WorldWideScience

Sample records for human blood neutrophils

  1. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Quercetin and Vitexin on Activated Human Peripheral Blood Neutrophils - The effects of quercetin and vitexin on human neutrophils -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abd Nikfarjam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs constitute the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens. Early events in inflammation involve the recruitment of neutrophils to the site of injury or damage where changes in intracellular calcium can cause the activation of pro-inflammatory mediators from neutrophils including superoxide generation, degranulation and release of myeloperoxidase (MPO, productions of interleukin (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, and adhesion to the vascular endothelium. To address the anti-inflammatory role of flavonoids, in the present study, we investigated the effects of the flavonoids quercetin and vitexin on the stimulus-induced nitric oxide (NO, TNF-α, and MPO productions in human neutrophils. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated, and their viabilities were determined by using the Trypan Blue exclusion test. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL preparations contained more than 98% neutrophils as determin

  2. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation-a detailed in vitro analysis of murine and human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauler, Maximilian; Seyfert, Julia; Haenel, David; Seeba, Hannah; Guenther, Janine; Stallmann, Daniela; Schoenichen, Claudia; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Platelets form complexes with neutrophils during inflammatory processes. These aggregates migrate into affected tissues and also circulate within the organism. Several studies have evaluated platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker of cardiovascular diseases in human and mouse. Although multiple publications have reported platelet-neutrophil complex counts, we noticed that different methods were used to analyze platelet-neutrophil complex formation, resulting in significant differences, even in baseline values. We established a protocol for platelet-neutrophil complex measurement with flow cytometry in murine and human whole blood samples. In vitro platelet-neutrophil complex formation was stimulated with ADP or PMA. We tested the effect of different sample preparation steps and cytometer settings on platelet-neutrophil complex detection and noticed false-positive counts with increasing acquisition speed. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation depends on platelet P-selectin expression, and antibody blocking of P-selectin consequently prevented ADP-induced platelet-neutrophil complex formation. These findings may help generating more comparable data among different research groups that examine platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker for cardiovascular disease and novel therapeutic interventions.

  3. Response of Neutrophils to Extracellular Haemoglobin and LTA in Human Blood System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Kyung Lee

    2015-03-01

    Interpretation: metHb and metHb + LTA complex are ligands of TLR2, inducing an unconventional TLR signalling pathway. Neutrophils are a highly sensitive cell type to metHb + LTA complex. During a haemolytic infection, white blood cells in the vicinity crosstalk to modulate neutrophil TLR-signalling induced by metHb and LTA.

  4. IFN-gamma is produced by polymorphonuclear neutrophils in human uterine endometrium and by cultured peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, G R; Collins, J E; Currie, J K; Guyre, P M; Wira, C R; Fanger, M W

    1998-05-15

    Cytokines present in the human uterus play an important role both in modulating immune responses to infectious challenge and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. In particular, successful implantation and pregnancy is thought to require the establishment of a Th2 environment, while Th1 cytokines are associated with pregnancy loss and infertility. On the other hand, a Th1 response appears to be required for the resolution of acute infection. Using novel confocal microscopic analysis of fresh sections of human tissue, we have investigated the production of IFN-gamma, a Th1 cytokine, in human endometria. Extracellular IFN-gamma, mostly associated with matrix components, was located immediately beneath the luminal epithelium and along the glandular epithelium proximal to the lumen. As evidenced by intracellular staining, IFN-gamma is produced by both stromal cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes through all stages of the menstrual cycle. Surprisingly, the stromal cell containing intracellular IFN-gamma was identified as a polymorphonuclear neutrophil on the basis of its reactivity with a panel of mAbs and its nuclear morphology. We further found that polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from normal donors produce IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with LPS, IL-12, and TNF-alpha. Taken together, these findings suggest that polymorphonuclear neutrophils are capable of producing IFN-gamma both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that their role in shaping immune responses may be more extensive than previously thought. Furthermore, these studies strongly suggest that polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in determining immune responsiveness within the female reproductive tract.

  5. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Bolen, Christopher R.; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Angst, Martin S.; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20–30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women. PMID:28179497

  6. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation.

  7. The subcellular particulate NADPH-dependent O2.(-)-generating oxidase from human blood monocytes: comparison to the neutrophil system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, A N; Santinga, J T; Gabig, T G

    1982-10-01

    Highly purified preparations of normal human monocytes obtained from peripheral blood were shown to contain a subcellular particulate O2.(-)-generating oxidase system. This O2.(-)-generating activity was present in particulate preparations from monocytes that had been previously stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate but was low or absent in control preparations from unstimulated monocytes or stimulated monocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. In the stimulated preparations from normal monocytes, O2.(-)-generation was linearly proportional to cell protein concentration, insensitive to inhibition by azide, and dependent on NADPH as substrate. These characteristics are similar to the O2.(-)-generating oxidase system from human neutrophils. A significant difference in the apparent Km for NADPH was shown between preparations from stimulated monocytes and neutrophils (monocyte 83 +/- 16 microM, neutrophil 31 +/- 5 microM, mean +/- SE). Additionally, affinity of the stimulated monocyte particulate preparation for NADH was unmeasurably low.

  8. Effect of sevoflurane on human neutrophil apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Both chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents and acute in vitro exposure of neutrophils to isoflurane have been shown to inhibit the rate of apoptosis of human neutrophils. It is possible that inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis arises through delaying mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. We assessed mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in unexposed neutrophils and neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo. METHODS: A total of 20 mL venous blood was withdrawn pre- and postinduction of anaesthesia, the neutrophils isolated and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Mitochondrial depolarization was measured using the dual emission styryl dye JC-1. RESULTS: Apoptosis was significantly inhibited in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo at 24 (exposed: 38 (12)% versus control: 28 (11)%, P = 0.001), but not at 1 or 12 h, in culture. Mitochondrial depolarization was not delayed in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are that sevoflurane inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in vivo and that inhibition is not mediated primarily by an effect on mitochondrial depolarization.

  9. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  10. PARTICIPATION OF TLR4 IN ENGULFMENT OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BY HUMAN BLOOD NEUTROPHILS IN PRESENCE OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zubova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. TLR4 is a key player in signaling system of host cells. Possible role of TLR4 is actively discussed, e.g. its significance for phagocytosis. A capacity of neutrophils to engulf FITC-labeled E. coli bacteria upon activation with LPS of different origin was studied in presence of anti-TLR4 Mab’s (HTA125 clone. It was shown that, in whole blood, TLR4 does not play any essential role in engulfment of bacteria by the neutrophils. Phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood increases increased after their priming with E. coli endotoxins. LPS from Rb. сapsulatus did not affect phagocytosis. In presence of endotoxins, the degree of TLR4 involvement in neutrophil phagocytosis depends on LPS structure.

  11. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  12. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  13. Photothermal image cytometry of human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotko, Dmitry

    2001-07-01

    Photothermal imaging, when being applied to the study of living cells, provides morpho-functional information about the cell populations. In technical terms, the method is complementary to optical microscopy. The photothermal method was used for cell imaging and quantitative studies. Preliminary results of the studies on living human neutrophils are presented. Differences between normal and pathological neutrophil populations from blood of healthy donors and patients with saracoidosis and pleuritis are demonstrated.

  14. Functional differentiation of normal human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, L; Fiederlein, R L

    1987-03-01

    In the past differentiation of human neutrophils has been defined by morphology, cytochemistry, or surface markers. In our experiments we have sequenced the various events that occur during the functional differentiation of the normal human neutrophil and have also examined some of the functional properties in relationship to surface markers and biochemical events. Granulocytes were obtained from the bone marrow and blood of hematologically normal individuals. Cells were separated into different stages of maturation by their physical properties using counterflow centrifugal elutriation and density gradient separation. Three cell fractions were obtained that were enriched for either immature myeloid cells, band neutrophils, or segmented neutrophils. Since the enriched fractions were not entirely pure, methodologies for functional assays were chosen that allowed cytologic evaluation of the functional capacity of each cell type. The criteria used to classify the stages of differentiation included both morphology by light microscopy and DNA labeling with tritiated thymidine. Various neutrophilic properties were studied: Fc receptors, complement receptors (CR1, CR3), phagocytosis of both live and dead opsonized Staphylococcus aureus, microbial killing of S aureus, NBT dye reduction after cellular stimulation with endotoxin, and chemotaxis. Our results indicate that the functional properties of the neutrophil appear in a distinct order. The sequence for the functional differentiation of the human neutrophil appears to be the following: Fc receptors----immune phagocytosis----complement receptors----oxygen-independent microbial killing----oxygen-dependent microbial killing----chemotaxis.

  15. Human Neutrophils Kill Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  16. Human neutrophils kill Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mayer-Scholl

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  17. Human neutrophils kill Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Hurwitz, Robert; Brinkmann, Volker; Schmid, Monika; Jungblut, Peter; Weinrauch, Yvette; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2005-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  18. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  19. Functional neutrophils from human ES cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Colin L; Malech, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Yokoyama and colleagues demonstrate in vitro differentiation of hESCs into mature neutrophils with functional capabilities (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, microbicidal oxidase activity, and bacterial killing) approaching or equal to that of normal peripheral blood neutrophils.

  20. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    The host response to Plasmodia includes the production of enlarged populations of peripheral blood monocytes and tissue macrophages in the spleen and the liver. Since the hyperplasia of the mononuclear phagocyte system is believed to arise as a consequence of an enhanced blood monocyte influx, we....... In conclusion, not all cell functions were altered in concert, and the previously unreported suppression of chemotactic migration might reflect a change in blood leucocyte subpopulations, deactivation in vivo or a direct suppressive effect of plasmodia induced products....

  1. Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E L; Lehrer, R I; Rest, R F

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

  2. Identification of C-terminal phosphorylation sites of N-formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) in human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaty, Walid S; Lord, Connie I; Gripentrog, Jeannie M; Riesselman, Marcia; Keren-Aviram, Gal; Liu, Ting; Dratz, Edward A; Bothner, Brian; Jesaitis, Algirdas J

    2013-09-20

    Accumulation, activation, and control of neutrophils at inflammation sites is partly driven by N-formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors (FPRs). Occupancy of these G-protein-coupled receptors by formyl peptides has been shown to induce regulatory phosphorylation of cytoplasmic serine/threonine amino acid residues in heterologously expressed recombinant receptors, but the biochemistry of these modifications in primary human neutrophils remains relatively unstudied. FPR1 and FPR2 were partially immunopurified using antibodies that recognize both receptors (NFPRa) or unphosphorylated FPR1 (NFPRb) in dodecylmaltoside extracts of unstimulated and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) + cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils or their membrane fractions. After deglycosylation and separation by SDS-PAGE, excised Coomassie Blue-staining bands (∼34,000 Mr) were tryptically digested, and FPR1, phospho-FPR1, and FPR2 content was confirmed by peptide mass spectrometry. C-terminal FPR1 peptides (Leu(312)-Arg(322) and Arg(323)-Lys(350)) and extracellular FPR1 peptide (Ile(191)-Arg(201)) as well as three similarly placed FPR2 peptides were identified in unstimulated and fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated samples. LC/MS/MS identified seven isoforms of Ala(323)-Lys(350) only in the fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated sample. These were individually phosphorylated at Thr(325), Ser(328), Thr(329), Thr(331), Ser(332), Thr(334), and Thr(339). No phospho-FPR2 peptides were detected. Cytochalasin B treatment of neutrophils decreased the sensitivity of fMLF-dependent NFPRb recognition 2-fold, from EC50 = 33 ± 8 to 74 ± 21 nM. Our results suggest that 1) partial immunopurification, deglycosylation, and SDS-PAGE separation of FPRs is sufficient to identify C-terminal FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations by LC/MS/MS; 2) kinases/phosphatases activated in fMLF/cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils produce multiple C-terminal tail FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations but have little effect on corresponding FPR2 sites

  3. Identification of C-terminal Phosphorylation Sites of N-Formyl Peptide Receptor-1 (FPR1) in Human Blood Neutrophils*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaty, Walid S.; Lord, Connie I.; Gripentrog, Jeannie M.; Riesselman, Marcia; Keren-Aviram, Gal; Liu, Ting; Dratz, Edward A.; Bothner, Brian; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation, activation, and control of neutrophils at inflammation sites is partly driven by N-formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors (FPRs). Occupancy of these G-protein-coupled receptors by formyl peptides has been shown to induce regulatory phosphorylation of cytoplasmic serine/threonine amino acid residues in heterologously expressed recombinant receptors, but the biochemistry of these modifications in primary human neutrophils remains relatively unstudied. FPR1 and FPR2 were partially immunopurified using antibodies that recognize both receptors (NFPRa) or unphosphorylated FPR1 (NFPRb) in dodecylmaltoside extracts of unstimulated and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) + cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils or their membrane fractions. After deglycosylation and separation by SDS-PAGE, excised Coomassie Blue-staining bands (∼34,000 Mr) were tryptically digested, and FPR1, phospho-FPR1, and FPR2 content was confirmed by peptide mass spectrometry. C-terminal FPR1 peptides (Leu312–Arg322 and Arg323–Lys350) and extracellular FPR1 peptide (Ile191–Arg201) as well as three similarly placed FPR2 peptides were identified in unstimulated and fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated samples. LC/MS/MS identified seven isoforms of Ala323–Lys350 only in the fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated sample. These were individually phosphorylated at Thr325, Ser328, Thr329, Thr331, Ser332, Thr334, and Thr339. No phospho-FPR2 peptides were detected. Cytochalasin B treatment of neutrophils decreased the sensitivity of fMLF-dependent NFPRb recognition 2-fold, from EC50 = 33 ± 8 to 74 ± 21 nm. Our results suggest that 1) partial immunopurification, deglycosylation, and SDS-PAGE separation of FPRs is sufficient to identify C-terminal FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations by LC/MS/MS; 2) kinases/phosphatases activated in fMLF/cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils produce multiple C-terminal tail FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations but have little effect on corresponding FPR2 sites; and 3) the extent of

  4. Hawthorn extract inhibits human isolated neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli, Ernesto; Milara, Javier; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Cosín-Sales, Juan; Sotillo, José Francisco

    2008-06-01

    Hawthorn extract is a popular herbal medicine given as adjunctive treatment for chronic heart failure. In contrast to the cardiac properties of hawthorn extract, its anti-inflammatory effect has been scarcely investigated. This study examines the effects of a dry extract of leaves and flowers of Crataegus laevigata on various functional outputs of human neutrophils in vitro. Incubation of human neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood of healthy donors with C. laevigata extract (0.75-250 microg/ml) inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)-induced superoxide anion generation, elastase release and chemotactic migration with potency values of 43.6, 21.9, and 31.6 microg/ml, respectively. By contrast, serum-opsonized zymosan-induced phagocytosis was unaltered by plant extract. C. laevigata extract (125 microg/ml) reduced FMLP-induced leukotriene B(4) production and lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8. Extract inhibited FMLP-induced intracellular calcium signal with potency of 17.4 microg/ml. Extract also markedly inhibited the extracellular calcium entry into calcium-depleted neutrophils, and the thapsigargin-induced intracellular calcium response. In conclusion, C. laevigata extract inhibited various functional outputs of activated human neutrophils which may be relevant to the pathophysiology of cardiac failure.

  5. Human Neutrophil Elastase Induce Interleukin-10 Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells through Protein Kinase C Theta/Delta and Phospholipase Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Kawata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neutrophils have an important role in the rapid innate immune response, and the release or active secretion of elastase from neutrophils is linked to various inflammatory responses. Purpose of this study was to determine how the human neutrophil elastase affects the interleukin-10 (IL-10 response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, changes in IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA and protein expression levels in monocytes derived from human PBMCs were investigated after stimulation with human neutrophil elastase (HNE. A set of inhibitors was used for examining the pathways for IL-10 production induced by HNE. Results: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed that stimulation with HNE upregulated IL-10 mRNA expression by monocytes, while the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA revealed an increase of IL-10 protein level in the culture medium. A phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122 partially blunted the induction of IL-10 mRNA expression by HNE, while IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor (Rottlerin. A calcium chelator (3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylaminooctyl ester: TMB-8 inhibited the response of IL-10 mRNA to stimulation by HNE. In addition, pretreatment with a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor (Ro-318425 partly blocked the response to HNE. Finally, an inhibitor of PKC theta/delta abolished the increased level of IL-10 mRNA expression. Conclusion: These results indicate that HNE mainly upregulates IL-10 mRNA expression and protein production in moncytes via a novel PKC theta/delta, although partially via the conventional PKC pathway.

  6. Transcriptome kinetics of circulating neutrophils during human experimental endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan de Kleijn

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear cells (neutrophils play an important role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the development of sepsis. These cells are essential for the defense against microorganisms, but may also cause tissue damage. Therefore, neutrophil numbers and activity are considered to be tightly regulated. Previous studies have investigated gene transcription during experimental endotoxemia in whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the gene transcription response of the circulating pool of neutrophils to systemic inflammatory stimulation in vivo is currently unclear. We examined neutrophil gene transcription kinetics in healthy human subjects (n = 4 administered a single dose of endotoxin (LPS, 2 ng/kg iv. In addition, freshly isolated neutrophils were stimulated ex vivo with LPS, TNFα, G-CSF and GM-CSF to identify stimulus-specific gene transcription responses. Whole transcriptome microarray analysis of circulating neutrophils at 2, 4 and 6 hours after LPS infusion revealed activation of inflammatory networks which are involved in signaling of TNFα and IL-1α and IL-1β. The transcriptome profile of inflammatory activated neutrophils in vivo reflects extended survival and regulation of inflammatory responses. These changes in neutrophil transcriptome suggest a combination of early activation of circulating neutrophils by TNFα and G-CSF and a mobilization of young neutrophils from the bone marrow.

  7. Protein adsorption to monosodium urate crystals: differential responses of human peripheral blood neutrophils. [Etiology of acute gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skosey, J.L.; Kozin, F.; Ginsberg, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order for acute gouty arthritis to occur, neutrophils must interact with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. As a result of this interaction, enzymes, chemotactic factors, and other mediators of the inflammatory response are released from neutrophil lysosomes. It was observed that MSU crystals adsorb gamma globulin, albumin, and other proteins found in serum and joint fluid. Results are reported from a study designed to demonstrate the effects of coating of MSU crystals with proteins on the phlogistic responses of neutrophils to crystals.

  8. Olfactomedin 4 defines a subset of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Bohr, Christina T; Rørvig, Sara;

    2012-01-01

    OLFM4 was identified initially as a gene highly induced in myeloid stem cells by G-CSF treatment. A bioinformatics method using a global meta-analysis of microarray data predicted that OLFM4 would be associated with specific granules in human neutrophils. Subcellular fractionation of peripheral...... blood neutrophils demonstrated complete colocalization of OLFM4 with the specific granule protein NGAL, and stimulation of neutrophils with PMA resulted in corelease of NGAL and OLFM4, proving that OLFM4 is a genuine constituent of neutrophil-specific granules. In accordance with this, OLFM4 mRNA peaked...... at the MY/MM stage of maturation. OLFM4 was, however, present in only 20-25% of peripheral blood neutrophils, as determined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, whereas mRNA for OLFM4 was present in all MY/MM, indicating post-transcriptional regulation as a basis for the heterogeneous expression...

  9. Effect of a Korean traditional formulation, Hwaotang, on superoxide generation in human neutrophils, platelet aggregation in human blood, and nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 production and paw oedema induced by carrageenan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Hwan; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2004-02-01

    Hwaotang, a traditional Korean medicinal formulation, is a dried decoctum of a mixture of 7 herbal medicines, consisting of Angelica gigantis Radix, Rehmanniae radix, Paeoniae radix, Ciniamomi cortex, Cnidii rhizoma, Persicae semen and Carthami flos. We have investigated that Hwaotang water extract (HOT) has various effects on stimulus-induced superoxide generation in human neutrophils. The effects of HOT on superoxide generation in human neutrophils were investigated. HOT significantly inhibited N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced superoxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner, but not that induced by arachidonic acid (AA). On the other hand, HOT enhanced superoxide generation induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in a concentration-dependent manner. The superoxide generation induced by PMA with HOT was suppressed by staurosporine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but was not suppressed by genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinase. Tyrosyl phosphorylation of a 58 kDa protein, which was increased by fMLP, was inhibited by HOT. HOT also inhibited the generation of a 47 kDa protein and platelet aggregation in human blood. The results suggest that protein tyrosine kinase participates in fMLP-mediated superoxide generation by HOT-treated human neutrophils. HOT inhibited neutrophil functions, including degranulation, superoxide generation, and leukotriene B4 production, without any effect on 5-lipoxygenase activity. HOT reduced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 production in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, whereas no influence on the activity of iNOS, COX-2 or COX-1 was observed. HOT significantly reduced mouse paw oedema induced by carrageenan. Western blot analysis showed that HOT reduced the expression of iNOS and COX-2. The results indicate that HOT exerts anti-inflammatory effects related to the inhibition of neutrophil functions and of NO and prostaglandin E2 production, which

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of the potential deleterious effects of ZnO nanomaterials (nanoneedles and nanoflowers) on blood components, including albumin, erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrello, Bruna; Paracatu, Luana Chiquetto; de Carvalho Bertozo, Luiza; Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias

    2016-07-01

    The application of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in biomaterials has increased significantly in the recent years. Here, we aimed to study the potential deleterious effects of ZnO on blood components, including human serum albumin (HSA), erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils. To test the influence of the morphology of the nanomaterials, ZnO nanoneedles (ZnO-nn) and nanoflowers (ZnO-nf) were synthesized. The zeta potential and mean size of ZnO-nf and ZnO-nn suspensions in phosphate-buffered saline were -10.73 mV and 3.81 nm and -5.27 mV and 18.26 nm, respectively. The incubation of ZnO with HSA did not cause its denaturation as verified by the absence of significant alterations in the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence and in the circular dichroism spectrum of the protein. The capacity of HSA as a drug carrier was not affected as verified by employing site I and II fluorescent markers. Neither type of ZnO was able to provoke the activation of neutrophils, as verified by lucigenin- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence and by the extracellular release of hydrogen peroxide. ZnO-nf, but not ZnO-nn, induced the haemolysis of erythrocytes. In conclusion, our results reinforce the concept that ZnO nanomaterials are relatively safe for usage in biomaterials. A potential exception is the capacity of ZnO-nf to promote the lysis of erythrocytes, a discovery that shows the importance of the morphology in the toxicity of nanoparticles.

  11. [Ultrastructural location of enzymes in peripheral blood neutrophils and in cerebrospinal fluid neutrophils in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotarczak, B

    1993-01-01

    Using cytochemical methods the location and activity were determined of alkaline phosphatase, ATP-ase and succinate dehydrogenase as representative enzymes for the metabolic processes in neutrophils isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils in a control group. The study showed presence of phosphatase on the membranes of many intracellular structures. The activity of the enzymes was higher than in the control group in the membranes of neutrophils in blood and CSF. This is explained as an effect of action of the chemotactic factor on the cell membrane and activation of the cell to movements and phagocytosis. ATP-ase activity in peripheral blood neutrophils in controls was found in all membranous structures in the cell. However, in peripheral blood neutrophils and CSF neutrophils in the acute stage of the disease the active enzyme was noted, in the first place, in cell membranes and digesting vacuoles, which reflected probably the direction of metabolic processes for phagocytosis and destroying of bacteria. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was found in mitochondrial membranes. Peripheral blood and CSF neutrophils showed a high activity of the enzyme. In the CSF cells in acute phase atypical sites of succinate dehydrogenase activity were noted, which was explained as a sign of cell destruction.

  12. Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauder Faraday

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies.

  13. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role.

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) is constitutive in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, Jan; Follin, Per; Forslund, Tony; Lindmark, Maria; Sundqvist, Tommy; Skogh, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    The objective was to study the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) in and NO production by human blood neutrophils and in in vivo exudated neutrophils. Cellular expression of NOS II was evaluated by flow cytometry in whole blood, in isolated blood neutrophils, and in neutrophils obtained by exudation in vivo into skin chambers. Neutrophil NOS II was also demonstrated by Western blotting. Uptake of 3H-labelled L-arginine was studied in vitro and NOS activity measured in a whole cell assay by the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline. In contrast to unseparated blood cells, NOS II was demonstrable both in isolated blood neutrophils and exudated cells. The failure to detect NOS II by flow cytometry in whole blood cells thus proved to be due to the quenching effect of hemoglobin. Western blotting revealed a 130 kD band corresponding to NOS II in isolated blood neutrophils, but detection was dependent on diisopropylfluorophosphate for proteinase inhibition. L-arginine was taken up by neutrophils, but enzymatic activity could not be demonstrated. We conclude that human neutrophils constitutively express NOS II, but that its demonstration by FITC-labelling is inhibited by hemoglobin-mediated quenching in whole blood samples.

  15. Stem bark and flower extracts of Vismia cauliflora are highly effective antioxidants to human blood cells by preventing oxidative burst in neutrophils and oxidative damage in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Berto, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Chisté, Renan Campos; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2015-01-01

    Vismia cauliflora A.C.Sm. [Hypericaceae (Clusiaceae)] is an Amazonian plant traditionally used by indigenous population to treat dermatosis and inflammatory processes of the skin. Previous research on V. cauliflora extracts suggests its potential to neutralize cellular oxidative damages related to the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. To determine the activity of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora on the modulation of oxidative burst in human neutrophils, as well as its potential to inhibit oxidative damage in human erythrocytes. The modulation of neutrophil's oxidative burst by the ethanolic extracts (0.3-1000 µg/mL) was determined by the oxidation of specific probes by reactive species. Additionally, the potential of these extracts to inhibit oxidative damage in human erythrocytes was evaluated by monitoring its biomarkers of oxidative stress. Vismia cauliflora extracts presented remarkable capacity to prevent the oxidative burst in activated human neutrophils (IC50 < 15 µg/mL). However, the maximum percentage of inhibition achieved against hydrogen peroxide was 45%. Concerning the oxidative damage in human erythrocytes, the extracts were able to minimize the tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hemoglobin oxidation and lipid peroxidation in a very low concentration range (2.7-18 μg/mL). Furthermore, only stem bark extract (100 µg/mL) was able to inhibit the depletion of glutathione (13%). These results reinforce the therapeutic potential of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora to heal topical skin disease, namely in the treatment of neutrophil-related dermatosis and skin conditions related to oxidative stress, including skin aging.

  16. Ultrastructural observation of human neutrophils during apoptotic cell death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Seobo; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Yong, Tai-Soon; Park, Soon-Jung; Im, Kyung-il; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2004-12-01

    Neutrophils are important effector cells against protozoan extracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and liver abscess in human beings. Apoptotic cell death of neutrophils is an important event in the resolution of inflammation and parasite's survival in vivo. This study was undertaken to investigate the ultrastructural aspects of apoptotic cells during neutrophil death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica. Isolated human neutrophils from the peripheral blood were incubated with or without live trophozoites of E. histolytica and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Neutrophils incubated with E. histolytica were observed to show apoptotic characteristics, such as compaction of the nuclear chromatin and swelling of the nuclear envelop. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in the absence of the amoeba had many protrusions of irregular cell surfaces and heterogenous nuclear chromatin. Therefore, it is suggested that Entamoeba-induced neutrophil apoptosis contribute to prevent unwanted tissue inflammation and damage in the amoeba-invaded lesions in vivo.

  17. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is resistant to killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas R; Davey, Martin S; Green, Christopher; Cooper, Ian A M; Titball, Richard W; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between human neutrophils and the Gram negative gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was investigated in vitro. Despite the wealth of data describing how Yersinia can affect the function of neutrophils, there are no published studies describing if neutrophil cells can affect the viability of Y. pseudotuberculosis. The wild-type IP32953 strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis was found to be resistant to killing by human neutrophils. Confocal examination and flow-cytometric analysis of this interaction revealed that bacteria were taken up.

  18. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O-/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O-/sub 2/ generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O-/sub 2/ responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils.

  19. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  20. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  1. Phagocytosis and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus by Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Frank R DeLeo

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and unexpe...

  2. Peripheral blood neutrophil cytokine hyper-reactivity in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Martin R; Chapple, Iain L C; Matthews, John B

    2015-10-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine release (IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) by peripheral blood neutrophils, isolated from periodontitis patients (before/after therapy) and matched controls, was determined after 18 h culture in the presence/absence of Escherichia coli LPS, opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, heat-killed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All cultures demonstrated differences in the amounts of each cytokine detected (P IL-6 > TNF-α = IL-1β). Median cytokine release from unstimulated patient neutrophils was consistently, but non-significantly, higher than from control cells. Stimulated cytokine release from untreated patient neutrophils was also consistently higher than from control cells. This hyper-reactivity was significant for all tested cytokines when data for all stimuli were combined (P TNF-α), opsonised S. aureus (IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β) and P. gingivalis (IL-8, IL-1β). Cytokine production by patient neutrophils did not reduce following successful non-surgical periodontal therapy and, except for responses to F. nucleatum, the cytokine hyper-reactivity detected pre-therapy was retained. These data demonstrate that chronic periodontitis is characterised by neutrophils that constitutively exhibit cytokine hyper-reactivity, the effects of which could modulate local and systemic inflammatory-immune responses and influence the risk and severity of periodontitis-associated systemic inflammatory diseases.

  3. MPLA inhibits release of cytotoxic mediators from human neutrophils while preserving efficient bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchaud-Sparagano, Marie-Hélène; Mills, Ross; Scott, Jonathan; Simpson, A John

    2014-10-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derivative associated with neutrophil-dependent anti-inflammatory outcomes in animal models of sepsis. Little is known about the effect of MPLA on neutrophil function. This study sought to test the hypothesis that MPLA would reduce release of cytotoxic mediators from neutrophils without impairing bacterial clearance. Neutrophils were isolated from whole blood of healthy volunteers. The effects of MPLA and LPS on autologous serum-opsonised Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing by neutrophils and phagocytosis of autologous serum-opsonised zymosan were examined. Neutrophil oxidative burst, chemotaxis, enzyme and cytokine release as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression were assessed following exposure to LPS or MPLA. LPS, but not MPLA, induced significant release of superoxide and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils. However, MPLA did not impair neutrophil capacity to ingest microbial particles and kill P. aeruginosa efficiently. MPLA was directly chemotactic for neutrophils, involving TLR4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tyrosine and alkaline phosphatases. LPS, but not MPLA, impaired N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine-directed migration of neutrophils, increased surface expression of TLR4, increased interleukin-8 release and strongly activated the myeloid differentiation primary response 88 pathway. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibition significantly augmented IL-8 release from MPLA-treated neutrophils. The addition of MPLA to LPS-preincubated neutrophils led to a significant reduction in LPS-mediated superoxide release and TLR4 surface expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that MPLA directs efficient chemotaxis and bacterial killing in human neutrophils without inducing extracellular release of cytotoxic mediators and suggest that MPLA warrants further attention as a potential therapeutic in human sepsis.

  4. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood.

  5. Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies.

  6. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Sharpe, Matthew R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  7. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  8. Activation of the Small GTPase Rap1 in Human Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M'Rabet, Laura; Coffer, P.J.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Franke, Barbara; Segal, Anthony W.; Koenderman, L.; Bos, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 is highly expressed in human neutrophils, but its function is largely unknown. Using the Rap1- binding domain of RalGDS (RalGDS-RBD) as an activationspecific probe for Rap1, we have investigated the regulation of Rap1 activity in primary human neutrophils. We found that a varie

  9. High glucose impairs superoxide production from isolated blood neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Nielsen, S E; Rask-Madsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)), a key antimicrobial agent in phagocytes, is produced by the activity of NADPH oxidase. High glucose concentrations may, however, impair the production of O(2)(-) through inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which catalyzes the formation of NADPH. This stud...... measured the acute effects of high glucose or the G6PD inhibitor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the production of O(2)(-) from isolated human neutrophils....

  10. Characterization of Yersinia pestis Interactions with Human Neutrophils In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia C. Dudte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, zoonotic, bacterial pathogen, and the causative agent of plague. The bubonic form of plague occurs subsequent to deposition of bacteria in the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Neutrophils are recruited to the site of infection within the first few hours and interactions between neutrophils and Y. pestis have been demonstrated in vivo. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils have been considered non-permissive to Y. pestis intracellular survival. Several studies have shown killing of the vast majority of Y. pestis ingested by human neutrophils. However, survival of 10–15% of Y. pestis after phagocytosis by neutrophils is consistently observed. Furthermore, these surviving bacteria eventually replicate within and escape from the neutrophils. We set out to further characterize the interactions between Y. pestis and human neutrophils by (1 determining the effects of known Y. pestis virulence factors on bacterial survival after uptake by neutrophils, (2 examining the mechanisms employed by the neutrophil to kill the majority of intracellular Y. pestis, (3 determining the activation phenotype of Y. pestis-infected neutrophils, and (4 characterizing the Y. pestis-containing phagosome in neutrophils. We infected human neutrophils in vitro with Y. pestis and assayed bacterial survival and uptake. Deletion of the caf1 gene responsible for F1 capsule production resulted in significantly increased uptake of Y. pestis. Surprisingly, while the two-component regulator PhoPQ system is important for survival of Y. pestis within neutrophils, pre-induction of this system prior to infection did not increase bacterial survival. We used an IPTG-inducible mCherry construct to distinguish viable from non-viable intracellular bacteria and determined the association of the Y. pestis-containing phagosome with neutrophil NADPH-oxidase and markers of primary, secondary and tertiary granules. Additionally, we show that inhibition of

  11. Synchronisation of glycolytic oscillations in a suspension of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Poulsen, Allan K.; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Neutrophils are known to be able to synchronize their production of superoxide. We show that glycolysis is also synchronized in human neutrophils being in suspension and suggest that oscillations in glycolysis are driving the pulsatile production of superoxide. The synchronising agent remains so...

  12. Synchronisation of glycolytic oscillations in a suspension of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Poulsen, Allan K.; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Neutrophils are known to be able to synchronize their production of superoxide. We show that glycolysis is also synchronized in human neutrophils being in suspension and suggest that oscillations in glycolysis are driving the pulsatile production of superoxide. The synchronising agent remains so...

  13. Ascorbate recycling in human neutrophils: Induction by bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaohui; Russo, Thomas A.; Kwon, Oran; Chanock, Stephen; Rumsey, Steven C.; Levine, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) recycling occurs when extracellular ascorbate is oxidized, transported as dehydroascorbic acid, and reduced intracellularly to ascorbate. We investigated microorganism induction of ascorbate recycling in human neutrophils and in microorganisms themselves. Ascorbate recycling was determined by measuring intracellular ascorbate accumulation. Ascorbate recycling in neutrophils was induced by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, and the fungal pathogen C...

  14. GPR55 regulates cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated responses in human neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nariman A B Balenga; Maria Waldhoer; Elma Aflaki; Julia Kargl; Wolfgang Platzer; Ralf Schr(o)der; Stefanie Bl(a)ttermann; Evi Kostenis; Andrew J Brown; Akos Heinemann

    2011-01-01

    The directional migration of neutrophils towards inflammatory mediators,such as chemokines and cannabinoids,occurs via the activation of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) and is a highly organized process.A crucial role for controlling neutrophil migration has been ascribed to the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R),but additional modulatory sites distinct from CB2R have recently been suggested to impact CB2R-mediated effector functions in neutrophils.Here,we provide evidence that the recently de-orphanized 7TM/GPCR GPR55potently modulates CB2R-mediated responses.We show that GPR55 is expressed in human blood neutrophils and its activation augments the migratory response towards the CB2R agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG),while inhibiting neutrophil degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.Using HEK293 and HL60 cell lines,along with primary neutrophils,we show that GPR55 and CB2R interfere with each other's signaling pathways at the level of small GTPases,such as Rac2 and Cdc42.This ultimately leads to cellular polarization and efficient migration as well as abrogation of degranulation and ROS formation in neutrophils.Therefore,GPR55 limits the tissueinjuring inflammatory responses mediated by CB2R,while it synergizes with CB2R in recruiting neutrophils to sites of inflammation.

  15. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  16. NSP4, an elastase-related protease in human neutrophils with arginine specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Natascha C.; Schilling, Oliver; Kittel, Heike; Back, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Jenne, Dieter E.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) in cytoplasmic granules of neutrophils are regarded as important antimicrobial defense weapons after engulfment and exposure of pathogens to the content of primary granules. Despite intensive studies on neutrophils during the last three decades, only three active serine proteases, neutrophil elastase (NE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3) have been identified in these short-lived cells. Here, we report on the identification of a fourth serine protease (NSP4) with 39% identity to NE and PR3, but arginine specificity, yet sharing features like propeptide processing by dipeptidyl peptidase I, storage, and release as an active enzyme with the three active proteases. We established monoclonal antibodies against NSP4, excluded cross-reactivity to human granzymes, NE, CG, PR3, and azurocidin, and screened for NSP4 protein expression in various human tissues and blood leukocyte populations. Only granulocyte precursors and neutrophil populations from peripheral blood were positive. The content of NSP4 in neutrophil lysates, however, was about 20-fold lower compared with CG. Upon neutrophil activation, NSP4 was released into the supernatant. Profiling its specificity with peptide libraries from Escherichia coli revealed a preference for arginine in P1; it cleaved Tyr-Arg-Phe-Arg-AMC and Ala-Pro-Nva-thiobenzyl esters. NSP4 was inhibited by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1–antitrypsin), C1 inhibitor, and most efficiently by antithrombin-heparin, but not by elafin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, α1–antichymotrypsin, and monocyte-neutrophil elastase inhibitor. Functional specialization and preferred natural substrates of NSP4 remain to be determined to understand the biological interplay of all four NSPs during neutrophil responses. PMID:22474388

  17. Structural divergence of GPI-80 in activated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Takeda, Yuji; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2007-07-27

    GPI-80 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is mainly expressed in human neutrophils. Previous studies using 3H9, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against GPI-80, suggested that GPI-80 regulates leukocyte adherence and migration through Mac-1. GPI-80, which is anchored at the plasma membrane in resting neutrophils, moves into the pseudopodia and is released from activated human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil activation affects GPI-80 dynamics using a new anti-GPI-80 mAb, designated 4D4, which is directed against the form of GPI-80 found on resting human neutrophils. Similar to 3H9, 4D4 influences Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Treatment of purified GPI-80 with periodic acid and trypsin indicated that 3H9 and 4D4 recognize peptide and carbohydrate moieties, respectively. Stimulation with fMLP decreased the binding of 4D4 to GPI-80 on the neutrophil surface but increased the overall expression of GPI-80, as visualized by the 3H9 signal. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the 4D4 signal mainly on cell bodies and at a low level on pseudopodia during migration toward increasing concentrations of fMLP, whereas the 3H9 signal was observed in both areas. In addition, soluble GPI-80 released from activated neutrophils did not bind 4D4. These results suggest that there are two populations of GPI-80 that differ in the ability to bind 4D4. The 4D4-recognized form may regulate Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion, and may subsequently be converted to a 4D4-unrecognized form during neutrophil activation.

  18. Tumor Associated Neutrophils in Human Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Internet site(s) Penn Medicine News Site: ▪ http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2016/07/eruslanov/ Technologies or techniques Nothing to...determine whether the tumor microenvironment stimu- lates trafficking of neutrophils, resting PBNs were assayed for tran- swell migration in the presence of...Ray, Neutrophilic inflammatory response and oxidative stress in premenopausal women chronically exposed to indoor air pollution from biomass burning

  19. Absolute counting of neutrophils in whole blood using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunck, Marion E G; Andersen, Stacey B; Timmins, Nicholas E; Osborne, Geoffrey W; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-12-01

    Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) is used clinically to monitor physiological dysfunctions such as myelosuppression or infection. In the research laboratory, ANC is a valuable measure to monitor the evolution of a wide range of disease states in disease models. Flow cytometry (FCM) is a fast, widely used approach to confidently identify thousands of cells within minutes. FCM can be optimised for absolute counting using spiked-in beads or by measuring the sample volume analysed. Here we combine the 1A8 antibody, specific for the mouse granulocyte protein Ly6G, with flow cytometric counting in straightforward FCM assays for mouse ANC, easily implementable in the research laboratory. Volumetric and Trucount™ bead assays were optimized for mouse neutrophils, and ANC values obtained with these protocols were compared to ANC measured by a dual-platform assay using the Orphee Mythic 18 veterinary haematology analyser. The single platform assays were more precise with decreased intra-assay variability compared with ANC obtained using the dual protocol. Defining ANC based on Ly6G expression produces a 15% higher estimate than the dual protocol. Allowing for this difference in ANC definition, the flow cytometry counting assays using Ly6G can be used reliably in the research laboratory to quantify mouse ANC from a small volume of blood. We demonstrate the utility of the volumetric protocol in a time-course study of chemotherapy induced neutropenia using four drug regimens.

  20. Age associated variations in human neutrophil and sperm functioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaveri Purandhar; Sriram Seshadri

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the functional and biochemical variations in sperm and the neutrophil with the progression of age. Methods: Ninety healthy male subjects were selected in the age group 26-40 for the collection of semen and blood samples were collected. Basic semen analysis, hematogram, differential count serum analysis, seminal plasma and serum biochemistry was performed. Mitochondrial isolation from sperm and neutrophil was done to ascertain mitochondrial markers. Results: Our data shows a significant age-dependent reduction in the levels of mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) in sperm and the neutrophil. The functional attributes of sperm and neutrophil did not show any specific trend.Conclusion:The decreasing trend of the mitochondrial antioxidants enzymes in the sperm and the neutrophil is an indicative of the reduction in the functioning of sperm and the neutrophil. The antioxidants enzymes of sperm and neutrophil shows similar declining trend with the progression of age suggesting its possible role as a prognostic marker for age related deformities and even in male fertility.

  1. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-03-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface.

  2. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed...... with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address...... issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules...

  3. [Purification and antimicrobial activity of human neutrophil defensins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, X; Wang, A

    1991-11-01

    Neutrophils are one of the weapons of host defenses against microbial infection. Their ability to kill the invading microorganisms depends on two principle mechanisms. One depends on production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by stimulated neutrophils, and the other depends on the delivery of antimicrobial contents of the neutrophils' cytoplasmic granules, oxygen-independent. The defensins have the highest concentration in the neutrophils, and the broadest antimicrobial spectrum, being capable of killing gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, fungi and some envelope viruses. We purified human defensins from the neutrophils' granules by gel permeation chromatography and SDS-preparative acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of human defensins is between 3,000-4,000 daltons. After testing, C. neoformans was susceptible to these defensins. Under condition of 37 degrees C, pH 7.4 and low ionic strength, antifungal activity by human defensins was related to its concentration and incubating time. All of these illustrate that nonoxidative killing mechanism of neutrophils, especially the function of defensins is very important in host defenses.

  4. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  5. Isolation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their use in the study of neutrophil transmigration under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D

    2012-08-08

    Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell. They form an essential part of the innate immune system. During acute inflammation, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of injury. Recruitment of neutrophils to an injury site is a stepwise process that includes first, dilation of blood vessels to increase blood flow; second, microvascular structural changes and escape of plasma proteins from the bloodstream; third, rolling, adhesion and transmigration of the neutrophil across the endothelium; and fourth accumulation of neutrophils at the site of injury. A wide array of in vivo and in vitro methods has evolved to enable the study of these processes. This method focuses on neutrophil transmigration across human endothelial cells. One popular method for examining the molecular processes involved in neutrophil transmigration utilizes human neutrophils interacting with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Neutrophil isolation has been described visually elsewhere; thus this article will show the method for isolation of HUVEC. Once isolated and grown to confluence, endothelial cells are activated resulting in the upregulation of adhesion and activation molecules. For example, activation of endothelial cells with cytokines like TNF-α results in increased E-selectin and IL-8 expression. E-selectin mediates capture and rolling of neutrophils and IL-8 mediates activation and firm adhesion of neutrophils. After adhesion neutrophils transmigrate. Transmigration can occur paracellularly (through endothelial cell junctions) or transcellularly (through the endothelial cell itself). In most cases, these interactions occur under flow conditions found in the vasculature. The parallel plate flow chamber is a widely used system that mimics the hydrodynamic shear stresses found in vivo and enables the study of neutrophil recruitment under flow condition in vitro. Several companies produce parallel plate flow chambers and

  6. IL-17 attenuates the anti-apoptotic effects of GM-CSF in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stéphane; Saffar, Arash Shoja; Shan, Lianyu; Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in chronic inflammatory and degenerative disorders. IL-17 has been demonstrated to link activated T-lymphocyte with the recruitment of neutrophils at sites of inflammation, however whether IL-17 can mediate neutrophil survival and subsequently affect inflammatory responses has not fully been elucidated. In our study, we demonstrate that human peripheral blood and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils express mRNA and cell surface IL-17A receptor. IL-17A does not affect the rate of spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, however significantly decreased granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated survival by antagonizing the signal transduction pathways of p38, Erk1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B. These events were associated with reduced myeloid cell lymphoma-1 (Mcl-1) protein levels, increased translocation and aggregation of Bax to mitochondria, decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential and in an increase in caspase-3/7 activity. These events were independent of increased Fas or soluble Fas ligand expression levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-17 may regulate neutrophil homeostasis and favor the resolution of inflamed tissues by attenuating the delay in neutrophil apoptosis induced by inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Chemotactic Activity on Human Neutrophils to Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate chemotactic activity o neutrophil to S. mutans. Chemotaxis assay was performed in blind well chambers. Materials and Methods: Hanks balanced salt solution (HBSS containing 106 S. mutans,  108 S. mutans, 10-8 M fMLP, or HBSS alone were placed in the lower wells of the chamber and covered with polycorbonate membrane filter. Neutrophils suspension (2x105 cells was then placed in the upper compartment. After incubation for 60 mins at 37ºC in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO2, the filters were removed and stained with Giemsa. Result: ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences among groups (p<0.05, indicating that S. mutans induced neutrophils chemotaxis. The number of neutrophils migration in response to 108 S. mutans and 106 S. mutans were signifiantly greater compared to fMLP (p<0.05. Conclusion: S. mutans may activate human neutrophils, resulting in the chemotaxis of the neutrophils.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.99

  8. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-10-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species.

  9. Human neutrophils dump Candida glabrata after intracellular killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Dietrich, Stefanie; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    Interaction between fungal pathogens and human phagocytes can lead to remarkably variable outcomes, ranging from intracellular killing to prolonged survival and replication of the pathogen in the host cell. Using live cell imaging we observed primary human neutrophils that release phagocytosed Candida glabrata yeast cells after intracellular killing. This process, for which we propose the name "dumping", adds a new outcome to phagocyte-fungus interaction which may be of potential immunological importance as it allows professional antigen presenting cells to take up and process neutrophil-inactivated pathogens that in their viable state are able to evade intracellular degradation in these cells.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  11. Human neutrophils produce extracellular traps against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Susana P; Cano, Luz E; López, Juan A; Hernandez, Orville; González, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Neutrophils play an important role as effector cells and contribute to the resistance of the host against microbial pathogens. Neutrophils are able to produce extracellular traps (NETs) in response to medically important fungi, including Aspergillus spp., Candida albicans and Cryptococcus gattii. However, NET production in response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has yet to be studied. We have demonstrated that human neutrophils produce NETs against both conidia and yeasts of P. brasiliensis. Although the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) did not alter NET production against conidia, it partially suppressed NET formation against P. brasiliensis yeasts. Cytochalasin D or IFN-γ did not affect the production of NETs against the fungus. Additionally, a mutant strain of P. brasiliensis with reduced expression of an alternative oxidase induced significantly higher levels of NETs in comparison with the WT strain. Finally, c.f.u. quantification of P. brasiliensis showed no significant differences when neutrophils were treated with DPI, DNase I or cytochalasin D as compared with untreated cells. These data establish that NET formation by human neutrophils appears to be either dependent or independent of reactive oxygen species production, correlating with the fungal morphotype used for stimulation. However, this mechanism was ineffective in killing the fungus.

  12. Influence of neopterin on generation of reactive species by myeloperoxidase in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumovitch, Julia A; Fuchs, Dietmar; Semenkova, Galina N; Cherenkevich, Sergei N

    2004-04-07

    Increased neopterin concentrations in human serum indicate activation of cell-mediated immune response. Earlier we have shown that neopterin enhanced generation of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide in human peripheral blood neutrophils by NADPH-independent pathways. To further investigate a participation of neopterin in reactive species production by neutrophils, we studied its influence on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. MPO was isolated from human peripheral blood neutrophils from healthy donors. Generation of reactive species by MPO/H(2)O(2) in Earl's solution (pH=7.2) at 37 degrees C was investigated by monitoring of chemiluminescence using luminol as light emitter. In the MPO/H(2)O(2) system, neopterin increased singlet oxygen in a concentration-dependent manner, but it decreased formation of other oxidizing species. Comparing several oxygen scavengers, formation of reactive species was totally blocked by sodium azide (NaN(3)), both in the presence and in the absence of neopterin. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and d-mannitol insignificantly decreased chemiluminescence of this reaction, but diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) strongly inhibited it. We conclude that the effects of neopterin on neutrophils' MPO are directed to increase singlet oxygen and to decrease other reactive species via inhibition of MPO and/or scavenging of reactive species.

  13. [Effects of periodontitis and opsonized zymosan on chemiluminescence of blood neutrophils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekonis, Gediminas; Ivanauskiene, Egle

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to explore oxidative function of parodontitis patient's blood neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan by method of luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. The leukocytes for this study were obtained from peripheral venous blood of 16 parodontitis patients and 10 healthy subjects. The luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of stimulated neutrophils of parodontitis patients did not differ (p > 0.05) from control subjects (66,849 +/- 6372 cpm and 61,243 +/- 5240 cpm, respectively). Lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of stimulated neutrophils of parodontitis patients was increased (p parodontitis patients was significantly higher (p parodontitis patients possibly can affect parodontal health.

  14. Leukotriene B4 production by blood neutrophils in allergic rhinitis--effects of cetirizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheria-Sammari, S; Aloui, R; Gormand, F; Chabannes, B; Gallet, H; Grosclaude, M; Melac, M; Rihoux, J P; Perrin-Fayolle, M; Lagarde, M

    1995-08-01

    Mucosal inflammatory processes in late phase of allergic diseases involve cytokine production, cell adhesion molecule overexpression and release of inflammatory mediators with chemotactic activity, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We had previously observed increased production of LTB4 by neutrophils in patients with allergic rhinitis and discussed the role of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) priming. Some antihistaminic compounds were shown to diminish the production of leukotrienes by neutrophils. In a first step, we evaluated in ex vivo and in vitro studies, the effects of cetirizine on LTB4 production by blood neutrophils from allergic and healthy subjects. In a second step, we studied the in vitro effect of cetirizine on LTB4 production by neutrophils from healthy subjects during GM-CSF priming of these cells. Neutrophils from both populations were purified from venous blood and LTB4 production was measured using high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) method. In ex vivo studies, cetirizine treatment induced a decreased LTB4 production by neutrophils in allergic rhinitis. This effect of decreased LTB4 production was reproduced in vitro with 10(-8)-10(-6)M cetirizine. Nevertheless, this anti-H1 compound had no effect on neutrophil priming with GM-CSF. As LTB4 is an important chemotactic factor, Cetirizine could act on inflammatory cell recruitment by inhibiting LTB4 production by neutrophils.

  15. Entamoeba histolytica induces human neutrophils to form NETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Juarez, J; Campos-Esparza, Mr; Pacheco-Yepez, J; López-Blanco, J A; Adabache-Ortíz, A; Silva-Briano, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica invades the intestine and other organs during the pathogenesis of amoebiasis. In the early stages, the host organism responds with an inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of neutrophils. It has been reported that these immune cells, activated by E. histolytica, exert a protective role by releasing proteolytic enzymes and generating reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and antimicrobial peptides. It is now known that neutrophils also produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are able to damage and kill pathogens. Studies have shown that intracellular protozoan pathogens, including Toxoplasma gondi, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania spp, induce neutrophils to release NETs and are damaged by them. However, the action of this mechanism has not been explored in relation to E. histolytica trophozoites. Through scanning electron, epifluorescence microscopy and viability assays, we show for first time that during in vitro interaction with E. histolytica trophozoites, human neutrophils released NETs that covered amoebas and reduced amoebic viability. These NETs presented histones, myeloperoxidase and decondensed chromatin. The results suggest that NETs participate in the elimination of the parasite.

  16. Hypoxia Selectively Inhibits Respiratory Burst Activity and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus in Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern, Naomi N.; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Porter, Linsey; Walmsley, Sarah R.; Summers, Charlotte; Thompson, Alfred A. R.; Anwar, Sadia; Willcocks, Lisa C.; Moira K B Whyte; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play a central role in the innate immune response and a critical role in bacterial killing. Most studies of neutrophil function have been conducted under conditions of ambient oxygen, but inflamed sites where neutrophils operate may be extremely hypoxic. Previous studies indicate that neutrophils sense and respond to hypoxia via the ubiquitous prolyl hydroxylase/hypoxia-inducible factor pathway and that this can signal for enhanced survival. In the current study, human neutrophils...

  17. Local Rheology of Human Neutrophils Investigated Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong J. Lee, Dipika Patel, Soyeun Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM - based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa, while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz, the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the

  18. Characterization of neutrophil subsets in healthy human pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Ssemaganda

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that in successful pregnancies increased arginase activity is a mechanism that contributes to the suppression of the maternal immune system. We identified the main type of arginase-expressing cells as a population of activated low-density granulocytes (LDGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in term placentae. In the present study, we analyzed the phenotype of LDGs and compared it to the phenotype of normal density granulocytes (NDGs in maternal peripheral blood, placental biopsies and cord blood. Our data reveal that only LDGs but no NDGs could be detected in placental biopsies. Phenotypically, NDGs and LDGs from both maternal and cord blood expressed different levels of maturation, activation and degranulation markers. NDGs from the maternal and cord blood were phenotypically similar, while maternal, cord and placental LDGs showed different expression levels of CD66b. LDGs present in cord blood expressed higher levels of arginase compared to maternal and placental LDGs. In summary, our results show that in maternal and cord blood, two phenotypically different populations of neutrophils can be identified, whereas in term placentae, only activated neutrophils are present.

  19. Technical advance: immunophenotypical characterization of human neutrophil differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, Helena Isabel; Jendholm, Johan; Fossum, Anna;

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports a flow cytometry-based protocol for the prospective purification of human BM populations representing six successive stages of terminal neutrophil differentiation, including early promyelocytes and late promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band cells, and PMN...... differentiation in vivo in the human setting and constitutes an important alternative to models that are based on in vitro differentiation of myeloid cell lines and HPCs....

  20. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  1. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Peripheral Blood Neutrophils of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Guoda Pilkauskaite; Skaidrius Miliauskas; Raimundas Sakalauskas

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as obesity is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neutrophils produce great amounts of ROS. The aim was to evaluate peripheral blood neutrophils ROS production in men with OSA and to establish relations with disease severity and obesity. Methods. Forty-six men with OSA and 10 controls were investigated. OSA was confirmed by polysomnography (PSG), when apnea/hypopnea index was >5/h. Body mass index (BMI) was evaluated. Ne...

  3. A Comparison of Human Neutrophils Acquired from Four Experimental Models of Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Madhur P.; Day, Richard M.; Gilroy, Derek W.; O’Brien, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in neutrophil function have been implicated in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. Several models are employed to study activated human neutrophils akin to those found at a site of inflammation. These include whole blood (WB) ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo techniques: cantharidin blister, skin windows and intra-dermal injection of UV-killed E.coli (UVKEc). Neutrophils obtained from these have never been compared. We compared the activation status of neutrophils from each technique in order to inform the optimal model for use in human studies. Healthy male volunteers were randomised to undergo one of the four techniques (n = 5/group). LPS: WB stimulated with 1ng/ml of LPS for 4 hours. Cantharidin: 12.5μl of 0.1% cantharidin elicited a single blister, aspirated at 24 hours. Skin windows: four 6mm mechanical-suction blisters created, de-roofed and an exudate-collection chamber placed over the windows for 4 hours before aspiration. UVKEc: 1.5 x 107 UVKEc injected intra-dermally. A single 10mm mechanical-suction blister formed and aspirated at 4 hours. Unstimulated WB used as the control. Flow cytometry was used to determine activation status using CD16, CD11b, CD54, CD62L and CD88. Functional status was assessed with a phagocytosis assay. The pattern of neutrophil activation was similar in all models. Neutrophil CD11b was elevated in all models, most markedly in UVKEc (p<0.0001), and CD54 was also elevated but only significant in the LPS model (p = 0.001). CD62L was significantly reduced in all 4 models (p<0.0001) and CD88 was also suppressed in all. There were no changes in CD16 in any model, neither was there any significant difference in the phagocytic capacity of the neutrophils. In summary, there are no significant differences in activation marker expression or phagocytic capacity in the neutrophils obtained from each technique. Therefore we believe whole blood stimulation is the best model in experimentally challenging

  4. Subcellular Fractionation of Human Neutrophils and Analysis of Subcellular Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine Novrup; Udby, Lene; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    passage from blood to tissues. Nitrogen cavitation was developed as a method for disruption of cells on the assumption that sudden reduction of the partial pressure of nitrogen would lead to aeration of nitrogen dissolved in the lipid bilayer of plasma membranes. We find that cells are broken by the shear......The neutrophil has long been recognized for its impressive number of cytoplasmic granules that harbor proteins indispensable for innate immunity. Analysis of isolated granules has provided important information on how the neutrophil grades its response to match the challenges it meets on its...... for creation of continuous density gradients with shoulders in the density profile created to optimize the physical separation of granule subsets and light membranes. Immunological methods (sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) are used for quantitation of proteins that are characteristic constituents...

  5. Flow Cytometric Evaluation of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis During Nitric Oxide Generation In Vitro: The Role of Exogenous Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Sulowska

    2005-01-01

    in vitro. The effect of exogenous supply of NO donors such as SNP, SIN-1, and GEA-3162 on the course of human neutrophil apoptosis and the role of extracellular antioxidants in this process was investigated. Isolated from peripheral blood, neutrophils were cultured in the presence or absence of NO donor compounds and antioxidants for 8, 12, and 20 hours. Apoptosis of neutrophils was determined in vitro by flow cytometric analysis of cellular DNA content and Annexin V protein binding to the cell surface. Exposure of human neutrophils to GEA-3162 and SIN-1 significantly accelerates and enhances their apoptosis in vitro in a time-dependent fashion. In the presence of SNP, intensification of apoptosis has not been revealed until 12 hours after the culture. The inhibition of GEA-3162- and SIN-1-mediated neutrophil apoptosis by superoxide dismutase (SOD but not by catalase (CAT was observed. Our results show that SOD and CAT can protect neutrophils against NO-donors-induced apoptosis and suggest that the interaction of NO and oxygen metabolites signals may determine the destructive or protective role of NO donor compounds during apoptotic neutrophil death.

  6. Interleukin-15 increases Paracoccidioides brasiliensis killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, Elisandra Garcia; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão; Acorci, Michele Janegitz; Graciani, Ana Paula Bordon; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Soares, Angela Maria Victoriano de Campos

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 is a cytokine produced by a wide range of different cell types, including macrophages, in response to lipopolysaccharide or microbial infection. This cytokine may play a crucial role in the activation of phagocytic cells against pathogens, especially during innate immune response. The effects of IL-15 on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte fungicidal activity against a highly virulent Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain were investigated. Pretreatment of human neutrophils from healthy individuals with IL-15 for 18 hours increased cell fungicidal activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the exposure to IL-15 induced an increase in neutrophil oxidative burst as evaluated by superoxide anion and H(2)O(2) release. Catalase inhibited fungicidal activity supporting a role for H(2)O(2) in fungus killing. In contrast, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were not affected by IL-15 suggesting that its effects were not mediated by these cytokines. Together, these results show that IL-15 is a potent stimulant of antifungal activities in human neutrophils, at least in part by a mechanism dependent on oxidative metabolism.

  7. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, R.P.; Hamme, J.L. van; Tool, A.T.; Houdt, M. van; Verkuijlen, P.J.; Herbst, M.; Liese, J.G.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Roos, D.; Berg, T.K. van den; Kuijpers, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils

  8. Staphylococcus aureus SaeR/S-regulated factors reduce human neutrophil reactive oxygen species production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Addison, Conrad B.; de Jong, Nienke W M; Azzolino, Joseph; Pallister, Kyler B.; van Strijp, Jos A G; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense after a pathogen has breached the epithelial barriers, and unimpaired neutrophil functions are essential to clear infections. Staphylococcus aureus is a prevalent human pathogen that is able to withstand neutrophil killing, yet the mechanisms used by S. aure

  9. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-07-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity.

  10. Homocysteine enhances superoxide anion release and NADPH oxidase assembly by human neutrophils. Effects on MAPK activation and neutrophil migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Maqueda, Moisés; El Bekay, Rajaa; Monteseirín, Javier; Alba, Gonzalo; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Santa María, Consuelo; Tejedo, Juan R; Martín-Nieto, José; Bedoya, Francisco J; Pintado, Elisabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2004-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia has recently been recognized as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, the action mechanisms of homocysteine (Hcy) are not well understood. Given that Hcy may be involved in the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils to the vascular wall, we have investigated the role of Hcy in essential functions of human neutrophils. We show that Hcy increased superoxide anion (O2*-) release by neutrophils to the extracellular medium, and that this effect was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity. The enzyme from rat peritoneal macrophages displayed a similar response. These effects were accompanied by a time-dependent increased translocation of p47phox and p67phox subunits of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane. We also show that Hcy increased intracellular H2O2 production by neutrophils, that Hcy enhanced the activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), specifically p38-MAPK and ERK1/2, and that the migration of neutrophils was increased by Hcy. Present results are the first evidence that Hcy enhances the oxidative stress of neutrophils, and underscore the potential role of phagocytic cells in vascular wall injury through O2*- release in hyperhomocysteinaemia conditions.

  11. Evaluation of endotoxin (LPS) activity in bovine blood using neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a neutrophil chemiluminescence-based assay for the measurement of LPS stimulatory activity in bovine whole blood. The assay is based on the capacity for LPS to trigger the respiratory oxidative burst activity (RBA) of autologous neutroph...

  12. Staphylococcus epidermidis strategies to avoid killing by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Y C Cheung

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading nosocomial pathogen. In contrast to its more aggressive relative S. aureus, it causes chronic rather than acute infections. In highly virulent S. aureus, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs contribute significantly to immune evasion and aggressive virulence by their strong ability to lyse human neutrophils. Members of the PSM family are also produced by S. epidermidis, but their role in immune evasion is not known. Notably, strong cytolytic capacity of S. epidermidis PSMs would be at odds with the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus, prompting us to examine the biological activities of S. epidermidis PSMs. Surprisingly, we found that S. epidermidis has the capacity to produce PSMδ, a potent leukocyte toxin, representing the first potent cytolysin to be identified in that pathogen. However, production of strongly cytolytic PSMs was low in S. epidermidis, explaining its low cytolytic potency. Interestingly, the different approaches of S. epidermidis and S. aureus to causing human disease are thus reflected by the adaptation of biological activities within one family of virulence determinants, the PSMs. Nevertheless, S. epidermidis has the capacity to evade neutrophil killing, a phenomenon we found is partly mediated by resistance mechanisms to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including the protease SepA, which degrades AMPs, and the AMP sensor/resistance regulator, Aps (GraRS. These findings establish a significant function of SepA and Aps in S. epidermidis immune evasion and explain in part why S. epidermidis may evade elimination by innate host defense despite the lack of cytolytic toxin expression. Our study shows that the strategy of S. epidermidis to evade elimination by human neutrophils is characterized by a passive defense approach and provides molecular evidence to support the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus.

  13. Staphylococcus epidermidis strategies to avoid killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Rigby, Kevin; Wang, Rong; Queck, Shu Y; Braughton, Kevin R; Whitney, Adeline R; Teintze, Martin; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael

    2010-10-07

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading nosocomial pathogen. In contrast to its more aggressive relative S. aureus, it causes chronic rather than acute infections. In highly virulent S. aureus, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) contribute significantly to immune evasion and aggressive virulence by their strong ability to lyse human neutrophils. Members of the PSM family are also produced by S. epidermidis, but their role in immune evasion is not known. Notably, strong cytolytic capacity of S. epidermidis PSMs would be at odds with the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus, prompting us to examine the biological activities of S. epidermidis PSMs. Surprisingly, we found that S. epidermidis has the capacity to produce PSMδ, a potent leukocyte toxin, representing the first potent cytolysin to be identified in that pathogen. However, production of strongly cytolytic PSMs was low in S. epidermidis, explaining its low cytolytic potency. Interestingly, the different approaches of S. epidermidis and S. aureus to causing human disease are thus reflected by the adaptation of biological activities within one family of virulence determinants, the PSMs. Nevertheless, S. epidermidis has the capacity to evade neutrophil killing, a phenomenon we found is partly mediated by resistance mechanisms to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including the protease SepA, which degrades AMPs, and the AMP sensor/resistance regulator, Aps (GraRS). These findings establish a significant function of SepA and Aps in S. epidermidis immune evasion and explain in part why S. epidermidis may evade elimination by innate host defense despite the lack of cytolytic toxin expression. Our study shows that the strategy of S. epidermidis to evade elimination by human neutrophils is characterized by a passive defense approach and provides molecular evidence to support the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus.

  14. The lipooligosaccharide-modifying enzyme LptA enhances gonococcal defence against human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Jonathan W; Criss, Alison K

    2015-06-01

    Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) is marked by an influx of neutrophils to the site of infection. Despite a robust immune response, viable Gc can be recovered from neutrophil-rich gonorrhoeal secretions. Gc enzymatically modifies the lipid A portion of lipooligosaccharide by the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the phosphate group at the 4' position. Loss of lipooligosaccharide phosphoethanolamine transferase A (LptA), the enzyme catalysing this reaction, increases bacterial sensitivity to killing by human complement and cationic antimicrobial peptides. Here, we investigated the importance of LptA for interactions between Gc and human neutrophils. We found that lptA mutant Gc was significantly more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils. Three mechanisms underlie the increased sensitivity of lptA mutant Gc to neutrophils. (i) lptA mutant Gc is more likely to reside in mature phagolysosomes than LptA-expressing bacteria. (ii) lptA mutant Gc is more sensitive to killing by components found in neutrophil granules, including CAP37/azurocidin, human neutrophil peptide 1 and the serine protease cathepsin G. (iii) lptA mutant Gc is more susceptible to killing by antimicrobial components that are exocytosed from neutrophils, including those decorating neutrophil extracellular traps. By increasing the resistance of Gc to the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, LptA-catalysed modification of lipooligosaccharide enhances survival of Gc from the human inflammatory response during acute gonorrhoea.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus SaeR/S-regulated factors reduce human neutrophil reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E; Addison, Conrad B; de Jong, Nienke W M; Azzolino, Joseph; Pallister, Kyler B; van Strijp, Jos A G; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2016-11-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense after a pathogen has breached the epithelial barriers, and unimpaired neutrophil functions are essential to clear infections. Staphylococcus aureus is a prevalent human pathogen that is able to withstand neutrophil killing, yet the mechanisms used by S. aureus to inhibit neutrophil clearance remain incompletely defined. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a vital neutrophil antimicrobial mechanism. Herein, we test the hypothesis that S. aureus uses the SaeR/S two-component gene regulatory system to produce virulence factors that reduce neutrophil ROS production. With the use of ROS probes, the temporal and overall production of neutrophil ROS was assessed during exposure to the clinically relevant S. aureus USA300 (strain LAC) and its isogenic mutant LACΔsaeR/S Our results demonstrated that SaeR/S-regulated factors do not inhibit neutrophil superoxide (O2(-)) production. However, subsequent neutrophil ROS production was significantly reduced during exposure to LAC compared with LACΔsaeR/S In addition, neutrophil H2O2 production was reduced significantly by SaeR/S-regulated factors by a mechanism independent of catalase. Consequently, the reduction in neutrophil H2O2 resulted in decreased production of the highly antimicrobial agent hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite anion (HOCl/(-)OCl). These findings suggest a new evasion strategy used by S. aureus to diminish a vital neutrophil antimicrobial mechanism. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Heterogeneity of the Mac-1 expression on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with different types of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Szyłło, Krzysztof; Malinowski, Andrzej; Sułowska, Zofia; Nowak, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The expression level of Mac-1 on the surface of neutrophils is an important indicator of neutrophil activation. Under pathological conditions, Mac-1 is believed a key adhesion molecule that facilitates cancer progression and mediates the adhesion of tumour cells to the endothelium of blood vessels. Our previous findings indicated that circulating peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) expressed enhanced levels of Mac-1, which was functionally associated with an increased adhesive function of neutrophils. The objective of the current study was to analyse whether the value of individual components of the differential white cell count, including the neutrophil and lymphocyte ratios, which are markers of blood neutrophil activation, might be associated with certain types of ovarian cancer. We showed the increase in Mac-1 expression along with a parallel decrease of L-selectin and PSGL-1 on peripheral blood neutrophils of patients with EOC of early and advanced FIGO stages, which indicates an activated state of neutrophils in comparison to neutrophils of individuals without cancer. Despite a significant difference between Mac-1 expression in patients with and without cancer, a dramatic increase in Mac-1 expression was observed in the blood of patients with undifferentiated carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. Moreover, the expression level of Mac-1 correlated with the number of neutrophils in patients with serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated EOC. The results of an ROC analysis demonstrated that the patients with the undifferentiated type of EOC form a distinct group with regard to Mac-1 expression on blood neutrophils. The results suggested a diverse biological cadre of immune cells in patients with undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC.

  17. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  18. Neutrophil recruitment to the brain in mouse and human ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-de-Puig, Isabel; Miró-Mur, Francesc; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Gelpi, Ellen; Pedragosa, Jordi; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils are rapidly recruited in response to local tissue infection or inflammation. Stroke triggers a strong inflammatory reaction but the relevance of neutrophils in the ischemic brain is not fully understood, particularly in the absence of reperfusion. We investigated brain neutrophil recruitment in two murine models of permanent ischemia induced by either cauterization of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery (c-MCAo) or intraluminal MCA occlusion (il-MCAo), and three fatal cases of human ischemic stroke. Flow cytometry analyses revealed progressive neutrophil recruitment after c-MCAo, lesser neutrophil recruitment following il-MCAo, and absence of neutrophils after sham operation. Confocal microscopy identified neutrophils in the leptomeninges from 6 h after the occlusion, in the cortical basal lamina and cortical Virchow-Robin spaces from 15 h, and also in the cortical brain parenchyma at 24 h. Neutrophils showed signs of activation including histone-3 citrullination, chromatin decondensation, and extracellular projection of DNA and histones suggestive of extracellular trap formation. Perivascular neutrophils were identified within the entire cortical infarction following c-MCAo. After il-MCAo, neutrophils prevailed in the margins but not the center of the cortical infarct, and were intraluminal and less abundant in the striatum. The lack of collaterals to the striatum and a collapsed pial anastomotic network due to brain edema in large hemispheric infarctions could impair neutrophil trafficking in this model. Neutrophil extravasation at the leptomeninges was also detected in the human tissue. We concluded that neutrophils extravasate from the leptomeningeal vessels and can eventually reach the brain in experimental animal models and humans with prolonged arterial occlusion.

  19. Modulation of Interleukin-15-induced Suppression of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis by TNFα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiuping; XIONG Changyun; LI Chunhong; YANG Deguang

    2007-01-01

    Human interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a proinflammatory cytokine to suppress neutrophil apoptosis, which is a potential therapeutic agent. The modulatory effect of TNFα was investigated in IL-15-induced suppression of human neutrophil apoptosis. TNFα was shown to reverse the ability of IL-15 to delay neutrophil apoptosis within certain time course. Moreover, this reverse effect by TNFα might be associated with a reduction of the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-Xl protein detected by Western blotting. It is concluded that TNFα can be used to modulate IL-15-induced suppression of neutrophil apoptosis within certain time course.

  20. White blood cells, neutrophils, and reactive oxygen metabolites among asymptomatic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Kotani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with health and the disease status. The objective of the present study was to investigate the association among white blood cell (WBC counts, neutrophil counts as a WBC subpopulation, and diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs levels in an asymptomatic population. Methods: The clinical data, including general cardiovascular risk variables and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, were collected from 100 female subjects (mean age, 62 years in outpatient clinics. The correlation of the d-ROMs with hs-CRP, WBC, and neutrophil counts was examined. Results: The mean/median levels were WBC counts 5.9 × 10 9 /L, neutrophil counts 3.6 × 10 9 /L, hs-CRP 0.06 mg/dL, and d-ROMs 359 CURR U. A simple correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation of the d-ROMs with the WBC counts, neutrophil counts, or hs-CRP levels. The correlation between d-ROMs and neutrophil counts (β = 0.22, P < 0.05, as well as that between d-ROMs and hs-CRP (β = 0.28, P < 0.01, remained significant and independent in a multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for other variables. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that WBC counts had only a positive correlation tendency to the d-ROMs. Conclusions: Neutrophils may be slightly but more involved in the oxidative stress status, as assessed by d-ROMs, in comparison to the overall WBC. Further studies are needed to clarify the biologic mechanism(s of the observed relationship.

  1. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P; Williams, Andrew R; Murungi, Linda M; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H; Douglas, Alexander D; Osier, Faith H; Fairhurst, Rick M; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J

    2015-09-16

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field.

  2. Severe exercise and exercise training exert opposite effects on human neutrophil apoptosis via altering the redox status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Da Syu

    Full Text Available Neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, a process crucial for immune regulation, is mainly controlled by alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondria integrity. Exercise has been proposed to be a physiological way to modulate immunity; while acute severe exercise (ASE usually impedes immunity, chronic moderate exercise (CME improves it. This study aimed to investigate whether and how ASE and CME oppositely regulate human neutrophil apoptosis. Thirteen sedentary young males underwent an initial ASE and were subsequently divided into exercise and control groups. The exercise group (n = 8 underwent 2 months of CME followed by 2 months of detraining. Additional ASE paradigms were performed at the end of each month. Neutrophils were isolated from blood specimens drawn at rest and immediately after each ASE for assaying neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis (annexin-V binding on the outer surface along with redox-related parameters and mitochondria-related parameters. Our results showed that i the initial ASE immediately increased the oxidative stress (cytosolic ROS and glutathione oxidation, and sequentially accelerated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, the surface binding of annexin-V, and the generation of mitochondrial ROS; ii CME upregulated glutathione level, retarded spontaneous apoptosis and delayed mitochondria deterioration; iii most effects of CME were unchanged after detraining; and iv CME blocked ASE effects and this capability remained intact even after detraining. Furthermore, the ASE effects on neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis were mimicked by adding exogenous H(2O(2, but not by suppressing mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, while ASE induced an oxidative state and resulted in acceleration of human neutrophil apoptosis, CME delayed neutrophil apoptosis by maintaining a reduced state for long periods of time even after detraining.

  3. Neutrophil-Mediated Delivery of Therapeutic Nanoparticles across Blood Vessel Barrier for Treatment of Inflammation and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dafeng; Gao, Jin; Wang, Zhenjia

    2015-12-22

    Endothelial cells form a monolayer in lumen of blood vessels presenting a great barrier for delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) into extravascular tissues where most diseases occur, such as inflammation disorders and infection. Here, we report a strategy for delivering therapeutic NPs across this blood vessel barrier by nanoparticle in situ hitchhiking activated neutrophils. Using intravital microscopy of TNF-α-induced inflammation of mouse cremaster venules and a mouse model of acute lung inflammation, we demonstrated that intravenously (iv) infused NPs made from denatured bovine serum albumin (BSA) were specifically internalized by activated neutrophils, and subsequently, the neutrophils containing NPs migrated across blood vessels into inflammatory tissues. When neutrophils were depleted using anti-Gr-1 in a mouse, the transport of albumin NPs across blood vessel walls was robustly abolished. Furthermore, it was found that albumin nanoparticle internalization did not affect neutrophil mobility and functions. Administration of drug-loaded albumin NPs markedly mitigated the lung inflammation induced by LPS (lipopolysaccharide) or infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These results demonstrate the use of an albumin nanoparticle platform for in situ targeting of activated neutrophils for delivery of therapeutics across the blood vessel barriers into diseased sites. This study demonstrates our ability to hijack neutrophils to deliver nanoparticles to targeted diseased sites.

  4. TLR4 ligation induces expression of APRIL molecule in human neutrophils — a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jabłońska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigate the consequences of TLR4 activation by LPS for the synthesis of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL by human neutrophils (PMNs, and the possible role of the ERK1/2 kinases signaling pathway. In order to make a comparison, the same examinations were carried out on autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. The levels of mRNA for APRIL and TLR4 were measured using the real-time PCR method. Western blot analysis was used to assay the expressions of APRIL and ERK1/2 in cell lysates. We discovered an increased expression of APRIL accompanying the increased expression of TLR4 in the LPS-stimulated PMNs and PBMCs. Furthermore, stimulation with LPS triggered similar changes in phospho-ERK1/2 proteins expression in those cells. The present study suggests that LPS plays a role in TLR4-ligation in APRIL induction through ERK1/2 pathway activation in human neutrophils and mononuclear cells of peripheral blood. The association between TLR4 activation and APRIL expression in examined leukocytes might have important implications for the  mmune response of the host exposed to TLR4 ligands such as LPS.

  5. Synergistic bactericidal interaction of josamycin with human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, M T; el Benna, J

    1990-10-01

    Josamycin and erythromycin have been compared for their in-vitro interaction with bactericidal killing by human neutrophils. The mechanism of this interaction was studied in two ways. First, the target organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were incubated for 60 min with josamycin, erythromycin or control buffer prior to use in a human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) killing assay. Second the macrolides were added directly to acellular killing systems mimicking those acting inside the phagolysosome; oxygen-independent systems were obtained from a crude granule extract of PMN and oxygen-dependent systems consisted either of a mixture of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase or of a solution of H2O2. Whereas josamycin-pretreated P. aeruginosa were twice as sensitive to killing by PMN than were control cells, this was not the case for S. aureus. Both oxidant generating systems were more effective in destroying S. aureus in the presence of josamycin (3 and 30 mg/l). Erythromycin showed a similar synergy but only with the xanthine plus xanthine oxidase system. This synergy was observed with neither of the O2-independent systems for S. aureus, nor with any acellular system for P. aeruginosa. These data suggest that at least two kinds of mechanism may explain the bactericidal synergy observed between macrolides and PMN. The first (for macrolide-resistant species such as P. aeruginosa) could be due to alterations in the bacteria by the antibiotics, while the second (for macrolide-sensitive species such as S. aureus) could be based upon an as yet unexplained transformation of the molecules by reactive oxygen species into more "toxic" forms. These differences between josamycin and erythromycin could arise from differences in their chemical structure.

  6. Honokiol suppresses formyl peptide-induced human neutrophil activation by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Syu, Yu-Ting; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Tung; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2017-07-27

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) mediates bacterial and mitochondrial N-formyl peptides-induced neutrophil activation. Therefore, FPR1 is an important therapeutic target for drugs to treat septic or sterile inflammatory diseases. Honokiol, a major bioactive compound of Magnoliaceae plants, possesses several anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we show that honokiol exhibits an inhibitory effect on FPR1 binding in human neutrophils. Honokiol inhibited superoxide anion generation, reactive oxygen species formation, and elastase release in bacterial or mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (FPR1 agonists)-activated human neutrophils. Adhesion of FPR1-induced human neutrophils to cerebral endothelial cells was also reduced by honokiol. The receptor-binding results revealed that honokiol repressed FPR1-specific ligand N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein binding to FPR1 in human neutrophils, neutrophil-like THP-1 cells, and hFPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. However, honokiol did not inhibit FPR2-specific ligand binding to FPR2 in human neutrophils. Furthermore, honokiol inhibited FPR1 agonist-induced calcium mobilization as well as phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK in human neutrophils. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that honokiol may have therapeutic potential for treating FPR1-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  7. Recruitment of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier: the role of posttraumatic hepatic ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani Mario

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the effects of total hepatic ischemia, and reperfusion on the accumulation of neutrophils in the brain of rats submitted to normovolemic conditions as well as to controlled hemorrhagic shock state. METHODS: Thirty two adult male Wistar rats, were divided into four groups: the Control group, was submitted to the standard procedures for a period of 60 min of observation; Shock group, was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial blood pressure=40mmHg, 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1 and reperfusion for 60min; Pringle group, was submitted to total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. The total group was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock for 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1, total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. Measurements of serum lactate and base excess were used to characterize the hemorrhagic shock state with low tissue perfusion. The counting of neutrophils on the brain was performed after the euthanasia of animals. RESULTS: The values for the counting of neutrophils on the brain indicate that did not occur difference among studied groups (p=0.196 (Control 0.12± 0.11, Shock 0.12± 0.13, Pringle 0.02± 0.04, Total 0.14± 0.16. CONCLUSION: Hemorrhagic shock associated to total hepatic ischemia for 15 minutes, followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion, did not causes significant neutrophils accumulation in the brain of rats.

  8. Cefodizime (HR 221) potentiation of human neutrophil oxygen-independent bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, M T; Amit, N; Babin-Chevaye, C; Hakim, J

    1987-03-01

    The enhanced bactericidal activity of human neutrophils induced by cefotaxime and cefodizime, two methoxy-imino-amino- 2-thiazolyl cephalosporins, is linked to the cell stimulation of oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent killing systems, respectively. Cefotaxime enhances both the killing and the oxidative response of neutrophils to opsonized particulate stimuli (bacteria for both activities and opsonized zymosan for the oxidative burst). These effects were not observed with non-opsonized particles (bacteria or zymosan) or soluble stimuli. On the contrary, cefodizime enhances killing of opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria by neutrophils regardless of treatment with phenylbutazone which blocks neutrophil oxidative metabolism. Cefodizime does not universally alter the oxidative burst induced by various stimuli, but has been shown to enhance the bactericidal activity of crude extracts of neutrophil granules. The data suggest that cefodizime and non O2-dependent killing systems of neutrophils cooperate in killing bacteria.

  9. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacilara Conceição

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS. Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects.

  10. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  11. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine W M Ong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB, are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8 secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease.

  12. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Mothes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment.

  13. The effect of manual acupuncture on blood neutrophil counts in moderate intensity exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciang, C. Y.; Simadibrata, C.; Tobing, A.; Srilestari, A.

    2017-08-01

    Exercise, even though it has a beneficial effect, can cause muscle damage and trigger inflammatory responses, as evidenced by increased neutrophils in the blood. Acupuncture is a therapeutic modality that is expected to reduce acute inflammatory responses due to exercise. Thirty untrained men were divided randomly into two groups. The manual acupuncture group (n = 15) received stimulation at acupoints ST36 and SP6 bilateral by needle insertion, while the placebo group (n = 15) received insertion of needles on plaster without penetrating the skin. Therapy was done once for 30 minutes immediately after the subjects completed the exercise. Blood neutrophil counts were assessed before exercise and one hour after exercise ended. The results show there is a statistically significant difference in the number of neutrophils before and after exercise between the manual acupuncture group and the placebo group (0.08±0.91 and 0.97±0.70 p = 0.006). Acupuncture therapy effectively mitigates the acute inflammatory response triggered by exercise.

  14. THE PHENOTYPE AND METABOLISM RELATIONSHIP OF BLOOD NEUTROPHILS IN PATIENTS WITH WIDESPREAD PURULENT PERITONITIS IN THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Savchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the relationship of the phenotype and metabolism of neutrophils in patients with widespread purulent peritonitis (WPP in the dynamics of the postoperative period. The study involved 27 patients with acute surgical diseases and injuries of abdominal organs complicated by WPP. Blood sampling was performed prior to surgery (pre-operative period and at 7, 14 and 24 day post-operative period. As controls 67 respect healthy people were examined. Research blood neutrophilic granulocytes phenotype was performed by f low cytometry using a direct immunof luorescence whole peripheral blood. The levels of surface receptor expression was assessed by the mean f luorescence intensity. The NADand NADP-dependent dehydrogenases activity in the blood neutrophils studied using bioluminescence method. It was found that in patients with WPP in the preoperative period in the peripheral blood increased content of CD62L+-, HLA-DR+and CD64+-neutrophils. High levels of CD62L+-cells stored within 24 postoperative days, whereas the amount of HLA-DR+and CD64+-neutrophils on 24 postoperative day is reduced to the level of controls. The dynamics of changes in the content of CD64+-cells in the peripheral blood of patients with WPP corresponds to the expression level of CD64-receptor on the membrane of neutrophilic granulocytes. The metabolism of blood neutrophils in patients with WPP in the preand postoperative period is characterized by high intensity of the substrate stream on the citric acid cycle, low activity of NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase and aerobic reaction of lactate dehydrogenase. In the preoperative period and within 14 days of the postoperative period in neutrophil granulocytes of the patients revealed high activity of anaerobic lactate dehydrogenase reaction characterized by increased activity of anaerobic glycolysis. In the late postoperative period the intensity of anaerobic energy in the neutrophils of patients with

  15. Fucoidan delays apoptosis and induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although some immune modulatory effects of fucoidan have been elucidated, the effects of fucoidan on the apoptosis and activation of human neutrophils have not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan purified from the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifilda delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils and induces their activation. Fucoidan treatment inhibited apoptotic nuclei changes and phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on neutrophils cultured in vitro for 24h. The delay in neutrophil apoptosis mediated by fucoidan was associated with increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and decreased levels of activated caspase-3. Screening of the signaling pathways by specific inhibitors indicated that fucoidan-induced delay in neutrophil apoptosis was dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, whereas MAPK signaling pathway was not critical. In addition, fucoidan enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from neutrophils in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fucoidan delays human neutrophil apoptosis and induces their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This knowledge could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases and neutropenia by controlling neutrophil homeostasis and function with fucoidan.

  16. Phagocytosis and Killing of Carbapenem-Resistant ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae by Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Porter, Adeline R; Dorward, David W; Brinkworth, Amanda J; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; DeLeo, Frank R

    2016-05-15

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains classified as multilocus sequence type 258 (ST258) are among the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens. Treatment of infections caused by these organisms is difficult, and mortality is high. The basis for the success of ST258, outside of antibiotic resistance, remains incompletely determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that ST258K. pneumoniae has enhanced capacity to circumvent killing by human neutrophils, the primary cellular defense against bacterial infections. There was limited binding and uptake of ST258 by human neutrophils, and correspondingly, there was limited killing of bacteria. On the other hand, transmission electron microscopy revealed that any ingested organisms were degraded readily within neutrophil phagosomes, thus indicating that survival in the neutrophil assays is due to limited phagocytosis, rather than to microbicide resistance after uptake. Our findings suggest that enhancing neutrophil phagocytosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of infection caused by carbapenem-resistant ST258K. pneumoniae.

  17. Effect of Baliospermum montanum root extract on phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Kalpana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extract of roots of Baliospermum montanum was evaluated on preliminary basis for immunomodulatory activity by studying neutrophil phagocytic function. The different concentration of (25, 50, 100 mg/ml of aqueous extract of roots of Baliospermum montanum was subjected to study its effect on different in vitro methods of phagocytosis such as neutrophil locomotion, chemotaxis, immunostimulant activity of phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans and qualitative nitroblue tetrazolium test by using human neutrophils. This preliminary study revealed that Baliospermum montanum extract has stimulated chemotactic, phagocytic and intracellular killing potency of human neutrophils at the different concentration. From the results obtained it can be observed that the aqueous extract of Baliospermum montanum stimulate cell-mediated immune system by increasing neutrophil function.

  18. Gene networks in skeletal muscle following endurance exercise are co-expressed in blood neutrophils and linked with blood inflammation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, James A; Sampson, Dayle; Sabapathy, Surendran; Haseler, Luke J; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Bulmer, Andrew Cameron; Peake, Jonathan M; Neubauer, Oliver

    2017-01-19

    It remains incompletely understood whether there is an association between the transcriptome profiles of skeletal muscle and blood leukocytes in response to exercise or other physiological stressors. We have previously analyzed the changes in the muscle and blood neutrophil transcriptome in eight trained men before and 3 h, 48 h and 96 h after 2 h cycling and running. Because we collected muscle and blood in the same individuals and under the same conditions, we were able to directly compare gene expression between the muscle and blood neutrophils. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) as an advanced network-driven method to these original datasets enabled us to compare the muscle and neutrophil transcriptomes in a rigorous and systematic manner. Two gene networks were identified that were preserved between skeletal muscle and blood neutrophils, functionally related to mitochondria and post-translational processes. Strong preservation measures (Zsummary > 10) for both muscle-neutrophil gene networks were evident within the post-exercise recovery period. Muscle and neutrophil gene co-expression was strongly correlated in the mitochondria-related network (r = 0.97; p = 3.17E-2). We also identified multiple correlations between muscular gene sub-networks and exercise-induced changes in blood leukocyte counts, inflammation and muscle damage markers. These data reveal previously unidentified gene co-expression between skeletal muscle and blood neutrophils following exercise, showing the value of WGCNA to understand exercise physiology. Furthermore, these findings provide preliminary evidence in support of the notion that blood neutrophil gene networks may potentially help us to track physiological and pathophysiological changes in the muscle.

  19. CYTOKINE REGULATION OF RESPIRATORY BURST IN BLOOD NEUTROPHILS FOR PREDICTION OF ABDOMINAL SEPSIS IN PATIENTS WITH EXTENDED PURULENT PERITONITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Savchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate correlations between cytokine concentrations and parameters of respiratory burst in blood neutrophils, in order to predict potential development of abdominal sepsis in the patients with extended purulent peritonitis (EPP. The study involved fifteen patients with EPP. Peripheral blood samples were taken on the first day post-admissiona. Abdominal sepsis was diagnosed in thirty-five patients (70% within 5…10 days after surgical intervention. Clinical complications were absent in fifteen patients (30%. Sixty-seven healthy individuals were examined as a control group. Evaluation of the cytokine concentrations was performed by ELISA technique. The degree of respiratory burst in blood neutrophils was measured by means of chemiluminescence assay.It is revealed that the EPP patients exhibited increased levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines and IFNγ, along with higher intensity of respiratory burst in blood neutrophils, due to activated synthesis of of both primary and secondary reactive oxygen species (ROS. The EPP patients who later developed abdominal sepsis showed reduced spontaneous synthesis of primary ROS and increased spontaneous synthesis of secondary ROS. Upon zymosan induction of neutrophils, both primary and secondary ROS levels proved to be similar in the EPP subgroups with or without subsequent sepsis. EPP patients with uncomplicated post-surgical period still exhibited a predominant regulation of respiratory burst of neutrophils by IFNγ activity. Meanwhile, the neutrophil respiratory burst was correlated with TNFα and IL-6 in those patients who further developed abdominal sepsis. A stimulatory effect of IFNγ and a presumably inhibitory action of TNFα and IL-6 upon respiratory burst of blood neutrophils in EPP patients are associated with a release of large cytokine amounts during acute immune inflammatory events, and migration of activated cells to the inflammatory focus. In particular, the

  20. Plasma sE-selectin level is positively correlated with neutrophil count and diastolic blood pressure in Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Kazuki; Inoue, Seiya; Miyauchi, Rie; Misaki, Yasumi; Shimada, Masaya; Kasezawa, Nobuhiko; Tohyama, Kazushige; Goda, Toshinao

    2013-01-01

    Increased levels of circulating soluble type of E-selectin (sE-selectin), neutrophil counts and blood pressure are associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this study, we conducted a cross-sectional study of men who participated in health check-ups, and selected those who were not diagnosed with or being treated for metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and lipid abnormality according to the health check-ups. We measured their basic clinical parameters including blood pressure and neutrophil count, plasma sE-selectin concentration and lifestyle factors, and assessed their interrelations by multivariate linear regression (MLR) analysis. A total of 351 subjects aged 47.5±8.41 (range, 30-64) y were recruited. Significantly correlated with sE-selectin concentration were neutrophil count, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.194, 0.220 and 0.175, respectively). MLR analysis showed that sE-selectin concentration was independently positively related with DBP and neutrophil count, whereas neutrophil count was positively associated with sE-selectin concentration but not DBP. DBP, but not SBP, was independently positively correlated with sE-selectin concentration but not neutrophil count. These results indicate that circulating sE-selectin concentration may be a biomarker for indicating subsequent development of metabolic diseases, in particular CVD, from a healthy state.

  1. Effect of acute and chronic excesses of dietary nitrogen on blood neutrophil functions in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, D; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; De Marchi, L; Ferraton, J M; Gannac, S; Millet, A; Enjalbert, F; Schelcher, F; Foucras, G

    2014-12-01

    Excess dietary nitrogen (EDN) is commonly expected in dairy herds, but no data are available regarding its consequences on cattle immunity. In this study neutrophil functions were assessed during EDN in steers. In experiment 1, 4 one-month periods, 4 diets [16% crude protein (CP; DM basis), 20% CP based on soybean meal, 20% CP based on urea, and 24% CP based on urea and soybean meal], and 4 steers were included in a crossover design to determine the effects of a chronic excess. In experiment 2, the repercussions of an acute excess were assessed with 2 periods of 10 d, the same 4 steers, and 2 diets containing 14 and 20% CP. Sampling was done during the fourth week of each period in experiment 1, and on d 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, and 9 of each period in experiment 2. Individual blood biochemistry parameters were measured and neutrophil factors, such as counts, recovery after isolation, surface expression of CD11b and CD62L, phagocytosis, diapedesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and bacteria killing, were determined. Data were analyzed by general linear models of R, with period, diet or biochemical component, and animal as explanatory variables. The outcome variables were biochemical or immune variables. The variables diet, period, and animal were forced as fixed effects. Data collected over the entire period of experiment 2 were pooled. Several multiples linear regressions or ANOVA were performed and a Bonferroni correction was applied. In experiment 2 (acute EDN), neutrophil counts were negatively associated with nitrogen intake, conversely to CD62L expression. The observed relative neutropenia may be due to neutrophil margination because CD62L-expressing neutrophils are more likely to stick to endothelium. Interestingly, ROS production was changed by EDN: chronic EDN (experiment 1) was negatively associated with opsonized zymozan (OZ)-induced ROS production and acute EDN (experiment 2) with spontaneous ROS production. For chronic EDN, ROS production upon

  2. Cultured rat and purified human Pneumocystis carinii stimulate intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Aliouat, E M; Lundgren, B

    1998-01-01

    The production of free radicals in human neutrophils was studied in both Pneumocystis carinii derived from cultures of L2 rat lung epithelial-like cells and Pneumocystis carinii purified from human lung. Using the cytochrome C technique, which selectively measured extracellular superoxide....... It was established that 1) P. carinii stimulated intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils, 2) opsonized cultured rat-derived P. carinii stimulated human neutrophils to a strong intracellular response of superoxide production, and 3) opsonized P. carinii, purified from human lung also...

  3. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping; Birck, Malene M; Pan, Xiaoyu; Kamal, Shamrulazhar B S; Pors, Susanne E; Gammelgaard, Pernille L; Nielsen, Dennis S; Thymann, Thomas; Levy, Ofer; Frøkiær, Hanne; Sangild, Per T

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm neutrophil and monocyte TLR2 expression and TLR2-mediated blood cytokine responses were low relative to adults. ORA pigs showed enhanced blood neutrophil maturation with reduced cell size and CD172a expression. Only ORA pigs, but not SYS pigs, were protected from a high density of gut Gram-positive bacteria, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.

  4. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Eva E; Salaiza, Norma; Pulido, Julieta; Rodríguez, Mayra C; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica.

  5. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Eva E.; Rodríguez, Mayra C.; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P.; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  6. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Elastase by Pentacyclic Triterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Weiliang; Guo, Fujiang; YingchunWu; Wang, Rui; Chen, Kaixian; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Scope Inhibiting human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a promising strategy for treating inflammatory lung diseases, such as H1N1 and SARS virus infections. The use of sivelestat, the only clinically registered synthesized HNE inhibitor, is largely limited by its risk of organ toxicity because it irreversibly inhibits HNE. Therefore, potent reversible HNE inhibitors are promising alternatives to sivelestat. Methods and Results An in vitro HNE inhibition assay was employed to screen a series of triterpenes. Six pentacyclic triterpenes, but not tetracyclic triterpenes, significantly inhibited HNE. Of these pentacyclic triterpenes, ursolic acid exhibited the highest inhibitory potency (IC50 = 5.51 µM). The HNE inhibitory activity of ursolic acid was further verified using a mouse model of acute smoke-induced lung inflammation. The results of nuclear magnetic resonance and HNE inhibition kinetic analysis showed that the pentacyclic triterpenes competitively and reversibly inhibited HNE. Molecular docking experiments indicated that the molecular scaffold, 28-COOH, and a double bond at an appropriate location in the pentacyclic triterpenes are important for their inhibitory activity. Conclusion Our results provide insights into the effects of pentacyclic triterpenes on lung inflammatory actions through reversible inhibition of HNE activity. PMID:24376583

  7. Interleukin 17 expression in peripheral blood neutrophils from fungal keratitis patients and healthy cohorts in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Rajapandian Sivaganesa; Vareechon, Chairut; Prajna, Namperumalsamy Venkatesh; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu; Pearlman, Eric; Lalitha, Prajna

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17) production by peripheral blood neutrophils was examined in patients with fungal keratitis and in uninfected individuals in southern India, which has high levels of airborne Aspergillus and Fusarium conidia. Il17a gene expression and intracellular IL-17 were detected in all groups, although levels were significantly elevated in neutrophils from patients with keratitis. There were no significant differences in plasma IL-17 and IL-23 between patients with keratitis and uninfected individuals; however, combined data from all groups showed a correlation between the percentage IL-17 producing neutrophils and plasma IL-23, and between plasma IL-17 and IL-6 and IL-23.

  8. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  9. Effector responses of bovine blood neutrophils against Escherichia coli: Role of NOD1/NF-κB signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xun; Wei, Liang-Jun; Fan, Guo-Juan; Jiang, Ya-Nan; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Neutrophils use a broad array of pattern recognition receptors to sense and respond to invading pathogens and are important in the early control of acute bacterial infections. Nucleotide-binding oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) is a cytoplasmic receptor involved in recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan. Reduced neutrophil NOD1 expression has been reported in periparturient dairy cows. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of NOD1 signalling in the early responses of bovine neutrophils to bacterial infections. Blood neutrophils from healthy heifers were preincubated for 2h with ML130, a selective inhibitor of NOD1-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Thereafter, cells were cultured with live Escherichia coli for additional 30 min or subjected to Boyden chamber cell migration assay with E. coli in the lower chamber. Results showed that ML130 inhibited E. coli-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. There was an indication, although not significant, that ML130 down-regulated gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, chemokines IL-8 and C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2), and adhesion molecule CD62L, in E. coli-challenged neutrophils. Flow cytometry-based Annexin V staining revealed a considerable increase in neutrophil survival upon E. coli infection, an effect that was attenuated in the presence of ML130. Additionally, inhibition of NOD1/NF-κB signalling resulted in reduced migration of neutrophils to E. coli, and impaired phagocytosis, intracellular bacterial killing and reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils. These results indicate that NOD1/NF-κB pathway plays a crucial role in modulating neutrophil responses that are important for early control of infections. Approaches aiming at restoring neutrophil NOD1 function could be beneficial for prevention or treatment of coliform mastitis.

  10. Detection of Human Neutrophil Elastase with Fluorescent Peptide Sensors Conjugated to Nanocellulosic Solid Supports Targeting Wound Care Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a biomarker for chronic wounds and a therapeutic target for certain diseases. An unchecked influx of neutrophils, which contain about one pictogram of elastase per neutrophil, is responsible for degrading growth factors and collagen formation, indefinitely delaying...

  11. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H; Lok, Josephine

    2015-04-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the upregulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin, as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury.

  12. Resistance of fluorescent-labelled Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains to phagocytosis and killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permpanich, Piyanuj; Kowolik, Michael J; Galli, Dominique M

    2006-01-01

    Neutrophils are initially the predominant cells involved in the host defence of bacterial infections, including periodontal disease. Aggressive periodontitis is associated with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative capnophilic microorganism. Infections caused by A. actinomycetemcomitans are not resolved by the host immune response despite the accumulation of neutrophils at the site of inflammation. To better understand the role of natural host defence mechanisms in A. actinomycetemcomitans infections, the interaction of phenotypically diverse strains of this pathogen with human neutrophils was assessed directly using techniques such as genetic labelling with the gene for green fluorescent protein, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence imaging. The study included clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans represented by self-aggregating, biofilm-associated and isogenic planktonic variants. Data obtained showed that complement-mediated phagocytosis of A. actinomycetemcomitans was generally inefficient regardless of strain-specific serotype or leukotoxin production. Furthermore, the majority of ingested bacteria remained viable after exposure to neutrophils for 1 h. Interestingly, uptake of antibody-opsonized bacteria resulted in the rapid cell death of neutrophils. This was in contrast to ingestion of complement-opsonized bacteria, which did not affect neutrophil viability. The methods used in this study provided reliable and reproducible results with respect to adherence, phagocytosis and killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans when encountering human neutrophils.

  13. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  14. Doxycycline induced photodamage to human neutrophils and tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, S.; Glette, J.; Hopen, G.; Solberg, C.O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway))

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophil function were studied following irradiation (340-380 nm) of the cells in the presence of 22 ..mu..M doxycycline. At increasing light fluence the locomotion, chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation (by the hexose monophosphate shunt) of the neutrophils steadily decreased. The photodamage increased with increasing preincubation temperature and time and was enhanced in D/sub 2/O, reduced in azide and abolished in anaerobiosis. Superoxide dismutase, catalase or mannitol did not influence the photodamage. Photooxidation of tryptophan in the presence of doxycycline was increased 9-10-fold in D/sub 2/O and nearly abolished in the presence of 0.25 mM NaN/sub 3/, indicating that singlet oxygen is the most important reactive oxygen species in the doxycycline-induced photodamage. The results may explain some of the features of tetracycline-induced photosensitivity and why other authors have obtained diverging results when studying the influence of tetracyclines on neutrophil functions.

  15. DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils of dairy cows during the transition period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oikawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the apoptotic process in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN in dairy cattle during the transition period. Blood samples were collected from 4 dairy cattle at 3 weeks before the expected parturition (wk -3, parturition (wk 0 and 3 weeks after parturition (wk +3. The DNA damage of PBMC and PMN was evaluated based on the comet assay using visual scoring (arbitrary units. Undamaged DNA remained within the core (score 0 and the broken DNA migrated from the core towards the anode forming the tail of a comet (scores 1-4. Significantly higher scores in PBMC at wk 0 and wk +3 were observed compared with those in PMN although there were no significant changes of scores in either cell type during the experimental period. It is suggested that the apoptotic rate of PBMC is accelerated compared with that of PMC during the transition period.

  16. Interdependency of CEACAM-1, -3, -6, and -8 induced human neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skubitz Amy PN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family (CEACAMs are widely expressed, and, depending on the tissue, capable of regulating diverse functions including tumor promotion, tumor suppression, angiogenesis, and neutrophil activation. Four members of this family, CEACAM1, CEACAM8, CEACAM6, and CEACAM3 (recognized by CD66a, CD66b, CD66c, and CD66d mAbs, respectively, are expressed on human neutrophils. CD66a, CD66b, CD66c, and CD66d antibodies each increase neutrophil adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This increase in neutrophil adhesion caused by CD66 antibodies is blocked by CD18 mAbs and is associated with upregulation of CD11/CD18 on the neutrophil surface. To examine potential interactions of CEACAMs in neutrophil signaling, the effects on neutrophil adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells of a set of CD66 mAbs was tested following desensitization to stimulation by various combinations of these mAbs. Addition of a CD66 mAb in the absence of calcium results in desensitization of neutrophils to stimulation by that CD66 mAb. The current data show that desensitization of neutrophils to any two CEACAMs results in selective desensitization to those two CEACAMs, while the cells remain responsive to the other two neutrophil CEACAMs. In addition, cells desensitized to CEACAM-3, -6, and -8 were still responsive to stimulation of CEACAM1 by CD66a mAbs. In contrast, desensitization of cells to CEACAM1 and any two of the other CEACAMs left the cells unresponsive to all CD66 mAbs. Cells desensitized to any combination of CEACAMs remained responsive to the unrelated control protein CD63. Thus, while there is significant independence of the four neutrophil CEACAMs in signaling, CEACAM1 appears to play a unique role among the neutrophil CEACAMs. A model in which CEACAMs dimerize to form signaling complexes could accommodate the observations. Similar interactions may occur in other cells expressing CEACAMs.

  17. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an

  18. Physiological concentrations of leptin do not affect human neutrophils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, V.M.; Langereis, J.D.; Aalst, C.W. van; Linden, J. van der; Ulfman, L.H.; Koenderman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that is thought to be important in many inflammatory diseases, and is known to influence the function of several leukocyte types. However, no clear consensus is present regarding the responsiveness of neutrophils for this adipokine. In this study a 2D DIGE proteomics approach

  19. Physiological concentrations of leptin do not affect human neutrophils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, V.M.; Langereis, J.D.; Aalst, C.W. van; Linden, J. van der; Ulfman, L.H.; Koenderman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that is thought to be important in many inflammatory diseases, and is known to influence the function of several leukocyte types. However, no clear consensus is present regarding the responsiveness of neutrophils for this adipokine. In this study a 2D DIGE proteomics approach

  20. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  1. Extracellular lipase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: biochemical characterization and effect on human neutrophil and monocyte function in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, K E; Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    on neutrophils. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and was abolished by heat treatment of the enzyme at 100 degrees C. Since monocytes are one of the important cells of the host defence system the inhibition of the function of these cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of infections caused...... concentrations of this lipase preparation were preincubated with human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. The chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of these cells were then determined. It was shown that lipase inhibited the monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence, whereas it had no or very little effect...... chromatography revealed spherical particles with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm. Biochemical characterization and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested that these particles consisted of protein and carbohydrate including lipopolysaccharide with the major enzyme activity being lipase. Various...

  2. Ligation of the adhesion-GPCR EMR2 regulates human neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, Simon; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Dri, Pietro; Davies, John Q; Hayhoe, Richard P G; Lewis, Sion M; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; Brown, K Alun; Perretti, Mauro; Hamann, Jörg; Treacher, David F; Gordon, Siamon; Stacey, Martin

    2008-03-01

    At present, approximately 150 different members of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family have been identified in metazoans. Surprisingly, very little is known about their function, although they all possess large extracellular domains coupled to a seven-transmembrane domain, suggesting a potential role in cell adhesion and signaling. Here, we demonstrate how the human-restricted adhesion-GPCR, EMR2 (epidermal growth factor-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor), regulates neutrophil responses by potentiating the effects of a number of proinflammatory mediators and show that the transmembrane region is critical for adhesion-GPCR function. Using an anti-EMR2 antibody, ligation of EMR2 increases neutrophil adhesion and migration, and augments superoxide production and proteolytic enzyme degranulation. On neutrophil activation, EMR2 is rapidly translocated to membrane ruffles and the leading edge of the cell. Further supporting the role in neutrophil activation, EMR2 expression on circulating neutrophils is significantly increased in patients with systemic inflammation. These data illustrate a definitive function for a human adhesion-GPCR within the innate immune system and suggest an important role in potentiating the inflammatory response. Ligation of the adhesion-GPCR EMR2 regulates human neutrophil function.

  3. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects.

  4. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-21

    vitro interaction of human neutrophils with MARV and EBOV. We report that although productive filovirus replication was not observed in human neutrophils...supernatants. Where alphaviruses such as Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were used as nonfilovirus controls, the viruses to be inactivated...viral replication in human neutrophils exposed to live MARV or EBOV (MOI 1), as measured by plaque assay of supernatants 1, 6, 24, or 48 h

  5. The Beta-2-Adrenoreceptor Agonists, Formoterol and Indacaterol, but Not Salbutamol, Effectively Suppress the Reactivity of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory properties of beta-2 agonists remains contentious possibly due to differences in their molecular structures and agonist activities. The current study has compared the effects of 3 different categories of β2-agonists, namely, salbutamol (short-acting, formoterol (long-acting and indacaterol (ultra-long-acting, at concentrations of 1–1000 nM, with human blood neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils were activated with either N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP, 1 µM or platelet-activating factor (PAF, 200 nM in the absence and presence of the β2-agonists followed by measurement of the generation of reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4, release of elastase, and expression of the β2-integrin, CR3, using a combination of chemiluminescence, ELISA, colorimetric, and flow cytometric procedures respectively. These were correlated with alterations in the concentrations of intracellular cyclic-AMP and cytosolic Ca2+. At the concentrations tested, formoterol and indacaterol caused equivalent, significant (P<0.05 at 1–10 nM dose-related inhibition of all of the pro-inflammatory activities tested, while salbutamol was much less effective (P<0.05 at 100 nM and higher. Suppression of neutrophil reactivity was accompanied by elevations in intracellular cAMP and accelerated clearance of Ca2+ from the cytosol of activated neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that β2-agonists vary with respect to their suppressive effects on activated neutrophils.

  6. The Beta-2-Adrenoreceptor Agonists, Formoterol and Indacaterol, but Not Salbutamol, Effectively Suppress the Reactivity of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ronald; Theron, Annette J.; Steel, Helen C.; Durandt, Chrisna; Tintinger, Gregory R.; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory properties of beta-2 agonists remains contentious possibly due to differences in their molecular structures and agonist activities. The current study has compared the effects of 3 different categories of β2-agonists, namely, salbutamol (short-acting), formoterol (long-acting) and indacaterol (ultra-long-acting), at concentrations of 1–1000 nM, with human blood neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils were activated with either N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP, 1 µM) or platelet-activating factor (PAF, 200 nM) in the absence and presence of the β2-agonists followed by measurement of the generation of reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4, release of elastase, and expression of the β2-integrin, CR3, using a combination of chemiluminescence, ELISA, colorimetric, and flow cytometric procedures respectively. These were correlated with alterations in the concentrations of intracellular cyclic-AMP and cytosolic Ca2+. At the concentrations tested, formoterol and indacaterol caused equivalent, significant (P < 0.05 at 1–10 nM) dose-related inhibition of all of the pro-inflammatory activities tested, while salbutamol was much less effective (P < 0.05 at 100 nM and higher). Suppression of neutrophil reactivity was accompanied by elevations in intracellular cAMP and accelerated clearance of Ca2+ from the cytosol of activated neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that β2-agonists vary with respect to their suppressive effects on activated neutrophils. PMID:24733958

  7. Epinephrine enhances platelet-neutrophil adhesion in whole blood in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.A.; Anastase, D.M.; Hecker, K.E.; Baumert, J.H.; Robitzsch, T.; Rossaint, R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor stimulation by catecholamines influenced neutrophil function, cytokine liberation, and platelet aggregability. We investigated whether adrenergic stimulation with epinephrine also alters platelet-neutrophil adhesion. This might be of specific

  8. Epinephrine enhances platelet-neutrophil adhesion in whole blood in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.A.; Anastase, D.M.; Hecker, K.E.; Baumert, J.H.; Robitzsch, T.; Rossaint, R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor stimulation by catecholamines influenced neutrophil function, cytokine liberation, and platelet aggregability. We investigated whether adrenergic stimulation with epinephrine also alters platelet-neutrophil adhesion. This might be of specific

  9. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. (Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield, CT (USA))

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  10. Human Neutrophils Use Different Mechanisms To Kill Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Hyphae: Evidence from Phagocyte Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van den Berg, J Merlijn; Prins, Jan M; Vitkov, Ljubomir; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophils are known to play a pivotal role in the host defense against Aspergillus infections. This is illustrated by the prevalence of Aspergillus infections in patients with neutropenia or phagocyte functional defects, such as chronic granulomatous disease. However, the mechanisms by which human neutrophils recognize and kill Aspergillus are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied in detail which neutrophil functions, including neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, are involved in the killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and hyphae, using neutrophils from patients with well-defined genetic immunodeficiencies. Recognition of conidia involves integrin CD11b/CD18 (and not dectin-1), which triggers a PI3K-dependent nonoxidative intracellular mechanism of killing. When the conidia escape from early killing and germinate, the extracellular destruction of the Aspergillus hyphae needs opsonization by Abs and involves predominantly recognition via Fcγ receptors, signaling via Syk, PI3K, and protein kinase C to trigger the production of toxic reactive oxygen metabolites by the NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase. A. fumigatus induces NET formation; however, NETs did not contribute to A. fumigatus killing. Thus, our findings reveal distinct killing mechanisms of Aspergillus conidia and hyphae by human neutrophils, leading to a comprehensive insight in the innate antifungal response.

  11. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  12. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    Full Text Available Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis. Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  13. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuk Lee

    Full Text Available Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis. This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores.

  14. Zinc oxide nanoparticles delay human neutrophil apoptosis by a de novo protein synthesis-dependent and reactive oxygen species-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, David M.; Girard, D

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Highlights ZnO nanoparticles are antiapoptotic for human neutrophils. ZnO nanoparticles do not increase ROS production in human neutrophils. ZnO nanoparticles induce de novo protein synthesis in human neutrophils. Abstract Inflammation is one of the major toxic effects reported in the literature following nanoparticle (NP) exposure. Knowing the importance of neutrophils to orchestrate inflammation, it is surprising that the direct role of NPs on neutrophil biology is p...

  15. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Monch, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, P.

    2004-01-01

    receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing...... and function, and promotes wound healing.......To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin...

  16. Purification and characterization of a lipid thiobis ester from human neutrophil cytosol that reversibly deactivates the O2- -generating NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, E A; Gabig, T G

    1990-05-25

    Intact neutrophils possess a cellular mechanism that efficiently deactivates the microbicidal O2-generating NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst (Akard, L. P., English, D., and Gabig, T. G. (1988) Blood 72, 322-327). The present studies directed at identifying the molecular mechanism(s) involved in NADPH oxidase deactivation showed that a heat- and trypsin-insensitive species in the cytosolic fraction from normal unstimulated neutrophils was capable of deactivating the membrane-associated NADPH oxidase isolated from opsonized zymosan- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. This cytosolic species also deactivated the cell-free-activated oxidase. Deactivation by this cytosolic species occurred in the absence of NADPH-dependent catalytic turnover and was reversible, since NADPH oxidase activity could be subsequently reactivated in the cell-free system. The sedimentable particulate fraction from unstimulated neutrophils did not demonstrate deactivator activity. Deactivator activity was demonstrated in the neutral lipid fraction of neutrophil cytosol extracted with chloroform:methanol. Following complete purification of cytosolic deactivator activity by thin layer chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, the deactivator species was shown to be a lipid thiobis ester compound by mass spectroscopy. Cellular metabolism of this compound in human neutrophils may reveal a unique mechanism for enzymatic control of the NADPH oxidase system and thereby play an important role in regulation of the inflammatory response.

  17. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  18. Human milk effects on neutrophil calcium metabolism: blockade of calcium influx after agonist stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Cruz, E; Oelberg, D G; Buescher, E S

    1999-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant cellular mediators of acute inflammation, and human milk suppresses multiple neutrophil functions. We sought to determine whether these effects were mediated through disruption of normal intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Exposure of human neutrophils to human milk, followed by washing, resulted in altered Ca2+ transient responses to formyl-peptide stimulation in which the peak cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([free Ca]) was the same as in unexposed cells, but the postpeak decline in [free Ca] was more rapid. This effect was observed after human milk exposures as brief as 10 s, persisted for up to 4 h after human milk removal, and was concentration dependent. On the basis of experiments examining Ca2+-free conditions followed by Ca2+ supplementation, and experiments examining spontaneous and stimulated manganese and barium influx into neutrophils, the human milk effect was due to blockade of Ca2+ influx. Decreased Ca2+ transient responses to other physiologic stimuli (IL-8, opsonized Staphylococcus aureus, and immune complexes) were observed after human milk exposures. Rat intestinal epithelial cells and HL-60 cells failed to show these effects, suggesting a selective effect on mature inflammatory cells. Characterization of the Ca2+-blocking activity showed it was heat and acid stable in human milk with a molecular mass between 30-100 kD. Commercial human milk lactoferrin exhibited Ca2+ influx blockade activity, but recombinant human lactoferrin showed none. Separation of the activity by heparin affinity chromatography showed that it was distinct from lactoferrin. Human milk-induced blockade of Ca2+ influx provides a potential mechanism for broad suppression of neutrophil functions that may contribute to the antiinflammatory properties of human milk.

  19. Molecular typing of human platelet and neutrophil antigens (HPA and HNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuisen, Barbera; Porcelijn, Leendert; Ellen van der Schoot, C; de Haas, Masja

    2014-04-01

    Genotyping is an important tool in the diagnosis of disorders involving allo-immunisation to antigens present on the membranes of platelets and neutrophils. To date 28 human platelet antigens (HPAs) have been indentified on six polymorphic glycoproteins on the surface of platelets. Antibodies against HPAs play a role in foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and refractoriness to donor platelets. The 11 human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) described to date have been indentified on five polymorphic proteins on the surface of granulocytes. Antibodies to HNAs are implicated with foetal and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia (FNAIN), autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). In this report, we will review the molecular basis and techniques currently available for the genotyping of human platelet and neutrophil antigens.

  20. Molecular docking analysis of curcumin analogues as human neutrophil elastase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Narayanaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to dock 17 different ligands of curcumin analogues with that of human neutrophil elastase. Molecular descriptors analysis using Molinspiration online tool was carried out including investigation on human neutrophil elastase putative binding sites using Discovery Studio. The molecular physicochemical analysis revealed that all of the curcumin analogues complied well with the five rules of thumb. With regard to bioact-ivity score, compound 17 has exhibited least score towards nuclear receptor ligand (0.05 and enzyme inhibitor (0.10 compared to all other ligands. Compounds 2, 4 and 13 exhibited the maximum interaction energy (-40 kcal/mol. Interestingly, seven compounds namely 3, 11-14, 16 and 17 interacted well with Arg147 amino acid residue. The present study outcomes therefore might provide new insight in understanding these 17 curcumin analogues as potential candidates for human neutrophil elastase inhibitory agents.

  1. In vitro killing of oral Capnocytophaga by granule fractions of human neutrophils is associated with cathepsin G activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L

    1991-01-01

    The Capnocytophaga are inhabitants of the hypoxic human gingival crevice that are normally prevented by neutrophils from causing periodontal and systemic infection. To identify potential nonoxidative bactericidal mechanisms against Capnocytophaga within human neutrophils, gel filtration chromatography was used to fractionate neutrophil granule extracts. Seven granule fractions, designated A through G, were obtained. The Capnocytophaga were most sensitive to killing by fraction D. Fraction D e...

  2. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  3. White blood cell counts and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the diagnosis of testicular cancer: a simple secondary serum tumor marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Verit, Ayhan; Sahin, Aytac; Urkmez, Ahmet; Uruc, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate white blood cell counts and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as markers of systemic inflammation in the diagnosis of localized testicular cancer as a malignancy with initially low volume. Thirty-six patients with localized testicular cancer with a mean age of 34.22±14.89 years and 36 healthy controls with a mean age of 26.67±2.89 years were enrolled in the study. White blood cell counts and NLR were calculated from complete blood cell counts. White blood cell counts and NLR were statistically significantly higher in patients with testicular cancer compared with the control group (ptesticular cancer besides the well-known accurate serum tumor markers as AFP (alpha fetoprotein), hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase).

  4. Proton stoichiometry associated with human neutrophil respiratory-burst reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A; Ossanna, P J; Weiss, S J

    1984-11-10

    Control of the intraphagosomal pH in neutrophils may be of importance in creating a microbicidal environment by regulating the activity of the O2-.-generating NADPH oxidase and the lysosomal enzymes discharged into this compartment. In this study, we examined the proton stoichiometry associated with the primary enzymatic reaction underlying the respiratory burst. A preparation of the neutrophil-derived, membrane oxidase consumed NADPH and generated O2-. with a stoichiometry of 1 NADPH:2 O2-. When the enzymatically produced O2-. was prevented from undergoing dismutation, net protons were released in an approximate 1:2 stoichiometry with O2-. generated. In contrast, when O2-. was allowed to dismutate to H2O2, net protons were consumed in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the accumulated H2O2. Thus, the delta pH associated with the NADPH oxidase-dependent production of O2-. was dictated by the fate of the generated radical. The consumption of the oxidase-generated H2O2 by the lysosomal enzyme myeloperoxidase resulted in the formation of HOCl which was trapped in the presence of taurine as the N-chloro derivative. The ratio of chlorinated product formed to H+ consumed was 1:1. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the known intraphagosomal pH changes that occur following neutrophil stimulation. We conclude that the O2-.-generating oxidase plays a dual role in the phagosome by simultaneously creating an oxidizing environment that optimizes pH-dependent microbicidal processes.

  5. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara

    2011-01-01

    1AT is produced at all stages of myeloid maturation in the bone marrow. The production increases as neutrophils enter circulation and increases further upon migration to tissues as observed in skin windows and when blood neutrophils are incubated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor...

  6. Arachidonic acid metabolism in the platelets and neutrophils of diabetic rabbit and human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    An alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism to prostaglandins and leukotrienes from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes respectively is evident in subjects with diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of altered platelet/vascular wall interactions in diabetes mellitus and evidence that polymorphonuclear leukocytes influence the vascular walls. Theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis include both blood cells. Platelet hypersensitivity is evident in those platelets from the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit either suspended in plasma or buffer. Arachidonic acid- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation, release of /sup 14/serotonin, and T x B/sub 2/ and 12-HETE production is enhanced when responses of diabetic platelets are compared to control platelets. Control rabbit neutrophils produce more LTB/sub 4/, LTB/sub 4/ isomers and 5-HETE than diabetic rabbits neutrophils. Decreased synthesis from diabetic rabbit neutrophils is not explained by increased catabolism of LTB/sub 4/, reesterification of 5-HETE, or increased eicosanoid formation. These experiments demonstrate both platelet and neutrophil dysfunction in diabetic subjects. Because of the involvement of these cells in regulating circulatory homeostatis, abnormal behavior could aggravate the atherosclerotic process. Platelet and neutrophil dysfunctions are noted before macroscopic vascular lesions are apparent suggesting an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  7. Impact of total body irradiation on successful neutrophil engraftment in unrelated bone marrow or cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Hideki; Fuji, Shigeo; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Onizuka, Makoto; Shinohara, Akihito; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Miyamura, Koichi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Takanashi, Minoko; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ogata, Masao

    2017-02-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been thought to promote donor cell engraftment in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from alternative donors. However, recent progress in HCT strategies may affect the clinical significance of TBI on neutrophil engraftment. With the use of a Japanese transplant registry database, we analyzed 3933 adult recipients (>15 y.o.) who underwent HCT between 2006 and 2013 from an 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated bone marrow donor (MUD, n = 1367), an HLA-mismatched unrelated bone marrow donor (MMUD, n = 1102), or unrelated cord blood (CBT, n = 1464). Conditioning regimens were divided into five groups: High-TBI-(>8Gy), Low-TBI- (≤8Gy), and no-TBI-myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and Low-TBI- and no-TBI-reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). In both MUD and MMUD, neutrophil engraftment rate was >90% in each of the five conditioning groups, and TBI was not associated with prompt neutrophil engraftment in multivariate analyses. Conversely, in CBT, TBI regimens had a higher rate of day-30 neutrophil engraftment than no-TBI-regimens: 78% in High-TBI-MAC, 83% in Low-TBI-MAC, and 76% in Low-TBI-RIC versus 65% in No-TBI-MAC, and 68% in No-TBI-RIC (P < .001). Multivariate analyses in CBT demonstrated that TBI-regimens were significantly associated with a higher rate of neutrophil engraftment. Subsequently focusing on CBT patients alone, TBI-regimens were significantly associated with a higher rate of neutrophil engraftment in patients who received CBT with a 4/6 or less HLA allele-match, or who had anti-HLA antibodies. In summary, TBI-regimens had no impact on neutrophil engraftment in the current practice of unrelated bone marrow transplantation. However, in CBT, TBI is still necessary to enhance engraftment.

  8. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  9. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  10. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Laura C.; Weems, Megan N.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62Ldim, CD16bright, CD11bbright, CD66bbright, CD63bright surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil–H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease. PMID:28148734

  11. Airborne particulate matter PM2.5 from Mexico City affects the generation of reactive oxygen species by blood neutrophils from asthmatics: an in vitro approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceballos Guillermo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is densely populated, and toxic air pollutants are generated and concentrated at a higher rate because of its geographic characteristics. It is well known that exposure to particulate matter, especially to fine and ultra-fine particles, enhances the risk of cardio-respiratory diseases, especially in populations susceptible to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fine particles on the respiratory burst of circulating neutrophils from asthmatic patients living in Mexico City. Methods In total, 6 subjects diagnosed with mild asthma and 11 healthy volunteers were asked to participate. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral venous blood and incubated with fine particles, and the generation of reactive oxygen species was recorded by chemiluminescence. We also measured plasma lipoperoxidation susceptibility and plasma myeloperoxidase and paraoxonase activities by spectrophotometry. Results Asthmatic patients showed significantly lower plasma paraoxonase activity, higher susceptibility to plasma lipoperoxidation and an increase in myeloperoxidase activity that differed significantly from the control group. In the presence of fine particles, neutrophils from asthmatic patients showed an increased tendency to generate reactive oxygen species after stimulation with fine particles (PM2.5. Conclusion These findings suggest that asthmatic patients have higher oxidation of plasmatic lipids due to reduced antioxidant defense. Furthermore, fine particles tended to increase the respiratory burst of blood human neutrophils from the asthmatic group. On the whole, increased myeloperoxidase activity and susceptibility to lipoperoxidation with a concomitant decrease in paraoxonase activity in asthmatic patients could favor lung infection and hence disrupt the control of asthmatic crises.

  12. Hypoxia selectively inhibits respiratory burst activity and killing of Staphylococcus aureus in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Naomi N; Cowburn, Andrew S; Porter, Linsey; Walmsley, Sarah R; Summers, Charlotte; Thompson, Alfred A R; Anwar, Sadia; Willcocks, Lisa C; Whyte, Moira K B; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils play a central role in the innate immune response and a critical role in bacterial killing. Most studies of neutrophil function have been conducted under conditions of ambient oxygen, but inflamed sites where neutrophils operate may be extremely hypoxic. Previous studies indicate that neutrophils sense and respond to hypoxia via the ubiquitous prolyl hydroxylase/hypoxia-inducible factor pathway and that this can signal for enhanced survival. In the current study, human neutrophils were shown to upregulate hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α-dependent gene expression under hypoxic incubation conditions (3 kPa), with a consequent substantial delay in the onset of apoptosis. Despite this, polarization and chemotactic responsiveness to IL-8 and fMLP were entirely unaffected by hypoxia. Similarly, hypoxia did not diminish the ability of neutrophils to phagocytose serum-opsonized heat-killed streptococci. Of the secretory functions examined, IL-8 generation was preserved and elastase release was enhanced by hypoxia. Hypoxia did, however, cause a major reduction in respiratory burst activity induced both by the soluble agonist fMLP and by ingestion of opsonized zymosan, without affecting expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits. Critically, this reduction in respiratory burst activity under hypoxia was associated with a significant defect in the killing of Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, killing of Escherichia coli, which is predominantly oxidase independent, was fully preserved under hypoxia. In conclusion, these studies suggest that although the NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial killing mechanism may be compromised by hypoxia, neutrophils overall appear extremely well adapted to operate successfully under severely hypoxic conditions.

  13. Use of CFSE staining of borreliae in studies on the interaction between borreliae and human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hytönen Jukka

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the tick-transmitted spirochete group Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi cause Lyme borreliosis. Acute borrelial infection of the skin has unusual characteristics with only a mild local inflammatory response suggesting that the interaction between borreliae and the cells of the first-line defence might differ from that of other bacteria. It has been reported that human neutrophils phagocytose motile borreliae through an unconventional mechanism (tube phagocytosis which is not observed with non-motile borreliae. Therefore, it would be of great interest to visualise the bacteria by a method not affecting motility and viability of borreliae to be able to study their interaction with the cells of the innate immunity. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFSE labelling has been previously used for studying the adhesion of labelled bacteria to host cells and the uptake of labelled substrates by various cells using flow cytometry. Results In this study, CFSE was shown to efficiently stain different genospecies of B. burgdorferi without affecting bacterial viability or motility. Use of CFSE staining allowed subsequent quantification of borreliae associated with human neutrophils with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. As a result, no difference in association between different borrelial genospecies (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, or between borreliae and the pyogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, with neutrophils could be detected. Borrelial virulence, on the other hand, affected association with neutrophils, with significantly higher association of a non-virulent mutant B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain compared to the parental virulent wild type strain. Conclusion These results suggest that the flow cytometric assay using CFSE labelled borreliae is a valuable tool in the analysis of the interaction between borreliae and human neutrophils. The

  14. Staphylococcus aureus panton-valentine leukocidin is a very potent cytotoxic factor for human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Löffler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs, a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins, induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections.

  15. β2 integrin-mediated crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Roser; Lyck, Ruth; Vestweber, Dietmar; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuroinflammatory states such as meningitis, neutrophils cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and contribute to pathological alterations of cerebral function. The mechanisms that govern neutrophil migration across the BBB are ill defined. Using live-cell imaging, we show that LPS-stimulated BBB endothelium supports neutrophil arrest, crawling, and diapedesis under physiological flow in vitro. Investigating the interactions of neutrophils from wild-type, CD11a(-/-), CD11b(-/-), and CD18(null) mice with wild-type, junctional adhesion molecule-A(-/-), ICAM-1(null), ICAM-2(-/-), or ICAM-1(null)/ICAM-2(-/-) primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, we demonstrate that neutrophil arrest, polarization, and crawling required G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent activation of β2 integrins and binding to endothelial ICAM-1. LFA-1 was the prevailing ligand for endothelial ICAM-1 in mediating neutrophil shear resistant arrest, whereas Mac-1 was dominant over LFA-1 in mediating neutrophil polarization on the BBB in vitro. Neutrophil crawling was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and neutrophil LFA-1 and Mac-1. In the absence of crawling, few neutrophils maintained adhesive interactions with the BBB endothelium by remaining either stationary on endothelial junctions or displaying transient adhesive interactions characterized by a fast displacement on the endothelium along the direction of flow. Diapedesis of stationary neutrophils was unchanged by the lack of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and occurred exclusively via the paracellular pathway. Crawling neutrophils, although preferentially crossing the BBB through the endothelial junctions, could additionally breach the BBB via the transcellular route. Thus, β2 integrin-mediated neutrophil crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed BBB.

  16. MicroRNA profiling in human neutrophils during bone marrow granulopoiesis and in vivo exudation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maria T; Hother, Christoffer; Häger, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of neutrophils and their precursors from the initiation of granulopoiesis in the bone marrow to extravasation and accumulation in skin windows. We analyzed three different cell populations from human bone marrow, p...

  17. Analysis of Ascorbic Acid in Single Human Neutrophils by Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ascorbic acid in individual human neutrophils was determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with electrochemical detection. In order to overcome the influence of the adsorption of the substances in cells on the inner surface wall of the capillary on the migration time and the number of theoretical plates, a procedure for treating capillaries has been described.

  18. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the num

  19. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg;

    2013-01-01

    granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in...

  20. Potential, pH, and arachidonate gate hydrogen ion currents in human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoursey, T E; Cherny, V V

    1993-01-01

    Indirect evidence indicates that a proton-selective conductance is activated during the respiratory burst in neutrophils. A voltage- and time-dependent H(+)-selective conductance, gH, in human neutrophils is demonstrated here directly by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The gH is extremely low at large negative potentials, increases slowly upon membrane depolarization, and does not inactivate. It is enhanced at high external pH or low internal pH and is inhibited by Cd2+ and Zn2+. Arachi...

  1. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 mediates rolling of human neutrophils on P-selectin

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils roll on P-selectin expressed by activated platelets or endothelial cells under the shear stresses in the microcirculation. P- selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a high affinity ligand for P- selectin on myeloid cells. However, it has not been demonstrated that PSGL-1 contributes to the rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin. We developed two IgG mAbs, PL1 and PL2, that appear to recognize protein- dependent epitopes on human PSGL-1. The mAbs bound to PSGL-1 on all leukocytes...

  2. ANNEXIN A1 N-TERMINAL DERIVED PEPTIDE AC2-26 EXERTS CHEMOKINETIC EFFECTS ON HUMAN NEUTROPHILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesmond eDalli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that peptides derived from the N-terminal region of Annexin A1, a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, could act as biomimetics of the parent protein. However, recent evidence, amongst which the ability to interact with distinct receptors other then that described for Annexin A1, suggest that these peptides might fulfil other functions at variance to those reported for the parent protein. Here we tested the ability of peptide Ac2-26 to induce chemotaxis of human neutrophils, showing that this peptide can elicit responses comparable to those produced by the canonical activator formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (or FMLP. However, whilst disruption of the chemical gradient abolished the FMLP response, addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top well of the chemotaxis chamber did not affect (10 µM or augmented (at 30 µM the neutrophil locomotion to the bottom well, as elicited by 10 µM peptide Ac2-26. Intriguingly, the sole addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top wells produced a marked migration of neutrophils. A similar behaviour was observed when human primary monocytes were used. Thus, peptide Ac2-26 is a genuine chemokinetic agent towards human blood leukocytes.Neutralization strategies indicated that engagement of either the GPCR termed FPR1 or its cognate receptor FPR2/ALX was sufficient to sustain peptide Ac2-26 induced neutrophil migration. Similarly, application of pharmacological inhibitors showed that cell locomotion to peptide Ac2-26 was mediated primarily by the ERK, but not the JNK and p38 pathways.In conclusion, we report here novel in vitro properties for peptide Ac2-26, promoting neutrophil and monocyte chemokinesis, a process that may contribute to accelerate the resolution phase of inflammation. Here we postulate that the generation Annexin A1 N-terminal peptides at the site of inflammation may expedite the egress of migrated leukocytes thus promoting the return to homeostasis.

  3. Functional relationship of the cytochrome b to the superoxide-generating oxidase of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Schervish, E W; Santinga, J T

    1982-04-25

    A subcellular particulate fraction containing the NADPH-dependent O2.--generating oxidase from stimulated human neutrophils was prepared. This fraction was depleted of certain enzyme markers of primary and secondary granules and was devoid of measurable myeloperoxidase, both enzymatically and spectrally. When prepared from neutrophils which had been previously stimulated with phorbal myristate acetate, this fraction contained cyanide-insensitive, pyridine nucleotide-dependent O2.--generating activity with a specific activity of 260 nmol min-1 mg-1. O2.--generating activity is completely ablated by p-chloromercuribenzoate exposure. Preparations from normal unstimulated neutrophils or stimulated neutrophils from a male patient with chronic granulomatous disease had negligible amounts of this O2.--generating enzymatic activity. The dominant chromophore in this preparation was a b-type cytochrome, the spectral and functional characteristics of which are further described herein. Pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of the intrinsic cytochrome b closely parallels O2.- generation in this preparation. Specifically, reduction occurs in preparations from phorbal myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils and is absent in unstimulated or stimulated p-chloromercuribenzoate-inactivated preparations.

  4. Induction of ERK-kinase signalling triggers morphotype-specific killing of Candida albicans filaments by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniok, Iwona; Hornbach, Anke; Schmitt, Corinna; Frosch, Matthias; Einsele, Hermann; Hube, Bernhard; Löffler, Jürgen; Kurzai, Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Candida albicans is among the most important fungal pathogens in humans. Morphological plasticity has been linked to its pathogenic potential as filamentous forms are associated with tissue invasion and infection. Here we show that human neutrophils discriminate between yeasts and filaments of C. albicans. Whereas filaments induced targeted motility, resulting in the establishment of close contact between neutrophils and fungal cells, yeast forms were largely ignored during coincubation. In transwell assays, C. albicans filaments induced significantly higher migratory activity in neutrophils than yeasts. Neutrophil motility based on actin rearrangement was essential for killing of C. albicans filaments but not involved in killing of yeast forms. Using inhibitors for MAP-kinase cascades, it was shown that recognition of C. albicans filaments by neutrophils is mediated via the MEK/ERK cascade and independent of JNK or p38 activation. Inhibition of the ERK signalling pathway abolished neutrophil migration induced by C. albicans filaments and selectively impaired the ability to kill this morphotype. These data show that invasive filamentous forms of C. albicans trigger a morphotype-specific activation of neutrophils, which is strongly dependent on neutrophil motility. Therefore, human neutrophils are capable of sensing C. albicans invasion and initiating an appropriate early immune response.

  5. [The participation of neutrophilic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic elevated blood immune complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidiuk, M M; Chop'iak, V V; Liubinets', L A; Pavlovich, S I; Nykytiuk, H P; Porokhovs'ka, Z S

    1997-01-01

    For reproduction of chronic hyperimmunocomplexemia model the classic Cochrane C. G., 1973 elaboration was used. The circulating immune complexes (CIC) were identified by precipitation methods, and fixated--by immunofluorescent in endothelium reproduction of aorta, and their clearance organs--liver and spleen. The estimation of neutrophil status was carried out according to rosette-forming neutrophils ability--by latex, zimosane, mieloperoxidasa, NST tests. The growth of large and middle CIC in vessel bed was estimated, their fixation in aorta bifurcation, and also on liver and spleen calls, but their intensivity is less, comparing to aorta endothelium. The neutrophil status was characterised by O-neutrophils growth, strengthening of capturing macrophages function, considerable activation of fermentative polynuclear systems, although reserve possibilities in them grew in less degree. Morphologic investigations allow to speak mediatingly about neutrophils participation in endotheliocytes damage, and also about their ability to secure the mononuclear cells further participation in damaging of aorta walls and partially of liver and spleen.

  6. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram J van Raam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their energy provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrane potential (Deltapsi(m, which is usually generated by the respiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of Deltapsi(m in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and HL-60 cells, and whether neutrophils can still utilise this Deltapsi(m for the generation of ATP. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual activity of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes was significantly reduced in neutrophils, except for complex II and V, but Deltapsi(m was still decreased by inhibition of complex III, confirming the role of the respiratory chain in maintaining Deltapsi(m. Complex V did not maintain Deltapsi(m by consumption of ATP, as has previously been suggested for eosinophils. We show that complex III in neutrophil mitochondria can receive electrons from glycolysis via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. Furthermore, respiratory supercomplexes, which contribute to efficient coupling of the respiratory chain to ATP synthesis, were lacking in neutrophil mitochondria. When HL-60 cells were differentiated to neutrophil-like cells, they lost mitochondrial supercomplex organisation while gaining increased aerobic glycolysis, just like neutrophils. CONCLUSIONS: We show that neutrophils can maintain Deltapsi(m via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, whereby their mitochondria play an important role in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis, rather than producing energy themselves. This peculiar mitochondrial phenotype is acquired during differentiation from myeloid precursors.

  7. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  8. Nucleobindin co-localizes and associates with cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Leclerc

    Full Text Available The inducible cyclooxygenase isoform (COX-2 is associated with inflammation, tumorigenesis, as well as with physiological events. Despite efforts deployed in order to understand the biology of this multi-faceted enzyme, much remains to be understood. Nucleobindin (Nuc, a ubiquitous Ca(2+-binding protein, possesses a putative COX-binding domain. In this study, we investigated its expression and subcellular localization in human neutrophils, its affinity for COX-2 as well as its possible impact on PGE(2 biosynthesis. Complementary subcellular localization approaches including nitrogen cavitation coupled to Percoll fractionation, immunofluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy collectively placed Nuc, COX-2, and all of the main enzymes involved in prostanoid synthesis, in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum of human neutrophils. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated a high affinity between Nuc and COX-2. Addition of human recombinant (hr Nuc to purified hrCOX-2 dose-dependently caused an increase in PGE(2 biosynthesis in response to arachidonic acid. Co-incubation of Nuc with COX-2-expressing neutrophil lysates also increased their capacity to produce PGE(2. Moreover, neutrophil transfection with hrNuc specifically enhanced PGE(2 biosynthesis. Together, these results identify a COX-2-associated protein which may have an impact in prostanoid biosynthesis.

  9. A serine proteinase inhibitor isolated from Tamarindus indica seeds and its effects on the release of human neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fook, J M S L L; Macedo, L L P; Moura, G E D D; Teixeira, F M; Oliveira, A S; Queiroz, A F S; Sales, M P

    2005-05-01

    Proteinaceous inhibitors with high inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) were found in seeds of the Tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica). A serine proteinase inhibitor denoted PG50 was purified using ammonium sulphate and acetone precipitation followed by Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-50 gel filtration chromatographies. Inhibitor PG50 showed a Mr of 14.9 K on Sephadex G-50 calibrated column and a Mr of 11.6 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PG50 had selective activity while cysteine proteinases (papain and bromelain) and serine proteinases (porcine pancreatic elastase and bovine chymotrypsin) were not inhibited, it was strongly effective against serine proteinases such as bovine trypsin and isolated human neutrophil elastase. The IC50 value was determined to be 55.96 microg.mL-1. PG50 showed neither cytotoxic nor haemolytic activity on human blood cells. After pre-incubation of PG50 with cytochalasin B, the exocytosis of elastase was initiated using PAF and fMLP. PG50 exhibited different inhibition on elastase release by PAF, at 44.6% and on release by fMLP, at 28.4%. These results showed that PG50 preferentially affected elastase release by PAF stimuli and this may indicate selective inhibition on PAF receptors.

  10. Prepartal dietary energy level affects peripartal bovine blood neutrophil metabolic, antioxidant, and inflammatory gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z; Bu, D P; Vailati Riboni, M; Khan, M J; Graugnard, D E; Luo, J; Cardoso, F C; Loor, J J

    2015-08-01

    During the dry period, cows can easily overconsume higher-grain diets, a scenario that could impair immune function during the peripartal period. Objectives were to investigate the effects of energy overfeeding on expression profile of genes associated with inflammation, lipid metabolism, and neutrophil function, in 12 multiparous Holstein cows (n=6/dietary group) fed control [CON, 1.34 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM)] or higher-energy (HE, 1.62 Mcal/kg of DM) diets during the last 45 d of pregnancy. Blood was collected to evaluate 43 genes in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) isolated at -14, 7, and 14 d relative to parturition. We detected greater expression of inflammatory-related cytokines (IL1B, STAT3, NFKB1) and eicosanoid synthesis (ALOX5AP and PLA2G4A) in HE cows than in CON cows. Around parturition, all cows had a close balance in mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory IL1B and the anti-inflammatory IL10, with greater expression of both in cows fed HE than CON. The expression of CCL2, LEPR, TLR4, IL6, and LTC4S was undetectable. Cows in the HE group had greater expression of genes involved in PMNL adhesion, motility, migration, and phagocytosis, which was similar to expression of genes related to the pro-inflammatory cytokine. This response suggests that HE cows experienced a chronic state of inflammation. The greater expression of G6PD in HE cows could have been associated with the greater plasma insulin, which would have diverted glucose to other tissues. Cows fed the HE diet also had greater expression of transcription factors involved in metabolism of long-chain fatty acids (PPARD, RXRA), suggesting that immune cells might be predisposed to use endogenous ligands such as nonesterified fatty acids available in the circulation when glucose is in high demand for milk synthesis. The lower overall expression of SLC2A1 postpartum than prepartum supports this suggestion. Targeting interleukin-1β signaling might be of value in terms of controlling

  11. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  12. Neutrophil recruitment by human IL-17 via C-X-C chemokine release in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, M; Cui, Z H; Hoshino, H; Lötvall, J; Sjöstrand, M; Gruenert, D C; Skoogh, B E; Lindén, A

    1999-02-15

    IL-17 is a recently discovered cytokine that can be released from activated human CD4+ T lymphocytes. This study assessed the proinflammatory effects of human (h) IL-17 in the airways. In vitro, hIL-17 increased the release of IL-8 in human bronchial epithelial and venous endothelial cells, in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. This effect of hIL-17 was inhibited by cotreatment with an anti-hIL-17 Ab and was potentiated by hTNF-alpha. In addition, hIL-17 increased the expression of hIL-8 mRNA in bronchial epithelial cells. Conditioned medium from hIL-17-treated bronchial epithelial cells increased human neutrophil migration in vitro. This effect was blocked by an anti-hIL-8 Ab. In vivo, intratracheal instillation of hIL-17 selectively recruited neutrophils into rat airways. This recruitment of neutrophils into the airways was inhibited by an anti-hIL-17 Ab and accompanied by increased levels of rat macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (rMIP-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The BAL neutrophilia was also blocked by an anti-rMIP-2 Ab. The effect of hIL-17 on the release of hIL-8 and rMIP-2 was also inhibited by glucocorticoids, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These data demonstrate that hIL-17 can specifically and selectively recruit neutrophils into the airways via the release of C-X-C chemokines from bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a novel mechanism linking the activation of T-lymphocytes to recruitment of neutrophils into the airways.

  13. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D;

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  14. Semi-synthetic analogs of pinitol as potential inhibitors of TNF-alpha cytokine expression in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Khurshid A; Shah, Bhahwal A; Gupta, Kuldeep K; Pandey, Anjali; Bani, Sarang; Taneja, Subhash C

    2009-04-01

    Semi-synthetic analogs of pinitol were subjected to screening by determining TNF-alpha expression in human neutrophils using flowcytometry. Among the tested compounds, three derivatives displayed more than 50% inhibition of TNF-alpha cytokine secretion in LPS induced stimulated neutrophils and can be considered as potent anti-inflammatory moieties.

  15. Human platelets utilize cycloxygenase-1 to generate dioxolane A3, a neutrophil activating eicosanoid

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, MacEler; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David; Lauder, Sarah Nicol; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter William; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lip...

  16. IL-17A potentiates TNFα-induced secretion from human endothelial cells and alters barrier functions controlling neutrophils rights of passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosteen, Markus H; Tritsaris, Katerina; Hansen, Anker J; Dissing, Steen

    2014-05-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates leukocyte mobilization and recruitment. To better understand how IL-17A controls leukocyte trafficking across capillaries in the peripheral blood circulation, we used primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) to investigate their secretory potential and barrier function when activated with IL-17A and TNFα. Activation by TNFα and IL-17A causes phosphorylation of p38 as well as IκBα whereby NFκB subsequently becomes phosphorylated, a mechanism that initiates transcription of adhesion molecules such as E-selectin. Members of the neutrophil-specific GRO-family chemokines were significantly up-regulated upon IL-17A stimulation on the mRNA and protein level, whereas all tested non-neutrophil-specific chemokines remained unchanged in comparison. Moreover, a striking synergistic effect in the induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) was elicited when IL-17A was used in combination with TNFα, and IL-17A was able to significantly augment the levels of TNFα-induced E-selectin and ICAM-1. In accordance with this observation, IL-17A was able to markedly increase TNFα-induced neutrophil adherence to HDMEC monolayers in an in vitro adhesion assay. Using a trans-well migration assay with an HDMEC monolayer as a barrier, we here show that pre-stimulating the endothelial cells with TNFα and IL-17A together enhances the rate of neutrophil transmigration compared to TNFα or IL-17A alone. These results show that IL-17A and TNFα act in cooperation to facilitate neutrophil migration across the endothelial cell barrier. In addition, the synergistic actions of IL-17A with TNFα to secrete G-CSF appear to be important for mobilizing neutrophils from the bone marrow to the blood stream.

  17. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Siti M; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Edinur, Hisham A

    2015-10-01

    Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641-0.765), -3a (0.676-0.867), -4a (0.943-1.000) and -5a (0.529-0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study.

  18. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yang-Chang [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lan, Yu-Hsuan [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chang, Fang-Rong [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Wen [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  19. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  20. Role of gastric blood flow, neutrophil infiltration, and mucosal cell proliferation in gastric adaptation to aspirin in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T; Stachura, J; Dembinski, A; Majka, J

    1994-01-01

    Gastric mucosa exhibits the ability to adapt to ulcerogenic action of aspirin but the mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown. In this study, acute gastric lesions were produced by single or repeated doses of acidified aspirin in rats with intact or resected salivary glands and with intact or suppressed synthase of nitric oxide. A single oral dose of aspirin produced a dose dependent increase in gastric lesions accompanied by considerable blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, significant reduction in gastric blood flow, and almost complete suppression of biosynthesis of prostaglandins. After rechallenge with aspirin, the mucosal damage became smaller and progressively declined with repeated aspirin insults. Gastric adaptation to aspirin was accompanied by a significant rise in gastric blood flow, reduction in both blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, and a remarkable increase in mucosal cell regeneration and mucosal content of epidermal growth factor. Salivectomy, which reduced the mucosal content of epidermal growth factor, aggravated the initial mucosal damage induced by the first exposure to acidified aspirin but did not prevent the adaptation of this mucosa to repeated aspirin insults. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, eliminated the hyperaemic response to repeated aspirin but did not abolish the development of adaptation to aspirin showing that the maintenance of the gastric blood flow plays little part in this adaptation. In conclusion, the stomach adapts readily to repeated aspirin insults and this is accompanied by a considerable reduction in blood neutrophilia and the severity of neutrophil infiltration and by an extensive proliferation of mucosal cells possibly involving epidermal growth factor. PMID:7525421

  1. Neutrophils at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauseef, William M; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    blood to tissues in models of blood-borne infections versus bacterial invasion through epithelial linings. We examine data on novel aspects of the activation of NADPH oxidase and the heterogeneity of phagosomes and, finally, consider the importance of two neutrophil-derived biological agents: neutrophil......In this Review we discuss data demonstrating recently recognized aspects of neutrophil homeostasis in the steady state, granulopoiesis in 'emergency' conditions and interactions of neutrophils with the adaptive immune system. We explore in vivo observations of the recruitment of neutrophils from...

  2. Reduced expression of C5a receptors on neutrophils from cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Sørensen, O; Leslie, R;

    1998-01-01

    MLP was tested by measuring migration and exocytosis of myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. RESULTS: C5a mean fluorescence on neutrophils from neonates was significantly lower (22.4 (SD 3.5)) than in adult controls (31.5 (3.1)). Neutrophils from neonates migrated poorly towards both C5a and fMLP compared with those...... from adult controls. Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase, but not lactoferrin from neonatal neutrophils stimulated with C5a, was significantly lower than in adult controls. fMLP stimulation, on the other hand, resulted in significantly higher exocytosis in neonates. CONCLUSION: The lower expression of C5a...... receptors on neutrophils from neonates could be related to reduced C5a mediated exocytosis of myeloperoxidase....

  3. Rapid Detection of Neutrophil Oxidative Burst Capacity is Predictive of Whole Blood Cytokine Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Vernon

    Full Text Available Maladaptive immune responses, particularly cytokine and chemokine-driven, are a significant contributor to the deleterious inflammation present in many types of injury and infection. Widely available applications to rapidly assess individual inflammatory capacity could permit identification of patients at risk for exacerbated immune responses and guide therapy. Here we evaluate neutrophil oxidative burst (NOX capacity measured by plate reader to immuno-type Rhesus Macaques as an acute strategy to rapidly detect inflammatory capacity and predict maladaptive immune responses as assayed by cytokine array.Whole blood was collected from anesthetized Rhesus Macaques (n = 25 and analyzed for plasma cytokine secretion (23-plex Luminex assay and NOX capacity. For cytokine secretion, paired samples were either unstimulated or ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated (100μg/mL/24h. NOX capacity was measured in dihydrorhodamine-123 loaded samples following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA/ionomycin treatment. Pearson's test was utilized to correlate NOX capacity with cytokine secretion, p<0.05 considered significant.LPS stimulation induced secretion of the inflammatory molecules G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12/23(p40, IL-18, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα. Although values were variable, several cytokines correlated with NOX capacity, p-values≤0.0001. Specifically, IL-1β (r = 0.66, IL-6 (r = 0.74, the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12/23(p40 (r = 0.78, and TNFα (r = 0.76 were strongly associated with NOX.NOX capacity correlated with Th1-polarizing cytokine secretion, indicating its ability to rapidly predict inflammatory responses. These data suggest that NOX capacity may quickly identify patients at risk for maladaptive immune responses and who may benefit from immuno-modulatory therapies. Future studies will assess the in-vivo predictive value of NOX in animal models of immune-mediated pathologies.

  4. Endocytosis is required for exocytosis and priming of respiratory burst activity in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-06-21

    Neutrophil generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced by exposure to pro-inflammatory agents in a process termed priming. Priming is depending on exocytosis of neutrophil granules and p47(phox) phosphorylation-dependent translocation of cytosolic NADPH oxidase components. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was recently reported to be necessary for priming, but the mechanism linking endocytosis to priming was not identified. The present study examined the hypothesis that endocytosis regulates neutrophil priming by controlling granule exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis by isolated human neutrophils was inhibited by chlorpromazine, monodansylcadaverine, and sucrose. Exocytosis of granule subsets was measured as release of granule components by ELISA or chemiluminescence. ROS generation was measured as extracellular release of superoxide as reduction of ferrocytochrome c. p38 MAPK activation and p47(phox) phosphorylation were measured by immunoblot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA with the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test. Inhibition of endocytosis prevented priming of superoxide release by TNFα and inhibited TNFα stimulation and priming of exocytosis of all four granule subsets. Inhibition of endocytosis did not reduce TNFα-stimulated p38 MAPK activation or p47(phox) phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked TNFα stimulation of secretory vesicle and gelatinase granule exocytosis. Endocytosis is linked to priming of respiratory burst activity through ROS-mediated control of granule exocytosis.

  5. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eBarrientos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme Alu I was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins (histone 3, lactoferrin were quantified by western blotting, and dsDNA was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, lactoferrin, elastase and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  6. Macroautophagy is essential for killing of intracellular Burkholderia pseudomallei in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchai, Darawan; Riyapa, Donporn; Buddhisa, Surachat; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Titball, Richard W; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M; Ogawa, Michinaga; Tanida, Isei; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play a key role in the control of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the pathogen that causes melioidosis. Here, we show that survival of intracellular B. pseudomallei was significantly increased in the presence of 3-methyladenine or lysosomal cathepsin inhibitors. The LC3-flux was increased in B. pseudomallei-infected neutrophils. Concordant with this result, confocal microscopy analyses using anti-LC3 antibodies revealed that B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes partially overlapped with LC3-positive signal at 3 and 6 h postinfection. Electron microscopic analyses of B. pseudomallei-infected neutrophils at 3 h revealed B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes that occasionally fused with phagophores or autophagosomes. Following infection with a B. pseudomallei mutant lacking the Burkholderia secretion apparatus Bsa Type III secretion system, neither this characteristic structure nor bacterial escape into the cytosol were observed. These findings indicate that human neutrophils are able to recruit autophagic machinery adjacent to B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes in a Type III secretion system-dependent manner.

  7. Calcium signalling in human neutrophil cell lines is not affected by low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Philippi, John G M; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-09-01

    We are increasingly exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) by electrical devices and power lines, but if and how these fields interact with living cells remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of LF EMF exposure on calcium signalling in neutrophils. In neutrophilic granulocytes, activation of G-protein coupled receptors leads to efflux of calcium from calcium stores and influx of extracellular calcium via specialised calcium channels. The cytoplasmic rise of calcium induces cytoskeleton rearrangements, modified gene expression patterns, and cell migration. If LF EMF modulates intracellular calcium signalling, this will influence cellular behaviour and may eventually lead to health problems. We found that calcium mobilisation upon chemotactic stimulation was not altered after a short 30 min or long-term LF EMF exposure in human neutrophil-like cell lines HL-60 or PLB-985. Neither of the two investigated wave forms (Immunent and 50 Hz sine wave) at three magnetic flux densities (5 μT, 300 μT, and 500 μT) altered calcium signalling in vitro. Gene-expression patterns of calcium-signalling related genes also did not show any significant changes after exposure. Furthermore, analysis of the phenotypical appearance of microvilli by scanning electron microscopy revealed no alterations induced by LF EMF exposure. The findings above indicate that exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal or Immunent LF EMF will not affect calcium signalling in neutrophils in vitro.

  8. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Lorena; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Le-Moal, Vanessa Lievin; Sandré, Catherine; Bianchini, Elsa; Nicolas, Valerie; Pallardy, Marc; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis, and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme AluI was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins [histone 3, lactoferrin (LF)] were quantified by western blotting, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase (ELA) activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, LF, ELA, and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating, and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  9. Effects of oxygen tension and pH on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Bearman, S I; Babior, B M

    1979-06-01

    The respiratory burst of human neutrophils was measured under conditions of hypoxia and low pH. O2 -- production by neutrophils activated with opsonized zymosan fell slowly as the oxygen concentration declined to 1%, then dropped more sharply, reaching negligible levels at oxygen concentrations less than 0.25%. Production was half maximal at an oxygen concentration of 0.35% (equivalent to approximately 10-microM dissolved oxygen). O2- production by the cell-free O2- -forming system prepared from zymosan-activated neutrophils showed a similar dependence on oxygen concentration. A drop in pH caused decreases in both oxygen consumption and O2-- production by zymosan-treated neutrophils, values at PH 6.0 being 10%--20% of those observed at pH 7.5. Experiments with the cell-free O2-- -forming system suggested that this decline in respiratory burst activity at low pH was due to inefficient activation of the O2-- -forming enzyme under acidic conditions.

  10. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J; Longhurst, Hilary J; Warner, Timothy D; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A; Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W; Murphy, Robert C; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2016-06-24

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation.

  11. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  12. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S

    1991-01-01

    strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients by the hot phenol-water method. Chemical characterization included neutral sugars, amino components, and fatty acids. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were preincubated with different concentrations...... of LPS. After preincubation, the chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of neutrophils to various stimuli were determined. It was shown that LPS from different strains did not exert the same degree of regulatory effect on neutrophil functions. LPS from strain 174-O:9 exerted the most pronounced effect...

  13. Propofol Treatment Inhibits Constitutive Apoptosis in Human Primary Neutrophils and Granulocyte-Differentiated Human HL60 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis regulation is essential for neutrophil homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that a process involving glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β determines neutrophil apoptosis. As for this apoptotic process, an overdose of propofol (2,6-Diisopropylphenol; 25 μg/ml or 140 μM) also causes GSK-3β-mediated macrophage apoptosis; however, the early deactivation of GSK-3β with low-dose propofol has been shown. Therefore, we hypothesize that low-dose propofol may induce neutrophil survival via GSK-3β inactivation. Following in vitro culture, the therapeutic concentration of propofol (10 μg/ml or 56 μM) treatment decreased constitutive apoptosis in isolated human primary neutrophils and in granulocyte-differentiated HL60 cells after all-trans retinoic acid (1 μM) treatment. The inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/AKT and the activation of GSK-3β results in myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) down-regulation, the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and caspase-3 activation in these cells, which is accompanied by apoptosis. Notably, propofol treatment attenuates these effects in a PI3-kinase-regulated manner. We found that propofol initiates PI3-kinase/AKT-mediated GSK-3β inactivation and Mcl-1 stabilization, rescuing the constitutive apoptosis in primary neutrophils and granulocyte-differentiated acute promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. PMID:26061531

  14. Modulation of human neutrophil oxidative metabolism and degranulation by extract of Tamarindus indica L. fruit pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Fabiana S; Kabeya, Luciana M; Kanashiro, Alexandre; de Figueiredo, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2009-01-01

    The tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) is indigenous to Asian countries and widely cultivated in the American continents. The tamarind fruit pulp extract (ExT), traditionally used in spices, food components and juices, is rich in polyphenols that have demonstrated anti-atherosclerotic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. This study evaluated the modulator effect of a crude hydroalcoholic ExT on some peripheral human neutrophil functions. The neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, triggered by opsonized zymosan (OZ), n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL and LucCL, respectively), was inhibited by ExT in a concentration-dependent manner. ExT was a more effective inhibitor of the PMA-stimulated neutrophil function [IC50 (in microg/10(6)cells)=115.7+/-9.7 (LumCL) and 174.5+/-25.9 (LucCL)], than the OZ- [IC50=248.5+/-23.1 (LumCL) and 324.1+/-34.6 (LucCL)] or fMLP-stimulated cells [IC50=178.5+/-12.2 (LumCL)]. The ExT also inhibited neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity (evaluated by O2 consumption), degranulation and elastase activity (evaluated by spectrophotometric methods) at concentrations higher than 200 microg/10(6)cells, without being toxic to the cells, under the conditions assessed. Together, these results indicate the potential of ExT as a source of compounds that can modulate the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  15. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  16. Andrographolide prevents oxygen radical production by human neutrophils: possible mechanism(s) involved in its anti‐inflammatory effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shen, Yuh‐Chiang; Chen, Chieh‐Fu; Chiou, Wen‐Fei

    2002-01-01

    .... To further elucidate the possible mechanism(s) underlying the ANDRO's effect, N ‐formyl‐methionyl‐leucyl‐phenylalanine (fMLP)‐induced adhesion and transmigration of isolated peripheral human neutrophils were studied...

  17. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation.

  18. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae exhibits reduced survival in human neutrophils via Src family kinase-mediated bacterial trafficking into mature phagolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M Brittany; Ball, Louise M; Daily, Kylene P; Martin, Jennifer N; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K

    2015-05-01

    During gonorrhoeal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial contents. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signalling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signalling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils' full antimicrobial arsenal.

  19. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Monch, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, P.

    2004-01-01

    receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing......To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin...... lesions. After migration to skin lesions, PMNs demonstrated a significant transcriptional response including genes from several different functional categories. The up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes concomitant with the down-regulation of proapoptotic genes suggested a transient anti-apoptotic priming...

  20. Binding of human serum albumin to single-walled carbon nanotubes activated neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2014-06-16

    Previous studies have shown that carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be catalytically biodegraded by hypochlorite (OCl-) and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, the importance of protein-SWCNT interactions in the biodegradation of SWCNTs was not stressed. Here, we used both experimental and theoretical approaches to investigate the interactions of SWCNTs with human serum albumin (HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in blood circulation) and found that the binding was involved in the electrostatic interactions of positively charged Arg residues of HSA with the carboxyls on the nanotubes, along with the π-π stacking interactions between SWCNTs and aromatic Tyr residues in HSA. Compared with SWCNTs, the binding of HSA could result in a reduced effect for OCl- (or the human MPO system)-induced SWCNTs degradation in vitro. However, the HSA-SWCNT interactions would enhance cellular uptake of nanotubes and stimulate MPO release and OCl- generation in neutrophils, thereby creating the conditions favorable for the degradation of the nanotubes. Upon zymosan stimulation, both SWCNTs and HSA-SWCNTs were significantly biodegraded in neutrophils, and the degree of biodegradation was more for HSA-SWCNTs under these relevant in vivo conditions. Our findings suggest that the binding of HSA may be an important determinant for MPO-mediated SWCNT biodegradation in human inflammatory cells and therefore shed light on the biomedical and biotechnological applications of safe carbon nanotubes by comprehensive preconsideration of their interactions with human serum proteins.

  1. Amburanins A and B from Amburana cearensis: daphnodorin-type biflavonoids that modulate human neutrophil degranulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canuto, Kirley M.; Silveira, Edilberto R., E-mail: edil@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Leal, Luzia K.A.M.; Lopes, Amanda A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (CEFAC/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Centro de Estudos Farmaceuticos e Cosmeticos. Departamento de Farmacia; Coleman, Christina M.; Ferreira, Daneel [Department of Pharmacognosy and the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, MS (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Two new biflavonoids 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-(2→O→4':3→3')-2',4',6',4- tetrahydroxydihydrochalcone (1) and 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-(2→O→7:3→8)-3,4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (2), named as amburanin A and amburanin B, respectively, were isolated from the trunk bark of Amburana cearensis, and their structures elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with literature data. The effects of 1 and 2 on the pro-inflammatory response of human neutrophils were investigated (0.1; 1; 25; 50 e 100 μg mL{sup -1}). At concentration higher than 25 μg mL{sup -1}, both compounds suppressed nearly 92% of the neutrophil degranulation and 53% of myeloperoxidase activity, thus indicating that they are potential anti-inflammatory lead compounds. (author)

  2. Invasive fungal infection and impaired neutrophil killing in human CARD9 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Agata; Gazendam, Roel P; Tool, Anton T J; van Houdt, Michel; Jansen, Machiel H; van Hamme, John L; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Roos, Dirk; Scalais, Emmanuel; de Beaufort, Carine; Janssen, Hans; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-03-28

    Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is an adaptor molecule in the cytosol of myeloid cells, required for induction of T-helper cells producing interleukin-17 (Th17 cells) and important in antifungal immunity. In a patient suffering from Candida dubliniensis meningoencephalitis, mutations in the CARD9 gene were found to result in the loss of protein expression. Apart from the reduced numbers of CD4(+) Th17 lymphocytes, we identified a lack of monocyte-derived cytokines in response to Candida strains. Importantly, CARD9-deficient neutrophils showed a selective Candida albicans killing defect with abnormal ultrastructural phagolysosomes and outgrowth of hyphae. The neutrophil killing defect was independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase system. Taken together, this demonstrates that human CARD9 deficiency results in selective defect in the host defense against invasive fungal infection, caused by an impaired phagocyte killing.

  3. Evidence for production of oxidizing radicals by the particulate O-2-forming system from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, A I; Gabig, T G; Babior, B M

    1979-04-01

    The particulate O-2-forming system from human neutrophils was found to oxidize methional and 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) to ethylene, indicating the formation by this system of strongly oxidizing radicals. Conforming this interpretation was the observation that ethylene production was inhibited by the radical scavengers benzoate, ethanol, and mannitol. Ethylene production was also sharply reduced by superoxide dismutase, implicatin O-2 as a precursor of oxidizing radicals. In our system catalase only partially inhibited ethylene generation from either methional or KMB, suggesting that oxidizing radicals are generated at least in part by the reacton of O-2 with compounds other than H2O2. We propose that in neutrophils oxidizing radicals are formed in a reaction between O-2 and a peroxide according to the following equation: O-2 + ROOH leads to RO . + OH- + O2, in which ROOH may be hydrogen peroxide, an alkyl peroxide, or an acyl peroxide (i.e., a peroxy acid).

  4. [Ultrastructural changes of neutrophilic granulocytes in dilated cardiomyopathy and their dynamics after blood irradiation with Helium-Neon laser in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomeriki, S G; Morozov, I A

    1998-01-01

    Venous blood from 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy was irradiated with a laser in vitro. The control group consisted of 20 healthy donors. The neutrophil granulocytes were separated at gradient centrifugation. Alterations of neutrophils manifested with an increase of specific cytoplasmic granules number, thickening of submembrane actin, cell configuration changes with a relative increase of their surface. Laser irradiation of the blood resulted in destruction of the altered (less resistant) cells while morphometric parameters of the remaining cells approaches those of donor cells. Thus, low-intensity laser irradiation results in the renewal of the neutrophil population in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and normalization of structural-functional changes in the circulating neutrophil population.

  5. The inhibition of oxygen radical release from human neutrophils by resting platelets is reversed by administration of acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, C M; Dunzendorfer, S; Pechlaner, C; Ricevuti, G; Wiedermann, C J

    2001-05-01

    Resting platelets inhibit oxygen radical release from neutrophils. Antiplatelet therapy may support this function by preventing platelet activation. Whether antiplatelet agents affect the antioxidative action of resting platelets in the absence of platelet activation is unknown. The effect of acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel administration on the antioxidative action of resting platelets was therefore studied in ten healthy volunteers. Preparations of resting platelets were obtained from 5 subjects each - before, during and after an eight-day course of daily treatment with 100 mg of acetylsalicylic acid or 75 mg of the thienopyridine clopidogrel. Human peripheral blood neutrophils were pretreated with the platelets at a ratio of (1/5)0 for 45 min; then formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-triggered oxygen radical release was measured fluorometrically. The inhibitory effect of platelets on oxygen radical release from neutrophils which was seen before treatment was abolished by antiplatelet therapy with either of the drugs, and inhibition was restored gradually after discontinuing acetlsalicylic acid/ clopidogrel intake. Results suggest that the protective role of resting platelets in controlling oxygen radical release from neutrophils in the absence of platelet activation may be impaired by antiplatelet therapy.

  6. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  7. A selective reversible azapeptide inhibitor of human neutrophil proteinase 3 derived from a high affinity FRET substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epinette, Christophe; Croix, Cécile; Jaquillard, Lucie; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Lalmanach, Gilles; Cadene, Martine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2012-03-15

    The biological functions of human neutrophil proteinase 3 (PR3) remain unclear because of its close structural resemblance to neutrophil elastase and its apparent functional redundancy with the latter. Thus, all natural inhibitors of PR3 preferentially target neutrophil elastase. We have designed a selective PR3 inhibitor based on the sequence of one of its specific, sensitive FRET substrates. This azapeptide, azapro-3, inhibits free PR3 in solution, PR3 bound to neutrophil membranes, and the PR3 found in crude lung secretions from patients with chronic inflammatory pulmonary diseases. But it does not inhibit significantly neutrophil elastase or cathepsin G. Unlike most of azapeptides, this inhibitor does not form a stable acyl-enzyme complex; it is a reversible competitive inhibitor with a K(i) comparable to the K(m) of the parent substrate. Low concentrations (60 μM) of azapro-3 totally inhibited the PR3 secreted by triggered human neutrophils (200,000 cells/100 μL) and the PR3 in neutrophil homogenates and in lung secretions of patients with lung inflammation for hours. Azapro-3 also resisted proteolysis by all proteases contained in these samples for at least 2h.

  8. Systemic inflammation in COPD visualised by gene profiling in peripheral blood neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, EJD; Nijhuis, EHJ; Zwank, MD; van de Graaf, EA; Mager, HJ; Coffer, PJ; Lammers, JWJ; Koenderman, L

    2005-01-01

    Background: The inflammatory process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD) is characterised by the presence of neutrophils in the lung that are able to synthesise de novo several inflammatory mediators. The local chronic persistent inflammatory response is accompanied by systemic effects

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  10. Expression and role of a2 vacuolar-ATPase (a2V) in trafficking of human neutrophil granules and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Tikoo, Anjali; Akman-Anderson, Leyla; Jaiswal, Mukesh; Ntrivalas, Evangelos; Beaman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Neutrophils kill microorganisms by inducing exocytosis of granules with antibacterial properties. Four isoforms of the "a" subunit of V-ATPase-a1V, a2V, a3V, and a4V-have been identified. a2V is expressed in white blood cells, that is, on the surface of monocytes or activated lymphocytes. Neutrophil associated-a2V was found on membranes of primary (azurophilic) granules and less often on secondary (specific) granules, tertiary (gelatinase granules), and secretory vesicles. However, it was not found on the surface of resting neutrophils. Following stimulation of neutrophils, primary granules containing a2V as well as CD63 translocated to the surface of the cell because of exocytosis. a2V was also found on the cell surface when the neutrophils were incubated in ammonium chloride buffer (pH 7.4) a weak base. The intracellular pH (cytosol) became alkaline within 5 min after stimulation, and the pH increased from 7.2 to 7.8; this pH change correlated with intragranular acidification of the neutrophil granules. Upon translocation and exocytosis, a2V on the membrane of primary granules remained on the cell surface, but myeloperoxidase was secreted. V-ATPase may have a role in the fusion of the granule membrane with the cell surface membrane before exocytosis. These findings suggest that the granule-associated a2V isoform has a role in maintaining a pH gradient within the cell between the cytosol and granules in neutrophils and also in fusion between the surface and the granules before exocytosis. Because a2V is not found on the surface of resting neutrophils, surface a2V may be useful as a biomarker for activated neutrophils.

  11. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Hwa-Yong [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Won, E-mail: chyj7983@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Warfare Research, The Armed Forces Medical Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Si-Nae [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Min-Soo [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Ja [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong-Keun, E-mail: dksong@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  12. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    . Neutrophils circulate in the blood as dormant cells. At sites of infection, endothelial cells capture bypassing neutrophils and guide them through the endothelial cell lining whereby the neutrophils are activated and tuned for the subsequent interaction with microbes. Once in tissues, neutrophils kill...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  13. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study was to characte......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...... with the hemagglutination-inhibiting activity of SP-D. HNPs had significant viral neutralizing activity against divergent IAV strains. However, the HNPs generally had competitive effects when combined with SP-D in assays using an SP-D-sensitive IAV strain. In contrast, cooperative antiviral effects were noted in some...

  14. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, Henning; Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Kaufmann, Roland; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Settmacher, Utz

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP) 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment. To further specify the role of α-defensins in tumourigenesis and progression, HNP1–3 were analyzed in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas of 87 patients and quantified in relation to cancer stage and grading. Using the ProteinChip arrays, HNP1–3 were found upregulated in both colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. By combining the array with Laser capture microscopy we were able to confirm that HNP1–3 are expressed by tumour cells but not by neutrophils or other tumour invading cells. These findings suggest that α-defensins are more likely to contribute to tumour growth than they are to mount an effective host anti-tumour response. However, the amount of HNP-expression was not found to be related to tumour stage, grading, and serological tumour markers. PMID:18957723

  15. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Houdt, Michel; Verkuijlen, Paul J J H; Herbst, Martin; Liese, Johannes G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-07-24

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils use 2 distinct and independent phagolysosomal mechanisms to kill Candida albicans. The first mechanism for the killing of unopsonized C albicans was found to be dependent on complement receptor 3 (CR3) and the signaling proteins phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), but was independent of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. The second mechanism for the killing of opsonized C albicans was strictly dependent on Fcγ receptors, protein kinase C (PKC), and reactive oxygen species production by the NADPH oxidase system. Each of the 2 pathways of Candida killing required Syk tyrosine kinase activity, but dectin-1 was dispensable for both of them. These data provide an explanation for the variable clinical presentation of fungal infection in patients suffering from different immune defects, including dectin-1 deficiency, CARD9 deficiency, or chronic granulomatous disease.

  16. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by the human neutrophil myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Genco, R J

    1986-07-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative coccobacillus associated with periodontal disease and nonoral infections. This organism is resistant to serum bactericidal mechanisms but is nevertheless killed by human neutrophils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms is inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggests that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride (MPO-H2O2-Cl-) system may be a key factor in the oxidative killing process. In this report, we examine whether the isolated MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is bactericidal against A. actinomycetemcomitans. We found that three major chromatographic forms of MPO were capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans at sublethal concentrations of H2O2 and that both catalase-positive and catalase-negative strains of this organism were sensitive to killing by the MPO-H2O2-Cl- system. We conclude that the isolated MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans independent of other neutrophil granule constituents and may be an important component of the oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity of the neutrophil with respect to this periodontopathic organism.

  17. Identification and cloning of the SNARE proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4 from HL-60 cells and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, J E; Hessler, R J; Nauseef, W M; Goedken, M; Joe, Y

    2001-08-01

    Degranulation and membrane fusion by neutrophils are essential to host defense. We sought homologues of neuron-specific fusion proteins in human neutrophils and in their precursors, the promyelocytic cell line HL-60. We screened a differentiated HL-60 library and obtained an 848 bp sequence with a 351 bp open reading frame, identical to that published for human VAMP-2 and including 5' and 3' untranslated regions. RNA from HL-60 cells during differentiation into the neutrophil lineage was subjected to Northern blot analysis. which revealed a transcript of approximately 1050 bp at all stages of differentiation. The amount of these transcripts increased approximately threefold during differentiation, a finding confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. We also detected mRNA for VAMP-2 in human neutrophils and monocytes using RT-PCR. In like fashion, transcripts of syntaxin-4, another fusion protein, were recovered from a neutrophil cDNA library. As with VAMP-2, expression of syntaxin-4 (determined by Northern blots) also increased, but by only 50%, during differentiation of HL-60 cells. These studies demonstrate that neutrophils and their progenitors possess mRNA for the fusion proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4, and that their transcription increases during differentiation, concurrent with the functional maturation of myeloid cells.

  18. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  19. СHANGES IN PARAMETERS OF LUMINOL-DEPENDENT AND LUCIGENIN-DEPENDENT CHEMILUMINESCENCE OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD NEUTROPHILS IN PATIENTS WITH BLADDER CANCER IN THE DISEASE DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kurtasova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with parameters of luminol-dependent and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL of peripheral blood neutrophils from patients with bladder cancer (BC prior to surgical treatment. We examined sixty patients (45 to 55 years old with advanced bladder cancer (TNM prior to the operation, and forty-six patients at 10 days after surgical treatment. A control group consisted of 56 healthy donors. Luminol-dependent and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of blood neutrophils was assessed according to De Sole et al. (1983. Chemiluminescence assays of peripheral blood neutrophils from the patients with bladder cancer revealed changes in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, both for initial stage of oxidation reaction, and total level of active oxygen radicals. We have found disturbed values of primary-to-secondary ROS ratio in the cells. In the patients with bladder cancer, some changes in oxidative metabolism of the blood neutrophils have been registered. These alterations may play an important role in promotion of potential effector cell functions, thus, probably, affecting the whole-scale development of a cytopathic effect exerted by neutrophilic granulocytes. 

  20. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like a-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of a......-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and Agr...

  1. Platelets may inhibit leucotriene biosynthesis by human neutrophils at the integrin level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannes, Bernard; Moliere, Patrick; Merhi-Soussi, Faten; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood platelets co-operate in several pathophysiological processes, and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in response to the activation of these cells are potent mediators of their functions. We studied the role of platelets in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase products from AA by autologous neutrophils, especially the chemotactic agent leucotriene (LT) B4. The formation of all products, namely 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), LTB4 and the other LTA4-derived metabolites, in response to the calcium ionophore A23187 was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. All the 5-lipoxygenase products were significantly diminished by physiological concentrations of platelets. This inhibitory effect was lost when platelets were previously degranulated by thrombin in non-aggregating conditions. Peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser or His-His-Leu-Gly-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val sequence, which prevent the adhesion of platelets to neutrophils via the fibrinogen released from platelet granules and the integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, markedly decreased the inhibitory effect of non-degranulated platelets. The production of transcellular metabolites of AA such as LTC4, the dual 5- and 12-lipoxygenase product 5,12-diHETE and lipoxins could not account for the decreased formation of 5-HETE and LTA4-derived metabolites. It is concluded that platelets may inhibit the neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase activity at the integrin level and in turn may play a role in slowing down the production of LTB4 in the course of inflammation.

  2. Francisella tularensis LVS evades killing by human neutrophils via inhibition of the respiratory burst and phagosome escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ramona L; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2006-12-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Recent data indicate that F. tularensis replicates inside macrophages, but its fate in other cell types, including human neutrophils, is unclear. We now show that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), opsonized with normal human serum, was rapidly ingested by neutrophils but was not eliminated. Moreover, evasion of intracellular killing can be explained, in part, by disruption of the respiratory burst. As judged by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and nitroblue tetrazolium staining, neutrophils infected with live F. tularensis did not generate reactive oxygen species. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that NADPH oxidase assembly was disrupted, and LVS phagosomes did not acquire gp91/p22(phox) or p47/p67(phox). At the same time, F. tularensis also impaired neutrophil activation by heterologous stimuli such as phorbol esters and opsonized zymosan particles. Later in infection, LVS escaped the phagosome, and live organisms persisted in the neutrophil cytosol for at least 12 h. To our knowledge, our data are the first demonstration of a facultative intracellular pathogen, which disrupts the oxidative burst and escapes the phagosome to evade elimination inside neutrophils, and as such, our data define a novel mechanism of virulence.

  3. Laboratory blood group examination of proteolysis degradation human blood

    OpenAIRE

    Beta Ahlam Gizela, Beta Ahlam Gizela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood group examination has many purposes and one of them is identification. In several forensic cases there is incompatibility of blood group in corpse and in other evidences usually used blood group examination is serum agglutination method. From the previous study, it was found that there was increasing osmotic fragility of red cell. For that reason, we need to know how the result of blood group tests in degradation human blood.Objective: The purpose of this study is to know bl...

  4. The innate defense regulator peptides IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulate human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonsaba, François; Madera, Laurence; Afacan, Nicole; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-07-01

    Although HDPs were originally hypothesized to act as antimicrobial agents, they also have been shown to broadly modulate the immune response through the activation of different cell types. We recently developed a series of novel, synthetic peptides, termed IDRs, which are conceptually based on a natural HDP, bovine bactenecin. We showed that IDR-1 and IDR-1002 protect the host against bacterial infections through the induction of chemokines. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the IDRs on various functions of human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrated that IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulated the expression of neutrophil adhesion and activation markers. Moreover, these IDRs enhanced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells in a β₂ integrin-dependent manner and induced neutrophil migration and chemokine production. The IDR peptides also increased the release of the neutrophil-generated HDPs (antimicrobial), human α-defensins, and LL-37 and augmented neutrophil-mediated killing of Escherichia coli. Notably, the IDRs significantly suppressed LPS-mediated neutrophil degranulation, the release of ROS, and the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-10, consistent with their ability to dampen inflammation. As evidenced by the inhibitory effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, IDRs activated the MAPK pathway that was required for chemokine production. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence regarding the contribution of the IDR peptides to the innate immune response through the modulation of neutrophil functions. The results described here may aid in the development of IDRs as novel, anti-infective and immunomodulatory agents.

  5. [Physiology and pathology of bactericidal activity in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, J

    1980-09-13

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils defend man against aggressions from pathogens. Under the combined influence of granulocytic and non-granulocytic factors, the defensive process develops by steps: the neutrophil moves towards the pathogenic organism which, one reached, is engulfed and killed. The killing systems of the cell are either oxygen-dependent or independent. the oxygen-dependent system is triggered off by stimulation of the cell membrane and involves various reactions, including cyanide-resistant oxygen consumption, production of activated oxygen, oxygen peroxide and halogenisation of the pathogen membrane. Impairment of the killing activity requires quantitative assessment of its various components in the presence of autologous or control serum with the view of: determining the origin (granulocytic or non-granulocytic) of the impairment, and identifying the step in oxygen metabolism that is affected. In the vast majority of non-granulocytic insufficiencies the cause lies in defective opsonins. In granulocytic insufficiencies, global failure of the system indicates chromic granulomatous disease, a syndrome that is now being dismembered. Defective halogenisation should lead to testing for deficiency of myeloperoxidase or abnormal degranulation. The non oxygen-independent bactericidal system, although highly effective in vitro, appears to be less important in vivo than the oxygen-dependent system. Little is known of its pathology.

  6. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes in lesions, spleens and blood neutrophils after burn injuries in mice treated with silver sulfodiazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhzari, Soheyla; Rezvan, Hossein; Zolhavarieh, Seyed Masoud

    2017-07-01

    It is now supposed that cytokines released during the burn injuries have a great impact on the immunological and pathological responses after the burn. The main objective of this study was to investigate the expression of some pro-inflammatory genes in the wound, spleen and blood neutrophils during the healing process of burn wounds in a murine model. The expression of ten pro-inflammatory genes were examined in wounds, spleens and blood neutrophils of mice with burn injuries treated with either silver sulfodiazine or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) using RT-PCR at the end of the first and second weeks after injuries. None of the pro-inflammatory genes were expressed in the skin, spleen and blood neutrophils of healthy mice. In the group control, IL-12P35, IL-12P40, CCR5, IL-1β and IFN-γ were expressed in the spleen and blood neutrophils in the first week. Instead, CCL5, CCR5, IL-1β and IFN-γ were expressed in the wound, but in the second week, the expression of the genes became similar. In the test group, in the first week, TNF-α, IL-12P35, IL-12P40 and IL-1β were expressed in the lesions, CCL4, IL-1α, IL-12P35, IL-12P40, CCR5 and IFN-γ were expressed in the spleen and no pro-inflammatory gene expression was detected in blood neutrophils. IL-1β and IFN-γ are expressed in wound, spleen and neutrophils of untreated mice, but not in silver sulfodiazine treated mice. Hence, treatment with silver sulfodiazine suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in some stages of healing.

  7. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes in lesions, spleens and blood neutrophils after burn injuries in mice treated with silver sulfodiazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheyla Akhzari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: It is now supposed that cytokines released during the burn injuries have a great impact on the immunological and pathological responses after the burn. The main objective of this study was to investigate the expression of some pro-inflammatory genes in the wound, spleen and blood neutrophils during the healing process of burn wounds in a murine model. Materials and Methods: The expression of ten pro-inflammatory genes were examined in wounds, spleens and blood neutrophils of mice with burn injuries treated with either silver sulfodiazine or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS using RT-PCR at the end of the first and second weeks after injuries. Results: None of the pro-inflammatory genes were expressed in the skin, spleen and blood neutrophils of healthy mice. In the group control, IL-12P35, IL-12P40, CCR5, IL-1β and IFN- γ were expressed in the spleen and blood neutrophils in the first week. Instead, CCL5, CCR5, IL-1β and IFN- γ were expressed in the wound, but in the second week, the expression of the genes became similar. In the test group, in the first week, TNF-α, IL-12P35, IL-12P40 and IL-1β were expressed in the lesions, CCL4, IL-1α, IL-12P35, IL-12P40, CCR5 and IFN- γ were expressed in the spleen and no pro-inflammatory gene expression was detected in blood neutrophils.  Conclusion: IL-1β and IFN- γ are expressed in wound, spleen and neutrophils of untreated mice, but not in silver sulfodiazine treated mice. Hence, treatment with silver sulfodiazine suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in some stages of healing.

  8. In vitro killing of oral Capnocytophaga by granule fractions of human neutrophils is associated with cathepsin G activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L

    1991-05-01

    The Capnocytophaga are inhabitants of the hypoxic human gingival crevice that are normally prevented by neutrophils from causing periodontal and systemic infection. To identify potential nonoxidative bactericidal mechanisms against Capnocytophaga within human neutrophils, gel filtration chromatography was used to fractionate neutrophil granule extracts. Seven granule fractions, designated A through G, were obtained. The Capnocytophaga were most sensitive to killing by fraction D. Fraction D exhibited substantial bactericidal activity under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The bactericidal activity associated with ion-exchange subfractions D8-D11, which contained primarily cathepsin G as assessed by enzymatic activity, amino acid composition, and NH2-terminal sequence. Heat-inactivation, diisopropylfluorophosphate, PMSF, and N-benzyloxycarbonylglycylleucylphenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone inhibited bactericidal activity against Capnocytophaga sputigena but not Escherichia coli. We conclude that (a) human neutrophil cathepsin G is an important antimicrobial system against the Capnocytophaga, (b) the bactericidal activity of cathepsin G against Capnocytophaga is oxygen independent, and (c) an intact enzyme active site is involved in the killing of C. sputigena but not E. coli. We suggest that human neutrophil cathepsin G is an important antimicrobial system against certain oral bacteria and that cathepsin G kills bacteria by two distinct mechanisms.

  9. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  10. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  11. Immunomodulation by α(1)-proteinase inhibitor: lack of chemotactic effects of recombinant human α(1)-proteinase inhibitor from yeast on human peripheral blood granulocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Mosheimer, Birgit; Alzner, Reinhard; Wiedermann, Christian J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Recombinant α(1)-proteinase inhibitor, clinically developed for inhalative augmentation therapy in patients with α(1)-proteinase inhibitor deficiency or cystic fibrosis, may directly contribute to leukocyte accumulation as it may function as a chemoattractant. The migratory effects of yeast-derived human recombinant α(1)-proteinase inhibitor on human peripheral blood neutrophils and eosinophils were therefore tested in vitro. Materials and Methods: Human peripheral blood leukocy...

  12. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D; Borregaard, N; Nissen, N I

    1991-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma undergoing GM-CSF treatment. Patients with either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with various dosages (2-16 micrograms kg-1 body weight per day for 5 days) of rhGM-CSF by intravenous or subcutaneous route. Prior to and on day 5 of rhGM-CSF treatment, neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence system may be enhanced by GM-CSF treatment and that this cytokine may be a useful therapeutic adjunct in compromised patients.

  13. Influence of botulinum C2 toxin on F-actin and N-formyl peptide receptor dynamics in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Stimulation of human neutrophils with the chemotactic N-formyl peptide causes production of oxygen radicals and conversion of monomeric actin (G-actin) to polymeric actin (F-actin). The effects of the binary botulinum C2 toxin on the amount of F-actin and on neutrophil cell responses were studied. Two different methods for analyzing the actin response were used in formyl peptide-stimulated cells: staining of F- actin with rhodamine-phalloidin and a transient right angle light scatter. Preincubation of neutrophils with 400 ng/ml component I and 1,600 ng/ml component II of botulinum C2 toxin for 30 min almost completely inhibited the formyl peptide-stimulated polymerization of G- actin and at the same time decreased the amount of F-actin in unstimulated neutrophils by an average of approximately 30%. Botulinum C2 toxin preincubation for 60 min destroyed approximately 75% of the F- actin in unstimulated neutrophils. Right angle light scatter analysis showed that control neutrophils exhibited the transient response characteristic of actin polymerization; however, after botulinum C2 toxin treatment, degranulation was detected. Single components of the binary botulinum C2 toxin were without effect on the actin polymerization response. Fluorescence flow cytometry and fluorospectrometric binding studies showed little alteration in N- formyl peptide binding or dissociation dynamics in the toxin-treated cells. However, endocytosis of the fluorescent N-formyl peptide ligand- receptor complex was slower but still possible in degranulating neutrophils treated with botulinum C2 toxin for 60 min. The half-time of endocytosis, estimated from initial rates, was 4 and 8 min in control and botulinum C2 toxin-treated neutrophils, respectively. PMID:2768337

  14. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathy-Hartert

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−. In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M, this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC. Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2− generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2 was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon. So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis.

  15. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system.

  16. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity...... and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes......, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth....

  17. alpha(4)-Integrin (CD49d) expression on bovine peripheral blood neutrophils is related to inflammation of the respiratory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soethout, E.C.; Rutten, V.; Houwers, D.J.; Groot, de H.S.J.; Antonis, A.F.G.; Niewold, T.A.; Muller, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophil emigration from the pulmonary vasculature, is mediated by cellular adhesion molecules (CAM) expressed on the outer membranes of endothelial cells and neutrophils. Although ß2-integrin-dependent migration is a major mechanism of neutrophil migration, which was demonstrated by extensive

  18. Isolation of Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-08-03

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments.

  19. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Alexander Bloes

    Full Text Available The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  20. Differential killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga spp. by human neutrophil granule components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Flemmig, T F

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether granule fractions of human neutrophils differentially kill Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga spp. Granule extracts were subjected to gel filtration, and seven fractions (designated A through G) were obtained. Under aerobic conditions at pH 7.0, representative strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans were killed by fraction D and variably by fraction B. In contrast, the Capnocytophaga spp. were killed by fractions C, D, F, and G. Fractions A (containing lactoferrin and myeloperoxidase) and E (containing lysozyme) exerted little bactericidal activity under these conditions. Anaerobiosis had little effect on the bactericidal activity of fractions D and F but inhibited that of fractions B and C. Electrophoresis, zymography, determination of amino acid composition, and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that fraction C contained elastase, proteinase 3, and azurocidin. Fraction D contained lysozyme, elastase, and cathepsin G. Subfractions of C and D containing elastase (subfraction C4), a mixture of elastase and azurocidin (subfraction C5), and cathepsin G (subfraction D9) were found to be bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of fraction D and subfraction D9 against A. actinomycetemcomitans was not inhibited by heat inactivation, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, or N-benzyloxycarbonylglycylleucylphenylalanylchloromethyl ketone. We conclude that (i) A. actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga spp. were sensitive to the bactericidal effects of different neutrophil granule components, (ii) both were sensitive to the bactericidal effects of neutral serine proteases, and (iii) the killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by cathepsin G-containing fractions was independent of oxygen and neutral serine protease activity.

  1. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Prevost

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing. Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze. A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration.

  2. DioxolaneA3-phosphatidylethanolamines are generated by human platelets and stimulate neutrophil integrin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceler Aldrovandi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated platelets generate an eicosanoid proposed to be 8-hydroxy-9,10-dioxolane A3 (DXA3. Herein, we demonstrate that significant amounts of DXA3 are rapidly attached to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE forming four esterified eicosanoids, 16:0p, 18:0p, 18:1p and 18:0a/DXA3-PEs that can activate neutrophil integrin expression. These lipids comprise the majority of DXA3 generated by platelets, are formed in ng amounts (24.3±6.1 ng/2×108 and remain membrane bound. Pharmacological studies revealed DXA3-PE formation involves cyclooxygenase-1 (COX, protease-activated receptors (PAR 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, phospholipase C and intracellular calcium. They are generated primarily via esterification of newly formed DXA3, but can also be formed in vitro via co-oxidation of PE during COX-1 co-oxidation of arachidonate. All four DXA3-PEs were detected in human clots. Purified platelet DXA3-PE activated neutrophil Mac-1 expression, independently of its hydrolysis to the free eicosanoid. This study demonstrates the structures and cellular synthetic pathway for a family of leukocyte-activating platelet phospholipids generated on acute activation, adding to the growing evidence that enzymatic PE oxidation is a physiological event in innate immune cells.

  3. The Numerical Predominance and Large Transcriptome Differences of Neutrophils in Peripheral Blood Together Inevitably Account for a Reported Pulmonary Tuberculosis Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wang-Long; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Previous transcriptomic analysis revealed a 393-transcript signature (PTBsig), which is dominated by interferon inducible genes, in whole blood of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. Comparisons with a limited set of interferon-driven genes among separated monocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and neutrophils indicated that the signature is due to changes in neutrophils, the overwhelmingly predominant cell type. By extending the analysis to the entire 393 transcripts of PTBsig and by switching the cell proportions between separated monocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and neutrophils, we create putative PTBsig for whole blood (pPTBsig) in which CD4+ or CD8+ T cells or monocytes predominated or in which the cell proportions were unchanged. These putative signatures are then compared to the actual reported PTBsig. We show that, because of their predominance in peripheral blood and their larger transcriptional responses, neutrophils were indeed almost exclusively responsible for PTBsig. We caution that the functional significance of changes in other cell types might escape notice in transcriptome analysis that is based upon whole blood.

  4. An experimental evaluation of in vitro immunomodulatory activity of isolated compound of Ricinus communis on human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the in vitro immunomodulatory activity of Ricinus communis Linn (Euphorbiaceae was determined on human neutrophils. The isolated compound (tannin of R. communis leaves was screened for its possible immunomodulatory activity by carrying out nitroblue tetrazolium test, phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans, neutrophil locomotion and chemotaxis. The isolated compound was tested at concentrations, viz. 10 μg/ml, 20 μg/ml, 40 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml. The isolated compound of R. communis showed predominantly significant activity on human neutrophils in all the parameters tested, which was comparable to the standard and control at different concentrations, indicating the possible immunostimulating effect.

  5. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-12-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Partial characterization of lipids that develop during the routine storage of blood and prime the neutrophil NADPH oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Christopher C.; Clay, Keith L.; Thurman, Gail W.; Johnson, Chris A.; Ambruso, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Factors developed during the routine storage of whole blood and packed red blood cells that primed the neutrophil (PMN) reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase significantly by 2 weeks of storage, with maximal priming activity by product outdate (2.5 to 3.7 fold). These agents appeared to be generated by cellular constituents because stored, acellular plasma did not demonstrate PMN priming. The priming activity was soluble in chloroform. Priming of the oxidase by plasma and plasma extracts was inhibited by WEB 2170, a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist. Separation of the chloroform-soluble compounds from plasma by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated two peaks of priming activity at the retention times of neutral lipids and lysophos-phatidylcholines (lyso-PCs) for both whole blood and packed red blood cells, Analysis of the latter peak of PMN priming by fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy identified several specific lyso-PC species including C16 and C16 lyso-PAF. Further evaluation by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy demonstrated that three of these species increased dramatically over product storage time, while the other two species increased modestly, and paralleled the Increase in priming activity. Commercially available, purified mixtures of these lyso-PCs primed the PMN oxidase by twofold. When PMNs were incubated with this mixture of lyso-PCs, acetylated analogs of these compounds rapidly accumulated. Thus lipids, including specific lyso-PC species, develop during routine storage of cellular blood components, prime PMNs, and possibly play a role in the severe complications of transfusion therapy. PMID:7964126

  7. Differential Constitutive and Cytokine-Modulated Expression of Human Toll-like Receptors in Primary Neutrophils, Monocytes, and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shane O'Mahony, Uyenvy Pham, Ramesh Iyer, Thomas R. Hawn, W. Conrad Liles

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Toll-like receptors (TLRs comprise a family of proteins that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and initiates host innate immune responses. Neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages are critical cellular components of the human innate immune system. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, have been shown to up-regulate microbicidal activity in these effector cells of innate immunity. Currently, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects are not completely understood. We hypothesized that these cytokines may up-regulate TLR expression as a mechanism to facilitate microbial recognition and augment the innate immune response. Using quantitative realtime rt-PCR technology, we examined constitutive expression of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 mRNA and the effects of G-CSF, GM-CSF, M-CSF, and IFN-γ on TLR mRNA expression in purified populations of normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Relative constitutive expression of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 was similar in neutrophils and monocytes. Constitutive expression of TLR5 was less in neutrophils compared to monocytes. Constitutive expression of TLR4 was greater and that of TLR9 lower in monocyte-derived macrophages compared to monocytes. Of the cytokines examined, IFN-γ and GM-CSF caused the greatest effects on TLR expression. IFN- γ up-regulated TLR2 and TLR4 in neutrophils and monocytes. GM-CSF up-regulated expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in neutrophils and TLR2 in monocytes. TLR5 was down-regulated by inflammatory cytokines in monocytes. These results suggest a potential role for IFN- γ and/or GM-CSF as therapeutic immunomodulators of the host defense to infection.

  8. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites of a Marine Bacillus sp. Inhibit Superoxide Generation and Elastase Release in Human Neutrophils by Blocking Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Ting Huang; Tsong-Long Hwang; Pei-Jen Chung; Jimmy Kuo; Shun-Chin Yang; Wen-Yi Chang; Chwan-Fwu Lin

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited supero...

  9. Influence of subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone on opsonization and killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, M T; Babin-Chevaye, C; Hakim, J

    1988-09-01

    Ceftriaxone, a 2-aminothiazolyl cephalosporin does not alter human neutrophil (PMN) bactericidal function. However, low concentrations of ceftriaxone induce some bacterial strains to be more sensitive to PMN killing. We have studied the effect of a subinhibitory concentration of ceftriaxone (10 mg/l) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC greater than 128 mg/l). After an overnight exposure to this concentration of ceftriaxone, P. aeruginosa elongated into filaments. PMN killing of ceftriaxone-treated bacteria was better than killing of control bacteria. This enhanced killing was correlated with an increased sensitivity to oxygen-dependent bacterial killing. Furthermore, the altered bacteria induced a greater oxidative response of PMN which was independent of their chemiluminescence response after stimulation by control P. aeruginosa. This increased oxidative burst was attributable to both non-opsonodependent stimulation and to increased deposit of opsonins.

  10. Inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by labdane diterpenes from the fruiting bodies of Ramaria formosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Kwan-Chul; Yoo, Ick-Dong; Ha, Byung-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Two new labdane diterpenes (1 and 2) were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ramaria formosa. The structures of these compounds were established by extensive spectroscopic studies and chemical evidence. The inhibitory activity of compounds 1 and 2 against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was evaluated in vitro. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HNE activity moderately. The IC50 values for compounds 1 and 2 were 36.4 ± 1.2 and 40.8 ± 1.5 μM, respectively; the IC50 value for the positive control, EGCG, was 12.5 ± 0.8 μM. In addition, the mechanism by which 2 inhibited HNE was a mixed-type noncompetitive inhibition, with a Ki of 41.5 ± 1.8 μM.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nigranoic acid esters as novel human neutrophil elastase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoli; Feng, Li; Liu, Bo; He, Yi; Li, Yiming; Chen, Yegao

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) has been implicated as a major contributor in the pathogenesis of diseases, such as lung disorders and other inflammatory diseases. A series of 12 new nigranoic acid esters were regioselectively synthesised in good yields and evaluated for HNE inhibitory activity. Nigranoic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against HNE with the IC50 value of 3.77 μM, and six esters displayed considerable inhibitory effects on HNE with IC50 values in the range of 2.61-8.95 μM. The nigranoic acid esters having phenyls substituted with bromine and trimethoxyls (3h and 3b) showed stronger inhibitory activity on HNE than nigranoic acid.

  12. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  13. Evaluation of Toll-like, chemokine, and integrin receptors on monocytes and neutrophils from peripheral blood of septic patients and their correlation with clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, S.C.; Baggio-Zappia, G.L.; Brunialti, M.K.C. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Hospital São Paulo, Disciplina de Infectologia, Departamento de Medicina, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Disciplina de Infectologia, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assunçao, M.S.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Azevedo, L.C.P. [Hospital Sírio Libanês, Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Sírio Libanês, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Machado, F.R. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Hospital São Paulo, Disciplina de Anestesiologia, Departamento de Cirurgia, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Disciplina de Anestesiologia, Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salomao, R. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Hospital São Paulo, Disciplina de Infectologia, Departamento de Medicina, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Disciplina de Infectologia, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-11

    Recognition of pathogens is performed by specific receptors in cells of the innate immune system, which may undergo modulation during the continuum of clinical manifestations of sepsis. Monocytes and neutrophils play a key role in host defense by sensing and destroying microorganisms. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of CD14 receptors on monocytes; CD66b and CXCR2 receptors on neutrophils; and TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD11b receptors on both cell types of septic patients. Seventy-seven septic patients (SP) and 40 healthy volunteers (HV) were included in the study, and blood samples were collected on day zero (D0) and after 7 days of therapy (D7). Evaluation of the cellular receptors was carried out by flow cytometry. Expression of CD14 on monocytes and of CD11b and CXCR2 on neutrophils from SP was lower than that from HV. Conversely, expression of TLR5 on monocytes and neutrophils was higher in SP compared with HV. Expression of TLR2 on the surface of neutrophils and that of TLR5 on monocytes and neutrophils of SP was lower at D7 than at D0. In addition, SP who survived showed reduced expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on the surface of neutrophils at D7 compared to D0. Expression of CXCR2 for surviving patients was higher at follow-up compared to baseline. We conclude that expression of recognition and cell signaling receptors is differentially regulated between SP and HV depending on the receptor being evaluated.

  14. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  15. Mechanisms and target sites of damage in killing of Candida albicans hyphae by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, L; Wysong, D R; Meshulam, T; Wang, S; Diamond, R D

    1997-12-01

    Target sites of fungal cell damage were studied to define mechanisms of neutrophil-mediated killing of Candida albicans hyphae. Neutrophils induced hyphal cell wall damage, as evidenced by release of cell wall glycoproteins and confocal microscopic changes. Damage occurred in the presence of neutrophil granule extracts and did not require oxidants. However, oxidation of hyphal surface glycoproteins correlated strongly with parallel increments in fungicidal activity, suggesting that oxidants did contribute to maximal cell wall damage. Neutrophil oxidants also induced hyphal DNA fragmentation, primarily single-strand breakage, as shown by increased electrophoretic migration after nuclease-S1 DNA digestion at single-strand break sites. The onset of damage to hyphal cell walls and DNA preceded detectable neutrophil-mediated fungicidal effects. Likewise, hyphal amino acid and nucleotide turnover as well as ATP initially rose, then declined as lethal effects became detectable. Thus, preceding detectable fungal cell death, neutrophil oxidative and oxygen-independent mechanisms damaged defined targets.

  16. Neutrophil chemotaxis in cord blood of term and preterm neonates is reduced in preterm neonates and influenced by the mode of delivery and anaesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Birle

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections, even without any perinatal risk factors, are common in newborns, especially in preterm neonates. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis in term and preterm neonates compared with adults as well as neonates with different modes of delivery and anaesthesia. We analysed the expression of the adhesion molecule L-Selectin as well as shape change, spontaneous and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced transmigration of neutrophils in a flow cytometric assay of chemotaxis after spontaneous delivery with Cesarian Section (CS under spinal anaesthesia (mepivacaine, sufentanil, epidural anaesthesia (ropivacaine or bupivacaine, sufentanil or general anaesthesia (ketamine, thiopental, succinylcholine. Chemokinesis was higher (p=0.008 in cord blood neutrophils than in the adult ones, whereas those could be more stimulated by fMLP (p=0.02. After vaginal delivery neutrophils showed a higher spontaneous and fMLP-stimulated chemotactic response compared to neonates after CS without labor. Comparing different types of anaesthesia for CS, spinal anaesthesia resulted in less impairment on chemotaxis than general anaesthesia or epidural anaesthesia. The new flow cytometric assay of neutrophil chemotaxis is an appropriate and objective method to analyse functional differences even in very small volumes of blood, essential in neonatology. Term neonates do not show reduced chemotaxis compared to adults. Preterm neonates present with reduced chemotaxis and chemokinesis, confirming the well known deficits in their neutrophil function. The side effects of maternal drugs on the neonatal immune system have to be considered especially when the immune response is already impaired, as in preterm infants.

  17. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Mediates FcγRIIa/Toll-Like Receptor–4 Receptor Crosstalk in Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fudala, Rafal; Florence, Jon M.; Tucker, Torry; Allen, Timothy C.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Luchowski, Rafal; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-01-01

    Previous observations by our laboratory indicate that the presence of anti–IL-8 autoantibody:IL-8 immune complexes in lung fluids from patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) comprises an important prognostic indicator in the development and ultimate outcome of ALI/ARDS. We also showed that these complexes display proinflammatory activity toward neutrophils through the engagement of FcγRIIa receptors. Because sepsis is one of the most common risk factors for ALI/ARDS, the initial goal of our present study involved investigating the effects of LPS on the expression of FcγRIIa receptors in neutrophils. Our results indicate that LPS triggers an increase in the expression of FcγRIIa on the neutrophil surface, which leads to shortening of the molecular distance between FcγRIIa and Toll-like receptor–4 (TLR4). When such neutrophils are stimulated with anti–IL-8:IL-8 complexes, the TLR4 cascade becomes activated via the engagement of FcγRIIa. The underlying molecular mechanism has been subsequently examined and involves Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk). In conclusion, our study reveals the existence of Btk-dependent molecular cooperation between FcγRIIa and TLR4 signaling cascades in LPS-“primed” human neutrophils. Furthermore, we used fluorescence lifetime imaging to study the interactions between TLR4 and FcγRIIa in human alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS. The results from these experiments confirm the existence of the molecular cooperation between TLR4 and FcγRIIa. PMID:23239500

  18. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  19. Effect of human milk on blood and bone marrow cells in a malnourished mice model; comparative study with cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isabel; Salva, Susana; Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    We studied the impact of human (HM) and cow (CM) milk on the recovery of blood and bone marrow cells in malnourished mice. Results: both milks normalized serum albumin levels and improved thymus weight. HM was less effective than CM to increase body weight and serum transferrin levels. In contrast, HM was more effective than CM to increase the number of leukocytes and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Both milks induced an increment in mitotic pool cells in bone marrow and α-naphthyl butyrate esterase positive cells in peripheral blood. They also normalized phagocytic function in blood neutrophils and oxidative burst in peritoneal cells. Conclusion: both milks were equally effective to exert favorable effects on the number of the bone marrow cells and the functions of the blood and peritoneal cells involved in immune response. However, only HM normalized the number of leukocytes and increased the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood.

  20. Formation of Reactive Sulfite-Derived Free Radicals by the Activation of Human Neutrophils: An ESR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Garantziotis, Stavros; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) on human neutrophils and the ability of these immune cells to produce reactive free radicals due to (bi)sulfite oxidation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant heme protein in neutrophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma and inflammatory disorders. In the present study sulfite (•SO3−) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals are characterized with the ESR spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in the reaction of (bi)sulfite oxidation by human MPO and human neutrophils via sulfite radical chain reaction chemistry. After treatment with (bi)sulfite, PMA-stimulated neutrophils produced DMPO-sulfite anion radical, -superoxide, and -hydroxyl radical adducts. The latter adduct probably resulted, in part, from the conversion of DMPO-sulfate to DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of the radical adduct. This anion radical (SO4•−) is highly reactive and, presumably, can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. Therefore, we propose that the potential toxicity of (bi)sulfite during pulmonary inflammation or lung-associated diseases such as asthma may be related to free radical formation. PMID:22326772

  1. Peripheral venous blood neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio predicts survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Li Chen,1 Yanjiao Zuo,1 Lihua Zhu,2 Yuxin Zhang,3 Sen Li,1 Fei Ma,4 Yu Han,5 Hongjiang Song,1 Yingwei Xue11Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 2Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, Hebei, 3Department of General Surgery, Mudanjiang First People’s Hospital, Mudanjiang, 4Department of Breast Surgery, 5Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Accurate and useful predictors of gastric carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are lacking at present. We aim to explore the potential prognostic significance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR in advanced gastric cancer receiving S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX or oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOX regimen.Methods: We enrolled 91 patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from August 2008 to September 2015. The peripheral venous blood samples were collected before neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The NLR was divided into two groups: low NLR <2.17 group and high NLR ≥2.17 group. Univariate analysis on disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS were generated using the Kaplan–Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Prognostic factors were assessed by univariate analyses, and the independent prognostic factors were evaluated using multivariate analysis (Cox’s proportional-hazards regression model.Results: The univariate analysis showed that median DFS and median OS were worse for high NLR values than low NLR values before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (median DFS: 19.97 and 26.87 months, respectively, P=0.299; median OS: 25.83 and 29.73 months, respectively, P=0.405. Multivariate analysis showed that the NLR before neoadjuvant

  2. The stress of birth enhances in vitro spontaneous and IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in the human newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektaei-Karin, Elham; Moshfegh, Ali; Lundahl, Joachim; Berggren, Veronica; Hansson, Lars-Olof; Marchini, Giovanna

    2007-12-01

    The birth process induces fetal stress. Stress has profound effects on the immune system, also by acting on the trafficking of leukocytes, a process in which adhesion and chemotaxis are primordial and critical events for the development of effective antimicrobial defenses. The newborn is rapidly challenged by a microflora at the epithelia linings and therefore depending on early, innate immunity onset. The objective of the study was to investigate the immune response in cord blood from newborns in relation to different degrees of fetal stress, with focus on neutrophil chemotaxis. We analyzed in vitro transmigration ability of neutrophils and their CD11b expression, measured total white blood count (WBC) and the major leukocyte populations, interleukin (IL)-8, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and soluble E-Selectin, as well as relevant immuno-modulating hormones in infants born at term after Cesarean section prior to the start of labor (n = 55), normal vaginal delivery (n = 87), and assisted delivery (n = 26). Arterial pH and lactate were used as stress markers. We found that spontaneous and IL-8-induced transmigration ability of neutrophils from newborns after normal delivery was significantly higher compared with that of neutrophils from Cesarean section or from adults. With a progressive increase in fetal stress, there were significant elevations in total WBC, in particular neutrophils and monocytes, as well as an enhanced IL-8 and soluble E-Selectin level. Assisted delivery, associated with the highest degree of fetal stress in addition had an enhanced lymphocyte and monocytes count as well as an increased IFN-gamma level. There were significant direct correlations between neutrophils and monocytes, respectively, with cortisol, beta-endorphin, and prolactin. Interferon-gamma was directly related to dopamine, as well as to the lymphocyte and monocyte count. The setting of the HPA-axis at birth is a promoter of an alarm response and a surge of neuroendocrine immuno

  3. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  4. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Jena

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  5. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Prajna; Mohanty, Soumitra; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Kallert, Stephanie; Morgelin, Matthias; Lindstrøm, Thomas; Borregaard, Niels; Stenger, Steffen; Sonawane, Avinash; Sørensen, Ole E

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP) were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  6. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    . Neutrophils circulate in the blood as dormant cells. At sites of infection, endothelial cells capture bypassing neutrophils and guide them through the endothelial cell lining whereby the neutrophils are activated and tuned for the subsequent interaction with microbes. Once in tissues, neutrophils kill......Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow from stem cells that proliferate and differentiate to mature neutrophils fully equipped with an armory of granules. These contain proteins that enable the neutrophil to deliver lethal hits against microorganisms, but also to cause great tissue damage...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  7. Microparticles from stored red blood cells activate neutrophils and cause lung injury after hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belizaire, R.M.; Prakash, P.S.; Richter, J.R.; Robinson, B.R.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Caldwell, C.C.; Lentsch, A.B.; Pritts, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of stored blood is associated with increased complications. Microparticles (MPs) are small vesicles released from RBCs that can induce cellular dysfunction, but the role of RBC-derived MPs in resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock is unknown. In the current study, we examined t

  8. The role of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and red blood cell distribution width in the classification of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Y; Yilmaz, S; Akdogan, A; Halhalli, H C; Ozbek, A E; Gencer, E G

    2017-02-01

    Most febrile seizures occur outside of hospitals, and in most cases, information about the characteristics of the seizures is obtained from the parents. This makes it difficult to differentiate between simple and complex seizures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance of the Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) and the red blood cell (erythrocyte) distribution width (RDW) in distinguishing between simple and complex febrile seizures. The files of 142 patients between the ages of 6 months and 5 years who were admitted to the Emergency Department with the diagnosis of first febrile seizure were reviewed retrospectively. Complete blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) parameters obtained from the venous blood samples collected from the patients at admission were evaluated. The average values of NLR for simple and complex seizure groups were 2.38 ± 1.60 and 3.42 ± 1.77 respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p seizure groups were 16.15 ± 1.37 and 16.27 ± 1.53, respectively; the difference was not significant (p = 0.631). We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and chose a cutoff value of 2.315 for the NLR, and we found that the sensitivity and specificity were 62.7% and 53.8%, respectively (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.665, p = 0.001, confidence interval [CI] 0.573-0.756). We suggest that NLR may provide clinicians with an insight into differentiating between simple and complex febrile seizures; however, it does not produce a clear-cut distinction. We found that the RDW ratio is not useful in this differentiation.

  9. Effects of growth temperature on the ingestion and killing of clinical isolates of Listeria monocytogenes by human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Stecha, P F; Heynen, C A; Roll, J T; Brown, J F; Czuprynski, C J

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we compared three human isolates (F5380, Scott A, and Murray B) and one laboratory strain (EGD) of Listeria monocytogenes for their resistance to ingestion and killing by human neutrophils. We observed no substantial difference in killing among these strains when they were grown at 37 degrees C. Because it is likely that listerial growth occurs at lower temperatures during food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis, we also compared these strains after they were grown at 22 and 4 degr...

  10. Phagocytosis and killing of Candida albicans by human neutrophils after exposure to structurally different lipid emulsions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Naber, A.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To test the hypothesis that structurally different lipid emulsions have distinct immune-modulating properties, we analyzed the elimination of Candida albicans by neutrophils after exposure to various emulsions. METHODS: Neutrophils from 8 volunteers were incubated in physiologic 5 mmol/L

  11. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Influence of fluoroquinolones on phagocytosis and killing of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruger, Thomas; Morler, Caroline; Schnitzler, Norbert; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Nidermajer, Sabine; Horre, Regine; Zundorf, Josef

    2008-11-01

    Candida albicans infections often occur during or shortly after antibacterial treatment. Phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN) is the most important primarily defence mechanism against C. albicans. Certain antibiotics such as some fluoroquinolones (FQ) are known to influence phagocyte functions. Thus, we investigated the influence of older and newer FQ on the phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans by human PMN paying special attention to CD11b expression of these cells as an indicator of the degree of their activation. In order to obtain comprehensive and comparable results we tested 13 FQ over a wide range of concentrations and in a time dependent manner in a standardized approach. When used at therapeutic concentrations, the FQ tested did not influence to a clinically significant degree the phagocytosis or the killing of C. albicans by human PMN and also not their activation. However, at high concentrations those FQ with cyclopropyl-moiety at position N1 showed increase in CD11b expression and diminished phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

  14. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Novick, Richard P; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  15. Neutrophil influx measured in nasal lavages of humans exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, D.; Henderson, F.; House, D.

    1988-05-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) obtained by nasal lavage were counted to determine if ozone, an oxidant air pollutant, induces an acute inflammatory response in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of humans. Background data were obtained by the nasal lavages from 200 nonexperimentally exposed subjects. Then, using a known inflammatory agent for the URT, rhinovirus-type 39, the induction, peak, and resolution of an acute inflammatory response was shown to be documented by the nasal lavage PMN counts. To determined if ozone induces this response, 41 subjects were exposed to either filtered air or 0.5 ppm ozone for 4 hr, on 2 consecutive days. Nasal lavages were taken pre-, immediately post each exposure, and 22 hr following the last exposure. Lavage PMN counts increased significantly (p = .005) in the ozone-exposed group, with 3.5-, 6.5-, and 3.9-fold increases over the air-exposed group at the post 1, pre 2, and post 2 time points, respectively. Ozone induces an inflammatory response in the URT of humans, and nasal lavage PMN counts are useful to assay the inflammatory properties of air pollutants.

  16. High fidelity processing and activation of the human α-defensin HNP1 precursor by neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Tongaonkar

    Full Text Available The azurophilic granules of human neutrophils contain four α-defensins called human neutrophil peptides (HNPs 1-4. HNPs are tridisulfide-linked antimicrobial peptides involved in the intracellular killing of organisms phagocytosed by neutrophils. The peptides are produced as inactive precursors (proHNPs which are processed to active microbicides by as yet unidentified convertases. ProHNP1 was expressed in E. coli and the affinity-purified propeptide isolated as two species, one containing mature HNP1 sequence with native disulfide linkages ("folded proHNP1" and the other containing non-native disulfide linked proHNP1 conformers (misfolded proHNP1. Native HNP1, liberated by CNBr treatment of folded proHNP1, was microbicidal against Staphylococcus aureus, but the peptide derived from misfolded proHNP1 was inactive. We hypothesized that neutrophil elastase (NE, proteinase 3 (PR3 or cathepsin G (CG, serine proteases that co-localize with HNPs in azurophil granules, are proHNP1 activating convertases. Folded proHNP1 was converted to mature HNP1 by both NE and PR3, but CG generated an HNP1 variant with an N-terminal dipeptide extension. NE and PR3 cleaved folded proHNP1 to produce a peptide indistinguishable from native HNP1 purified from neutrophils, and the microbicidal activities of in vitro derived and natural HNP1 peptides were equivalent. In contrast, misfolded proHNP1 conformers were degraded extensively under the same conditions. Thus, NE and PR3 possess proHNP1 convertase activity that requires the presence of the native HNP1 disulfide motif for high fidelity activation of the precursor in vitro.

  17. The Bacillus anthracis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, Anthrolysin O, kills human neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rest Richard F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is an animal and human pathogen whose virulence is characterized by lethal and edema toxin, as well as a poly-glutamic acid capsule. In addition to these well characterized toxins, B. anthracis secretes several proteases and phospholipases, and a newly described toxin of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family, Anthrolysin O (ALO. Results In the present studies we show that recombinant ALO (rALO or native ALO, secreted by viable B. anthracis, is lethal to human primary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, lymphocytes, THP-1 monocytic human cell line and ME-180, Detroit 562, and A549 epithelial cells by trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release viability assays. ALO cytotoxicity is dose and time dependent and susceptibility to ALO-mediated lysis differs between cell types. In addition, the viability of monocytes and hMDMs was assayed in the presence of vegetative Sterne strains 7702 (ALO+, UT231 (ALO-, and a complemented strain expressing ALO, UT231 (pUTE544, and was dependent upon the expression of ALO. Cytotoxicity of rALO is seen as low as 0.070 nM in the absence of serum. All direct cytotoxic activity is inhibited by the addition of cholesterol or serum concentration as low as 10%. Conclusion The lethality of rALO and native ALO on human monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes supports the idea that ALO may represent a previously unidentified virulence factor of B. anthracis. The study of other factors produced by B. anthracis, along with the major anthrax toxins, will lead to a better understanding of this bacterium's pathogenesis, as well as provide information for the development of antitoxin vaccines for treating and preventing anthrax.

  18. Human neutrophils and oral microbiota: a constant tug-of-war between a harmonious and a discordant coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Edmisson, Jacob S.; Jimenez-Flores, Emeri

    2017-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils are a major component of the innate host response, and the outcome of the interaction between the oral microbiota and neutrophils is a key determinant of oral health status. The composition of the oral microbiome is very complex and different in health and disease. Neutrophils are constantly recruited to the oral cavity, and their protective role is highlighted in cases where their number or functional responses are impeded, resulting in different forms of periodontal disease. Periodontitis, one of the more severe and irreversible forms of periodontal disease, is a microbial-induced chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gingival tissues supporting the tooth. This chronic inflammatory disease is the result of a shift of the oral bacterial symbiotic community to a dysbiotic more complex community. Chronic inflammatory infectious diseases such as periodontitis can occur because the pathogens are able to evade or disable the innate immune system. In this review, we discuss how human neutrophils interact with both the symbiotic and the dysbiotic oral community; an understanding of which is essential to increase our knowledge of the periodontal disease process. PMID:27558341

  19. Ultra-structure and localisation of formazan formed by human neutrophils and amoebae phagocytosing virulent and avirulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halablab, M A; Bazin, M; Richards, L; Pacy, J

    1990-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila (LP) strains of differing virulence were incubated with a solution of nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) at a concentration of 1 mg.ml-1 in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga or human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Reduction of NBT to formazan occurred at a faster rate in the presence of virulent strains. Reduction appeared to be temperature dependent; at 37 degrees C the reaction rate was higher than at 20 degrees C. On microscopic examination, deposits of formazan around Legionella cells were observed inside amoebae similar to those deposited in human neutrophils. Electron microscopy revealed electron-dense particles surrounding virulent legionellae, which appeared to be associated with formazan formation. Formazan formation inside amoebae may suggest the presence of a respiratory burst against LP, which is more intense with virulent strains.

  20. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae resists extracellular human neutrophil elastase- and cathepsin G-mediated killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D. van der; Bootsma, H.J.; Burghout, P.; Gaast-de Jongh, C.E. van der; Hermans, P.W.M.; Flier, M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Although the Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide capsule is an important virulence factor, ~ 15% of carriage isolates are nonencapsulated. Nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae are a cause of mucosal infections. Recent studies have shown that neutrophils kill S. pneumoniae predominately through neutroph

  1. Mechanisms of interaction among subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, and gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, L A; Afnan, M

    1991-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that pretreatment of bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics enhances the susceptibility of the organisms to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Our purpose was to study a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action and to determine whether the mechanism and locus of action altered the sub-MIC effect. The following outcome measures were used: ingestion and killing of bacteria by PMNs, bacterial killing in the absence of phagosome formation, and binding requirements of the bacteria to PMNs. The antibiotics used were representative of a variety of classes, including beta-lactams (piperacillin and imipenem) and quinolones (ciprofloxacin). Bacterial uptake and killing were measured by using standard techniques, and results were analyzed by using the analysis-of-variance technique and Dunnett's t test. Pretreatment of Escherichia coli with all drugs showed significantly enhanced killing of bacteria by PMNs, which was independent of ingestion by the phagocytes. Even in the absence of phagosome formation, statistically significant killing persisted with piperacillin-pretreated bacteria but not with imipenem- or ciprofloxacin-pretreated organisms. The opsonization experiments showed that contact between bacteria and PMNs was necessary for killing to occur. The sub-MIC effect appears to be independent of the locus or mechanism of action of the antibiotic. It results in enhanced killing by PMNs which is independent of ingestion and also may persist even in the absence of phagosome formation. Killing is dependent upon specific contact between bacteria and an intact phagocyte.

  2. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  3. Optimization of N-benzoylindazole Derivatives as Inhibitors of Human Neutrophil Elastase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Letizia; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Giomi, Donatella; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Quinn, Mark T.; Giovannoni, Maria Paola

    2013-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is an important therapeutic target for treatment of pulmonary diseases. Previously, we identified novel N-benzoylindazole derivatives as potent, competitive, and pseudoirreversible HNE inhibitors. Here, we report further development of these inhibitors with improved potency, protease selectivity, and stability compared to our previous leads. Introduction of a variety of substituents at position 5 of the indazole resulted in the potent inhibitor 20f (IC50~10 nM), and modifications at position 3 resulted the most potent compound in this series, the 3-CN derivative 5b (IC50= 7 nM); both derivatives demonstrated good stability and specificity for HNE versus other serine proteases. Molecular docking of selected N-benzoylindazoles into the HNE binding domain suggested that inhibitory activity depended on geometry of the ligand-enzyme complexes. Indeed, the ability of a ligand to form a Michaelis complex and favorable conditions for proton transfer between Hys57, Asp102 and Ser195 both affected activity. PMID:23844670

  4. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites of a Marine Bacillus sp. Inhibit Superoxide Generation and Elastase Release in Human Neutrophils by Blocking Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ting Huang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1 plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA, an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  5. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-03

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  6. Low-Chlorinated Non-Dioxin-like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Present in Blood and Breast Milk Induce Higher Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neutrophil Granulocytes than High-Chlorinated Congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Fonnum, Frode; Walaas, Sven Ivar; Bogen, Inger Lise

    2016-12-01

    Despite their ban several decades ago, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) still pose a health threat to human beings due to their persistent and accumulative nature and continued presence in the environment. Non-dioxin-like (NDL)-PCBs have earlier been found to have effects on the immune system, including human neutrophil granulocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between ortho-chlorinated NDL-PCBs with a low or high degree of chlorination in their capability to induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human neutrophil granulocytes in vitro. We used some of the congeners occurring at the highest levels in blood, breast milk and food: PCB 52 representing the low-chlorinated congeners and PCB 180 the high-chlorinated congeners. In addition, the extensively studied PCB 153 was included as a reference compound. ROS production was assessed with the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence and DCF fluorescence assays. The involvement of intracellular signalling mechanisms was investigated using different pharmacological substances. At high concentrations (10-20 μM), PCB 52 induced more ROS than PCB 153 and PCB 180. The role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and/or ERK 5 signalling in PCB-induced ROS production was implicated through the reduction in ROS in the presence of the specific inhibitor U0126, whereas reduced ROS production after the use of SB203580 and SP600125 indicated the involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, respectively. In addition, the calcineurin inhibitor FK-506, the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and the antioxidant vitamin E reduced the levels of ROS. The intracellular signalling mechanisms involved in ROS production in human neutrophil granulocytes appeared to be similar for PCB 52, PCB 153 and PCB 180. Based on the results from the present and previous studies, we conclude that for abundant ortho-chlorinated PCBs

  7. alpha isoforms of soluble and membrane-linked folate-binding protein in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoier-Madsen, M.; Holm, J.; Hansen, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    supported the hypothesis that serum FBP (29 kDa) mainly originates from neutrophils. The presence of FBP/FR alpha isoforms were established for the first time in human blood using antibodies specifically directed against human milk FBP alpha. The alpha isoforms identified on erythrocyte membranes...... a non-functional FR beta on the surface, and, in addition, nanomolar concentrations of a secretory functional FBP (29 kDa) can be present in the secondary granules. A statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of functional FBP, probably a gamma isoform, in granulocytes and serum......, and in granulocytes and serum, only constituted an almost undetectable fraction of the functional FBP The FBP alpha in neutrophil granulocytes was identified as a cytoplasmic component by indirect immunofluorescence. Gel filtration of serum revealed a peak of FBP alpha (>120 kDa), which could represent receptor...

  8. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils.

  9. Identification of Lys49-PLA2 from crude venom of Crotalus atrox as a human neutrophil-calcium modulating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Md Tipu; Li, Hong-Mei; Lee, Yong Zu; Lim, Soon Sung; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-03-01

    We fortuitously observed a human neutrophil intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increasing activity in the commercially available phosphodiesterase I (PDE I), which is actually dried crude venom of Crotalus atrox. As this activity was not observed with another commercially available pure PDE I, we tried to find out the causative molecule(s) present in 'crude' PDE, and identified Lys49-phospholipase A2 (Lys49-PLA2 or K49-PLA2), a catalytically inactive protein which belongs to the phospholipase A2 family, by activity-driven three HPLC (reverse phase, size exclusion, reverse phase) steps followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. K49-PLA2 induced Ca(2+) infl ux in human neutrophils without any cytotoxic eff ect. Two calcium channel inhibitors, 2-aminoetoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (30 µM) and SKF-96365 (20 µM) signifi cantly inhibited K49-PLA2-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. These results suggest that K49-PLA2 modulates [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils via 2-APB- and SKF-96365-sensitive calcium channels without causing membrane disruption.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  11. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Mariano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS, Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS. qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  12. A combretastatin-mediated decrease in neutrophil concentration in peripheral blood and the impact on the anti-tumor activity of this drug in two different murine tumor models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Bille Bohn

    Full Text Available The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3-6 h and a late (>72 h increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3-6 h in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models.

  13. Development and Identification of a Novel Subpopulation of Human Neutrophil-derived Giant Phagocytes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Lena; Dyugovskaya, Larissa; Polyakov, Andrey; Rogovoy, Oksana; Leder, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are best known for their phagocytic functions against invading pathogens and microorganisms. They have the shortest half-life amongst leukocytes and in their non-activated state are constitutively committed to apoptosis. When recruited to inflammatory sites to resolve inflammation, they produce an array of cytotoxic molecules with potent antimicrobial killing. Yet, when these powerful cytotoxic molecules are released in an uncontrolled manner they can damage surrounding tissues. In recent years however, neutrophil versatility is increasingly evidenced, by demonstrating plasticity and immunoregulatory functions. We have recently identified a new neutrophil-derived subpopulation, which develops spontaneously in standard culture conditions without the addition of cytokines/growth factors such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-4. Their phagocytic abilities of neutrophil remnants largely contribute to increase their size immensely; therefore they were termed giant phagocytes (Gϕ). Unlike neutrophils, Gϕ are long lived in culture. They express the cluster of differentiation (CD) neutrophil markers CD66b/CD63/CD15/CD11b/myeloperoxidase (MPO)/neutrophil elastase (NE), and are devoid of the monocytic lineage markers CD14/CD16/CD163 and the dendritic CD1c/CD141 markers. They also take-up latex and zymosan, and respond by oxidative burst to stimulation with opsonized-zymosan and PMA. Gϕ also express the scavenger receptors CD68/CD36, and unlike neutrophils, internalize oxidized-low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Moreover, unlike fresh neutrophils, or cultured monocytes, they respond to oxLDL uptake by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Additionally, these phagocytes contain microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3B (LC3B) coated vacuoles, indicating the activation of autophagy. Using specific inhibitors it is evident that both phagocytosis and autophagy are prerequisites for their development and

  14. Infusion of hypertonic saline (7.5%) does not change neutrophil oxidative burst or expression of endothelial adhesion molecules after abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølsen-Petersen, Jens Aage; Rasmussen, Torsten Bøgh; Krog, Jan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies found hypertonicity to affect neutrophils in intact laboratory animals and in human blood cell cultures. We investigated whether infusion of hypertonic saline in a clinical relevant dose before hysterectomy affected peripheral blood neutrophils and their response to s...

  15. Proinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is the most abundant protein in gram-negative bacterial cell walls, heavily outweighing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein we present findings demonstrating the potent in vitro effects of BLP on neutrophil (PMN) activation status, function, and capacity to transmigrate an endothelial monolayer. PMNs are the principal effectors of the initial host response to injury or infection and constitute a significant threat to invading bacterial pathogens. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterised by significant host tissue injury mediated, in part, by uncontrolled regulation of PMN cytotoxic activity. We found that BLP-activated human PMN as evidenced by increased CD11b\\/CD18 (Mac-1) expression. Up-regulation of PMN Mac-1 in response to BLP occurred independently of membrane-bound CD14 (mCD14). A similar up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells was observed whilst E-Selectin expression was unaffected. PMN transmigration across a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was markedly increased after treating either PMN\\'s or HUVEC independently with BLP. This increased transmigration did not occur as a result of any direct effect of BLP on HUVEC monolayer permeability, assessed objectively using the passage of FITC-labeled Dextran-70. BLP primed PMN for enhanced respiratory burst and superoxide anion production in response to PMA, but did not influence phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. BLP far exceeds LPS as a gram-negative bacterial wall component, these findings therefore implicate BLP as an additional putative mediator of SIRS arising from gram-negative infection.

  16. Simultaneous mobilization of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) and formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, V; Gabig, T; McCarthy, L; Strour, E F; Leemhuis, T; English, D

    1992-08-01

    Mobilization of a distinct subset of specific granules provides a physiologically important mechanism to recruit Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) from an intracellular pool to the external surface of the neutrophil plasma membrane, where the functionally active heterodimer mediates several adherence-dependent processes that are crucial for adequate host defense and cellular inflammatory responses. We observed similar characteristics for translocation of Mac-1 and neutrophil formyl peptide receptors (FPR) and hypothesize that the readily accessible pools of both Mac-1 and FPR are colocalized within this specific granule subset. Plasma membrane levels of both FPR (assessed with 3H-FMLP) and Mac-1 (assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-Mo-1-labeled cells) were markedly downregulated in cells prepared at low temperature from blood cooled to 4 degrees C immediately after removal from the circulation. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 remained low on cells held at 4 degrees C. Upon warming, spontaneous upregulation of Mac-1 and FPR occurred with similar kinetics and temperature dependency. Translocation of both Mac-1 and FPR was markedly potentiated by exposure of cells to either fluoride ion (which has been shown by others to specifically elicit exocytosis of gelatinase-rich and vitamin B-12 binding protein-poor granules) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that markedly potentiates the neutrophils' host defense capabilities. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 on F-- or GM-CSF-treated neutrophils exceeded those present on cells incubated at 37 degrees C for extended time intervals, indicating that stimulated translocation may involve mobilization of an additional granule subset. Scatchard analysis showed that only low-affinity FPR were translocated during spontaneous and stimulus-dependent upregulation. To directly compare FPR levels on the surface of cells displaying varying levels of Mac-1 within a

  17. Compact NMR relaxometry of human blood and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistola, David P; Robinson, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry is a uniquely practical and versatile implementation of NMR technology. Because it does not depend on chemical shift resolution, it can be performed using low-field compact instruments deployed in atypical settings. Early relaxometry studies of human blood were focused on developing a diagnostic test for cancer. Those efforts were misplaced, as the measurements were not specific to cancer. However, important lessons were learned about the factors that drive the water longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times. One key factor is the overall distribution of proteins and lipoproteins. Plasma water T2 can detect shifts in the blood proteome resulting from inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In whole blood, T2 is sensitive to hemoglobin content and oxygenation, although the latter can be suppressed by manipulating the static and applied magnetic fields. Current applications of compact NMR relaxometry include blood tests for candidiasis, hemostasis, malaria and insulin resistance.

  18. The NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G

    1983-05-25

    A subcellular particulate fraction from normal neutrophils that was enriched in NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating activity (Gabig, T. G., Schervish, E. W., and Santinga, J. T. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4114-4119) has been further characterized. This preparation contained 0.25 +/- 0.02 nmol of flavin adenine dinucleotide/mg of protein and 0.28 +/- 0.01 nmol of cytochrome b/mg of protein. Measurable amounts of riboflavin or flavin mononucleotide were not present. The flavoprotein was completely resolved from the cytochrome b by selective bile salt extraction of the particulate oxidase fraction. The identical subcellular particulate fraction was studied in the neutrophils from two male patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from one of the chronic granulomatous disease patients had a cytochrome b component that was spectrally abnormal, but a normal content of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from this patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had fluorescence excitation and emission spectra that were identical to the normal flavoprotein. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from the second chronic granulomatous disease patient had a quantitatively and spectrally normal cytochrome b but less than 8% of the normal amount of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from the latter patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had no detectable flavoprotein by fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. It is postulated that these two patients represent distinct mutants in two separate components of the neutrophil NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase system, flavoprotein and cytochrome b.

  19. Sulfite-Mediated Oxidation of Myeloperoxidase to a Free Radical: Immuno-Spin Trapping Detection in Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Steinckwich, Natacha; Deterding, Leesa J.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Mason, Ronald P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies focused on catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite, leading to the formation of reactive sulfur trioxide (•SO3−), peroxymonosulfate (−O3SOO•) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals, which can damage target proteins and oxidize them to protein radicals. It is known that these very reactive sulfur- and oxygen-centered radicals can be formed by oxidation of (bi)sulfite by peroxidases. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated neutrophils that play a central role in host defense mechanisms, allergic reactions and asthma, is a likely candidate for initiating the respiratory damage caused by sulfur dioxide. The objective of the present study is to examine the oxidative damage caused by (bi)sulfite-derived free radicals in human neutrophils through formation of protein radicals. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. We found that the presence of sulfite can cause MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated human neutrophils. We trapped the MPO-derived radicals in situ using the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and detected them immunologically as nitrone adducts in cells. Our present study demonstrates that myeloperoxidase initiates (bi)sulfite oxidation leading to MPO radical damage possibly leading to (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions. PMID:23376232

  20. Data on human neutrophil activation induced by pepducins with amino acid sequences derived from β2AR and CXCR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Holdfeldt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data described here is related to the research article titled (Gabl et al., 2016 [1]. Pepducins with peptide sequence derived from one of the intracellular domains of a given G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR can either activate or inhibit cell functions. Here we include data on human neutrophil function induced by pepducins derived from β2AR (ICL3-8 and CXCR4 (ATI-2341, respectively. ICL3-8 exerts neither direct activating effect on the NADPH-oxidase as measured by superoxide release nor inhibitory effect on FPR signaling. ATI-2341 dose-dependently triggers neutrophil activation and these cells were subsequently desensitized in their response to FPR2 specific agonists F2Pal10 and WKYMVM. Moreover, the ATI-2341 response is inhibited by PBP10 and the peptidomimetic Pam-(Lys-betaNSpe6-NH2 (both are FPR2 specific inhibitors, but not to the FPR1 specific inhibitor cyclosporine H.

  1. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure Enhances Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils through the NADPH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Scheer, Marleen H; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society, and the potential biological consequences of exposure to these fields are under intense debate. Immune cells are suggested as possible target cells, though a clear mechanism is lacking. Considering their crucial role in innate immune activation, we selected an ex vivo exposure set-up with human neutrophils to investigate a possible correlation between neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation and LF EMF exposure. Our study shows that formation of NETs is enhanced by LF EMF exposure. Enhanced NET formation leads to increased antimicrobial properties as well as damage to surrounding cells. We found that LF-EMF-induced NET formation is dependent on the NADPH oxidase pathway and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LF EMF exposure does not influence autophagy and PAD4 activity. Our study provides a mechanism by which exposure to LF EMFs could influence the innate immune system.

  2. Solubilization of the O2(-)-forming activity responsible for the respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Kipnes, R S; Babior, B M

    1978-10-10

    On exposure to suitable activating agents, neutrophils sharply alter their oxygen metabolism, showing large increases in oxygen uptake, O2 and H2O2 production, and glucose consumption via the hexose monophosphate shunt. These metabolic alterations, which together are designated the "respiratory burst," are due to the activation of a system which catalyzes the reaction: 2O2 + NADPH leads to 2O2(-) + NADP. This O2(-)-forming system is found in a particulate fraction isolated from neutrophils which had been activated with opsonized zymosan. When these particles were treated with detergent under suitable conditions, the O2(-)-forming activity was released in a form which passed through a membrane filter capable of retaining species of Mr greater than 3000,000. Soluble O2(-)-forming activity was obtained from normal activated neutrophils, but not from normal resting neutrophils or from activated neutrophils obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited condition in which the respiratory burst is defective. O2(-)production by the soluble system required a reduced pyridine nucleotide as electron donor, and showed a quadratic dependence on the concentration of the solubilized preparation.

  3. Role for membrane fusion in the activation of the respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manara-Shediac, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Components of the respiratory burst oxidase reside in intracellular membranes of the tertiary granules in resting cells, yet oxidase activity in the activated cells occurs at the neutrophil surface. The role of degranulation in activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst was therefore investigated. Surface labeling experiments were carried out on resting and activated neutrophils using three impermeant labeling methods. Activated neutrophils labeled with (/sup 35/S) diazobenzene sulfonic acid showed a fourfold higher specific radioactivity than resting neutrophils. Similar results were obtained with the pyridoxal phosphate/borotritide labeling method. On the other hand, little difference in labeling was seen using the periodate/borotritide method which detects the carbohydrate of glycoproteins. These results suggest that either a large amount of protein, or a highly reactive protein becomes exposed upon activation. Resting, activated, and enucleated cells were labeled using the (/sup 125/I) lactoperoxidase method, then subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of these gels showed that two proteins of about 75 and 45 kD, are labeled at the external surface of enucleated and activated cells but not resting cells.

  4. Regulation of Discrete Functional Responses by Syk and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornin Ear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a critical role in innate immunity and also influence adaptive immune responses. This occurs in good part through their production of inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines, in conjunction with their prolonged survival at inflamed foci. While a picture of the signaling machinery underlying these neutrophil responses is now emerging, much remains to be uncovered. In this study, we report that neutrophils constitutively express various Src family isoforms (STKs, as well as Syk, and that inhibition of these protein tyrosine kinases selectively hinders inflammatory cytokine generation by acting posttranscriptionally. Accordingly, STK or Syk inhibition decreases the phosphorylation of signaling intermediates (e.g., eIF-4E, S6K, and MNK1 involved in translational control. By contrast, delayed apoptosis appears to be independent of either STKs or Syk. Our data therefore significantly extend our understanding of which neutrophil responses are governed by STKs and Syk and pinpoint some signaling intermediates that are likely involved. In view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions, our findings identify potential molecular targets that could be exploited for future therapeutic intervention.

  5. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  6. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Barquero-Calvo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs, enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  7. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  8. The respiratory burst oxidase of human neutrophils. Further studies of the purified enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, G A; DeLisle, D M; DeTogni, P; Gabig, T G; Magee, B H; Markert, M; Babior, B M

    1986-10-05

    A superoxide-forming oxidase from activated human neutrophil membranes was solubilized by two slightly different methods, then purified by "dye-affinity" chromatography. Kinetic studies of the purified preparations gave Vmax values of 5-10 mumol of O-2/min/mg of protein, and Km values for NADH and NADPH that were in reasonable agreement with values determined previously using particulate and crude solubilized preparations of the respiratory burst oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed prominent bands at 67, 48, and 32 kDa, together with some minor contaminants, whereas gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions gave a single major band that when eluted and re-electrophoresed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed bands at 67, 48, 32 kDa. We believe that all three bands represent oxidase components. The flavin content of the purified enzyme was 20.4 +/- 2.0 S.E. pmol of FAD/microgram of protein, whereas heme averaged 0.1 +/- 0.02 pmol/microgram and ubiquinone could not be detected. Assuming that the enzyme is composed of one 67-kDa subunit, one 48-kDa subunit, and one 32-kDa subunit (i.e. that its molecular mass is approximately 150 kDa), it can be calculated to have a turnover number of 700-1500 min-1, in agreement with a value reported previously for oxidase in a particulate O-2-forming system (Cross, A. R., Parkinson, J. F., and Jones, O. T. G. (1985) Biochem. J. 226, 881-884), and to contain the following quantities of redox carriers (mol/mol): FAD, 3.0; heme, 0.015; ubiquinone, less than 0.06. It remains to be determined whether this preparation represents the complete respiratory burst oxidase or is only the pyridine nucleotide dehydrogenating component of a more complex enzyme.

  9. Circulating platelet-neutrophil complexes are important for subsequent neutrophil activation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, Kristin N; Salmon, Gary P; Pitchford, Simon C; Liu, Wai L; Page, Clive P

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that platelets are essential for the migration of eosinophils into the lungs of allergic mice, and that this is dependent on the functional expression of platelet P-selectin. We sought to investigate whether the same is true for nonallergic, acute inflammatory stimuli administered to distinct anatomic compartments. Neutrophil trafficking was induced in two models, namely zymosan-induced peritonitis and LPS-induced lung inflammation, and the platelet dependence of these responses investigated utilizing mice rendered thrombocytopenic. The relative contribution of selectins was also investigated. The results presented herein clearly show that platelet depletion (>90%) significantly inhibits neutrophil recruitment in both models. In addition, we show that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, but not P-selectin, is essential for neutrophil recruitment in mice in vivo, thus suggesting the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for the recruitment of leukocyte subsets in response to allergic and nonallergic stimuli. Further studies in human blood demonstrate that low-dose prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli (CCL17 or CCL22) synergize to induce platelet and neutrophil activation, as well as the formation of platelet-neutrophil conjugates. We conclude that adhesion between platelets and neutrophils in vivo is an important event in acute inflammatory responses. Targeting this interaction may be a successful strategy for inflammatory conditions where current therapy fails to provide adequate treatment.

  10. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes. Preincubation of neutrophils with L. pneumophila sonicate did not affect phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes, whereas Listeria killing was significantly inhibited at sonicate concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/ml. The phenol phase of a phenol-water extraction, containing most...... of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), had no inhibitory effect on the listericidal activity of neutrophils. Killing of Listeria by monocytes was inhibited in a similar manner. The inhibitory activity was mainly recovered in the sonicate fraction above 100 kDa, suggesting that components organized in larger molecular complexes...... are most likely to represent the inhibitory factors. The inhibitory activity of L. pneumophila sonic extract appears to be related to inhibition of killing mechanisms since uptake of Listeria was not affected by the sonicate. Our observations indicate that as Legionella infection progresses, bacterial...

  11. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  12. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Campos; R C N Melo; L P Silva; E N Aquino; M S Castro; W Fontes

    2014-02-01

    Although titanium (Ti) is known to elicit a foreign body response when implanted into humans, Ti implant healing resembles normal wound healing in terms of inflammatory cell recruitment and inflammation persistence. Rough implant surfaces may present better conditions for protein adsorption and for the adhesion of platelets and inflammatory cells such as neutrophils. Implanted biomedical devices initially interact with coagulating blood; however, direct contact between the oxide layer of the implant and neutrophils has not been completely described. The aim of the present study is to compare the behaviours of neutrophils in direct contact with different Ti surfaces. Isolated human neutrophils were placed into contact with Ti discs, which had been rendered as `smooth' or `rough', following different surface treatments. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry were used to measure cell adhesion to the surfaces and exposure of membrane proteins such as CD62L and CD11b. Topographic roughness was demonstrated as higher for SLA treated surfaces, measured by atomic force microscopy and elemental analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray, showing a similar composition for both surfaces. The adhesion of neutrophils to the `rough' Ti surface was initially stronger than adhesion to the `smooth' surface. The cell morphology and adhesion marker results revealed clear signs of neutrophil activation by either surface, with different neutrophil morphological characteristics being observed between the two surface types. Understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating cell–implant interactions should help researchers to improve the surface topography of biomedical implant devices.

  13. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  14. Blood neutrophil bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus during cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Honoré, Stéphanie; Kirsch, Matthias; Plonquet, Anne; Fernandez, Eric; Touqui, Lhousseine; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Soussy, Claude-James; Loisance, Daniel; Delclaux, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    Whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitutes per se an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality after surgery as compared with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) remains a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to assess whether innate defenses against MRSA and MSSA strains are similarly impaired after cardiac surgery. Both intracellular (isolated neutrophil functions) and extracellular (plasma) defenses of 12 patients undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery were evaluated preoperatively (day 0) and postoperatively (day 3) against two MSSA strains with a low level of catalase secretion and two MRSA strains with a high level of catalase secretion, inasmuch as SA killing by neutrophils relies on oxygen-dependent mechanisms. After surgery, an increase in plasma concentration of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine able to inhibit reactive oxygen species secretion and bactericidal activity of neutrophils, was evidenced. Despite the fact that univariate analysis suggested a specific impairment of neutrophil functions against MRSA strains, two-way repeated-measures ANOVA failed to demonstrate that the effect of S. aureus phenotype was significant. On the other hand, an increase in type-II secretory phospholipase A2 activity, a circulating enzyme involved in SA lysis, was evidenced and was associated with an enhancement of extracellular defenses (bactericidal activity of plasma) against MRSA. Overall, cardiac surgery and S. aureus phenotype had a significant effect on plasma bactericidal activity. Cardiac surgery was characterized by enhanced antibacterial defenses of plasma, whereas neutrophil killing properties were reduced. The overall effect of S. aureus phenotype on neutrophil functions did not seem significant.

  15. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits.

  16. The in vitro effects of Newcastle disease virus on the metabolic and antibacterial functions of human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Humbert, J.; Lee, J.; Sutyla, P.; Ogra, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    Live Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was used to investigate the in vitro effects of a viral infection on phagocytosis, chemiluminescence generation, superoxide production, oxygen consumption, NADPH-oxidase activity, and intracellular killing of bacteria by Ficoll-Hypaque separated human neutrophils. Phagocytosis of oil red O particles by NDV-treated PMN was inhibited by 50%. Chemiluminescence by PMN was inhibited 79% after zymosan stimulation and 86% after tetradeconyl phorbol acetate stimulation. Superoxide generation was inhibited by 68%. Oxygen consumption was inhibited in the presence of NDV by 37% after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate, while membrane-associated NADPH-enzyme activity was decreased by 19%. The percent of surviving intracellular S. aureus was significantly elevated in NDV-treated PMN after 60 and 120 min of incubation. Purified bacterial neuraminidase markedly suppressed chemiluminescence, while neuraminic acid blocked the effects of the virus. These observations suggest that infections with myxoviruses may suppress a number of vital neutrophil functions. It appears that the effects may be partly mediated by the interaction of viral neuraminidase with the external neutrophil membrane.

  17. Human spleen and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  18. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Hidalgo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8 release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  19. Oxidative burst of circulating neutrophils following traumatic brain injury in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiliu Liao

    Full Text Available Besides secondary injury at the lesional site, Traumatic brain injury (TBI can cause a systemic inflammatory response, which may cause damage to initially unaffected organs and potentially further exacerbate the original injury. Here we investigated plasma levels of important inflammatory mediators, oxidative activity of circulating leukocytes, particularly focusing on neutrophils, from TBI subjects and control subjects with general trauma from 6 hours to 2 weeks following injury, comparing with values from uninjured subjects. We observed increased plasma level of inflammatory cytokines/molecules TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP, dramatically increased circulating leukocyte counts and elevated expression of TNF-α and iNOS in circulating leukocytes from TBI patients, which suggests a systemic inflammatory response following TBI. Our data further showed increased free radical production in leukocyte homogenates and elevated expression of key oxidative enzymes iNOS, COX-2 and NADPH oxidase (gp91(phox in circulating leukocytes, indicating an intense induction of oxidative burst following TBI, which is significantly greater than that in control subjects with general trauma. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay proved neutrophils as the largest population in circulation after TBI and showed significantly up-regulated oxidative activity and suppressed phagocytosis rate for circulating neutrophils following brain trauma. It suggests that the highly activated neutrophils might play an important role in the secondary damage, even outside the injured brain. Taken together, the potent systemic inflammatory response induced by TBI, especially the intensively increase oxidative activity of circulating leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, may lead to a systemic damage, dysfunction/damage of bystander tissues/organs and even further exacerbate secondary local damage. Controlling these pathophysiological processes may be a promising therapeutic strategy and will protect unaffected

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  1. Deletion of the SSK1 response regulator gene in Candida albicans contributes to enhanced killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chen; Calderone, Richard; Richert, John; Li, Dongmei

    2005-02-01

    The isolation and partial functional characterization of the two-component response regulator SSK1 gene of Candida albicans was previously reported. Compared to wild-type (CAF2-1) and gene-reconstituted (SSK23) strains, the ssk1 null strain (SSK21) was avirulent in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis and less able to adhere to human esophageal cells. More recent data indicate that SSK21 is sensitive to 4 to 8 mM H(2)O(2) in vitro than CAF2-1 and SSK23. Furthermore, microarray studies indicate that the regulation of two classes of genes, those encoding cell wall functions and stress adaptation, are altered in the ssk1 mutant. In the present study, the susceptibility of strains CAF2-1, SSK21, and SSK23 to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was assessed. Results are also described for a newly constructed ssk1 mutant (SSK24) in which the URA3 gene is integrated into its native locus. Our results indicate that killing of SSK21 and SSK24 was significantly greater than that of CAF2-1 and SSK23 (P killing activity of human PMNs, we compared the signal transduction activity and the inflammatory response gene profiles of PMNs infected with either the wild type or the ssk1 mutant. Phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p42/44 and p38 from neutrophils infected with either CAF2-1 (wild type) or SSK21 (ssk1/ssk1) was similar, while expression and phosphorylation of the JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase was not observed following infection with either strain. On the other hand, we observed an upregulation of seven inflammatory response genes in PMNs infected with the SSK21 mutant only, while an increase in interleukin-10 expression was measured in PMNs infected with either strain. Downregulation of interleukin-2 was observed in PMNs infected with either strain. Verification of the transcriptional profiling was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR for three of the genes that were upregulated in neutrophils infected

  2. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  3. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Woodman

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50 via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  4. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Michael E; Worth, Randall G; Wooten, R Mark

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50) via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  5. Human neutrophil elastase inhibition studied by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection and microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syntia, Fayad; Nehmé, Reine; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CZE-LIF) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) were used for the first time to study the inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We recently studied HNE kinetics (Km and Vmax) by developing an in-capillary CZE-LIF assay based on transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP) for reactant mixing. In this work, the former assay was adapted to monitor HNE inhibition. Two natural well known HNE inhibitors from the triterpene family, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, were tested to validate the developed assay. Since the solubility of pentacyclic triterpenes in aqueous media where the enzymatic reaction will take place is limited, the effect of DMSO and ethanol on HNE was studied using microscale thermophoresis (MST). An agglomeration of the enzyme was revealed when preparing the inhibitor in 5% (v/v) DMSO. This phenomenon did not occur in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, ethanol was used as inhibitor solvent, at a limited percentage of 20% (v/v). In these conditions and after optimization of the TDLFP approach, the repeatability (RSD on migration times and peak-areas inferior to 2.2%) of the CZE-LIF assay and the sensitivity (LOQ of few nM) were found to be satisfactory for conducting inhibition assays. IC50 values for ursolic and oleanolic acid were successfully determined. They were respectively equal to 5.62±0.10μM (r(2)=0.9807; n=3) and to 8.21±0.23μM (r(2)=0.9887; n=3). Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in literature which validates the developed method. Particularly, the CE-based assay is able to rank HNE inhibitors relative to each other. Furthermore, MST technique was used for evaluating HNE interaction with the ursolic acid. Up to 16 capillaries were automatically processed to obtain in one titration experiment the dissociation constant for the HNE-ursolic acid complex. Ki was found to be 2.72±0.66μM (n=3) which is in excellent agreement

  6. Supplemental Smartamine M or MetaSmart during the transition period benefits postpartal cow performance and blood neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, J S; Ji, P; Drackley, J K; Luchini, D; Loor, J J

    2013-10-01

    source increased milk yield, milk protein percentage, energy-corrected milk, and milk fat yield by 3.4 kg/d, 0.18% units, 3.9 kg/d, and 0.18 kg/d, respectively. Those responses were associated with greater postpartum concentration of growth hormone but not insulin-like growth factor 1. There was a diet × time effect for nonesterified fatty acid concentration due to greater values on d 7 for MS; however, liver concentration of triacylglycerol was not affected by diet or diet × time but increased postpartum. Blood neutrophil phagocytosis at 21 d was greater with Met supplementation, suggesting better immune function. Supplemental MS or SM resulted in a tendency for lower incidence of ketosis postpartum. Although supplemental MS or SM did not decrease liver triacylglycerol, it improved milk production-related traits by enhancing voluntary DMI.

  7. Neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatology: Caught in the NET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jochen H O; Enk, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    Neutrophil, or polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) constitute the most abundant type of leucocytes in peripheral human blood. One of the major advances in the last decade was the discovery of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation: a process by which neutrophils externalize web-like chromatin strands decorated with antimicrobial peptides. These structures were soon implicated in immune defense and auto-immunity alike and now link neutrophils to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases of dermatological relevance. Currently, NET formation is mainly subdivided into suicidal and vital NETosis. Controversy exists regarding the capacity of NETs to kill pathogens, and little is known about the way NETs are formed in vivo. Here, we discuss the current terminology, methods for NET quantification, pathways leading to NET formation, and the role of NETs in systemic and cutaneous immune defense and auto-immunity, with a focus on psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  8. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... of YKL-40 is unknown, but the pattern of its expression in normal and disease states suggests that it could function in remodeling or degradation of the extracellular matrix. High levels of YKL-40 are found in synovial fluid from patients with active RA. Neutrophils are abundant in synovial fluid...

  9. Blood type biochemistry and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, D Rose; Sumner, Susan C J

    2016-11-01

    Associations between blood type and disease have been studied since the early 1900s when researchers determined that antibodies and antigens are inherited. In the 1950s, the chemical identification of the carbohydrate structure of surface antigens led to the understanding of biosynthetic pathways. The blood type is defined by oligosaccharide structures, which are specific to the antigens, thus, blood group antigens are secondary gene products, while the primary gene products are various glycosyltransferase enzymes that attach the sugar molecules to the oligosaccharide chain. Blood group antigens are found on red blood cells, platelets, leukocytes, plasma proteins, certain tissues, and various cell surface enzymes, and also exist in soluble form in body secretions such as breast milk, seminal fluid, saliva, sweat, gastric secretions, urine, and amniotic fluid. Recent advances in technology, biochemistry, and genetics have clarified the functional classifications of human blood group antigens, the structure of the A, B, H, and Lewis determinants and the enzymes that produce them, and the association of blood group antigens with disease risks. Further research to identify differences in the biochemical composition of blood group antigens, and the relationship to risks for disease, can be important for the identification of targets for the development of nutritional intervention strategies, or the identification of druggable targets. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:517-535. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Propofol inhibits superoxide production, elastase release, and chemotaxis in formyl peptide-activated human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Chung, Pei-Jen; Ho, Chiu-Ming; Kuo, Chan-Yen; Hung, Min-Fa; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chang, Ya-Wen; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-15

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory processes, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Binding of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) by N-formyl peptides can activate neutrophils and may represent a new therapeutic target in either sterile or septic inflammation. Propofol, a widely used i.v. anesthetic, has been shown to modulate immunoinflammatory responses. However, the mechanism of propofol remains to be established. In this study, we showed that propofol significantly reduced superoxide generation, elastase release, and chemotaxis in human neutrophils activated by fMLF. Propofol did not alter superoxide generation or elastase release in a cell-free system. Neither inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors nor an inhibitor of protein kinase A reversed the inhibitory effects of propofol. In addition, propofol showed less inhibitory effects in non-FPR1-induced cell responses. The signaling pathways downstream from FPR1, involving calcium, AKT, and ERK1/2, were also competitively inhibited by propofol. These results show that propofol selectively and competitively inhibits the FPR1-induced human neutrophil activation. Consistent with the hypothesis, propofol inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analog of fMLF, to FPR1 in human neutrophils, differentiated THP-1 cells, and FPR1-transfected human embryonic kidney-293 cells. To our knowledge, our results identify, for the first time, a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of propofol by competitively blocking FPR1 in human neutrophils. Considering the importance of N-formyl peptides in inflammatory processes, our data indicate that propofol may have therapeutic potential to attenuate neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases by blocking FPR1.

  11. Light scattering by neutrophils: Model, simulation, and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlova, D.Y.; Yurkin, M.A.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Maltsev, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determine

  12. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence.

  13. Lundep, a sand fly salivary endonuclease increases Leishmania parasite survival in neutrophils and inhibits XIIa contact activation in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza C Chagas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the host's first line of defense against infections, and their extracellular traps (NET were recently shown to kill Leishmania parasites. Here we report a NET-destroying molecule (Lundep from the salivary glands of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Previous analysis of the sialotranscriptome of Lu. longipalpis showed the potential presence of an endonuclease. Indeed, not only was the cloned cDNA (Lundep shown to encode a highly active ss- and dsDNAse, but also the same activity was demonstrated to be secreted by salivary glands of female Lu. longipalpis. Lundep hydrolyzes both ss- and dsDNA with little sequence specificity with a calculated DNase activity of 300000 Kunitz units per mg of protein. Disruption of PMA (phorbol 12 myristate 13 acetate- or parasite-induced NETs by treatment with recombinant Lundep or salivary gland homogenates increases parasite survival in neutrophils. Furthermore, co-injection of recombinant Lundep with metacyclic promastigotes significantly exacerbates Leishmania infection in mice when compared with PBS alone or inactive (mutagenized Lundep. We hypothesize that Lundep helps the parasite to establish an infection by allowing it to escape from the leishmanicidal activity of NETs early after inoculation. Lundep may also assist blood meal intake by lowering the local viscosity caused by the release of host DNA and as an anticoagulant by inhibiting the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  14. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  15. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is a chemoattractant for eosinophils and neutrophils that acts via formyl-peptide receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjabringa, G.S.; Ninaber, D.K.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Rabe, K.F.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by the presence of eosinophils and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms that mediate the influx of these cells are incompletely understood. Neutrophil products, including

  16. Extracellular fibrils of pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii are important for ecological niche, murine virulence and human neutrophil interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Springer

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40-100 nm diameter x500-3000 nm length. Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and by high voltage- EM (HVEM. Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12alpha mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN- mediated killing.

  17. Neutrophil biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are involved in bacterial killing as well as autoimmunity, because NETs contain proteases, bactericidal peptides, DNA and ribonucleoprotein. NETs are formed via a novel type of cell death called NETosis. NETosis is distinct from apoptosis, but it resembles necrosis in that both membranes are not intact so that they allow intracellular proteins to leak outside of the cells. Removal of NETs and neutrophils undergoing NETosis by phagocytes and its subsequent...

  18. Staphylococcus aureus survival in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is abundant in hospitals and in the United States is a leading cause of mortality due to infectious agents. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300, which typically cause disease outside of healthcare settings, are also prevalent in the United States. Although most CA-MRSA infections affect skin and soft tissue, the pathogen can enter the bloodstream and ultimately cause severe disease. In a recent paper, we used USA300-specific microarrays to generate a comprehensive view of the molecules that facilitate S. aureus immune evasion and survival in human blood. Notably, genes encoding proteins involved in iron-uptake and utilization and gamma-hemolysin (hlgABC) are highly up-regulated by USA300 during culture in human blood. Here we discuss the potential implication of these findings and the possible role of gamma-hemolysin in the success of S. aureus as a human pathogen.

  19. Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy on Human Blood

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, M; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric spectra of human blood reveal a rich variety of dynamic processes. Achieving a better characterization and understanding of these processes not only is of academic interest but also of high relevance for medical applications as, e.g., the determination of absorption rates of electromagnetic radiation by the human body. The dielectric properties of human blood are studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, systematically investigating the dependence on temperature and hematocrit value. By covering a frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 GHz, information on all the typical dispersion regions of biological matter is obtained. We find no evidence for a low-frequency relaxation (alpha-relaxation) caused, e.g., by counterion diffusion effects as reported for some types of biological matter. The analysis of a strong Maxwell-Wagner relaxation arising from the polarization of the cell membranes in the 1-100 MHz region (beta-relaxation) allows for the test of model predictions and the determination of variou...

  20. The potential role of cobalt ions released from metal prosthesis on the inhibition of Hv1 proton channels and the decrease in Staphyloccocus epidermidis killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Samira; El Chemaly, Antoun; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Bernard, Louis; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Infection by Staphylococcus epidermidis is a devastating complication of metal-on-metal (MM) total hip arthroplasty (THA). Neutrophils are the first line of defense against infection, and these innate immune cells are potentially exposed to Co(2+) ions released in the peri-prosthetic tissue by the wear of MM THA. The toxicity of Co(2+) is still debated, but Co(2+) is a potential inhibitor of the Hv1 proton channel that sustains the production of superoxide by neutrophils. In this study, we show that the Co(2+) concentration in peri-prosthetic tissue from patients with MM THA averages 53 μM and that such high concentrations of Co(2+) alter the antibacterial activity of human neutrophils in vitro by inhibiting Hv1 proton channels. We show that submillimolar concentrations of Co(2+) inhibit proton currents, impair the extrusion of cytosolic acid, and decrease the production of superoxide in human neutrophils. As a result, Co(2+) reduces the ability of human neutrophils to kill two strains of Staphyloccocus epidermidis by up to 7-fold at the maximal concentration tested of 100 μM Co(2+). By inhibiting proton channels, the Co(2+) ions released by metal prostheses might therefore promote bacterial infections in patients with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

  1. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-11-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing.

  2. Activities of enzymes that metabolize platelet-activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in neutrophils and eosinophils from humans and the effect of a calcium ionophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. (Oak Ridge Associated Univ., TN); Malone, B.; Wasserman, S.I.; Fitzgerald, V.; Snyder, F.

    1982-04-29

    Enzymatic systems in human blood cells are described for the activation and inactivation of a biologically active phospholipid (l-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) with hypotensive, platelet-aggregating, and inflammatory properties. The results document the presence of alkyldihydroxyacetone-phosphate synthase (forms the O-alkyl linkage in lipids), l-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (produces the biologically active molecule), and 1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: acetylhydrolase (destroys the biological activity) in human neutrophils and eosinophils. Both the acetyltransferase and acetylhydrolase activities are increased severalfold after treatment of normal neutrophils with ionophore A23187; however, alkyldihydroxyacetone-phosphate synthase activity is not influenced by the ionophore. Eosinophils isolated from patients with eosinophilia have significantly greater activities of all the enzymes studied than the eosinophils isolated from normal individuals. Our results indicate the acetyltransferase responsible for 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline synthesis may serve an important role in human blood cells that release this biologically active phospholipid. Moreover, the acetyltransferase activity was found to be dramatically influenced by calcium flux.

  3. Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Bianca, V.; Grzeskowiak, M.; Lissandrini, D.; Rossi, F. (Univ. of Verona (Italy))

    1991-06-28

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that in human neutrophils phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles is associated with activation of phospholipase D and that this reaction is the main source of diglycerides. The demonstration is based upon the following findings: (1) the challenge of neutrophils with these opsonized particles was followed by a rapid formation of (3H)alkyl-phosphatidic acid (( 3H)alkyl-PA) and (3H)alkyl-diglyceride (( 3H)alkyl-DG) in cells labeled with (3H)alkyl-lyso-phosphatidylcholine; (2) in the presence of ethanol (3H)alkyl-phosphatidylethanol was formed, and accumulation of (3H)alkyl-PA and (3H)alkyl-DG was depressed; (3) propranolol, by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of (3H)alkyl-PA, completely inhibited the accumulation of (3H)alkyl-DG and depressed by about 75% the formation of diglyceride mass. Evidence is also presented that phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst can take place independently of diglyceride formation and of the activity of this second messenger on protein kinase C. In fact: (a) propranolol while completely inhibited the formation of diglyceride mass did not modify either the phagocytosis or respiratory burst; (b) these two processes were insensitive to staurosporine.

  4. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  5. Involvement of neutrophil hyporesponse and the role of Toll-like receptors in human immunodeficiency virus 1 protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Hernandez

    Full Text Available Neutrophils contribute to pathogen clearance through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs activation. However, the role of PRRs in neutrophils in both HIV-1-infected [HIV-1(+] and HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN is unknown. Here, a study was carried out to evaluate the level of PRR mRNAs and cytokines produced after activation of neutrophils from HIV-1(+, HESN and healthy donors.The neutrophils were stimulated with specific agonists for TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 in the presence of HIV-1 particles. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production, expression of neutrophil activation markers and reactive oxygen species (ROS production were analyzed in neutrophils from HESN, HIV-1(+ and healthy donors (controls.We found that neutrophils from HESN presented reduced expression of PRR mRNAs (TLR4, TLR9, NOD1, NOD2, NLRC4 and RIG-I and reduced expression of cytokine mRNAs (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α and TGF-β. Moreover, neutrophils from HESN were less sensitive to stimulation through TLR4. Furthermore, neutrophils from HESN challenged with HIV-1 and stimulated with TLR2 and TLR4 agonists, produced significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, versus HIV-1(+.A differential pattern of PRR expression and release of innate immune factors in neutrophils from HESN is evident. Our results suggest that lower neutrophil activation can be involved in protection against HIV-1 infection.

  6. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Little, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3) antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener\\'s granulomatosis). Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻\\/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17%) more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  7. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Little

    Full Text Available Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3 antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's granulomatosis. Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17% more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  8. The Interleukin-17 Induced Activation and Increased Survival of Equine Neutrophils Is Insensitive to Glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Yoana Murcia

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are the most effective drugs for the treatment of human asthma. However, a subgroup of asthmatic patients with neutrophilic airway inflammation is insensitive to GCs. Interleukin-17 (IL-17, a cytokine upregulated in the airways of a subset of human asthmatic patients, contributes to the recruitment of neutrophils and induces a glucocorticoid resistance in human airway epithelial cells. We hypothesized that IL-17 similarly activates neutrophils and contributes to their persistence in the asthmatic airways in spite of glucocorticoid therapy.To determine whether IL-17 directly activates neutrophils and whether this response is attenuated by GCs.Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of horses and incubated in the presence of recombinant equine IL-17, LPS and dexamethasone. mRNA and protein expression of IL-17 receptors (IL-17RA/IL-17RC were assessed by qPCR and immunoblot, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, cell viability and apoptosis were determined by qPCR, Trypan Blue exclusion test, and flow cytometry, respectively.Equine neutrophils express both IL-17RA and IL-17RC at the mRNA and protein levels. Neutrophil stimulation with IL-17 increases the mRNA expression of IL-8, which is not attenuated by dexamethasone (p = 0.409. Also, neutrophil viability is significantly increased (p<0.0001 by IL-17 in the presence of LPS when compared to LPS alone. Flow cytometry and light microscopy revealed that LPS-induced apoptosis is decreased by IL-17 (p = 0.02 and p = 0.006 respectively.These results indicate that IL-17 directly activates equine neutrophils at 24 hours, and that the expression of IL-8 thus induced is not attenuated by GCs. Additionally, IL-17 increases neutrophil viability and decreases apoptosis. These findings suggest an important role of IL-17 in pulmonary persistence of neutrophils in the asthmatic airways.

  9. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. [Relationship between white blood cell count, neutrophils ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and short clinical outcomes among patients with acute ischemic stroke at hospital admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jia-kai; Zhang, Jin-tao; Kong, Yan; Xu, Tan; Zou, Ting-ting; Zhang, Yong-hong; Zhang, Shao-yan

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between white blood cell count, neutrophils ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and short outcomes among patients with acute ischemic stroke at admission to the hospital. A total of 2675 acute ischemic stroke patients were included in this study. Data on demographic characteristics, life style, history of disease, white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophils ratio (NEUR), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and clinical outcomes were collected for all the participants. Poor clinical outcome was defined as neurologic deficiency (NIHSS ≥ 5) at discharge or death during hospitalization. White blood cell count, neutrophils ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were higher in patients with poor outcome than in those without clinical outcome. According to the quartile range, WBC, NEUR and ESR were divided into four levels at admission. After adjustment for multivariate, compared with WBC ≤ 5.6× 10(9)/L, the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) of poor outcome with ≥ 8.7×10(9)/L was 1.883 (1.306 - 2.716). When compared with NEUR ≤ 0.56, the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) of poor outcome with 0.57 - 0.64 and with ≥ 0.74 were 1.572 (1.002 - 2.466) and 2.577 (1.698 - 3.910), respectively. When compared with ESR ≤ 4 mm/h, the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) of poor outcome with ≥ 17 mm/h was 2.426 (1.233 - 4.776). Elevated WBC count and NEUR at admission were significantly and positively associated with poor clinical outcomes among patients with acute ischemic stroke (trend test P acute ischemic stroke (trend test P > 0.05). There appeared associations between WBC, NEUR, ESR and poor outcome among patients with acute ischemic stroke at admission to the hospital. Both elevated WBC count and NEUR showed significantly positive association with poor clinical outcomes among patients with acute ischemic stroke at admission.

  11. Ageing exacerbates damage of systemic and salivary neutrophils from patients presenting Candida-related denture stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porto Vinicius

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing leads to a decline in the function of the immune system, increasing the body's susceptibility to infections through the impairment of T-cells, macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells Denture stomatitis is a primary oral disease affecting elderly denture wearers. The major etiologic factor involved in this pathology is the infection by Candida albicans, an opportunistic pathogen that causes local and disseminated diseases in immunosuppressed humans. Neutrophils play a critical role in the immune response against C. albicans and are continually present in the salivary fluid and in the blood. The aim of this study was to determine ageing-related changes in salivary and blood neutrophils and their potential implications in Candida-related denture stomatitis. Results Our results showed a lower number of neutrophils in the saliva from patients presenting Candida-related denture stomatitis in comparison to their matched controls. Furthermore, fewer neutrophils were isolated from the saliva of aged control individuals in comparison to matched younger subjects. CXCR1, CD62L and CD11b expression were significantly greater on systemic neutrophils from younger control individuals. Elderly individuals showed more apoptotic salivary neutrophils and lower GM-CSF levels than younger ones, regardless of the occurrence of Candida infection. On the other hand, CXCL-8 concentrations were higher in the saliva from elderly individuals. Besides, TNF-α was detected at elevated levels in the saliva from infected elderly subjects. Salivary neutrophils from elderly and young patients presented impaired phagocytic activity against C. albicans. However, just systemic neutrophils from elderly showed decreased phagocytosis when compared to the younger ones, regardless of the occurrence of infection. In addition, neutrophils from aged individuals and young patients presented low fungicidal activity. Conclusion The data suggests that the Candida

  12. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role for the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-04-06

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, several cell types contribute considerably to the physiopathology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in sickle cell disease pathophysiology and the targeting of neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represent important opportunities for new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and we investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ETB receptor highly influences neutrophils recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils display functional ETB receptors with calcium signaling capability leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium, through action on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. ETB intact function was also found to be required for TNFα-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1 that may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ETB axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptor, including ETB, may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises of sickle cell patients.

  13. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymor......Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages......), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide...

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase occurs upstream of Ca^(2+)-signalling induced by Fcy receptor cross-linking in human neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossebeld, Paula J. M.; Homburg, Christa H. E.; Schweizer, R.C.; Ibarrola, Iñaki; Kessler, Jan; Koenderman, L.; Roos, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin on IgG-receptor (FcyR)-mediated stimulation of human neutrophils was investigated. The Ca^(2+) influx induced by clustering of both Fcy receptors was inhibited by wortmannin, as was the release of Ca^(2+) from intracellular stores. Wortmannin also inhibited, with the same ef

  15. Systemic neutrophil depletion modulates the migration and fate of transplanted human neural stem cells to rescue functional repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X; Hooshmand, Mitra J; Saiwai, Hirokazu; Maddox, Jake; Salehi, Arjang; Lakatos, Anita; Nishi, Rebecca; Salazar, Desiree; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J

    2017-08-28

    The interaction of transplanted stem cells with local cellular and molecular cues in the host central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment may affect the potential for repair by therapeutic cell populations. In this regard, spinal cord injury (SCI), Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological injuries and diseases all exhibit dramatic and dynamic changes to the host microenvironment over time. Previously, we reported that delayed transplantation of CNS-derived human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) at 9 or 30 days post-SCI (dpi) resulted in extensive donor cell migration, predominantly neuronal and oligodendrocytic donor cell differentiation, and functional locomotor improvements. Here, we report that acute transplantation of hCNS-SCns at 0 dpi resulted in localized astroglial differentiation of donor cells near the lesion epicenter, and failure to produce functional improvement in an all-female immunodeficient mouse model. Critically, specific immunodepletion of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) blocked hCNS-SCns astroglial differentiation near the lesion epicenter and rescued the capacity of these cells to restore function. These data represent novel evidence that a host immune cell population can block the potential for functional repair derived from a therapeutic donor cell population, and support targeting the inflammatory microenvironment in combination with cell transplantation after SCI.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe interaction of transplanted cells with local cellular and molecular cues in the host microenvironment is a key variable that may shape the translation of neurotransplantation research to the clinical SCI human population, and few studies have investigated these events. We show that the specific immunodepletion of PMN neutrophils using anti-Ly6G inhibits donor cell astrogliosis and rescues the capacity of a donor cell population to promote locomotor improvement after SCI. Critically, our data demonstrate novel evidence that a specific

  16. Staphylococcus aureus LukAB cytotoxin kills human neutrophils by targeting the CD11b subunit of the integrin Mac-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMont, Ashley L; Yoong, Pauline; Day, Christopher J; Alonzo, Francis; McDonald, W Hayes; Jennings, Michael P; Torres, Victor J

    2013-06-25

    Staphylococcus aureus causes diseases ranging from superficial wound infections to more invasive manifestations like osteomyelitis and endocarditis. The evasion of host phagocytes recruited to the site of infection is essential to the success of S. aureus as a pathogen. A single S. aureus strain can produce up to five different bicomponent pore-forming leukotoxins that lyse immune cells by forming pores in the cellular plasma membrane. Although these leukotoxins have been considered redundant due to their cytotoxic activity toward human neutrophils, each toxin displays varied species and cell-type specificities. This suggests that cellular factors may influence which cells each toxin targets. Here we describe the identification of CD11b, the α subunit of the αM/β2 integrin (CD11b/CD18), macrophage-1 antigen, or complement receptor 3, as a cellular receptor for leukocidin A/B (LukAB), an important toxin that contributes to S. aureus killing of human neutrophils. We demonstrate that CD11b renders human neutrophils susceptible to LukAB-mediated killing by purified LukAB as well as during S. aureus infection ex vivo. LukAB directly interacts with human CD11b by binding to the I domain, a property that determines the species specificity exhibited by this toxin. Identification of a LukAB cellular target has broad implications for the use of animal models to study the role of LukAB in S. aureus pathogenesis, explains the toxin's tropism toward human neutrophils and other phagocytes, and provides a cellular therapeutic target to block the effect of LukAB toward human neutrophils.

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles delay human neutrophil apoptosis by a de novo protein synthesis-dependent and reactive oxygen species-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, David M; Girard, D

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the major toxic effects reported in the literature following nanoparticle (NP) exposure. Knowing the importance of neutrophils to orchestrate inflammation, it is surprising that the direct role of NPs on neutrophil biology is poorly documented. Here, we investigated if ZnO NPs can alter neutrophil biology. We found that ZnO NPs increased the cell size, induced cell shape changes, activated phosphorylation events, enhanced cell spreading onto glass, but did not induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment of neutrophils with ZnO NPs markedly and significantly inhibited apoptosis and increased de novo protein synthesis, as demonstrated by gel electrophoresis of metabolically [(35)S]-labeled cells. Utilization of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed such antiapoptotic effect. We conclude that ZnO NPs are activators of several human neutrophil functions and that they inhibit apoptosis by a de novo protein synthesis-dependent and ROS-independent mechanism. This is the first example that a NP acts on the neo-synthesis of polypeptides.

  18. Morphology and staining behavior of neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Martina; Curths, Christoph; Dahlmann, Franziska; Wichmann, Judy; Bauer, Natali; Moritz, Andreas; Braun, Armin; Knauf, Sascha; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Gruber-Dujardin, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are frequently used as translational animal models for human diseases. However, a comparative study of cytological and histochemical detection methods as well as morphometric and ultrastructural characterization of neutrophils and eosinophils in this species is lacking. Blood samples of house dust mite sensitized and allergen challenged as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged marmosets were analyzed with different cytological and histological staining methods. Furthermore, cell size and number of nuclear segments were compared between neutrophils and eosinophils. Electron microscopy was performed to characterize the ultrastructure of granulocytes. Of all applied cytological stains, three allowed differentiation of eosinophils and neutrophils and, thus, reliable quantification in blood smears: May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain, Congo Red and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate-Esterase. For histology, Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) could not demonstrate clear differences, whereas Sirius Red, Congo Red, and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate Esterase showed capable results for identification of eosinophils or neutrophils in lung tissue. Morphometry revealed that marmoset neutrophils have more nuclear segments and are slightly larger than eosinophils. Ultrastructurally, eosinophils presented with large homogeneous electron-dense granules without crystalloid cores, while neutrophils were characterized by heterogeneous granules of different size and density. Additionally, sombrero-like vesicles were detected in tissue eosinophils of atopic marmosets, indicative for hypersensitivity-related piecemeal degranulation. In conclusion, we provide a detailed overview of marmoset eosinophils and neutrophils, important for phenotypic characterization of marmoset models for human airway diseases.

  19. [Nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the neutrophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood and by the monocytic-reticular cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Demczuk, K

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of Park et al. the author studied spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by neutrophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, and by monocytic-reticular cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis and meningismus. The author performed 333 investigations in 74 patients. Significantly higher mean values of the index of spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by the granulocytes and cerebrospinal fluid were observed in cases of bacterial meningitis as compared with the granulocytes of the peripheral blood in healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that in patients with bacterial meningitis blood and fluid granulocytes showed a similar phagocytic acitivty independent of the humoral environment. In the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis the monocytic-reticular cells the cerebrospinal fluid showed a similar, sometimes high, phagocytic activity depending on the phase and severity of the disease. On the otherhand, in most cases of meningismus these cells failed to manifest any phagocytic and bactericidal activity. In only few isolated cells in the fluid weak NBT reduction was observed. The obtained results of investigations showed the usefulness of the NBT test not only for the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of neuroinfections but also for the assessment of immune processes taking place in the nervous system.

  20. Green tea catechins alone or in combination alter functional parameters of human neutrophils via suppressing the activation of TLR-4/NFκB p65 signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinovic, M P; Morandi, A C; Otton, R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a mixture containing the four main catechins found in green tea, as well it separately, as modulators of the functional parameters of human neutrophils. The cells were obtained from peripheral blood of healthy individuals isolated and cultured with a mix: 30 μM of EGCG, 3 μM of EGC, 2 μM of ECG and 1.4 μM of EC, as well as each one alone. We evaluated the cytotoxicity of catechins, production of several reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GPx and GR), Nrf2, TLR4/IKK/NFκB, CD11b mRNA levels, intracellular calcium release, chemotactic and phagocytic capacity, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and G6PDH activities, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, protein levels of TLR4, p38 MAPK, iNOS and p-65 NFκB. The actions of the catechins were evidenced by the reduction in inflammatory parameters, including the suppression of TLR4, NFκB and iNOS protein expression, decreased release of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, migration capacity, MPO activity and HOCl production and the suppression of ROS, nitric oxide and peroxynitrite production, while inducing antioxidant enzyme activities and Nrf2 mRNA levels, phagocytic capacity and calcium release. Our results demonstrate that catechins present marked immunomodulatory actions, either alone or in combination.

  1. Prognostic Significance of Immunoreactive Neutrophil Elastase in Human Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up Results in 313 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Akizuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We have measured the concentration of immunoreactive neutrophil elastase (ir-NE in the tumor extracts of 313 primary human breast cancers. Sufficient time has elapsed, and we are now ready to analyze its prognostic value in human breast cancer. METHODS: ir-NE concentration in tumor extracts was determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that enables a rapid measurement of both free-form ir-NE and the α1-protease inhibitor-complexed form of ir-NE. We analyzed the prognostic value of this enzyme in human breast cancer in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Patients with breast cancer tissue containing a high concentration of ir-NE had poor survival compared to those with a low concentration of ir-NE at the cutoff point of 9.0 µg/100 mg protein (P = .0012, which had been previously determined in another group of 49 patients. Multivariate stepwise analysis selected lymph node status (P= .0004; relative risk = 1.46 and ir-NE concentration (P= .0013; relative risk = 1.43 as independent prognostic factors for recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor ir-NE concentration is an independent prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer who undergo curative surgery. This enzyme may play an active role in tumor progression that leads to metastasis in human breast cancer.

  2. Human sputum cathepsin B degrades proteoglycan, is inhibited by alpha 2-macroglobulin and is modulated by neutrophil elastase cleavage of cathepsin B precursor and cystatin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttle, D J; Abrahamson, M; Burnett, D; Mort, J S; Barrett, A J; Dando, P M; Hill, S L

    1991-01-01

    The high-Mr alkali-stable form of cathepsin B was purified from purulent human sputum. It was shown to solubilize proteoglycan monomer entrapped in polyacrylamide at a rate comparable with that of human lysosomal cathepsin B. Like the enzyme from lysosomes, sputum cathepsin B was bound by human alpha 2-macroglobulin, which inhibited its action on proteoglycan. Cystatin C in purulent sputum was shown to be the N-terminally truncated form generated by neutrophil elastase cleavage, and sputum cathepsin B was only weakly inhibited by recombinant cystatin C that had been cleaved by neutrophil elastase in vitro. Addition of neutrophil elastase to mucoid sputum led to a 5-fold increase in cathepsin B activity concomitant with a lowering in Mr of the cysteine proteinase from 40,000 to 37,000, i.e. the size of the active enzyme purified from purulent sputum. It is concluded that the high-Mr form of cathepsin B present in purulent sputum is a functional proteinase, unlike similar forms of the enzyme secreted by mammary gland in organ culture. The activity of cathepsin B in sputum is modulated by neutrophil elastase, by a combination of inhibitor inactivation and zymogen activation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1710889

  3. Early human herpes virus type 6 reactivation in umbilical cord blood allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, Frank; Ippoliti, Cindy; Wang, Hanhan; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Shore, Tsiporah; van Besien, Koen

    2016-11-01

    Human herpes virus type 6 can reactivate in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and has been associated with serious sequelae such as delayed engraftment and an increased risk of developing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This study investigated human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) reactivation within 60 days of transplantation in stem cell transplants utilizing single umbilical cord blood, double umbilical cord blood, or umbilical cord blood plus haploidentical stem cells. Of 92 patients, 60 (65%) had HHV-6 reactivation. Reactivation was not significantly influenced by any patient characteristics, disease characteristics, or by stem cell source (umbilical cord blood only versus haploidentical plus umbilical cord blood). We did not observe any impact of HHV-6 reactivation on neutrophil or platelet count recovery or on relapse-free survival. HHV-6 reactivation was associated with subsequent development of prerelapse acute GVHD (HR = 3.00; 95% CI, 1.4 to 6.4; p = 0.004).

  4. Computational Analysis of Human Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Yogendra; Marie, Hazel; Harvey, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Fluid flow modeling with commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is widely used to visualize and predict physical phenomena related to various biological systems. In this presentation, a typical human aorta model was analyzed assuming the blood flow as laminar with complaint cardiac muscle wall boundaries. FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume software, coupled with Solidworks, a modeling software, was employed for the preprocessing, simulation and postprocessing of all the models.The analysis mainly consists of a fluid-dynamics analysis including a calculation of the velocity field and pressure distribution in the blood and a mechanical analysis of the deformation of the tissue and artery in terms of wall shear stress. A number of other models e.g. T branches, angle shaped were previously analyzed and compared their results for consistency for similar boundary conditions. The velocities, pressures and wall shear stress distributions achieved in all models were as expected given the similar boundary conditions. The three dimensional time dependent analysis of blood flow accounting the effect of body forces with a complaint boundary was also performed.

  5. Concentrations of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and the immature-to-total neutrophil ratio in the blood of neonates with nosocomial infections: Gram-negative bacilli vs coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordek, A

    2011-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether concentrations of procalcitonin in the blood of neonates with nosocomial infections depend on the type of pathogen. Qualification for the study group was based on the clinical signs of infection. We found that infections with Gram-positive (chiefly coagulase-negative staphylococci) and Gram-negative bacteria are accompanied by elevated concentrations of procalcitonin. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, other laboratory signs of infection studied by us (concentration of C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, immature-to-total neutrophil ratio) were not discriminatory, confirming the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin measurements in nosocomial infections of the neonate with Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Prokisch, Holger; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the ‘human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface’ (BMTI). Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease. PMID:26086077

  7. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bartel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI. Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease.

  8. Treatment with Rutin - A Therapeutic Strategy for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases - Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rutin on Neutrophils -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abd Nikfarjam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neutrophils represent the front line of human defense against infections. Immediately after stimulation, neutrophilic enzymes are activated and produce toxic mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO and myeloperoxidase (MPO. These mediators can be toxic not only to infectious agents but also to host tissues. Because flavonoids exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, they are subjects of interest for pharmacological modulation of inflammation. In the present study, the effects of rutin on stimulus-induced NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α productions and MPO activity in human neutrophils were investigated. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation coupled with dextran T500 sedimentation. The cell preparations containing > 98% granulocytes were determined by morphological examination through Giemsa staining. Neutrophils were cultured in complete Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI medium, pre-incubated with or without rutin (25 μM for 45 minutes, and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Then, the TNF-α, NO and MPO productions were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, Griess Reagent, and MPO assay kits, respectively. Also, the viability of human neutrophils was assessed using tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT, and neutrophils were treated with various concentrations of rutin (1 - 100 μM, after which MTT was appended and incubated at 37ºC for 4 hour. Results: Rutin at concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect neutrophil viability during the 4-hour incubation period. Rutin significantly decreased the NO and TNF-α productions in human peripheral blood neutrophils compared to PMA-control cells (P < 0.001. Also, MPO activity was significantly reduced by rutin (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In this in vitro study, rutin had an anti-inflammatory effect

  9. Clinical relevance of P-glycoprotein activity on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils to methotrexate in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Macías-Díaz, Salvador; Etchegaray-Morales, Ivet; Méndez-Martínez, Socorro; Soto-Santillán, Pamela; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Jiménez-Herrera, Erick A; Guzmán-Ruiz, Omar; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro

    2017-06-14

    To elucidate the relationship between P-glycoprotein activity on peripheral blood leukocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with lupus arthritis and the clinical response to methotrexate. An observational study was made in patients with SLE according to ACR criteria 1997 who had arthralgia and arthritis and received methotrexate for ≥3 months. Methotrexate responders and non-responders were compared according to the Clinical Disease Activity Index. Mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils were isolated from SLE patients and P-glycoprotein expression was measured using the relative fluorescence index and percentage of positive cells. The chi-square test was used to compare P-glycoprotein activity between responders and non-responders. Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 45.4 ± 10.7 years were included: 34.4% had a response to methotrexate and 65.6% did not. Mean relative fluorescence units of both mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils were significantly lower in patients with a good response (7.0 ± 4.3 vs. 9.6 ± 3.8; p = 0.041 and 4.2 ± 3.5 vs. 7.6 ± 4.0; p = 0.004). The prevalence of low fluorescence levels (P-glycoprotein activity of both mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, was higher in methotrexate responders than in non-responders (27.3 vs. 4.8%; p = 0.10 and 81.8 vs. 23.8%; p = 0.003, respectively). In SLE patients with joint involvement treated with methotrexate, P-glycoprotein activity was higher in responders to methotrexate than in non-responders. Further studies are required to determine the mechanisms behind this finding and whether P-glycoprotein activity mediates alterations in methotrexate efficacy.

  10. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Jancinova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues.

  11. The Endocannabinoid Metabolite Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-Glycerol Inhibits Human Neutrophil Functions: Involvement of Its Hydrolysis into PGE2 and EP Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Caroline; Zarini, Simona; Jean, Stéphanie; Martin, Cyril; Murphy, Robert C; Marsolais, David; Laviolette, Michel; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Flamand, Nicolas

    2017-03-03

    The endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine mediate an array of pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. These effects are related, in part, to their metabolism by eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes. For example, N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine and 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol can be metabolized by cyclooxygenase-2 into PG-ethanolamide (PG-EA) and PG-glycerol (PG-G), respectively. Although PGE2 is a recognized suppressor of neutrophil functions, the impact of cyclooxygenase-derived endocannabinoids such as PGE2-EA or PGE2-G on neutrophils is unknown. This study's aim was to define the effects of these mediators on neutrophil functions and the underlying cellular mechanisms involved. We show that PGE2-G, but not PGE2-EA, inhibits leukotriene B4 biosynthesis, superoxide production, migration, and antimicrobial peptide release. The effects of PGE2-G were prevented by EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH-6809 but not the EP4 antagonist ONO-AE2-227. The effects of PGE2-G required its hydrolysis into PGE2, were not observed with the non-hydrolyzable PGE2-serinol amide, and were completely prevented by methyl-arachidonoyl-fluorophosphate and palmostatin B, and partially prevented by JZL184 and WWL113. Although we could detect six of the documented PG-G hydrolases in neutrophils by quantitative PCR, only ABHD12 and ABHD16A were detected by immunoblot. Our pharmacological data, combined with our protein expression data, did not allow us to pinpoint one PGE2-G lipase, and rather support the involvement of an uncharacterized lipase and/or of multiple hydrolases. In conclusion, we show that PGE2-G inhibits human neutrophil functions through its hydrolysis into PGE2, and by activating the EP2 receptor. This also indicates that neutrophils could regulate inflammation by altering the balance between PG-G and PG levels in vivo.

  12. Noncontact discrimination of animal and human blood with vacuum blood vessel and factors affect the discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Zhang, Shengzhao; Sun, Meixiu; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Fu, Zhigang; Guan, Yang; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-03-01

    Discrimination of human and nonhuman blood is crucial for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. Current methods are usually destructive, complicated and time-consuming. We had previously demonstrated that visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy combining PLS-DA method can successfully realize human blood discrimination. In that research, the spectra were measured with the fiber probe under the surface of blood samples. However, open sampling may pollute the blood samples. Virulence factors in blood samples can also endanger inspectors. In this paper, we explored the classification effect with the blood samples measured in the original containers-vacuum blood vessel. Furthermore, we studied the impact of different conditions of blood samples, such as coagulation and hemolysis, on the prediction ability of the discrimination model. The calibration model built with blood samples in different conditions displayed a satisfactory prediction result. This research demonstrated that visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method was potential for noncontact discrimination of human blood.

  13. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  14. Purification of a 75 kDa protein from the organelle matrix of human neutrophils and identification as N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    A 75 kDa protein was purified to homogeneity from granule extracts of normal human granulocytes using Sephadex G-75 chromatography, Mono-S cation exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The protein consisted of one chain with a molecular mass of 75 kDa, as determined by SDS/PAGE. Tryptic peptide analysis by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS and sequence analysis by MS/MS identified the protein to be N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulphatase (EC 3.1.6.14). The identity of the protein was confirmed by demostrating enzymatic activity towards the substrate N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulphate. The enzyme was active over a broad pH range with an optimum of pH 7.0, and showed a Km value of 13.0 mM and a Vmax value of ∼1.8 μM/min per mg. The enzyme also showed O-desulphation activity towards heparan sulphate-derived saccharides. Subcellular fractionation of neutrophil organelles showed the presence of enzymatic activity mainly in the same fractions as primary granules. Furthermore, PMA treatment of the neutrophils induced release of the enzyme, indicating its matrix protein nature. The presence of N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulphatase in human neutrophils implies that neutrophils may play a role in the modulation of cell surface molecules and extracellular matrix by O-desulphation. PMID:15595925

  15. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Syed Musthafa, Khadar; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-05-27

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125-250 µg/mL was 58.48%-50.28% and 69.13%-35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  16. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutharat Hmoteh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125–250 µg/mL was 58.48%–50.28% and 69.13%–35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  17. Three surface exoglycosidases from Streptococcus pneumoniae, NanA, BgaA, and StrH, promote resistance to opsonophagocytic killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalia, Ankur B; Standish, Alistair J; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2010-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of inflammatory infections such as pneumonia and otitis media. An important mechanism for host defense against S. pneumoniae is opsonophagocytic killing by neutrophils. To persist in the human host, the pneumococcus has developed strategies to evade opsonization and subsequent neutrophil-mediated killing. Utilizing a genomic approach, we identified NanA, the major pneumococcal neuraminidase, as a factor important for resistance to opsonophagocytic killing in ex vivo killing assays using human neutrophils. The effect of NanA was shown using both type 4 (TIGR4) and type 6A clinical isolates. NanA promotes this resistance by acting in conjunction with two other surface-associated exoglycosidases, BgaA, a beta-galactosidase, and StrH, an N-acetylglucosaminidase. Experiments using human serum showed that these exoglycosidases reduced deposition of complement component C3 on the pneumococcal surface, providing a mechanism for this resistance. Additionally, we have shown that antibodies in human serum do not contribute to this phenotype. These results demonstrate that deglycosylation of a human serum glycoconjugate(s) by the combined effects of NanA, BgaA, and StrH, is important for resistance to complement deposition and subsequent phagocytic killing of S. pneumoniae.

  18. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  19. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  20. BIRM 270: a novel inhibitor of arachidonate release that blocks leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor biosynthesis in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, P R; Graham, A G; Hoffman, A F; Watrous, J M; Borgeat, P; Nadeau, M; Hansen, G; Dinallo, R M; Adams, J; Miao, C K

    1994-12-01

    (S)-N-[2-Cyclohexyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethyl]-5-methyl-2-benzoxazolamine+ ++ (BIRM 270) was identified as a potent and enantiomerically selective inhibitor of calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated leukotriene B4 biosynthesis in human neutrophils. The (S)- and (R)-enantiomers exhibited IC50 values of 1 nM and 40 nM, respectively. BIRM 270 did not inhibit 5-lipoxygenase activity in a cell-free assay. In addition, the compound did not interfere with the conversion of exogenous 5-lipoxygenase substrate (15S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid to (5S, 15S)-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in intact, ionophore-stimulated neutrophils. Under the same experimental conditions, BIRM 270 inhibited the production of 5-lipoxygenase products from endogenous substrate, suggesting that the compound affected arachidonate availability rather than metabolism. Consistent with this concept, the inhibition of leukotriene B4 biosynthesis by BIRM 270 was overcome by the addition of exogenous arachidonic acid to the leukocyte preparation. Direct measurement of free arachidonate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that BIRM 270 inhibited arachidonate release from ionophore-stimulated neutrophils. The compound did not affect arachidonate reacylation. The blockage of arachidonate release coincided with inhibition of leukotriene B4 biosynthesis in these cells. BIRM 270 also inhibited ionophore-stimulated platelet-activating factor biosynthesis by human neutrophils. Although these results suggest that BIRM 270 inhibited phospholipase A2-mediated deacylation of membrane phospholipids, the compound did not directly inhibit the high molecular weight, cytosolic phospholipase A2 derived from human neutrophils or U937 cells. Thus, suppression of arachidonate mobilization by BIRM 270 may be due to indirect inhibition of intracellular phospholipase A2 or to inhibition of another acylhydrolase activity.

  1. Light scattering by neutrophils: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determined the absolute differential light-scattering cross sections of neutrophils. We also proposed an optical model for a neutrophil as a sphere filled by small spheres and prolate spheroids that correspond to granules and segmented nucleus, respectively. This model was used in simulations of LSPs using the discrete dipole approximation and different compositions of internal organelles. A comparison of experimentally measured and simulated LSPs gives a good qualitative agreement in LSP shape and quantitative agreement in overall magnitude of the differential light-scattering cross section.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus strains lacking D-alanine modifications of teichoic acids are highly susceptible to human neutrophil killing and are virulence attenuated in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, L Vincent; Kristian, Sascha A; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Faigle, Marion; Van Kessel, Kok P M; Van Strijp, Jos A G; Götz, Friedrich; Neumeister, Birgid; Peschel, Andreas

    2002-07-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to alpha-defensins, antimicrobial peptides that play an important role in oxygen-independent killing of human neutrophils. The dlt operon mediates d-alanine incorporation into teichoic acids in the staphylococcal cell envelope and is a determinant of defensin resistance. By using S. aureus wild-type (WT) and Dlt- bacteria, the relative contributions of oxygen-dependent and -independent antimicrobial phagocyte components were analyzed. The Dlt- strain was efficiently killed by human neutrophils even in the absence of a functional respiratory burst, whereas the killing of the WT organism was strongly diminished when the respiratory burst was inhibited. Human monocytes, which do not produce defensins, inactivated the WT and Dlt- bacteria with similar efficiencies. In addition, mice injected with the Dlt- strain had significantly lower rates of sepsis and septic arthritis and fewer bacteria in the kidneys, compared with mice infected with the WT strain.

  3. Neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (NAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hymowitz, Michelle; Schmidt, Cathleen E; Montana, Steve; Foda, Hussein; Zucker, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a novel soluble factor(s), neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinases (NAM), secreted by unstimulated normal human peripheral blood neutrophils that causes the activation of cell secreted promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2). Partially purified preparations of NAM have been isolated from the conditioned media of neutrophils employing gelatin-Sepharose chromatography and differential membrane filter centrifugation. NAM activity, as assessed by exposing primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or HT1080 cells to NAM followed by gelatin zymography, was seen within one hour. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and hydroxamic acid derived inhibitors of MMPs (CT1746 and BB94) abrogated the activation of proMMP-2 by NAM, while inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases showed no effect. NAM also produced an increase in TIMP-2 binding to HUVEC and HT1080 cell surfaces that was inhibited by TIMP-2, CT1746, and BB94. Time-dependent increases in MT1-MMP protein and mRNA were seen following the addition of NAM to cells. These data support a role for NAM in cancer dissemination.

  4. Cunninghamella bertholletiae exhibits increased resistance to human neutrophils with or without antifungal agents as compared to Rhizopus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitsopoulou, Maria; Georgiadou, Elpiniki; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2010-08-01

    Among Zygomycetes, Cunninghamella bertholletiae occurs less frequently as the etiologic agent of human disease but causes more aggressive, refractory, and fatal infections despite antifungal therapy. Little is known about the differential innate host response against Cunninghamella and other Zygomycetes in the presence of antifungal agents. We therefore studied the activity of human neutrophils (PMNs) alone or in combination with caspofungin, posaconazole (PSC), and voriconazole (VRC) against hyphae of Rhizopus oryzae, Rhizopus microsporus and C. bertholletiae. Hyphal damage was measured by XTT metabolic assay and release of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha from PMNs by ELISA. Cunninghamella bertholletiae was more resistant to PMN-induced hyphal damage than either Rhizopus spp. at effector:target (E:T) ratios of 1:1, 5:1 and 10:1 (P Rhizopus spp. (P < 0.01). No IL-6 was released from PMNs exposed to the three Zygomycetes. In comparison to R. oryzae and R. microsporus, C. bertholletiae is more resistant to PMN-induced hyphal damage with or without antifungal therapy and is more capable of suppressing release of IL-8.

  5. Short-Term Effects of Oral Feeding Jujube Ziziphus Solution before a Single Session of Circuit Resistance Exercise on Apoptosis of Human Neutrophil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Morteza Tayebi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present research was the effect of short-term use of edible solution of jujube one week before a single session of circuit resistance exercise on neutrophil apoptosis of male students of physical education. 14 young male volunteer students were divided into two groups of placebo (n=7, aged 24.50±2.50, height 171.17±1.70, and weight 67.51±4.92 and jujube solution (n=7, aged 25.25±1.31, height 179.75±3.63, weight 74.07±5.78 at random, performing one circuit resistance exercise (9 moves/stops, 30 seconds for each exercise, 3 nonstop sets with a 3-minute active recession between sets, 10-14 repetitions, and an intensity of 70% maximum repetition. Subjects received placebo and jujube solutions (0.5 g/kgbody weight in 2.5cc of distilled water as long as 7 days at certain times and double-blind. Blood samples were collected 30 minutes before, immediately, and 2 hours after the exercise for separation and counting the number of neutrophils, and neutrophil apoptosis was determined through AnexinV-FITC kit and flow cytometric method. The results indicated the significant response of initial apoptosis neutrophils to one course of activity by jujube group. However, different responses were observed between two groups of placebo and jujube during the recession after training. Unlike placebo group, the response was significantly lower with a greater decrease after training in jujube group. However, necrosis/delayed apoptosis neutrophils significantly increased in placebo group after 2 hours, while this change was not observed in jujube group. At the end of a 2-hour recession, delayed apoptosis neutrophils significantly decreased in both placebo and jujube groups. The present findings indicate that one-session resistance activity is not very effective after pretreatment with jujube solution during one week. Perhaps this useful effect of jujube can be explained by existing glucose compounds and amino acids which could provide neutrophils with

  6. Inflammation-associated autophagy-related programmed necrotic death of human neutrophils characterized by organelle fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Cristina C; Yousefi, Shida; Conus, Sébastien; Villiger, Peter M; Schneider, E Marion; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2011-06-01

    The most common form of neutrophil death, under both physiological and inflammatory conditions, is apoptosis. In this study, we report a novel form of programmed necrotic cell death, associated with cytoplasmic organelle fusion events, that occurs in neutrophils exposed to GM-CSF and other inflammatory cytokines upon ligation of CD44. Strikingly, this type of neutrophil death requires PI3K activation, a signaling event usually involved in cellular survival pathways. In the death pathway reported in this study, PI3K is required for the generation of reactive oxygen species, which somehow trigger the generation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles, generated by the fusion of CD44-containing endosomes with autophagosomes and secondary, but not primary, granules. Neutrophils demonstrating vacuolization undergo rapid cell death that depends on receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase activity and papain family protease(s), but not caspases, that are most likely activated and released, respectively, during or as a consequence of organelle fusion. Vacuolized neutrophils are present in infectious and autoimmune diseases under in vivo conditions. Moreover, isolated neutrophils from such patients are highly sensitive toward CD44-mediated PI3K activation, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death, suggesting that the newly described autophagy-related form of programmed neutrophil necrosis plays an important role in inflammatory responses.

  7. The effects of extracellular matrix proteins on neutrophil-endothelial interaction--a roadway to multiple therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2012-06-01

    Polymorphoneuclear leukocytes or neutrophils, a major component of white blood cells, contribute to the innate immune response in humans. Upon sensing changes in the microenvironment, neutrophils adhere to the vascular wall, migrate through the endothelial cell (EC)-pericyte bilayer, and subsequently through the extracellular matrix to reach the site of inflammation. These cells are capable of destroying microbes, cell debris, and foreign proteins by oxidative and non-oxidative processes. While primarily mediators of tissue homeostasis, there are an increasing number of studies indicating that neutrophil recruitment and transmigration can also lead to host-tissue injury and subsequently inflammation-related diseases. Neutrophil-induced tissue injury is highly regulated by the microenvironment of the infiltrated tissue, which includes cytokines, chemokines, and the provisional extracellular matrix, remodeled through increased vascular permeability and other cellular infiltrates. Thus, investigation of the effects of matrix proteins on neutrophil-EC interaction and neutrophil transmigration may help identify the proteins that induce pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. This area of research presents an opportunity to identify therapeutic targets in inflammation-related diseases. This review will summarize recent literature on the role of neutrophils and the effects of matrix proteins on neutrophil-EC interactions, with focus on three different disease models: 1) atherosclerosis, 2) COPD, and 3) tumor growth and progression. For each disease model, inflammatory molecules released by neutrophils, important regulatory matrix proteins, current anti-inflammatory treatments, and the scope for further research will be summarized.

  8. Structural characterization of mouse neutrophil serine proteases and identification of their substrate specificities: relevance to mouse models of human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupov, Timofey; Brillard-Bourdet, Michèle; Dadé, Sébastien; Serrano, Hélène; Wartelle, Julien; Guyot, Nicolas; Juliano, Luiz; Moreau, Thierry; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Gauthier, Francis

    2009-12-01

    It is widely accepted that neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) play a critical role in neutrophil-associated lung inflammatory and tissue-destructive diseases. To investigate NSP pathogenic role(s), various mouse experimental models have been developed that mimic acutely or chronically injured human lungs. We and others are using mouse exposure to cigarette smoke as a model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with or without exacerbation. However, the relative contribution of NSPs to lung disease processes as well as their underlying mechanisms remains still poorly understood. And the lack of purified mouse NSPs and their specific substrates have hampered advances in these studies. In this work, we compared mouse and human NSPs and generated three-dimensional models of murine NSPs based on three-dimensional structures of their human homologs. Analyses of these models provided compelling evidence that peptide substrate specificities of human and mouse NSPs are different despite their conserved cleft and close structural resemblance. These studies allowed us to synthesize for the first time novel sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates for individual mouse NSPs. Our findings and the newly identified substrates should better our understanding about the role of NSPs in the pathogenesis of cigarette-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as other neutrophils-associated inflammatory diseases.

  9. The natural stilbenoid pinosylvin and activated neutrophils: effects on oxidative burst, protein kinase C, apoptosis and efficiency in adjuvant arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viera JAN(C)INOV(A); Tomá(s) PERE(C)KO; Rado NOS(A)(L); Juraj HARMATHA; Jan (S)MIDRKAL; Katarína DR(A)BIKOV(A)

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effects of the naturally occurring stilbenoid pinosylvin on neutrophil activity in vitro and in experimental arthritis,and to examine whether protein kinase C (PKC) activation served as an assumed target of pinosylvin action.Methods:Fresh human blood neutrophils were isolated.The oxidative burst of neutrophils was evaluated on the basis of enhanced chemiluminescence.Neutrophil viability was evaluated with flow cytometry,and PKC phosphorylation was assessed by Western blotting analysis.Adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats with heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum,and the animals were administered with pinosylvin (30 mg/kg,po) daily for 21 d after arthritis induction.Results:In isolated human neutrophils,pinosylvin (10 and 100 μmol/L) significantly decreased the formation of oxidants,both extraand intracellularly,and effectively inhibited PKC activation stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (0.05 μmol/L).The inhibition was not due to neutrophil damage or increased apoptosis.In arthritic rats,the number of neutrophils in blood was dramatically increased,and whole blood chemiluminescence (spontaneous and PMA-stimulated) was markedly enhanced.Pinosylvin administration decreased the number of neutrophils (from 69 671±5588/μL to 51 293±3947/μL,P=0.0198) and significantly reduced the amount of reactive oxygen species in blood.Conclusion:Pinosylvin is an effective inhibitor of neutrophil activity,and is potentially useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persistent inflammation.

  10. Elevated glucose concentrations promote receptor-independent activation of adherent human neutrophils: an experimental and computational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kummer, Ursula; Zobeley, Jürgen; Brasen, Jens Christian;

    2007-01-01

    these dynamic metabolic changes, mathematical simulations were performed. A model for glycolysis in neutrophils was created. The results indicated that the frequency change in NAD(P)H oscillations can result from the activation of the hexose monophosphate shunt, which competes with glycolysis for glucose-6......-phosphate. Experimental confirmation of these simulations was performed by measuring the effect of glucose concentrations on flavoprotein autofluorescence, an indicator of the rate of mitochondrial electron transport. Moreover, after prolonged exposure to elevated glucose levels, neutrophils return......Neutrophil activation plays integral roles in host tissue damage and resistance to infectious diseases. As glucose uptake and NADPH availability are required for reactive oxygen metabolite production by neutrophils, we tested the hypothesis that pathological glucose levels (>or=12 m...

  11. Ficolin-1 is present in a highly mobilizable subset of human neutrophil granules and associates with the cell surface after stimulation with fMLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Honoré, Christian Le Fèvre; Larsson, Lars-Inge;

    2009-01-01

    Ficolins are soluble molecules that bind carbohydrate present on the surface of microorganisms and function as recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Three ficolins have been identified in humans: ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3. Ficolin-1 is synthesized in monocytes and type...... associated with the surface membrane of the cells and can be detected by flow cytometry. Our studies show that neutrophils are a major source of ficolin-1, which can be readily exocytosed by stimulation....

  12. The changes in the blood of humans chronically exposed to low level gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, N.P. Jr. [Los Alamos Scientific Lab., NM (United States)

    1949-04-19

    This report describes a statistical study of the changes in the total white blood count and the absolute neutrophil and lymphocyte counts for ten individuals who had daily film badge exposure records and weekly blood counts over a seventy-seven week period.

  13. Peptide mimetics of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and FcαRI block IgA-induced human neutrophil activation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Marieke H; van der Steen, Lydia P E; Korthouwer, Rianne M; Hage, J Joris; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Benschop, Joris J; Bakema, Jantine E; Slootstra, Jerry W; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2017-07-24

    The cross-linking of the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) by IgA induces release of the chemoattractant LTB4, thereby recruiting neutrophils in a positive feedback loop. IgA autoantibodies of patients with autoimmune blistering skin diseases therefore induce massive recruitment of neutrophils, resulting in severe tissue damage. To interfere with neutrophil mobilization and reduce disease morbidity, we developed a panel of specific peptides mimicking either IgA or FcαRI sequences. CLIPS technology was used to stabilize three-dimensional structures and to increase peptides' half-life. IgA and FcαRI peptides reduced phagocytosis of IgA-coated beads, as well as IgA-induced ROS production and neutrophil migration in in vitro and ex vivo (human skin) experiments. Since topical application would be the preferential route of administration, Cetomacrogol cream containing an IgA CLIPS peptide was developed. In the presence of a skin permeation enhancer, peptides in this cream were shown to penetrate the skin, while not diffusing systemically. Finally, epitope mapping was used to discover sequences important for binding between IgA and FcαRI. In conclusion, a cream containing IgA or FcαRI peptide mimetics, which block IgA-induced neutrophil activation and migration in the skin may have therapeutic potential for patients with IgA-mediated blistering skin diseases. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The proteolytically stable peptidomimetic Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 selectively inhibits human neutrophil activation via formyl peptide receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Heegaard, Peter M H; Larsen, Camilla J; Franzyk, Henrik; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2015-01-15

    Immunomodulatory host defense peptides (HDPs) are considered to be lead compounds for novel anti-sepsis and anti-inflammatory agents. However, development of drugs based on HDPs has been hampered by problems with toxicity and low bioavailability due to in vivo proteolysis. Here, a subclass of proteolytically stable HDP mimics consisting of lipidated α-peptide/β-peptoid oligomers was investigated for their effect on neutrophil function. The most promising compound, Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2, was shown to inhibit formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) agonist-induced neutrophil granule mobilization and release of reactive oxygen species. The potency of Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 was comparable to that of PBP10, the most potent FPR2-selective inhibitor known. The immunomodulatory effects of structural analogs of Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 emphasized the importance of both the lipid and peptidomimetic parts. By using imaging flow cytometry in primary neutrophils and FPR-transfected cell lines, we found that a fluorescently labeled analog of Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 interacted selectively with FPR2. Furthermore, the interaction between Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 and FPR2 was found to prevent binding of the FPR2-specific activating peptide agonist Cy5-WKYMWM, while the binding of an FPR1-selective agonist was not inhibited. To our knowledge, Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 is the first HDP mimic found to inhibit activation of human neutrophils via direct interaction with FPR2. Hence, we consider Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 to be a convenient tool in the further dissection of the role of FPR2 in inflammation and homeostasis as well as for investigation of the importance of neutrophil stimulation in anti-infective therapy involving HDPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigations of the lysophospholipid composition of human neutrophils under different stimulation conditions by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JURGEN ARNHOLD

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser desorption / ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS is usually used for the analyses of proteins, carbohydrates and oligonucleotides. In spite of the number of advantages that MALDI-TOF MS exhibits for lipid analysis, this method has not often been applied in this field. In this paper we have extended our previous studies on the suitability of MALDI-TOF MS for the investigation of changes in the content of lipid-derived second messengers in organic extracts of human neutrophils. Qualitative differences in the lysophospholipid composition in organic extracts of the human neutrophils under different stimulation conditions could be easily observed by MALDI-TOF MS. Although there are still some methodological problems to be solved before this method can be routinely applied for the quantification of different lipid classes in complex biological mixtures (such as organic extracts of human neutrophils it is shown here that MALDI-TOF MS possesses the capability to be used as a simple screening method for the investigation of the content of lipid-derived second messengers and of signalling pathways in cells.

  16. Mechanisms of Degranulation in Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy Paige

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neutrophils are critical inflammatory cells that cause tissue damage in a range of diseases and disorders. Being bone marrow-derived white blood cells, they migrate from the bloodstream to sites of tissue inflammation in response to chemotactic signals and induce inflammation by undergoing receptor-mediated respiratory burst and degranulation. Degranulation from neutrophils has been implicated as a major causative factor in pulmonary disorders, including severe asphyxic episodes of asthma. However, the mechanisms that control neutrophil degranulation are not well understood. Recent observations indicate that granule release from neutrophils depends on activation of intracellular signalling pathways, including β-arrestins, the Rho guanosine triphosphatase Rac2, soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP receptors, the src family of tyrosine kinases, and the tyrosine phosphatase MEG2. Some of these observations suggest that degranulation from neutrophils is selective and depends on nonredundant signalling pathways. This review focuses on new findings from the literature on the mechanisms that control the release of granule-derived mediators from neutrophils.

  17. Diabetic microangiopathy and peripheral blood neutrophil count%糖尿病微血管病变与外周血中性粒细胞计数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 何方平; 娜丽玛; 伊力哈木江·依马木

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Course of diabetes and hypertension are independent risk factors for diabetic microvascular complications, and fasting C-peptide level is a protective factor. There are many studies concerning glycated hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, white blood cel count and diabetic microvascular complications, but studies about neutrophils are rarely reported. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the relationship of peripheral blood neutrophil count with diabetic microvascular complications. METHODS:Totaly 112 patients with type 2 diabetes melitus were selected and divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of microvascular complications: diabetes group and diabetes+ microvascular complication group. The gender, age, ethnic group, disease history and laboratory examination parameters were colected and analyzed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1) Univariate analysis: Patients in the diabetes+microvascular complication group had significantly higher age, course of diabetes, globulin, creatinine, the percentage of neutrophile granulocytes, nertrophil count, rate of hypertension than those in the diabetes group (P < 0.05), while the lymphocyte percentage, glomerular filtration rate, and triglyceride level were significantly lower than those in the diabetes group (P < 0.05). (2) Logistic regression analysis showed that age, course of diabetes and nertrophil count were the independent risk factors of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes melitus (odds ratio=1.155, 2.145, 2.275, alP < 0.01). Based on the adjustment of the age factor, the partial correlation analysis showed that the nertrophil count was positively correlated to the levels of creatinine, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, globulin and hemoglobin, but negatively correlated to the levels of serum bile acid and glomerular filtration rate. Chronic subclinical inflammations are closely correlated to the occurrence of microvascular

  18. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time.

  19. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Uribe-Querol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions.

  20. Blood pressure estimation in the human fetal descending aorta.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, P.C.; Mathews, V.J.; Loupas, T.; Stewart, P.A.; Clark, E.B.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Wladimiroff, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to estimate fetal blood pressure non-invasively from two-dimensional color Doppler-derived aortic blood flow and diameter waveforms, and to compare the results with invasively derived human fetal blood pressures available from the literature. METHODS:

  1. Blood pressure estimation in the human fetal descending aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Struijk (Pieter); V.J. Mathews; T. Loupas; P.A. Stewart (Patricia); E.B. Clark; R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The objectives of this study were to estimate fetal blood pressure non-invasively from two-dimensional color Doppler-derived aortic blood flow and diameter waveforms, and to compare the results with invasively derived human fetal blood pressures available from the literature.

  2. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  3. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  4. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  5. Postpartal immunometabolic gene network expression and function in blood neutrophils are altered in response to prepartal energy intake and postpartal intramammary inflammatory challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, K M; Graugnard, D E; Khan, M J; Mukesh, M; Loor, J J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of over-feeding energy prepartum on blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) response remains unclear. Cows fed controlled (CON; 1.34Mcal/kg of dry matter) or excess energy (OVE; 1.62Mcal/kg dry matter) during the dry period (~45d before expected calving date) received an intramammary (IM) challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during the postpartal period to determine the effects of IM LPS and prepartal diet on the expression of key genes associated with immunometabolic response in blood PMN. Feed intake and daily milk yield were recorded throughout the study period. At 7d in milk (DIM), all cows received LPS (200µg) into 1 rear mammary quarter. Blood PMN were isolated at 7, 14, and 30 DIM, as well as before (0h) and after (12h) IM LPS challenge for gene expression analysis using quantitative real time PCR. Phagocytosis capabilities in vitro were assessed at 7, 14, and 30 DIM. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS with repeated measures. No differences in feed intake and milk yield were observed between OVE- and CON-fed cows. As expected, IM LPS challenge altered the expression of genes associated with the immune response (e.g., 1.9- and 1.8-fold for SELL and TLR2, respectively), metabolism (e.g., 1.8- and -1.8-fold for LDHA and SLC2A1, respectively), and transcription (e.g., 1.1- and 1.7-fold for NCOR1 and PPARD, respectively). At 12h postchallenge, an upregulation of TLR2 (1.8-fold), HIF1A (1.9-fold), and NFKB1 (1.5-fold) was observed for OVE rather than CON. At 7 DIM, S100A9 tended (2.2-fold) to be upregulated for OVE rather than CON. At 14 DIM, OVE resulted in lower PMN phagocytosis and an upregulation of NCOR2 (1.6-fold) and RXRA (1.9-fold) compared with CON-fed cows. At 30 DIM, an upregulation of MPO (3.5-fold) and PLA2G4A (1.5-fold) and a tendency for RXRA (1.7-fold) was observed for OVE- rather than CON-fed cows. Our results suggest that IM LPS challenge altered gene expression associated with metabolism in PMN

  6. Biomimetic, ultrathin and elastic hydrogels regulate human neutrophil extravasation across endothelial-pericyte bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Holly M.

    2017-01-01

    The vascular basement membrane—a thin, elastic layer of extracellular matrix separating and encasing vascular cells—provides biological and mechanical cues to endothelial cells, pericytes, and migrating leukocytes. In contrast, experimental scaffolds typically used to replicate basement membranes are stiff and bio-inert. Here, we present thin, porated polyethylene glycol hydrogels to replicate human vascular basement membranes. Like commercial transwells, our hydrogels are approximately 10μm thick, but like basement membranes, the hydrogels presented here are elastic (E: 50-80kPa) and contain a dense network of small pores. Moreover, the inclusion of bioactive domains introduces receptor-mediated biochemical signaling. We compare elastic hydrogels to common culture substrates (E: >2GPa) for human endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers to replicate postcapillary venules in vitro. Our data demonstrate that substrate elasticity facilitates differences in vascular phenotype, supporting expression of vascular markers that are increasingly replicative of venules. Endothelial cells differentially express vascular markers, like EphB4, and leukocyte adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1, with decreased mechanical stiffness. With porated PEG hydrogels we demonstrate the ability to evaluate and observe leukocyte recruitment across endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers, reporting that basement membrane scaffolds can significantly alter the rate of vascular migration in experimental systems. Overall, this study demonstrates the creation and utility of a new and accessible method to recapture the mechanical and biological complexity of human basement membranes in vitro. PMID:28234918

  7. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  8. Proinflammatory mediators stimulate neutrophil-directed angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular permeability factor) is one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, and it plays a central role in mediating the process of angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. Neutrophils (PMNs) recently have been shown to produce VEGF. HYPOTHESIS: The acute inflammatory response is a potent stimulus for PMN-directed angiogenesis. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and anti-human Fas monoclonal antibody. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs were then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvessel endothelial cells and assessed for endothelial cell proliferation using 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Tubule formation was also assessed on MATRIGEL basement membrane matrix. Neutrophils were lysed to measure total VEGF release, and VEGF expression was detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN VEGF (532+\\/-49 and 484+\\/-80 pg\\/mL, respectively; for all, presented as mean +\\/- SEM) compared with control experiments (32+\\/-4 pg\\/mL). Interleukin 6 and Fas had no effect. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs also resulted in significant increases (P<.005) in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. Adding anti-human VEGF-neutralizing polyclonal antibody to stimulated PMN supernatant inhibited these effects. Total VEGF release following cell lysis and Western blot analysis suggests that the VEGF is released from an intracellular store. CONCLUSION: Activated human PMNs are directly angiogenic by releasing VEGF, and this has important implications for inflammation, capillary leak syndrome

  9. Modulation of γδ T cell activation by neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towstyka, Nadia Yasmín; Shiromizu, Carolina Maiumi; Keitelman, Irene; Sabbione, Florencia; Salamone, Gabriela Verónica; Geffner, Jorge Raúl; Trevani, Analía Silvina; Jancic, Carolina Cristina

    2017-09-09

    γδ T cells are non-conventional, innate-like T cells, characterized by a restricted TCR repertoire. They participate in protective immunity response against extracellular and intracellular pathogens, tumor surveillance, modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, tissue healing, epithelial cell maintenance, and regulation of physiological organ function. In this study, we investigated the role of neutrophils during the activation of human blood γδ T cells through CD3 molecules. We found that the up-regulation of CD69 expression, and the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α induced by anti-CD3 antibodies were potentiated by neutrophils. We found that inhibition of caspase-1 and neutralization of IL-18 did not affect neutrophil-mediated modulation. By contrast, the treatment with serine proteases inhibitors prevented the potentiation of γδ T cell activation induced by neutrophils. Moreover, the addition of elastase to γδ T cell culture increased their stimulation, and the treatment of neutrophils with elastase inhibitor prevented the effect of neutrophils on γδ T cell activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effect of elastase on γδ T cells was mediated through the proteases-activated receptor, PAR1, since the inhibition of this receptor with a specific antagonist, RWJ56110, abrogated the effect of neutrophils on γδ T cell activation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutrophil and asbestos fiber-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human mesothelial and bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, V L; Raivio, K O; Linnainmaa, K; Ekman, A; Klockars, M

    1995-03-01

    This study investigates reactive oxygen species generation and oxidant-related cytotoxicity induced by amosite asbestos fibers and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) in human mesothelial cells and human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Transformed human pleural mesothelial cells (MET 5A) and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS 2B) were treated with amosite (2 micrograms/cm2) for 48 h. After 24 h of incubation, the cells were exposed for 1 h to nonactivated or amosite (50 micrograms) activated PMNs, washed, and incubated for another 23 h. Reactive oxygen species generation by the PMNs and the target cells was measured by chemiluminescence. Cell injury was assessed by cellular adenine nucleotide depletion, extracellular release of nucleotides, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Amosite-activated (but also to a lesser degree nonactivated) PMNs released substantial amounts of reactive oxygen metabolites, whereas the chemiluminescence of amosite-exposed mesothelial cells and epithelial cells did not differ from the background. Amosite treatment (48 h) of the target cells did not change intracellular adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) or nucleotide catabolite products (xanthine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid). When the target cells were exposed to nonactivated PMNs, significant adenine nucleotide depletion and nucleotide catabolite accumulation was observed in mesothelial cells only. In separate experiments, when the target cells were exposed to amosite-activated PMNs, the target cell injury was further potentiated compared with the amosite treatment alone or exposure to nonactivated PMNs. In conclusion, this study suggests the importance of inflammatory cell-derived free radicals in the development of amosite-induced mesothelial cell injury.

  11. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  12. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    was associated with a 30-40% increase in blood flow rate and a highly significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (P less than 0.001 for all). Approximately 100 min after the subjects went to sleep an additional blood flow rate increment (mean 56%) and a simultaneous significant decrease......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...... were used for measurement of blood flow rates. An automatic portable blood pressure recorder and processor unit was used for measurement of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate every 15 min. The change from upright to supine position at the beginning of the night period...

  13. In vitro inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by oleic acid albumin formulations from derivatized cotton wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J Vincent; Howley, Phyllis; Cohen, I Kelman

    2004-10-13

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is elevated in chronic wounds. Oleic acid albumin formulations that inhibit HNE may be applicable to treatment modalities for chronic wounds. Oleic acid/albumin formulations with mole ratios of 100:1, 50:1, and 25:1 (oleic acid to albumin) were prepared and found to have dose response inhibition properties against HNE. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations were 0.029-0.049 microM. Oleic acid/albumin (BSA) formulations were bound to positively and negatively charged cotton wound dressings and assessed for elastase inhibition using a fiber bound formulation in an assay designed to mimic HNE inhibition in the wound. Cotton derivatized with both carboxylate and amine functional groups were combined with oleic acid/albumin formulations at a maximum loading of 0.030 mg oleic acid + 0.14 mg BSA/mg fiber. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations bound to derivatized cotton were 0.26-0.42 microM. Release of the oleic acid/albumin formulation from the fiber was measured by measuring oleic acid levels with quantitative GC analysis. Approximately, 35-50% of the fiber bound formulation was released into solution within the first 15 min of incubation. Albumin was found to enhance the rate of elastase hydrolysis of the substrate within a concentration range of 0.3-50 g/L. The acceleration of HNE substrate hydrolysis by albumin required increased concentration of inhibitor in the formulation to obtain complete inhibition of HNE. Oleic acid formulations prepared with albumin enable transport, solubility and promote dose response inhibition of HNE from derivatized cotton fibers under aqueous conditions mimicking the chronic wound.

  14. Human mucosal leishmaniasis: neutrophils infiltrate areas of tissue damage that express high levels of Th17-related cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Santos, Claire S; Cardoso, Cristina R; de Andrade, José; Dos Santos, Washington L C; Clarêncio, Jorge; Silva, João S; Borges, Valeria M; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Claudia I; Barral, Aldina

    2010-10-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is characterised by severe tissue destruction. Herein, we evaluated the involvement of the IL-17-type response in the inflammatory infiltrate of biopsy specimens from 17 ML patients. IL-17 and IL-17-inducing cytokines (IL-1β, IL-23, IL-6 and TGF-β) were detected by immunohistochemistry in ML patients. IL-17(+) cells exhibited CD4(+), CD8(+) or CD14(+) phenotypes, and numerous IL-17(+) cells co-expressed the CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Neutrophils, a hallmark of Th17-mediated inflammation, were regularly detected in necrotic and perinecrotic areas and stained positive for neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and MMP-9. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of Th17 cells in ML lesions associated with neutrophils in areas of tissue injury and suggest that IL-17 is involved in ML pathogenesis.

  15. Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play critical roles in modulating the immune response. We present a robust methodology for rapidly isolating neutrophils directly from whole blood and develop ‘on-chip’ processing for mRNA and protein isolation for genomics and proteomics. We validate this device with an ex vivo stimulation experiment and by comparison with standard bulk isolation methodologies. Lastly, we implement this tool as part of a near patient blood processing system within a multi-center clinical study of...

  16. Doxycycline inhibits neutrophil (PMN)-type matrix metalloproteinases in human adult periodontitis gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L M; Sorsa, T; Lee, H M; Ciancio, S; Sorbi, D; Ramamurthy, N S; Gruber, B; Salo, T; Konttinen, Y T

    1995-02-01

    We previously reported that low-dose doxycycline (DOXY) therapy reduces host-derived collagenase activity in gingival tissue of adult periodontitis (AP) patients. However, it was not clear whether this in vivo effect was direct or indirect. In the present study, inflamed human gingival tissue, obtained from AP patients during periodontal surgery, was extracted and the extracts partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The extracts were then analyzed for collagenase activity using SDS-PAGE/fluorography/laser densitometry, and for gelatinase activity using type I gelatin zymography as well as a new quantitative assay using biotinylated type I gelatin as substrate. DOXY was added to the incubation mixture at a final concentration of 0-1000 microM. The concentration of DOXY required to inhibit 50% of the gingival tissue collagenase (IC50) was found to be 16-18 microM in the presence or absence of 1.2 mM APMA (an optimal organomercurial activator of latent procollagenases); this IC50 for DOXY was similar to that exhibited for collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and from gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of AP patients. Of interest, Porphyromonas gingivalis collagenase was also inhibited by similar DOXY levels (IC50 = 15 microM), however the collagenase activity observed in the gingival tissue extracts was found to be of mammalian not bacterial origin based on the production of the specific alpha A (3/4) and alpha B (1/4) collagen degradation fragments. In contrast, the inhibition of collagenase purified from culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (MMP-1) required much greater DOXY levels (IC50 = 280 microM). The predominant molecular forms of gelatinolytic activity presented in the AP patients gingival tissue extracts were found to closely correspond to the 92 kD PMN-type gelatinase (MMP-9) although small quantities of 72 kD fibroblast-type gelatinase (MMP-2), and some other low molecular weight gelatinases

  17. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Zilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  18. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-09-09

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  19. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  20. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-11-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron.

  1. The influence of porcine prophenin on neutrophils isolated from rabbit blood during implantation of calcium sulphate graft material into bone tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wessely-Szponder

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Immune dysfunction induced by surgical trauma may comprise either an inappropriately exaggerated inflammatory response or a profound suppression of cell- mediated immunity. Neutrophils are the leading cells in the first response to trauma. It is known that they mediate initial resistance to bacterial infection. Activated neutrophils can degranulate and release some enzymes such as elastase and myeloperoxidase (MPO. The function of elastase is, among others, to kill bacterial, whereas MPO is a specific enzyme of primary granules of neutrophils and a marker of in vivo neutrophil activation. Previous reports estimated that some cathelicidins could act to increase or diminish an innate immune response in which neutrophils participate. The aim of this study was to evaluate prophenins (PF isolated from porcine leukocytes in respect to neutrophil activity and survival during implantation of calcium sulphate bone grafts substitution in rabbits. Obtained results pointed out that neutrophils responded to  PF  depending upon concentration. Thirty min from implantation of calcium sulphate graft, we observed the greatest release of elastase (57.01±0.49% of maximal release in cultures stimulated with 10 mg/ml of PF, at 0 mg/ml was 51.15±0.23%, while after 24 h of incubation the greatest response was at a concentration of 20 mg/ml.  MPO release after 30 min from surgery decreased significantly at 10 mg/ml. In higher concentrations, the inhibition was less pronounced. Moreover, we estimated that PF causes cytotoxicity in the highest concentration as well as the apoptosis of neutrophils.

  2. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  3. Sepsis affects most routine and cell population data (CPD) obtained using the Sysmex XN-2000 blood cell analyzer: neutrophil-related CPD NE-SFL and NE-WY provide useful information for detecting sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S H; Park, C-J; Lee, B-R; Nam, K-S; Kim, M-J; Han, M-Y; Kim, Y J; Cho, Y-U; Jang, S

    2015-04-01

    The Sysmex XN-2000 analyzer can assess 36 routine and 57 cell population data (CPD) items. In this study, we evaluated these items as sepsis biomarkers. We enrolled 280 normal control (NC) and 130 sepsis patients. The sepsis patients were classified as uncomplicated or complicated sepsis. Routine and CPD items were determined, and the results were compared at between the NC and sepsis groups, uncomplicated and complicated sepsis groups, and survivors and nonsurvivors. For the detection of sepsis, CPD items NE-SFL [defined as the fluorescent light intensity of the neutrophil area on the WDF (white blood cell differential) scattergram] and NE-WY (defined as the fluorescent light distribution width of the neutrophil area on the WDF scattergram) showed comparative or higher AUC of 0.909 and 0.905, respectively, when compared with routine items such as hematocrit, hemoglobin, RBC, RDW, immature granulocytes count, lymphocytes count, and neutrophils count. For the discrimination of sepsis severity, only platelet-related items showed higher AUC (0.723 - 0.748) than lactic acid (0.695). For the prediction of 28-day mortality, only CV and SD of RDW showed higher AUC (0.766 and 0.732 each) than lactic acid (0.712). Sepsis patients demonstrated significant changes in routine and CPD items related to RBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets when compared to NCs. Increase in CPD items NE-SFL and NE-WY, which may indicate neutrophil immaturity or activation, could be useful for the detection of sepsis patients, in conjunction with currently used surrogate sepsis biomarkers. However, these items did not efficiently contribute to the discrimination of sepsis severity or predict mortality. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 penetration and neutrophil transmigration across the blood-brain barrier are modulated by alpha7 nicotinic receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chi

    Full Text Available Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, an essential regulator of inflammation, is abundantly expressed in hippocampal neurons, which are vulnerable to bacterial meningitis. However, it is unknown whether α7 nAChR contributes to the regulation of these events. In this report, an aggravating role of α7 nAChR in host defense against meningitic E. coli infection was demonstrated by using α7-deficient (α7(-/- mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC and animal model systems. As shown in our in vitro and in vivo studies, E. coli K1 invasion and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN transmigration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB were significantly reduced in α7(-/- BMEC and α7(-/- mice. Stimulation by nicotine was abolished in the α7(-/- cells and animals. The same blocking effect was achieved by methyllycaconitine (α7 antagonist. The tight junction molecules occludin and ZO-1 were significantly reduced in the brain cortex of wildtype mice infected with E. coli and treated with nicotine, compared to α7(-/- cells and animals. Decreased neuronal injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was observed in α7(-/- mice with meningitis. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and RANTES and adhesion molecules (CD44 and ICAM-1 were significantly reduced in the cerebrospinal fluids of the α7(-/- mice with E. coli meningitis. Furthermore, α7 nAChR is the major calcium channel for nicotine- and E. coli K1-increased intracellular calcium concentrations of mouse BMEC. Taken together, our data suggest that α7 nAChR plays a detrimental role in the host defense against meningitic infection by modulation of pathogen invasion, PMN recruitment, calcium signaling and neuronal inflammation.

  5. Clinical protection from falciparum malaria correlates with neutrophil respiratory bursts induced by merozoites opsonized with human serum antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Joos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective vaccines to combat malaria are urgently needed, but have proved elusive in the absence of validated correlates of natural immunity. Repeated blood stage infections induce antibodies considered to be the main arbiters of protection from pathology, but their essential functions have remained speculative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study evaluated antibody dependent respiratory burst (ADRB activity in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and antibodies in the sera of two different African endemic populations, and investigated its association with naturally acquired clinical protection. Respiratory bursts by freshly isolated PMN were quantified by chemiluminescence readout in the presence of isoluminol, which preferentially detects extra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Using a standardized, high throughput protocol, 230 sera were analyzed from individuals of all age groups living in meso- (Ndiop or holo-endemic (Dielmo Senegalese villages, and enrolled in a cross-sectional prospective study with intensive follow-up. Statistical significance was determined using non-parametric tests and Poisson regression models. The most important finding was that PMN ADRB activity was correlated with acquired clinical protection from malaria in both high and low transmission areas (P = 0.006 and 0.036 respectively. Strikingly, individuals in Dielmo with dichotomized high ADRB indexes were seventeen fold less susceptible to malaria attacks (P = 0.006. Complementary results showed that ADRB activity was (i dependent on intact merozoites and IgG opsonins, but not parasitized erythrocytes, or complement, (ii correlated with merozoite specific cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibody titers (P<0.001 for both, and (iii stronger in antisera from a holo-endemic compared to a meso-endemic site (P = 0.002, and reduced in asymptomatic carriers (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work presents the

  6. Toxaphene, but not beryllium, induces human neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS): involvement of caspases and ROS in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavastre, Valérie; Roberge, Charles J; Pelletier, Martin; Gauthier, Marc; Girard, Denis

    2002-07-01

    Chemicals of environmental concern are known to alter the immune system. Recent data indicate that some contaminants possess proinflammatory properties by activating neutrophils, an area of research that is still poorly investigated. We have previously documented that toxaphene activates human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accelerates apoptosis by a yet unknown mechanism. In this study, we found that toxaphene induces another neutrophil function, chemotaxis. Furthermore, we found that toxaphene induces both chemotaxis and apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism, since these responses were blocked by the addition of catalase to the culture. In addition, toxaphene was found to induce the degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, paxillin, and vimentin during apoptosis, and this was reversed by the addition of z-VAD-FMK (caspase inhibitor) or catalase, demonstrating the importance of caspases and ROS in this process. In contrast to toxaphene, we found that beryllium does not induce superoxide production, and, this correlates with its inability to induce chemotaxis and apoptosis. We conclude that toxaphene induces chemotaxis and apoptosis via ROS and that caspases and ROS are involved in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

  7. β-Glucan induces reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils to improve the killing of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata isolates from vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Souza Bonfim-Mendonça

    Full Text Available Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is among the most prevalent vaginal diseases. Candida albicans is still the most prevalent species associated with this pathology, however, the prevalence of other Candida species, such as C. glabrata, is increasing. The pathogenesis of these infections has been intensely studied, nevertheless, no consensus has been reached on the pathogenicity of VVC. In addition, inappropriate treatment or the presence of resistant strains can lead to RVVC (vulvovaginal candidiasis recurrent. Immunomodulation therapy studies have become increasingly promising, including with the β-glucans. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated microbicidal activity, phagocytosis, intracellular oxidant species production, oxygen consumption, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and the release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-8 (IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra in neutrophils previously treated or not with β-glucan. In all of the assays, human neutrophils were challenged with C. albicans and C. glabrata isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. β-glucan significantly increased oxidant species production, suggesting that β-glucan may be an efficient immunomodulator that triggers an increase in the microbicidal response of neutrophils for both of the species isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. The effects of β-glucan appeared to be mainly related to the activation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of cytokine release.

  8. β-Glucan induces reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils to improve the killing of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata isolates from vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia de Souza; Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine da Silva Ribeiro; Negri, Melyssa; Lima, Nayara Cristina Alves de; Fiorini, Adriana; Hatanaka, Elaine; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is among the most prevalent vaginal diseases. Candida albicans is still the most prevalent species associated with this pathology, however, the prevalence of other Candida species, such as C. glabrata, is increasing. The pathogenesis of these infections has been intensely studied, nevertheless, no consensus has been reached on the pathogenicity of VVC. In addition, inappropriate treatment or the presence of resistant strains can lead to RVVC (vulvovaginal candidiasis recurrent). Immunomodulation therapy studies have become increasingly promising, including with the β-glucans. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated microbicidal activity, phagocytosis, intracellular oxidant species production, oxygen consumption, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1β, and IL-1Ra in neutrophils previously treated or not with β-glucan. In all of the assays, human neutrophils were challenged with C. albicans and C. glabrata isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. β-glucan significantly increased oxidant species production, suggesting that β-glucan may be an efficient immunomodulator that triggers an increase in the microbicidal response of neutrophils for both of the species isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis. The effects of β-glucan appeared to be mainly related to the activation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of cytokine release.

  9. Activation of the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase results in coupling of electron carrier function between ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A

    1985-04-10

    The enzymatic activity underlying the respiratory burst in human neutrophils was examined in a subcellular fraction with high specific activity and shown to be a membrane-associated complex of a flavoprotein, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559 in an approximate 1.3:1:2 molar ratio. Study of the redox poise of these electron carriers indicated that electron flow in the intact complex from unstimulated cells proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10. Similar studies on the complex prepared from stimulated neutrophils indicated that electron flow proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10----cytochrome b559----oxygen. The active enzyme complex was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Inhibition persisted after removal of excess inhibitor, was reversed by dithiothreitol, and could be blocked by prior addition of substrate (NADPH). Inhibition of the active oxidase complex by p-chloromercuribenzoate also inhibited electron flow from NADPH to all purported electron carriers in the chain (i.e. E-FAD, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559). We conclude that activation of the oxidase enzyme complex in the intact neutrophil resulted in linkage of electron carrier function between endogenous ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559 and was without demonstrable effect on proximal electron flow. The p-chloromercuribenzoate sensitive site(s) proximal to the initial electron acceptor (E-FAD) did not appear to be altered by the cellular activation process.

  10. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    in femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... leg. In conclusion, resting femoral bone blood flow increases by physical exercise, but appears to level off with increasing exercise intensities. Moreover, while moderate systemic hypoxia does not change bone blood flow at rest or during exercise, intra-arterially administered adenosine during...

  11. Complement receptor 3 and Toll-like receptor 4 act sequentially in uptake and intracellular killing of unopsonized Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen, Robin; Zweers, Debby; van Diepen, Angela; van Dissel, Jaap T; Roos, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2007-06-01

    The uptake and subsequent killing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by human neutrophils was studied. In particular, two pattern recognition receptors, complement receptor 3 (CR3) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), were found to be essential for the efficient uptake and activation, respectively, of the NADPH oxidase. The uptake of Salmonella was almost completely inhibited by various monoclonal antibodies against CR3, and neutrophils from a patient with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, which lack CR3, showed almost no uptake of Salmonella. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant strain of Salmonella was used to show that the expression of full-length, wild-type, or so-called smooth LPS is important for the efficient killing of intracellular Salmonella. Infection with wild-type-LPS-expressing Salmonella resulted in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TLR4-decorated, Salmonella-containing vacuoles, whereas ROS were not induced by an LPS mutant strain. In addition, the recognition of Salmonella by neutrophils, leading to ROS production, was shown to be intracellular, as determined by priming experiments with intact bacteria under conditions where the bacterium is not taken up. Finally, the generation of ROS in the wild-type-Salmonella-infected neutrophils was largely inhibited by the action of a TLR4-blocking, cell-permeable peptide, showing that signaling by this receptor from the Salmonella-containing vacuole is essential for the activation of the NADPH oxidase. In sum, our data identify the sequential recognition of unopsonized Salmonella strains by CR3 and TLR4 as essential events in the efficient uptake and killing of this intracellular pathogen.

  12. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpre