through GUERBET TESTS. Part one describes the structural, physiological and immuno properties of C-peptide and its method of determination. Part two is devoted to a review of foreign publications on the practical interest of the C-peptide measurement. Part three gives the results of 140 oral or venous stimulation tests where blood sugar, blood insulin and C-peptide are measured in parallel. The different diabetic pathologies are explored and compared against normal subjects. The purpose of this work is to establish the value of C-peptide as a reflection of insulin secretion on the one hand, and that of a parallel insulin and C-peptide determination on the other [fr

  12. Purification and characterization of insulin and the C-peptide of proinsulin from Przewalski's horse, zebra, rhino, and tapir (Perissodactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J S; Lance, V A; Conlon, J M

    1993-02-01

    Within the order Perissodactyla, the primary structure of insulin has been strongly conserved. Insulin from Przewalski's horse and the mountain zebra (suborder Hippomorpha) is the same as that from the domestic horse and differs from insulin from the white rhinoceros and mountain tapir (suborder Ceratomorpha) by a single substitution (Gly-->Ser) at position 9 in the A-chain. A second molecular form of Przewalski's horse insulin isolated in this study was shown to represent the gamma-ethyl ester of the Glu17 residue of the A-chain. This component was probably formed during the extraction of the pancreas with acidified ethanol. The amino acid sequence of the C-peptide of proinsulin has been less well conserved. Zebra C-peptide comprises 31 amino acid residues and differs from Przewalski's horse and domestic horse C-peptide by one substitution (Gln30-->Pro). Rhino C-peptide was isolated only in a truncated form corresponding to residues (1-23) of intact C-peptide. Its amino acid sequence contains three substitutions compared with the corresponding region of horse C-peptide. It is postulated that the substitution (Pro23-->Thr) renders rhino C-peptide more liable to proteolytic cleavage by a chymotrypsin-like enzyme than horse C-peptide. C-peptide could not be identified in the extract of tapir pancreas, suggesting that proteolytic degradation may have been more extensive than in the rhino. In contrast to the ox and pig (order Artiodactyla), there was no evidence for the expression of more than one proinsulin gene in the species of Perissodactyla examined.

  13. Sensitivity and reproducibility of urinary C-peptide as estimate of islet B-cell function in insulin-treated diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Faber, O K

    1989-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the ability of urinary C-peptide determination to demonstrate presence of residual insulin secretion, and to evaluate the reproducibility of urinary C-peptide excretion in 125 insulin-treated diabetic patients. C-peptide was determined in two...

  14. Optimization of reagent concentration for radioiodination of rat C-peptide II in development of radioimmunoassay procedure for rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B R Manupriya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat C-peptide is a polypeptide molecule made up of 31 amino acids and secreted from pancreas into circulation in two isoforms I and II. Quantification of rat C-peptide II in rat serum is important as it is directly related to the diagnosis of carbohydrate metabolism abnormalities, pancreatic performance analysis, monitoring of hypoglycemia, and diabetes-related illness in rat model. The aim of the present work is to develop a tracer by chloramine-T method for radioimmunoassay (RIA procedure and to determine the optimum amount of chloramine-T required for the preparation of stable radioiodinated product with a specific activity of around 24.97 MBq/μg, corresponding to 1 125I atom per molecule of the peptide. Tyrosylated rat C-peptide II was selected for the radioiodination procedure as rat C-peptide II does not contain either tyrosine or histidine which is mandatory for the incorporation of 125I atom to the rat C-peptide II. Tyrosylated rat C-peptide II was subjected to radioiodination by chloramine-T method with different concentrations of chloramine-T and sodium metabisulfite (MBS to obtain a stable radiolabeled compound. Optimized reaction conditions relating to the concentration of chloramine-T (10 μg and MBS (20 μg yielded a stable 125I-rat C-peptide II with specific activity of 21.01 MBq/μg corresponding to 0.84 125I atoms per molecule of the peptide. Preparation of high integrity tracer of rat C-peptide II was achieved by combining one molecule of oxidant (chloramine-T and two molecule of reductant (MBS.

  15. Human exposure to low level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paix, David

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the low-level radiation sources and their effects on human populations, from a global perspective. 'Low-level' means exposures in the range of the natural background to which everybody is exposed. The quoted values are whole-world averages, but individual variations are mentioned in a few cases. (author). 22 refs

  16. The association between newborn regional body composition and cord blood concentrations of C-peptide and insulin-like growth factor I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Emma M; Renault, Kristina M; Jensen, Rikke B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Third trimester fetal growth is partially regulated by C-peptide and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Prenatal exposures including maternal obesity and high gestational weight gain as well as high birth weight have been linked to subsequent metabolic disease. We evaluated...... with both C-peptide (p tissue accumulation was associated with cord blood C-peptide and IGF-I. Total and abdominal fat masses were related to C-peptide but not to IGF-I. Thus, newborn adiposity is partially mediated through C-peptide and early...

  17. Association between age, IL-10, IFN¿, stimulated C-peptide and disease progression in children with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, A; Pfleger, Claudia Christina; Kharagjitsingh, A V

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The relation of disease progression and age, serum interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon gamma (IFN¿) and their genetic correlates were studied in paediatric patients with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Two hundred and twenty-seven patients from the Hvidoere Study Group were...... classified in four different progression groups as assessed by change in stimulated C-peptide from 1 to 6 months. CA repeat variants of the IL-10 and IFN¿ gene were genotyped and serum levels of IL-10 and IFN¿ were measured at 1, 6 and 12 months. Results: IL-10 decreased (P...

  18. Human-Level Artificial Intelligence? Be Serious!

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Nils J.

    2005-01-01

    I claim that achieving real human-level artificial intelligence would necessarily imply that most of the tasks that humans perform for pay could be automated. Rather than work toward this goal of automation by building special-purpose systems, I argue for the development of general-purpose, educable systems that can learn and be taught to perform any of the thousands of jobs that humans can perform. Joining others who have made similar proposals, I advocate beginning with a system that has mi...

  19. Dessert formulation using sucralose and dextrin affects favorably postprandial response to glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Konstantina; Sotiropoulos, Alexios; Psarou, Eirini; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Zampelas, Antonios; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dessert compositions may conform to diabetic diet when it contains low sugar or artificial sweetener to replace sugar. However, it is still questionable whether glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients is improved by the use of diet-conforming dessert compositions. To compare, in type 2 diabetes patients, the glycemic, insulin, and C-peptide responses to seven modified dessert compositions for diabetics (D-dessert) with the response to seven similar desserts of non-modified composition, used as control desserts (C-dessert). Seventy type 2 diabetes patients were allocated to seven groups of ten. On three occasions, each patient received either the meal which consisted of bread and cheese, or the meal and D-dessert, or the meal and the respective C-dessert. Differences in postprandial glucose, insulin, and C-peptide were evaluated using analysis of repeated measures at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption. D-cake and D-pastry cream resulted in lower glucose levels (8.81 ± 0.32 mmol/l and 8.67 ± 0.36 mmol/l, respectively) and D-strawberry jelly in lower insulin levels (16.46 ± 2.66 μU/ml) than the respective C-desserts (9.99 ± 0.32 mmol/l for C-cake, 9.28 ± 0.36 mmol/l for C-pastry cream, and 27.42 ± 2.66 μU/ml for C-strawberry jelly) (p pastry cream increased glucose to a lesser extent than C-pastry cream (p < 0.05). Similar effects were reported for D-milk dessert, D-millefeuille, and D-chocolate on glucose, insulin, and C-peptide at specific timepoints. D-crème caramel showed no effect. Some desserts formulated with sugar substitutes and soluble fiber may have a favorable effect on postprandial levels of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in type 2 diabetic patients.

  20. [Correlation analysis of the pre-pregnant body mass index, the gestational weight gain and umbilical cord blood C peptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X L; Han, Y; Zhao, X M; Liu, Y; Lü, J J

    2017-01-03

    Objective: To explore the correlation among the pre-pregnant body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG) and umbilical cord blood C peptide, and to investigate the influence of maternal weight management on the incidence of baby long-term metabolic syndrome. Methods: During May to Aug.2015, 485 pregnant women in Zhejiang Taizhou first people's hospital and Taizhou Huangyan maternal &child care service centre were selected in random and divided into four groups according to pre-pregnant BMI: low body mass, normal body mass, over body mass and obese group, and also divided into two groups for getting gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or not. According to the gestational weight gain (GWG), all the cases were divided into two groups: above the Institute Of Medicine (IMO) 2009 recommendations or not. According to the outcome, the GDM group which had received weight control treatment, was divided into successful treat group or not. At last, we tested the umbilical cord blood C peptide and birth weight of each newborn and compared the difference in all subgroups. The correlation between the umbilical cord blood C peptide and birth weight were analysed. Results: (1) In the pre-pregnant BMI groups, there were significant differences of incidence of GDM ( P 0.05). (2) Newborn birth weight and the umbilical cord blood C peptide were positively correlated ( r =0.673, P newborn birth weight in all subgroups. (4) All groups showed correlations with neonatal umbilical cord blood C peptide, the GDM mostly (β=0.58), pre-pregnant BMI secondly (β: 0.36, 0.38) , and GWG weakly (β=0.17). (5) By stratification analysis, in GDM group, low body mass was negatively correlated with umbilical cord blood C peptide ( P gestational weight gain and umbilical cord blood C peptide. Suitable maternal weight control especially pre-pregnant body mass index control will lower the baby long-term metabolic syndrome incidence.

  1. The clinical significance of detecting serum glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD), C-peptide and insulin in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Tingliang; Zhang Jinchi; Yao Yingfei; Chen Linxing; Huang Hua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of detecting serum glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody, C-peptide (CP) and insulin (INS) in the classification of diabetic patients. Methods: Serum GAD antibody, CP and INS concentration were determined with RIA in 27 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and 49 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Sugar-electrode-method was used to detect the concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in these patients. Results: The positive rate of GAD antibody in DM1 patients (66.7%) were significantly higher than that in DM2 group (8.2%) (P<0.01), The levels of CP and INS were lower in DM1 group than those in DM2 group as well (P<0.01). Conclusion: GAD antibody is a valuable marker to predict the impairment of β-cell GAD antibody levels, together with CP /FPG and INS/FPG ratios, might be useful in determining the type of DM and guiding the therapy. (authors)

  2. Human factors in healthcare level two

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenorn-Lanng, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This book builds on Human Factors in Healthcare Level One by delving deeper into the challenges of leadership, conflict resolution, and decision making that healthcare professionals currently face. It is written in an easy to understand style and includes a wealth of real-life examples of errors and patient safety issues.

  3. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  4. Characterization of an insulin-like growth factor-I/somatomedin-C radioimmunoassay specific for the C-peptide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintz, R.L.; Liu, F.; Seegan, G.

    1982-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and somatomedin-C (SM-C) have been shown to be functionally identical by a number of criteria. We have synthesized the 12 amino acid C-peptide region of IGF-I (Gly-Tyr-Gly-Ser-Ser-Ser-Arg-Arg-Ala-Pro-Glu-Thr) and developed a RIA based on antibodies against this synthetic peptide. IGF-I and SM-C were indistinguishable in this RIA. No other peptides competed for this antiserum. The SM-C/IGF-I values of acid-chromatographed serum were strongly age dependent. The mean of children 1-5 yr old was 0.67 +/- 0.033 U/ml (mean +/- sD; n = 23), whereas the mean of children 12-17 yr old was 2.01 +/- 0.66 U/ml (n = 39) and the mean of 38 adults 26-85 yr old was 1.05 +/- 0.34. The SM-C/IGF-I values measured by this RIA were also growth hormone dependent. Thus, this region-specific RIA provides a clinically useful assessment of serum SM-C/IGF-I levels

  5. Improvement of glycaemic control and elevation of C-peptide following a diet free of dairy products in an insulin-treated, patient with type 2 diabetes with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandeter, Howard

    2009-01-01

    An insulin-treated patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus started a diet free of dairy products. Unexpectedly, she developed episodes of hypoglycaemia, without any change in her usual medication (insulin NPH at bedtime and Metformin). Laboratory tests showed an improvement of endogenous insulin secretion as demonstrated by the induction of hypoglycaemia and the elevation to normalisation of C-peptide levels. The patient was rechallenged with dairy products, leading to the lowering of the C-peptide levels back to abnormal levels, and an increase in HBA1C levels. The findings in our patient contrast with the insulinotropic effect of milk in healthy subjects described in the literature. The two main "milk debates" on the relation between milk (or its components) and diabetes are presented. Further observations will be needed to clarify the question of whether a diet free of dairy products can improve glycaemic control in other insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Employment growth, human capital and educational levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Høgni Kalsø; Winther, Lars

    2015-01-01

    human capital in understanding regional growth. We examine to what extent different labour competences and capabilities relate to municipal employment growth using nine stratified, educational categories as proxies for different levels of human capital. Dividing municipalities into four spatial...... categories ranging from the urban to the peripheral, we conclude that there is a strong spatial distinction of educational structures with an urban bias, and that educational categories other than academic human capital can make an important contribution to our understanding of what drives employment growth......Contemporary studies in urban and regional development stress the importance of large city-regions as key places in modern capitalism taking the form of agglomerations of economic activities by industries, firms and highly skilled people. In this article, we challenge the strong focus on academic...

  7. Metabolic risk profiles in diabetes stratified according to age at onset, islet autoimmunity and fasting C-peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wod, Mette; Yderstræde, Knud B; Halekoh, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Islet autoimmunity, age at onset and time to insulin treatment are often used to define subgroups of diabetes. However, the latter criterion is not clinical useful. Here, we examined whether an unbiased stratification of diabetes according to age at onset, fasting C-peptide and GAD......, fasting C-peptide above or below 300 pmol/l (CPEPhigh or CPEPlow), and presence or absence of GADab (GADpos or GADneg). HbA1c, BMI, blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatinine were evaluated. RESULTS: GADab were present in 13% of the cohort. Age at onset...... as GADposCPEPhigh; n=327) and patients with type 2 diabetes (GADnegCPEPhigh; n=3,544). Patients with LADA defined an intermediate group with higher HbA1c but otherwise lower cardiometabolic risk than patients with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that fasting C-peptide and GADab status...

  8. Bisphenol A levels in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Kunugita, Naoki; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Foureman, Gary L; Morita, Masatoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    The estrogenic effects of bisphenol A (BPA) have been reported in human cells (E-screen assays) and in (italic)in vivo(/italic) studies of rodents, although the latter reports remain controversial, as do the exposure levels and adverse health effects of BPA in humans. In this study we report on an analytical high-performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence method for BPA and its conjugate in human urine and on the application of this method in two student cohorts. Urine, along with information on smoking, alcohol intake, and coffee/tea consumption, was collected in two different years from two different groups of university students, 50 in 1992 and 56 in 1999. Overall, the urinary BPA levels in the students in 1992 were significantly higher than were those in 1999. The BPA levels were also positively correlated with coffee and tea consumption in the 1992 cohort but not in the 1999 cohort. We speculate that recent changes made in Japan regarding the interior coating of cans used to package these beverages may partly explain these findings. PMID:12515686

  9. A dietary pattern that is associated with C-peptide and risk of colorectal cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Schulze, Matthias; Pollak, Michael; Wu, Tianying; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-06-01

    Higher serum C-peptide concentrations have shown to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, we used diet information to identify food groups that correlated with fasting serum concentrations of C-peptide and assess the association of this dietary pattern and CRC risk. Major food contributors to fasting C-peptide concentrations were identified with stepwise linear regression in a subsample (n = 833) of women from a large cohort. We then summed the consumption frequency of the major food contributors to form a C-peptide dietary pattern for the entire cohort (n = 66,714). Risk for CRC was computed using Cox proportional hazard model with the C-peptide dietary pattern score as the predictor. In up to 20 years of follow-up, we ascertained 985 cases of CRC and 758 colon cancer. After adjusting for confounders, the C-peptide dietary pattern, characterized by higher meat, fish, and sweetened beverage intake, but lower coffee, high fat dairy, and whole grains intake, showed direct association with CRC risk (RR comparing extreme quintiles = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.58, p trend = 0.048). The same comparison was slightly stronger for colon cancer (RR = 1.35, 95 % CI = 1.07-1.70, p trend = 0.009). In stratified analysis, there was no association between the C-peptide dietary pattern and colon cancer among lean and active women. However, for overweight or sedentary women, RR for the same comparison was 1.58 (95 % CI = 1.20-2.07, p trend = 0.002) (p for interaction = 0.007). We derived a dietary pattern that correlated with C-peptide concentrations. This pattern was associated with an increase in colon cancer, especially among women who were overweight or sedentary.

  10. Elevations in the Fasting Serum Proinsulin–to–C-Peptide Ratio Precede the Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Emily K.; Chaudhry, Zunaira; Watkins, Renecia; Syed, Farooq; Blum, Janice; Ouyang, Fangqian; Perkins, Susan M.; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Sosenko, Jay; DiMeglio, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether an elevation in the serum proinsulin–to–C-peptide ratio (PI:C), a biomarker of β-cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, was associated with progression to type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fasting total PI and C levels were measured in banked serum samples obtained from TrialNet Pathway to Prevention (PTP) participants, a cohort of autoantibody-positive relatives without diabetes of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Samples were obtained ∼12 months before diabetes onset from PTP progressors in whom diabetes developed (n = 60), and were compared with age-, sex-, and BMI-matched nonprogressors who remained normoglycemic (n = 58). PI:C ratios were calculated as molar ratios and were multiplied by 100% to obtain PI levels as a percentage of C levels. RESULTS Although absolute PI levels did not differ between groups, PI:C ratios were significantly increased in antibody-positive subjects in whom there was progression to diabetes compared with nonprogressors (median 1.81% vs. 1.17%, P = 0.03). The difference between groups was most pronounced in subjects who were ≤10 years old, where the median progressor PI:C ratio was nearly triple that of nonprogressors; 90.0% of subjects in this age group within the upper PI:C quartile progressed to the development of diabetes. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age and BMI, demonstrated increased odds of progression for higher natural log PI:C ratio values (odds ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.02, 2.05). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that β-cell ER dysfunction precedes type 1 diabetes onset, especially in younger children. Elevations in the serum PI:C ratio may have utility in predicting the onset of type 1 diabetes in the presymptomatic phase. PMID:27385327

  11. Elevations in the Fasting Serum Proinsulin-to-C-Peptide Ratio Precede the Onset of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Emily K; Chaudhry, Zunaira; Watkins, Renecia; Syed, Farooq; Blum, Janice; Ouyang, Fangqian; Perkins, Susan M; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Sosenko, Jay; DiMeglio, Linda A; Evans-Molina, Carmella

    2016-09-01

    We tested whether an elevation in the serum proinsulin-to-C-peptide ratio (PI:C), a biomarker of β-cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, was associated with progression to type 1 diabetes. Fasting total PI and C levels were measured in banked serum samples obtained from TrialNet Pathway to Prevention (PTP) participants, a cohort of autoantibody-positive relatives without diabetes of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Samples were obtained ∼12 months before diabetes onset from PTP progressors in whom diabetes developed (n = 60), and were compared with age-, sex-, and BMI-matched nonprogressors who remained normoglycemic (n = 58). PI:C ratios were calculated as molar ratios and were multiplied by 100% to obtain PI levels as a percentage of C levels. Although absolute PI levels did not differ between groups, PI:C ratios were significantly increased in antibody-positive subjects in whom there was progression to diabetes compared with nonprogressors (median 1.81% vs. 1.17%, P = 0.03). The difference between groups was most pronounced in subjects who were ≤10 years old, where the median progressor PI:C ratio was nearly triple that of nonprogressors; 90.0% of subjects in this age group within the upper PI:C quartile progressed to the development of diabetes. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age and BMI, demonstrated increased odds of progression for higher natural log PI:C ratio values (odds ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.02, 2.05). These data suggest that β-cell ER dysfunction precedes type 1 diabetes onset, especially in younger children. Elevations in the serum PI:C ratio may have utility in predicting the onset of type 1 diabetes in the presymptomatic phase. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. Nature of the Charged-Group Effect on the Stability of the C-Peptide Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kevin R.; Kim, Peter S.; Brems, David N.; Marqusee, Susan; York, Eunice J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Stewart, John M.; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1985-04-01

    The residues responsible for the pH-dependent stability of the helix formed by the isolated C-peptide (residues 1-13 of ribonuclease A) have been identified by chemical synthesis of analogues and measurement of their helix-forming properties. Each of the residues ionizing between pH 2 and pH 8 has been replaced separately by an uncharged residue. Protonation of Glu-2- is responsible for the sharp decrease in helix stability between pH 5 and pH 2, and deprotonation of His-12+ causes a similar decrease between pH 5 and pH 8. Glu-9- is not needed for helix stability. The results cannot be explained by the Zimm-Bragg model and host-guest data for α -helix formation, which predict that the stability of the C-peptide helix should increase when Glu-2- is protonated or when His-12+ is deprotonated. Moreover, histidine+ is a strong helix-breaker in host-guest studies. In proteins, acidic and basic residues tend to occur at opposite ends of α -helices: acidic residues occur preferentially near the NH2-terminal end and basic residues near the COOH-terminal end. A possible explanation, based on a helix dipole model, has been given [Blagdon, D. E. & Goodman, M. (1975) Biopolymers 14, 241-245]. Our results are consistent with the helix dipole model and they support the suggestion that the distribution of charged residues in protein helices reflects the helix-stabilizing propensity of those residues. Because Glu-9 is not needed for helix stability, a possible Glu-9-\\cdots His-12+ salt bridge does not contribute significantly to helix stability. The role of a possible Glu-2-\\cdots Arg-10+ salt bridge has not yet been evaluated. A charged-group effect on α -helix stability in water has also been observed in a different peptide system [Ihara, S., Ooi, T. & Takahashi, S. (1982) Biopolymers 21, 131-145]: block copolymers containing (Ala)20 and (Glu)20 show partial helix formation at low temperatures, pH 7.5, where the glutamic acid residues are ionized. (Glu)20(Ala)20Phe forms a

  13. C-Peptide, Baseline and Postprandial Insulin Resistance after a Carbohydrate-Rich Test Meal - Evidence for an Increased Insulin Clearance in PCOS Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassek, J; Erdmann, J; Ohnolz, F; Berg, F D; Kiechle, M; Seifert-Klauss, V

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Known characteristics of patients with PCOS include infertility, menstrual disorders, hirsutism and also often insulin resistance. These symptoms increase with increasing body weight. In the LIPCOS study ( L ifestyle I ntervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [ PCOS ]) long-term changes of the PCOS in dependence on pregnancy and parenthood were systematically assessed. In the framework of the LIPCOS study, PCOS patients were given a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal in order to examine glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The results were compared with those of a eumenorrhoeic control group who all had corresponding BMI values and corresponding ages. Methods and Patients 41 PCOS patients (without diabetes) and 68 controls received a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal (260 kcal, 62 % carbohydrates, 32 % fat, 6 % proteins) in order to generate a submaximal insulin and glucose stimulation. The values were determined at baseline and postprandial after 60, 120 and 180 minutes. In addition, the corresponding C-peptide levels were recorded. Results In the PCOS patients (n = 41), the insulin secretion test after a standardised test meal showed almost identical baseline and postprandial insulin levels when compared with those of the age- and BMI-matched eumenorrhoeic controls (n = 68). In the PCOS patients, the baseline and postprandial glucose levels were significantly elevated (92.88 ± 10.28 [PCOS] vs. 85.07 ± 9.42 mg/dL [controls]; p PCOS patients formally exhibit a higher fasting insulin resistance than controls. In spite of the higher stimulated C-peptide levels, the insulin levels did not increase more strongly with increasing glucose levels than in controls which may be indicative of a higher insulin clearance in PCOS patients.

  14. Investigation of relationship between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitusF%探究血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范进绵; 高俊泽

    2015-01-01

    目的:对血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)的关系进行分析与探讨。方法120例2型糖尿病患者,根据患者病情将其分为三组,即:无糖尿病视网膜病变(NDR)组40例,非增殖性糖尿病视网膜病变(NPDR)组42例,增殖性糖尿病视网膜病变(PDR)组38例。以电化学发光法对所有患者空腹血清C肽进行测定。结果三组患者空腹血清C肽水平均呈现下降趋势,三组比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。血清C肽与2型糖尿病视网膜病变程度呈负相关。结论研究表明,在2型糖尿病视网膜病变中,血清C肽含量会由于病变程度的加深而逐渐降低,血清C肽水平是2型糖尿病视网膜病变进展的重要标志。%ObjectiveTo analyze and investigate the relationship between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsA total of 120 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were divided by their illness condition into three groups, as non diabetic retinopathy (NDR) group with 40 cases, non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group with 42 cases, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) group with 38 cases. Electrochemiluminescence method was applied for detection of serum C-peptide in all patients.ResultsAll the three groups had decreased levels of fasting serum C-peptide, and the difference had statistical significance across the three groups (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between serum C-peptide and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.ConclusionThis study shows the content of serum C-peptide will decrease along with the development of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, therefore, serum C-peptide acts as an important indicator for progression of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Fall in C-Peptide During First 4 Years From Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: Variable Relation to Age, HbA1c, and Insulin Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei; Gitelman, Steven; DiMeglio, Linda A; Boulware, David; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to describe the natural history of residual insulin secretion in Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet participants over 4 years from diagnosis and relate this to previously reported alternative clinical measures reflecting β-cell secretory function. Data from 407 subjects from 5 TrialNet intervention studies were analyzed. All subjects had baseline stimulated C-peptide values of ≥0.2 nmol/L from mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs). During semiannual visits, C-peptide values from MMTTs, HbA1c, and insulin doses were obtained. The percentage of individuals with stimulated C-peptide of ≥0.2 nmol/L or detectable C-peptide of ≥0.017 nmol/L continued to diminish over 4 years; this was markedly influenced by age. At 4 years, only 5% maintained their baseline C-peptide secretion. The expected inverse relationships between C-peptide and HbA1c or insulin doses varied over time and with age. Combined clinical variables, such as insulin-dose adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1C) and the relationship of IDAA1C to C-peptide, also were influenced by age and time from diagnosis. Models using these clinical measures did not fully predict C-peptide responses. IDAA1C ≤9 underestimated the number of individuals with stimulated C-peptide ≥0.2 nmol/L, especially in children. Current trials of disease-modifying therapy for type 1 diabetes should continue to use C-peptide as a primary end point of β-cell secretory function. Longer duration of follow-up is likely to provide stronger evidence of the effect of disease-modifying therapy on preservation of β-cell function. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Postprandial C-Peptide to Glucose Ratio as a Marker of β Cell Function: Implication for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide is secreted from pancreatic β cells at an equimolar ratio to insulin. Since, in contrast to insulin, C-peptide is not extracted by the liver and other organs, C-peptide reflects endogenous insulin secretion more accurately than insulin. C-peptide is therefore used as a marker of β cell function. C-peptide has been mainly used to assess the presence of an insulin-dependent state for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. However, recent studies have revealed that β cell dysfunction is also a core deficit of type 2 diabetes, and residual β cell function is a key factor in achieving optimal glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the role of C-peptide, especially the postprandial C-peptide to glucose ratio which likely better reflects maximum β cell secretory capacity compared with the fasting ratio in assessing β cell function, and discusses perspectives on its clinical utility for managing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Bioactive antibiotic levels in the human aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, D; Richards, G; Brown, R A; Mulder, D S

    1982-12-01

    A new bioassay was used to determine the level of active antibiotic within the aortic wall in 24 patients undergoing elective aortic surgery involving prosthetic grafts. The patients were divided into three groups and received either cefazolin, clindamycin, or cefoxitin intravenously at the induction of general anesthesia. Cefazolin and cefoxitin attained satisfactory tissue levels. Clindamycin did not reach therapeutic levels in the aortic wall. Blood levels did not correlate well with tissue levels.

  18. Fall in C-peptide during first 2 years from diagnosis: evidence of at least two distinct phases from composite Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Carla J; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David; Gitelman, Stephen E; Gottlieb, Peter A; Herold, Kevan C; Lachin, John M; McGee, Paula; Palmer, Jerry P; Pescovitz, Mark D; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Skyler, Jay S; Sosenko, Jay M

    2012-08-01

    Interpretation of clinical trials to alter the decline in β-cell function after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes depends on a robust understanding of the natural history of disease. Combining data from the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet studies, we describe the natural history of β-cell function from shortly after diagnosis through 2 years post study randomization, assess the degree of variability between patients, and investigate factors that may be related to C-peptide preservation or loss. We found that 93% of individuals have detectable C-peptide 2 years from diagnosis. In 11% of subjects, there was no significant fall from baseline by 2 years. There was a biphasic decline in C-peptide; the C-peptide slope was -0.0245 pmol/mL/month (95% CI -0.0271 to -0.0215) through the first 12 months and -0.0079 (-0.0113 to -0.0050) from 12 to 24 months (P < 0.001). This pattern of fall in C-peptide over time has implications for understanding trial results in which effects of therapy are most pronounced early and raises the possibility that there are time-dependent differences in pathophysiology. The robust data on the C-peptide obtained under clinical trial conditions should be used in planning and interpretation of clinical trials.

  19. The role of insulin C-peptide in the coevolution analyses of the insulin signaling pathway: a hint for its functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available As the linker between the A chain and B chain of proinsulin, C-peptide displays high variability in length and amino acid composition, and has been considered as an inert byproduct of insulin synthesis and processing for many years. Recent studies have suggested that C-peptide can act as a bioactive hormone, exerting various biological effects on the pathophysiology and treatment of diabetes. In this study, we analyzed the coevolution of insulin molecules among vertebrates, aiming at exploring the evolutionary characteristics of insulin molecule, especially the C-peptide. We also calculated the correlations of evolutionary rates between the insulin and the insulin receptor (IR sequences as well as the domain-domain pairs of the ligand and receptor by the mirrortree method. The results revealed distinctive features of C-peptide in insulin intramolecular coevolution and correlated residue substitutions, which partly supported the idea that C-peptide can act as a bioactive hormone, with significant sequence features, as well as a linker assisting the formation of mature insulin during synthesis. Interestingly, the evolution of C-peptide exerted the highest correlation with that of the insulin receptor and its ligand binding domain (LBD, implying a potential relationship with the insulin signaling pathway.

  20. The influence of body mass index and age on C-peptide at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children who participated in the diabetes prevention trial-type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosenko, Jay M; Geyer, Susan; Skyler, Jay S; Rafkin, Lisa E; Ismail, Heba M; Libman, Ingrid M; Liu, Yuk-Fun; DiMeglio, Linda A; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Palmer, Jerry P

    2018-05-01

    The extent of influence of BMI and age on C-peptide at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is unknown. We thus studied the impact of body mass index Z-scores (BMIZ) and age on C-peptide measures at and soon after the diagnosis of T1D. Data from Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) participants C-peptide measures with BMIZ and age in 2 cohorts: oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at diagnosis (n = 99) and mixed meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) C-peptide from OGTTs (n = 99) at diagnosis and MMTTs (n = 80) after diagnosis were positively associated with BMIZ and age (P C-peptide measures. In an example, 2 individuals with identical AUC C-peptide values had an approximate 5-fold difference in values after adjustments for BMIZ and age. The association between fasting glucose and C-peptide decreased markedly when fasting C-peptide values were adjusted (r = 0.30, P C-peptide measures are strongly and independently related to BMIZ and age at and soon after the diagnosis of T1D. Adjustments for BMIZ and age cause substantial changes in C-peptide values, and impact the association between glycemia and C-peptide. Such adjustments can improve assessments of β-cell impairment at diagnosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Short-term glucagon stimulation test of C-peptide effect on glucose utilization in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojto, Viliam; Rausova, Zuzana; Chrenova, Jana; Dedik, Ladislav

    2015-12-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the use of a four-point glucagon stimulation test of C-peptide effect on glucose utilization in type 1 diabetic patients using a new mathematical model. A group of 32 type 1 diabetic patients and a group of 10 healthy control subjects underwent a four-point glucagon stimulation test with blood sampling at 0, 6, 15 and 30 min after 1 mg glucagon bolus intravenous administration. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of C-peptide effect on glucose utilization versus area under curve (AUC) were used. A two-sample t test and ANOVA with Bonferroni correction were used to test the significance of differences between parameters. A significant difference between control and patient groups regarding the coefficient of whole-body glucose utilization and AUC C-peptide/AUC glucose ratio (p ≪ 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively) was observed. The high correlation (r = 0.97) between modeled coefficient of whole-body glucose utilization and numerically calculated AUC C-peptide/AUC glucose ratio related to entire cohort indicated the stability of used method. The short-term four-point glucagon stimulation test allows the numerically calculated AUC C-peptide/AUC glucose ratio and/or the coefficient of whole-body glucose utilization calculated from model to be used to diagnostically identify type 1 diabetic patients.

  2. Different level of population differentiation among human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the colonization of the world, after dispersal out of African, modern humans encountered changeable environments and substantial phenotypic variations that involve diverse behaviors, lifestyles and cultures, were generated among the different modern human populations. Results Here, we study the level of population differentiation among different populations of human genes. Intriguingly, genes involved in osteoblast development were identified as being enriched with higher FST SNPs, a result consistent with the proposed role of the skeletal system in accounting for variation among human populations. Genes involved in the development of hair follicles, where hair is produced, were also found to have higher levels of population differentiation, consistent with hair morphology being a distinctive trait among human populations. Other genes that showed higher levels of population differentiation include those involved in pigmentation, spermatid, nervous system and organ development, and some metabolic pathways, but few involved with the immune system. Disease-related genes demonstrate excessive SNPs with lower levels of population differentiation, probably due to purifying selection. Surprisingly, we find that Mendelian-disease genes appear to have a significant excessive of SNPs with high levels of population differentiation, possibly because the incidence and susceptibility of these diseases show differences among populations. As expected, microRNA regulated genes show lower levels of population differentiation due to purifying selection. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates different level of population differentiation among human populations for different gene groups.

  3. Different level of population differentiation among human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-14

    During the colonization of the world, after dispersal out of African, modern humans encountered changeable environments and substantial phenotypic variations that involve diverse behaviors, lifestyles and cultures, were generated among the different modern human populations. Here, we study the level of population differentiation among different populations of human genes. Intriguingly, genes involved in osteoblast development were identified as being enriched with higher FST SNPs, a result consistent with the proposed role of the skeletal system in accounting for variation among human populations. Genes involved in the development of hair follicles, where hair is produced, were also found to have higher levels of population differentiation, consistent with hair morphology being a distinctive trait among human populations. Other genes that showed higher levels of population differentiation include those involved in pigmentation, spermatid, nervous system and organ development, and some metabolic pathways, but few involved with the immune system. Disease-related genes demonstrate excessive SNPs with lower levels of population differentiation, probably due to purifying selection. Surprisingly, we find that Mendelian-disease genes appear to have a significant excessive of SNPs with high levels of population differentiation, possibly because the incidence and susceptibility of these diseases show differences among populations. As expected, microRNA regulated genes show lower levels of population differentiation due to purifying selection. Our analysis demonstrates different level of population differentiation among human populations for different gene groups.

  4. Improvement of C peptide zero BMI 24-34 diabetic patients after tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciacaballero, M; Martínez-Moreno, J M; Toval, J A; Miralles, F; Mínguez, A; Osorio, D; Mata, J M; Reyes-Ortiz, A

    2013-03-01

    Although bariatric surgery proved to be a very effective method in the treatment of patients in whose pancreas still produce insulin (type 2 diabetes), the accompanied metabolic syndrome and their diabetes complications, there is no information on the effect of this type of surgery in BMI24-34 patients when pancreas do not produce insulin at all (type 1, LADA and long term evolution type 2 diabetes among others). We report preliminary data of a serie of 11 patients all with a C-peptide values below 0.0 ng/ml. They were followed for 6 to 60 months (mean 19 months) after surgery. We studied the changes in glycemic control, evolution of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications after one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA). All values relative to glycemic control were improved HbA1c (from 8.9 ± 0.6 to 6.7 ± 0.2%), FPG (Fasting Plasma Glucose) [from 222.36 ± 16.87 to 94 ± 5 (mg/dl)] as well as the daily insulin requirement of rapid (from 40.6 ± 12.8 to 0 (U/d) and long-lasting insulin (from 41.27 ± 7.3 U/day to 15.2 ± 3.3 U/day). It resolved 100% of the metabolic syndrome diseases as well as severe hypoglycaemia episodes present before surgery and improved some serious complications from diabetes like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, peripheral vasculopathy and cardiopathy. Tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass in BMI 24-34 C peptide zero diabetic patients eliminated the use of rapid insulin, reduced to only one injection per day long-lasting insulin and improved the glycemic control. After surgery disappear metabolic syndrome and severe hypoglycaemia episodes and improves significantly retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, peripheral vasculopathy and cardiopathy. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma amino acid profiles are associated with insulin, C-peptide and adiponectin levels in type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, H; Jinzu, H; Nagao, K; Noguchi, Y; Shimba, N; Miyano, H; Watanabe, T; Iseki, K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plasma-free amino acid (PFAA) profiles have been associated with a future risk of developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease in nondiabetic subjects. These PFAA alterations might predominantly result from the metabolic shift caused by insulin resistance and visceral fat deposition. The variety of PFAA profiles within diabetic subjects is not well researched. In this study, we focused on type 2 diabetic subjects and examined the association between PFAA profiles and insulin- and...

  6. Skim Milk, Whey, and Casein Increase Body Weight and Whey and Casein Increase the Plasma C-Peptide Concentration in Overweight Adolescents12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer

    2012-01-01

    insulin, and insulin secretion estimated as the plasma C-peptide concentration in overweight adolescents. Overweight adolescents (n = 203) aged 12–15 y with a BMI of 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m2 (mean ± SD) were randomized to 1 L/d of skim milk, whey, casein, or water for 12 wk. All milk drinks contained 35 g protein....... Outcomes were BMI-for-age Z-scores (BAZs), waist circumference, plasma insulin, homeostatic model assessment, and plasma C-peptide. We found no change in BAZ in the pretest control and water groups, whereas it was greater at 12 wk in the skim milk, whey, and casein groups compared with baseline...... and with the water and pretest control groups. The plasma C-peptide concentration increased from baseline to wk 12 in the whey and casein groups and increments were greater than in the pretest control (P

  7. Study on the relationship between changes of serum true insulin (Tl) C-peptide, GAD-Ab, INS-Ab contents and age, course of disease, degree of obesity in patients with DM2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Wang Zizheng; Cao Jiwei; Wu Jindan; Tao Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum TI, C-peptide, GAD-Ab and INS-Ab in different groups of patients with DM2 (age,course of disease and degree of obesity). Methods: Serum C-peptide(with CLIA), INS-Ab(with RIA) and TI, GAD-Ab(with ELISA) contents were measured in altogether 428 patients with DM2. Relationship between changes of the above parameters and different groups of patients was studide in accordance with age, course of disease and degree of obesity respectively. Results: 1)Relationship among different age groups:(below 50, n=86, 51-70, n=216, over 71 n=126). The serum levels of the 4 parameters were significantly higher in all age group than those in the controls(n=40). Among the various age groups, the levels of all parameters were significantly lower in age group below 50 than the levels,in the other 2 groups with the only exception of INS-Ab, which was not significantly different from that in age group 51-70.The levels were significantly different between age-group 51-70 and age groups over 70, with the only exception of GAD-Ab, which was about the same in the two age-groups. 2)Relationship between changes of serum levels and course of disease(below 5yrs n=157, 6-10yrs n=168,over 1yrs,n=103). The serum levels in patients with disease less than 5years were significantly lower than those in other groups with the exception of GAD-Ab, which was not significantly different from that in patients with disease 6-10 years. 3) Relationship among different degree of obesity(non-obese, BMI BMI≥25, n=202, super-obese BMI≥32 n=50): The serum levels of all the parameters were significantly lower in the non-obese subjects than those in the other two groups.The levels in the super-obese group were also significantly higher than those in the obese group (P<0.01, P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum levels of the 4 parameters (TI, C-peptide, GAD-Ab, INS-Ab)were significantly increased in patients with DM2, especially in the older patients with prolonged course of disease as

  8. Responses to Human Bioeffluents at Levels Recommended by Ventilation Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether exposure to human bioeffluents, at the levels recommended by the current ventilation standards, would cause any effects on humans. Ten subjects were exposed in a low-emission stainless-steel climate chamber for 4.25 hours. The outdoor air supply rate...... was set to 33 or 4 l/s per person, creating two levels of bioeffluents with carbon dioxide (CO2) at 500 or 1600 ppm. Subjective ratings were collected, cognitive performance was examined and physiological responses were monitored. The results show that exposures to human bioeffluents at ventilation rate...

  9. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R B; SegersNolten, IGMJ; DeGrauw, K J; Sijtsema, N M; VanderMaas, L; Greve, J; Otto, C; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called ''Gall bodies''. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to

  10. Insulin secretion and glucose uptake by isolated islets of the hamster. Effect of insulin, proinsulin and C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J C; McLaughlin, W J; Walsh, M F.J.; Foa, P P [Sinai Hospital of Detroit, Mich. (USA). Dept. of Research

    1976-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic islets of normal hamsters were perfused either in a closed or in a open system. When the buffer was recirculated and the endogenous insulin was allowed to accumulate, the islets secreted significantly less insulin than when the system was open and the endogenous insulin was washed away. The addition of monocomponent insulin or of proinsulin to the perfusion buffer significantly decreased insulin secretion. The inhibitory action of proinsulin was significantly greater than that of monocomponent insulin. C peptide had no effect. When pancreatic islets were incubated in a fixed volume of stationary buffer containing unlabeled glucose (1.0 mg or 3.0 mg/ml) and glucose-U-/sup 14/C (1.0 ..mu..C/ml), the amount of insulin secreted and the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ produced by each islet decreased progressively as the number of islets in the sample increased. Under these conditions, the concentration of insulin required to inhibit insulin secretion increased with the concentration of glucose in the medium. Proinsulin did not alter the incorporation of leucine-4.5-/sup 3/H into total extractable insulin (insulin + proinsulin). Thus, insulin and proinsulin appear to inhibit insulin release, but not insulin synthesis.

  11. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed

  12. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insulin injections or an insulin pump; when your health practitioner suspects that you have insulin resistance ; when you have documented ... Preparation Needed? Fasting for 8 to 10 hours before blood testing ...

  13. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halton, D.M.; Dranitsaris, P.; Baynes, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    A literature review was conducted of the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF) with emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF. The data and findings of the relevant references were summarized under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure and industrial exposure. These were critically reviewed and then lethal concentration-time relationships were developed for humans, corresponding to LCsub(LO), LCsub(10) and LCsub(50) levels. The effects of age, health and other physiological variables on the sensitivity to HF were discussed, as well as antagonistic and synergistic effects with other substances

  14. Maximal sustained levels of energy expenditure in humans during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jamie A; Nguyen, David D; Ruby, Brent C; Schoeller, Dale A

    2011-12-01

    Migrating birds have been able to sustain an energy expenditure (EE) that is five times their basal metabolic rate. Although humans can readily reach these levels, it is not yet clear what levels can be sustained for several days. The study's purposes were 1) to determine the upper limits of human EE and whether or not those levels can be sustained without inducing catabolism of body tissues and 2) to determine whether initial body weight is related to the levels that can be sustained. We compiled data on documented EE as measured by doubly labeled water during high levels of physical activity (minimum of five consecutive days). We calculated the physical activity level (PAL) of each individual studied (PAL = total EE / basal metabolic rate) from the published data. Correlations were run to examine the relationship between initial body weight and body weight lost with both total EE and PAL. The uppermost limit of EE was a peak PAL of 6.94 that was sustained for 10 consecutive days of a 95-d race. Only two studies reported PALs above 5.0; however, significant decreases in body mass were found in each study (0.45-1.39 kg·wk(-1) of weight loss). To test whether initial weight affects the ability to sustain high PALs, we found a significant positive correlation between TEE and initial body weight (r = 0.46, P body weight (r = 0.27, not statistically significant). Some elite humans are able to sustain PALs above 5.0 for a minimum of 10 d. Although significant decreases in body weight occur at this level, catabolism of body tissue may be preventable in situations with proper energy intake. Further, initial body weight does not seem to affect the sustainability of PALs.

  15. Do glutathione levels decline in aging human brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Fitzmaurice, Paul S; Moszczynska, Anna; Mattina, Katie; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Sailasuta, Napapon; Kish, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    For the past 60 years a major theory of "aging" is that age-related damage is largely caused by excessive uncompensated oxidative stress. The ubiquitous tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant defense mechanism against reactive free radicals and has also served as a marker of changes in oxidative stress. Some (albeit conflicting) animal data suggest a loss of glutathione in brain senescence, which might compromise the ability of the aging brain to meet the demands of oxidative stress. Our objective was to establish whether advancing age is associated with glutathione deficiency in human brain. We measured reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in multiple regions of autopsied brain of normal subjects (n=74) aged one day to 99 years. Brain GSH levels during the infancy/teenage years were generally similar to those in the oldest examined adult group (76-99 years). During adulthood (23-99 years) GSH levels remained either stable (occipital cortex) or increased (caudate nucleus, frontal and cerebellar cortices). To the extent that GSH levels represent glutathione antioxidant capacity, our postmortem data suggest that human brain aging is not associated with declining glutathione status. We suggest that aged healthy human brains can maintain antioxidant capacity related to glutathione and that an age-related increase in GSH levels in some brain regions might possibly be a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. Since our findings, although suggestive, suffer from the generic limitations of all postmortem brain studies, we also suggest the need for "replication" investigations employing the new (1)H MRS imaging procedures in living human brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in development of viable glucose-responsive pancreatic endocrine tissue. Athymic nude rats were implanted with PE derived from hESC either via implantation into the epididymal fat pads or by subcutaneous implantation into TheraCyte encapsulation devices for 20 wk. Blood glucose, weight, and human insulin/C-peptide secretion were monitored by weekly blood draws. Graft β-cell function was assessed by a glucose tolerance test, and graft morphology was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. At 20 wk postimplantation, epididymal fat-implanted PE progressed to develop islet-like structures in 50% of implants, with a mean β-cell fractional area of 0.8 ± 0.3%. Human C-peptide and insulin were detectable, but at very low levels (C-peptide = 50 ± 26 pmol/l and insulin = 15 ± 7 pmol/l); however, there was no increase in human C-peptide/insulin levels after glucose challenge. There was no development of viable pancreatic tissue or meaningful secretory function when human PE was implanted in the TheraCyte encapsulation devices. These data confirm that islet-like structures develop from hESC differentiated to PE by the protocol developed by NovoCell. However, the extent of endocrine cell formation and secretory function is not yet sufficient to be clinically relevant.

  17. Home urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Rachel E J; Shields, Beverley M; Hammersley, Suzanne E; Colclough, Kevin; McDonald, Timothy J; Gray, Zoe; Heywood, James J N; Barrett, Timothy G; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2013-05-01

    Making the correct diabetes diagnosis in children is crucial for lifelong management. Type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are seen in the pediatric setting, and can be difficult to discriminate from type 1 diabetes. Postprandial urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) is a non-invasive measure of endogenous insulin secretion that has not been tested as a diagnostic tool in children or in patients with diabetes duration MODY and type 2 in pediatric diabetes. Two-hour postprandial UCPCR was measured in 264 patients aged MODY, n = 63). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to identify the optimal UCPCR cutoff for discriminating diabetes subtypes. UCPCR was lower in type 1 diabetes [0.05 (MODY [3.51 (2.37-5.32) nmol/mmol, p MODY (p = 0.25), so patients were combined for subsequent analyses. After 2-yr duration, UCPCR ≥ 0.7 nmol/mmol has 100% sensitivity [95% confidence interval (CI): 92-100] and 97% specificity (95% CI: 91-99) for identifying non-type 1 (MODY + type 2 diabetes) from type 1 diabetes [area under the curve (AUC) 0.997]. UCPCR was poor at discriminating MODY from type 2 diabetes (AUC 0.57). UCPCR testing can be used in diabetes duration greater than 2 yr to identify pediatric patients with non-type 1 diabetes. UCPCR testing is a practical non-invasive method for use in the pediatric outpatient setting. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Nutritional factors and preservation of C-peptide in youth with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes: SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J; Dabelea, Dana; Crandell, Jamie L; Crume, Tessa; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Dolan, Lawrence; King, Irena B; Lawrence, Jean M; Norris, Jill M; Pihoker, Catherine; The, Natalie

    2013-07-01

    To test the novel hypothesis that nutritional factors previously associated with type 1 diabetes etiology or with insulin secretion are prospectively associated with fasting C-peptide (FCP) concentration among youth recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Included were 1,316 youth with autoantibody-positive type 1 diabetes who participated in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (baseline disease duration, 9.9 months; SD, 6.3). Nutritional exposures included breastfeeding and age at introduction of complementary foods, baseline plasma long-chain omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), vitamin D, vitamin E, and, from a baseline food frequency questionnaire, estimated intake of the branched-chain amino acid leucine and total carbohydrate. Multiple linear regression models were conducted to relate each nutritional factor to baseline FCP adjusted for demographics, disease-related factors, and other confounders. Prospective analyses included the subset of participants with preserved β-cell function at baseline (baseline FCP ≥0.23 ng/mL) with additional adjustment for baseline FCP and time (mean follow-up, 24.3 months; SD, 8.2; n = 656). FCP concentration was analyzed as log(FCP). In adjusted prospective analyses, baseline EPA (P = 0.02), EPA plus DHA (P = 0.03), and leucine (P = 0.03) were each associated positively and significantly with FCP at follow-up. Vitamin D was unexpectedly inversely associated with FCP (P = 0.002). Increased intake of branched-chain amino acids and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may support preservation of β-cell function. This represents a new direction for research to improve prognosis for type 1 diabetes.

  19. Companion Cognitive Systems: A Step toward Human-Level AI

    OpenAIRE

    Forbus, Kenneth D.; Hinrichs, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing Companion Cognitive Systems, a new kind of software that can be effectively treated as a collaborator. Aside from their potential utility, we believe this effort is important because it focuses on three key problems that must be solved to achieve human-level AI: Robust reasoning and learning, interactivity, and longevity. We describe the ideas we are using to develop the first architecture for Companions: analogical processing, grounded in cognitive science for reasoning and...

  20. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  1. Detection of human influence on sea-level pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Nathan P; Zwiers, Francis W; Weaver, Andrew J; Stott, Peter A

    2003-03-20

    Greenhouse gases and tropospheric sulphate aerosols--the main human influences on climate--have been shown to have had a detectable effect on surface air temperature, the temperature of the free troposphere and stratosphere and ocean temperature. Nevertheless, the question remains as to whether human influence is detectable in any variable other than temperature. Here we detect an influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols in observations of winter sea-level pressure (December to February), using combined simulations from four climate models. We find increases in sea-level pressure over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, southern Europe and North Africa, and decreases in the polar regions and the North Pacific Ocean, in response to human influence. Our analysis also indicates that the climate models substantially underestimate the magnitude of the sea-level pressure response. This discrepancy suggests that the upward trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation index (corresponding to strengthened westerlies in the North Atlantic region), as simulated in a number of global warming scenarios, may be too small, leading to an underestimation of the impacts of anthropogenic climate change on European climate.

  2. Dessert Formulation Using Sucralose and Dextrin Affects Favorably Postprandial Response to Glucose, Insulin, and C-Peptide in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Argyri, Konstantina; Sotiropoulos, Alexios; Psarou, Eirini; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Zampelas, Antonios; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dessert compositions may conform to diabetic diet when it contains low sugar or artificial sweetener to replace sugar. However, it is still questionable whether glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients is improved by the use of diet-conforming dessert compositions. OBJECTIVE: To compare, in type 2 diabetes patients, the glycemic, insulin, and C-peptide responses to seven modified dessert compositions for diabetics (D-dessert) with the response to seven similar desserts of non-...

  3. Effects of ghrelin on circulating neuropeptide Y levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Vittorio; Saccani-Jotti, Gloria; Rubino, Pasquale; Manfredi, Guido; Melani, Andrea; Chiodera, Paolo

    2006-12-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino-acid peptide with a strong GH-releasing activity and a complex role in regulation of appetite, fuel utilization, body weight and composition. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-known stimulator of pathways favouring food intake and energy storage. Recently, studies in rodents suggested a possible mediation of ghrelin action by NPY. In contrast, until now no evidence of ghrelin-NPY interaction in humans has been provided. In the present study, we examined whether ghrelin influences NPY secretion in normal men. Twelve healthy normal men (aged 24-35 years; body mass index (BMI) 22.3+/-0.93 kg/m2) were tested twice at 08.00 AM on two different days, in random order at weekly intervals, after an overnight fast and rest in bed. An intravenous bolus of 1 microg/kg body weight ghrelin (esperimental test) or an equal amount of normal saline (control test) was injected at time 0. Blood was taken before and over 90 minutes after injections, and was used for the measurement of plasma NPY levels. Plasma levels of NPY slightly, but significantly rose in response to ghrelin, with a mean peak level at 15 min after injection, whereas no significant change was observed after saline administration. Our results show a significant enhancement of plasma NPY levels under ghrelin stimulation. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a ghrelin-NPY interaction in humans, which may suggest a possible mediation of ghrelin action by NPY in humans.

  4. Human Value And Soft Skill In Diploma Level Architectural Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sarita Dash

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In todays economic scenario the rising incomes and expectations in the wake of rapid urbanization has created a crying need for creation of value concept in the appropriate climate which will encourage emergence of good human-beings a band of worthy as well as socially responsible professionals and will eventually lead to the creation of a good society. So this paper has been designed to look at the present status of Architectural Education at Diploma level in a dynamic society. To meet the demands of the changing needs of the changing society the future architectural education should address some pertinent issues regarding soft skills which has been discussed in this paper. A little measure has been taken to explain that the innovations and practices in architectural education will impose new demands on the teachers who are mainly responsible for the rectification of the foundation at root level to cultivate the human values as a part of their teachings. The paper has also talked about the outcome of evaluation that necessitates the change in education to express the qualitative significance to human consciousness.

  5. Increased Plasma Levels of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Human Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Yu-Xue; Fu, Dong-Wei; Gao, Qing-Feng; Ge, Feng-Xia; Liu, Wei-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Brucellosis is associated with inflammation and the oxidative stress response. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective stress-responsive enzyme that has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Nevertheless, the role of HO-1 in human brucellosis has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to examine the plasma levels of HO-1 in patients with brucellosis and to evaluate the ability of plasma HO-1 levels as an auxiliary diagnosis, a severity predictor, and a monitor for brucellosis treatments. A total of 75 patients with brucellosis were divided into the acute, subacute, chronic active, and chronic stable groups. An additional 20 volunteers were included as the healthy control group. The plasma HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters were measured in all groups. Furthermore, the plasma levels of HO-1 in the acute group were compared before and after treatment. The plasma HO-1 levels were considerably increased in the acute (4.97 ± 3.55), subacute (4.98 ± 3.23), and chronic active groups (4.43 ± 3.00) with brucellosis compared to the healthy control group (1.03 ± 0.63) (p brucellosis (r = 0.707, p brucellosis status and may be used as a supplementary plasma marker for diagnosing brucellosis and monitoring its treatment.

  6. Chronic inflammation modulates ghrelin levels in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, M; Nogueiras, R; Lago, F; Dieguez, C; Gomez-Reino, J J; Gualillo, O

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether changes in plasma ghrelin, the recently discovered 28-amino acid gastric hormone that regulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and energy homeostasis, occur during inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats. For completeness, ghrelin plasma levels were measured in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. AA was induced in male Lewis rats using Freund's complete adjuvant. Animals were monitored for weight and food intake, every 2 or 3 days, along all time-course experiments. Plasma ghrelin concentrations in 31 RA patients and 18 healthy controls, as well as in rats, were determined by a specific double-antibody radioimmunoassay. Gastric ghrelin mRNA expression was evaluated by northern blot analysis. Human GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 were determined by quantitative chemiluminescence assay. Compared with controls, arthritic rats gained significantly (P Ghrelin plasma levels were significantly lower at day 7 after arthritis induction than in controls (AA 7 = 91.2 +/- 5.6 pg/ml vs controls = 124.75 +/- 5.9 pg/ml), but they recovered to control levels by day 15. RA patients had ghrelin plasma levels significantly lower than healthy controls (RA = 24.54 +/- 2.57 pg/ml vs 39.01 +/- 4.47 pg/ml of healthy controls; P = 0.0041). In AA, there is a compensatory variation of ghrelin levels that relates to body weight adjustments. Recovery of ghrelin levels in the latter stage suggests an adaptive response and may represent a compensatory mechanism under catabolic conditions. In RA patients, chronic imbalance in ghrelin levels suggests that this gastric hormone may participate, together with other factors, in alterations of metabolic status during inflammatory stress.

  7. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  8. Effect of Technological Treatments on Human-Like Leptin Level in Bovine Milk for Human Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Magistrelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, raw milk and commercially available full-cream UHT milk, semi-skimmed UHT milk, skimmed UHT milk, full-cream pasteurized milk, semi-skimmed pasteurized milk and infant formulas for babies between 6 and 12 months of age were analyzed by RIA, with a method using an antibody directed against human leptin and human leptin as reference standard. Raw milk and full-cream UHT milk did not differ for human-like leptin. Leptin content of full-cream pasteurized milk was not different to that of full-cream UHT milk, but it was 14% lower (p < 0.05 than that observed in raw milk. Human-like leptin level of semi-skimmed UHT milk was not different to that of semi-skimmed pasteurized milk, but it was 30% lower (p < 0.0001 than those of full-cream UHT and full-cream pasteurized milks. In skimmed UHT milk, leptin was 40% lower (p < 0.0001 than in full-cream UHT milk. Leptin was correlated (p < 0.001 with lipid content. Leptin level of infant formulas was not different to that of skimmed milks. Results suggest that the heat treatment (pasteurization or UHT is not a modifier of human-like leptin content of edible commercial bovine milks, whereas the skimming process significantly reduces milk leptin level.

  9. Human Development Index and Efficiency level of Social Security Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sepehrdost

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hospitals as one of the main institutions providing health care services play an important role in the health system and allocate a high percentage of health sector's budget to them. This study aimed to answer whether social security hospitals efficiency levels are the same for all provinces in Iran? And whether any relationship exists between the human development indexes (HDI of the provinces and technical efficiency levels of the hospitals?Materials & Methods: Data envelopment analysis model has been used to measure technical efficiency of 65 social security hospitals, including small hospitals (working with lower than one hundred active beds and large hospitals (working with over one hundred active beds during the years 2007 to 2009. Further, the relationship between human development index and technical efficiency of hospitals in the provinces has been analyzed.Results: Results show that the average technical efficiency of small and large hospitals working in low and medium HDI provinces (0.912 and 0.937 are more than the average technical efficiency of hospitals in higher HDI provinces (0.870 and 0.887.Conclusion: It is recommended that social security organization concentrated distribute its hospital services in provinces with lower HDI and higher density of population living under the coverage of organization’s insurance. This will eventually puts its positive effects on per capita income of people, as well as more equitable distribution of income. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:32-38

  10. Lansoprazole enhances the antidiabetic effect of sitagliptin in mice with diet-induced obesity and healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, ShaoJun; Sun, JianHua; Tian, XiKui; Sun, Xu; Zhang, ZhenXing; Gao, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors as adjunctive therapy would improve diabetes control and could enhance the hypoglycaemic activity of DPP-4 inhibitors. The aim of the study was to investigate the short-term effects of lansoprazole (LPZ), sitagliptin (SITA) and their combination therapy on glucose regulation and gut peptide secretion. Glucose and gut peptide were determined and compared after short-term administration of LPZ or SITA, or in combination to mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) and to healthy human subjects (n = 16) in a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) by a crossover design. In DIO mice, LPZ significantly improve glucose metabolism, increase plasma C-peptide and insulin compared with vehicle treatment. Furthermore, the combination of LPZ and SITA improved glucose tolerance additively, with higher plasma insulin and C-peptide levels compared with SITA-treated mice. Similarly, in human in the OGTT, the combination showed significant improvement in glucose-lowering and insulin increase vs SITA-treated group. However, no significant differences in area under curve (AUC) of insulin, glucose and C-peptide between the LPZ-treated group and baseline, except that mean AUCgastrin was significantly increased by LPZ. LPZ and SITA combination therapy appears to have complementary mechanisms of action and additive antidiabetic effect. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Elevated Serum Level of Human Alkaline Phosphatase in Obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. R.; Awan, F. R.; Najam, S. S.; Islam, M.; Siddique, T.; Zain, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase level and body mass index in human subjects. Methods: The comparative cross-sectional study was carried out at the National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faisalabad, Pakistan, from April 2012 to June 2013. Blood serum alkaline phosphatase levels were estimated and the subjects were divided into three sub-groups on the basis of their body mass index: normal weight (<25kg/m2), overweight (25-27kg/m2) and obese (>27kg/m2) subjects. The serum samples were used for the estimation of clinically important biochemical parameters, using commercial kits on clinical chemistry analyser. Results: Of the 197 subjects, 97(49 percent) were obese and 100(51 percent) were non-obese. The serum alkaline phosphatase level increased in obese (214±6.4 IU/L) compared to the non-obese subjects (184.5±5 IU/L). Furthermore, a significant linear relationship (r=0.3;p-0.0001) was found between serum alkaline phosphatase and body mass index. Other biochemical variables were not correlated to the body mass index. Conclusion: Over activity and higher amounts of alkaline phosphatase were linked to the development of obesity. (author)

  12. Effect of Technological Treatments on Human-Like Leptin Level in Bovine Milk for Human Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistrelli, Damiano; Rosi, Fabia

    2014-07-23

    In this experiment, raw milk and commercially available full-cream UHT milk, semi-skimmed UHT milk, skimmed UHT milk, full-cream pasteurized milk, semi-skimmed pasteurized milk and infant formulas for babies between 6 and 12 months of age were analyzed by RIA, with a method using an antibody directed against human leptin and human leptin as reference standard. Raw milk and full-cream UHT milk did not differ for human-like leptin. Leptin content of full-cream pasteurized milk was not different to that of full-cream UHT milk, but it was 14% lower ( p raw milk. Human-like leptin level of semi-skimmed UHT milk was not different to that of semi-skimmed pasteurized milk, but it was 30% lower ( p pasteurized milks. In skimmed UHT milk, leptin was 40% lower ( p milk. Leptin was correlated ( p milks. Results suggest that the heat treatment (pasteurization or UHT) is not a modifier of human-like leptin content of edible commercial bovine milks, whereas the skimming process significantly reduces milk leptin level.

  13. Low level dose induced chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Unstable structural aberrations in chromosomes of human blood lymphocytes cannot be used as biological dosemeters in the low dose range, when extrapolating from high doses using a linear dose response, as required by the original formula of the dual radiation action theory. A survey is given of experimental dose-response curves of chromosome aberrations, obtained in investigations not only by this institute, in cooperation with many other laboratories, but also by various authors in different areas of the world. The results are not compatible with the predicted linear dose relationships at in vivo dose ranges up to 30 mGy.y -1 . The aberration frequencies rise sharply with dose within the normal environmental exposure up to about twice that level. At higher doses, aberration frequencies increase less rapidly and reach a plateau. Some in vitro experiments of various authors with higher doses of low LET radiations, up to about 400 mGy have found dose responses with steps. (author)

  14. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers: human tissue levels and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Udai; Chu, Ih; Ryan, John J; Feeley, Mark

    2004-01-01

    with behavioral alterations in neonatal mice. When considering the outlier value for PBDE-99 at 229 ng/g, this would result in an estimated PBDE-99 body burden of 46 microg/kg, or a MOS of only 9. However, no toxicokinetics data are available for humans, and the actual margin of safety may be much smaller if based on levels in critical target organs or tissues.

  15. Fall in C-Peptide During First 4 Years From Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: Variable Relation to Age, HbA1c, and Insulin Dose

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Wei; Gitelman, Steven; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Boulware, David; Greenbaum, Carla J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We aimed to describe the natural history of residual insulin secretion in Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet participants over 4 years from diagnosis and relate this to previously reported alternative clinical measures reflecting β-cell secretory function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from 407 subjects from 5 TrialNet intervention studies were analyzed. All subjects had baseline stimulated C-peptide values of ≥0.2 nmol/L from mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs). During semiannual visits, C...

  16. Two-step ion-exchange chromatographic purification combined with reversed-phase chromatography to isolate C-peptide for mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabytaev, Kuanysh; Durairaj, Anita; Shin, Dmitriy; Rohlfing, Curt L; Connolly, Shawn; Little, Randie R; Stoyanov, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    A liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry on-line platform that includes the orthogonal techniques of ion exchange and reversed phase chromatography is applied for C-peptide analysis. Additional improvement is achieved by the subsequent application of cation- and anion-exchange purification steps that allow for isolating components that have their isoelectric points in a narrow pH range before final reversed-phase mass spectrometry analysis. The utility of this approach for isolating fractions in the desired "pI window" for profiling complex mixtures is discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Development of SAAP3D force field and the application to replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulation for chignolin and C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Michio; Suzuki, Toshiki; Shoji, Yuya; Dedachi, Kenichi; Shimosato, Taku; Minezaki, Toshiya; Hojo, Hironobu; Onuki, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Single amino acid potential (SAAP) would be a prominent factor to determine peptide conformations. To prove this hypothesis, we previously developed SAAP force field for molecular simulation of polypeptides. In this study, the force field was renovated to SAAP3D force field by applying more accurate three-dimensional main-chain parameters, instead of the original two-dimensional ones, for the amino acids having a long side-chain. To demonstrate effectiveness of the SAAP3D force field, replica-exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulation was performed for two benchmark short peptides, chignolin (H-GYDPETGTWG-OH) and C-peptide (CHO-AETAAAKFLRAHA-NH 2 ). For chignolin, REMC/SAAP3D simulation correctly produced native β-turn structures, whose minimal all-atom root-mean-square deviation value measured from the native NMR structure (except for H) was 1.2 Å, at 300 K in implicit water, along with misfolded β-hairpin structures with unpacked aromatic side chains of Tyr2 and Trp9. Similar results were obtained for chignolin analog [G1Y,G10Y], which folded more tightly to the native β-turn structure than chignolin did. For C-peptide, on the other hand, the α-helix content was larger than the β content on average, suggesting a significant helix-forming propensity. When the imidazole side chain of His12 was protonated (i.e., [His12Hip]), the α content became larger. These observations as well as the representative structures obtained by clustering analysis were in reasonable agreement not only with the structures of C-peptide that were determined in this study by NMR in 30% CD 3 CD in H 2 O at 298 K but also with the experimental and theoretical behaviors having been reported for protonated C-peptide. Thus, accuracy of the SAAP force field was improved by applying three-dimensional main-chain parameters, supporting prominent importance of SAAP for peptide conformations.

  18. Development of SAAP3D force field and the application to replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulation for chignolin and C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Michio; Suzuki, Toshiki; Shoji, Yuya; Dedachi, Kenichi; Shimosato, Taku; Minezaki, Toshiya; Hojo, Hironobu; Onuki, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Single amino acid potential (SAAP) would be a prominent factor to determine peptide conformations. To prove this hypothesis, we previously developed SAAP force field for molecular simulation of polypeptides. In this study, the force field was renovated to SAAP3D force field by applying more accurate three-dimensional main-chain parameters, instead of the original two-dimensional ones, for the amino acids having a long side-chain. To demonstrate effectiveness of the SAAP3D force field, replica-exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulation was performed for two benchmark short peptides, chignolin (H-GYDPETGTWG-OH) and C-peptide (CHO-AETAAAKFLRAHA-NH2). For chignolin, REMC/SAAP3D simulation correctly produced native β-turn structures, whose minimal all-atom root-mean-square deviation value measured from the native NMR structure (except for H) was 1.2 Å, at 300 K in implicit water, along with misfolded β-hairpin structures with unpacked aromatic side chains of Tyr2 and Trp9. Similar results were obtained for chignolin analog [G1Y,G10Y], which folded more tightly to the native β-turn structure than chignolin did. For C-peptide, on the other hand, the α-helix content was larger than the β content on average, suggesting a significant helix-forming propensity. When the imidazole side chain of His12 was protonated (i.e., [His12Hip]), the α content became larger. These observations as well as the representative structures obtained by clustering analysis were in reasonable agreement not only with the structures of C-peptide that were determined in this study by NMR in 30% CD3CD in H2O at 298 K but also with the experimental and theoretical behaviors having been reported for protonated C-peptide. Thus, accuracy of the SAAP force field was improved by applying three-dimensional main-chain parameters, supporting prominent importance of SAAP for peptide conformations.

  19. Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnih, Volodymyr; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Silver, David; Rusu, Andrei A.; Veness, Joel; Bellemare, Marc G.; Graves, Alex; Riedmiller, Martin; Fidjeland, Andreas K.; Ostrovski, Georg; Petersen, Stig; Beattie, Charles; Sadik, Amir; Antonoglou, Ioannis; King, Helen; Kumaran, Dharshan; Wierstra, Daan; Legg, Shane; Hassabis, Demis

    2015-02-01

    The theory of reinforcement learning provides a normative account, deeply rooted in psychological and neuroscientific perspectives on animal behaviour, of how agents may optimize their control of an environment. To use reinforcement learning successfully in situations approaching real-world complexity, however, agents are confronted with a difficult task: they must derive efficient representations of the environment from high-dimensional sensory inputs, and use these to generalize past experience to new situations. Remarkably, humans and other animals seem to solve this problem through a harmonious combination of reinforcement learning and hierarchical sensory processing systems, the former evidenced by a wealth of neural data revealing notable parallels between the phasic signals emitted by dopaminergic neurons and temporal difference reinforcement learning algorithms. While reinforcement learning agents have achieved some successes in a variety of domains, their applicability has previously been limited to domains in which useful features can be handcrafted, or to domains with fully observed, low-dimensional state spaces. Here we use recent advances in training deep neural networks to develop a novel artificial agent, termed a deep Q-network, that can learn successful policies directly from high-dimensional sensory inputs using end-to-end reinforcement learning. We tested this agent on the challenging domain of classic Atari 2600 games. We demonstrate that the deep Q-network agent, receiving only the pixels and the game score as inputs, was able to surpass the performance of all previous algorithms and achieve a level comparable to that of a professional human games tester across a set of 49 games, using the same algorithm, network architecture and hyperparameters. This work bridges the divide between high-dimensional sensory inputs and actions, resulting in the first artificial agent that is capable of learning to excel at a diverse array of challenging tasks.

  20. Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnih, Volodymyr; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Silver, David; Rusu, Andrei A; Veness, Joel; Bellemare, Marc G; Graves, Alex; Riedmiller, Martin; Fidjeland, Andreas K; Ostrovski, Georg; Petersen, Stig; Beattie, Charles; Sadik, Amir; Antonoglou, Ioannis; King, Helen; Kumaran, Dharshan; Wierstra, Daan; Legg, Shane; Hassabis, Demis

    2015-02-26

    The theory of reinforcement learning provides a normative account, deeply rooted in psychological and neuroscientific perspectives on animal behaviour, of how agents may optimize their control of an environment. To use reinforcement learning successfully in situations approaching real-world complexity, however, agents are confronted with a difficult task: they must derive efficient representations of the environment from high-dimensional sensory inputs, and use these to generalize past experience to new situations. Remarkably, humans and other animals seem to solve this problem through a harmonious combination of reinforcement learning and hierarchical sensory processing systems, the former evidenced by a wealth of neural data revealing notable parallels between the phasic signals emitted by dopaminergic neurons and temporal difference reinforcement learning algorithms. While reinforcement learning agents have achieved some successes in a variety of domains, their applicability has previously been limited to domains in which useful features can be handcrafted, or to domains with fully observed, low-dimensional state spaces. Here we use recent advances in training deep neural networks to develop a novel artificial agent, termed a deep Q-network, that can learn successful policies directly from high-dimensional sensory inputs using end-to-end reinforcement learning. We tested this agent on the challenging domain of classic Atari 2600 games. We demonstrate that the deep Q-network agent, receiving only the pixels and the game score as inputs, was able to surpass the performance of all previous algorithms and achieve a level comparable to that of a professional human games tester across a set of 49 games, using the same algorithm, network architecture and hyperparameters. This work bridges the divide between high-dimensional sensory inputs and actions, resulting in the first artificial agent that is capable of learning to excel at a diverse array of challenging tasks.

  1. Study of the Levels of Human-Human and Human-Animal Empathy in Veterinary Medical Students from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Amor, Javiera; Luna-Fernández, Daniela; Tadich, Tamara

    Social relationships are based on our ability to put ourselves in the place of others, and from there to react appropriately and logically. This empathic ability can be extended to other species, based on the human ability to develop techniques to understand and communicate with animals. In education, the benefits of training professionals with ethical and empathic tools are known. Gender, diet, past experiences, and other factors can modify a person's levels of empathy toward humans and animals, and a relationship exists between both types of empathy. The aims of this study were to investigate some determinants of the level of empathy and to gain insight into the possible correlation between human-animal and human-human empathy. For this, the Animal Empathy Scale and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index by Davis were applied through an electronic survey system to freshmen and final-year students (n=452) from five schools of veterinary medicine in Chile. The correlation between the empathy scores of both instruments and their association with individual factors were studied using Spearman's correlation, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The results suggest that both instruments correlate significantly, and that gender, year of study, diet, and area of interest have a significant association with the score for empathy toward animals. This research shows that individual characteristics and changes that occur during veterinary training can affect students' attitudes toward animals.

  2. Multi-level human motion analysis for surveillance applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lao, W.; Han, Jungong; With, de P.H.N.; Rabbani, M.; Stevenson, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study a flexible framework for semantic analysis of human motion from a monocular surveillance video. Successful trajectory estimation and human-body modeling facilitate the semantic analysis of human activities in video sequences. As a first contribution, we propose a flexible

  3. From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Insulin-Producing Cells: Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mahmoud M; Zakaria, Mahmoud M; Refaie, Ayman F; Abdel-Rahman, Engy A; Reda, Asmaa M; Ali, Sameh S; Khater, Sherry M; Ashamallah, Sylvia A; Ismail, Amani M; Ismail, Hossam El-Din A; El-Badri, Nagwa; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs), for their differentiation potentials to form insulin-producing cells. BM-MSCs were obtained during elective orthotopic surgery and AT-MSCs from fatty aspirates during elective cosmetics procedures. Following their expansion, cells were characterized by phenotyping, trilineage differentiation ability, and basal gene expression of pluripotency genes and for their metabolic characteristics. Cells were differentiated according to a Trichostatin-A based protocol. The differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining for insulin and c-peptide. In addition the expression of relevant pancreatic endocrine genes was determined. The release of insulin and c-peptide in response to a glucose challenge was also quantitated. There were some differences in basal gene expression and metabolic characteristics. After differentiation the proportion of the resulting insulin-producing cells (IPCs), was comparable among both cell sources. Again, there were no differences neither in the levels of gene expression nor in the amounts of insulin and c-peptide release as a function of glucose challenge. The properties, availability, and abundance of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine. Conclusion . BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs are comparable regarding their differential potential to form IPCs. The availability and properties of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine.

  4. From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Insulin-Producing Cells: Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Gabr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs, for their differentiation potentials to form insulin-producing cells. BM-MSCs were obtained during elective orthotopic surgery and AT-MSCs from fatty aspirates during elective cosmetics procedures. Following their expansion, cells were characterized by phenotyping, trilineage differentiation ability, and basal gene expression of pluripotency genes and for their metabolic characteristics. Cells were differentiated according to a Trichostatin-A based protocol. The differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining for insulin and c-peptide. In addition the expression of relevant pancreatic endocrine genes was determined. The release of insulin and c-peptide in response to a glucose challenge was also quantitated. There were some differences in basal gene expression and metabolic characteristics. After differentiation the proportion of the resulting insulin-producing cells (IPCs, was comparable among both cell sources. Again, there were no differences neither in the levels of gene expression nor in the amounts of insulin and c-peptide release as a function of glucose challenge. The properties, availability, and abundance of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs are comparable regarding their differential potential to form IPCs. The availability and properties of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine.

  5. Phenotypic Characterization of Genetically Lowered Human Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Connor A.; Khera, Amit V.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Klarin, Derek; Won, Hong-Hee; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Nomura, Akihiro; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Bick, Alexander G.; Gupta, Namrata; Asselta, Rosanna; Duga, Stefano; Merlini, Piera Angelica; Correa, Adolfo; Kessler, Thorsten; Wilson, James G.; Bown, Matthew J.; Hall, Alistair S.; Braund, Peter S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Willer, Cristen; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Felix, Janine F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Lander, Eric; Rader, Daniel J.; Danesh, John; Ardissino, Diego; Gabriel, Stacey; Saleheen, Danish; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genomic analyses have suggested that the LPA gene and its associated plasma biomarker, lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), represent a causal risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). As such, lowering Lp(a) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy. Beyond target identification, human genetics may contribute to the development of new therapies by defining the full spectrum of beneficial and adverse consequences and by developing a dose-response curve of target perturbation. OBJECTIVES We attempted to establish the full phenotypic impact of LPA gene variation and to estimate a dose-response curve between genetically altered plasma Lp(a) and risk for CHD. METHODS We leveraged genetic variants at the LPA gene from 3 data sources: individual-level data from 112,338 participants in the UK Biobank; summary association results from large-scale genome-wide association studies; and LPA gene sequencing results from cases with and controls free of CHD. RESULTS One standard deviation genetically lowered Lp(a) level was associated with 29% lower risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69 to 0.73), 31% lower risk of peripheral vascular disease (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.59 to 0.80), 13% lower risk of stroke (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79 to 0.96), 17% lower risk of heart failure (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.94), and 37% lower risk of aortic stenosis (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47 to 0.83). We observed no association with 31 other disorders including type 2 diabetes and cancer. Variants that led to gain of LPA gene function increased risk for CHD whereas those that led to loss of gene function reduced CHD risk. CONCLUSIONS Beyond CHD, genetically lowered Lp(a) is associated with a lower risk of peripheral vascular disease, stroke, heart failure, and aortic stenosis. As such, pharmacological lowering of plasma Lp(a) may impact a range of atherosclerosis-related diseases. PMID:28007139

  6. Telomerase levels control the lifespan of human T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, Alexander; Yssel, Hans; Pene, Jerome; Chavez, Elizabeth A.; Schertzer, Mike; Lansdorp, Peter M.; Spits, Hergen; Luiten, Rosalie M.

    2003-01-01

    The loss of telomeric DNA with each cell division contributes to the limited replicative lifespan of human T lymphocytes. Although telomerase is transiently expressed in T lymphocytes upon activation, it is insufficient to confer immortality. We have previously shown that immortalization of human

  7. Upgrading Training Skill Levels And Overall Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ... Human Resource Development Of Women For Employment Opportunities ... This setoff inferiority complex and gender enslavement that have been given chance to grow in Nigeria.

  8. Levels of organochlorine pesticides in Brazilian human milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, T. [INCQS/FIOCRUZ, RJ (Brazil); Braga, A.M.C.B.; Rosa, J.M. [CESTEH/ENSP/FIOCRUZ, RJ (Brazil); Kypke, K.; Malisch, R. [State Inst. for Chemical and Veterinary Analysis of Food, Freiburg (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Breastfeeding has been intensively encouraged, especially in developing countries, due to its beneficial properties, i.e., increase infant immune factors and resistance to chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes or allergies. In addition, human exposure to environmental pollution has led the scientific community to study the pathways of these contaminants and the possible risks they pose to human health. Exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCs), in special, has been the subject of great interest during recent years given their potential toxicity, resistance to degradation and bioaccumulation through the food chain. The major source of OC has been agriculture and public health campaigns to vector control. General population exposure occur mainly through the diet and human milk can be an indicator of exposure since OCs are lipophilic xenobiotics that accumulate in adipose tissue and breastfeeding is the main pathway of elimination through the fatty fraction of milk. In this study pooled samples of mothers living in the capitals of two different states of Brazil were evaluated in order to assess the trends of human exposure to persistent pollutants.

  9. Serum urea and creatinine levels in Nigerian human malaria patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum urea and creatinine levels were determined in malaria patients infected with P. falciparum. Serum urea levels decreased significantly (P<0.05) in both mild (4.10 ±1.10 mmol/L) and moderate (4.40 ±1.40 mmol/L) parasitaemia when compared to control subjects (5.50 ±1.40 mmol/L). On the other hand, serum ...

  10. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  11. Levels and trends of contaminants in humans of the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer; Adlard, Bryan; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Sandanger, Torkjel Manning; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) is one of the six working groups established under the Arctic Council. AMAP is tasked with monitoring the levels of contaminants present in the Arctic environment and people as well as assessing their effects on a continuous basis, and reporting these results regularly. Most of the presented data have been collected over the last 20 years and are from all eight Arctic countries. Levels of contaminants appear to be declining in some of the monitored Arctic populations, but it is not consistent across the Arctic. Most Arctic populations continue to experience elevated levels of these contaminants compared to other populations monitored globally. There are certain contaminants, such as perfluorinated compounds and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, which are still increasing in Arctic populations. These contaminants require more investigation to find out the predominant and important sources of exposure, and whether they are being transported to the Arctic through long-range transport in the environment.

  12. Population level evidence for seasonality of the human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korownyk, Christina; Liu, Fangwei; Garrison, Scott

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether human body odors undergo seasonal modulation. We utilized google trends search volume from the United States of America from January 1, 2010 to June 24, 2017 for a number of predetermined body odors. Regression modeling of time series data was completed. Our primary outcome was to determine the proportion of the variability in Internet searches for each unpleasant odor (about the mean) that is explained by a seasonal model. We determined that the seasonal (sinusoidal) model provided a significantly better fit than the null model (best straight line fit) for all searches relating to human body odors (P odor, 60% of the variability in search volume for foot odor, and 58% of the variability in search volume for bad breath. Flatulence and bad breath tended to peak in January, foot odor in February, and Axillary odor in July. We conclude that searching by the general public for information on unpleasant body odors undergoes substantial seasonal variation, with the timing of peaks and troughs varying with the body part involved. The symptom burden of such smells may have a similar seasonal variation, as might the composition of the commensal bacterial microflora that play a role in creating them.

  13. Human hypocretin and melanin-concentrating hormone levels are linked to emotion and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Ashley M; Fried, Itzhak; Wilson, Charles L; Staba, Richard J; Behnke, Eric J; Lam, Hoa A; Maidment, Nigel T; Karlsson, Karl Æ; Lapierre, Jennifer L; Siegel, Jerome M

    2013-01-01

    The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behaviour are largely unknown. Here we report on the changes in the levels of two hypothalamic neuropeptides, hypocretin-1 and melanin-concentrating hormone, measured in the human amygdala. We show that hypocretin-1 levels are maximal during positive emotion, social interaction and anger, behaviours that induce cataplexy in human narcoleptics. In contrast, melanin-concentrating hormone levels are minimal during social interaction, but are increased after eating. Both peptides are at minimal levels during periods of postoperative pain despite high levels of arousal. Melanin-concentrating hormone levels increase at sleep onset, consistent with a role in sleep induction, whereas hypocretin-1 levels increase at wake onset, consistent with a role in wake induction. Levels of these two peptides in humans are not simply linked to arousal, but rather to specific emotions and state transitions. Other arousal systems may be similarly emotionally specialized.

  14. Process for Selecting System Level Assessments for Human System Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, James; Park, John

    2006-01-01

    The integration of many life support systems necessary to construct a stable habitat is difficult. The correct identification of the appropriate technologies and corresponding interfaces is an exhaustive process. Once technologies are selected secondary issues such as mechanical and electrical interfaces must be addressed. The required analytical and testing work must be approached in a piecewise fashion to achieve timely results. A repeatable process has been developed to identify and prioritize system level assessments and testing needs. This Assessment Selection Process has been defined to assess cross cutting integration issues on topics at the system or component levels. Assessments are used to identify risks, encourage future actions to mitigate risks, or spur further studies.

  15. Modulation of Human Plasma Fibronectin Levels Following Exercise,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    forms of this large molecular weight (440 kilodaltons) glycoprotein,(17. While the tissue type is cell-associated and important to cell adhesion and...increased under conditions of pathology, such as in obesity (6). cancer (3). proteinuria (4). diabetic retinopathy (5). and preeclampsia (27). in the absence...Res. 1977: 22:709-716. 27. Stubbs. T.M.. Lazarchick. J.. and Horger. E.O. Plasma fibronectin levels in preeclampsia : A possible biochemical marker

  16. Glucagon-like peptide 1 abolishes the postprandial rise in triglyceride concentrations and lowers levels of non-esterified fatty acids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J J; Gethmann, A; Götze, O

    2006-01-01

    and gastric emptying were assessed. METHODS: 14 healthy male volunteers were studied with an i.v. infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or placebo over 390 min in the fasting state. A solid test meal was served and gastric emptying was determined using a (13)C-labelled sodium octanoate breath test......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetic dyslipidaemia contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) lowers postprandial glycaemia predominantly by slowing gastric emptying. Therefore, the effects of GLP-1 on postprandial lipid levels....... Venous blood was drawn frequently for measurement of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, triglycerides and NEFA. RESULTS: GLP-1 administration lowered fasting and postprandial glycaemia (pGastric emptying was delayed by GLP-1 compared with placebo (p

  17. Natural levels of {sup 210}Po in human urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Frances, I.; Manjon, G.; Mantero, J.; Diaz, J. [Departament of Applied Phisic II, University of Seville, P.O. Box 41012 Seville (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Departament of Applied Phisic II, University of Seville, P.O. Box 41012 Seville (Spain); National Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Since the secret agent Alexander Litvinenko was murdered in 2006 by a {sup 210}Po lethal dose, presumably ingested, there is renovated interest on the toxicity of this radionuclide in humans. {sup 210}Po is a radioactive isotope naturally found in nature, mainly incorporated by humans via food and water ingestion, as well as inhaled through its progenitor, the {sup 222}Rn. The total amount of natural {sup 210}Po in the human body can vary from person to person depending on their lifestyle: dietary habits, drinking water source, place of residence (associated with exposure to {sup 222}Rn), etc- and therefore in the concentrations of this element to be found in urine. To analyze the influence of dietary habits on the amount of {sup 210}Po excreted in urine, two volunteers in Seville had a well-defined and time-varying diet for a month, following a daily collection of their urine and determination of the concentrations therein of this radionuclide. The results obtained and the conclusions derived from them form the core of this communication. {sup 210}Po determinations were performed daily in 200 ml aliquots of urine using the technique of high resolution alpha spectrometry. This has involved the application of a single radiochemical method for the concentration and isolation {sup 210}Po, followed by its auto-deposition on copper planchets for proper measure. Daily {sup 210}Po activity concentrations in voluntary urine analyzed during the month of study show high variability with a difference of up to an order of magnitude between maximum and minimum values obtained, and a clear dependence on the diet type followed in the various stages of the experiment. The lowest concentrations obtained are associated with a diet rich in carbohydrates and proteins 'terrestrial' (pork, beef,...), while the highest concentrations were obtained in the final phase of the experiment when the diet was enriched with presence of marine products in fair correspondence with the

  18. Culture conditions affect photoreactivating enzyme levels in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Oliver, R.

    1976-01-01

    Photoreactivation of pyrimidine dimers occured under the experimental conditions given in this study, but has not been observed under conditions used by others. Three possible differences were tested in experimental procedures including dimer separation and analysis methods, illumination conditions and cell culture techniques. The methods in this study of dimer separation and analysis indeed measure cis-syn pyrimidine dimers and give results in quantitative agreement with the methods of others. It was found that white light pre-illumination of fibroblasts from the xeroderma pigmentosum line XP12BE or of normal cells does not affect the cellular capacity for dimer photoreactivation. However, the cell culture conditions can affect photoreactivating enzyme levels, and thus cellular dimer photoreactivation capacity. Cells grown in Eagle's minimal essential medium (supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum) contain very low levels of photoreactivating enzyme and cannot photoreactivate dimers in their DNA; but companion cultures maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's minimal medium do contain photoreactivating enzyme and can reactivate photoreactive cellular dimers

  19. Human and great ape red blood cells differ in plasmalogen levels and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ann B; Steinberg, Steven J; Watkins, Paul A; Moser, Hugo W; Ramaswamy, Krishna; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Lee, D Rick; Ely, John J; Ryder, Oliver A; Hacia, Joseph G

    2011-06-17

    Plasmalogens are ether phospholipids required for normal mammalian developmental, physiological, and cognitive functions. They have been proposed to act as membrane antioxidants and reservoirs of polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as influence intracellular signaling and membrane dynamics. Plasmalogens are particularly enriched in cells and tissues of the human nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Humans with severely reduced plasmalogen levels have reduced life spans, abnormal neurological development, skeletal dysplasia, impaired respiration, and cataracts. Plasmalogen deficiency is also found in the brain tissue of individuals with Alzheimer disease. In a human and great ape cohort, we measured the red blood cell (RBC) levels of the most abundant types of plasmalogens. Total RBC plasmalogen levels were lower in humans than bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas, but higher than orangutans. There were especially pronounced cross-species differences in the levels of plasmalogens with a C16:0 moiety at the sn-1 position. Humans on Western or vegan diets had comparable total RBC plasmalogen levels, but the latter group showed moderately higher levels of plasmalogens with a C18:1 moiety at the sn-1 position. We did not find robust sex-specific differences in human or chimpanzee RBC plasmalogen levels or composition. Furthermore, human and great ape skin fibroblasts showed only modest differences in peroxisomal plasmalogen biosynthetic activity. Human and chimpanzee microarray data indicated that genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis show cross-species differential expression in multiple tissues. We propose that the observed differences in human and great ape RBC plasmalogens are primarily caused by their rates of biosynthesis and/or turnover. Gene expression data raise the possibility that other human and great ape cells and tissues differ in plasmalogen levels. Based on the phenotypes of humans and rodents with plasmalogen disorders, we propose that cross

  20. Human and great ape red blood cells differ in plasmalogen levels and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ely John J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmalogens are ether phospholipids required for normal mammalian developmental, physiological, and cognitive functions. They have been proposed to act as membrane antioxidants and reservoirs of polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as influence intracellular signaling and membrane dynamics. Plasmalogens are particularly enriched in cells and tissues of the human nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Humans with severely reduced plasmalogen levels have reduced life spans, abnormal neurological development, skeletal dysplasia, impaired respiration, and cataracts. Plasmalogen deficiency is also found in the brain tissue of individuals with Alzheimer disease. Results In a human and great ape cohort, we measured the red blood cell (RBC levels of the most abundant types of plasmalogens. Total RBC plasmalogen levels were lower in humans than bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas, but higher than orangutans. There were especially pronounced cross-species differences in the levels of plasmalogens with a C16:0 moiety at the sn-1 position. Humans on Western or vegan diets had comparable total RBC plasmalogen levels, but the latter group showed moderately higher levels of plasmalogens with a C18:1 moiety at the sn-1 position. We did not find robust sex-specific differences in human or chimpanzee RBC plasmalogen levels or composition. Furthermore, human and great ape skin fibroblasts showed only modest differences in peroxisomal plasmalogen biosynthetic activity. Human and chimpanzee microarray data indicated that genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis show cross-species differential expression in multiple tissues. Conclusion We propose that the observed differences in human and great ape RBC plasmalogens are primarily caused by their rates of biosynthesis and/or turnover. Gene expression data raise the possibility that other human and great ape cells and tissues differ in plasmalogen levels. Based on the phenotypes of humans and

  1. The dependence level analysis between the human actions in NPP Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, M.; Nitoi, M.; Apostol, M.; Florescu, G.; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is an important method in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies and offers desirability for concrete improvement of the man - machine - organization interfaces, reliability and safety. An important step in HRA is the dependence level analysis between the human actions performed by the same person or between the actions performed by different persons, step in quantitative analysis of the human errors probabilities. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model to analyze the dependence level between human actions for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation. The model estimates the conditional human error probabilities (CHEP) and joint human error probabilities (JHEP). The achieved sensitivity analyses determine human performance sensibility to systematic variations for dependence level between human actions. The human error probabilities estimated in this paper are adequate values for integration both in HRA and in PSA realized for NPP. This type of analysis helps in finding and analyzing the ways of reducing the likelihood of human errors, so that the impact of human factor to systems availability, reliability and safety can be realistically estimated. In order to demonstrate the usability of this model an analysis is performed upon the dependences between the necessary human actions in mitigating the consequences of LOCA events, particularly for the case of Cernavoda NPP. (authors)

  2. Early human pregnancy serum cytokine levels predict autoimmunity in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindehammer, Sabina Resic; Björck, Sara; Lynch, Kristian; Brundin, Charlotte; Marsal, Karel; Agardh, Daniel; Fex, Malin

    2011-09-01

    It is generally believed that pregnancy is mediated by a Th2 response, which includes cytokines that promote placental growth and are involved in inducing tolerance to the foetus. If the balance between Th1/and Th2-mediated cytokines is disrupted, systemic and local changes could predispose the foetus to future disease. Therefore, a shift in the Th1/Th2 balance during pregnancy, possibly caused by underlying environmental factors, could be associated with post-partum autoimmune disease in the offspring. Based on this presumption, we used celiac disease as a model to investigate whether autoimmunity is triggered in the foetus during early pregnancy, observed as changes in the mother's cytokine profile. Ten cytokines were measured by electro-chemi-luminescent multiplex ELISA in serum samples obtained from mothers during early pregnancy. Cases included women with children who had developed verified celiac disease before the age of 5, who were compared with other women as matched controls. We observed that 7 out of 10 cytokine levels were significantly increased in our case mothers when compared to controls. Five of these belonged to what is generally known as a Th1-mediated response (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-2, IL-1β and IL-12) and two were Th2 cytokines (IL-13 and IL-10). However, the IL-10 cytokine is known to have features from both arms of the immune system. These results were confirmed in a logistic regression model where five out of the initial seven cytokines remained. This study suggests that increase in Th1 serum cytokines may be associated with celiac disease in offspring.

  3. Gene-specific correlation of RNA and protein levels in human cells and tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, Fredrik; Danielsson, Frida; Hallström, Björn M.

    2016-01-01

    An important issue for molecular biology is to establish whether transcript levels of a given gene can be used as proxies for the corresponding protein levels. Here, we have developed a targeted proteomics approach for a set of human non-secreted proteins based on parallel reaction monitoring...... to measure, at steady-state conditions, absolute protein copy numbers across human tissues and cell lines and compared these levels with the corresponding mRNA levels using transcriptomics. The study shows that the transcript and protein levels do not correlate well unless a gene-specific RNA-to-protein (RTP...

  4. Glucose metabolism in pigs expressing human genes under an insulin promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijkstrom, Martin; Bottino, Rita; Iwase, Hayoto; Hara, Hidetaka; Ekser, Burcin; van der Windt, Dirk; Long, Cassandra; Toledo, Frederico G S; Phelps, Carol J; Trucco, Massimo; Cooper, David K C; Ayares, David

    2015-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine islets can reverse diabetes in non-human primates. The remaining hurdles for clinical application include safe and effective T-cell-directed immunosuppression, but protection against the innate immune system and coagulation dysfunction may be more difficult to achieve. Islet-targeted genetic manipulation of islet-source pigs represents a powerful tool to protect against graft loss. However, whether these genetic alterations would impair islet function is unknown. On a background of α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO)/human (h)CD46, additional genes (hCD39, human tissue factor pathway inhibitor, porcine CTLA4-Ig) were inserted in different combinations under an insulin promoter to promote expression in islets (confirmed by immunofluorescence). Seven pigs were tested for baseline and glucose/arginine-challenged levels of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon. This preliminary study did not show definite evidence of β-cell deficiencies, even when three transgenes were expressed under the insulin promoter. Of seven animals, all were normoglycemic at fasting, and five of seven had normal glucose disposal rates after challenge. All animals exhibited insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon responses to both glucose and arginine challenge; however, significant interindividual variation was observed. Multiple islet-targeted transgenic expression was not associated with an overtly detrimental effect on islet function, suggesting that complex genetic constructs designed for islet protection warrants further testing in islet xenotransplantation models. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Taking it to another level: do personality-based human capital resources matter to firm performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, In-Sue; Kim, Seongsu; Van Iddekinge, Chad H

    2015-05-01

    Drawing on the attraction-selection-attrition perspective, strategic human resource management (SHRM) scholarship, and recent human capital research, this study explores organization-level emergence of personality (i.e., personality-based human capital resources) and its direct, interactive, and (conditional) indirect effects on organization-level outcomes based on data from 6,709 managers across 71 firms. Results indicate that organization-level mean emotional stability, extraversion, and conscientiousness are positively related to organization-level managerial job satisfaction and labor productivity but not to financial performance. Furthermore, organization-level mean and variance in emotional stability interact to predict all three organization-level outcomes, and organization-level mean and variance in extraversion interact to predict firm financial performance. Specifically, the positive effects of organization-level mean emotional stability and extraversion are stronger when organization-level variance in these traits is lower. Finally, organization-level mean emotional stability, extraversion, and conscientiousness are all positively related to firm financial performance indirectly via labor productivity, and the indirect effects are more positive when organization-level variance in those personality traits is lower. Overall, the findings suggest that personality-based human capital resources demonstrate tangible effects on organization-level outcomes. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed along with study limitations and future research directions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. The Changes of the Human Development on Micro-Regional and Settlement Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Lipták

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to define and estimate the human potential of the settlements in South-Cserehát,, Hungary. The human development index in the classical view can be estimated atmicroregional level with only hard distortions, to which the list of starting indicators differ from the usual indicators, such as GDP and GNI, the life expectancy at birth and the portion of taking part in education. However, the estimating calculations made for defining the human potential in a settlement level should be handled with hard restrictions , at the same time it perfectly shows the formation of the human factor in the region. As a research question the following was defined: In what range has the human potential changed on the basis of the census data and what kind of configuration changes have happened in the South-Cserehát? The aim of the study to attempt to estimate the HDI on settlement level.

  7. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples form other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process

  8. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples from other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process

  9. Hexachlorobenzene sources, levels and human exposure in the environment of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.; Lu, Y.L.; Han, Jingyi; Luo, W.; Shi, Y.J.; Wang, T.Y.; Sun, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the published scientific data on sources, levels and human exposure of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in China. Potential sources of unintended HCB emission were assessed by production information, emission factors and environmental policies. HCB was observed in various

  10. Overnight hypoxic exposure and glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin levels in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, Eric M; Carr, Richard D; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2008-01-01

    increases with hypoxia; however, the influence of hypoxia on GLP-1 has not been studied in animals or humans to date. We sought to determine the influence of normobaric hypoxia on plasma leptin and GLP-1 levels in 25 healthy humans. Subjects ingested a control meal during normoxia and after 17 h of exposure...

  11. Student Perceptions of an Upper-Level, Undergraduate Human Anatomy Laboratory Course without Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shirley J.

    2012-01-01

    Several programs in health professional education require or are considering requiring upper-level human anatomy as prerequisite for their applicants. Undergraduate students are confronted with few institutions offering such a course, in part because of the expense and logistical issues associated with a cadaver-based human anatomy course. This…

  12. Perfluorinated compounds: Levels, trophic web enrichments and human dietary intakes in transitional water ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzi, Monia; Guerranti, Cristiana; Giovani, Andrea; Perra, Guido; Focardi, Silvano E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • PFOA/S levels in a trophic web of a heavily human-stressed lagoon are measured. • High levels were found in mussels, clams and crabs. • The principal PFCs inflow sources for the ecosystem is the river. • Biota (i.e. macroalgae proliferation) contributes to redistribute pollutants in the lagoon. • Human daily dietary intakes are below maximum tolerable levels suggested by the EFSA. -- Abstract: The results of a study on levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), analyzed in terms of HPLC-ESI-MS in water, sediment, macrophyte, bivalve, crustacean and fish samples, are reported here. The aim of the research is to define, for the first time, PFOA/S levels in a heavily human-stressed transitional water ecosystem (Orbetello lagoon, Italy) and evaluate trophic web enrichments and human dietary intakes. The results obtained show that: (i) levels significantly higher than those reported in the literature were found in mussels, clams and crabs; (ii) the river is a significant pollution source; (iii) although absolute levels are relatively low, macroalgae proliferation contributes to redistribute pollutants from river-affected areas throughout the entire lagoon basin; (iv) to the best of our current knowledge, water-filtering species considered in this study are the most exposed to PFOA/S pollution; (v) human daily dietary intakes of PFOA/S through Slow Food-endorsed product consumption are below maximum tolerable levels suggested by the EFSA

  13. Identification of variables and their influence on the human resources planning in the territorial level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Vivar, R.; Sánchez Rodríguez, A.; Pérez Campdesuñer, R.; García Vidal, G.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper lies in the use of experimental way through empirical tools for identification of the set of variables and their interrelationships and influences on the human resources planning at the territorial level. The methodology used to verify the existence of the variables that affect the planning of human resources at the territorial level consists of two phases: a qualitative study of the variables that influence the planning of human resources, where the explicit variables are measured and / or implied raised in the literature analyzing the main contributions and limitations expressed by each of the authors consulted. Then it proceeds to confirmatory phase (quantitative) to prove the existence of the dimensions of the planning of human resources in the territorial level through the use of multivariate statistics through the combination of expert analysis and techniques of factorial grouping. Identification is achieved by using empirical methods, variables that affect human resources planning at the territorial level, as well as their grouping essential dimensions, while the description of a theoretical model that integrates the dimensions is made essential and relationships that affect human resource planning at the regional level, which is characterized by the existence of systemic and prospective nature. The literature shows two streams that address a wide range of approaches to human resources planning. The first is oriented from the business object and the second part of the management in highlighting a limited territorial level to address this latest theoretical development, an element that has contributed to the fragmented treatment of human resources planning and management in general at this level. The originality of this paper is part of the creation and adaptation, on a scientific basis of a theoretical model developed from the conceptual contribution of this process at the territorial level where the key variables that affect this

  14. Application of fuzzy synthetic assessment to assess human factors design level on reactor control panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xuecheng

    1999-01-01

    Reactor control panel design level on human factors must be considered by designer. The author evaluated the human factor design level of arrangement and combinations including the switch buttons, meter dials and indication lamps on Minjiang Reactor and High-Flux Engineer Test Reactor (HFETR) critical device by application of fuzzy synthetic assessment method in mathematics. From the assessment results, the advantages and shortcomings are fount, and some modification suggestions have also been proposed

  15. Analyses of the rate of decline in stimulated c-peptide 12 months after diagnosis in children with newly diag-nosed type 1 diabetes. results from the Hvidoere study group on childhood diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Porksen, S.; Nielsen, L.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Direct measurement of C-peptide has been recommended to provide the most appropriate primary outcome in trials evaluating the efficacy of therapies to preserve beta-cell function. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively characterize the natural history of disease progression...... as assessed by stimulated C-peptide the first 12 months after diagnosis in children with new onset T1D in two independent cohorts collected over a time interval of 6 years. Furthermore the purpose was to assess whether the natural history of disease has changed over time. Materials and methods...... for both cohorts was calculated to 8.0 ± 0.7%/ month.This is in the same range as the value reported of 0.019 nmol/l/month (1982-1985) by Wallensteen corresponding to a relative change of 9.5%/month. Conclusion: Thus, the natural history of disease progression during the first 12 months after diagnosis has...

  16. Human pancreatic islet-derived extracellular vesicles modulate insulin expression in 3D-differentiating iPSC clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ribeiro

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that extracellular vesicles (EVs can mediate crosstalk between hormones and metabolites within pancreatic tissue. However, the possible effect of pancreatic EVs on stem cell differentiation into pancreatic lineages remains unknown. Herein, human islet-derived EVs (h-Islet-EVs were isolated, characterized and subsequently added to human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC clusters during pancreatic differentiation. The h-islet-EVs had a mean size of 117±7 nm and showed positive expression of CD63 and CD81 EV markers as measured by ELISA. The presence of key pancreatic transcription factor mRNA, such as NGN3, MAFA and PDX1, and pancreatic hormone proteins such as C-peptide and glucagon, were confirmed in h-Islet-EVs. iPSC clusters were differentiated in suspension and at the end stages of the differentiation protocol, the mRNA expression of the main pancreatic transcription factors and pancreatic hormones was increased. H-Islet-EVs were supplemented to the iPSC clusters in the later stages of differentiation. It was observed that h-Islet-EVs were able to up-regulate the intracellular levels of C-peptide in iPSC clusters in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of h-Islet-EVs on the differentiation of iPSC clusters cultured in 3D-collagen hydrogels was also assessed. Although increased mRNA expression for pancreatic markers was observed when culturing the iPSC clusters in 3D-collagen hydrogels, delivery of EVs did not affect the insulin or C-peptide intracellular content. Our results provide new information on the role of h-Islet-EVs in the regulation of insulin expression in differentiating iPSC clusters, and are highly relevant for pancreatic tissue engineering applications.

  17. A model for assessing the risk of human trafficking on a local level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colegrove, Amanda

    Human trafficking is a human rights violation that is difficult to quantify. Models for estimating the number of victims of trafficking presented by previous researchers depend on inconsistent, poor quality data. As an intermediate step to help current efforts by nonprofits to combat human trafficking, this project presents a model that is not dependent on quantitative data specific to human trafficking, but rather profiles the risk of human trafficking at the local level through causative factors. Businesses, indicated by the literature, were weighted based on the presence of characteristics that increase the likelihood of trafficking in persons. The mean risk was calculated by census tract to reveal the multiplicity of risk levels in both rural and urban settings. Results indicate that labor trafficking may be a more diffuse problem in Missouri than sex trafficking. Additionally, spatial patterns of risk remained largely the same regardless of adjustments made to the model.

  18. Incidence of high-level evernimicin resistance in Enterococcus faecium among food animals and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; McNicholas, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    Six high-level evernimicin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates were identified among 304 avilarnycin-resistant E. faecium isolates from animals and 404 stool samples from humans with diarrhea. All four animal isolates, and one of the human isolates, were able to transfer resistance...... to a susceptible E. faecium strain. The resulting transconjugants all tested positive for the presence of emtA, a gene encoding a methyltransferase previously linked with high-level evernimicin resistance. The four transconjugants derived from animal isolates all carried the same plasmid, while a differently sized...... plasmid was found in the isolate from humans. This study demonstrated a low incidence of high-level evernimicin resistance mediated by the emtA gene in different E. faecium isolates of animal and human origin....

  19. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C-peptide (CP), connecting the A and B chains in proinsulin, has been considered to possess physiological effects in diabetes. In order to prolong the half-life of CP in vivo, a long acting CP analog [human serum albumin (HSA-CP)] was obtained by direct gene fusion of a single-chain CP to HSA and expressed in host ...

  20. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... C-peptide (CP), connecting the A and B chains in proinsulin, has been considered to possess physiological effects in diabetes. In order to prolong the half-life of CP in vivo, a long acting CP analog. [human serum albumin (HSA-CP)] was obtained by direct gene fusion of a single-chain CP to HSA and.

  1. PBDE levels in human milk: the situation in Germany and potential influencing factors - a controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieth, B.; Mielke, H.; Ostermann, B.; Ruediger, T. [Federal Inst. for Risk Assessment, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, T.; Paepke, O. [ERGO Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    An exponential increase of PBDE levels in breast milk from Sweden between 1972 and 1997 has been reported, which is in contrast to the continuous decline of other chlorinated POPs in breast milk. Also in blood samples from Germany, an increasing trend has been observed during the period from 1985 to 1999. The knowledge about human exposure pathways, which contribute to the PBDE body burden, is very limited. Consumption of food of animal origin, inhalation or ingestion of dust and further factors possibly influencing the PBDE levels in human matrices, like age, breast-feeding or smoking are under discussion. Only a few data on PBDE levels in breast milk from Germany have been published. To fill the data gaps, a controlled study was started in 2001 to characterise the PBDE levels in human milk from Germany with special efforts to identify and quantify deca-BDE-209. Furthermore, it was intended to verify potential factors possibly influencing PBDE levels. Two main hypotheses were proposed: (1) Are PBDE levels in breast milk from mothers consuming traditional food (omnivores) higher than those found in breast milk from mothers consuming vegetarian or vegan food? and (2) Are the PBDE levels found in human milk after a three-months period of breast-feeding lower than those detected at the beginning or does breast feeding result in a lower body burden, respectively? This paper summarises preliminary results. Further analytical data and results of data evaluation will be presented at the conference.

  2. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy--many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. © 2015 Cenik et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Indoor Levels of Formaldehyde and Other Pollutants and Relationship to Air Exchange Rates and Human Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Y.; O'Keeffe, P.; Kirk, M.; Walden, V. P.; Lamb, B. K.; Jobson, B. T.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports results on an indoor air quality study conducted on six homes in summer and winter, contrasting indoor and outdoor concentrations of O3, CO, CO2, NOx, PM2.5, and selected volatile organic hydrocarbons measured by PTR-MS. Data were collected as 1 minute averages. Air exchange rates of the homes were determined by CO2 tracer release. Smart home sensors, recording human activity level in various places in the home, and window and doors openings, were utilized to better understand the link between human activity and indoor air pollution. From our study, averaged air exchange rates of the homes ranged from 0.2 to 1.2 hour-1 and were greatly affected by the ventilation system type and window and door openings. In general, a negative correlation between air exchange rate and indoor VOCs levels was observed, with large variation of pollutant levels between the homes. For most of the VOCs measured in the house, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, summer levels were much higher than winter levels. In some homes formaldehyde levels displayed a time of day variation that was linked to changes in indoor temperature. During a wildfire period in the summer of 2015, outdoor levels of PM2.5, formaldehyde, and benzene dramatically increased, significantly impacting indoor levels due to infiltration. Human activities, such as cooking, can significantly change the levels of most of the compounds measured in the house and the levels can be significantly elevated for short periods of time, with peak levels can be several orders higher compared with typical levels. The data suggest that an outcome of state energy codes that require new homes to be energy efficient, and as a consequence built with lower air exchange rates, will be unacceptable levels of air toxics, notably formaldehyde.

  4. Human Capital and Economic Growth: The Quest for the Most Relevant Level of Education in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Faisal; Tehseen, Syed; Arif, Imtiaz

    2009-01-01

    The study examines the role of human capital in the economic growth of Pakistan by using primary, secondary and higher education enrolments as proxies for human capital in three different specifications. The idea behind these models is to find out the most relevant level of education in terms of its contribution in economic growth. The order of integration of the variables is checked through Augmented Dickey Fuller and Phillips Perron test. In order to find out the evidences of the long run r...

  5. Differing levels of excision repair in human fetal dermis and brain cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    1982-01-01

    The levels of DNA excision repair, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay, were compared in cells derived from human fetal brain and dermal tissues. The level of UDS induced following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was found to be lower (approx. 60%) in the fetal brain cells than in fetal dermal cells. It was determined, using the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay to confirm the UDS observation, that 50% of the dimers induced by UV in fetal dermal cells were repaired in 8 h. while only 15% were removed in the fetal brain cells during the same period of time. Even after 24 h. only 44% of the dimers induced by UV in the fetal brain cells were repaired, while 65% were removed in the dermal cells. These data suggest that cultured human fetal brain cells exhibit lower levels of excision repair compared to cultured human fetal dermal cells. (author)

  6. Development of Human-level Decision Making Algorithm for NPPs through Deep Neural Networks : Conceptual Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Geun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Development of operation support systems and automation systems are closely related to machine learning field. However, since it is hard to achieve human-level delicacy and flexibility for complex tasks with conventional machine learning technologies, only operation support systems with simple purposes were developed and high-level automation related studies were not actively conducted. As one of the efforts for reducing human error in NPPs and technical advance toward automation, the ultimate goal of this research is to develop human-level decision making algorithm for NPPs during emergency situations. The concepts of SL, RL, policy network, value network, and MCTS, which were applied to decision making algorithm for other fields are introduced and combined with nuclear field specifications. Since the research is currently at the conceptual stage, more research is warranted.

  7. Impact Response Comparison Between Parametric Human Models and Postmortem Human Subjects with a Wide Range of Obesity Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Cao, Libo; Wang, Yulong; Hwang, Eunjoo; Reed, Matthew P; Forman, Jason; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-10-01

    Field data analyses have shown that obesity significantly increases the occupant injury risks in motor vehicle crashes, but the injury assessment tools for people with obesity are largely lacking. The objectives of this study were to use a mesh morphing method to rapidly generate parametric finite element models with a wide range of obesity levels and to evaluate their biofidelity against impact tests using postmortem human subjects (PMHS). Frontal crash tests using three PMHS seated in a vehicle rear seat compartment with body mass index (BMI) from 24 to 40 kg/m 2 were selected. To develop the human models matching the PMHS geometry, statistical models of external body shape, rib cage, pelvis, and femur were applied to predict the target geometry using age, sex, stature, and BMI. A mesh morphing method based on radial basis functions was used to rapidly morph a baseline human model into the target geometry. The model-predicted body excursions and injury measures were compared to the PMHS tests. Comparisons of occupant kinematics and injury measures between the tests and simulations showed reasonable correlations across the wide range of BMI levels. The parametric human models have the capability to account for the obesity effects on the occupant impact responses and injury risks. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Classifying oxidative stress by F2-isoprostane levels across human diseases: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Erve, Thomas J; Kadiiska, Maria B; London, Stephanie J; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-08-01

    The notion that oxidative stress plays a role in virtually every human disease and environmental exposure has become ingrained in everyday knowledge. However, mounting evidence regarding the lack of specificity of biomarkers traditionally used as indicators of oxidative stress in human disease and exposures now necessitates re-evaluation. To prioritize these re-evaluations, published literature was comprehensively analyzed in a meta-analysis to quantitatively classify the levels of systemic oxidative damage across human disease and in response to environmental exposures. In this meta-analysis, the F 2 -isoprostane, 8-iso-PGF 2α , was specifically chosen as the representative marker of oxidative damage. To combine published values across measurement methods and specimens, the standardized mean differences (Hedges' g) in 8-iso-PGF 2α levels between affected and control populations were calculated. The meta-analysis resulted in a classification of oxidative damage levels as measured by 8-iso-PGF 2α across 50 human health outcomes and exposures from 242 distinct publications. Relatively small increases in 8-iso-PGF 2α levels (ganalysis of published data. This analysis provides knowledge on the true involvement of oxidative damage across human health outcomes as well as utilizes past research to prioritize those conditions requiring further scrutiny on the mechanisms of biomarker generation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Factors explaining the level of voluntary human capital disclosure in the Brazilian capital market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Batista Fontana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents a study on factors explaining the level of voluntary human capital information in companies with shares in the Brazilian stock exchange. Assuming the existence of information asymmetry between managers and shareholders, agency theory states that disclosure might lead to a reduction in agency costs. The proprietary costs theory indicates that information disclosure might increase the company’s costs. According to these theories, the likelihood that the managers will voluntarily disclose information depends on certain factors that are characteristic of the company. Understanding the disclosure of information regarding intangible assets, specifically human capital, has strategic relevance for enterprises because these features, although not always recorded in accounting, represent a competitive business edge in the current economy.Design/methodology/approach: The study examined 145 annual reports, representing 29 companies in the period of 2005-2009. The level of voluntary disclosure was determined through content analysis of annual reports using representative indicators of human capital information.Findings: The statistical results indicate that factors such as size, debt, growth and time of registration with the brazilian Securities and Exchange Commission explain the level of voluntary human capital disclosure of the companies studied.Originality/value: An important contribution of this research is the formulation and non-repudiation of the time of registration with the CVM hypothesis as a factor that explains the level of human capital disclosure because none of the revised studies have tested this hypothesis.

  10. The potential pitfalls of studying adult sex ratios at aggregate levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Thomas V; Stoevenbelt, Andrea H; Kuppens, Toon

    2017-09-19

    Human adult sex ratios have been studied extensively across the biological and social sciences. While several studies have examined adult sex ratio effects in a multilevel perspective, many studies have focused on effects at an aggregated level only. In this paper, we review some key issues relating to such analyses. We address not only nation-level analyses, but also aggregation at lower levels, to investigate whether these issues extend to lower levels of aggregation. We illustrate these issues with novel databases covering a broad range of variables. Specifically, we discuss distributional issues with aggregated measures of adult sex ratio, significance testing, and statistical non-independence when using aggregate data. Firstly, we show that there are severe distributional issues with national adult sex ratio, such as extreme cases. Secondly, we demonstrate that many 'meaningless' variables are significantly correlated with adult sex ratio (e.g. the max. elevation level correlates with sex ratio at US state level). Finally, we re-examine associations between adult sex ratios and teenage fertility and find no robust evidence for an association at the aggregate level. Our review highlights the potential issues of using aggregate data on adult sex ratios to test hypotheses from an evolutionary perspective in humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Adult sex ratios and reproductive decisions: a critical re-examination of sex differences in human and animal societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Effect of cholesterol and triglycerides levels on the rheological behavior of human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Leonardo; Calderas, Fausto; Sanchez-Olivares, Guadalupe; Medina-Torres, Luis; Sanchez-Solis, Antonio; Manero, Octavio

    2015-02-01

    Important public health problems worldwide such as obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and coronary diseases are quite common. These problems arise from numerous factors, such as hyper-caloric diets, sedentary habits and other epigenetic factors. With respect to Mexico, the population reference values of total cholesterol in plasma are around 200 mg/dL. However, a large proportion has higher levels than this reference value. In this work, we analyze the rheological properties of human blood obtained from 20 donors, as a function of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, upon a protocol previously approved by the health authorities. Samples with high and low cholesterol and triglyceride levels were selected and analyzed by simple-continuous and linear-oscillatory shear flow. Rheometric properties were measured and related to the structure and composition of human blood. In addition, rheometric data were modeled by using several constitutive equations: Bautista-Manero-Puig (BMP) and the multimodal Maxwell equations to predict the flow behavior of human blood. Finally, a comparison was made among various models, namely, the BMP, Carreau and Quemada equations for simple shear rate flow. An important relationship was found between cholesterol, triglycerides and the structure of human blood. Results show that blood with high cholesterol levels (400 mg/dL) has flow properties fully different (higher viscosity and a more pseudo-plastic behavior) than blood with lower levels of cholesterol (tendency to Newtonian behavior or viscosity plateau at low shear rates).

  12. Information Flow Analysis for Human-System Interaction in the SG Level Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Shin, Yeong Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between automatic control and operators is one of main issues in the application of automation technology. Inappropriate information from automatic control systems causes unexpected problems in human-automation collaboration. Poor information becomes critical, especially when the operator takes over the control from an automation system. Operators cannot properly handle the situation transferred from the automatic mode because of inadequate situation awareness, if the operator is out-of-the loop and the automatic control system fails. Some cases of unplanned reactor trips during the transition between the manual mode and the automatic mode are reported in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Among unplanned reactor trips since 2002, two cases were partially caused by automation-related failures of steam generator (SG) level control. This paper conducts information flow analysis to identify information and control requirement for human-system interaction of SG level control. At first, this paper identifies the level of automation in SG level control systems and then function allocation between system control and human operators. Then information flow analysis for monitoring and transition of automation is performed by adapting job process chart. Information and control requirements will be useful as an input for the human-system interface (HSI) design of SG level control

  13. Composition and function of macroencapsulated human embryonic stem cell-derived implants: comparison with clinical human islet cell grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motté, Evi; Szepessy, Edit; Suenens, Krista; Stangé, Geert; Bomans, Myriam; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Ling, Zhidong; Kroon, Evert; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    β-Cells generated from large-scale sources can overcome current shortages in clinical islet cell grafts provided that they adequately respond to metabolic variations. Pancreatic (non)endocrine cells can develop from human embryonic stem (huES) cells following in vitro derivation to pancreatic endoderm (PE) that is subsequently implanted in immune-incompetent mice for further differentiation. Encapsulation of PE increases the proportion of endocrine cells in subcutaneous implants, with enrichment in β-cells when they are placed in TheraCyte-macrodevices and predominantly α-cells when they are alginate-microencapsulated. At posttransplant (PT) weeks 20-30, macroencapsulated huES implants presented higher glucose-responsive plasma C-peptide levels and a lower proinsulin-over-C-peptide ratio than human islet cell implants under the kidney capsule. Their ex vivo analysis showed the presence of single-hormone-positive α- and β-cells that exhibited rapid secretory responses to increasing and decreasing glucose concentrations, similar to isolated human islet cells. However, their insulin secretory amplitude was lower, which was attributed in part to a lower cellular hormone content; it was associated with a lower glucose-induced insulin biosynthesis, but not with lower glucagon-induced stimulation, which together is compatible with an immature functional state of the huES-derived β-cells at PT weeks 20-30. These data support the therapeutic potential of macroencapsulated huES implants but indicate the need for further functional analysis. Their comparison with clinical-grade human islet cell grafts sets references for future development and clinical translation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Population-level impact, herd immunity, and elimination after human papillomavirus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brisson, Marc; Bénard, Élodie; Drolet, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundModelling studies have been widely used to inform human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination policy decisions; however, many models exist and it is not known whether they produce consistent predictions of population-level effectiveness and herd effects. We did a systematic review and meta-a...

  15. Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels were determined among HIV patients visiting St Camillus Hospital, Uromi, Edo State, Nigeria, between January to March, 2013. Fifty (50) HIV patients (20 males; 30 females) and 50 control subjects (24 males; 26 females) were enrolled for this study. The clinical status of ...

  16. Contrast media effect on interleukin-2 levels in human plasma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolov, Yu.K.; Borsukova, N.M.; Shimanovskij, N.L.

    1992-01-01

    As shown in the study of bilignost, iodamide and triombrast action on interleukin-2 (IL-2) level in human plasma in vitro, these contrast media (2.5x10 -2 -2.5x10 -4 M) elevate IL-2 content in blood plasma of sensitive to contrast media subjects in dose-dependent manner

  17. Availability verification of information for human system interface in automatic SG level control using activity diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuraslinda, Anuar; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Uljugun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Steam Generator (SG) level control system in OPR 1000 is one of representative automatic systems that falls under the Supervisory Control level in Endsley's taxonomy. Supervisory control of automated systems is classified as a form of out of the loop (OOTL) performance due to passive involvement in the systems operation, which could lead to loss of situation awareness (SA). There was a reported event, which was caused by inadequate human automation communication that contributed to an unexpected reactor trip in July 2005. A high SG level trip occurred in Yeonggwang (YGN) Unit 6 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) due to human operator failure to recognize the need to change the control mode of the economizer valve controller (EVC) to manual mode during swap over (the transition from low power mode to high power mode) after the loss of offsite power (LOOP) event was recovered. This paper models the human system interaction in NPP SG level control system using Unified Modeling Language (UML) Activity Diagram. Then, it identifies the missing information for operators in the OPR1000 Main Control Room (MCR) and suggests some means of improving the human system interaction.

  18. Availability verification of information for human system interface in automatic SG level control using activity diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraslinda, Anuar; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) level control system in OPR 1000 is one of representative automatic systems that falls under the Supervisory Control level in Endsley's taxonomy. Supervisory control of automated systems is classified as a form of out of the loop (OOTL) performance due to passive involvement in the systems operation, which could lead to loss of situation awareness (SA). There was a reported event, which was caused by inadequate human automation communication that contributed to an unexpected reactor trip in July 2005. A high SG level trip occurred in Yeonggwang (YGN) Unit 6 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) due to human operator failure to recognize the need to change the control mode of the economizer valve controller (EVC) to manual mode during swap over (the transition from low power mode to high power mode) after the loss of offsite power (LOOP) event was recovered. This paper models the human system interaction in NPP SG level control system using Unified Modeling Language (UML) Activity Diagram. Then, it identifies the missing information for operators in the OPR1000 Main Control Room (MCR) and suggests some means of improving the human system interaction

  19. The potential pitfalls of studying adult sex ratios at aggregate levels in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollet, Thomas V.; Stoevenbelt, Andrea H.; Kuppens, Toon

    2017-01-01

    Human adult sex ratios have been studied extensively across the biological and social sciences. While several studies have examined adult sex ratio effects in a multilevel perspective, many studies have focused on effects at an aggregated level only. In this paper, we review some key issues relating

  20. Water distribution and related morphology in human stratum corneum at different hydration levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, J.A.; Graaff, de A.; Gooris, G.S.; Nijsse, J.; Wiechers, J.W.; Aelst, van A.C.

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on the water distribution in human stratum corneum and on the swelling of the corneocytes. For this purpose stratum corneum was hydrated to various levels and used either for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or for cryo-scanning electron microscopy. The images were analyzed

  1. Risk factors for human-directed canine aggression in a referral level clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, M; Casey, R A; Loftus, B A; Blackwell, E J

    2017-07-07

    Risk factors for human-directed aggression were investigated using retrospective analysis of data from a referral-level clinical behaviour population in the UK. A sample of 200 cases involving human-directed canine aggression and 200 control cases involving no instance of human-directed aggression were selected at random from a population of 746 cases. The final model suggested that clinical cases with human-directed aggression were significantly younger than those presenting with other undesired behaviours (P=0.008) and that male dogs were 1.4 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings than female dogs (P=0.019). Dogs were 1.7 times more likely to be aggressive towards people if they had attended more than five puppy classes than if they had never attended puppy class (P=0.015) and that dogs were 2.8 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings if there was another dog between 0 months and 24 months of age in the home (P=0.004). These factors only account for 7 per cent to 10 per cent of the variance between the human-directed aggression population and the control population, but factors such as attendance at puppy classes and numbers of dogs in the household suggest the need for longitudinal studies to investigate temporal relationships.

  2. Radioimmunoassay of Human Thyrotropin - Part 1. Plasma TSH levels in various thyroid functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Ro, Heung Kyu; Lee, Mun Ho

    1972-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay of human thyrotropin was performed in various thyroid states, utilizing the anti-h-T.S.H. antibody and purified human thyrotropin supplied from National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, Bethesda, Ma., U.S.A., and human thyrotropin standard-A obtained from National Institute for Biologic Standards, Mill Hill, London, England. 131 I labelled h-TSH was prepared after the Chloramine-T method of Greenwood et al. This double antibody system had a assay sensitivity of about l. 0 μU/ml of plasma HTS-A and could detect the plasma h-TSH level in the euthyroid patients. Plasma h-TSH level of the normal 26 Korean was l.1±0. 83 μU/ml, and that of the 8 hypothyroidisms were 8.3 to 67.5 μU/ml. In hyperthyroidisms, no cases showed the plasma h-TSH levels over l. 0 μU/ ml. Between the hypothyroidism and euthyroidism, no overlap is noticed on plasma h-TSH levels. A case of transient hypothyroid state identified by determination of plasma h-TSH level is presented. These results revealed that the radioimmunoassay of h-TSH in plasma could be a sensitive method to diagnose the hypothyroidism, if not caused by a pituitary disease.

  3. Levels of dechloranes and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in human serum from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Catherine; Pirard, Catherine; Scholl, Georges; De Pauw, Edwin; Viel, Jean-François; Shen, Li; Reiner, Eric J; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    Human exposure to dechloranes has been evaluated in Western Europe (France) with the analysis of Dechlorane Plus (DP), Dechloranes (Dec) 602, 603 and 604, Chlordene Plus (CP) and Mirex in 48 serum samples collected between 2003 and 2005. While no production source has been identified in Europe until now, detection frequencies for all investigated dechloranes were high, except for Dec 604 which was below detection limit for all samples. The mean DP concentration was 1.40±1.40ng/g lipid weight (lw), lower than levels reported in serum from Chinese population, but higher than levels reported in Canadian human milk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that ∑5dechlorane levels are reported for human serum. A specific pattern of contamination was found (Dec 603>DP>Mirex>Dec 602>CP) compared to other biota samples that have been analyzed from Europe, with Dec 603 as the most abundant dechlorane (mean level: 2.61±2.63ng/g lw). Dec 603 and CP levels were correlated with age and with levels of some bioaccumulative organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). These results indicate that bioaccumulation properties should be further investigated and taken in consideration when assessing human exposure to dechloranes. For comparison purposes, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels were also measured for BDE-47, -99, -100, -153 and -154 in the serum samples. As expected, BDE-47 and BDE-153 were the major congeners with mean levels of 2.06±1.80ng/g lw and 1.39±0.97ng/g lw, respectively. The mean ∑5PBDE levels (4.32±2.99ng/g lw) were in the range typical of Western Europe levels, but lower than the mean ∑5dechlorane levels (6.24±4.16ng/g lw). These results indicate that the attention to dechloranes should be continued if research indicates toxicological concerns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing the subjective task difficulty of human operators with task description levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea; Yang, Joon Eon

    2011-01-01

    Without the loss of generality, it is reasonable to say that an operating procedure consists of many steps including detailed descriptions that provide necessary information in conducting the required tasks safely and effectively. In this regard, since it is widely perceived that procedures are effective for reducing the occurrence of human performance related problems, the use of procedures is very popular in large process control systems including nuclear power plants (NPPs), commercial airplanes and railway systems. However, the secure of an operational safety by using an operating procedure can be accomplished only if human operators are able to effectively obtain necessary information from it. In other words, it is hard to expect the reduction of human performance related problems, if task descriptions are so ambiguous or incomplete that human operators feel an undue difficulty in identifying 'what have to be done' and 'how to do it' from procedures. Unfortunately, it seems that a systematic method that can be used to distinguish the proper level of task descriptions is rare. For this reason, Park et al. developed a decision chart that could be helpful for characterizing the level of task descriptions. In this study, in order to ensure the appropriateness of the suggested decision chart, more detailed investigations were conducted with the support of human operators who are working as the operating personnel of NPPs

  5. Does dietary iodine regulate oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-02-10

    Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk.

  6. Levels of PCBs, DDT, DDE and DDD in Italian human blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, C. La; Abate, V.; Alivernini, S.; Iacovella, N.; Mantovani, A.; Turrio-Baldassarri, L. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita, Roma (Italy); Silvestroni, L.; Spera, G. [Dept. of Medical Pathophysiology, Univ. (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    The environmental contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is effecting the exposure of the general population in a direct way through air inhalation, ingestion of particulate matter and dermal absorption and, most of all, in an indirect way through diet. Diet represents, in fact, the main way of human exposure to PCBs. PCBs have potential teratogenic, carcinogenic, hormonal and immunological effects. An association between endometriosis and high levels of PCB in plasma has also been reported3. Moreover, some congeners (PCB 105, PCB 118, PCB 153) have effects on thyroid hormones in animal models, although the PCB dose used in these experiments was an order of magnitude higher than the estimated human exposure. Humans are, however, exposed to a complex mixtures of PCB congeners. In this study identification and quantification of 60 PCB congeners and 3 chlorinated pesticides in human whole blood samples are presented. The subjects examined in this pilot study were a small group of patients with possible endocrine-related problems and unknown specific exposure. The aim of this study was to increase the present understanding about the distribution of the PCBs in human whole blood. The levels of DDT and metabolites were measured as well, since these compounds are consistently reported to contribute to the whole body burden of persistent chlorinated compounds, together with PCBs.

  7. Toward a framework for levels of robot autonomy in human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Jenay M; Fisk, Arthur D; Rogers, Wendy A

    2014-07-01

    A critical construct related to human-robot interaction (HRI) is autonomy, which varies widely across robot platforms. Levels of robot autonomy (LORA), ranging from teleoperation to fully autonomous systems, influence the way in which humans and robots may interact with one another. Thus, there is a need to understand HRI by identifying variables that influence - and are influenced by - robot autonomy. Our overarching goal is to develop a framework for levels of robot autonomy in HRI. To reach this goal, the framework draws links between HRI and human-automation interaction, a field with a long history of studying and understanding human-related variables. The construct of autonomy is reviewed and redefined within the context of HRI. Additionally, the framework proposes a process for determining a robot's autonomy level, by categorizing autonomy along a 10-point taxonomy. The framework is intended to be treated as guidelines to determine autonomy, categorize the LORA along a qualitative taxonomy, and consider which HRI variables (e.g., acceptance, situation awareness, reliability) may be influenced by the LORA.

  8. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  9. [Influence of human body target's spectral characteristics on visual range of low light level image intensifiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ju; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Hui; Liu, Lei; Tao, Yuan-Yaun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on low light level (LLL) image intensifier's distance, based on the spectral characteristics of the night-sky radiation and the spectral reflective coefficients of common clothes, we established a equation of human body target's spectral reflective distribution, and analyzed the spectral reflective characteristics of different human targets wearing the clothes of different color and different material, and from the actual detection equation of LLL image intensifier distance, discussed the detection capability of LLL image intensifier for different human target. The study shows that the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on LLL image intensifier distance is mainly reflected in the average reflectivity rho(-) and the initial contrast of the target and the background C0. Reflective coefficient and spectral reflection intensity of cotton clothes are higher than polyester clothes, and detection capability of LLL image intensifier is stronger for the human target wearing cotton clothes. Experimental results show that the LLL image intensifiers have longer visual ranges for targets who wear cotton clothes than targets who wear same color but polyester clothes, and have longer visual ranges for targets who wear light-colored clothes than targets who wear dark-colored clothes. And in the full moon illumination conditions, LLL image intensifiers are more sensitive to the clothes' material.

  10. Ontology-Based High-Level Context Inference for Human Behavior Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Villalonga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a huge progress in the automatic identification of individual primitives of human behavior, such as activities or locations. However, the complex nature of human behavior demands more abstract contextual information for its analysis. This work presents an ontology-based method that combines low-level primitives of behavior, namely activity, locations and emotions, unprecedented to date, to intelligently derive more meaningful high-level context information. The paper contributes with a new open ontology describing both low-level and high-level context information, as well as their relationships. Furthermore, a framework building on the developed ontology and reasoning models is presented and evaluated. The proposed method proves to be robust while identifying high-level contexts even in the event of erroneously-detected low-level contexts. Despite reasonable inference times being obtained for a relevant set of users and instances, additional work is required to scale to long-term scenarios with a large number of users.

  11. Ontology-Based High-Level Context Inference for Human Behavior Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalonga, Claudia; Razzaq, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio; Lee, Sungyoung; Banos, Oresti

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a huge progress in the automatic identification of individual primitives of human behavior, such as activities or locations. However, the complex nature of human behavior demands more abstract contextual information for its analysis. This work presents an ontology-based method that combines low-level primitives of behavior, namely activity, locations and emotions, unprecedented to date, to intelligently derive more meaningful high-level context information. The paper contributes with a new open ontology describing both low-level and high-level context information, as well as their relationships. Furthermore, a framework building on the developed ontology and reasoning models is presented and evaluated. The proposed method proves to be robust while identifying high-level contexts even in the event of erroneously-detected low-level contexts. Despite reasonable inference times being obtained for a relevant set of users and instances, additional work is required to scale to long-term scenarios with a large number of users. PMID:27690050

  12. Basal HIF-1a expression levels are not predictive for radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, D.; Multhoff, G.; Helmholtz Center Munich, CCG - Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, Munich; Bayer, C.; Emmerich, K.; Molls, M.; Vaupel, P.; Huber, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    High levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a in tumors are reported to be associated with tumor progression and resistance to therapy. To examine the impact of HIF-1a on radioresistance under normoxia, the sensitivity towards irradiation was measured in human tumor cell lines that differ significantly in their basal HIF-1a levels. HIF-1a levels were quantified in lysates of H1339, EPLC-272H, A549, SAS, XF354, FaDu, BHY, and CX- tumor cell lines by ELISA. Protein levels of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), and GAPDH were assessed by Western blot analysis. Knock-down experiments were performed using HIF-1a siRNA. Clonogenic survival after irradiation was determined by the colony forming assay. According to their basal HIF-1a status, the tumor cell lines were divided into low (SAS, XF354, FaDu, A549, CX-), intermediate (EPLC-272H, BHY), and high (H1339) HIF-1a expressors. The functionality of the high basal HIF-1a expression in H1339 cells was proven by reduced CA IX expression after knocking-down HIF-1a. Linear regression analysis revealed no correlation between basal HIF-1a levels and the survival fraction at either 2 or 4 Gy in all tumor cell lines investigated. Our data suggest that basal HIF-1a levels in human tumor cell lines do not predict their radiosensitivity under normoxia. (orig.)

  13. Redifferentiation of insulin-secreting cells after in vitro expansion of adult human pancreatic islet tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, Andreas; Nolan, Anna L.; Blacken, Robyn A.; Habener, Joel F.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular replacement therapy holds promise for the treatment of diabetes mellitus but donor tissue is severely limited. Therefore, we investigated whether insulin-secreting cells could be differentiated in vitro from a monolayer of cells expanded from human donor pancreatic islets. We describe a three-step culture protocol that allows for the efficient generation of insulin-producing cell clusters from in vitro expanded, hormone-negative cells. These clusters express insulin at levels of up to 34% that of average freshly isolated human islets and secrete C-peptide upon membrane depolarization. They also contain cells expressing the other major islet hormones (glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide). The source of the newly differentiated endocrine cells could either be indigenous stem/progenitor cells or the proliferation-associated dedifferentiation and subsequent redifferentiation of mature endocrine cells. The in vitro generated cell clusters may be efficacious in providing islet-like tissue for transplantation into diabetic recipients

  14. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, Shanghai 200063 (China); Liu, Siwen [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Liang [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Xiao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Basic Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lei, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine, University-Town Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Peng, Xiaojun [Jingjie PTM BioLab (Hangzhou) Co. Ltd, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Cheng, Zhongyi [Advanced Institute of Translational Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. Methods: The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Results: We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Conclusions: Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. - Highlights: • We used SILAC-based proteomics to analyze the acetylome of BDV infected OL cells. • We quantified 791Kac sites in 473 proteins. • Bioinformatic analysis revealed altered acetylation of metabolic proteins et al. • BDV manipulates the OL acetylome towards higher energy and transporter levels. • BDV infection is associated with enriched phosphate-associated metabolic processes.

  15. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xia; Liu, Siwen; Bode, Liv; Liu, Chengyu; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Li, Dan; Lei, Yang; Peng, Xiaojun; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. Methods: The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Results: We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Conclusions: Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. - Highlights: • We used SILAC-based proteomics to analyze the acetylome of BDV infected OL cells. • We quantified 791Kac sites in 473 proteins. • Bioinformatic analysis revealed altered acetylation of metabolic proteins et al. • BDV manipulates the OL acetylome towards higher energy and transporter levels. • BDV infection is associated with enriched phosphate-associated metabolic processes.

  16. Hematocrit and Hemoglobin Levels of Nonhuman Apes at Moderate Altitudes: A Comparison with Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Wilfong, DeeAnn

    2016-12-01

    Mortola, Jacopo P. and DeeAnn Wilfong. Hematocrit and hemoglobin levels of nonhuman apes at moderate altitudes: a comparison with humans. High Alt Med Biol. 17:323-335, 2016.-We asked to what extent the hematologic response (increase in hematocrit [Hct] and in blood hemoglobin concentration [Hb]) of humans to altitude hypoxia was shared by our closest relatives, the nonhuman apes. Data were collected from 29 specimens of 7 species of apes at 2073 m altitude (barometric pressure Pb = 598 mm Hg); additional data originated from apes located at a lower altitude (1493 m, Pb = 639 mm Hg). The human altitude profiles of Hct and Hb between sea level and 3000 m were constructed from a compilation of literature sources that (all combined) comprised data sets of 10,000-12,000 subjects for each gender. These human data were binned for 0-250 m altitude (sea level) and for each 500 m of progressively higher altitudes. Values of Hb and Hct of both men and women were significantly higher than at sea level at the 1500 bin (1250-1750 m); hence, the altitude threshold for the human hematological responses must be between 1000 and 1500 m. In the nonhuman apes, no increase in Hct or Hb was apparent at 1500 m; at 2000 m, the increase was significant only for the Hb of females. At either altitude in the group of nonhuman apes, the increase in Hct was much less than in humans, and that of Hb was significantly less at 1500 m. We conclude that lack of, or minimal, hematopoietic response to moderate altitude can occur in mammalian species that are not genetically adapted to high altitudes. Polycythemia is not a common response to altitude hypoxia and, at least at moderate altitudes, the degree of the human response may represent the exception among apes rather than the rule.

  17. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Sano

    Full Text Available Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH and kappa-chain (hIGK germline loci (named as κHAC are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO. However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR complex, we partially replaced (bovinized the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO, the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  18. Plasma PCSK9 levels are significantly modified by statins and fibrates in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbikay Majambu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin-like 9 (PCSK9 is a secreted glycoprotein that is transcriptionally regulated by cholesterol status. It modulates levels of circulating low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC by negatively regulating low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR levels. PCSK9 variants that result in 'gain of function' have been linked to autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia, while significant protection from coronary artery disease has been documented in individuals who carry 'loss of function' PCSK9 variants. PCSK9 circulates in human plasma, and we previously reported that plasma PCSK9 is positively correlated with total cholesterol and LDLC in men. Results Herein, we report the effects of two lipid-modulating therapies, namely statins and fibrates, on PCSK9 plasma levels in human subjects. We also document their effects on endogenous PCSK9 and LDLR expression in a human hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, using immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analyses. Changes in plasma PCSK9 following fenofibrate or gemfibrozil treatments (fibric acid derivatives were inversely correlated with changes in LDLC levels (r = -0.558, p = 0.013. Atorvastatin administration (HMGCoA reductase inhibitor significantly increased plasma PCSK9 (7.40%, p = 0.033 and these changes were inversely correlated with changes in LDLC levels (r = -0.393, p = 0.012. Immunoblot analyses of endogenous PCSK9 and LDLR expression by HepG2 cells in response to statins and fibrates showed that LDLR is more upregulated than PCSK9 by simvastatin (2.6× vs 1.5×, respectively at 10 μM, while fenofibrate did not induce changes in either. Conclusion These results suggest that in vivo (1 statins directly increase PCSK9 expression while (2 fibrates affect PCSK9 expression indirectly through its modulation of cholesterol levels and (3 that these therapies could be improved by combination with a PCSK9 inhibitor, constituting a novel hypercholesterolemic therapy

  19. Applications Geiger-Muller detectors monitor the level of radioactivity in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear technology is the technology high risk, because of an application and implementation have to support by human skill. The support facility has to complete and up to date, or modern. It means if the accident occurs in mistake have to do or delayed something, they can solved that problem. So the probability the risk of accident can be minimized. The specific problem is in the implementation nuclear technology on the human safety which is works in the radiation field or in the environment where they are working. The pointer that the problems have to design the tools monitor to monitoring the value radiation maximum was allowed. The tools monitor design is giving the information signal, if the radiation level maximum have over limit. Whereas the high and low level radiation can be just depend on the needed. (author)

  20. Mechanical Properties of Human Patellar Tendon at the Hierarchical levels of Tendon and Fibril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue

    2012-01-01

    Tendons are strong hierarchical structures, but how tensile forces are transmitted between different levels remains incompletely understood. Collagen fibrils are thought to be primary determinants of whole tendon properties, and therefore we hypothesized that the whole human patellar tendon and its...... distinct collagen fibrils would display similar mechanical properties. Human patellar tendons (n=5) were mechanically tested in vivo by ultrasonography. Biopsies were obtained from each tendon and individual collagen fibrils were dissected and tested mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The Young...... that of tendon supports that fibrillar rather than interfibrillar properties govern sub-failure tendon response, making the fibrillar level a meaningful target of intervention. The lower modulus found in vitro suggests a possible adverse effect of removing the tissue from its natural environment. In addition...

  1. Interevent time distributions of human multi-level activity in a virtual world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mryglod, O.; Fuchs, B.; Szell, M.; Holovatch, Yu.; Thurner, S.

    2015-02-01

    Studying human behavior in virtual environments provides extraordinary opportunities for a quantitative analysis of social phenomena with levels of accuracy that approach those of the natural sciences. In this paper we use records of player activities in the massive multiplayer online game Pardus over 1238 consecutive days, and analyze dynamical features of sequences of actions of players. We build on previous work where temporal structures of human actions of the same type were quantified, and provide an empirical understanding of human actions of different types. This study of multi-level human activity can be seen as a dynamic counterpart of static multiplex network analysis. We show that the interevent time distributions of actions in the Pardus universe follow highly non-trivial distribution functions, from which we extract action-type specific characteristic 'decay constants'. We discuss characteristic features of interevent time distributions, including periodic patterns on different time scales, bursty dynamics, and various functional forms on different time scales. We comment on gender differences of players in emotional actions, and find that while males and females act similarly when performing some positive actions, females are slightly faster for negative actions. We also observe effects on the age of players: more experienced players are generally faster in making decisions about engaging in and terminating enmity and friendship, respectively.

  2. Hypoxia and oxidation levels of DNA and lipids in humans and animal experimental models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Risom, Lotte; Lundby, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the association between hypoxia and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Evaluation criteria encompassed specificity and validation status of the biomarkers, study design, strength of the association, dose-response relationship, biological plausibility......, analogous exposures, and effect modification by intervention. The collective interpretation indicates persuasive evidence from the studies in humans for an association between hypoxia and elevated levels of oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. The levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions and lipid...... in subjects at high altitude. Most of the animal experimental models should be interpreted with caution because the assays for assessment of lipid peroxidation products have suboptimal validity....

  3. FAST COMMUNICATION: A PDE Based Two Level Model of the Masking Property of the Human Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Jack; Qi, Yingyong

    2003-01-01

    Human ear has the masking property that certain audible sound becomes inaudible in the presence of another sound. Masking is quantified by the raised threshold from the absolute hearing threshold in quiet. It is of scientific and practical importance to compute masking thresholds. Empirical models on masking have applications in low bit rate digital music compression. A first principle based two level model is developed with partial differential equation (PDE) at the periphe...

  4. Human intrusion into geologic repositories for high-level radioactive waste: potential and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, F X [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1981-12-01

    Isolation of high-level radioactive waste over long periods of time requires protection not only from natural events and processes, but also from the deliberate or inadvertent activities of future societies. This paper evaluates the likelihood of inadvertent human intrusion due to the loss of societal memory of the repository site. In addition measures to prevent inadvertent intrusion, and to guide future societies in any decision to deliberately intrude into the repository are suggested.

  5. Association Between Human Hair Loss and the Expression Levels of Nucleolin, Nucleophosmin, and UBTF Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Sener; Eroz, Recep; Dogan, Hasan; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Sahin, Ibrahim; Kara, Murat; Engin, Ragip Ismail; Turkez, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleolar organizer regions, also known as argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions, are associated with ribosomal genes. The main function of the nucleolus is the rapid production of ribosomal subunits, a process that must be highly regulated to provide the appropriate levels for cellular proliferation and cell growth. There are no studies in the literature addressing the expression and function of nucleolar component proteins, including nucleophosmin, nucleolin and the upstream binding transcription factor (UBTF), in human follicular hair cells. Nineteen healthy males who had normal and sufficient hair follicles on the back of the head, but exhibited hair loss on the frontal/vertex portions of the head and 14 healthy males without hair loss were included in the current study. Gene expression levels were measured by relative quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. In the individuals suffering from alopecia, the total expression levels of nucleolin, nucleophosmin, and UBTF were lower in normal sites than in hair loss sites. Strong expression level correlations were detected between: nucleophosmin and nucleolin; nucleophosmin and UBTF, and nucleolin and UBTF for both groups. There was an association between human hair loss and the expression levels of nucleolin, nucleophosmin, and UBTF genes.

  6. Levels of contamination for various pollutants present in Belgian human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouwe, N. Van; Goeyens, L. [Scientific Inst. of Public Health, Brussels (Belgium); Covaci, A. [Toxicological Center, Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium); Kannan, K. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States); Gordon, J.; Chu, A. [Xenobiotic Detection System Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Eppe, G.; Pauw, E. De [Center of Analysis of residues in Traces (CART), Univ. of Liege (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    During the last century, numerous compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), were banned because of their bioaccumulative and toxic properties, while other compounds, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), appeared on the market and consequently in the environment. The experiences gained from accidents involving PBBs, PCBs or PCDD/Fs are useful to conduct scientific investigations focused on preventing similar catastrophies with the newly introduced compounds. Several studies have reported potential increase in the concentration of PBDEs in food and wildlife. Monitoring the levels of toxic chemicals is therefore useful to understand the exposure pathways, sources and trends. The aim of the paper is to present actual contamination's levels of various pollutants in human plasma from Belgium. Several classes of pollutants, such PCDD/Fs, PCBs and OCPs were determined in 20 human plasmas. In addition, perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and related fluorochemicals, which are of current concern, were measured. Although anticipated, concentrations of PBDEs in the same samples were not yet determined. Through this study, a good approximation of the contamination level in Belgian human is given, allowing thus comparison with concentrations observed in other countries.

  7. Investigation of prostaglandin levels in human milk after high performance liquid chromatography purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu-Wang, C.Y.; Neu, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate five prostaglandins (PGs), i.e. PGE 2 , PGF/sub 2α/, 13-14-dihydro-15-keto-PGF/sub 2α/ (DHKF/sub 2α/), thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/), measured by (RIA) after C 18 Sep-Pak extraction and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two trials were performed. In each trial, 3-5 mature human milk samples were pooled, acidified and extracted for PGs. The separation of PGs by HPLC was achieved by using an isocratic solvent system of acetonitrile/water (pH 3.0) (32/68, V/V). The PG levels from the two trials were determined and averaged after monitoring the recoveries. The results indicate that PGE 2 and DHKF/sub 2α/ are the two major PGs found in extracted human milk. However, after HPLC purification, no predominant PG is found and the levels of all the five PGs are much lower compared to the extracted sample. Since the immunoreactive material was also detected in HPLC fractions not within the PG peak, low levels of PG found in human milk after HPLC is likely due to the purification step removing the bulk of nonspecific immunoreactive substances present in the sample

  8. Investigation on bisphenol A levels in human milk and dairy supply chain: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercogliano, Raffaelina; Santonicola, Serena

    2018-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), widely used as additive in food packaging, is an environmental and food contaminant that shows a weak estrogenic activity in general population and toxicity in the infant population. A temporary tolerable daily intake (t-TDI) of 4 μg/kg bw/day and a migration limit of 0.6 mg/kg in food from plastic materials, intended to come in contact with food, were fixed. Dietary milk is important in the human diet. The review investigated the contamination levels in human milk and along the dairy supply chain. Despite the reported levels are generally below the fixed limits, breast milk is considered a continuous low-level exposure to endocrine-active compounds for infants. In addition, BPA residues are detected in milk and dairy products posing a risk to human health. BPA enters into milk chain via multiple pathways at various points during milk production (e.g., PVC tubing used during the milking process, transfer from bulk milk to storage tanks, during milk processing). To prevent or mitigate this hazard, a specific TDI for infants is recommended and evaluation of risk factors at each phase of the dairy supply chain, in the quality systems, is recommended. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Late Holocene Lake Level Fluctuations at Laguna Arapa, Peru and Connections to Human Demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, A. L.; Abbott, M. B.; Werne, J. P.; Arkush, E.; Thompson, L. G.; Ferland, T.; Holmes, E.; Puhnaty, C.; Woods, A.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between variations in hydroclimate and human demography on the Peruvian Altiplano has significant implications for understanding how people in the past have adapted to changes in freshwater resources. To investigate these human-environmental interactions, this project presents a 2,000 year sediment record from Laguna Arapa, a large lake that is Titicaca. Using sedimentology and stratigraphy as well as a suite of organic geochemical proxies including fecal 5β-stanols and leaf waxes (long chain n-alkanoic acids), we aim to tie together proxies of human population with indicators of regional hydroclimate. Preliminary results of sedimentology and stratigraphy show notable transitions from sand to silt to clay, suggesting rising lake level sequences at 500 and 700 AD. The last 1,300 years of sediment are characterized by alternating layers of organic rich material with abundant charcoal and black inorganic clay, suggesting intermittent periods of aridity and/or anthropogenic fire-setting. These layers are particularly frequent during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, which was characterized by dry and warm conditions. These results agree well with other records of hydroclimate from regional lakes as well as accumulation rate and temperature from the Quelccaya ice cap. Organic geochemical work is currently in progress and shows promise for linking together proxies of human demography with hydroclimate to understand the relationship between human settlement and climate change.

  10. Cholinergic signaling mediates the effects of xenin-25 on secretion of pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin or glucagon in humans with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyan Wang

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that infusion of an intestinal peptide called xenin-25 (Xen amplifies the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP on insulin secretion rates (ISRs and plasma glucagon levels in humans. However, these effects of Xen, but not GIP, were blunted in humans with type 2 diabetes. Thus, Xen rather than GIP signaling to islets fails early during development of type 2 diabetes. The current crossover study determines if cholinergic signaling relays the effects of Xen on insulin and glucagon release in humans as in mice. Fasted subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were studied. On eight separate occasions, each person underwent a single graded glucose infusion- two each with infusion of albumin, Xen, GIP, and GIP plus Xen. Each infusate was administered ± atropine. Heart rate and plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, and pancreatic polypeptide (PP levels were measured. ISRs were calculated from C-peptide levels. All peptides profoundly increased PP responses. From 0 to 40 min, peptide(s infusions had little effect on plasma glucose concentrations. However, GIP, but not Xen, rapidly and transiently increased ISRs and glucagon levels. Both responses were further amplified when Xen was co-administered with GIP. From 40 to 240 min, glucose levels and ISRs continually increased while glucagon concentrations declined, regardless of infusate. Atropine increased resting heart rate and blocked all PP responses but did not affect ISRs or plasma glucagon levels during any of the peptide infusions. Thus, cholinergic signaling mediates the effects of Xen on insulin and glucagon release in mice but not humans.

  11. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  12. Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg...... and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min...... and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin....

  13. Human factors evaluation of level 2 and level 3 automated driving concepts : past research, state of automation technology, and emerging system concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Within the context of automation Levels 2 and 3, this report documents the proceedings from a literature review of key : human factors studies that was performed related to automated vehicle operations. This document expands and updates : the results...

  14. CSF levels of hypocretin-1 (orexin-A) peak during early infancy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Adi; Shors, Irina; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schimmel, Michael S

    2012-02-01

    Hypocretin (orexin) is a unique neuropeptide involved in the consolidation of wakefulness and sleep. Although hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are stable after infancy, how levels change in preterm and term human infants is unknown. Hypocretin-1 levels were measured in CSF samples, obtained from 284 preterm (25-37 gestational weeks) and full-term infants in the first 4 months of life and 35 older children (ages 0.5-13 years), in a tertiary hospital. Detailed clinical and laboratory data were collected for each of the 319 participants. Based on that data, 108 neurologically intact children were selected (95 infants [43 preterm and 52 term] and 13 older children). CSF hypocretin-1 was measured by direct radioimmunoassay. Hypocretin-1 levels at the first weeks of the 3rd embryonic trimester (gestational age [GA] 28-34 weeks) were 314 ± 65 pg/mL (n = 17). The levels linearly increased during the third trimester and early infancy (r = 0.6), peaking in infants of 2-4 months ages (476 ± 72 pg/mL; n = 16) and decreasing thereafter; hypocretin levels in 2- to 4-month-old infants were significantly higher than those in children 0.5-13 years old (353 ± 78 pg/mL, n = 13; P = 0.0001). The present findings indicate that in human infants, CSF hypocretin-1 increases during the third embryonic trimester and is highest at 4 months of life. Thereafter, and consistent with previously published results, hypocretin levels are lower and stable until the geriatric age. This pattern may reflect the role of hypocretin in the dramatic process of sleep and wakefulness consolidation that occurs during early infancy.

  15. Vitamin A levels and human immunodeficiency virus load in injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, R D; Farzadegan, H; Vlahov, D

    1997-01-01

    Although low plasma vitamin A levels are associated with increased mortality and higher vertical transmission during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, it is unknown whether plasma low vitamin A levels are a marker for circulating HIV load. We conducted a cross-sectional study within a prospective cohort study of injection drug users in order to evaluate the relationship between plasma vitamin A levels and HIV viral load. Plasma vitamin A level was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Infectious viral load was measured by quantitative microculture of serial fivefold dilutions of 10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A total of 284 HIV-infected adults (79 women, 205 men) were studied. Plasma vitamin A levels consistent with deficiency were found in 28.9% of adults. A total of 38.0% of women and 25.3% of men had vitamin A deficiency (P < 0.04). The median infectious viral load for the entire study population was 8 infectious units per million cells. No significant relationship between plasma vitamin A levels and infectious viral load was observed in these injection drug users. This study suggests that there is no correlation between HIV viral load and plasma vitamin A levels in injection drug users, and these variables may represent independent risk factors during HIV infection. HIV-infected adult women appear to be at higher risk of developing vitamin A deficiency. PMID:9008289

  16. Approaches for establishing human health no effect levels for engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschberger, K.; Christensen, F. M.

    2011-07-01

    Current Technical Guidance Documents for preparing risk assessments, like the guidance for the implementation of REACH, have limited focus on chemical substances in the particulate form and generally do not focus on substances in the nanoform. Within the ENRHES project a comprehensive and critical scientific review of publicly available health and safety information on four types of nanoparticles was performed. Based on the identified exposure and hazard data, basic human health risk assessment appraisals were carried out for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, nano-silver and nano-titanium dioxide. These risk assessment appraisals followed the structure of a regulatory risk assessment and if possible and relevant, it was attempted to derive indicative human no-effect levels from key studies by applying assessment factors as suggested in the technical guidance document for REACH. These assessment factors address differences and uncertainty related to exposure features between test animals and humans (time, respiratory volume), other interspecies and intraspecies differences and factors for extrapolation to chronic duration. If required, the severity of effects and the quality of the database can be addressed by additional factors. Recently other procedures for deriving human no-effect levels have been published and these are compared to the ENRHES basic risk assessment appraisals. The main differences were observed in relation to evaluating the differences in animal and human exposure situations and interspecies differences, and in applying assessment factors for intraspecies differences for local effects. The applicability of the REACH guidance for nanomaterials is currently being investigated for possible adaptations, considering the specific behaviour and mode of action of nanomaterials.

  17. Approaches for establishing human health no effect levels for engineered nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschberger, K; Christensen, F M

    2011-01-01

    Current Technical Guidance Documents for preparing risk assessments, like the guidance for the implementation of REACH, have limited focus on chemical substances in the particulate form and generally do not focus on substances in the nanoform. Within the ENRHES project a comprehensive and critical scientific review of publicly available health and safety information on four types of nanoparticles was performed. Based on the identified exposure and hazard data, basic human health risk assessment appraisals were carried out for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, nano-silver and nano-titanium dioxide. These risk assessment appraisals followed the structure of a regulatory risk assessment and if possible and relevant, it was attempted to derive indicative human no-effect levels from key studies by applying assessment factors as suggested in the technical guidance document for REACH. These assessment factors address differences and uncertainty related to exposure features between test animals and humans (time, respiratory volume), other interspecies and intraspecies differences and factors for extrapolation to chronic duration. If required, the severity of effects and the quality of the database can be addressed by additional factors. Recently other procedures for deriving human no-effect levels have been published and these are compared to the ENRHES basic risk assessment appraisals. The main differences were observed in relation to evaluating the differences in animal and human exposure situations and interspecies differences, and in applying assessment factors for intraspecies differences for local effects. The applicability of the REACH guidance for nanomaterials is currently being investigated for possible adaptations, considering the specific behaviour and mode of action of nanomaterials.

  18. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells....

  19. The predictive nature of transcript expression levels on protein expression in adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2017-04-24

    Next generation sequencing methods are the gold standard for evaluating expression of the transcriptome. When determining the biological implications of such studies, the assumption is often made that transcript expression levels correspond to protein levels in a meaningful way. However, the strength of the overall correlation between transcript and protein expression is inconsistent, particularly in brain samples. Following high-throughput transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) and proteomic (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses of adult human brain samples, we compared the correlation in the expression of transcripts and proteins that support various biological processes, molecular functions, and that are located in different areas of the cell. Although most categories of transcripts have extremely weak predictive value for the expression of their associated proteins (R 2 values of < 10%), transcripts coding for protein kinases and membrane-associated proteins, including those that are part of receptors or ion transporters, are among those that are most predictive of downstream protein expression levels. The predictive value of transcript expression for corresponding proteins is variable in human brain samples, reflecting the complex regulation of protein expression. However, we found that transcriptomic analyses are appropriate for assessing the expression levels of certain classes of proteins, including those that modify proteins, such as kinases and phosphatases, regulate metabolic and synaptic activity, or are associated with a cellular membrane. These findings can be used to guide the interpretation of gene expression results from primate brain samples.

  20. Aging Affects Adaptation to Sound-Level Statistics in Human Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Maess, Burkhard; Johnsrude, Ingrid S

    2018-02-21

    Optimal perception requires efficient and adaptive neural processing of sensory input. Neurons in nonhuman mammals adapt to the statistical properties of acoustic feature distributions such that they become sensitive to sounds that are most likely to occur in the environment. However, whether human auditory responses adapt to stimulus statistical distributions and how aging affects adaptation to stimulus statistics is unknown. We used MEG to study how exposure to different distributions of sound levels affects adaptation in auditory cortex of younger (mean: 25 years; n = 19) and older (mean: 64 years; n = 20) adults (male and female). Participants passively listened to two sound-level distributions with different modes (either 15 or 45 dB sensation level). In a control block with long interstimulus intervals, allowing neural populations to recover from adaptation, neural response magnitudes were similar between younger and older adults. Critically, both age groups demonstrated adaptation to sound-level stimulus statistics, but adaptation was altered for older compared with younger people: in the older group, neural responses continued to be sensitive to sound level under conditions in which responses were fully adapted in the younger group. The lack of full adaptation to the statistics of the sensory environment may be a physiological mechanism underlying the known difficulty that older adults have with filtering out irrelevant sensory information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Behavior requires efficient processing of acoustic stimulation. Animal work suggests that neurons accomplish efficient processing by adjusting their response sensitivity depending on statistical properties of the acoustic environment. Little is known about the extent to which this adaptation to stimulus statistics generalizes to humans, particularly to older humans. We used MEG to investigate how aging influences adaptation to sound-level statistics. Listeners were presented with sounds drawn from

  1. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Abdul Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0. Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin, lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL, genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1, glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4, proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations.

  2. Relationship between the level of essential metal elements in human hair and coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor-Tsung Hsieh; Kai-Yuan Cheng; Ying-Chen Chang

    2011-01-01

    Studies on epidemics have demonstrated the relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and mineral substances, such as selenium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, and vanadium, in human bodies. In this study, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) were applied to evaluate the levels of selenium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, copper, zinc, and iron in healthy individuals and CHD patients. Hair samples were collected from 42 healthy participants and 28 diagnosed CHD patients. Calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc levels in healthy individuals are significantly higher than the levels found in the patients (p < 0.01). Calcium/selenium ratio is also significantly higher in healthy individuals (p < 0.05). Based on the possible synergies and/or antagonisms of elements and their absorption and metabolism, magnesium/calcium, zinc/copper, and sodium/potassium ratios showed positive relevance (p < 0.01). (author)

  3. A hybrid modeling with data assimilation to evaluate human exposure level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Y. S.; Cheong, H. K.; Choi, D.; Kim, A. L.; Yun, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure models are designed to better represent human contact with PM (Particulate Matter) and other air pollutants such as CO, SO2, O3, and NO2. The exposure concentrations of the air pollutants to human are determined by global and regional long range transport of global and regional scales from Europe and China as well as local emissions from urban and road vehicle sources. To assess the exposure level in detail, the multiple scale influence from background to local sources should be considered. A hybrid air quality modeling methodology combing a grid-based chemical transport model with a local plume dispersion model was used to provide spatially and temporally resolved air quality concentration for human exposure levels in Korea. In the hybrid modeling approach, concentrations from a grid-based chemical transport model and a local plume dispersion model are added to provide contributions from photochemical interactions, long-range (regional) transport and local-scale dispersion. The CAMx (Comprehensive Air quality Model with Extensions was used for the background concentrations from anthropogenic and natural emissions in East Asia including Korea while the road dispersion by vehicle emission was calculated by CALPUFF model. The total exposure level of the pollutants was finally assessed by summing the background and road contributions. In the hybrid modeling, the data assimilation method based on the optimal interpolation was applied to overcome the discrepancies between the model predicted concentrations and observations. The air quality data from the air quality monitoring stations in Korea. The spatial resolution of the hybrid model was 50m for the Seoul Metropolitan Ares. This example clearly demonstrates that the exposure level could be estimated to the fine scale for the exposure assessment by using the hybrid modeling approach with data assimilation.

  4. Mercury contamination in human hair and fish from Cambodia: levels, specific accumulation and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Monirith, In; Tana, Touch Seang; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations in human hair and fish samples from Phnom Penh, Kien Svay, Tomnup Rolork and Batrong, Cambodia, collected in November 1999 and December 2000 were determined to understand the status of contamination, and age- and sex-dependent accumulation in humans and to assess the intake of mercury via fish consumption. Mercury concentrations in human hair ranged from 0.54 to 190 μg/g dry wt. About 3% of the samples contained Hg levels exceeding the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) of WHO (50 μg/g) and the levels in some hair samples of women also exceeded the NOAEL (10 μg/g) associated with fetus neurotoxicity. A weak but significant positive correlation was observed between age and Hg levels in hair of residents. Mercury concentrations in muscle of marine and freshwater fish from Cambodia ranged from <0.01 to 0.96 μg/g wet wt. Mercury intake rates were estimated on the basis of the Hg content in fish and daily fish consumption. Three samples of marine fish including sharp-tooth snapper and obtuse barracuda, and one sample of sharp-tooth snapper exceeded the guidelines by US EPA and by Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), respectively, which indicates that some fish specimens examined (9% and 3% for US EPA and JECFA guidelines, respectively) were hazardous for consumption at the ingestion rate of Cambodian people (32.6 g/day). It is suggested that fish is probably the main source of Hg for Cambodian people. However, extremely high Hg concentrations were observed in some individuals and could not be explained by Hg intake from fish consumption, indicating some other contamination sources of Hg in Cambodia. - A source other than fish may be responsible for high Hg in some Cambodians

  5. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes

  6. Entropy Generation and Human Aging: Lifespan Entropy and Effect of Physical Activity Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos; Annamalai, Kalyan

    2008-06-01

    The first and second laws of thermodynamics were applied to biochemical reactions typical of human metabolism. An open-system model was used for a human body. Energy conservation, availability and entropy balances were performed to obtain the entropy generated for the main food components. Quantitative results for entropy generation were obtained as a function of age using the databases from the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which provide energy requirements and food intake composition as a function of age, weight and stature. Numerical integration was performed through human lifespan for different levels of physical activity. Results were presented and analyzed. Entropy generated over the lifespan of average individuals (natural death) was found to be 11,404 kJ/ºK per kg of body mass with a rate of generation three times higher on infants than on the elderly. The entropy generated predicts a life span of 73.78 and 81.61 years for the average U.S. male and female individuals respectively, which are values that closely match the average lifespan from statistics (74.63 and 80.36 years). From the analysis of the effect of different activity levels, it is shown that entropy generated increases with physical activity, suggesting that exercise should be kept to a “healthy minimum” if entropy generation is to be minimized.

  7. Entropy Generation and Human Aging: Lifespan Entropy and Effect of Physical Activity Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Annamalai

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The first and second laws of thermodynamics were applied to biochemical reactions typical of human metabolism. An open-system model was used for a human body. Energy conservation, availability and entropy balances were performed to obtain the entropy generated for the main food components. Quantitative results for entropy generation were obtained as a function of age using the databases from the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board (FNB and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, which provide energy requirements and food intake composition as a function of age, weight and stature. Numerical integration was performed through human lifespan for different levels of physical activity. Results were presented and analyzed. Entropy generated over the lifespan of average individuals (natural death was found to be 11,404 kJ/ºK per kg of body mass with a rate of generation three times higher on infants than on the elderly. The entropy generated predicts a life span of 73.78 and 81.61 years for the average U.S. male and female individuals respectively, which are values that closely match the average lifespan from statistics (74.63 and 80.36 years. From the analysis of the effect of different activity levels, it is shown that entropy generated increases with physical activity, suggesting that exercise should be kept to a “healthy minimum” if entropy generation is to be minimized.

  8. Apolipoprotein A5: A newly identified gene impacting plasmatriglyceride levels in humans and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-09-15

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is a newly described member of theapolipoprotein gene family whose initial discovery arose from comparativesequence analysis of the mammalian APOA1/C3/A4 gene cluster. Functionalstudies in mice indicated that alteration in the level of APOA5significantly impacted plasma triglyceride concentrations. Miceover-expressing human APOA5 displayed significantly reducedtriglycerides, while mice lacking apoA5 had a large increase in thislipid parameter. Studies in humans have also suggested an important rolefor APOA5 in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations. In theseexperiments, polymorphisms in the human gene were found to define severalcommon haplotypes that were associated with significant changes intriglyceride concentrations in multiple populations. Several separateclinical studies have provided consistent and strong support for theeffect with 24 percent of Caucasians, 35 percent of African-Americans and53 percent of Hispanics carrying APOA5 haplotypes associated withincreased plasma triglyceride levels. In summary, APOA5 represents anewly discovered gene involved in triglyceride metabolism in both humansand mice whose mechanism of action remains to be deciphered.

  9. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of erythropoietin: circulating levels in normal and polycythemic human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.F.; Ebbe, S.N.; Hollander, L.; Cutting, H.O.; Miller, M.E.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques are described in detail for the RIA of human Ep in unextracted plasma or serum. With 100 μl of sample, the assay is sensitive at an Ep concentration of approximately 4 mU/ml, and when required, the sensitivity can be increased to 0.4 mU/ml, a range considerably less than the concentration observed in normal human beings. This is approximately 100 times more sensitive than existing in vivo bioassays for this hormone. Studies concerned with the validation of the Ep RIA show a high degree of correlation with the polycythemic mouse bioassay. Dilutions of a variety of human serum samples show a parallel relationship with the standard reference preparation for Ep. Validation of the RIA is further confirmed by observations of appropriate increases or decreases of circulating Ep levels in physiological and clinical conditions known to be associated with stimulation or suppression of Ep secretion. Significantly different mean serum concentrations of 17.2 mU/ml for normal male subjects and 18.8 mU/ml for normal female subjects were observed. Mean plasma Ep concentrations in patients with polycythemia vera are significantly decreased, and those of patients with secondary polycythemia are significantly increased as compared to plasma levels in normal subjects. These results demonstrate an initial practical value of the Ep RA in the hematology clinic, which will most certainly be expanded with its more extensive use

  11. Provincial human development index, a guide for efficiency level analysis: the case of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabermahani, Asma; Barouni, Mohsen; Seyedin, Hesam; Aryankhesal, Aidin

    2013-01-01

    Human Development Index (HDI) is a composite indicator that can show the impact of economic strategies on human life standards. The index is calculated by three main factors of income, education and health. This research studies the status of HDI across the Iranian provinces, its changes over time and the efficiency of provinces in using resources. The data for 2001 and 2009 was obtained from the Iranian Center of Statistics. Data envelopment analysis technique was used to analyze the data. To calculate the efficiency, Banker, Charnes and Cooper's model was used. The national mean for the HDI in 2001 was 0.717 while it grew to 0.747 in 2009. Except for one province, all others had an improved human development index. Low ranked provinces such as Sistan & Baluchistan and Kurdistan stayed at the bottom in 2009 as well. Some provinces such as Bushehr with developing oil industries, or those purposively benefited from national oil income showed good growth. In some provinces, such as Hormozgan, out-migration of manpower to its neighboring province, Bushehr, was associated with decrease of the provincial income level. The number of efficient provinces increased from 5 to 13 in 2009. Iran falls among countries with high human development index based on the 2009 data. However, the distribution of HDI status across provinces was highly varied and the difference between high- and low-developed provinces increased in 2009. The government needs to revise policies concerning distribution of resources among the provinces.

  12. Genetic, anatomic, and clinical determinants of human serum sterol and vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Kozlitina, Julia; Thompson, Bonne M; McDonald, Jeffrey G; King, Kevin S; Russell, David W

    2014-09-23

    An unknown fraction of the genome participates in the metabolism of sterols and vitamin D, two classes of lipids with diverse physiological and pathophysiological roles. Here, we used mass spectrometry to measure the abundance of >60 sterol and vitamin D derivatives in 3,230 serum samples from a well-phenotyped patient population. Twenty-nine of these lipids were detected in a majority of samples at levels that varied over thousands of fold in different individuals. Pairwise correlations between sterol and vitamin D levels revealed evidence for shared metabolic pathways, additional substrates for known enzymes, and transcriptional regulatory networks. Serum levels of multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites varied significantly by sex, ethnicity, and age. A genome-wide association study identified 16 loci that were associated with levels of 19 sterols and 25-hydroxylated derivatives of vitamin D (P < 10(-7)). Resequencing, expression analysis, and biochemical experiments focused on one such locus (CYP39A1), revealed multiple loss-of-function alleles with additive effects on serum levels of the oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a substrate of the encoded enzyme. Body mass index, serum lipid levels, and hematocrit were strong phenotypic correlates of interindividual variation in multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites. We conclude that correlating population-based analytical measurements with genotype and phenotype provides productive insight into human intermediary metabolism.

  13. Relationship between plasma cholesterol levels and cholesterol esterification in isolated human mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallongeville, J.; Davignon, J.; Lussier-Cacan, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the relationship between plasma lipoprotein concentrations and cholesterol esterification in freshly isolated human mononuclear cells from 27 normolipidemic and 32 hyperlipidemic individuals. Cells were either incubated for 5 hours with radiolabeled oleate immediately after isolation or were preincubated for 18 hours in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, and then incubated with [ 14 C]sodium-oleate-albumin complex. In the absence of exogenous cholesterol, control and hypercholesterolemic subjects had similarly low values of intracellular cholesterol esterification. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, both hypertriglyceridemic and hypercholesterolemic subjects had higher cholesterol esterification than controls. There was a significant correlation between the rate of cholesterol esterification and plasma total cholesterol. These results suggest that plasma cholesterol levels may regulate mononuclear cell intra-cellular cholesterol esterification in humans

  14. Stress hormone levels in a freshwater turtle from sites differing in human activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polich, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone (CORT), commonly serve as a measure of stress levels in vertebrate populations. These hormones have been implicated in regulation of feeding behaviour, locomotor activity, body mass, lipid metabolism and other crucial behaviours and physiological processes. Thus, understanding how glucocorticoids fluctuate seasonally and in response to specific stressors can yield insight into organismal health and the overall health of populations. I compared circulating CORT concentrations between two similar populations of painted turtle, Chrysemys picta, which differed primarily in the level of exposure to human recreational activities. I measured basal CORT concentrations as well as the CORT stress response and did not find any substantive difference between the two populations. This similarity may indicate that painted turtles are not stressed by the presence of humans during the nesting season. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of CORT concentrations in freshwater reptiles, a group that is historically under-represented in studies of circulating hormone concentrations; specifically, studies that seek to use circulating concentrations of stress hormones, such as CORT, as a measure of the effect of human activities on wild populations. They also give insight into how these species as a whole may respond to human recreational activities during crucial life-history stages, such as the nesting season. Although there was no discernable difference between circulating CORT concentrations between the urban and rural populations studied, I did find a significant difference in circulating CORT concentrations between male and female C. picta. This important finding provides better understanding of the sex differences between male and female painted turtles and adds to our understanding of this species and other species of freshwater turtle.

  15. Electrocortical correlates of human level-ground, slope, and stair walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trieu Phat Luu

    Full Text Available This study investigated electrocortical dynamics of human walking across different unconstrained walking conditions (i.e., level ground (LW, ramp ascent (RA, and stair ascent (SA. Non-invasive active-electrode scalp electroencephalography (EEG signals were recorded and a systematic EEG processing method was implemented to reduce artifacts. Source localization combined with independent component analysis and k-means clustering revealed the involvement of four clusters in the brain during the walking tasks: Left and Right Occipital Lobe (LOL, ROL, Posterior Parietal Cortex (PPC, and Central Sensorimotor Cortex (SMC. Results showed that the changes of spectral power in the PPC and SMC clusters were associated with the level of motor task demands. Specifically, we observed α and β suppression at the beginning of the gait cycle in both SA and RA walking (relative to LW in the SMC. Additionally, we observed significant β rebound (synchronization at the initial swing phase of the gait cycle, which may be indicative of active cortical signaling involved in maintaining the current locomotor state. An increase of low γ band power in this cluster was also found in SA walking. In the PPC, the low γ band power increased with the level of task demands (from LW to RA and SA. Additionally, our results provide evidence that electrocortical amplitude modulations (relative to average gait cycle are correlated with the level of difficulty in locomotion tasks. Specifically, the modulations in the PPC shifted to higher frequency bands when the subjects walked in RA and SA conditions. Moreover, low γ modulations in the central sensorimotor area were observed in the LW walking and shifted to lower frequency bands in RA and SA walking. These findings extend our understanding of cortical dynamics of human walking at different level of locomotion task demands and reinforces the growing body of literature supporting a shared-control paradigm between spinal and

  16. Electrocortical correlates of human level-ground, slope, and stair walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Trieu Phat; Brantley, Justin A; Nakagome, Sho; Zhu, Fangshi; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated electrocortical dynamics of human walking across different unconstrained walking conditions (i.e., level ground (LW), ramp ascent (RA), and stair ascent (SA)). Non-invasive active-electrode scalp electroencephalography (EEG) signals were recorded and a systematic EEG processing method was implemented to reduce artifacts. Source localization combined with independent component analysis and k-means clustering revealed the involvement of four clusters in the brain during the walking tasks: Left and Right Occipital Lobe (LOL, ROL), Posterior Parietal Cortex (PPC), and Central Sensorimotor Cortex (SMC). Results showed that the changes of spectral power in the PPC and SMC clusters were associated with the level of motor task demands. Specifically, we observed α and β suppression at the beginning of the gait cycle in both SA and RA walking (relative to LW) in the SMC. Additionally, we observed significant β rebound (synchronization) at the initial swing phase of the gait cycle, which may be indicative of active cortical signaling involved in maintaining the current locomotor state. An increase of low γ band power in this cluster was also found in SA walking. In the PPC, the low γ band power increased with the level of task demands (from LW to RA and SA). Additionally, our results provide evidence that electrocortical amplitude modulations (relative to average gait cycle) are correlated with the level of difficulty in locomotion tasks. Specifically, the modulations in the PPC shifted to higher frequency bands when the subjects walked in RA and SA conditions. Moreover, low γ modulations in the central sensorimotor area were observed in the LW walking and shifted to lower frequency bands in RA and SA walking. These findings extend our understanding of cortical dynamics of human walking at different level of locomotion task demands and reinforces the growing body of literature supporting a shared-control paradigm between spinal and cortical

  17. [Correlation between RNA Expression Level and Early PMI in Human Brain Tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Y H; Ma, K J; Li, Z H; Gu, J; Bao, J Y; Yang, Z F; Gao, J; Zeng, Y; Tao, L; Chen, L

    2016-08-01

    To explore the correlation between the expression levels of several RNA markers in human brain tissue and early postmortem interval (PMI). Twelve individuals with known PMI (range from 4.3 to 22.5 h) were selected and total RNA was extracted from brain tissue. Eight commonly used RNA markers were chosen including β -actin, GAPDH, RPS29, 18S rRNA, 5S rRNA, U6 snRNA, miRNA-9 and miRNA-125b, and the expression levels were detected in brain tissue by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The internal reference markers with stable expression in early PMI were screened using geNorm software and the relationship between its expression level and some relevant factors such as age, gender and cause of death were analyzed. RNA markers normalized by internal reference were inserted into the mathematic model established by previous research for PMI estimation using R software. Model quality was judged by the error rate calculated with estimated PMI. 5S rRNA, miRNA-9 and miRNA-125b showed quite stable expression and their expression levels had no relation with age, gender and cause of death. The error rate of estimated PMI using β -actin was 24.6%, while GAPDH was 41.0%. 5S rRNA, miRNA-9 and miRNA-125b are suitable as internal reference markers of human brain tissue owing to their stable expression in early PMI. The expression level of β -actin correlates well with PMI, which can be used as an additional index for early PMI estimation. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  18. Hormonal Responses to Cholinergic Input Are Different in Humans with and without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Peripheral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate insulin and glucagon release in rodents but their importance for similar roles in humans is unclear. Bethanechol, an acetylcholine analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was used to examine the role of peripheral muscarinic signaling on glucose homeostasis in humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 10, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 11, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n = 9. Subjects received four liquid meal tolerance tests, each with a different dose of oral bethanechol (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg given 60 min before a meal containing acetaminophen. Plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, glucose, glucagon, C-peptide, and acetaminophen concentrations were measured. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs were calculated from C-peptide levels. Acetaminophen and PP concentrations were surrogate markers for gastric emptying and cholinergic input to islets. The 150 mg dose of bethanechol increased the PP response 2-fold only in the IGT group, amplified GLP-1 release in the IGT and T2DM groups, and augmented the GIP response only in the NGT group. However, bethanechol did not alter ISRs or plasma glucose, glucagon, or acetaminophen concentrations in any group. Prior studies showed infusion of xenin-25, an intestinal peptide, delays gastric emptying and reduces GLP-1 release but not ISRs when normalized to plasma glucose levels. Analysis of archived plasma samples from this study showed xenin-25 amplified postprandial PP responses ~4-fold in subjects with NGT, IGT, and T2DM. Thus, increasing postprandial cholinergic input to islets augments insulin secretion in mice but not humans.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01434901.

  19. Human impacts on tides overwhelm the effect of sea level rise on extreme water levels in the Rhine-Meuse delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, N. E.; Hoitink, A. J F; van der Vegt, M.; Zhang, W.; Hoekstra, P.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to link tidal and subtidal water level changes to human interventions, 70. years of water level data for the Rhine-Meuse tidal river network is analysed using a variety of statistical methods. Using a novel parameterization of probability density functions, mean high and low water

  20. On the Climate Variability and Energy Demands for Indoor Human Comfort Levels in Tropical Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, R.; Ortiz, L. E.; González, J. E.; Ramírez-Beltran, N. D.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to identify how climate variability influences human comfort levels in tropical urban environments. San Juan Metropolitan Area (SJMA) of the island of Puerto Rico was chosen as a reference point. A new human discomfort index (HDI) based on environmental enthalpy is defined. This index is expanded to determine the energy required to maintain indoor human comfort levels and was compared to Total Electricity consumption for the Island of Puerto Rico. Regression analysis shows that both Temperature and HDI are good indictor to predict total electrical energy consumption. Results showed that over the past 35 years the average enthalpy have increased and have mostly been above thresholds for human comfort for SJMA. The weather stations data further shows a clear indication of urbanization biases ramping up the index considered. From the trend analysis local scale (weather station) data shows a decreasing rate of maximum cooling at -11.41 kW-h/years, and minimum is increasing at 10.64 kW-h/years. To compare human comfort levels under extreme heat wave events conditions, an event of 2014 in the San Juan area was identified. The analysis for this extreme heat event is complemented by data from the National Center for environmental Prediction (NCEP) at 250km spatial resolution, North American Re-Analysis (NARR) at 32 km spatial resolution, by simulations of the Weather Forecasting System (WRF) at a resolution of 2 km, and by weather station data for San Juan. WRF simulation's results showed an improvement for both temperature and relative humidity from the input NCEP data. It also shows that difference in Energy per Capita (EPC) in urban area during a heat wave event can increase to 16% over a non-urban area. Sensitivity analysis was done by modifying the urban land cover to the most common rural references of evergreen broadleaf forest and cropland to investigate the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect on HDI. UHI is seen to be maximum during

  1. High-level production of human interleukin-10 fusions in tobacco cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldis, Angelo; Ahmad, Adil; Reid, Alexandra; McGarvey, Brian; Brandle, Jim; Ma, Shengwu; Jevnikar, Anthony; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2013-01-01

    The production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants has made much progress in recent years with the development of transient expression systems, transplastomic technology and humanizing glycosylation patterns in plants. However, the first therapeutic proteins approved for administration to humans and animals were made in plant cell suspensions for reasons of containment, rapid scale-up and lack of toxic contaminants. In this study, we have investigated the production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) in tobacco BY-2 cell suspension and evaluated the effect of an elastin-like polypeptide tag (ELP) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag on IL-10 accumulation. We report the highest accumulation levels of hIL-10 obtained with any stable plant expression system using the ELP fusion strategy. Although IL-10-ELP has cytokine activity, its activity is reduced compared to unfused IL-10, likely caused by interference of ELP with folding of IL-10. Green fluorescent protein has no effect on IL-10 accumulation, but examining the trafficking of IL-10-GFP over the cell culture cycle revealed fluorescence in the vacuole during the stationary phase of the culture growth cycle. Analysis of isolated vacuoles indicated that GFP alone is found in vacuoles, while the full-size fusion remains in the whole-cell extract. This indicates that GFP is cleaved off prior to its trafficking to the vacuole. On the other hand, IL-10-GFP-ELP remains mostly in the ER and accumulates to high levels. Protein bodies were observed at the end of the culture cycle and are thought to arise as a consequence of high levels of accumulation in the ER. PMID:23297698

  2. Can Population-Level Laterality Stem from Social Pressures? Evidence from Cheek Kissing in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelain, Amandine; Pimbert, Pauline; Aube, Lydiane; Perrocheau, Océane; Debunne, Gilles; Bellido, Alain; Blois-Heulin, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the origins and functions of behavioural laterality remain largely unclear. One of the most striking unresolved issues is the fact that laterality generally occurs at the population-level. Why would the majority of the individuals of a population exhibit the same laterality, while individual-level laterality would yet provide the advantages in terms of improving behavioural efficiency? Are social pressures the key factor? Can social pressures induce alignment of laterality between the individuals of a population? Can the effect of social pressures overpass the effect of other possible determining factors (e.g. genes)? We tested this important new hypothesis in humans, for the first time. We asked whether population-level laterality could stem from social pressures. Namely, we assessed social pressures on laterality in an interactive social behaviour: kissing on the cheek as a greeting. We performed observations in 10 cities of France. The observations took place in spots where people of the city meet and greet each other. We showed that: a) there is a population-level laterality for cheek kissing, with the majority of individuals being aligned in each city, and b) there is a variation between populations, with a laterality that depends on the city. These results were confirmed by our complementary data from questionnaires and internet surveys. These findings show that social pressures are involved in determining laterality. They demonstrate that population-level laterality can stem from social pressures.

  3. Can Population-Level Laterality Stem from Social Pressures? Evidence from Cheek Kissing in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Chapelain

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, the origins and functions of behavioural laterality remain largely unclear. One of the most striking unresolved issues is the fact that laterality generally occurs at the population-level. Why would the majority of the individuals of a population exhibit the same laterality, while individual-level laterality would yet provide the advantages in terms of improving behavioural efficiency? Are social pressures the key factor? Can social pressures induce alignment of laterality between the individuals of a population? Can the effect of social pressures overpass the effect of other possible determining factors (e.g. genes? We tested this important new hypothesis in humans, for the first time. We asked whether population-level laterality could stem from social pressures. Namely, we assessed social pressures on laterality in an interactive social behaviour: kissing on the cheek as a greeting. We performed observations in 10 cities of France. The observations took place in spots where people of the city meet and greet each other. We showed that: a there is a population-level laterality for cheek kissing, with the majority of individuals being aligned in each city, and b there is a variation between populations, with a laterality that depends on the city. These results were confirmed by our complementary data from questionnaires and internet surveys. These findings show that social pressures are involved in determining laterality. They demonstrate that population-level laterality can stem from social pressures.

  4. Low-level lasers on microRNA and uncoupling protein 2 mRNA levels in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K. S.; Teixeira, A. F.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Paoli, F.; Nogueira, E. M.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNA is short non-coding RNA and is a mediator of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In addition, uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate thermogenesis, metabolic and energy balance, and decrease reactive oxygen species production. Both microRNA and UCP2 expression can be altered in cancer cells. At low power, laser wavelength, frequency, fluence and emission mode deternube photobiological responses, which are the basis of low-level laser therapy. There are few studies on miRNA and UCP mRNA levels after low-level laser exposure on cancer cells. In this work, we evaluate the micrRNA (mir-106b and mir-15a) and UCP2 mRNA levels in human breast cancer cells exposed to low-level lasers. MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers, total RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis and mRNA levels by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction were evaluated. Data show that mir-106b and mir-15a relative levels are not altered, but UCP2 mRNA relative levels are increased in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers at fluences used in therapeutic protocols.

  5. STUDY ON NOISE LEVEL GENERATED BY HUMAN ACTIVITIES IN SIBIU CITY, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina STANCA-MOISE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have proposed an analysis and monitoring of the noise sources in the open spaces of air traffic, rail and car in Sibiu. From centralizing data obtained from the analysis of the measurements performed with equipment noise levels, we concluded that the noise and vibration produced by means of Transportation (air, road, rail can affect human health if they exceed limits. Noise is present and part of our lives and always a source of pollution as any of modern man is not conscious.

  6. Association of a Human FABP1 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Altered Serum Triglyceride Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-E Peng

    Full Text Available Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, also known as fatty acid-binding protein 1 (FABP1, is a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. Elevated FABP1 levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and metabolic syndromes. In this study, we examine the association of FABP1 gene promoter variants with serum FABP1 and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Four promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of FABP1 gene were genotyped in a cross-sectional survey of healthy volunteers (n = 1,182 from Fuzhou city of China. Results showed that only the rs2919872 G>A variant was significantly associated with serum TG concentration(P = 0.032.Compared with the rs2919872 G allele, rs2919872 A allele contributed significantly to reduced serum TG concentration, and this allele dramatically decreased the FABP1 promoter activity(P < 0.05. The rs2919872 A allele carriers had considerably lower serum FABP1 levels than G allele carriers (P < 0.01. In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the rs2919872 A allele was negatively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = -0.320, P = 0.003, while serum TG levels were positively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = 0.487, P = 0.014. Our data suggest that compared with the rs2919872 G allele, the rs2919872 A allele reduces the transcriptional activity of FABP1 promoter, and thereby may link FABP1 gene variation to TG level in humans.

  7. High-level secretion of native recombinant human calreticulin in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Gold, Leslie I.

    2015-01-01

    , Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. RESULTS: Expression of a full-length human CRT precursor including its native signal sequence resulted in high-level secretion of mature recombinant protein into the culture medium by both S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris. To ensure the structural and functional...... by non-denaturing PAGE. Moreover, limited trypsin digestion yielded identical fragment patterns of calcium-binding recombinant and native CRT suggesting that the yeast-derived CRT was correctly folded. Furthermore, both native and recombinant CRT induced cellular proliferation (MTS assay) and migration...... recombinant CRT protein with yields reaching 75 % of total secreted protein and with production levels of 60 and 200 mg/l from S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris, respectively. Finally, cultivation of P. pastoris in a bioreactor yielded CRT secretion titer to exceed 1.5 g/l of culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: Yeasts...

  8. Aspirin effects on lymphocyte cyclic AMP levels in normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D E; Parker, C W

    1976-01-01

    In purified lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy human subjects who had ingested therapeutic doses of aspirin, there was a significant decrease in resting cyclic AMP levels as well as a partial inhibition of the rise in cyclic AMP with isoproterenol or prostaglandin E1. These changes were seen as early as 30 min after aspirin ingestion and did not appear to result from aspirin effects on lymphocyte recovery, purity, viability, or relative number of thymus- or bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. In contrast, the direct addition of aspirin to suspensions of purified peripheral lymphocytes did not significantly alter their cyclic AMP levels. However, an effect of aspirin could be obtained in vitro if aspirin was added to unprocessed whole blood during the dextran sedimentation phase of the cell purification. Thus the effect of aspirin on lymphocyte cyclic AMP metabolism, may be indirect, through other cells present in the peripheral blood. PMID:182720

  9. Human resource in tourism and hospitality industry: Relation between level of education and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a concise summary of current problems including the impact of education on (dissatisfaction of human resources in tourism and hospitality industry. In recent years, many researches have been focused on the phenomena of the relation between level of education and job satisfaction of the employees in tourism organizations as it is well known that employee satisfaction enhance competitiveness and efficiency in business. A current issue was set as the fundamental goal in designing this paper, and the basic parameter of the research is employee satisfaction with business operations and working conditions, or to be more precise, examining the extent of (dissatisfaction with the given segments depending on the employees' educational level. This paper represents a synthesis of the electronic research, the analysis of available references, as well as the use of descriptive, analytical and synthetic methods, and it will result in a critical analysis and confirmation (denial of certain hypotheses.

  10. Serum leptin levels in female patients with niddm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Z.; Rahman, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare serum leptin levels of diabetic and non-diabetic female subjects and also assess the relationship of hyperglycemia with serum insulin, C-peptide and leptin levels. Results: Serum leptin levels of obese diabetic and non-diabetic subjects were significantly higher as compared with lean diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects (P<0.05). Leptin levels were positively correlated with serum insulin and C-peptide levels. Serum leptin increased with increase in body mass index and waist hip ratio was strongly related with insulin resistance in NIDDM. Conclusion: Leptin levels are increased in obesity and may play a role in development of insulin resistance and NIDDM. (author)

  11. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD 50 ). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  12. Advancements toward a Systems Level Understanding of the Human Oral Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Scott Mclean

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral microbes represent one of the most well studied microbial communities owing to the fact that they are a fundamental part of human development influencing health and disease, an easily accessible human microbiome, a highly structured and remarkably resilient biofilm as well as a model of bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. In the last eighty years since oral plaque was first characterized for its functionally stable physiological properties such as the highly repeatable rapid pH decrease upon carbohydrate addition and subsequent recovery phase, the fundamental approaches to study the oral microbiome have cycled back and forth between community level investigations and characterizing individual model isolates. Since that time, many individual species have been well characterized and the development of the early plaque community, which involves many cell–cell binding interactions, has been carefully described. With high throughput sequencing enabling the enormous diversity of the oral cavity to be realized, a number of new challenges to progress were revealed. The large number of uncultivated oral species, the high interpersonal variability of taxonomic carriage and the possibility of multiple pathways to dysbiosis pose as major hurdles to obtain a systems level understanding from the community to the gene level. It is now possible however to start connecting the insights gained from single species with community wide approaches. This review will discuss some of the recent insights into the oral microbiome at a fundamental level, existing knowledge gaps, as well as challenges that have surfaced and the approaches to address them.

  13. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian

    2003-01-01

    The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized...... and applied for monitoring levels of dioxins in human milk samples. Combination effects of dioxin-like compounds were evaluated by testing potential mechanisms of interaction between seven of the major dioxin-like compounds in human milk using the isobole method. Results showed that the compounds acted...... lower REP in CALUX. The total dioxin-like activity was determined in 16 Danish human milk samples and was in the range 20.5-55.8 pg TEQ g(-1) fat. These values were compared with TEQs obtained from GC/MS analysis (range 14.8-43.6 pg TEQ-g(-1) fat) that overall were a little lower than CALUX TEQs...

  14. Economic growth and marine biodiversity: influence of human social structure on decline of marine trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Rebecca; York, Richard

    2008-04-01

    We assessed the effects of economic growth, urbanization, and human population size on marine biodiversity. We used the mean trophic level (MTL) of marine catch as an indicator of marine biodiversity and conducted cross-national time-series analyses (1960-2003) of 102 nations to investigate human social influences on fish catch and trends in MTL. We constructed path models to examine direct and indirect effects relating to marine catch and MTL. Nations' MTLs declined with increased economic growth, increased urbanization, and increased population size, in part because of associated increased catch. These findings contradict the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis, which claims that economic modernization will reduce human impact on the environment. To make informed decisions on issues of marine resource management, policy makers, nonprofit entities, and professional societies must recognize the need to include social analyses in overall conservation-research strategies. The challenge is to utilize the socioeconomic and ecological research in the service of a comprehensive marine-conservation movement.

  15. Human resources for health at the district level in Indonesia: the smoke and mirrors of decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harahap Nida P

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2001 Indonesia embarked on a rapid decentralization of government finances and functions to district governments. One of the results is that government has less information about its most valuable resource, the people who provide the services. The objective of the work reported here is to determine the stock of human resources for health in 15 districts, their service status and primary place of work. It also assesses the effect of decentralization on management of human resources and the implications for the future. Methods We enumerated all health care providers (doctors, nurses and midwives, including information on their employment status and primary place of work, in each of 15 districts in Java. Data were collected by three teams, one for each province. Results Provider density (number of doctors, nurses and midwives/1000 population was low by international standards – 11 out of 15 districts had provider densities less than 1.0. Approximately half of all three professional groups were permanent public servants. Contractual employment was also important for both nurses and midwives. The private sector as the primary source of employment is most important for doctors (37% overall and increasingly so for midwives (10%. For those employed in the public sector, two-thirds of doctors and nurses work in health centres, while most midwives are located at village-level health facilities. Conclusion In the health system established after Independence, the facilities established were staffed through a period of obligatory service for all new graduates in medicine, nursing and midwifery. The last elements of that staffing system ended in 2007 and the government has not been able to replace it. The private sector is expanding and, despite the fact that it will be of increasing importance in the coming decades, government information about providers in private practice is decreasing. Despite the promise of decentralization to

  16. Human resources for health at the district level in Indonesia: the smoke and mirrors of decentralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Peter F; Harahap, Nida P

    2009-02-03

    In 2001 Indonesia embarked on a rapid decentralization of government finances and functions to district governments. One of the results is that government has less information about its most valuable resource, the people who provide the services. The objective of the work reported here is to determine the stock of human resources for health in 15 districts, their service status and primary place of work. It also assesses the effect of decentralization on management of human resources and the implications for the future. We enumerated all health care providers (doctors, nurses and midwives), including information on their employment status and primary place of work, in each of 15 districts in Java. Data were collected by three teams, one for each province. Provider density (number of doctors, nurses and midwives/1000 population) was low by international standards--11 out of 15 districts had provider densities less than 1.0. Approximately half of all three professional groups were permanent public servants. Contractual employment was also important for both nurses and midwives. The private sector as the primary source of employment is most important for doctors (37% overall) and increasingly so for midwives (10%). For those employed in the public sector, two-thirds of doctors and nurses work in health centres, while most midwives are located at village-level health facilities. In the health system established after Independence, the facilities established were staffed through a period of obligatory service for all new graduates in medicine, nursing and midwifery. The last elements of that staffing system ended in 2007 and the government has not been able to replace it. The private sector is expanding and, despite the fact that it will be of increasing importance in the coming decades, government information about providers in private practice is decreasing. Despite the promise of decentralization to increase sectoral "decision space" at the district level, the

  17. Characteristics of functional enrichment and gene expression level of human putative transcriptional target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Naoki

    2018-01-19

    Transcriptional target genes show functional enrichment of genes. However, how many and how significantly transcriptional target genes include functional enrichments are still unclear. To address these issues, I predicted human transcriptional target genes using open chromatin regions, ChIP-seq data and DNA binding sequences of transcription factors in databases, and examined functional enrichment and gene expression level of putative transcriptional target genes. Gene Ontology annotations showed four times larger numbers of functional enrichments in putative transcriptional target genes than gene expression information alone, independent of transcriptional target genes. To compare the number of functional enrichments of putative transcriptional target genes between cells or search conditions, I normalized the number of functional enrichment by calculating its ratios in the total number of transcriptional target genes. With this analysis, native putative transcriptional target genes showed the largest normalized number of functional enrichments, compared with target genes including 5-60% of randomly selected genes. The normalized number of functional enrichments was changed according to the criteria of enhancer-promoter interactions such as distance from transcriptional start sites and orientation of CTCF-binding sites. Forward-reverse orientation of CTCF-binding sites showed significantly higher normalized number of functional enrichments than the other orientations. Journal papers showed that the top five frequent functional enrichments were related to the cellular functions in the three cell types. The median expression level of transcriptional target genes changed according to the criteria of enhancer-promoter assignments (i.e. interactions) and was correlated with the changes of the normalized number of functional enrichments of transcriptional target genes. Human putative transcriptional target genes showed significant functional enrichments. Functional

  18. Multimodal imaging of the human knee down to the cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, G.; Götz, C.; Müller-Gerbl, M.; Zanette, I.; Zdora, M.-C.; Khimchenko, A.; Deyhle, H.; Thalmann, P.; Müller, B.

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography reaches the best spatial resolution for the three-dimensional visualization of human tissues among the available nondestructive clinical imaging techniques. Nowadays, sub-millimeter voxel sizes are regularly obtained. Regarding investigations on true micrometer level, lab-based micro-CT (μCT) has become gold standard. The aim of the present study is firstly the hierarchical investigation of a human knee post mortem using hard X-ray μCT and secondly a multimodal imaging using absorption and phase contrast modes in order to investigate hard (bone) and soft (cartilage) tissues on the cellular level. After the visualization of the entire knee using a clinical CT, a hierarchical imaging study was performed using the lab-system nanotom® m. First, the entire knee was measured with a pixel length of 65 μm. The highest resolution with a pixel length of 3 μm could be achieved after extracting cylindrically shaped plugs from the femoral bones. For the visualization of the cartilage, grating-based phase contrast μCT (I13-2, Diamond Light Source) was performed. With an effective voxel size of 2.3 μm it was possible to visualize individual chondrocytes within the cartilage.

  19. Expression of DMP-1 in the human pulp tissue using low level laser therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Natalino Lourenço; Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Andrade Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Rodini, Camila Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on DMP-1 expression in pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. Twenty mandibular primary molars were randomly assigned into the following groups: Group I—Buckley’s Formocresol (FC); Group II—Calcium Hydroxide (CH); Group III—LLLT + CH and Group IV—LLLT + Zinc oxide/Eugenol. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Descriptive analysis was performed on the dentin pulp complex. Histopathological assessment showed internal resorption in group FC. Groups CH and LLLT + CH provided better pulpal repair due to the absence of inflammation and the formation of hard tissue barrier. These two groups presented odontoblastic layer expressing DMP-1. According to this study, low level laser therapy preceding the use of calcium hydroxide exhibited satisfactory bio-inductive activity on pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. However, other histological and cellular studies are needed to confirm the laser tissue action and efficacy. (paper)

  20. Human reliability analysis in support of a level 1 PRA for Surry during midloop operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.C.; Bley, D.C.; Chu, T.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) are to evaluate the important accident sequences initiated during midloop operations and to compare the qualitative and quantitative results with those for accidents initiated during power operations. The primary types of human actions analyzed in this study involve the dynamic operator actions and recovery actions that take place during the accident sequence following an initiating event. Two parts of the human actions were analyzed: failure to diagnose and failure to perform the action. The scope of the Level 1 PRA for Surry during midloop operations includes internal, fire, and flood initiating events. The major categories of dynamic operator actions taken during the accident sequence following an initiating event are: providing makeup to the reactor coolant system (RCS), restoring residual heat removal (RHR) cooling, establishing steam generator reflux cooling, establishing primary feed and spill, establishing gravity feed from refueling water storage tank (RWST), establishing high pressure recirculation, establishing recirculation spray, and cross-connecting RWSTs. All categories are not applicable to all initiating events and all plant operating states (POS). (author)

  1. Increase of {sup 210}Po levels in human semen fluid after mussel ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.co [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Radiometry-LARARA-PLS, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O.Box 100.436, 24001-970 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Programs in Environmental Science and Marine Biology, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Gouvea, Rita de Cassia dos Santos [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Radiometry-LARARA-PLS, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O.Box 100.436, 24001-970 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) radioactive concentrations were determined in human semen fluid of vasectomized non-smoker volunteers. The {sup 210}Po levels ranged from 0.10 to 0.39 mBq g{sup -1} (mean: 0.23 {+-} 0.08 mBq g{sup -1}). This value decreased to 0.10 {+-} 0.02 mBq g{sup -1} (range from 0.07 to 0.13 mBq g{sup -1}) after two weeks of a controlled diet, excluding fish and seafood. Then, volunteers ate during a single meal 200 g of the cooked mussel Perna perna L., and {sup 210}Po levels were determined again, during ten days, in semen fluid samples collected every morning. Volunteers continued with the controlled diet and maintained sexual abstinence through the period of the experiment. A 300% increase of {sup 210}Po level was observed the day following mussel consumption, with a later reduction, such that the level returned to near baseline by day 4.

  2. BUILDING HUMAN CAPITAL: THE IMPACT OF PARENTS´ INITIAL EDUCATIONAL LEVEL AND LIFELONG LEARNING ON THEIR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FISCHER, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of parents´ educational level on lifelong learning of children and relationship between parents´ and student´ lifelong learning including language skills and computer literacy. This intergenerational transmission, if proven, could influence the investments into the human capital in the long run. We used data from Adult Education Survey 2011 (AES to test the hypothesis that the parental attained level of education has a significant impact on the initial educational level of their children as well as on their lifelong learning participation. Furthermore, using data from AES, we tested the association between parental educational level and children´s language skills and reading activity and between parental non-formal as well as informal education and students´ lifelong learning. We have found that the parental effect on lifelong learning participation is slightly weaker than the effect of initial adult´s education. Nevertheless, the intergenerational transmission mechanism obviously works. The relationship between parental and students computer literacy is statistically significant, nevertheless weak. As for the nominal and ordinal character of the data, we used mainly the standard statistical methods including nonparametric tests, logit model and correspondence analysis.

  3. Morphology and function: MR pineal volume and melatonin level in human saliva are correlated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrich, Luisa-Sophie; Schredl, Michael; Findeisen, Peter; Groden, Christoph; Bumb, Jan Malte; Nölte, Ingo S

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the relation between circadian saliva melatonin levels and pineal volume as determined by MRI. Plasma melatonin levels follow a circadian rhythm with a high interindividual variability. In 103 healthy individuals saliva melatonin levels were determined at four time points within 24 h and MRI was performed once (3.0 Tesla, including three-dimensional T2 turbo spin echo [3D-T2-TSE], susceptibility-weighted imaging [SWI]). Pineal volume as well as cyst volume were assessed from multiplanar reconstructed 3D-T2-TSE images. Pineal calcification volume tissue was determined on SWI. To correct for hormonal inactive pineal tissue, cystic and calcified areas were excluded. Sleep quality was assessed with the Landeck Inventory for sleep quality disturbance. Solid and uncalcified pineal volume correlated to melatonin maximum (r = 0.28; P < 0.05) and area under the curve (r = 0.29; P < 0.05). Of interest, solid and uncalcified pineal volume correlated negatively with the sleep rhythm disturbances subscore (r = -0.17; P < 0.05) despite a very homogenous population. Uncalcified solid pineal tissue measured by 3D-T2-TSE and SWI is related to human saliva melatonin levels. The analysis of the sleep quality and pineal volume suggests a linkage between better sleep quality and hormonal active pineal tissue. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. CD36 Modulates Fasting and Preabsorptive Hormone and Bile Acid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibao, Cyndya A; Celedonio, Jorge E; Tamboli, Robyn; Sidani, Reem; Love-Gregory, Latisha; Pietka, Terri; Xiong, Yanhua; Wei, Yan; Abumrad, Naji N; Abumrad, Nada A; Flynn, Charles Robb

    2018-05-01

    Abnormal fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The FA receptor CD36 has been linked to risk of metabolic syndrome. In rodents CD36 regulates various aspects of fat metabolism, but whether it has similar actions in humans is unknown. We examined the impact of a coding single-nucleotide polymorphism in CD36 on postprandial hormone and bile acid (BA) responses. To examine whether the minor allele (G) of coding CD36 variant rs3211938 (G/T), which reduces CD36 level by ∼50%, influences hormonal responses to a high-fat meal (HFM). Obese African American (AA) women carriers of the G allele of rs3211938 (G/T) and weight-matched noncarriers (T/T) were studied before and after a HFM. Two-center study. Obese AA women. HFM. Early preabsorptive responses (10 minutes) and extended excursions in plasma hormones [C-peptide, insulin, incretins, ghrelin fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, FGF21], BAs, and serum lipoproteins (chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoprotein) were determined. At fasting, G-allele carriers had significantly reduced cholesterol and glycodeoxycholic acid and consistent but nonsignificant reductions of serum lipoproteins. Levels of GLP-1 and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were reduced 60% to 70% and those of total BAs were 1.8-fold higher. After the meal, G-allele carriers displayed attenuated early (-10 to 10 minute) responses in insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, gastric inhibitory peptide, and PP. BAs exhibited divergent trends in G allele carriers vs noncarriers concomitant with differential FGF19 responses. CD36 plays an important role in the preabsorptive hormone and BA responses that coordinate brain and gut regulation of energy metabolism.

  5. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated lo...

  6. The impact of low level radioactive waste on humans and environment the next 100 thousands years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, E.; Saetre, P.; Lindborg, T.; Norden, S.; Kautsky, U. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB - SKB (Sweden); Loefgren, A. [Ecoanalytica, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    A safety assessment for the extension of the low level repository of operational waste (SFR) has been performed (SR-PSU). The repository (both existing and planned extension) is situated c 60 - 120 m below the surface in archaean granitoid rock. SR-PSU evaluates the risk to humans and the environment for the next 100 000 years. During this time period considerable changes are expected in the surface environment due climate change and its effects on shore line displacement, terrestrialisation of lakes and expansion of forest and agricultural land. In this paper specific approaches and results for the surface ecosystems (i.e. biosphere) are presented. The transport and accumulation of radionuclides in marine, lake, and terrestrial ecosystems are modelled and expose of future human populations during present conditions, greenhouse warming, and peri-glacial climate conditions are estimated taking into account different habits and diets of future humans. A new radionuclide transport model was developed to improve the representation of C-14 in the ecosystem modelling. In SR-PSU it is shown that the primary release from the repository via the geosphere to the biosphere is focused to a small area that will be a mire in about 1000 year. The radionuclides can thereafter be transported to downstream lakes and sea ecosystems. The aquatic systems can be utilised for fish and water whereas the mire can either be utilised directly by e.g. collecting, mushroom berries, hay, or hunting, or the mire can be transformed to a small agricultural area and utilised for crops. Important dose contributing radionuclides from SFR are Cl-36, Mo-93, C-14, Ni-59 and I-129 and in some of the scenarios the dose is close to the regulatory limit of 14 μSv/y (i.e. the risk 10{sup -6}). For Non-human biota (NHB) doses are estimated with a novel implementation of the ERICA tool in Ecolego. Generally the same radionuclides contributes to dose to NHB (reference organisms and site -specific organisms) as

  7. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and osteopontin in human gingival crevicular fluid during initial tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Oswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During orthodontic treatment, the early response of periodontal tissues to mechanical stress involves several metabolic changes that allow tooth movement. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate osteopontin (OPN and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of human teeth exposed to orthodontic force. Materials and Methods: GCF samples were obtained from 15 healthy orthodontic patients (age, 12-22 years. In each patient, the left maxillary canine having the fixed orthodontic appliance was used as the test tooth, and its antagonist, with no appliance, was the control. Orthodontic force, 75 g was applied using a 16 × 22 beta titanium closing loop. The GCF sampling on the disto-buccal aspects of experimental and control tooth was performed at specific time interval with sterilized absorbent paper point. Processing was carried out with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect OPN and MMP-7 levels. Results: The peak level of OPN was seen after 1 h application of orthodontic force which was 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02. The peak level of MMP-7 was seen at 0 h which was 598.3 pg/ml ± 107.5. The levels of OPN after 1 h increased to 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02, and they decreased at 24 h to 1012.86 pg/ml ± 168.47 (P = 0.001. The levels of MMP-7 after 1 h decreased to 478 pg/ml ± 99.7 which increased at 24 h to 526.9 pg/ml ± 99.2. Conclusions: Orthodontic forces affect both OPN and MMP-7 protein levels on the compression side in a time-dependent fashion.

  8. C-14 bomb peak dating of human DNA samples at the microgram level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebl, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C, t 1/2 = 5700 ± 30 years) is probably the radionuclide with the most versatile applications, spanning from archaeology to geoscience and medicine. Many of these applications are finally limited by the minimum amount of carbon in which the isotopic ratio 14C/12C can be measured. The required carbon sample size has dramatically decreased with the development of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), typically from gram amounts for the classical beta counting method to about 1 milligram for AMS. The current work presents a further reduction into the few-μg carbon range. This means a decrease by a factor of one million compared to classical beta counting and is essential for the field of retrospective birth dating of human cells by means of radiocarbon from above-ground nuclear weapons testing between 1955 and 1963. The determination of 14C levels in genomic DNA can be used to retrospectively establish the birth date of cells in the human body. The main motive of the current work was to reduce the amount of carbon required for reliable 14C measurements to such an extent that investigations of neurons of particularly interesting small sections of the human brain (e.g. the olfactory bulb, bulbus olfactorius) were possible. In-depth investigations and development of 14C AMS sample preparation and measurement methods for μg-size DNA samples were carried out in close collaboration with the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. As the most significant result, 14C measurements of 4.6 μg carbon DNA samples were performed with an overall precision of 2.3%. This allowed to study neurogenesis in the human olfactory bulb, which turned out to take place primarily at birth. Assuming throughout life a constant annual renewal rate of neurons in the human olfactory bulb, an upper limit of 0.34% for the renewal rate (95% confidence) was determined. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) the μg carbon

  9. Pancreatic islet-like clusters from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of human first-trimester abortus can cure streptozocin-induced mouse diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Hua, Jinlian; Lei, Anmin; Lv, Changrong; Wang, Huayan; Yang, Chunrong; Gao, Zhimin; Dou, Zhongying

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been reported to possess low immunogenicity and cause immunosuppression of recipients when allografted. They can differentiate into insulin-producing cells and may be a valuable source for islet formation. However, the extremely low differentiating rate of adult BMSCs toward insulin-producing cells and the insufficient insulin secretion of the differentiated BMSCs in vitro prevent their clinical use in diabetes treatment. Little is known about the potential of cell replacement therapy with human BMSCs. Previously, we isolated and identified human first-trimester fetal BMSCs (hfBMSCs). Under a novel four-step induction procedure established in this study, the hfBMSCs effectively differentiated into functional pancreatic islet-like cell clusters that contained 62 ± 14% insulin-producing cells, expressed a broad gene profile related to pancreatic islet β-cell development, and released high levels of insulin (2.245 ± 0.222 pmol/100 clusters per 30 min) and C-peptide (2.200 ± 0.468 pmol/100 clusters per 30 min) in response to 25 mmol/L glucose stimulus in vitro. The pancreatic islet-like cell clusters normalized the blood glucose level of diabetic model mice for at least 9 weeks when xenografted; blood glucose levels in these mice rose abnormally again when the grafts were removed. Examination of the grafts indicated that the transplanted cells survived in recipients and produced human insulin and C-peptide in situ. These results demonstrate that hfBMSCs derived from a human first-trimester abortus can differentiate into pancreatic islet-like cell clusters following an established four-step induction. The insulin-producing clusters present advantages in cell replacement therapy of type 1 diabetic model mice.

  10. Environmental chemicals in human milk: a review of levels, infant exposures and health, and guidance for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaKind, Judy S.; Amina Wilkins, A.; Berlin, Cheston M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader to various science and policy aspects of the topic of environmental chemicals in human milk. Although information on environmental chemicals in human milk has been available since the 1950s, it is only relatively recently that public awareness of the issue has grown. This review on environmental chemicals in human milk provides a resource summarizing what is currently known about levels and trends of environmental chemicals in human milk, potential infant exposures, and benefits of breast-feeding relative to the risks of exposures to environmental chemicals. The term 'environmental chemicals', as it pertains to human milk, refers to many classes of exogenous chemicals that may be detected in human milk. For example, pharmaceutical agents and alcohol are environmental chemicals that have been found in human milk. Other chemicals, such as heavy metals and volatile organic compounds, have also been detected in human milk. Most research on environmental chemicals in human milk has concentrated on persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals. In this review, a description of human milk is provided, including a brief review of endogenous substances in human milk. Determinants of levels of PBTs are discussed, as are models that have been developed to predict levels of PBTs in human milk and associated body burdens in breast-feeding infants. Methodologies for human milk sampling and analysis, and concepts for consideration in interpretation and communication of study results, as developed by the Technical Workshop on Human Milk Surveillance and Research for Environmental Chemicals in the United States are described. Studies which have compared the health risks and benefits associated with breast-feeding and formula-feeding are discussed

  11. Influence of Breastfeeding Time on Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides in Human Milk of a Mexican Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Almazán, Luis A; Diaz-Ortiz, Jesús; Alarcón-Romero, Mario; Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Sampedro-Rosas, Laura; López-Silva, Saúl; Santiago-Moreno, Agustín; Rosas-Acevedo, José L; Waliszewski, Stefan M

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted with the objective of determining whether there is a depuration of organochlorine pesticides in breast milk according to breastfeeding time. In total, 171 samples from mothers that lived in the State of Guerrero, Mexico were analyzed. There was a weak negative relationship between pp'DDE (r = -0.216) and Σ-DDT (r = -0.222) concentrations with the days of lactation. In a comparison analysis, a statistically significant decrease of pp'DDT and pp'DDE levels was observed, as well as the Σ-DDT from the first to the fifth week of lactation. A reduction of 0.188 mg/kg lipid of pp'DDE and 0.181 mg/kg lipid of Σ-DDT per week was obtained. HCB, β-HCH and op'DDT concentrations were low and had no major fluctuations between subgroups. The low levels found and the observed reduction in time involve less exposure to the infant to these pollutants. Through this methodology changes in levels of certain organochlorine pesticides in various stages of human milk production may be shown.

  12. The impact of climate change and emissions control on future ozone levels: Implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jennifer D; Kim, Young-Min; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S; Chang, Howard H; Liu, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Overwhelming evidence has shown that, from the Industrial Revolution to the present, human activities influence ground-level ozone (O 3 ) concentrations. Past studies demonstrate links between O 3 exposure and health. However, knowledge gaps remain in our understanding concerning the impacts of climate change mitigation policies on O 3 concentrations and health. Using a hybrid downscaling approach, we evaluated the separate impact of climate change and emission control policies on O 3 levels and associated excess mortality in the US in the 2050s under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We show that, by the 2050s, under RCP4.5, increased O 3 levels due to combined climate change and emission control policies, could contribute to an increase of approximately 50 premature deaths annually nationwide in the US. The biggest impact, however, is seen under RCP8.5, where rises in O 3 concentrations are expected to result in over 2,200 additional premature deaths annually. The largest increases in O 3 are seen in RCP8.5 in the Northeast, the Southeast, the Central, and the West regions of the US. Additionally, when O 3 increases are examined by climate change and emissions contributions separately, the benefits of emissions mitigation efforts may significantly outweigh the effects of climate change mitigation policies on O 3 -related mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Association of human chorionic gonadotropin level in embryo culture media with early embryo development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Zhang, Renli; Han, Dong; Liu, Caixia; Cai, Jiajie; Bi, Yanling; Wen, Anmin; Quan, Song

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the association of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level on day 3 of embryo culture with embryo development. Spent culture media were collected from individually cultured embryos on day 3 of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. HCG concentration in the culture media was measured using an ELISA kit and its association with embryo development was assessed. In the 163 samples of embryo culture media from 60 patients, HCG was positive in 153 sample (93.8%) with a mean level of 0.85 ± 0.43 mIU/ml. The concentration of hCG in the culture media increased gradually as the number of blastomeres increased (F=2.273, P=0.03), and decreased as the morphological grade of the embryo was lowered (F=3.900, P=0.02). ELISA is capable of detecting HCG levels in spent culture media of embryos on day 3 of in vitro culture. The concentration of HCG in spent culture media is positively correlated with the status of early embryo development and implantation rate and thus serves as a useful marker for embryo selection in IVF-ET procedure.

  14. Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in human apical periodontitis: Correlation with clinical and histological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Karalic, Danijela; Soldatovic, Ivan; Popovic, Branka; Milasin, Jelena; Andric, Miroslav

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) between apical periodontitis lesions with different clinical and histological features. Based on clinical data and history of disease, 100 human apical periodontitis lesions were categorised as either asymptomatic or symptomatic lesions. According to histological examination, lesions were divided into periapical granulomas and radicular cysts. Pulp tissues of 25 impacted wisdom teeth were used as controls. Homogenised tissue samples were centrifuged and supernatants were used for the determination of cytokine levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Significantly higher levels of IL-1β and IL-6 were found in symptomatic lesions compared with asymptomatic lesions and control tissues (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). The concentration of IL-1β was significantly higher in radicular cysts compared with periapical granulomas (P = 0.003). Symptomatic lesions, as judged by high local production of IL-1β and IL-6, represent an immunologically active stage of the disease. © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  15. Increased levels of unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human fibroblasts pretreated with sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.I.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Pretreatment of growing normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) human fibroblasts with sodium butyrate at concentrations of 5-20 mM results in increased levels of DNA repair synthesis measured by autoradiography after exposure of the cells to 254 nm UV radiation in the fluence range 0-25 J/m 2 . The phenomenon manifests as an increased extent and an increased initial rate of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). This experimental result is not due to an artifact of autoradiography related to cell size. Xeroderma pigmentosum cells from complementation groups A, C, D and E and XP variant cells all exhibit increases in the levels of UV-induced UDS in response to sodium butyrate proportional to those observed with normal cells. These UDS increases associated with butyrate pretreatment correlate with demonstrable changes in intracellular thymidine pool size and suggest that sodium butyrate enhances uptake of exogenous radiolabeled thymidine during UV-induced repair synthesis by reducing endogenous levels of thymidine. (author)

  16. Free radicals and low-level photon emission in human pathogenesis: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wijk, Roeland; Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Wiegant, Fred A C; Ives, John

    2008-05-01

    Convincing evidence supports a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases. The model includes the formation of radical oxygen species (ROS) and the misassembly and aggregation of proteins when three tiers of cellular defence are insufficient: (a) direct antioxidative systems, (b) molecular damage repairing systems, and (c) compensatory chaperone synthesis. The aim of the present overview is to introduce (a) the basics of free radical and antioxidant metabolism, (b) the role of the protein quality control system in protecting cells from free radical damage and its relation to chronic diseases, (c) the basics of the ultraweak luminescence as marker of the oxidant status of biological systems, and (d) the research in human photon emission as a non-invasive marker of oxidant status in relation to chronic diseases. In considering the role of free radicals in disease, both their generation and their control by the antioxidant system are part of the story. Excessive free radical production leads to the production of heat shock proteins and chaperone proteins as a second line of protection against damage. Chaperones at the molecular level facilitate stress regulation vis-à-vis protein quali y control mechanisms. The manifestation of misfolded proteins and aggregates is a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amylotrophic lateral sclerosis, polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, diabetes and many others. Each of these disorders exhibits aging-dependent onset and a progressive, usually fatal clinical course. The second part reviews the current status of human photon emission techniques and protocols for recording the human oxidative status. Sensitive photomultiplier tubes may provide a tool for non-invasive and continuous monitoring of oxidative metabolism. In that respect, recording ultraweak luminescence has been favored compared to other indirect assays. Several biological models have

  17. Exposure levels, environmental fate modelling and human health risk assessment of lindane in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Kumi, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis discusses an innovative approach of combining chemical trace analysis including the use of 13 C-labelled isotopes as internal and recovery standards) with multi-media modelling for assessing health risks of Lindane which is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) and a commercial formulated insecticide also known as Gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH). Samples studied were background air, human breast milk, and edible fish (tilapia and catfish). The investigations focused on the exposure of the general population. For the first time levels and seasonal variation of Lindane, α-HCH and β-HCH in background air of Lake Bosumtwi, Kwabenya and East Legon in Ghana were studied with polyurethane foam based passive air samplers. Lindane (average concentration 53 pg m -3 ) was measured in all samples with (i) gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and (ii) gas chromatography-mass spectrometer operated in electron ionization mode (GC-EI-MS). Agricultural application and revolatilisation from soils were main primary and secondary sources of HCH releases. Levels and variation of Lindane, α-HCH and β-HCH in pooled and individual human breast milk samples collected from lactating mothers countrywide were determined using a high-resolution gas chromatography interfaced with a high-resolution gas chromatography interfaced with a high-resolution mass spectrometer (HRGC-HRMS). This constitutes the first comprehensive nationwide human breast milk study of assessing risks of HCHs for the general population of Ghana. Mothers were selected from three major cities (Accra, Kumasi and Tamale) and three rural communities (Ada, Jachie/Pramso and Tolon) representing the Southern, Middle and Northern sectors respectively. The results of the study showed that the general population of Ghana is widely exposed to HCHs although the current levels are generally low; and also suggest that the usage pattern and exposure levels of Lindane vary among the various regions in Ghana.

  18. Future climate change driven sea-level rise: secondary consequences from human displacement for island biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Florian T; Kissling, W Daniel; Beissmann, Helmut; Penn, Dustin J

    2012-09-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) due to global warming will result in the loss of many coastal areas. The direct or primary effects due to inundation and erosion from SLR are currently being assessed; however, the indirect or secondary ecological effects, such as changes caused by the displacement of human populations, have not been previously evaluated. We examined the potential ecological consequences of future SLR on >1,200 islands in the Southeast Asian and the Pacific region. Using three SLR scenarios (1, 3, and 6 m elevation, where 1 m approximates most predictions by the end of this century), we assessed the consequences of primary and secondary SLR effects from human displacement on habitat availability and distributions of selected mammal species. We estimate that between 3-32% of the coastal zone of these islands could be lost from primary effects, and consequently 8-52 million people would become SLR refugees. Assuming that inundated urban and intensive agricultural areas will be relocated with an equal area of habitat loss in the hinterland, we project that secondary SLR effects can lead to an equal or even higher percent range loss than primary effects for at least 10-18% of the sample mammals in a moderate range loss scenario and for 22-46% in a maximum range loss scenario. In addition, we found some species to be more vulnerable to secondary than primary effects. Finally, we found high spatial variation in vulnerability: species on islands in Oceania are more vulnerable to primary SLR effects, whereas species on islands in Indo-Malaysia, with potentially 7-48 million SLR refugees, are more vulnerable to secondary effects. Our findings show that primary and secondary SLR effects can have enormous consequences for human inhabitants and island biodiversity, and that both need to be incorporated into ecological risk assessment, conservation, and regional planning. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Modulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 levels in human osteoarthritic subchondral bone osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massicotte, Frédéric; Fernandes, Julio Cesar; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Human osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage loss, bone sclerosis, osteophyte formation and inflammation of the synovial membrane. We previously reported that OA osteoblasts (Ob) show abnormal phenotypic characteristics possibly responsible for bone sclerosis and that two subgroups of OA patients can be identified by low or high endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by OA Ob. Here, we determined that the elevated PGE2 levels in the high OA subgroup were linked with enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels compared to normal and low OA Ob. A linear relationship was observed between endogenous PGE2 levels and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels in OA Ob. As parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PGE2 are known stimulators of IGF-1 production in Ob, we next evaluated their effect in OA Ob. Both subgroups increased their IGF-1 production similarly in response to PGE2, while the high OA subgroup showed a blunted response to PTH compared to the low OA group. Conversely, only the high OA group showed a significant inhibition of IGF-1 production when PGE2 synthesis was reduced with Naproxen, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that inhibits cyclooxygenases (COX). The PGE2-dependent stimulation of IGF-1 synthesis was due in part to the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway since both the direct inhibition of this pathway with H-89 and the inhibition of EP2 or EP4 receptors, linked to cAMP production, reduced IGF-1 synthesis. The production of the most abundant IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs) in bone tissue, IGFBP-3, -4, and -5, was lower in OA compared to normal Ob independently of the OA group. Under basal condition, OA Ob expressed similar IGF-1 mRNA to normal Ob; however, PGE2 stimulated IGF-1 mRNA expression more in OA than normal Ob. These data suggest that increased IGF-1 levels correlate with elevated endogenous PGE2 levels in OA Ob and that higher IGF-1 levels in OA Ob could be important for bone sclerosis in OA.

  20. Functional specificity for high-level linguistic processing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Evelina; Behr, Michael K; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2011-09-27

    Neuroscientists have debated for centuries whether some regions of the human brain are selectively engaged in specific high-level mental functions or whether, instead, cognition is implemented in multifunctional brain regions. For the critical case of language, conflicting answers arise from the neuropsychological literature, which features striking dissociations between deficits in linguistic and nonlinguistic abilities, vs. the neuroimaging literature, which has argued for overlap between activations for linguistic and nonlinguistic processes, including arithmetic, domain general abilities like cognitive control, and music. Here, we use functional MRI to define classic language regions functionally in each subject individually and then examine the response of these regions to the nonlinguistic functions most commonly argued to engage these regions: arithmetic, working memory, cognitive control, and music. We find little or no response in language regions to these nonlinguistic functions. These data support a clear distinction between language and other cognitive processes, resolving the prior conflict between the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literatures.

  1. Very low levels of 6-keto-prostaglandin F 1/sub α/ in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siess, W.; Dray, F.

    1982-01-01

    Two stable derivatives of PGI 2 , its nonenzymatic hydrolysis product (6-keto-PGF 1 /sub α/) and an enzymatic metabolite (6, 15-diketo-PGF 1 /sub α/) were determined in human plasma and urine. These compounds were measured by RIA after separation on rp-HPLC. Previous purification of the samples on rp=HPLC markedly enhanced the specificity of the RIA determinations of those compounds in plasma and urine. The PGI 2 derivative 6-keto-PGF 1 /sub α/ was detected in both plasma (4.7 +/- 3.2 pg/ml, mean +/- S.D., n = 34) and urine (166 +/- 61 pg/ml, n = 9). No gender differences of the plasma or urinary levels of 6-keto-PGF 1 /sub α/ were found. The PGI 2 metabolite 6, 15-diketo-PGF 1 /sub α/ was not measurable in plasma or urine ( 2 in man. When [ 3 H]PGI 2 was added to citrated blood immediately after venipuncture, it was recovered entirely as [ 3 H]6-keto-PGF 1 /sub α/ after rp-HPLC. Therefore any circulating PGI 2 would be measured as 6-keto-PGF 1 /sub α/ by our method. The results obtained suggest that PGI 2 could be present in human venous blood under physiological conditions, but only in very low concentrations

  2. Levels of perfluorooctanesulfonate and related fluorochemicals in human blood from the general population of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Sun-Young; Shin, Im-Hee [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, School of Medicine, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea); Kannan, K. [Wardsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health and Dept. of Env. Health and Tox., SUNY, Albany, NY (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was found to be widespread in human populations and wildlife Major applications of these POSF-based products have included surfactants in: specialty paper and packaging products, carpet, upholstery, and textile products and in certain insecticide formulation. Depending on the specific functional derivatization or the degree of polymerization, such POSF based products may degrade or metabolize to PFOS, a stable and persistent end product that has the potential to bioaccumulate in the food chain. The mechanisms and pathways leading to the presence of PFOS in human blood are not well characterized but likely involve environmental and dietary exposure to PFOS or to precursor molecules of PFOS. PFOS and related perfluorinated compounds have recently been detected at low parts per billion (nanogram per milliliter) concentrations in the general population from 10 different countries including Korea. In the present report, the levels of perfluoroalkylated compounds in the general population from Korea were analyzed with respect to occupation, smoking status, sex, age and socio-economic status. The degree of association between the four target fluorochemicals measured in this study (PFOS, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOSA) were also analyzed by linear regression to determine the potential association between their sources of exposure.

  3. Nature vs. nurture in human sociality: multi-level genomic analyses of social conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biqing; Zhu, Zijian; Wang, Yingying; Ding, Xiaohu; Guo, Xiaobo; He, Mingguang; Fang, Wan; Zhou, Qin; Zhou, Shanbi; Lei, Han; Huang, Ailong; Chen, Tingmei; Ni, Dongsheng; Gu, Yuping; Liu, Jianing; Rao, Yi

    2018-05-01

    Social conformity is fundamental to human societies and has been studied for more than six decades, but our understanding of its mechanisms remains limited. Individual differences in conformity have been attributed to social and cultural environmental influences, but not to genes. Here we demonstrate a genetic contribution to conformity after analyzing 1,140 twins and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based studies of 2,130 young adults. A two-step genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed replicable associations in 9 genomic loci, and a meta-analysis of three GWAS with a sample size of ~2,600 further confirmed one locus, corresponding to the NAV3 (Neuron Navigator 3) gene which encodes a protein important for axon outgrowth and guidance. Further multi-level (haplotype, gene, pathway) GWAS strongly associated genes including NAV3, PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D), ARL10 (ADP ribosylation factor-like GTPase 10), and CTNND2 (catenin delta 2), with conformity. Magnetic resonance imaging of 64 subjects shows correlation of activation or structural features of brain regions with the SNPs of these genes, supporting their functional significance. Our results suggest potential moderate genetic influence on conformity, implicate several specific genetic elements in conformity and will facilitate further research on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying human conformity.

  4. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride - An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halton, D M

    1995-09-01

    In March 1993, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) commissioned and update of a 1984 review on the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF). The study places particular emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF and is divided into two main parts: a literature review and a lethal concentration (LC) estimation. The literature review summarizes data under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure, and industrial exposure. Data in these areas were critically reviewed for their relevance to lethal concentrations at LC{sub LO}, LC{sub 10} and LC{sub 50} levels that were derived in the 1984 report. In the last ten years, only one relevant animal study has been published. No new controlled human studies were found but a community exposure incident was reported. There were three new industrial/accidental exposures reported since 1984. Evaluation of new data does not change the lethal concentration estimates made in the 1984 report, but does indicate the absence of appropriate models to estimate the lethality of irritant and corrosive gases. In the last 10 years, much literature on the evaluation of major hazards has been published and suggests that such assessments are of growing political, economic and social importance. Numerous articles have been published on the acute toxicity of HF from skin contact and chronic toxicity from repeated airborne exposure. These publications offer important insights into the nature of HF toxicity. Several avenues of investigative research are suggested. (author). 55 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Toxicity levels to humans during acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride - An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halton, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    In March 1993, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) commissioned and update of a 1984 review on the acute toxicity of hydrogen fluoride (HF). The study places particular emphasis on the effects of inhalation of gaseous HF and is divided into two main parts: a literature review and a lethal concentration (LC) estimation. The literature review summarizes data under four categories: animal studies, controlled human studies, community exposure, and industrial exposure. Data in these areas were critically reviewed for their relevance to lethal concentrations at LC LO , LC 10 and LC 50 levels that were derived in the 1984 report. In the last ten years, only one relevant animal study has been published. No new controlled human studies were found but a community exposure incident was reported. There were three new industrial/accidental exposures reported since 1984. Evaluation of new data does not change the lethal concentration estimates made in the 1984 report, but does indicate the absence of appropriate models to estimate the lethality of irritant and corrosive gases. In the last 10 years, much literature on the evaluation of major hazards has been published and suggests that such assessments are of growing political, economic and social importance. Numerous articles have been published on the acute toxicity of HF from skin contact and chronic toxicity from repeated airborne exposure. These publications offer important insights into the nature of HF toxicity. Several avenues of investigative research are suggested. (author). 55 refs., 4 tabs

  6. Motivation of human resources for health: a case study at rural district level in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnen, Véronique; Paul, Elisabeth; Mwisongo, Aziza; Nyato, Daniel; Robert, Annie

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of studies explore the association between financial and non-financial incentives and the retention of health workers in developing countries. This study aims to contribute to empirical evidence on human resource for health motivation factors to assist policy makers in promoting effective and realistic interventions. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in four rural Tanzanian districts to explore staff stability and health workers' motivation. Data were collected using qualitative and quantitative techniques, covering all levels and types of health facilities. Stability of staff was found to be quite high. Public institutions remained very attractive with better job security, salary and retirement benefits. Satisfaction over working conditions was very low owing to inadequate working equipment, work overload, lack of services, difficult environment, favouritism and 'empty promotions'. Positive incentives mentioned were support for career development and supportive supervision. Attracting new staff in rural areas appeared to be more difficult than retaining staff in place. The study concluded that strategies to better motivate health personnel should focus on adequate remuneration, positive working and living environment and supportive management. However, by multiplying health facilities, the latest Tanzanian human resource for health plan could jeopardize current positive results. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. OAHG: an integrated resource for annotating human genes with multi-level ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Sun, Jie; Xu, Wanying; Dong, Lixiang; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Meng

    2016-10-05

    OAHG, an integrated resource, aims to establish a comprehensive functional annotation resource for human protein-coding genes (PCGs), miRNAs, and lncRNAs by multi-level ontologies involving Gene Ontology (GO), Disease Ontology (DO), and Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO). Many previous studies have focused on inferring putative properties and biological functions of PCGs and non-coding RNA genes from different perspectives. During the past several decades, a few of databases have been designed to annotate the functions of PCGs, miRNAs, and lncRNAs, respectively. A part of functional descriptions in these databases were mapped to standardize terminologies, such as GO, which could be helpful to do further analysis. Despite these developments, there is no comprehensive resource recording the function of these three important types of genes. The current version of OAHG, release 1.0 (Jun 2016), integrates three ontologies involving GO, DO, and HPO, six gene functional databases and two interaction databases. Currently, OAHG contains 1,434,694 entries involving 16,929 PCGs, 637 miRNAs, 193 lncRNAs, and 24,894 terms of ontologies. During the performance evaluation, OAHG shows the consistencies with existing gene interactions and the structure of ontology. For example, terms with more similar structure could be associated with more associated genes (Pearson correlation γ 2  = 0.2428, p < 2.2e-16).

  8. Frequency-specific modulation of population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Larry E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under natural circumstances, attention plays an important role in extracting relevant auditory signals from simultaneously present, irrelevant noises. Excitatory and inhibitory neural activity, enhanced by attentional processes, seems to sharpen frequency tuning, contributing to improved auditory performance especially in noisy environments. In the present study, we investigated auditory magnetic fields in humans that were evoked by pure tones embedded in band-eliminated noises during two different stimulus sequencing conditions (constant vs. random under auditory focused attention by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Results In total, we used identical auditory stimuli between conditions, but presented them in a different order, thereby manipulating the neural processing and the auditory performance of the listeners. Constant stimulus sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of identical frequency with band-eliminated noises, whereas random sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of random frequencies and band-eliminated noises. We demonstrated that auditory evoked neural responses were larger in the constant sequencing compared to the random sequencing condition, particularly when the simultaneously presented noises contained narrow stop-bands. Conclusion The present study confirmed that population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex can be sharpened in a frequency-specific manner. This frequency-specific sharpening may contribute to improved auditory performance during detection and processing of relevant sound inputs characterized by specific frequency distributions in noisy environments.

  9. Cystatins - Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels...

  10. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface.

  11. Should legislation regarding maximum Pb and Cd levels in human food also cover large game meat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Mark A; Reglero, Manuel M; Camarero, Pablo R; Mateo, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Game meat may be contaminated with metals and metalloids if animals reside in anthropogenically polluted areas, or if ammunition used to kill the game contaminates the meat. Muscle tissue from red deer and wild boar shot in Ciudad Real province (Spain) in 2005-06 was analysed for As, Pb, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd. Samples were collected from hunting estates within and outside an area that has been historically used for mining, smelting and refining various metals and metalloids. Meat destined for human consumption, contained more Pb, As and Se (red deer) and Pb (boar) when harvested from animals that had resided in mined areas. Age related accumulation of Cd, Zn and As (in deer) and Cd, Cu and Se (in boar) was also observed. Two boar meat samples contained high Pb, at 352 and 2408 μg/g d.w., and these were likely to have been contaminated by Pb ammunition. Likewise, 19-84% of all samples (depending on species and sampling area) had Pb levels > 0.1 μg/g w.w., the EU maximum residue level (MRL) for farm reared meat. Between 9 and 43% of samples exceeded comparable Cd limits. Such data highlight a discrepancy between what is considered safe for human consumption in popular farmed meat (chicken, beef, lamb), and what in game may often exist. A risk assessment is presented which describes the number of meals required to exceed current tolerable weekly intakes (PTWIs) for Pb and Cd, and the potential contribution of large game consumption to such intake limit criteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Circulating levels of human salusin-β, a potent hemodynamic and atherogenesis regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Fujimoto

    Full Text Available Using bioinformatics analysis, we previously identified salusin-β, an endogenous bioactive peptide with diverse physiological activities. Salusin-β is abundantly expressed in the neuroendocrine system and in systemic endocrine cells/macrophages. Salusin-β acutely regulates hemodynamics and chronically induces atherosclerosis, but its unique physicochemical characteristics to tightly adhere to all types of plastic and glassware have prevented elucidation of its precise pathophysiological role. To quantitate plasma total salusin-β concentrations, we produced rabbit and chicken polyclonal antibodies against the C- and N-terminal end sequences, circumvented its sticky nature, and successfully established a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Salusin-β was abundantly present in the plasma of healthy volunteers, ranging from 1.9 to 6.6 nmol/L. Reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that a single immunoreactive salusin-β peak coincided with synthetic authentic salusin-β. Plasma salusin-β concentrations were unaffected by postural changes and by potent vasopressin release stimuli, such as hypertonic saline infusion or smoking. However, salusin-β concentrations showed significant circadian variation; concentrations were high during the daytime and reached the lowest concentrations in the early morning. Plasma salusin-β levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular disease showed distinctly higher levels than healthy controls. Patients with panhypopituitarism combined with complete central diabetes insipidus also showed significantly higher plasma salusin-β levels. Therefore, the ELISA system developed in this study will be useful for evaluating circulating total salusin-β levels and for confirming the presence of authentic salusin-β in human plasma. The obtained results suggest a limited contribution of the neuroendocrine system to peripheral total salusin

  13. Increased complement C1q level marks active disease in human tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. METHODS: Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. RESULTS: C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS: C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy.

  14. Platelet serotonin level and impulsivity in human self-destructive behavior: A biological and psychological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Era Dutta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Suicide is a disease and a global public health problem. Suicidology has come to become a topic of study for intervention and research. The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5HT] system has remained a prime area of investigation. The neurons and platelets display structural and functional similarities. Ninety-nine percent of 5HT is contained in platelets, which shares similar 5HT uptake and release mechanisms with 5HT neurons. Aims: This study aims to study human self-destructive behavior (HSDB. Objectives: Exploring the biological (serotonin levels in platelets and psychological aspects (impulsivity of attempted suicide or HSDB. Settings and Design: Thirty-one patients, above the age of 18 years, with a recent history of HSDB, were studied and given an International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosis, after a detailed interview. Subjects and Methods: For the platelet 5HT estimation, blood samples were collected, and enzyme immunometric assay carried out. Detailed assessment of the impulsivity was done by the 25-item structured diagnostic interview for borderlines by Zanarini et al. Statistical Analysis Used: We obtained both categorical and continuous data. Chi-square test, Fisher's test, Student's t-test, and Pearson's product moment correlation were used. Results: Female subjects outnumbered males by 2:1. Major depression, adjustment disorder, personality disorder were predominant diagnoses. The mean platelet serotonin concentration for males = 57.3 ng/ml, that of females = 56.05 ng/ml (P > 0.05. Platelet 5HT levels were found to be negatively correlated with impulsivity scores (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Platelet serotonin levels in our study sample were quite low when compared with those reported in published literature. Low serotonin levels were inversely related to impulsivity, but only in males.

  15. Alternative Polyadenylation and Nonsense-Mediated Decay Coordinately Regulate the Human HFE mRNA Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rute; Proença, Daniela; Silva, Bruno; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Luísa; Faustino, Paula; Romão, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an mRNA surveillance pathway that selectively recognizes and degrades defective mRNAs carrying premature translation-termination codons. However, several studies have shown that NMD also targets physiological transcripts that encode full-length proteins, modulating their expression. Indeed, some features of physiological mRNAs can render them NMD-sensitive. Human HFE is a MHC class I protein mainly expressed in the liver that, when mutated, can cause hereditary hemochromatosis, a common genetic disorder of iron metabolism. The HFE gene structure comprises seven exons; although the sixth exon is 1056 base pairs (bp) long, only the first 41 bp encode for amino acids. Thus, the remaining downstream 1015 bp sequence corresponds to the HFE 3′ untranslated region (UTR), along with exon seven. Therefore, this 3′ UTR encompasses an exon/exon junction, a feature that can make the corresponding physiological transcript NMD-sensitive. Here, we demonstrate that in UPF1-depleted or in cycloheximide-treated HeLa and HepG2 cells the HFE transcripts are clearly upregulated, meaning that the physiological HFE mRNA is in fact an NMD-target. This role of NMD in controlling the HFE expression levels was further confirmed in HeLa cells transiently expressing the HFE human gene. Besides, we show, by 3′-RACE analysis in several human tissues that HFE mRNA expression results from alternative cleavage and polyadenylation at four different sites – two were previously described and two are novel polyadenylation sites: one located at exon six, which confers NMD-resistance to the corresponding transcripts, and another located at exon seven. In addition, we show that the amount of HFE mRNA isoforms resulting from cleavage and polyadenylation at exon seven, although present in both cell lines, is higher in HepG2 cells. These results reveal that NMD and alternative polyadenylation may act coordinately to control HFE mRNA levels, possibly varying its

  16. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 micro Ci/microgram and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and y intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3 Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (32.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM [90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml] returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA

  17. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 μCi/μg and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and ''y'' intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3. Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (31.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM [90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml] returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA

  18. Modulation of the human gut microbiota by dietary fibres occurs at the species level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wing Sun Faith; Walker, Alan W; Louis, Petra; Parkhill, Julian; Vermeiren, Joan; Bosscher, Douwina; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J

    2016-01-11

    Dietary intake of specific non-digestible carbohydrates (including prebiotics) is increasingly seen as a highly effective approach for manipulating the composition and activities of the human gut microbiota to benefit health. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known about the global response of the microbial community to particular carbohydrates. Recent in vivo dietary studies have demonstrated that the species composition of the human faecal microbiota is influenced by dietary intake. There is now potential to gain insights into the mechanisms involved by using in vitro systems that produce highly controlled conditions of pH and substrate supply. We supplied two alternative non-digestible polysaccharides as energy sources to three different human gut microbial communities in anaerobic, pH-controlled continuous-flow fermentors. Community analysis showed that supply of apple pectin or inulin resulted in the highly specific enrichment of particular bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs; based on 16S rRNA gene sequences). Of the eight most abundant Bacteroides OTUs detected, two were promoted specifically by inulin and six by pectin. Among the Firmicutes, Eubacterium eligens in particular was strongly promoted by pectin, while several species were stimulated by inulin. Responses were influenced by pH, which was stepped up, and down, between 5.5, 6.0, 6.4 and 6.9 in parallel vessels within each experiment. In particular, several experiments involving downshifts to pH 5.5 resulted in Faecalibacterium prausnitzii replacing Bacteroides spp. as the dominant sequences observed. Community diversity was greater in the pectin-fed than in the inulin-fed fermentors, presumably reflecting the differing complexity of the two substrates. We have shown that particular non-digestible dietary carbohydrates have enormous potential for modifying the gut microbiota, but these modifications occur at the level of individual strains and species and are not easily predicted a priori

  19. Quantification of human errors in level-1 PSA studies in NUPEC/JINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, M.; Hirose, M.; Sugawara, M.; Hashiba, T.

    1991-01-01

    THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) method is mainly adopted to evaluate the pre-accident and post-accident human error rates. Performance shaping factors are derived by taking Japanese operational practice into account. Several examples of human error rates with calculational procedures are presented. The important human interventions of typical Japanese NPPs are also presented. (orig./HP)

  20. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Kaas, A.; Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated...... longitudinally circulating concentrations of CCR5 ligands of 256 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes. CCR5 ligands were differentially associated with beta-cell function and clinical remission. CCL5 was decreased in remitters and positively associated with HbA1c suggestive of a Th1 associated...... of CCR5 by therapeutic agents such as maraviroc may provide a new therapeutic target to ameliorate disease progression in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  1. Assessment of levels of mercury in human breast milk in Obuasi Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asamoah-Antwi, Dinah

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the levels of mercury in breast milk and its potential health risk to the breastfed infants in Obuasi Municipality. Forty eight (48) individual breast milk samples were collected from mothers in selected health facilities in Obuasi town and it’s environ. Total mercury concentrations were determined in the breast milk samples using advanced mercury analyser (AMA254 Altec s.r.o, in the Czech Republic). Methylmercury levels were determined using high performance liquid chromatography linked to inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) with isotope dilution. The mean concentrations of Total Hg and Methyl Hg in the breast milk were 0.4043 and 0.1829 μg/L respectively. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations ranged from 0.080 to 2.320 μg/L and 0.008 to 0.734 μg/L respectively. The estimated intake obtained in this study was lower than the reference dose established by the US EPA (0.3μg/kg/day). However the hazard quotients evaluated showed that the one month old infants had hazard quotient above the 0.2, therefore indicating that there is a potential risk for such infants and need to be managed. It was also found that (65.3%) of the mothers had no knowledge of the exposure route to mercury and it toxicity to humans. (au)

  2. Data on environmentally relevant level of aflatoxin B1-induced human dendritic cells' functional alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Mehrzad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the effects of naturally occurring levels of AFB1 on the expression of key immune molecules and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs by cell culture, RT-qPCR, and flow cytometry. Data here revealed that an environmentally relevant level of AFB1 led to remarkably weakened key functional capacity of DCs, up-regulation of key transcripts and DCs apoptosis, down-regulation of key phagocytic element, CD64, and creation of pseudolicensing direction of DCs. Flow cytometry data confirmed a damage towards DCs, i.e., increased apoptosis. The detailed data and their mechanistic effects and the outcome are available in this research article (Mehrzad et al., 2018 [1]. The impaired phagocytosis capacity with triggered pseudolicensing direction of MDDCs caused by AFB1 and dysregulation of the key functional genes could provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed in vivo immunotoxicity associated with this mycotoxin. Keywords: AFB1, Apoptosis, AFB1-detoxifying genes, Dendritic cells, Flow cytometry, Functional genes, Immunnoderegulation, Phagocytosis, RT-qPCR

  3. The effects of low level laser irradiation on proliferation of human dental pulp: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffoli, S; Romeo, U; Amorim, R N S; Migliau, G; Palaia, G; Resende, L; Polimeni, A

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capability for self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in various types of specialized cells, so they are very important in cellular therapies. MSC from dental pulp are simply obtainable and have high proliferative capability. Among the therapies that can stimulate the proliferation of certain cell types, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) stands out. The target of this study is to perform a literature review to investigate these effects of low-level laser irradiation on proliferation of human dental pulp.The electronic search of scientific papers was conducted in the Lilacs, Scielo, Medline and PubMed databases through scientific articles published in national and international journals in the past 20 years.The results of this review suggest that LLLT may be a useful and important tool for future advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering associated to stem cells. Studies on cell therapy for regenerating dental tissues has already been done, and shows promising results.

  4. Structural architecture supports functional organization in the human aging brain at a regionwise and network level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Joelle; Ritter, Petra; Shen, Kelly; Rothmeier, Simon; Schirner, Michael; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-07-01

    Functional interactions in the brain are constrained by the underlying anatomical architecture, and structural and functional networks share network features such as modularity. Accordingly, age-related changes of structural connectivity (SC) may be paralleled by changes in functional connectivity (FC). We provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of the SC-FC coupling in human aging as inferred from resting-state blood oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging in a sample of 47 adults with an age range of 18-82. We revealed that SC and FC decrease with age across most parts of the brain and there is a distinct age-dependency of regionwise SC-FC coupling and network-level SC-FC relations. A specific pattern of SC-FC coupling predicts age more reliably than does regionwise SC or FC alone (r = 0.73, 95% CI = [0.7093, 0.8522]). Hence, our data propose that regionwise SC-FC coupling can be used to characterize brain changes in aging. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2645-2661, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Levels of semenogelin in human spermatozoa decrease during capacitation: involvement of reactive oxygen species and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lamirande, E; Lamothe, G

    2010-07-01

    Semenogelin (Sg), the main protein of human semen coagulum, prevents sperm capacitation. The objective of this study was to examine the role of Sg and its mechanism of action. Sg blocked sperm capacitation triggered by various stimuli, via inhibition of superoxide anion (O(2)*-; luminescence assay) and nitric oxide (NO*; tested using diaminofluorescein) generation. Triton-soluble and -insoluble sperm fractions contained Sg and Sg peptides (immunoblotting), the level of which decreased with initiation of capacitation. This drop was prevented by superoxide dismutase and NO* synthase inhibitor and was reproduced by addition of O(2)*- and NO*. Zinc (Zn(2+)) blocked and a zinc chelator (TPEN) promoted the decline in Sg levels. There was a decreased labelling of Sg on the head in capacitating spermatozoa with the two fixation techniques tested (immunocytochemistry). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) (O(2)*- and NO*) caused, these changes, and zinc prevented them. Spermatozoa quickly internalized Sg upon incubation and Sg was then rapidly degraded in a zinc-inhibitable manner. Sg blocked capacitation mainly via inhibition of ROS generation. Spermatozoa appeared permeable to Sg and processed Sg in a zinc-inhibitable fashion. ROS themselves could promote sperm disposal of Sg which maybe one of the mechanisms that allows initiation of capacitation.

  6. An assay for the assessment of lipocortin 1 levels in human lung lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S F; Goulding, N J; Godolphin, J L; Tetley, T D; Roberts, C M; Guz, A; Flower, R J

    1990-07-20

    The physiological function of the lipocortins, proteins which are thought to be glucocorticoid-regulated, is unclear. An improved assay for lipocortins might help to elucidate their role. A rapid and specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for lipocortin 1 with a working range of 1-2000 ng/ml and an interrun coefficient of variation of less than 10% is described and used in this pilot study to quantify human lipocortin 1 for the first time in acellular bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and in media conditioned by BAL cells, from control patients and those with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Using this assay a statistically significant relationship, not previously observed in man, has been demonstrated between concentrations of lipocortin 1/ml of BALF and serum cortisol levels (n = 10, rs = 0.6939, P less than 0.05). Although lipocortin 1 levels in acellular BALF were the same in control and sarcoid patients, significantly more lipocortin 1 was released from sarcoid BAL cells in culture (median 21.6, range 8.1-45.4 ng lipocortin/10(6) cells/h in culture) than from control cells (2.5, 1.5-7.6 ng lipocortin/10(6) cells/h in culture). The possible clinical significance of these data is discussed, but remains to be established.

  7. Low level ionizing radiation and human mortality: multi-regional epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, R.J.; Bowers, E.J.; Spence, D.E.; Zemel, B.S.; Clelland, A.B.; Clelland, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of relationships involving environmental chemicals, background radiation, and mortality rates for diseases of the heart and several cancer categories are presented. Bivariate correlation coefficients between radiation and mortality rate were significantly negative for cancer of the lung and respiratory organs, cancer of the buccal cavity and pharynx, cancer of the digestive organs and peritoneum, total cancer and diseases of the heart. Only the correlation coefficient between background radiation and leukemia-aleukemia was positive, and that not significantly positive. Initial multivariate statistical studies support the bivariate results in that all significant regression terms that represent background radiation have been negative. Background radiation level was not a significant predictor for leukemia-aleukemia mortality rate when examined without regard to age. This preliminary work suggests that any health effects of background radiation on the diseases studied do not exceed in magnitude those of environmental chemicals. It also suggests that models implying important long-term deleterious effects of low levels of ionizing radiation on humans may be invalid. (author)

  8. Does exposure to very high levels of natural radiation induce hematological alterations in humans?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiassi-Nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It has long been known that total body exposure to moderate doses decrease the number of circulating erythrocytes, platelets, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. However, data on hematopoietic effects of exposure to very low doses of ionizing radiation in humans are scarce. Recently it has been reported that hematological parameters have significant positive associations with the radiation dose received by residents lived near a nuclear power plant. Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has some inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation studied so far. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy y -1 and the highest recorded external gamma dose rates are about 130 mGy y -1 . In this study, hematological parameters such as counts of leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, PLT, and MPV were measured in the inhabitants. The results of this study indicated that there was no any statistically significant alteration in hematological parameters of the inhabitants of very high background radiation areas of Ramsar compared to those of a neighboring control area

  9. Upregulation of cellular glutathione levels in human ABCB5- and murine Abcb5-transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shingo; Hongama, Keita; Hanaya, Kengo; Yoshida, Ryota; Kawanobe, Takaaki; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Noguchi, Kohji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we have demonstrated that human ABCB5 is a full-sized ATP-binding cassette transporter that shares strong homology with ABCB1/P-glycoprotein. ABCB5-transfected cells showed resistance to taxanes and anthracyclines. Herein, we further screened ABCB5 substrates, and explored the mechanism of resistance. Sensitivity of the cells to test compounds was evaluated using cell growth inhibition assay. Cellular levels of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), glutathione and amino acids were measured using HPLC and an enzyme-based assay. Cellular and vesicular transport of glutathione was evaluated by a radiolabeled substrate. Expression levels of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes were assessed by RT-PCR. Human ABCB5-transfected 293/B5-11 cells and murine Abcb5-transfected 293/mb5-8 cells showed 6.5- and 14-fold higher resistance to BSO than the mock-transfected 293/mock cells, respectively. BSO is an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL), which is a key enzyme of glutathione synthesis. 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells also showed resistance to methionine sulfoximine, another GCL inhibitor. A cellular uptake experiment revealed that BSO accumulation in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was similar to that in 293/mock cells, suggesting that BSO is not an ABCB5 substrate. The cellular glutathione content in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was significantly higher than that in 293/mock cells. Evaluation of the BSO effect on the cellular glutathione content showed that compared with 293/mock cells the BSO concentration required for a 50 % reduction in glutathione content in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was approximately 2- to 3-fold higher. This result suggests that the BSO resistance of the ABCB5- and Abcb5-transfected cells can be attributed to the reduced effect of BSO on the transfectants. Cellular and vesicular transport assays showed that the transport of radiolabeled glutathione in 293/B5-11 cells was similar to that in 293/mock cells. The mRNA expression of genes

  10. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (pbacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Late Post-glacial Sea Level Rise and Its Effects On Human Activity In Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, S. J.

    Three rapid post-glacial sea-level rises flooded coastlines with large continental shelves. The last of these, shortly before the interglacial optimum c.7,500BP, not only changed coastal Neolithic societies, but may also have stimulated maritime skills. Two Asian examples explore these aspects. First, during the Mid-Holocene, the Arabian Gulf transgressed as far inland as Ur probably laying down Woolley's famous Ur Flood silt layer between 7,000-5,500 BP. Stratigraphy and dating suggests the phase of rapid sea level rise immediately preceded the start of the 'Ubaid pottery period. Red-slipped Uruk pottery and copper items then appear from about 6,000BP, but above Woolley's silt layer. The Sumerian King Lists also record a major upheaval and dynastic change after 'the Flood'. Second, the final flooding of the Sunda shelf in Southeast Asia was followed by a maritime extension of human occupation from Northern Melanesia south into the Solomon Islands 6,000 years ago. Simultaneously, further west on the north coast of New Guinea, new archaeological assemblages ap- pear beneath a silt layer left by a pro-grading 6,000 year-old inland sea. The presence of arboriculture items such as betel nuts and the contemporary arrival of dogs and pigs in the same region suggests intrusion from Southeast Asia. This supports Solheim's suggestion that rapid sea-level rise on the eastern edge of the Sunda Shelf stimulated maritime skills and invention in Southeast Asia. This may have provided the initial stimulus to the first maritime expansion that was later to colonise the whole Pacific.

  13. Monaural and binaural contributions to interaural-level-difference sensitivity in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, G Christopher; McLaughlin, Susan A; Higgins, Nathan C

    2015-10-15

    Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in human auditory cortex (AC) to sounds with intensity varying independently in the left and right ears. Echoplanar images were acquired at 3 Tesla with sparse image acquisition once per 12-second block of sound stimulation. Combinations of binaural intensity and stimulus presentation rate were varied between blocks, and selected to allow measurement of response-intensity functions in three configurations: monaural 55-85 dB SPL, binaural 55-85 dB SPL with intensity equal in both ears, and binaural with average binaural level of 70 dB SPL and interaural level differences (ILD) ranging ±30 dB (i.e., favoring the left or right ear). Comparison of response functions equated for contralateral intensity revealed that BOLD-response magnitudes (1) generally increased with contralateral intensity, consistent with positive drive of the BOLD response by the contralateral ear, (2) were larger for contralateral monaural stimulation than for binaural stimulation, consistent with negative effects (e.g., inhibition) of ipsilateral input, which were strongest in the left hemisphere, and (3) also increased with ipsilateral intensity when contralateral input was weak, consistent with additional, positive, effects of ipsilateral stimulation. Hemispheric asymmetries in the spatial extent and overall magnitude of BOLD responses were generally consistent with previous studies demonstrating greater bilaterality of responses in the right hemisphere and stricter contralaterality in the left hemisphere. Finally, comparison of responses to fast (40/s) and slow (5/s) stimulus presentation rates revealed significant rate-dependent adaptation of the BOLD response that varied across ILD values. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Effects of propranolol and pindolol on plasma ANP levels in humans at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouissou, P; Galen, F X; Richalet, J P; Lartigue, M; Devaux, F; Dubray, C; Atlan, G

    1989-08-01

    In attempt to elucidate whether the beta-adrenoceptor is involved in the control of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion, plasma immunoreactive ANP level was measured at rest, in recumbent and upright positions, and during graded maximal ergocycle exercise in nine healthy male subjects (23 +/- 0.5 years of age) treated for 3 days with nonselective beta-blockers propranolol (150 mg/day) or pindolol (15 mg/day) or with placebo. The effects of beta-blockers, which differ by their hemodynamic actions at rest because of the intrinsic sympathomimetic activity of pindolol, were compared. Maximal O2 consumption (VO2max) during beta-blockade was not significantly different from the placebo value. Resting heart rate was not affected by pindolol treatment but was decreased with propranolol (-10 beats/min). Both beta-blockers caused a reduction in heart rate at all the exercise intensities. Mean blood pressure was not affected by beta-blockade at rest but was significantly reduced during exercise. During placebo treatment, plasma ANP increased in response to exercise intensities greater than 65% of VO2max. At 100% VO2max plasma ANP was nearly doubled (101.5 +/- 14 pg/ml) compared with the basal value in upright position (56.6 +/- 15 pg/ml). beta-Blockade caused a marked elevation in plasma ANP at all the levels of activity. Despite different hemodynamic responses to pindolol and propranolol, both beta-blockers produced similar increases in the basal level of plasma ANP. These rises were maintained in the course of exercise tests, and no significant difference was found between propranolol and pindolol. We conclude that beta-adrenoceptor mechanisms are not directly responsible for tonic and exercise-induced ANP secretion in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Multi-level communication of human retinal pigment epithelial cells via tunneling nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierk Wittig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs may offer a very specific and effective way of intercellular communication. Here we investigated TNTs in the human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell line ARPE-19. Morphology of TNTs was examined by immunostaining and scanning electron microscopy. To determine the function of TNTs between cells, we studied the TNT-dependent intercellular communication at different levels including electrical and calcium signalling, small molecular diffusion as well as mitochondrial re-localization. Further, intercellular organelles transfer was assayed by FACS analysis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microscopy showed that cultured ARPE-19 cells are frequently connected by TNTs, which are not attached to the substratum. The TNTs were straight connections between cells, had a typical diameter of 50 to 300 nm and a length of up to 120 µm. We observed de novo formation of TNTs by diverging from migrating cells after a short time of interaction. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed characteristic features of TNTs. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that TNTs between ARPE-19 cells contain F-actin but no microtubules. Depolymerisation of F-actin, induced by addition of latrunculin-B, led to disappearance of TNTs. Importantly, these TNTs could function as channels for the diffusion of small molecules such as Lucifer Yellow, but not for large molecules like Dextran Red. Further, organelle exchange between cells via TNTs was observed by microscopy. Using Ca²⁺ imaging we show the intercellular transmission of calcium signals through TNTs. Mechanical stimulation led to membrane depolarisation, which expand through TNT connections between ARPE-19 cells. We further demonstrate that TNTs can mediate electrical coupling between distant cells. Immunolabelling for Cx43 showed that this gap junction protein is interposed at one end of 44% of TNTs between ARPE-19 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations indicate that

  16. Morphine Produces Immunosuppressive Effects in Non-human Primates at the Proteomic and Cellular Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Chan, Eric Y.; Purdy, David E.; Murnane, Robert D.; Larsen, Kay; Palermo, Robert E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Katze, Michael G.; McCune, Joseph M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-11

    Morphine has long been known to have immunosuppressive properties in vivo, but the molecular and immunologic changes induced by it are incompletely understood. As a prelude to understanding how these changes might interact with lentiviral infection in vivo, animals from two non-human primate (NHP) species [African green monkey (AGMs) and pigtailed macaque (PTs)] were provided morphine and studied using a systems biology approach. Biological specimens were obtained from multiple sources (e.g., lymph node, colon, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and peripheral blood) before and after the administration of morphine (titrated up to a maximum dose of 5 mg/kg over a period of 20 days). Cellular immune, plasma cytokine, and proteome changes were measured and morphine-induced changes in these parameters were assessed on an inter-organ, inter-individual, and inter-species basis. In both species, morphine was associated with decreased levels of (Ki-67+) T cell activation but with only minimal changes in overall T cell counts, neutrophil counts, and NK cells counts. While changes in T cell maturation were observed, these varied across the various tissue/fluid compartments studied. Proteomic analysis revealed a morphine-induced suppressive effect in the lymph node, with decreased abundance of protein mediators involved in the functional categories of energy metabolism, signaling, and maintenance of cell structure. These findings have relevance for understanding the impact of heroin addiction and the opioids used to treat addiction as well as on the interplay between opioid abuse and the response to infection with agents such as the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV).

  17. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human ovarian follicles and its association with intrafollicular hormone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Jane Alrø; Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate follicular fluid (FF) levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in relation to levels of intrafollicular hormones. Furthermore, immunostaining of human follicles of varying diameters was studied for PAPP-A, antimüllerian hormone (AMH), and aromatase, and the biological...... activity of PAPP-A in FF was evaluated....

  18. The Human Brain Does Not Need High Levels of Motivation to Learn a Foreign Language: Motivation Has Had Its Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Language is nature in action and something humans do. This literature review presents evidence from the literature that suggests that learning a foreign language in a classroom situation does not require high levels of student motivation. It is instead suggested that high levels of motivation are needed to make progress when a teacher is using…

  19. Knowledge levels of adolescent girls about human papilloma virus and its vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Orkun; Verit, Fatma Ferda; Keskin, Seda; Zebitay, Ali Galip; Deregözü, Ayşegül; Usta, Taner; Yücel, Oğuz

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of knowledge of the adolescent girls who presented to our clinic about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine. Five hundred and one adolescent girls aged between 13 and 18 years who presented to the gynecology outpatient clinic between March 2012 and March 2013 were asked to answer the questions of the questionnaire about HPV and HPV vaccine. The "Participant Information Form" and "HPV Information Assessment Form" were used by examination of the related literature by the investigators. The data obtained were entered into the computer using the SPSS 16.5 program and evaluated. Descriptive statistics were shown with mean, standard deviation, number and percentage values. The mean age of 501 subjects who were included into the study was 15.92 years. 390 subjects (77.8%) who were included in the study had no information about HPV. 111 subjects (22.2%) stated that they heard of HPV before or had information about HPV. The mean age of the subjects who had information about human papilloma virus was found to be 16.52 years. The mean age of 390 subjects (77.8%) who had no information about human papilloma virus was 15.75 years. It was found that only one of the subjects (0.9%) was vaccinated with HPV vaccine. When the subjects who did not wish to be vaccinated were asked for the reason, 40.9% stated that the reason was inadequate information, 26.4% stated that the reason was high cost, 16.4% stated that the reason was the fact that they did not consider themselves at risk and 16.4% stated that the reason was the fact that they were afraid of side effects. In our study, it was found that the adolescent girls who constituted our study group had insufficient information about HPV and HPV vaccine. Verbal, written and visual communication tools and internet should be used intensively and efficiently for the objective of introducing HPV vaccine and teaching the precautions related with prevention of cervix cancer in

  20. Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    2013-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as 'possibly carcinogenic' to humans that might transform normal cells into cancer cells. Owing to high utilisation of electricity in day-to-day life, exposure to power-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) EMFs is unavoidable. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by pineal gland activity in the brain that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle. How man-made EMFs may influence the pineal gland is still unsolved. The pineal gland is likely to sense EMFs as light but, as a consequence, may decrease the melatonin production. In this study, more than one hundred experimental data of human and animal studies of changes in melatonin levels due to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields exposure were analysed. Then, the results of this study were compared with the International Committee of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit and also with the existing experimental results in the literature for the biological effect of magnetic fields, in order to quantify the effects. The results show that this comparison does not seem to be consistent despite the fact that it offers an advantage of drawing attention to the importance of the exposure limits to weak EMFs. In addition to those inconsistent results, the following were also observed from this work: (i) the ICNIRP recommendations are meant for the well-known acute effects, because effects of the exposure duration cannot be considered and (ii) the significance of not replicating the existing experimental studies is another limitation in the power-frequency EMFs. Regardless of these issues, the above observation agrees with our earlier study in which it was confirmed that it is not a reliable method to characterise biological effects by observing only the ratio of AC magnetic field strength to frequency. This is because exposure duration does not include the ICNIRP limit. Furthermore, the results show the significance of

  1. Task-dependent output of human parasternal intercostal motor units across spinal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Anna L; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2017-12-01

    During breathing, there is differential activity in the human parasternal intercostal muscles and the activity is tightly coupled to the known mechanical advantages for inspiration of the same regions of muscles. It is not known whether differential activity is preserved for the non-respiratory task of ipsilateral trunk rotation. In the present study, we compared single motor units during resting breathing and axial rotation of the trunk during apnoea. We not only confirmed non-uniform recruitment of motor units across parasternal intercostal muscles in breathing, but also demonstrated that the same motor units show an altered pattern of recruitment in the non-respiratory task of trunk rotation. The output of parasternal intercostal motoneurones is modulated differently across spinal levels depending on the task and these results help us understand the mechanisms that may govern task-dependent differences in motoneurone output. During inspiration, there is differential activity in the human parasternal intercostal muscles across interspaces. We investigated whether the earlier recruitment of motor units in the rostral interspaces compared to more caudal spaces during inspiration is preserved for the non-respiratory task of ipsilateral trunk rotation. Single motor unit activity (SMU) was recorded from the first, second and fourth parasternal interspaces on the right side in five participants in two tasks: resting breathing and 'isometric' axial rotation of the trunk during apnoea. Recruitment of the same SMUs was compared between tasks (n = 123). During resting breathing, differential activity was indicated by earlier recruitment of SMUs in the first and second interspaces compared to the fourth space in inspiration (P motor units showed an altered pattern of recruitment because SMUs in the first interspace were recruited later and at a higher rotation torque than those in the second and fourth interspaces (P recruitment measures, was good-excellent [intraclass

  2. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  3. The Prosecution of State-Level Human Trafficking Cases in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Farrell; Monica J DeLateur; Colleen Owens; Stephanie Fahy

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to combat human trafficking, the United States federal government and all fifty states passed new laws that criminalise human trafficking and support the identification and prosecution of human trafficking perpetrators. Despite the passage of these laws, only a small number of human trafficking cases have been prosecuted in the last fifteen years. Guided by the notion that prosecutors seek to avoid uncertainty when making decisions to pursue criminal prosecution, we explore how h...

  4. Interaction of Leptospira interrogans with Human Proteolytic Systems Enhances Dissemination through Endothelial Cells and Protease Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Monica L.; Alvarez-Flores, Miryam P.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C.; Alves, Ivy J.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the ability of Leptospira to capture plasminogen (PLG) and generate plasmin (PLA) bound on the microbial surface in the presence of exogenous activators. In this work, we examined the effects of leptospiral PLG binding for active penetration through the endothelial cell barrier and activation. The results indicate that leptospires with PLG association or PLA activation have enhanced migration activity through human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers compared with untreated bacteria. Leptospira cells coated with PLG were capable of stimulating the expression of PLG activators by HUVECs. Moreover, leptospires endowed with PLG or PLA promoted transcriptional upregulation matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9). Serum samples from patients with confirmed leptospirosis showed higher levels of PLG activators and total MMP-9 than serum samples from normal (healthy) subjects. The highest level of PLG activators and total MMP-9 was detected with microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative serum samples, suggesting that this proteolytic activity stimulation occurs at the early stage of the disease. Furthermore, a gelatin zymography profile obtained for MMPs with serum samples from patients with leptospirosis appears to be specific to leptospiral infection because serum samples from patients with unrelated infectious diseases produced no similar degradation bands. Altogether, the data suggest that the Leptospira-associated PLG or PLA might represent a mechanism that contributes to bacterial penetration of endothelial cells through an activation cascade of events that enhances the proteolytic capability of the organism. To our knowledge, this is the first proteolytic activity associated with leptospiral pathogenesis described to date. PMID:23478319

  5. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials

  6. Human Lung Mast Cell Products Regulate Airway Smooth Muscle CXCL10 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, H; Cha, V; Tong, K; Moir, L M; Armour, C L; Hughes, J M

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) produces CXCL10 which may attract CXCR3(+) mast/T cells to it. Our aim was to investigate the effects of mast cell products on ASM cell CXCL10 production. ASM cells from people with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1 β , TNF- α , and/or IFN γ and treated with histamine (1-100  μ M) ± chlorpheniramine (H1R antagonist; 1  μ M) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist; 50  μ M) or tryptase (1 nM) ± leupeptin (serine protease inhibitor; 50  μ M), heat-inactivated tryptase, or vehicle for 4 h or 24 h. Human lung mast cells (MC) were isolated and activated with IgE/anti-IgE and supernatants were collected after 2 h or 24 h. The supernatants were added to ASM cells for 48 h and ASM cell CXCL10 production detected using ELISA (protein) and real-time PCR (mRNA). Histamine reduced IL-1 β /TNF- α -induced CXCL10 protein, but not mRNA, levels independent of H1 and H2 receptor activation, whereas tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants reduced all cytokine-induced CXCL10. Tryptase also reduced CXCL10 levels in a cell-free system. Leupeptin inhibited the effects of tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants. MC 24 h supernatants contained TNF- α and amplified IFN γ -induced ASM cell CXCL10 production. This is the first evidence that MC can regulate ASM cell CXCL10 production and its degradation. Thus MC may regulate airway myositis in asthma.

  7. High level leaching of heavy metals from colorful ceramic foodwares: a potential risk to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderemi, Taiwo Adedoyin; Adenuga, Adeniyi Abiodun; Oyekunle, John Adekunle Oyedele; Ogunfowokan, Aderemi Okunola

    2017-07-01

    Ceramic foodwares are among the products used by people on daily basis without being cautious of exposures to heavy metals through possible leaching from the glaze ceramics. This study investigated the levels of heavy metals found in some commonly used ceramic foodwares in Nigeria with the aim of determining levels of human exposures through the use of the ceramics. To achieve this, acid digestion was carried out for the total metal concentrations and leaching tests were done using 4% acetic acid as a leaching agent. Metal concentrations were quantified using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXES) analysis. All the ceramic foodwares studied were found to contain varied amounts of heavy metals in their glazes, with concentrations in the range of 26.45-2071.46, 5.20-547.00, 1.24-2681.02, 2590.00-8848.40, 6.42-654.66, 112.69-649.95, 63.38-2518.51, and 3786.51-8249.44 μg g -1 for Pb, Cd, Zn, As, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively. Concentrations of the metals leached from the ceramics were in the range of 0.11-0.97, 0.01-0.28, 0.00-4.19, 1.93-15.00, 0.01-0.41, 0.09-0.60, 0.01-2.14, and 0.01-11.53 mgL -1 for Pb, Cd, Zn, As, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively. Comparing the ratio of the metals leached from the ceramic wares with those of the metal oxides in the ceramics, it was noticeable that not all the metals detected in the ceramic samples were domiciled in the glaze but in the clay materials used for the ceramics.

  8. High Levels of Chemokine C-C Motif Ligand 20 in Human Milk and Its Production by Oral Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Alan G; Komesu, Marilena C; Duarte, Geraldo; Del Ciampo, Luiz A; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y

    2017-03-01

    Chemokine C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20) is implicated in the formation and function of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Although CCL20 is secreted by many normal human tissues, no studies have evaluated the presence of CCL20 in human milk or its production by oral keratinocytes stimulated by human milk. To evaluate the presence of CCL20 in breast milk and verify CCL20 secretion in vitro by oral keratinocytes stimulated with human and bovine milk, as well as its possible association with breast milk lactoferrin levels. The levels of CCL20 and lactoferrin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in human milk at three different stages of maturation from 74 healthy breastfeeding mothers. In vitro, oral keratinocytes were stimulated with human and bovine milk, and CCL20 was measured in their supernatant. High concentrations of CCL20 were detected in the human breast milk samples obtained during the first week (1,777.07 pg/mL) and second week postpartum (1,523.44 pg/mL), with a significantly low concentration in samples at 3-6 weeks postpartum (238.42 pg/mL; p stimulated higher CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes compared with bovine milk (p stimulation had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration. CCl20 is present at high levels in human milk, predominantly in the first and second week postpartum, but at significantly lower levels at 3-6 weeks postpartum. Human milk is capable of stimulating CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes, and this induction had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration.

  9. Analysis of Knowledge Level in Brazilian Students about Human Papillomavirus Infection and Development of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, George Kemil; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; Gomes, Bruno Belmonte Martinelli; Bianco, Thiago Mantello; Salge, Ana Karina Marques; Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira de; Dos Reis, Marlize Moura; Abrahão, Dayana Pousa Siqueira; Abdalla, Douglas Reis

    2017-05-01

    Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV), belonging to the Papovavirida family, is the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease (STD) agent worldwide. In Brazil, it is estimated that there are 3-6 million people infected with HPV. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of young male students about penis cancer related to HPV infection. Methods: This exploratory and quantitative study was conducted to analyze answers of 242 male students attending a private college located in Uberaba city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during 2015. Results: Most of the 242 participants (88.8%) affirmed having started sexual life very early, the majority (79.3%) were currently married and 69.8% had a single sexual partner. Regardless of their knowledge about HPV virus and its relationship with penis cancer, our data showed a general lack of awareness of the participants. Conclusion: Our results suggest that despite efforts to propagate information about HPV infection and its relation to penis cancer, the level of knowledge of students is low. Because of that, it is important to improve the information spread by media, emphasizing prevention and treatment of HPV infection in men. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Occurrence of Organochlorines Contaminants in Coastal Fish from Sepetiba Bay: Levels and Human Health Repercussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pacheco Ferreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to survey levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, polychlorinateddibenzofurans (PCDFs, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs in white mullet (Mugil curema,common snook (Centropomus undecimalis, and acoupa weakfish (Cynoscion acoupa, collected at Sepetibabay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, March-August 2013. PCBs and PCDD/Fs were determined by High Resolution GasChromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS as stated by the US EPA 1613B, 1668B,and 8290A methods. The concentration of total PCBs ranged from 0.589688 ~ 0.6981629 pg-WHO-TEQ/g wwand PCDDs/PCDFs ranged from 0.134037 ~ 0.242573 pg-WHO-TEQ/g ww. The concentrations of thesecontaminants on fish species currently appear to fall below critical values, and the dietary consumption of thesespecies did not represent a risk for human health. However, seeking to avoid future problems, systematicmonitoring can prevent complications to the environment, marine wildlife and public health impacts.

  11. Analysis of Knowledge Level in Brasilian Students about Human Papillomavirus Infection and Development of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, George Kemil; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; Gomes, Bruno Belmonte Martinelli; Bianco, Thiago Mantello; Salge, Ana Karina Marques; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Reis, Marlize Moura Dos; Abrahão, Dayana Pousa Siqueira; Abdalla, Douglas Reis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV), belonging to the Papovavirida family, is the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease (STD) agent worldwide. In Brazil, it is estimated that there are 3-6 million people infected with HPV. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of young male students about penis cancer related to HPV infection. Methods: This exploratory and quantitative study was conducted to analyze answers of 242 male students attending a private college located in Uberaba city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during 2015. Results: Most of the 242 participants (88.8%) affirmed having started sexual life very early, the majority (79.3%) were currently married and 69.8% had a single sexual partner. Regardless of their knowledge about HPV virus and its relationship with penis cancer, our data showed a general lack of awareness of the participants. Conclusion: Our results suggest that despite efforts to propagate information about HPV infection and its relation to penis cancer, the level of knowledge of students is low. Because of that, it is important to improve the information spread by media, emphasizing prevention and treatment of HPV infection in men. PMID:28612588

  12. Human Walk Modeled by PCPG to Control a Lower Limb Neuroprosthesis by High-Level Commands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Duvinage

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current active leg prostheses do not integrate the most recent advances in Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI and bipedal robotics. Moreover, their actuators are seldom driven by the subject’s intention. This paper aims at showing a summary of our current results in the field of human gait rehabilitation. In a first prototype, the main focus was on people suffering from foot drop problems, i.e. people who are unable to lift their feet. However, current work is focusing on a full active ankle orthosis. The approach is threefold: a BCI system, a gait model and an orthosis. Thanks to the BCI system, patients are able to generate high-level commands. Typically, a command could represent a speed modification. Then, a gait model based on a programmable central pattern generator is used to generate the adequate kinematics. Finally, the orthosis is tracking this kinematics when the foot is in the air, whereas, the orthosis is mimicking a spring when the foot is on the ground.

  13. Interplay between Selenium Levels and Replicative Senescence in WI-38 Human Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ghania; Legrain, Yona; Touat-Hamici, Zahia; Duhieu, Stéphane; Cornu, David; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Chavatte, Laurent

    2018-01-20

    Selenoproteins are essential components of antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis, and cell signaling in mammals, where selenium is found in the form of a rare amino acid, selenocysteine. Selenium, which is often limited both in food intake and cell culture media, is a strong regulator of selenoprotein expression and selenoenzyme activity. Aging is a slow, complex, and multifactorial process, resulting in a gradual and irreversible decline of various functions of the body. Several cellular aspects of organismal aging are recapitulated in the replicative senescence of cultured human diploid fibroblasts, such as embryonic lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. We previously reported that the long-term growth of young WI-38 cells with high (supplemented), moderate (control), or low (depleted) concentrations of selenium in the culture medium impacts their replicative lifespan, due to rapid changes in replicative senescence-associated markers and signaling pathways. In order to gain insight into the molecular link between selenium levels and replicative senescence, in the present work, we have applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on 2-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to the study of young and presenescent cells grown in selenium-supplemented, control, or depleted media. Applying a restrictive cut-off (spot intensity ±50% and a p value iii) spots varying in response to selenium concentration in presenescent cells. Interestingly, a 72% overlap between the impact of senescence and selenium was observed in our proteomic results, demonstrating a strong interplay between selenium, selenoproteins, and replicative senescence.

  14. In vitro analysis of low-level laser irradiation on human osteoblast-like cells proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, Nora; Saino, Enrica; Bragheri, Francesca; Minzioni, Paolo; Cristiani, Ilaria; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of a single or a multiple doses of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on proliferation of the human osteosarcoma cell line, SAOS-2. SAOS-2 cells were divided in five groups and exposed to LLLI (659 nm diode laser; 11 mW power output): group I as a control (dark), group II exposed to a single laser dose of 1 J/cm2, group III irradiated with a single dose of 3 J/cm2, and group IV and V exposed for three consecutive days to 1 or 3 J/cm², respectively. Cellular proliferation was assessed daily up to 7 days of culturing. The obtained results showed an increase in proliferative capacity of SAOS-2 cells during the first 96 h of culturing time in once-irradiated cells, as compared to control cells. Furthermore, a significantly higher proliferation in the group IV and V was detected if compared to a single dose or to control group after 96 h and 7 days. In conclusion, the effect of the single dose on cell proliferation was transitory and repeated irradiations were necessary to observe a strong enhancement of SAOS-2 growth. As a future perspective, we would like to determine the potential of LLLI as a new approach for promoting bone regeneration onto biomaterials.

  15. Comparative observations on levels of mercury in scalp hair of humans from different Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzoni, Aristeo

    1992-09-01

    Following the Minamata events, an extraordinary number of studies concerning mercury toxicity and human health have been undertaken. Particular attention has been given to the evaluation of the dose-response relationship, i.e., the body burden at which (evaluated through the mercury analyses in blood or hair) the risk of poisoning begins. The results of a comparative study concerning levels of mercury in the hair of fishermen living in small islands who eat seafood more than four times per week show that in two areas only, and only in a few cases in these areas, the mercury in the hair exceeds the limit at which a possible risk could exist. In fact, the limit of 50 mg/g of total mercury in the hair (indicated as the lower limit above which a possible risk could occur) is surpassed by nine fishermen out of a total of 39 at station 1 and by four fishermen out of a total of 26 at station 3. The average value at station 1 is 36.38 mg/g and that at station 3 is 30.31 mg. Many countries have set legal limits of mercury for seafood, but evidently the system does not offer a true protection for man. Only the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), as repeatedly suggested by WHO, should be considered the best guideline to prevent possibly harmful consequences.

  16. Psilocybin links binocular rivalry switch rate to attention and subjective arousal levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Olivia L; Hasler, Felix; Pettigrew, John D; Wallis, Guy M; Liu, Guang B; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2007-12-01

    Binocular rivalry occurs when different images are simultaneously presented to each eye. During continual viewing of this stimulus, the observer will experience repeated switches between visual awareness of the two images. Previous studies have suggested that a slow rate of perceptual switching may be associated with clinical and drug-induced psychosis. The objective of the study was to explore the proposed relationship between binocular rivalry switch rate and subjective changes in psychological state associated with 5-HT2A receptor activation. This study used psilocybin, the hallucinogen found naturally in Psilocybe mushrooms that had previously been found to induce psychosis-like symptoms via the 5-HT2A receptor. The effects of psilocybin (215 microg/kg) were considered alone and after pretreatment with the selective 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (50 mg) in ten healthy human subjects. Psilocybin significantly reduced the rate of binocular rivalry switching and increased the proportion of transitional/mixed percept experience. Pretreatment with ketanserin blocked the majority of psilocybin's "positive" psychosis-like hallucinogenic symptoms. However, ketanserin had no influence on either the psilocybin-induced slowing of binocular rivalry or the drug's "negative-type symptoms" associated with reduced arousal and vigilance. Together, these findings link changes in binocular rivalry switching rate to subjective levels of arousal and attention. In addition, it suggests that psilocybin's effect on binocular rivalry is unlikely to be mediated by the 5-HT2A receptor.

  17. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM ( p < 0.0001, n = 287). No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content ( p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  18. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  19. Polyphenol levels in human urine after intake of six different polyphenol-rich beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Gonthier, Marie-Paule; Manach, Claudine; Morand, Christine; Mennen, Louise; Rémésy, Christian; Scalbert, Augustin

    2005-10-01

    Dietary polyphenols are suggested to participate in the prevention of CVD and cancer. It is essential for epidemiological studies to be able to compare intake of the main dietary polyphenols in populations. The present paper describes a fast method suitable for the analysis of polyphenols in urine, selected as potential biomarkers of intake. This method is applied to the estimation of polyphenol recovery after ingestion of six different polyphenol-rich beverages. Fifteen polyphenols including mammalian lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone), several phenolic acids (chlorogenic, caffeic, m-coumaric, gallic, and 4-O-methylgallic acids), phloretin and various flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, kaempferol, hesperetin, and naringenin) were simultaneously quantified in human urine by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionisation mass-MS (HPLC-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry) with a run time of 6 min per sample. The method has been validated with regard to linearity, precision, and accuracy in intra- and inter-day assays. It was applied to urine samples collected from nine volunteers in the 24 h following consumption of either green tea, a grape-skin extract, cocoa beverage, coffee, grapefruit juice or orange juice. Levels of urinary excretion suggest that chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, epicatechin, naringenin or hesperetin could be used as specific biomarkers to evaluate the consumption of coffee, wine, tea or cocoa, and citrus juices respectively.

  20. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambavi Kugananthan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287. No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287, supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89. These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  1. Human-factors-based implementation of the remote characterization system high-level control station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, M.W.; Richardson, B.S.; Rowe, J.C.; Draper, J.V.; Sandness, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and characterization of buried objects and materials is an important first step in the restoration of the numerous US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Department of Defense waste disposal sites. DOE, through its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Robotics and Technology Development Program, has developed the Remote Characterization System (RCS) to address the needs of remote subsurfacecharacterization. The RCS consists of a low-metal-content (low-metallic-signature) remotely piloted vehicle, a high-level control station (HLCS) where operators can remotely control the vehicle and analyze real-time data from sensors, and an array of sensors that can be chosen to meet the survey task at hand. Communication between the vehicle and the base station is handled by a radio link. Site mapping is made possible through the use of geopositioning satellite data. The primary mode of vehicle operation is teleoperation, but provision has been made for semiautonomous or supervisory control that allows for automated sitesurvey on simple sites. Data analysis and display is supported for both real-time observation and postprocessing of data. The particular emphasis of this paper documents the human-factors-based design influences on the HLCS and describes the design in detail

  2. Assessing the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses to increasing anemia severity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Dey, Ankita; Chen, Tenn F.

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent medical condition that seriously affects millions of people all over the world. In many regions, not only its initial detection but also its monitoring are hindered by limited access to laboratory facilities. This situation has motivated the development of a wide range of optical devices and procedures to assist physicians in these tasks. Although noticeable progress has been achieved in this area, the search for reliable, low-cost, and risk-free solutions still continues, and the strengthening of the knowledge base about this disorder and its effects is essential for the success of these initiatives. We contribute to these efforts by closely examining the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses (within and outside the visible region of the light spectrum) to reduced hemoglobin concentrations associated with increasing anemia severity levels. This investigation, which involves skin specimens with distinct biophysical and morphological characteristics, is supported by controlled in silico experiments performed using a predictive light transport model and measured data reported in the biomedical literature. We also propose a noninvasive procedure to be employed in the monitoring of this condition at the point-of-care.

  3. Occurrence of Organochlorines Contaminants in Coastal Fish from Sepetiba Bay: Levels and Human Health Repercussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pacheco Ferreira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to survey levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs in white mullet (Mugil curema, common snook (Centropomus undecimalis, and acoupa weakfish (Cynoscion acoupa, collected at Sepetiba bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, March-August 2013. PCBs and PCDD/Fs were determined by High Resolution Gas Chromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS as stated by the US EPA 1613B, 1668B, and 8290A methods. The concentration of total PCBs ranged from 0.589688 ~ 0.6981629 pg-WHO-TEQ/g ww and PCDDs/PCDFs ranged from 0.134037 ~ 0.242573 pg-WHO-TEQ/g ww. The concentrations of these contaminants on fish species currently appear to fall below critical values, and the dietary consumption of these species did not represent a risk for human health. However, seeking to avoid future problems, systematic monitoring can prevent complications to the environment, marine wildlife and public health impacts.

  4. Saturation in Phosphene Size with Increasing Current Levels Delivered to Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosking, William H; Sun, Ping; Ozker, Muge; Pei, Xiaomei; Foster, Brett L; Beauchamp, Michael S; Yoshor, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Electrically stimulating early visual cortex results in a visual percept known as a phosphene. Although phosphenes can be evoked by a wide range of electrode sizes and current amplitudes, they are invariably described as small. To better understand this observation, we electrically stimulated 93 electrodes implanted in the visual cortex of 13 human subjects who reported phosphene size while stimulation current was varied. Phosphene size increased as the stimulation current was initially raised above threshold, but then rapidly reached saturation. Phosphene size also depended on the location of the stimulated site, with size increasing with distance from the foveal representation. We developed a model relating phosphene size to the amount of activated cortex and its location within the retinotopic map. First, a sigmoidal curve was used to predict the amount of activated cortex at a given current. Second, the amount of active cortex was converted to degrees of visual angle by multiplying by the inverse cortical magnification factor for that retinotopic location. This simple model accurately predicted phosphene size for a broad range of stimulation currents and cortical locations. The unexpected saturation in phosphene sizes suggests that the functional architecture of cerebral cortex may impose fundamental restrictions on the spread of artificially evoked activity and this may be an important consideration in the design of cortical prosthetic devices. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neural basis for phosphenes, the visual percepts created by electrical stimulation of visual cortex, is fundamental to the development of a visual cortical prosthetic. Our experiments in human subjects implanted with electrodes over visual cortex show that it is the activity of a large population of cells spread out across several millimeters of tissue that supports the perception of a phosphene. In addition, we describe an important feature of the production of phosphenes by

  5. Effects of snow-reflected light levels on human visual comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Demircioglu Yildiz, Nalan; Yilmaz, Sevgi

    2008-09-01

    The intensity of the sunlight reflected by the snow-covered surfaces is so high that it may disturb humans many times. This study aims to determine the reflected sunlight intensities from snow covered areas at points near (at a distance of 2 m) and under an individual tree and among trees (in the forest area) by accepting the open area as control; the reducing effects of the plant materials on reflected sunlight in percentage by comparing with the values of the open (control) area; and critical reflected sunlight threshold values for human visual comfort. The study was carried out over 22 clear and calm, i.e. sky was cloudless and wind was calm, days between the 1st and 31st days of January 2004, at 8:30 in the morning, at 12:30 at noon and at 14:30 in the afternoon in Erzurum. In order to determine the discomforting light intensity levels, 25 females and 26 male (totally 51) student subjects whose mean age was 20 and who had no visual disorders were selected. Considering the open area as control, mean reflected sunlight reducing effects were found to be 19.0, 66.0 and 82.7% for the 2 m near a tree, under a tree, and forest area, respectively. According to the responses of 51 subjects in the study, visually "very comfortable" range is between 5,000 and 8,000 lx; "comfortable" range is between 11,000 and 75,000 lx (mostly at 12,000 lx); "uncomfortable" condition is above the light intensity value of 43,000 lx and "very uncomfortable" condition is above the intensity of 80,000 lx. Great majority of the subjects (91%) found the value of 103,000 lx to be "very uncomfortable." As it is not an applicable way to use the great and dense tree masses in the cities, at least individual trees should be used along the main pedestrian axels in the cities having the same features with Erzurum to prevent the natural light pollution and discomforting effects of the snow-reflected sunlight.

  6. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis, as assessed by C-peptide and the Homeostasis Assessment Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jerry; Vadakkekuttical, Rosamma Joseph; George, Joseraj Manaloor; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Radhakrishnan, Chandni

    2017-08-01

    A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes and periodontitis. In the present clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis. Forty chronic periodontitis patients with type II DM were selected and equally allocated to case and control groups. All patients were assessed for periodontal parameters and systemic parameters. The case group received NSPT, and both groups were re-evaluated after 3 months. All periodontal parameters were found to be significantly improved in the case group compared to the control group 3 months after NSPT. The mean differences in systemic parameters, such as fasting serum C-peptide, Homeostasis Assessment (HOMA) Index-insulin resistance, and HOMA-insulin sensitivity, from baseline to 3 months for the case group were 0.544 ± 0.73, 0.54 ± 0.63, and -25.44 ± 36.81, respectively; for the control group, they were significant at -1.66 ± 1.89, -1.48 ± 1.86, and 31.42 ± 38.82 respectively (P periodontal inflammation could affect glycemic control and insulin resistance. Effective periodontal therapy reduced insulin resistance and improved periodontal health status and insulin sensitivity in patients with type II DM and chronic periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Effects of inhibition of interleukin-6 signalling on insulin sensitivity and lipoprotein (a levels in human subjects with rheumatoid diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Schultz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been found to be increased in type 2 diabetic subjects. However, it still remains unclear if these elevated IL-6 levels are co-incidental or if this cytokine is causally related to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in humans. Therefore, in the present study we examined insulin sensitivity, serum adipokine levels and lipid parameters in human subjects before and after treatment with the IL-6 receptor antibody Tocilizumab.11 non-diabetic patients with rheumatoid disease were included in the study. HOMA-IR was calculated and serum levels for leptin, adiponectin, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and lipoprotein (a (Lp (a were measured before as well as one and three months after Tocilizumab treatment. The HOMA index for insulin resistance decreased significantly. While leptin concentrations were not altered by inhibition of IL-6 signalling, adiponectin concentrations significantly increased. Thus the leptin to adiponectin ratio, a novel marker for insulin resistance, exhibited a significant decrease. Serum triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol tended to be increased whereas Lp (a levels significantly decreased.Inhibition of IL-6 signalling improves insulin sensitivity in humans with immunological disease suggesting that elevated IL-6 levels in type 2 diabetic subjects might be causally involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Furthermore, our data indicate that inhibition of IL-6 signalling decreases Lp (a serum levels, which might reduce the cardiovascular risk of human subjects.

  8. The influence of the level of physical activity and human development in the quality of life in survivors of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Aidar, Felipe J; de Oliveira, Ricardo J; Silva, Ant?nio J; de Matos, Dihogo G; Carneiro, Andr? L; Garrido, Nuno; Hickner, Robert C; Reis, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The association between physical activity and quality of life in stroke survivors has not been analyzed within a framework related to the human development index. This study aimed to identify differences in physical activity level and in the quality of life of stroke survivors in two cities differing in economic aspects of the human development index. Methods Two groups of subjects who had suffered a stroke at least a year prior to testing and showed hemiplegia or hemipare...

  9. Increased levels of IgG antibodies against human HSP60 in patients with spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Astrid; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Deleuran, Bent Winding

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) comprises a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases, with strong association to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27. SpA is suggested triggered by bacterial infection, and bacterial heat shock protein (HSP) seems to be a strong T cell antigen. Since...... against human HSP60, but not antibodies against bacterial HSP60, were elevated in the SpA group compared with the control group. Association between IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60 and BASMI was shown in HLA-B27+ patients. Only weak correlation between antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60...... was seen, and there was no indication of cross-reaction. Conclusion: These results suggest that antibodies against human HSP60 is associated with SpA, however, the theory that antibodies against human HSP60 is a specific part of the aetiology, through cross-reaction to bacterial HSP60, cannot be supported...

  10. Convolutional Neural Network Achieves Human-level Accuracy in Music Genre Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Mingwen

    2018-01-01

    Music genre classification is one example of content-based analysis of music signals. Traditionally, human-engineered features were used to automatize this task and 61% accuracy has been achieved in the 10-genre classification. However, it's still below the 70% accuracy that humans could achieve in the same task. Here, we propose a new method that combines knowledge of human perception study in music genre classification and the neurophysiology of the auditory system. The method works by trai...

  11. Genome-wide association identifies nine common variants associated with fasting proinsulin levels and provides new insights into the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); J. Dupuis (Josée); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A.M. Barker (Adam); E. Ahlqvist (Emma); D. Rybin (Denis); J.R. Petrie (John); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); H. Chen (Han); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); J. Taneera (Jalal); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); J. Peden (John); F. Turrini (Fabiola); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); C. Zabena (Carina); P. Almgren (Peter); G.V. Dedoussis (George); D. Barnes (Daniel); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); K. Hagen (Knut); P. Eriksson (Per); E. Eury (Elodie); L. Folkersen (Lasse); C.S. Fox (Caroline); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A. Goel (Anuj); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); B. Isomaa (Bo); A.U. Jackson (Anne); K. Jameson (Karen); E. Kajantie (Eero); J. Kerr-Conte (Julie); L. Groop (Leif); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J. Luan; K. Makrilakis (Konstantinos); A.K. Manning (Alisa); M.T. Martinez-Larrad (Maria Teresa); N. Narisu (Narisu); J. Öhrvik (John); C. Osmond (Clive); L. Pascoe (Laura); F. Payne (Felicity); A.A. Sayer; B. Sennblad (Bengt); C. Cooper (Charles); K. Stirrups (Kathy); A.J. Swift (Amy); A.C. Syvänen; T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); F. van't Hooft (Ferdinand); M. Walker (Mark); M.N. Weedon (Michael); W. Xie (Weijia); B. Zethelius (Björn); L.J. Scott (Laura); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); A.P. Morris (Andrew); C. Dina (Christian); R.P. Welch (Ryan); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); C. Huth (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L.J. McCulloch (Laura); T. Ferreira (Teresa); H. Grallert (Harald); N. Amin (Najaf); G. Wu (Guanming); C.J. Willer (Cristen); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); S.A. McCarroll (Steven); O.M. Hofmann (Oliver); L. Qi (Lu); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); M. van Hoek (Mandy); P. Navarro (Pau); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); B. Balkau (Beverley); N. Narisu (Narisu); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R. Blagieva (Roza); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K.B. Boström (Kristina Bengtsson); B. Bravenboer (Bert); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); N.P. Burtt (Noël); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); G. Crawford (Gabe); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); K.S. Elliott (Katherine); A.L. Elliott (Amanda); M.R. Erdos (Michael); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); M. Ganser (Martha); C. Gieger (Christian); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Green (Todd); S. Griffin (Simon); C.J. Groves (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); S. Hadjadj (Samy); N. Hassanali (Neelam); C. Herder (Christian); T. Jorgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kraft (Peter); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); M. Li (Man); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); M.N. Weedon (Michael); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); M. Marre (Michel); T. Meitinger (Thomas); K. Midthjell (Kristian); M.A. Morken (Mario); P. Nilsson (Peter); K.R. Owen (Katharine); J.R.B. Perry (John); A.K. Petersen; C. Platou (Carl); C. Proença (Christine); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); R.R. Frants (Rune); G. Rocheleau (Ghislain); M. Roden (Michael); M.J. Sampson (Michael); R. Saxena (Richa); B.M. Shields (Beverley); P. Shrader (Peter); T. Sparsø (Thomas); K. Strassburger (Klaus); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun (Qi); B. Thorand (Barbara); J. Tichet (Jean); T.W. van Haeften (Timon); T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); G.B. Walters (Bragi); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); S. Cauchi (Stephane); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); T. Hansen (T.); W.A. Hide (Winston); G.A. Hitman (Graham); A. Hofman (Albert); K. Hveem (Kristian); M. Laakso (Markku); K.L. Mohlke (Karen L.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); L.D. Stein (Lincoln); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); H. Campbell (Harry); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank B.); J.B. Meigs (James); J.S. Pankow (James); O. Pedersen (Oluf); I. Barroso (Inês); L. Groop (Leif); R. Sladek (Rob); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.F. Wilson (James F.); T. Illig (Thomas); P. Froguel (Philippe); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.I. McCarthy (Mark I.); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); K.L. Monda (Keri); H.L. Allen; R. Mägi (Reedik); J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); I.M. Heid (Iris); A.R. Wood (Andrew); R.J. Weyant (Robert); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Liang (Liming); J. Nemesh (James); J.H. Park; T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); J. Yang (Jian); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); I. Prokopenko (Inga); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); A.V. Smith; J.H. Zhao; K.K.H. Aben (Katja); D. Absher (Devin); A.L. Dixon (Anna); B.M. Shields (Beverley); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); V. Hoesel (Volker); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); B. Thorand (Barbara); C. Lamina (Claudia); S. Li (Shengxu); R.M. van Dam (Rob); R.H. Myers (Richard); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); C. Sandholt (Camilla); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); C.C. White (Charles); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); R.W. Lawrence (Robert); N. Pellikka (Niina); J. Shi (Jianxin); E. Thiering (Elisabeth); H. Alavere (Helene); M.T.S. Alibrandi (Maria); A.M. Arnold (Alice); T. Aspelund (Thor); I. Rudan (Igor); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Biebermann (Heike); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); T. Boes (Tanja); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan R.); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); F. Busonero; C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); F.B. Hu (Frank); C.-M. Chen (Chih-Mei); R. Clarke (Robert); J. Connell (John); I.N.M. Day (Ian N.M.); J. Duan (Jubao); R. Elosua (Roberto); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); T. Illig (Thomas); S.B. Felix (Stephan); P. Fischer-Posovszky (Pamela); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); N. Friedrich (Nele); M. Fu (Mao); S. Gaget (Stefan); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); E.J. Geus (Eeco); A.P. Gjesing (Anette); P. Goyette (Philippe); J. Gräsler (Jürgen); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hinney (Anke); G. Homuth (Georg); J. Hui (Jennie); W. Igl (Wilmar); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); I. Jarick (Ivonne); E. Jewell (Eelizabeth); U. John (Ulrich); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kaakinen (Marika); L. Kaplan (Lee); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); J. Kettunen (Johannes); J. Yang (Joanna); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); T. Esko (Tõnu); I.R. König (Inke); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J. Laitinen (Jaana); O. Lantieri (Olivier); C. Lanzani (Chiara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Lettre (Guillaume); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); M.E. Goddard (Michael); B. Ludwig (Barbara); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); T. Johnson (Toby); B. McKnight (Barbara); O. Melander (Olle); D. Meyre (David); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); R. Mulic (Rosanda); J.S. Ngwa; M. Nelis (Mari); M.J. Neville (Matthew); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); L.J. Scott (Laura); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G. Pare (Guillame); A.N. Parker (Alex); I. Pichler (Irene); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); C.P. Platou (Carl); O. Polasek (Ozren); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); S. Rafelt (Suzanne); O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); M. Ridderstråle (Martin); J. Shi (Jianxin); E. Thiering (Eelisabeth); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); M.J. Savolainen (Markku); A. Scherag (Andre); S. Schipf (Sabine); Y. Ben-Shlomo; H. Schunkert (Heribert); K. Silander (Kaisa); J. Sinisalo (Juha); D.S. Siscovick (David); J.H. Smit (Jan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); J. Stephens (Jonathan); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); M.L. Tammesoo; J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); F.P. Cappuccio (Francesco); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya M.); J.R. Thompson (John); B. Thomson (Brian); A. Tönjes (Anke); R. Clarke; L. Coin (Lachlan); V. Vatin (Vincent); I.N.M. Day (Ian); M. den Heijer (Martin); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); L. Waite (Lindsay); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S. Wiegand (Susanna); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J. Xu (Jianfeng); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.P. Beilby (John); I.S. Farooqi (I. Sadaf); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); H.V. Huikuri (Heikki); A. James (Alan); M. Kähönen (Mika); F. Macciardi (Fabio); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); C. Ohlsson (Claes); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); G.D. Smith; J. Erdmann (Jeanette); H. Grönberg (Henrik); P. Hall (Per); T.B. Harris (Tamara); R.B. Hayes (Richard); J. Heinrich (Joachim); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); K.T. Khaw; L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); H. Krude; D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); A. Metspalu (Andres); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); B.W.J.H. Penninx; A. Peters (Annette); T. Quertermous (Thomas); T. Reinehr (Thomas); A. Rissanen (Aila); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); M. Uda (Manuela); Wabitsch, M. (Martin); G. Waeber (Gérard); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); N. Chatterjee (Nilanjan); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Liu (Jianjun); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunians (Talin); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); D.P. Strachan (David); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); K.E. North (Kari); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); E. Ingelsson (Erik); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); L. Parts (Leopold); D. Glass (Daniel); J. Nisbet (James); A. Barrett (Angela); M. Sekowska (Magdalena); M.E. Travers (Mary); S.C. Potter (Simon); E. Grundberg (Elin); S. O'Rahilly (Stephen); A.K. Hedman (Asa); V. Bataille (Veronique); J.T. Bell (Jordana); G. Surdulescu (Gabriela); M. Perola (Markus); F.O. Nestle (Frank); J. Min (Josine); A. Wilk (Alicja); C.J. Hammond (Christopher J.); T.-P. Yang (Tsun-Po); O. Raitakari (Olli); R. Durbin (Richard); K.R. Ahmadi (Kourosh); H. Holm (Hilma); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); M. Barbalic (maja); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); S. Schreiber (Stefan); D. Ardissino (Diego); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); L.C. Becker (Lewis); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour Eddine); S.G. Ellis (Stephen); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); D.R. Witte (Deniel); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Ziegler (Andreas); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); I.S. Farooqi (Sadaf); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); H. Boeing (Heiner); C. Meisinger (Christa); V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); F.S. Collins (Francis); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Munzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); F. Peyvandi (Flora); R.B. Hayes (Richard); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Schäfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); P. Munroe (Patricia); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); M. Stoll (Monika); W. Tang (W.); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A.M. van Rij (Andre); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); T. Zeller (Tanja); F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); W. März (Winfried); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); R. Roberts (Robert); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Hopewell; P.M. Visscher (Peter); A. Offer (Alison); L. Bowman; P. Sleight (Peter); R. Peto (R.); F.S. Collins (Francis); J.C. Chambers (John C.); N. Ahmed (Nabeel); J.R. O´Connell; P. Donnelly (Peter); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Scott (James); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); W. Zhang (Weihua); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Sabater-Lleal, M. (Maria); A. Mälarstig (Anders); M.-L. Hellénius (Mai-Lis); G. Olsson; S. Rust (Stephan); G. Assmann (Gerd); U. Seedorf (Udo); G. Tognoni; M. Franzosi; P. Linksted (Pamela); H. Ongen (Halit); T. Kyriakou (Theodosios); M. Farrall (Martin); A. Rasheed (Asif); M.A. Zaidi (Aghar); N. Shah (Nisha); M. Samuel (Maria); C.B. Mallick (Chandana Basu); M. Azhar (Muhammad); K.S. Zaman (Khan Shah); M. Ishaq (Muhammad); A. Gardezi (Ali); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); R. Frossard; J. Danesh (John); J.C. Chambers (John); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); C.-G. Östenson (Claes-Göran); K.T. Zondervan (Krina); M. Serrano-Ríos (Manuel); E. Ferrannini (Ele); T. Forsen (Tom); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); G.V. Dedoussis (George); C. Langenberg (Claudia); A. Hamsten (Anders); J.C. Florez (Jose)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired b-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new

  12. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Nine Common Variants Associated With Fasting Proinsulin Levels and Provides New Insights Into the Pathophysiology of Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strawbridge, Rona J.; Dupuis, Josee; Prokopenko, Inga; Barker, Adam; Ahlqvist, Emma; Rybin, Denis; Petrie, John R.; Travers, Mary E.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dimas, Antigone S.; Nica, Alexandra; Wheeler, Eleanor; Chen, Han; Voight, Benjamin F.; Taneera, Jalal; Kanoni, Stavroula; Peden, John F.; Turrini, Fabiola; Gustafsson, Stefan; Zabena, Carina; Almgren, Peter; Barker, David J. P.; Barnes, Daniel; Dennison, Elaine M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eriksson, Per; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Goel, Anuj; Gu, Harvest F.; Horikoshi, Momoko; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Jameson, Karen A.; Kajantie, Eero; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Manning, Alisa K.; Teresa Martinez-Larrad, Maria; Narisu, Narisu; Mannila, Maria Nastase; Ohrvik, John; Osmond, Clive; Pascoe, Laura

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired beta-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new insights about

  13. Genome-wide association identifies nine common variants associated with fasting proinsulin levels and provides new insights into the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strawbridge, R.J.; Dupuis, J.; Prokopenko, I.; Barker, A.; Ahlqvist, E.; Rybin, D.; Petrie, J.R.; Travers, M.E.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Dimas, A.S.; Nica, A.; Wheeler, E.; Chen, H.; Voight, B.F.; Taneera, J.; Kanoni, S.; Peden, J.F.; Turrini, F.; Gustafsson, S.; Zabena, C.; Almgren, P.; Barker, D.J.; Barnes, D.; Dennison, E.M.; Eriksson, J.G.; Eriksson, P.; Eury, E.; Folkersen, L.; Fox, C.S.; Frayling, T.M.; Goel, A.; Gu, H.F.; Horikoshi, M.; Isomaa, B.; Jackson, A.U.; Jameson, K.A.; Kajantie, E.; Kerr-Conte, J.; Kuulasmaa, T.; Kuusisto, J.; Loos, R.J.; Luan, J.; Makrilakis, K.; Manning, A.K.; Martinez-Larrad, M.T.; Narisu, N.; Nastase Mannila, M.; Ohrvik, J.; Osmond, C.; Pascoe, L.; Payne, F.; Sayer, A.A.; Sennblad, B.; Silveira, A.; Stancakova, A.; Stirrups, K.; Swift, A.J.; Syvanen, A.C.; Tuomi, T.; Hooft, F. van 't; Walker, M.; Weedon, M.N.; Xie, W.; Zethelius, B.; Ongen, H.; Malarstig, A.; Hopewell, J.C.; Saleheen, D.; Chambers, J.; Parish, S.; Danesh, J.; Kooner, J.; Ostenson, C.G.; Lind, L.; Cooper, C.C.; Serrano-Rios, M.; Ferrannini, E.; Forsen, T.J.; Clarke, R.; Franzosi, M.G.; Seedorf, U.; Watkins, H.; Froguel, P.; Johnson, P.; Deloukas, P.; Collins, F.S.; Laakso, M.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Boehnke, M.; McCarthy, M.I.; Wareham, N.J.; Groop, L.; Pattou, F.; Gloyn, A.L.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Lyssenko, V.; Meigs, J.B.; Barroso, I.; Watanabe, R.M.; Heijer, M. den; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired beta-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new insights about

  14. Genome-wide association identifies nine common variants associated with fasting proinsulin levels and provides new insights into the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strawbridge, Rona J.; Dupuis, Josée; Prokopenko, Inga; Barker, Adam; Ahlqvist, Emma; Rybin, Denis; Petrie, John R.; Travers, Mary E.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dimas, Antigone S.; Nica, Alexandra; Wheeler, Eleanor; Chen, Han; Voight, Benjamin F.; Taneera, Jalal; Kanoni, Stavroula; Peden, John F.; Turrini, Fabiola; Gustafsson, Stefan; Zabena, Carina; Almgren, Peter; Barker, David J. P.; Barnes, Daniel; Dennison, Elaine M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eriksson, Per; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Goel, Anuj; Gu, Harvest F.; Horikoshi, Momoko; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Jameson, Karen A.; Kajantie, Eero; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Manning, Alisa K.; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Narisu, Narisu; Nastase Mannila, Maria; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Kastelein, John J. P.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2011-01-01

    Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired β-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new insights about T2D

  15. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompelat, S; Thomas, O; Le Bot, B

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of 20 human pharmaceutical compounds and metabolites from 10 representative therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface water). Of the 20 human pharmaceutical compounds selected, 16 were quantified in both the surface water and drinking water, with 22% of the values above the limit of quantification for surface water and 14% for drinking water). Psychostimulants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, iodinated contrast media and anxiolytic drugs were the main therapeutic classes of human pharmaceutical compounds detected in the surface water and drinking water. The results for surface water were close to results from previous studies in spite of differences in prescription rates of human pharmaceutical compounds in different countries. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other human pharmaceutical compounds seemed to be removed more efficiently (average elimination rate of over 50%) by adsorption onto activated carbon and oxidation/disinfection with ozone or chlorine (not taking account of the disinfection by-products). These results add to the increasing evidence of the occurrence of human pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water that may represent a threat to human beings exposed to a cocktail of human pharmaceutical compounds and related metabolites and by-products in drinking water.

  16. The Norwegian human milk study HUMIS variations in levels of chlorinated pesticides, PCBs and PBDEs in Norwegian breast milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polder, A.; Loeken, K. [The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Thomsen, C.; Becher, G.; Eggesboe, M. [Norwegian Inst. of Public Health, Oslo (Norway); Skaare, J.U. [National Veterinary Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated, -dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), -biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are among the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that have been found to accumulate in human breast milk. Because nursing children are exposed to these chemicals through the contaminated breast milk, health authorities worldwide are concerned for the infants' intake and therefore human milk monitoring programs are performed in many countries. While restrictions and bans resulted in a decline of organochlorines (OCs) in human milk during the last decades, an increasing trend has been found for PBDEs. The main goals of ''The Norwegian Human Milk Study, HUMIS'' are: to elucidate the human exposure in Norway to POPs, to identify dietary habits and other lifestyle factors that are associated with high levels of POPs in human milk, and to study the impact of exposure to the these contaminants on child health. This study reports preliminary results of recent levels of POPs in human milk in 4 different counties in Norway.

  17. Species-level analysis of DNA sequence data from the NIH Human Microbiome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Sean; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2012-01-01

    Outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections emphasize the importance of surveillance of potentially pathogenic bacteria. Genomic sequencing of clinical microbiological specimens expands our capacity to study cultivable, fastidious and uncultivable members of the bacterial community. Herein, we compared the primary data collected by the NIH's Human Microbiome Project (HMP) with published epidemiological surveillance data of Staphylococcus aureus. The HMP's initial dataset contained microbial survey data from five body regions (skin, nares, oral cavity, gut and vagina) of 242 healthy volunteers. A significant component of the HMP dataset was deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, which contains variable regions enabling taxonomic classification. Since species-level identification is essential in clinical microbiology, we built a reference database and used phylogenetic placement followed by most recent common ancestor classification to look at the species distribution for Staphylococcus, Klebsiella and Enterococcus. We show that selecting the accurate region of the 16S rRNA gene to sequence is analogous to carefully selecting culture conditions to distinguish closely related bacterial species. Analysis of the HMP data showed that Staphylococcus aureus was present in the nares of 36% of healthy volunteers, consistent with culture-based epidemiological data. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis were found less frequently, but across many habitats. This work demonstrates that large 16S rRNA survey studies can be used to support epidemiological goals in the context of an increasing awareness that microbes flourish and compete within a larger bacterial community. This study demonstrates how genomic techniques and information could be critically important to trace microbial evolution and implement hospital infection control.

  18. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii subspecies-level dysbiosis in the human gut microbiome underlying atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Han; Yoo, Young; Hwang, Junghyun; Na, Yun-Cheol; Kim, Heenam Stanley

    2016-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a serious global epidemic associated with a modern lifestyle. Although aberrant interactions between gut microbes and the intestinal immune system have been implicated in this skin disease, the nature of the microbiome dysfunction underlying the disease remains unclear. The gut microbiome from 132 subjects, including 90 patients with AD, was analyzed by using 16S rRNA gene and metagenome sequence analyses. Reference genomes from the Human Microbiome Project and the KEGG Orthology database were used for metagenome analyses. Short-chain fatty acids in fecal samples were compared by using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We show that enrichment of a subspecies of the major gut species Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is strongly associated with AD. In addition, the AD microbiome was enriched in genes encoding the use of various nutrients that could be released from damaged gut epithelium, reflecting a bloom of auxotrophic bacteria. Fecal samples from patients with AD showed decreased levels of butyrate and propionate, which have anti-inflammatory effects. This is likely a consequence of an intraspecies compositional change in F prausnitzii that reduces the number of high butyrate and propionate producers, including those related to the strain A2-165, a lack of which has been implicated in patients with Crohn disease. The data suggest that feedback interactions between dysbiosis in F prausnitzii and dysregulation of gut epithelial inflammation might underlie the chronic progression of AD by resulting in impairment of the gut epithelial barrier, which ultimately leads to aberrant TH2-type immune responses to allergens in the skin. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxic effects of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level: Their relevance to human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, Antonio F.; Parrón, Tesifón; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.; Requena, Mar; Alarcón, Raquel; López-Guarnido, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Toxic effects of pesticide mixtures can be independent, dose addition or interaction. ► Metabolic interactions involve inhibition or induction of detoxifying enzymes. ► Organophosphates can potentiate pyrethroid, carbaryl and triazine toxicity. ► Synergism occurs when two active pesticides elicit greater than additive toxicity. ► Endocrine disruptors have the potential for additivity rather than synergism. - Abstract: Pesticides almost always occur in mixtures with other ones. The toxicological effects of low-dose pesticide mixtures on the human health are largely unknown, although there are growing concerns about their safety. The combined toxicological effects of two or more components of a pesticide mixture can take one of three forms: independent, dose addition or interaction. Not all mixtures of pesticides with similar chemical structures produce additive effects; thus, if they act on multiple sites their mixtures may produce different toxic effects. The additive approach also fails when evaluating mixtures that involve a secondary chemical that changes the toxicokinetics of the pesticide as a result of its increased activation or decreased detoxification, which is followed by an enhanced or reduced toxicity, respectively. This review addresses a number of toxicological interactions of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level. Examples of such interactions include the postulated mechanisms for the potentiation of pyrethroid, carbaryl and triazine herbicides toxicity by organophosphates; how the toxicity of some organophosphates can be potentiated by other organophosphates or by previous exposure to organochlorines; the synergism between pyrethroid and carbamate compounds and the antagonism between triazine herbicides and prochloraz. Particular interactions are also addressed, such as those of pesticides acting as endocrine disruptors, the cumulative toxicity of organophosphates and organochlorines resulting in estrogenic effects and the

  20. Species-level analysis of DNA sequence data from the NIH Human Microbiome Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Conlan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections emphasize the importance of surveillance of potentially pathogenic bacteria. Genomic sequencing of clinical microbiological specimens expands our capacity to study cultivable, fastidious and uncultivable members of the bacterial community. Herein, we compared the primary data collected by the NIH's Human Microbiome Project (HMP with published epidemiological surveillance data of Staphylococcus aureus. METHODS: The HMP's initial dataset contained microbial survey data from five body regions (skin, nares, oral cavity, gut and vagina of 242 healthy volunteers. A significant component of the HMP dataset was deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, which contains variable regions enabling taxonomic classification. Since species-level identification is essential in clinical microbiology, we built a reference database and used phylogenetic placement followed by most recent common ancestor classification to look at the species distribution for Staphylococcus, Klebsiella and Enterococcus. MAIN RESULTS: We show that selecting the accurate region of the 16S rRNA gene to sequence is analogous to carefully selecting culture conditions to distinguish closely related bacterial species. Analysis of the HMP data showed that Staphylococcus aureus was present in the nares of 36% of healthy volunteers, consistent with culture-based epidemiological data. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis were found less frequently, but across many habitats. CONCLUSIONS: This work demonstrates that large 16S rRNA survey studies can be used to support epidemiological goals in the context of an increasing awareness that microbes flourish and compete within a larger bacterial community. This study demonstrates how genomic techniques and information could be critically important to trace microbial evolution and implement hospital infection control.

  1. Knowledge level of working and student nurses on cervical cancer and human papilloma virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Ozturk, Ozlem; Eroglu, Hulya; Bahadir, Ozgur; Harma, Muge; Harma, Mehmet Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    To determine knowledge levels of working and student nurses about cervical cancer and prophylactic cancer vaccines. This study was performed on 259 nursing students in the Department of Nursing and 137 nurses working in Health Research and Practice Center, approved to participate in the study between April-June 2012. The study was performed universally without selecting a sample. A questionnaire that was prepared for evaluating participants' knowledge and attitudes about human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine was distributed to the nurses and data obtained from the forms were transferred to SPSS 15.00 program and statistically analyzed. It was found that 54.8% of the student nurses were between 21-24 years old and 13.1% of working students were between 25-28 years old. When student nurses and working nurses were compared in terms of their knowledge about the causes of cervical cancer, their ideas about prevention from cervical cancer with HPV vaccine, their ideas about possible risks of HPV vaccine and conservation ratios of HPV vaccine, it was observed that there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). When student nurses and working nurses were compared in terms of the information-source about HPV, ways of HPV contamination, awareness about people who are susceptible to HPV contamination and age of HPV vaccination, it was determined that there was a statistically significant difference (pknowledge about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine, but this was not sufficient. Therefore; it is recommended to use verbal, written and visual communication tools intensively in order to have topics on cervical cancer, early diagnosis and prevention in bachelor and master programs for nurses, to inform society about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine for public health and to teach precautions for its prevention.

  2. Interplay between Selenium Levels and Replicative Senescence in WI-38 Human Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Hammad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins are essential components of antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis, and cell signaling in mammals, where selenium is found in the form of a rare amino acid, selenocysteine. Selenium, which is often limited both in food intake and cell culture media, is a strong regulator of selenoprotein expression and selenoenzyme activity. Aging is a slow, complex, and multifactorial process, resulting in a gradual and irreversible decline of various functions of the body. Several cellular aspects of organismal aging are recapitulated in the replicative senescence of cultured human diploid fibroblasts, such as embryonic lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. We previously reported that the long-term growth of young WI-38 cells with high (supplemented, moderate (control, or low (depleted concentrations of selenium in the culture medium impacts their replicative lifespan, due to rapid changes in replicative senescence-associated markers and signaling pathways. In order to gain insight into the molecular link between selenium levels and replicative senescence, in the present work, we have applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on 2-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE to the study of young and presenescent cells grown in selenium-supplemented, control, or depleted media. Applying a restrictive cut-off (spot intensity ±50% and a p value < 0.05 to the 2D-DIGE analyses revealed 81 differentially expressed protein spots, from which 123 proteins of interest were identified by mass spectrometry. We compared the changes in protein abundance for three different conditions: (i spots varying between young and presenescent cells, (ii spots varying in response to selenium concentration in young cells, and (iii spots varying in response to selenium concentration in presenescent cells. Interestingly, a 72% overlap between the impact of senescence and selenium was observed in our proteomic results, demonstrating a strong interplay between

  3. Measurements of natural levels of 14C in human's and rat's tissues by accelerator mass spectrometry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.Y.; Khu, H.J.; Kang, J.H.; Yoon, M.Y.; Kim, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive, safe and precise analytical method for quantifying long-lived isotope in biomedical research with animals as well as human beings. In Korea, AMS Laboratory has been operating successfully for years measuring especially archaeological samples for 14 C dating. In this year, a biological sample pretreatment facility was setup to work on biomedical applications. As a preliminary study, we have measured the natural background levels of 14 C in tissues and blood of humans and rats have been measured. The results were agreed with the other reported levels and gave stable and reproducible results within 1-2%. (author)

  4. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  5. [Humans or material? Three levels of the discourse about the stem cell research from theological-ethical view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    In the debate on the ethical evaluation of the stem cell research three levels can be differentiated. The first level of argumentation is that of weighing up goods: The possible therapeutical success for thousands of humans seems to justify the consumption of a few embryos. It is show, that this, however, already presupposes - on a second argumentation level - a judgement on the moral status of the embryo. Different moments of time, when human dignity and life protection are ascribe to the embryo, have already been discussed, but in spite of all rationality of the arguments a consensus has not been reached. On this third level of argumentation two fundamental meanings of reality can be differentiated. The empirical-observing and the communicative-participating view. These lead to a different moral evaluation of the embryo. This contribution votes for the priority of the communicative-participating view. It receives addition support by theology and Christian faith.

  6. Use of magnesium silicate as a selective absorbent in radioimmunological method of determination of insulin level in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogoniowska, Z; Stelmasiak, T [Wojskowy Instytut Higieny i Epidemiologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1974-01-01

    The authors present a radioimmunological method for determination of insulin (IRI) level in the human serum using magnesium silicate (talc) as adsorbent. The method is based on the phenomenon of selective adsorption of the free radioactive hormone. The optimal parameters for the method were determined. The serum level of IRI in clinically healthy subjects after oral glucose loading was established. The obtained results were compared with the results obtained by the radioimmunological method of double antibodies in stochastically grouped samples.

  7. Spatiotemporal prediction of daily ambient ozone levels across China using random forest for human exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yu; Luo, Yuzhou; Deng, Xunfei; Grieneisen, Michael L; Zhang, Minghua; Di, Baofeng

    2018-02-01

    In China, ozone pollution shows an increasing trend and becomes the primary air pollutant in warm seasons. Leveraging the air quality monitoring network, a random forest model is developed to predict the daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentrations ([O 3 ] MDA8 ) across China in 2015 for human exposure assessment. This model captures the observed spatiotemporal variations of [O 3 ] MDA8 by using the data of meteorology, elevation, and recent-year emission inventories (cross-validation R 2  = 0.69 and RMSE = 26 μg/m 3 ). Compared with chemical transport models that require a plenty of variables and expensive computation, the random forest model shows comparable or higher predictive performance based on only a handful of readily-available variables at much lower computational cost. The nationwide population-weighted [O 3 ] MDA8 is predicted to be 84 ± 23 μg/m 3 annually, with the highest seasonal mean in the summer (103 ± 8 μg/m 3 ). The summer [O 3 ] MDA8 is predicted to be the highest in North China (125 ± 17 μg/m 3 ). Approximately 58% of the population lives in areas with more than 100 nonattainment days ([O 3 ] MDA8 >100 μg/m 3 ), and 12% of the population are exposed to [O 3 ] MDA8 >160 μg/m 3 (WHO Interim Target 1) for more than 30 days. As the most populous zones in China, the Beijing-Tianjin Metro, Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta, and Sichuan Basin are predicted to be at 154, 141, 124, and 98 nonattainment days, respectively. Effective controls of O 3 pollution are urgently needed for the highly-populated zones, especially the Beijing-Tianjin Metro with seasonal [O 3 ] MDA8 of 140 ± 29 μg/m 3 in summer. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first statistical modeling work of ambient O 3 for China at the national level. This timely and extensively validated [O 3 ] MDA8 dataset is valuable for refining epidemiological analyses on O 3 pollution in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. UNEARTHING GLOBAL FINANCIAL INCLUSION LEVELS AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL INCLUSION AS A MEDIATING FACTOR IN GLOBAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshny Unnikrishnan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is a result of the author’s inquisition to unearth the current values of Global Financial Inclusion and its relationship with economic growth measured by Gross Domestic product(GDP and human development measured by United Nations Human Development Index (HDI. The Financial Inclusion (FI levels are measured using Index for Financial Inclusion .The relationship between GDP and HDI with FI as mediator, using multiple regression, is validated on a global level based on data of 162 countries for the year 2011. An overall global mediation analysis is undertaken to establish Financial Inclusion as a mediating factor and partial mediation on human development is validated. The study is valid and unique in the global context of income inequality prevailing in developed, developing and underdeveloped countries as it validates the argument that an impressive GDP performance does not ensure equity in economic growth.

  9. Effect of stimulus parameters and contraction level on inhibitory responses in human jaw-closing muscles: Implications for contingent stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jadidi, F; Wang, K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

      Objective: Examine the effect of stimulus duration as well as stimulus intensity and level of muscle contraction on the inhibitory responses in human jaw-closing muscles. Design: The inhibitory jaw-reflexes, ES1 and ES2, were recorded in the surface electromyogram (EMG) of masseter and temporal...

  10. Relation between location of a motor unit in the human biceps brachii and its critical firing levels for different tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Haar Romeny, B.M. ter; Gon, J.J.D. van der

    1984-01-01

    Critical firing levels (CFLs) of single motor units (MUs) in the long head of the human biceps brachii muscle were determined in combinations of two isometric tasks: flexion of the elbow, supination of the lower arm, and exorotation of the humerus, as well as the corresponding antagonistic tasks.

  11. CBFA1 and topoisomerase I mRNA levels decline during cellular aging of human trabecular osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Kveiborg, M.; Kassem, M.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the reasons for age-related impairment of the function of bone forming osteoblasts, we have examined the steady-state mRNA levels of the transcription factor CBFA1 and topoisomerase I during cellular aging of normal human trabecular osteoblasts, by the use of semiquantitati...

  12. Circulating levels of chromatin fragments are inversely correlated with anti-dsDNA antibody levels in human and murine systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mariann H; Rekvig, Ole Petter; Jacobsen, Rasmus S

    2011-01-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies represent a central pathogenic factor in Lupus nephritis. Together with nucleosomes they deposit as immune complexes in the mesangial matrix and along basement membranes within the glomeruli. The origin of the nucleosomes and when they appear e.g. in circulation is not known...... an inverse correlation between anti-dsDNA antibodies and the DNA concentration in the circulation in both murine and human serum samples. High titer of anti-DNA antibodies in human sera correlated with reduced levels of circulating chromatin, and in lupus prone mice with deposition within glomeruli....... The inverse correlation between DNA concentration and anti-dsDNA antibodies may reflect antibody-dependent deposition of immune complexes during the development of lupus nephritis in autoimmune lupus prone mice. The measurement of circulating DNA in SLE sera by using qPCR may indicate and detect...

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae show low levels of traversal across human endothelial barrier in vitro [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pérez-Torrado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Saccharomyces cerevisiae is generally considered safe, and is involved in the production of many types of foods and dietary supplements. However, some isolates, which are genetically related to strains used in brewing and baking, have shown virulent traits, being able to produce infections in humans, mainly in immunodeficient patients. This can lead to systemic infections in humans. Methods: In this work, we studied S. cerevisiae isolates in an in vitro human endothelial barrier model, comparing their behaviour with that of several strains of the related pathogens Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. Results: The results showed that this food related yeast is able to cross the endothelial barrier in vitro. However, in contrast to C. glabrata and C. albicans, S. cerevisiae showed very low levels of traversal. Conclusions: We conclude that using an in vitro human endothelial barrier model with S. cerevisiae can be useful to evaluate the safety of S. cerevisiae strains isolated from foods.

  14. The Observance of Human Rights and Freedoms in the Extradition Proceedings at National and International Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana (Mitra Radu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental rights and freedoms contained in international documents may be the object of the denial of an extradition request as independent exceptions, even if they are not covered by extradition treaties. The right to life is a fundamental human right whose protection must be achieved in the extradition proceedings. By Law no. 30/1994, Romania ratified the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by the Council of Europe.

  15. Categorial Ontology of Complex Systems, Meta-Systems and Levels: The Emergence of Life, Human Consciousness and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Glazebrook

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Relational structures of organisms and the human mind are naturally represented in terms of novel variable topology concepts, non-Abelian categories and Higher Dimensional Algebra{ relatively new concepts that would be defined in
    this tutorial paper. A unifying theme of local-to-global approaches to organismic development, evolution and human consciousness leads to novel patterns of relations that emerge in super- and ultra- complex systems in terms of compositions of local procedures [1]. The claim is defended in this paper that human consciousness is unique and should be viewed as an ultra-complex, global process of processes, at a meta-level not sub{summed by, but compatible with, human brain dynamics [2]-[5]. The emergence of consciousness and its existence
    are considered to be dependent upon an extremely complex structural and functional unit with an asymmetric network topology and connectivities{the human brain. However, the appearance of human consciousness is shown to be critically dependent upon societal co-evolution, elaborate language-symbolic communication and `virtual', higher dimensional, non{commutative processes involving separate space and time perceptions. Theories of the mind are approached from the theory of levels and ultra-complexity viewpoints that throw
    new light on previous semantic models in cognitive science. Anticipatory systems and complex causality at the top levels of reality are discussed in the context of psychology, sociology and ecology. A paradigm shift towards non-commutative, or more generally, non-Abelian theories of highly complex dynamics [6] is suggested to unfold now in physics, mathematics, life and cognitive sciences, thus leading to the realizations of higher dimensional algebras in neurosciences and psychology, as well as in human genomics, bioinformatics and interactomics. The presence of strange attractors in modern society dynamics gives rise to very serious concerns for the future

  16. Arsenic and mercury levels in human hairs and nails from gold mining areas in Wassa West District of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfor-Armah, Y.; Samlafo, B.V.; Yeboah, P.O.

    2009-01-01

    Hair and nail samples obtained from inhabitants of Wassa District, a major gold mining area in Ghana, were analysed for arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The samples were irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10 11 n cm -2 s -1 using the Ghana Research Reactor. Concentration of Hg in the hairs ranged from 1.65 to 20.46 μg/g, which were below World Health Organization (WHO) recommended level of 50.00 μg/g for human hair. Mercury concentration in human nail samples ranged from 0.97 to 31.94 μg/g. Arsenic concentrations in human hairs ranged from 0.07 to 0.95 μg/g, while the levels in nail samples ranged from 0.08 to 3.90 μg/g. Generally, levels of As in the hair were less than WHO recommended value of 1.00 μg/g, however, the levels of As in 5 nail samples (FN 11 , FN 20 , FN 28 , TN 9 and TN 16 ) were above the maximum WHO value of 1.80μg/g. The measurement precision specified by the relative standard deviation was within ± 3 %. The accuracy of determination evaluated by analysing certified standard human reference material GBW 09101 was within ± 4 % of the certified value. The levels of As in hair and nail samples of the experimental group were generally higher as compared to the control subject. Similarly, Hg levels in the hair and nail samples in experimental group were also higher compared to the control subject. However, the levels of the toxic elements determined were all below WHO recommended values. (au)

  17. Caloric Restriction and Exercise Increase Plasma ANGPTL4 Levels in Humans via Elevated Free Fatty Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.; Lichtenstein, L.L.; Steenbergen, E.; Mudde, C.M.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Hesselink, M.K.; Schrauwen, P.; Müller, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective - Plasma lipoprotein levels are determined by the balance between lipoprotein production and clearance. Recently, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) was uncovered as a novel endocrine factor that potently raises plasma triglyceride levels by inhibiting triglyceride clearance. However,

  18. Caloric restriction and exercise increase plasma ANGPTL4 levels in humans via elevated free fatty acids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, S.; Lichtenstein, L.; Steenbergen, E.; Mudde, K.; Hendriks, H.F.; Hesselink, M.K.; Schrauwen, P.; Muller, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma lipoprotein levels are determined by the balance between lipoprotein production and clearance. Recently, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) was uncovered as a novel endocrine factor that potently raises plasma triglyceride levels by inhibiting triglyceride clearance. However,

  19. Caloric restriction and exercise increase plasma ANGPTL4 levels in humans via elevated free fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, S.; Lichtenstein, L.; Steenbergen, E.; Mudde, K.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Hesselink, M.K.; Schrauwen, P.; Müller, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-: Plasma lipoprotein levels are determined by the balance between lipoprotein production and clearance. Recently, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) was uncovered as a novel endocrine factor that potently raises plasma triglyceride levels by inhibiting triglyceride clearance. However,

  20. Changes in human parotid salivary protein and sialic acid levels during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, S; Curbelo, H M; Tumilasci, O R; Tessler, J A; Houssay, A B

    1989-01-01

    Saliva was collected with a Carlson-Crittenden device, under citric acid stimulation, in 107 pregnant women, 9 puerperal and 7 non-pregnant controls. No significant changes were found in salivary flow rate, pH and amylase levels. The total protein levels were decreased during pregnancy and the puerperium. The sialic acid levels decreased gradually but markedly during pregnancy, returning to normal levels in the puerperium. These changes in parotid saliva may be related to the hormonal changes of pregnancy.

  1. Relationship between human respiratory reactivity and neutrophil metabolism under intermittent hypoxic influences in humans exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrovskaya, T.V.; Oberenko, O.A.; Guseva, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The group of 18 men exposed to radiation during amelioration work in the Chernobyl NPP was examined in the course of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia (rebreathing technique during 10 days of three dayly 5-7 min sessions with 15 min break). The starting level of ventilatory response to hypoxic stimulus (HVR) did not differ from the one in persons living in non-contaminated areas. This hypoxic training (HT) caused the increase of HVR, activity of NADPH-oxidase and cationic protein content in neutrophyls as well as various changes in mieloperoxidase activity. The correlation between respiration reactivity and deviations in neutrophil metabolism under HT was found. 14 refs., 2 figs

  2. Association between autoantibodies to the Arginine variant of the Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) and stimulated C-peptide levels in Danish children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise M; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Delli, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) was recently identified as a common autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and inclusion of ZnT8 autoantibodies (ZnT8Ab) was found to increase the diagnostic specificity of T1D.......The zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) was recently identified as a common autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and inclusion of ZnT8 autoantibodies (ZnT8Ab) was found to increase the diagnostic specificity of T1D....

  3. Dioxin and PCB levels in human samples from the Greek population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leondiadis, L.; Vassiliadou, I.; Costopoulou, D.; Papadopoulos, A. [Mass Spectrometry and Dioxin Analysis Lab. - NCSR Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are commercial chemical substances produced in a large scale since 1930, with a wide range of applications in industry, such as for coolant fluids in transformers and dielectric fluids in capacitors. After their health effects became apparent, PCB production was banned in the late 1970s. However, humans are still exposed through PCB leakage of old capacitors and transformers and disposal of contaminated materials. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs)), are formed as undesirable by-products mainly during the production of chlorinated chemicals and during the combustion of municipal and hazardous waste. Due to potential health hazard (dermal toxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive effects, teratogenicity, endocrine disruption and carcinogenicity), their monitoring in humans is of high general concern. Enough information on POP presence in human tissues from industrialized countries is available to suggest that the concentration of these compounds has decreased during the last 10 years. Monitoring of human exposure to PCBs and dioxins, contaminants that accumulate in lipid tissue, is most conveniently performed by analysis of blood plasma or blood serum. Monitoring of dioxins in human milk is of also great importance, since it is especially feared that lactational exposure to dioxins and related compounds may adversely affect brain development and the immune system of infants and children. The present study includes the analyses of non-ortho, mono-ortho, indicator PCBs, and PCDD/Fs in human blood and human milk samples collected between November 2002 and February 2004 and is the first study of this kind to be undertaken in Greece.

  4. Level of perception of technical terms regarding the effect of radiation on the human body by residents of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Yoshida, Yasuko; Isogai, Emiko; Hayase, Takashi; Nakamura, Kozue; Saito, Mitsuo; Arizono, Koji

    2017-10-27

    This study aimed to examine the level of perception of the technical terms related to the effect of radiation on the human body among residents of the six prefectures of Miyagi, Fukushima, Tokyo, Aichi, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki in Japan. Miyagi and Fukushima were selected as devastated area by Great East Japan Earthquake. Tokyo and Aichi were selected as control. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were selected as the A-bombed area. A total of 1030 respondents, 172, 173, 171, 173, 171, and 170, respectively, were surveyed. Differences in the recognition level of technical terms related to the effect of radiation on the human body among residents of the six prefectures were assessed. The highest recognition levels were reported by the respondents from Fukushima (17 items). Those from Miyagi scored the second highest recognition levels (10 out of the 17 terms); the second highest recognition levels for the remaining seven terms were marked by the respondents of Tokyo. Respondents in the Tohoku region had a better recognition for the technical terminology relevant to the effect of radiation on the human body. Our findings indicate a need for continued, comprehensive risk communication pertaining to health hazards of radiation exposure in Tohoku region. Concerted efforts by central/local governments and other stakeholders are required to allay the anxiety/stress related to radiation exposure among the residents.

  5. Statistical analysis of fluoride levels in human urine and drinking water samples of fluorinated area of punjab (pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Zaman, W.U.; Rehman, R.; Ahmad, B.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, S.; Murtaza, S

    2013-01-01

    Increasing fluoride levels in drinking water of fluorinated areas of world leading to fluorosis. For bio-monitoring of fluorosis patients, fluoride levels were determined in drinking water and human urine samples of different individuals having dental fluorosis and bony deformities from fluorotic area of Punjab (Sham Ki Bhatiyan, Pakistan) and then compared with reference samples of non fluorotic area (Queens Road, Lahore, Pakistan) using ion selective electrode methodology. Fluoride levels in fluorinated area differ significantly from control group (p < 0.05). In drinking water and human urine samples, fluoride levels in fluorinated areas were: 136.192 +- 67.836 and 94.484 +- 36.572 micro molL/sup -1/ respectively, whereas in control samples, fluoride concentrations were: 19.306 +- 2.109 and 47.154 +- 22.685 micro molL/sup -1/ in water and urine samples correspondingly. Pearson's correlation data pointed out the fact that that human urine and water fluoride concentrations have a significant positive dose response relationship with the prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis in fluorotic areas having higher fluoride levels in drinking water. (author)

  6. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondulich, Marie K; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-08-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. © The Author (2016). Published by

  7. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondulich, Marie K.; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. PMID:27297240

  8. Over-expression of CXCR4, a stemness enhancer, in human blastocysts by low level laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Tahmasbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The key role of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in the maintenance of stemness property of stem cells has been shown recently. The low level laser irradiation (LLLI is being used currently in a wide variety of clinical cases as a therapeutic tool for wound healing, relieving pain and destroying tumor cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of LLLI mimicking low level laser therapy (LLLT on the expression level of CXCR4 gene a few hours after irradiation on human blastocysts. After the development of human embryos to the first grade blastocyst stage, they were irradiated with a low power Ga-Al-As laser at a continuous wavelength of 650 nm and a power output of 30 mW. The total RNA of the irradiated blastocysts and control groups were isolated in groups of 1x2 J/cm2, 2x2 J/cm2, 1x4 J/cm2 and 2x4 J/cm2 LLLI. Specific Real-Time PCR primers were designed to amplify all the two CXCR4 isoforms yet identified. RNA amplifications were done for all the groups. We showed for the first time that LLLI makes the human blastocysts to increase the expression level of CXCR4 a few hours after irradiation. Moreover, it was shown that two irradiation doses with one day interval can cause a significant increase in CXCR4 expression level in human blastocysts. This study revealed that LLLI could be a proliferation motivator for embryonic cell divisions through enhanced over-expression of CXCR4 level.

  9. Nitrosylated hemoglobin levels in human venous erythrocytes correlate with vascular endothelial function measured by digital reactive hyperemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina I Lobysheva

    Full Text Available Impaired nitric oxide (NO-dependent endothelial function is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that erythrocyte levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin (HbNO-heme may reflect vascular endothelial function in vivo. We developed a modified subtraction method using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR spectroscopy to identify the 5-coordinate α-HbNO (HbNO concentration in human erythrocytes and examined its correlation with endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT. Changes in digital pulse amplitude were measured by PAT during reactive hyperemia following brachial arterial occlusion in a group of healthy volunteers (50 subjects. Erythrocyte HbNO levels were measured at baseline and at the peak of hyperemia. We digitally subtracted an individual model EPR signal of erythrocyte free radicals from the whole EPR spectrum to unmask and quantitate the HbNO EPR signals.Mean erythrocyte HbNO concentration at baseline was 219+/-12 nmol/L (n = 50. HbNO levels and reactive hyperemia (RH indexes were higher in female (free of contraceptive pills than male subjects. We observed a dynamic increase of HbNO levels in erythrocytes isolated at 1-2 min of post-occlusion hyperemia (120+/-8% of basal levels; post-occlusion HbNO levels were correlated with basal levels. Both basal and post-occlusion HbNO levels were significantly correlated with reactive hyperemia (RH indexes (r = 0.58; P<0.0001 for basal HbNO.The study demonstrates quantitative measurements of 5-coordinate α-HbNO in human venous erythrocytes, its dynamic physiologic regulation and correlation with endothelial function measured by tonometry during hyperemia. This opens the way to further understanding of in vivo determinants of NO bioavailability in human circulation.

  10. Basic level category structure emerges gradually across human ventral visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordan, Marius Cătălin; Greene, Michelle R; Beck, Diane M; Fei-Fei, Li

    2015-07-01

    Objects can be simultaneously categorized at multiple levels of specificity ranging from very broad ("natural object") to very distinct ("Mr. Woof"), with a mid-level of generality (basic level: "dog") often providing the most cognitively useful distinction between categories. It is unknown, however, how this hierarchical representation is achieved in the brain. Using multivoxel pattern analyses, we examined how well each taxonomic level (superordinate, basic, and subordinate) of real-world object categories is represented across occipitotemporal cortex. We found that, although in early visual cortex objects are best represented at the subordinate level (an effect mostly driven by low-level feature overlap between objects in the same category), this advantage diminishes compared to the basic level as we move up the visual hierarchy, disappearing in object-selective regions of occipitotemporal cortex. This pattern stems from a combined increase in within-category similarity (category cohesion) and between-category dissimilarity (category distinctiveness) of neural activity patterns at the basic level, relative to both subordinate and superordinate levels, suggesting that successive visual areas may be optimizing basic level representations.

  11. The Levels of Processing Conceptualization of Human Memory: Some Empirical and Theoretical Issues,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    levels -of- processing (LOP) framework was introduced by Craik and Lockhart in 1972...G. H. A multicomponent theory of the memory trace. In F. I. M. Craik and R. S. Lockhart , Levels of 6 processing : A framework for memory research... Lockhart , R. S. Levels of processing : A framework of memory research. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1972, 11, 671-684. 25. Craik , F.

  12. The Effect of Information Level on Human-Agent Interaction for Route Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    study of visualization types for mobile help systems. Proceedings of the 23rd British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers: Celebrating ...Lee JD. Trust, trustworthiness , and trustability. Presented at the Workshop on Human Machine Trust for Robust Autonomous Systems; 2012 Jan 31–Feb 2

  13. Fractal multi-level organisation of human groups in a virtual world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Benedikt; Sornette, Didier; Thurner, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Humans are fundamentally social. They form societies which consist of hierarchically layered nested groups of various quality, size, and structure. The anthropologic literature has classified these groups as support cliques, sympathy groups, bands, cognitive groups, tribes, linguistic groups, and so on. Anthropologic data show that, on average, each group consists of approximately three subgroups. However, a general understanding of the structural dependence of groups at different layers is largely missing. We extend these early findings to a very large high-precision large-scale internet-based social network data. We analyse the organisational structure of a complete, multi-relational, large social multiplex network of a human society consisting of about 400,000 odd players of an open-ended massive multiplayer online game for which we know all about their various group memberships at different layers. Remarkably, the online players' society exhibits the same type of structured hierarchical layers as found in hunter-gatherer societies. Our findings suggest that the hierarchical organisation of human society is deeply nested in human psychology.

  14. Avian abundance thresholds, human-altered landscapes, and the challenge of assemblage-level conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin J. Gutzwiller; Samuel K. Riffell; Curtis H. Flather

    2015-01-01

    Context: Land-use change is a global phenomenon with potential to generate abrupt spatial changes in species’ distributions. Objectives: We assessed whether theory about the internal structure of bird species’ geographic ranges can be refined to reflect abrupt changes in distribution and abundance associated with human influences on landscapes, and whether the...

  15. Global gene expression changes in human urothelial cells exposed to low-level monomethylarsonous acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medeiros, M.; Zheng, X.; Novák, Petr; Wnek, S.M.; Chyan, V.; Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 291, 1-3 (2012), s. 102-112 ISSN 0300-483X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : HUMAN BLADDER CELLS * METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS * MALIGNANT-TRANSFORMATION0300 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.017, year: 2012

  16. Relationship between Human Gut Microbiota and Interleukin 6 Levels in Overweight and Obese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Gut microbial diversity and abundance can profoundly impact human health. Research has shown that obese individuals are likely to have altered microbiota compared to lean individuals. Obesity is often considered a pro-inflammatory state, however the relationship between microbiota and i...

  17. How to Do More with Less: Handling an Increased Workload While Maintaining Human Capital Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doerr, Jr., James C; Glazman, Emily

    2008-01-01

    ...) and local situation with regard to "human capital." The DoD is particularly concerned with the issue of maintaining its knowledge base in the face of large numbers of workers retiring and with an ever-increasing and increasingly complex workload...

  18. Screening-level assays for potentially human-infectious environmental Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of the fact that Legionella species can be isolated from nonclinical settings, there is no standard method to determine whether environmental legionellae may be infectious to humans. In this study, an in vivo murine model of pneumonia and three in vitro proliferation as...

  19. Guidance document on the derivation of maximum permissible risk levels for human intake of soil contaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen PJCM; Speijers GJA; CSR

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a basic step-to-step description of the procedure followed in the derivation of the human-toxicological Maximum Permissible Risk (MPR ; in Dutch: Maximum Toelaatbaar Risico, MTR) for soil contaminants. In recent years this method has been applied for a large number of compounds

  20. Utilizing Service Learning in a College-Level Human Sexuality Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Dusty D.

    2017-01-01

    Implementing service learning into college courses has been shown to have positive benefits for both students and community members; however, service learning has not been largely evaluated in the literature on human sexuality courses. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to design, implement, and evaluate a service learning project in a…

  1. Serum vitamin D levels are not altered after controlled diesel exhaust exposures in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has suggested that exposure to urban air pollution may be associated with vitamin D deficiency in human populations. Vitamin D is widely known for its importance in bone growth/remodeling, muscle metabolism, and its ability to promote calcium absorption in the gut; ...

  2. Level and pattern of human rabies and dog bites in Techiman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Rabies is a viral zoonotic disease that is transmitted primarily by bites from rabid dogs and has the highest case fatality rate of most infectious diseases in humans. We described a 6-year trend of rabies and dog bites in a peri-urban district in Ghana. Methods: A record review was conducted in the health ...

  3. Level-Dependent Nonlinear Hearing Protector Model in the Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    HPD model. In an article on measuring HPD attenuation, Berger (1986) points out that Real Ear Attenuation at Threshold (REAT) tests are...men. Audiology . 1991;30:345–356. Fedele P, Binseel M, Kalb J, Price GR. Using the auditory hazard assessment algorithm for humans (AHAAH) with

  4. Maximum Permissible Risk Levels for Human Intake of Soil Contaminants: Fourth Series of Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen PJCM; Apeldoorn ME van; Engelen JGM van; Schielen PCJI; Wouters MFA; CSR

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the human-toxicological risk assessment work done in 1996 and 1997 at RIVM's Centre for Substances and Risk Assessment within the scope of the RIVM project on soil intervention values for soil clean-up. The method used for derivation of the Maximum Permissible Risk, as

  5. Position-independent high level expression of the human β-globin gene in transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Grosveld (Frank); G. Blom van Assendelft (Greet); D.R. Greaves (David); G. Kollias (George)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe have constructed a "minilocus" that contains the 5' and 3' flanking regions of the human beta-globin locus and the beta-globin gene. These regions are characterized by erythroid-specific DNAase I-superhypersensitive sites and are normally located approximately 50 kb 5' and 20 kb 3' of

  6. Has sea level fluctuations modulated human settlements in Gulf of Khambhat (Cambay)?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    elements with holes and studs, pot shreds, beads, fossil bones etc., which provide significant evidence of human activity in the area. A detailed examination of the area has revealed riverine conglomerate at water depth of 30-40 m between 20 and 40 km west...

  7. Pollution level and human health risk assessment of some pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in Nantong of Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wang; Li Yi; Lili Shi; Deyang Kong; Daoji Cai; Donghua Wang; Zhengjun Shan

    2012-01-01

    Food consumption is one of the key exposure routes of humans to contaminants.This article evaluated the residue levels of 51 pesticides and 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in selected fish and food items which were commonly consumed in the Nantong area of Jiangsu Province,Southeast China.The 51 pesticides and 16 PCBs were analyzed by highly sensitive gas chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).The results showed that organochlorine pesticides such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs),hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs),hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and mirex and other pesticides including chlorpyrifos,pyrethroid pesticides,metolachlor,pyridaben and trifluralin were frequently detected in the samples,which was consistent with the accumulation level and characteristics of these toxic chemicals in human adipose tissue of people living in Nantong.Meanwhile,correlation of the residue level of toxic chemicals with their physical chemical properties and historic use pattern in Nantong area was observed.Combined with dietary survey results at the same sampling locations,human health risk assessment of ingestion through the dietary route was performed.The results suggested that the non-cancer risks of the chemicals investigated can be considered negligible in the Nantong area,however,the cancer risks from lifetime dietary exposure to DDTs and HCB have exceeded the acceptable levels.

  8. The influence of acute resistance exercise on cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity and protein levels in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Chad C; O'Connor, Devin T; Steinmeyer, Robert; Del Mundo, Jonathon D; McMullan, David R; Whitt, Jamie A; Ramos, Jahir E; Gonzales, Rayna J

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the activity and content of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 in response to acute resistance exercise (RE) in human skeletal muscle. Previous work suggests that COX-1, but not COX-2, is the primary COX isoform elevated with resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle. COX activity, however, has not been assessed after resistance exercise in humans. It was hypothesized that RE would increase COX-1 but not COX-2 activity. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis of nine young men (25 ± 1 yr) at baseline (preexercise), 4, and 24 h after a single bout of knee extensor RE (three sets of 10 repetitions at 70% of maximum). Tissue lysate was assayed for COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels were measured via Western blot analysis. COX-1 activity increased at 4 h (P 0.05) with acute RE. In contrast, COX-2 protein levels were nearly 3-fold greater (P > 0.05) at 4 h and 5-fold greater (P = 0.06) at 24 h, compared with preexercise. In conclusion, COX-1 activity increases transiently with exercise independent of COX-1 protein levels. In contrast, both COX-2 activity and protein levels were elevated with exercise, and this elevation persisted to at least 24 h after RE.

  9. Enhanced constitutive invasion activity in human nontumorigenic keratinocytes exposed to a low level of barium for a long time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Nguyen D; Yajima, Ichiro; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ichihara, Gaku; Kato, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that exposure to barium for a short time (≤4 days) and at a low level (5 µM = 687 µg/L) promotes invasion of human nontumorigenic HaCaT cells, which have characteristics similar to those of normal keratinocytes, suggesting that exposure to barium for a short time enhances malignant characteristics. Here we examined the effect of exposure to low level of barium for a long time, a condition mimicking the exposure to barium through well water, on malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes. Constitutive invasion activity, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) protein expression and activity, and matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) protein expression in primary cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes, HaCaT keratinocytes, and HSC5 and A431 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were augmented following an increase in malignancy grade of the cells. Constitutive invasion activity, FAK phosphorylation, and MMP14 expression levels of HaCaT keratinocytes after treatment with 5 µM barium for 4 months were significantly higher than those of control untreated HaCaT keratinocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that exposure to a low level of barium for a long time enhances constitutive malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes via regulatory molecules (FAK and MMP14) for invasion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dengue-Immune Humans Have Higher Levels of Complement-Independent Enhancing Antibody than Complement-Dependent Neutralizing Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-09-25

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We previously reported that most inhabitants of dengue-endemic countries who are naturally immune to the disease have infection-enhancing antibodies whose in vitro activity does not decrease in the presence of complement (complement-independent enhancing antibodies, or CiEAb). Here, we compared levels of CiEAb and complement-dependent neutralizing antibodies (CdNAb) in dengue-immune humans. A typical antibody dose-response pattern obtained in our assay system to measure the balance between neutralizing and enhancing antibodies showed both neutralizing and enhancing activities depending on serum dilution factor. The addition of complement to the assay system increased the activity of neutralizing antibodies at lower dilutions, indicating the presence of CdNAb. In contrast, similar dose-response curves were obtained with and without complement at higher dilutions, indicating higher levels of CiEAb than CdNAb. For experimental support for the higher CiEAb levels, a cocktail of mouse monoclonal antibodies against dengue virus type 1 was prepared. The antibody dose-response curves obtained in this assay, with or without complement, were similar to those obtained with human serum samples when a high proportion of D1-V-3H12 (an antibody exhibiting only enhancing activity and thus a model for CiEAb) was used in the cocktail. This study revealed higher-level induction of CiEAb than CdNAb in humans naturally infected with dengue viruses.

  11. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Ski oncoprotein levels increase during progression of HPV16-transformed cells. • Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent. • Ski knock-down in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes inhibited cell proliferation. • Cervical cancer samples overexpress Ski

  12. Pharmacologic manipulation of human erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels by prednisone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silken, A B

    1975-02-01

    Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentrations in 10 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia rose 21.3%(P smaller than 0.02) after 3 weeks of prednisone and vincristine therapy, and returned to pretreatment level 2 weeks after therapy had been discontinued. The mean 2,3-DPG level of three patients on vincristine alone did not vary significantly from the control level of the leukemia patients on prednisone and vincristine. No significant change in serum inorganic phosphate level was observed. The mean erythrocyte 2,3-DPG concentration of 17 nephrotic syndrome patients being treated with chronic prednisone therapy was 14.0% higher than a control group of 20 nephrotic syndrome patients not being treated with prednisone (P small than 0.01). A significant positive correlation was observed between the dose of prednisone and 2,3-DPG level.

  13. Influence of different thyroid functional statuses on human serum IL-8, TNF levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Feng; Jiao Yanxiang; Guang Yancen; Zhang Zhu; Wei Cuiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different statuses of thyroid function (hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism as well as euthyroid status) on serum IL-8, TNF levels. Methods: Serum IL-8, TNF levels of 95 hyperthyroidism patients (41 males, 54 females), 53 hypothyroidism patients (23 males, 30 females), 45 euthyroid controls (24 males, 21 females) were measured with RIA. Results: 1. Serum IL-8 levels in hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease) patients were significantly higher than those in controls. (F=2.93, p 0.05). IL-8 and TNF levels were also not correlated to age and thyroid hormone levels. Conclusion: Both IL-8 and TNF took part in many auto-immure pathological processes including hyper-and hypo-thyroidism

  14. Serum Level of the Adipokine “Vaspin” in Relation to Metabolic Parameters: Short – Term Effect of Specific Dietary Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha I. A. Moaty

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: The effect of the dietary supplements may play a role in alleviating the impact of the components of the MetS and may also sustain the level of the vaspin in the sensitization of the C-peptide in order to attain glucose homeostasis.

  15. Level of Knowledge about Human Papillomavirus Infection among Women of Kashan City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekooi M.S. BSc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims A few studies concentrate on the level of knowledge of HPV. This study was conducted to evaluate the level of knowledge about HPV, its risk factors, and its relation with cervical cancer in women of Kashan City, Iran. Instrument & Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2015 in the population of the women of Kashan City, Iran, and 200 persons were selected by simple sampling method. The level of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer were measured using a questionnaire with 10 questions about knowledge. The data was analyzed in SPSS 16 software by Chi-square, Exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Findings Most of the participants (152 persons; 76% had “weak, 26 participants (13% had “moderate” and only 22 participants (11% had “strong” level of knowledge about HPV. There were significant differences between the level of knowledge according to educational level (p=0.014 and professional status (p0.05. In all the questions, the most frequent answer was “don’t know”. The participants had some knowledge about “HPV causing cervical cancer” (34.5%, “HPV causing genital warts” (38%, “sexually transmission of HPV” (37.5% and “increased risk of getting HPV by extramarital sexual affairs” (43.5% Conclusion The level of knowledge about HPV, genital warts, and ways of infection transmission and its preventions in women of Kashan City, Iran, is insufficient.

  16. Fucoidan cytotoxicity against human breast cancer T47D cell line increases with higher level of sulfate ester group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saepudin, Endang; Alfita Qosthalani, Fildzah; Sinurat, Ellya

    2018-01-01

    The anticancer activity of different sulfate ester group content in different molecular weight was examined. The anticancer activity was achieved in vitro on human breast cancer T47D cell line. Fucoidan with lower molecular weight (5.79 kDa) tends to have lower sulfate ester group content (8.69%) and resulted in higher IC50 value (184.22 μg/mL). While fucoidan with higher molecular weight (785.12 kDa) tends to have higher sulfate level (18.63%) and achieved lower IC50 value (75.69 μg/mL). The result showed that in order to maintain fucoidan cytotoxic activity against human breast cancer T47D cell line, the sulfate content should be remain high. Keywords: fucoidan, sulfate ester group, human breast cancer

  17. Bisphenol A (BPA) in China: a review of sources, environmental levels, and potential human health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y Q; Wong, C K C; Zheng, J S; Bouwman, H; Barra, R; Wahlström, B; Neretin, L; Wong, M H

    2012-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), identified as an endocrine disruptor, is an industrially important chemical that is used as a raw material in the manufacture of many products such as engineering plastics (e.g., epoxy resins/polycarbonate plastics), food cans (i.e., lacquer coatings), and dental composites/sealants. The demand and production capacity of BPA in China have grown rapidly. This trend will lead to much more BPA contamination in the environmental media and in the general population in China. This paper reviews the current literature concerning the pollution status of BPA in China (the mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) and its potential impact on human health. Due to potential human health risks from long-term exposure to BPA, body burden of the contaminant should be monitored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human internal and external exposure to PBDEs--a review of levels and sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the existing literature on human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), with particular focus on external exposure routes (e.g. dust, diet, and air) and the resulting internal exposure to PBDEs (e.g. breast milk and blood). Being lipophilic and persistent organic...... ingest more dust than adults. Infants are also exposed to PBDEs via breast milk. Internal human exposure has generally been found to be one order of magnitude larger in North America than in Europe and Asia. These differences cannot solely be explained by the dietary intake as meat products are the only...... food group where some differences has been observed. However, indoor air and dust concentrations have been found to be approximately one order of magnitude higher in North America than in Europe, possibly a result of different fire safety standards. Within Europe, higher PBDE concentrations in dust...

  19. High Level Soluble Expression and ATPase Characterization of Human Heat Shock Protein GRP78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Luo, Miao; Chen, Ke; Yang, Wei; Bai, Lei; Huang, Ailong; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-02-01

    Human GRP78 has been shown to promote cancer progression and is regarded as a novel target for anticancer drugs. However, generation of recombinant full-length GRP78 remains challenging. This report demonstrates that E. coli autoinduction is an excellent method for the preparation of active recombinant GRP78 protein. The final yield was approximately 50 mg/liter of autoinduction culture. Gel-filtration experiments confirmed that the chaperone is a monomer. The purified human GRP78 catalyzed the conversion of ATP to ADP without requiring metal ions as cofactors. Three mutants, T38A, T229A, and S300A, exhibited much lower activity than wild-type GRP78, indicating that the active sites of the ATPase are located at the negatively charged cavity. Three mutants in the negatively charged cavity region dramatically reduced GRP78 activity, further confirming the region as the site of ATPase activity.

  20. Osteopontin Levels in Human Milk vary Across Countries and within Lactation Period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Signe; Jacobsen, Lotte Neergaard; Ze, Xiaolei

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein expressed in many cell types, tissues and body fluids with the highest concentrations found in milk; significantly higher in human than in bovine milk. Intervention studies have indicated beneficial effects of supplementing infant formula...... with bovine OPN. In this multicenter study, we determined the OPN content in human milk samples from 629 Chinese, Danish, Japanese and Korean mothers. METHODS: At each study site, milk samples were collected and analyzed for OPN and protein concentration using ELISA and infrared spectroscopy, respectively....../L in Korean to 266.2 mg/L in Chinese mothers (p mothers delivering more than one sample, multilevel (mixed model) linear regression analysis showed...

  1. Levels of the Novel Glycoprotein Lacritin in Human Tears After Laser Refractive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    et al. Lacritin and other new proteins of the lacrimal functional unit . Exp Eye Res 2009;88(5):848. 6. McKown RL, et al. Mutational analysis of...Ryan COL MC USA 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER email:Kraig.Bower@amedd.army.mil 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...mitogenesis in human corneal epithelial cells and promoting production of tears in lacrimal gland acinar cells. Heparanase (HPSE) acts as a regulator for

  2. An assessment of the radiological impact of human intrusion at the UK Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) - 59356

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, Tim; Baldwin, Tamara; Cummings, Richard; Sumerling, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The UK Low Level Waste Repository Ltd submitted an Environmental Safety Case for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) to the Environment Agency on the 1 May 2011. The Environmental Safety Case (ESC) presents a complete case for the environmental safety of the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) both during operations and in the long term (Cummings et al, in these proceedings). This includes an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of the facility, including an assessment of the potential consequences of human intrusion at the site. The human intrusion assessment is based on a cautiously realistic approach in defining intrusion cases and parameter values. A range of possible human intrusion events was considered based on present-day technologies and credible future uses of the site. This process resulted in the identification of geotechnical investigations, a housing development and a smallholding as requiring quantitative assessment. A particular feature of the site is that, because of its proximity to the coast and in view of expected global sea-level rise, it is vulnerable to coastal erosion. During such erosion, wastes and engineered barrier materials will be exposed, and could become targets for investigation or recovery. Therefore, human intrusion events have been included that are associated with such activities. A radiological assessment model has been developed to analyse the impacts of potential human intrusion at the site. A key feature of the model is the representation of the spatial layout of the disposal site, including the engineered cap design and the large-scale spatial heterogeneity of radionuclide concentrations within the repository. The model has been used to calculate the radiation dose to intruders and to others following intrusion at different times and at different locations across the site, for the each of the selected intrusion events, considering all relevant exposure modes. Potential doses due to radon and its daughters in

  3. Level of action of cathodal DC polarisation induced inhibition of the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Michael A; Nitsche, Maren S; Klein, Cornelia C; Tergau, Frithjof; Rothwell, John C; Paulus, Walter

    2003-04-01

    To induce prolonged motor cortical excitability reductions by transcranial direct current stimulation in the human. Cathodal direct current stimulation was applied transcranially to the hand area of the human primary motor cortex from 5 to 9 min in separate sessions in twelve healthy subjects. Cortico-spinal excitability was tested by single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation and H-reflexes were used to learn about the origin of the excitability changes. Neurone specific enolase was measured before and after the stimulation to prove the safety of the stimulation protocol. Five and 7 min direct current stimulation resulted in motor cortical excitability reductions, which lasted for minutes after the end of stimulation, 9 min stimulation induced after-effects for up to an hour after the end of stimulation, as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Muscle evoked potentials elicited by transcranial electric stimulation and H-reflexes did not change. Neurone specific enolase concentrations remained stable throughout the experiments. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation is capable of inducing prolonged excitability reductions in the human motor cortex non-invasively. These changes are most probably localised intracortically.

  4. Caffeine enhanced measurement of mutagenesis by low levels of [gamma]-irradiation in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, T.P.; Johnson, R.; Waldren, C.A. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Morse, H. (Univ. of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The well-known action of caffeine in synergizing mutagenesis (including chromosome aberrations) of agents like ionizing radiation by inhibition of cellular repair processes has been incorporated into a rapid procedure for detection of mutagenicity with high sensitivity. Effects of 5-10 rads of [gamma]-irradiation, which approximate the human lifetime dose accumulation from background radiation, can be detected in a two-day procedure using an immortalized human WBC culture. Chromosomally visible lesions are scored on cells incubated for 2 h after irradiation in the presence and absence of 1.0 mg/ml of caffeine. An eightfold amplification of scorable lesions is achieved over the action of radiation alone. This approach provides a closer approximation to absolute mutagenicity unmitigated by repair processes, which can vary in different situations. It is proposed that mutagenesis testing of this kind, using caffiene or other repair-inhibitory agents, be employed to identify mutagens in their effective concentrations to which human populations may be exposed; to detect agents such as caffeine that may synergize mutagenic actions and pose epidemiologic threats; and to discover effective anti-mutagens. Information derived from the use of such procedures may help prevent cancer and newly acquired genetic disease.

  5. [11C]befloxatone distribution is well correlated to monoamine oxidase A protein levels in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Bottlaender, Michel

    2014-12-01

    [(11)C]befloxatone is a positron emission tomography radioligand to image monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) in the brain, which has been used in preclinical studies and in clinical protocols. However, a recent study found that [(11)C]befloxatone binding potential (k(3)/k(4)) has a poor correlation with MAO-A protein levels measured in the human brain. We here show that this poor correlation only depends on the choice of the parameter when performing kinetic modeling. In particular, the total volume of distribution of [(11)C]befloxatone shows a tight correlation with both protein and mRNA levels of MAO-A in the human brain.

  6. Distinct gene expression signatures in human embryonic stem cells differentiated towards definitive endoderm at single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Karin; Strömbeck, Anna; Semb, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    for the three activin A based protocols applied. Our data provide novel insights in DE gene expression at the cellular level of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells, and illustrate the power of using single-cell gene expression profiling to study differentiation heterogeneity and to characterize...... of anterior definitive endoderm (DE). Here, we differentiated human embryonic stem cells towards DE using three different activin A based treatments. Differentiation efficiencies were evaluated by gene expression profiling over time at cell population level. A panel of key markers was used to study DE...... formation. Final DE differentiation was also analyzed with immunocytochemistry and single-cell gene expression profiling. We found that cells treated with activin A in combination with sodium butyrate and B27 serum-free supplement medium generated the most mature DE cells. Cell population studies were...

  7. Environmental variation of arsenic levels in human blood determined by neutron activation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj

    1970-01-01

    Denmark. Arsenic was determined by neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separation and re-irradiation yield determination. The precision and accuracy of the results have been carefully evaluated in order to permit quantitative tests for the significance of the observed differences. The results......Arsenic levels in blood plasma and red cells from patients with Blackfoot disease, a peripheral arteriosclerosis endemic to a small area in Taiwan, were studied in relation to healthy individuals from the same and other parts of Taiwan and compared with arsenic levels in a control group from...... from Taiwan followed a logarithmic normal distribution, and no difference was found between Blackfoot patients and their healthy family members. However, their overall arsenic levels were higher than the Taiwan average, presumably because of arsenic in their drinking water. Much lower levels were found...

  8. Assessment of Salivary Human Herpesvirus-6 and Immunoglobulin A Levels in Nurses Working Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirom Fukuda, RN, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Conclusion: Salivary HHV-6 level may be a more sensitive stress marker than salivary IgA or mood for assessing chronic fatigue in nurses working shifts. Improvement to shift assignments using assessment by salivary HHV-6 is required.

  9. Cadmium, Zinc, and Selenium Levels in Carcinoma of the Human Prostate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarafanov, Andrey; Centeno, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    .... The objectives are: 1) to establish reliability of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tissue for analysis of Zn, Se and Cd tissue by comparing their levels in the fresh specimen...

  10. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostrzewa, E.; Brandys, M. K.; van Lith, H. A.; Kas, M. J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region

  11. The effect of dietary factors on nitrosoproline levels in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, H F; Hornby, A P; Dunn, B P

    1984-05-15

    The effect