WorldWideScience

Sample records for human arterial system

  1. Exercise and arterial adaptation in humans: uncoupling localized and systemic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowley, N.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Birk, G.K.; Cable, N.T.; George, K.; Whyte, G.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have established effects of exercise training on arterial wall thickness, remodeling, and function in humans, but the extent to which these changes are locally or systemically mediated is unclear. We examined the brachial arteries of the dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) upper limbs

  2. Earliest effects of sudden occlusions on pressure profiles in selected locations of the human systemic arterial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Marcin; Gadda, Giacomo; Taibi, Angelo; Gałązka, Mirosław; Zieliński, Piotr

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a numerical simulation method for predicting the time dependence (wave form) of pressure at any location in the systemic arterial system in humans. The method uses the matlab-Simulink environment. The input data include explicitly the geometry of the arterial tree, treated up to an arbitrary bifurcation level, and the elastic properties of arteries as well as rheological parameters of blood. Thus, the impact of anatomic details of an individual subject can be studied. The method is applied here to reveal the earliest stages of mechanical reaction of the pressure profiles to sudden local blockages (thromboses or embolisms) of selected arteries. The results obtained with a purely passive model provide reference data indispensable for studies of longer-term effects due to neural and humoral mechanisms. The reliability of the results has been checked by comparison of two available sets of anatomic, elastic, and rheological data involving (i) 55 and (ii) 138 arterial segments. The remaining arteries have been replaced with the appropriate resistive elements. Both models are efficient in predicting an overall shift of pressure, whereas the accuracy of the 55-segment model in reproducing the detailed wave forms and stabilization times turns out dependent on the location of the blockage and the observation point.

  3. An Human-Computer Interactive Augmented Reality System for Coronary Artery Diagnosis Planning and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiming; Huang, Chen; Lv, Shengqing; Li, Zeyu; Chen, Yimin; Ma, Lizhuang

    2017-09-02

    In order to let the doctor carry on the coronary artery diagnosis and preoperative planning in a more intuitive and more natural way, and to improve the training effect for interns, an augmented reality system for coronary artery diagnosis planning and training (ARS-CADPT) is designed and realized in this paper. At first, a 3D reconstruction algorithm based on computed tomographic (CT) images is proposed to model the coronary artery vessels (CAV). Secondly, the algorithms of static gesture recognition and dynamic gesture spotting and recognition are presented to realize the real-time and friendly human-computer interaction (HCI), which is the characteristic of ARS-CADPT. Thirdly, a Sort-First parallel rendering and splicing display subsystem is developed, which greatly expands the capacity of student users. The experimental results show that, with the use of ARS-CADPT, the reconstruction accuracy of CAV model is high, the HCI is natural and fluent, and the visual effect is good. In a word, the system fully meets the application requirement.

  4. Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftanas, L I; Sidorova, P V; Pavlov, S V; Makhnev, V P; Korenek, V V; Reva, N V; Amstislavskaya, T G

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.

  5. Role of the vestibular system in the arterial pressure response to parabolic-flight-induced gravitational changes in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Chihiro; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Morita, Hironobu

    2011-05-16

    Arterial pressure (AP) is known to fluctuate during parabolic-flight-induced gravitational changes in human subjects, increasing during hypergravity and decreasing during microgravity. In this study, we examined whether the vestibular system participates in the AP response to the gravitational changes induced by parabolic flight in human subjects. Eight subjects performed parabolic flights in a supine position as their AP was measured. Their vestibular inputs during the gravitational changes were reversibly masked by artificial electrical stimulation (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS). The AP responses during the parabolas were then compared between the GVS-off and GVS-on conditions. AP increased during hypergravity and decreased during microgravity. The AP responses at the onset of hypergravity and microgravity were abolished by GVS. These results indicate that the vestibular system elicits pressor and depressor responses during parabolic-flight-induced hypergravity and microgravity, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen transfer in human carotid artery bifurcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.G.Zhang; Y.B.Fan; X.Y.Deng

    2007-01-01

    Arterial bifurcations are places where blood flow may be disturbed and slow recirculation flow may occur.To reveal the correlation between local oxygen transfer and atherogenesis, a finite element method was employed to simulate the blood flow and the oxygen transfer in the human carotid artery bifurcation. Under steady-state flow conditions, the numerical simulation demonstrated a variation in local oxygen transfer at the bifurcation, showing that the convective condition in the disturbed flow region may produce uneven local oxygen transfer at the blood/wall interface.The disturbed blood flow with formation of slow eddies in the carotid sinus resulted in a depression in oxygen supply to the arterial wall at the entry of the sinus, which in turn may lead to an atherogenic response of the arterial wall, and contribute to the development of atherosclerotic stenosis there.

  7. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia. PMID:28228756

  8. VARIATIONS OF MIDDLE SEGMENTAL ARTERY OF HUMAN KIDNEY AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyan Prakash Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the arterial pattern of middle segmental artery and its relation with collecting system in the human kidneys. Materials and Methods: We studied 50 fresh human Kidneys by corrosion cast techniques. We used different colour coded moulding granules of butyl butyrate, red for artery, blue for vein and black for collecting system of the human kidneys. 20% solution of butyl butyrate in acetone was injected into renal vessels and ureter of each kidney. Injected kidneys were kept immersed in concentrated Potassium Hydroxide solution for corrosion to obtain the endocasts. These endocasts were cleaned under the running tap water and observed macroscopically. Results: We observed three types of variations in arterial pattern of middle segmental artery namely Middle Segmental Artery Type-1 (MSAT1, Middle Segmental Artery Type-2 (MSAT2, Middle Segmental Artery Type-3 (MSAT3 and they were seen in 29(58%, 14(28%, 6(12% kidneys respectively. We also observed three different variations in relation between middle segmental artery and collecting system namely Middle Segmental Artery Group-1 (MSAG1, Middle Segmental Artery Group-2 (MSAG2, Middle Segmental Artery Group-3 (MSAG3 and they were seen in 32%, 24%, 42% kidneys respectively. Conclusion: Anatomical knowledge of these variations is of valuable contribution for uro-surgeon in performing more and more conservative renal surgeries which lead to preservation of healthy and functional renal parenchyma and prevent intraoperative and post-operative complications.

  9. Concentration polarization of atherogenic lipids in the arterial system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Xiaoyan; (邓小燕); WANG; Guixue; (王贵学)

    2003-01-01

    The transport of atherogenic lipids (LDL) in a straight segment of an artery with a semi-permeable wall was simulated numerically. The numerical analysis predicted that a mass transport phenomenon called 'concentration polarization' of LDL might occur in the arterial system. Under normal physiological flow conditions, the luminal surface LDL concentration was 5%-14% greater than the bulk concentration in a straight segment of an artery. The luminal surface LDL concentration at the arterial wall was flow-dependent, varying linearly with the filtration rate across the arterial wall and inversely with wall shear rate. At low wall shear rate, the luminal surface LDL concentration was very sensitive to changes in flow conditions, decreasing sharply as wall shear rate increased. In order to verify the numerical analysis, the luminal surface concentration of bovine serum albumin (as a tracer macromolecule) in the canine carotid artery was measured in vitro by directly taking liquid samples from the luminal surface of the artery. The experimental result was in very good agreement with the numerical analysis. The authors believe that the mass transport phenomenon of 'concentration polarization' may indeed exist in the human circulation and play an important role in the localization of atherosclerosis.

  10. Microstructure and mechanics of human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J S; Adio, A O; Pitt, A; Hayman, L; Thorn, C E; Shore, A C; Whatmore, J L; Winlove, C P

    2016-12-01

    Vascular diseases such as diabetes and hypertension cause changes to the vasculature that can lead to vessel stiffening and the loss of vasoactivity. The microstructural bases of these changes are not presently fully understood. We present a new methodology for stain-free visualization, at a microscopic scale, of the morphology of the main passive components of the walls of unfixed resistance arteries and their response to changes in transmural pressure. Human resistance arteries were dissected from subcutaneous fat biopsies, mounted on a perfusion myograph, and imaged at varying transmural pressures using a multimodal nonlinear microscope. High-resolution three-dimensional images of elastic fibers, collagen, and cell nuclei were constructed. The honeycomb structure of the elastic fibers comprising the internal elastic layer became visible at a transmural pressure of 30 mmHg. The adventitia, comprising wavy collagen fibers punctuated by straight elastic fibers, thinned under pressure as the collagen network straightened and pulled taut. Quantitative measurements of fiber orientation were made as a function of pressure. A multilayer analytical model was used to calculate the stiffness and stress in each layer. The adventitia was calculated to be up to 10 times as stiff as the media and experienced up to 8 times the stress, depending on lumen diameter. This work reveals that pressure-induced reorganization of fibrous proteins gives rise to very high local strain fields and highlights the unique mechanical roles of both fibrous networks. It thereby provides a basis for understanding the micromechanical significance of structural changes that occur with age and disease.

  11. System and method for investigating arterial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachev, Alexander; Dominguez, Zachary; Vito, Raymond

    2009-10-01

    Organ culture systems are used to study remodeling of arteries and to fabricate tissue engineered vascular grafts. Investigations to date focused on changes in geometry and mechanical response of arteries or constructs associated with controlled sustained alterations in the global load parameters such as the arterial pressure, flow, or axial stretch. A new experimental paradigm is proposed, which is based on the simultaneous independent control of local mechanical parameters such as mean strain or stress in the arterial wall and flow-induced shear at the intima. An organ culture system and methodology were developed, which controls pressure, flow, and axial length of a specimen in order to maintain the local mechanical parameters at prescribed values. The operation of the system is illustrated by maintenance of elevated axial medial stress in porcine carotid artery, while keeping the mean circumferential stress and flow-induced shear stress at baseline values. Previously unknown aspects of remodeling that might be revealed by the novel approach are discussed.

  12. [Efferent innervation of the arteries of human leptomeninx in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, V M; Kotsiuba, A E; Babich, E V

    2009-01-01

    Structure of the efferent nerve plexuses (adrenergic, acetylcholinestherase- and cholinacetyltranspherase-positive, NO-dependent), was studied in the arteries of human leptomeninx with different diameters. Material was obtained from the corpses of the healthy people and of the patients with initial stages of arterial hypertension (AH). It was shown that the concentrations of cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers and varicosities in axon terminal part, innervating the arteries with the diameters ranging from 450 till 100 microm, were not significantly different. In these arteries, NO-ergic plexuses were also detected. In patients with AH, regardless the arterial diameters, the significant increase (up to 15-20%) of adrenergic nerve fiber and varicosity concentrations was found. The changes in cholinergic nerve fiber concentration were found to depend on the vessel diameter: the significant decrease of these parameter was observed only in arteries with the diameter of 100-200 microm. No significant changes in nerve plexus concentration was noticed in the arteries with greater or smaller diameter. In NO-ergic neural conductors, the enzyme activity decreased only in the large arteries, and remained almost unchanged in the small vascular branches. The changes in the vasomotor innervation described in AH, are interpreted as a vasomotor innervation dysfunction of the leptomeninx arteries that may result in the hemodynamic disturbances.

  13. Finite volume numerical solution to a blood flow problem in human artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti Budiawan, Inge; Mungkasi, Sudi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we solve a one dimensional blood flow model in human artery. This model is of a non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equation system which can generate either continuous or discontinuous solution. We use the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method to solve this model. Particularly, we investigate how a pulse propagates in human artery. For this simulation, we give a single sine wave with a small time period as an impluse input on the left boundary. The finite volume method is successful in simulating how the pulse propagates in the artery. It detects the positions of the pulse for the whole time period.

  14. Arterial compliance measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study the elasticity of the arterial wall using a non-invasive laser Doppler measurement system. The elasticity of the arterial wall is described by its compliance factor, which can be determined when both blood pressure and the radial velocity of the arterial wall are known. To measure radical velocity we used a self- mixing interferometer. The compliance factors were measured from six healthy volunteers, whose ages were varied from 21 to 32. Although a single volunteer's compliance factor is presented as an example, this paper treated the volunteers as a group. First, the elastic modulus, which is inversely proportional to the compliance factor, was determined. Then, an exponential curve was fitted into the measured data and a characteristic equation for the elastic modulus of the arterial wall was determined. The elastic modulus was calculated at different pressures and the results were compared to the static incremental modulus of a dog's femoral artery. The results indicate that there is a correlation between human elastic and canine static incremental modulus for blood pressures varying from 60 to 110 mmHg.

  15. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. Innervation of the human middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Gulbenkian, S; Barroso, C P

    1998-01-01

    in arteries without endothelium, while the responses to norepinephrine, NPY, VIP, PHM, and CGRP were not changed by endothelium removal. Blockade experiments showed that the vasomotor responses to norepinephrine were blocked by prazosin, to NPY by BIBP 3226, acetylcholine by atropin, substance P by RP 67580...

  17. Genetic fuzzy system predicting contractile reactivity patterns of small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, J; Sheykhzade, Majid; Clausen, B F;

    2014-01-01

    strategies. Results show that optimized fuzzy systems (OFSs) predict contractile reactivity of arteries accurately. In addition, OFSs identified significant differences that were undetectable using conventional analysis in the responses of arteries between groups. We concluded that OFSs may be used...

  18. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  19. MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF MEDIAL CIRCUMFLEX FEMORAL ARTERY IN HUMAN CADAVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh R. Aghera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial circumflex femoral artery is an important branch of Profunda femoris artery. It is an important artery in supplying blood to the head and neck of the femur, the adductor muscles and form anastomosis around head of femur. So study of variation of medial circumflex femoral artery great value for surgeon and orthopaedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: The present study includes 102 lower limbs of adult formalin fixed human cadavers used for the routine dissection procedure for under graduate and post graduate students in the department of Anatomy, M.R. Medical College, KBN Medical college and H K E Homeopathic College, Gulbarga (India during 2011-2014.The study was done by dissection method as per Cunningham’s manual of practical Anatomy. Result: In present study, we found that 25 extremities (25.49% medial circumflex femoral artery was originated directly from femoral artery. In 10 extremities (9.80% a common trunk was observed form medial circumflex femoral with femoral artery. Normal study was observed in 66 extremities (64.70%. Conclusion: In present study and other past studies we conclude that knowledge of variation in this artery is very important to preventing injury to vessels during surgical procedures around hip joint and also has important value in plastic surgery operations as the vascular pedicle of grafts such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG flap, medial thigh flap and medial circumflex femoral (gracilis perforator free flap. During case of selective arteriography in ischaemic necrosis of the femoral head to know the arterial supply of the femoral head it is used.

  20. Prediction of Carotid Artery Stenosis in Candidates of Coronary Artery Bypasses Surgery by A Scoring System.

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Shirani; Shakiba, M.; M. Soleymanzadeh

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective: Up to 9% of coronary ar-tery bypass grafting (CABG) patients suffer from stroke after the surgery. Although post CABG stroke has multiple etiologies, stenosis of cervical carotid arteries is an important factor. Many studies have evaluated carotid artery stenosis in CABG. Carotid stenosis and its related factors and a new scoring sys-tem for selection of CABG patients for Doppler study are introduced. Materials and methods: 1721 consecutive cases of non-urgent CABG w...

  1. [Ultrastructure of the intima of human pial arteries in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, V M; Kotsiuba, A E; Babich, E V

    2009-01-01

    Ultrastructure of the intima of human pial arteries obtained from 5 male cadavers of practically healthy individuals and from 8 cadavers of the patients with the intravitally diagnosed grade I arterial hypertension (AH) was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. AH was found to be associated with the remodeling of the intimal structural elements in the pial arteries. In most arteries, the changes were detected in the microrelief of the luminal surface and in the permeability of the vascular endothelial lining and of the subendothelial layer. During this remodeling, some endothelial cells were found in the state of structural and functional adaptation to the elevated arterial pressure, while the others were undergoing the dystrophic changes. The latter include the cells containing lipid inclusions, as well as the endothelial cells presumably in the state of apoptosis. The destruction of the intercellular junctions, the disturbances in the endothelium permeability contributed to the development of subendothelial layer edema, resulting in its significant thickening. This layer became looser and contained abundant collagen fibrils.

  2. Dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takada, Daisuke; Ohmi, Masato; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2011-03-01

    OCT is highly potential for development of a new field of dynamic skin physiology, as recently reported by the authors. In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by the SS-OCT. Among the vascular system, only the small artery has two physiological functions both for the elastic artery (like main and middle arteries) and for muscle-controlled one (like arterioles). It, therefore, is important for dynamic analysis of blood flow and circulation. In the time-sequential OCT images obtained with 25 frames/s, it is found that the small artery makes a sharp response to sound stress for contraction and expansion while it continues pulsation in synchronization with the heartbeats. This result indicates that the small artery exhibits clearly the two physiological functions for blood flow and circulation. In response to sound stress, blood flow is controlled effectively by thickness change of the tunica media which consists of five to six layers of smooth muscles. It is thus found that the thickness of the tunica media changes remarkably in response to external stress, reflecting activity of the sympathetic nerve. The dynamic OCT of the small artery presented here will allow us not only to understand the mechanism of blood flow control and also to detect abnormal physiological functions in the whole vascular system.

  3. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the human immune system on subsequent neointima formation elicited by vascular injury in a humanized mouse model. Immunodeficient NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtm1Wjl(NSG) mice were reconstituted with human (h)PBMCs immediately after both carotid wire and femoral cuff injury were induced in order to identify how differences in the severity of injury influenced endothelial regeneration, neointima formation, and homing of human inflammatory and progenitor cells. In contrast to non-reconstituted mice, hPBMC reconstitution reduced neointima formation after femoral cuff injury whereas hPBMCs promoted neointima formation after carotid wire injury 4 weeks after induction of injury. Neointimal endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the injured arteries were of mouse origin. Our results indicate that the immune system may differentially respond to arterial injury depending on the severity of injury, which may also be influenced by the intrinsic properties of the arteries themselves, resulting in either minimal or aggravated neointima formation. PMID:27759053

  4. K ATP channels in pig and human intracranial arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Sørensen, Mette Aaskov; Strøbech, Lotte Bjørg

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials suggest that synthetic ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel openers may cause headache and migraine by dilating cerebral and meningeal arteries. We studied the mRNA expression profile of K(ATP) channel subunits in the pig and human middle meningeal artery (MMA) and in the pig middle...... cerebral artery (MCA). We determined the order of potency of four K(ATP) channel openers when applied to isolated pig MMA and MCA, and we examined the potential inhibitory effects of the Kir6.1 subunit specific K(ATP) channel blocker PNU-37883A on K(ATP) channel opener-induced relaxation of the isolated...... pig MMA and MCA. Using conventional RT-PCR, we detected the mRNA transcripts of the K(ATP) channel subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2B in all the examined pig and human intracranial arteries. Application of K(ATP) channel openers to isolated pig MMA and MCA in myographs caused a concentration...

  5. Thermomechanical behavior of human carotid arteries in the passive state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinea, G V; Atienza, J M; Elices, M; Aragoncillo, P; Hayashi, K

    2005-06-01

    Localized heating or cooling is expanding the clinical procedures used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Advantageous implementation and development of these methods are linked indissolubly to a deeper understanding of the arterial response to combined mechanical and thermal loads. Despite this, the basic thermomechanical behavior of human blood vessels still remains largely unknown, primarily due to the lack of appropriate experimental data. In this work, the influence of temperature on the passive behavior of human carotid arteries was studied in vitro by means of inflation tests. Eleven carotid segments were tested in the range 0-200 mmHg at four different temperatures of 17, 27, 37, and 42 degrees C. The results show that the combined change of temperature and stress has a dramatic effect on the dilatation coefficient of the arterial wall, which is shifted from negative to positive depending on the stress state, whereas the structural stiffness of the arterial wall does not change appreciably in the range of temperatures tested.

  6. Mammary artery harvesting using the Da Vinci Si robotic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Secchin Canale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Internal mammary artery harvesting is an essential part of any coronary artery bypass operation. Totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery has become reality in many centers as a safe and effective alternative to conventional surgery in selected patients. Internal mammary artery harvesting is the initial part of the procedure and should be performed equally safely if one wants to achieve excellence in patency rates for the bypass. We here describe the technique for mammary harvesting with the Da Vinci Si robotic system.

  7. [Arterial hypertension in females engaged into penal system work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagirova, M M; El'garov, A A; Shogenova, A B; Murtazov, A M

    2010-01-01

    The authors proved significant prevalence of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis risk factors in women engaged into penal system work--so these values form cardiovascular risk caused by environmental parameters. Teveten and Nebilet were proved effective in the examinees with arterial hypertension.

  8. Arterial stiffness, antiphospholipid antibodies, and pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Im Cho, Kyoung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of arterial stiffness in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and its relationship with antiphospholipid antibody (aPL). Measurement of brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), carotid arterial stiffness, and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was performed in 51 patients with SLE. PAH was diagnosed if the pulmonary artery systolic pressure was >40mmHg. Information concerning SLE duration, medication, and serum autoantibodies was recorded. SLE activity was assessed by the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). aPL was present in 10 patients (20%), and PAH was detected in 6 patients (12%). The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon, baPWV, positive aPL, and titers of IgG anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) were increased in SLE with PAH; however, no difference was found in inflammatory markers, disease duration, and SLEDAI compared to SLE without PAH. Carotid artery deformation and right ventricular function were reduced in patients with PAH (all p<0.05). Carotid artery circumferential strain (r=0.34, p=0.021), radial strain (r=-0.30, p=0.045), and baPWV (r=0.46, p=0.001) showed significant correlation between IgG aCL. Univariate and multiple regression analysis revealed that the only significant independent predictors of the presence of PAH were baPWV, carotid artery stiffness, and IgG aCL. Arterial stiffness might contribute to the pathogenesis of PAH related to SLE as well as aPLs. Furthermore, the significant association of aPL with arterial stiffness suggests its important role in PAH with SLE. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  10. Experience With Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Of Human Atherosclerotic Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, John A.; Gessert, James M.; Maciel, Mario; Tobis, John M.; Griffith, James M.; Berns, Michael W.; Henry, Walter L.

    1989-08-01

    Normal human arteries have a well-defined structure on intravascular images. The intima appears very thin and is most likely represented by a bright reflection arising from the internal elastic lamina. The smooth muscle tunica media is echo-lucent on the ultrasound image and appears as a dark band separating the intima from the adventitia. The adventitia is a brightly reflective layer of variable thickness. The thickness of the intima, and therefore of the atherosclerotic plaque can be accurately measured from the ultrasound images and correlates well with histology. Calcification within the wall of arteries is seen as bright echo reflection with shadowing of the peripheral wall. Fibrotic regions are highly reflective but do not shadow. Necrotic liquid regions within advanced atherosclerotic plaques are seen on ultrasound images as large lucent zones surrounded by echogenic tissue. Imaging can be performed before and after interventional procedures, such as laser angioplasty, balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Intravascular ultrasound appears to provide an imaging modality for identifying the histologic characteristics of diseased arteries and for quantifying plaque thickness. It might be possible to perform such quantification to evaluate the results of interventional procedures.

  11. Heparin inhibits human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Mandal, A K; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-09-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been shown to reduce neointimal proliferation and restenosis following vascular injury in experimental studies, but the clinical trials of heparin in coronary balloon angioplasty have been negative. The current study, therefore, examined the effect of heparin on basal or stimulated migration by serum and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by Boyden's chamber method. In addition, the reversibility of the heparin effect on human coronary artery SMC migration was examined. Fetal calf serum (FCS) and PDGF-BB stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Heparin in moderate to high concentration (10 to 100 U/mL) exhibited concentration-related inhibition of FCS- and PDGF-BB-stimulated SMC migration; however, a low concentration (1 U/mL) of heparin had no inhibitory effects. Heparin also had weak inhibitory effects on nonstimulated SMC migration. The SMCs that were exposed to a high concentration (100 U/mL) of heparin for 6 hours were capable of migrating after a short lag period of removal of heparin from the culture medium. These SMCs also showed recovery of responses to FCS and PDGF-BB by migrating significantly greater than the nonstimulated level. Furthermore, heparin-containing medium did not contain detached cells. These results indicate that heparin inhibits human coronary artery SMC migration, especially when stimulated by FCS or PDGF-BB, and that this inhibitory effect of heparin is reversible and not simply a function of killing cells.

  12. Genetic fuzzy system predicting contractile reactivity patterns of small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, J; Sheykhzade, Majid; Clausen, B F;

    2014-01-01

    information. We developed a genetic fuzzy system (GFS) algorithm that is capable of learning all information in time-domain physiological data. Data on isometric force development of isolated small arteries were used as a framework for developing and optimizing a GFS. GFS performance was improved by several...... strategies. Results show that optimized fuzzy systems (OFSs) predict contractile reactivity of arteries accurately. In addition, OFSs identified significant differences that were undetectable using conventional analysis in the responses of arteries between groups. We concluded that OFSs may be used...

  13. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Verweij, Simone L; Schnitzler, Johan G; Stiekema, Lotte C A; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Stroes, Erik S G; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation, circulating monocytes, and bone marrow in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Arterial wall inflammation and bone marrow activity were measured using (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Monocyte phenotype was assessed with flow cytometry. The correlation between remnant levels and hematopoietic activity was validated in the CGPS (Copenhagen General Population Study). We found a 1.2-fold increase of (18)F-FDG uptake in the arterial wall in patients with FD (n=17, age 60±8 years, remnant cholesterol: 3.26 [2.07-5.71]) compared with controls (n=17, age 61±8 years, remnant cholesterol 0.29 [0.27-0.40]; Pcholesterol accumulates in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells coinciding with myeloid skewing. Patients with FD have increased arterial wall and cellular inflammation. These findings imply an important inflammatory component to the atherogenicity of remnant cholesterol, contributing to the increased cardiovascular disease risk in patients with FD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Energy harvesting from arterial blood pressure for powering embedded micro sensors in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aditya; Karami, M. Amin

    2017-03-01

    This manuscript investigates energy harvesting from arterial blood pressure via the piezoelectric effect for the purpose of powering embedded micro-sensors in the human brain. One of the major hurdles in recording and measuring electrical data in the human nervous system is the lack of implantable and long term interfaces that record neural activity for extended periods of time. Recently, some authors have proposed micro sensors implanted deep in the brain that measure local electrical and physiological data which are then communicated to an external interrogator. This paper proposes a way of powering such interfaces. The geometry of the proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric, circular, curved bimorph that fits into the blood vessel (specifically, the Carotid artery) and undergoes bending motion because of blood pressure variation. In addition, the harvester thickness is constrained such that it does not modify arterial wall dynamics. This transforms the problem into a known strain problem and the integral form of Gauss's law is used to obtain an equation relating arterial wall motion to the induced voltage. The theoretical model is validated by means of a Multiphysics 3D-FEA simulation comparing the harvested power at different load resistances. The peak harvested power achieved for the Carotid artery (proximal to Brain), with PZT-5H, was 11.7 μW. The peak power for the Aorta was 203.4 μW. Further, the variation of harvested power with variation in the harvester width and thickness, arterial contractility, and pulse rate is investigated. Moreover, potential application of the harvester as a chronic, implantable and real-time Blood pressure sensor is considered. Energy harvested via this mechanism will also have applications in long-term, implantable Brain Micro-stimulation.

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Hui

    Full Text Available We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii constrict in response to S1P and (iii lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013. However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study.

  17. Characteristics and Fate of Systemic Artery Aneurysm after Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shinsuke; Tsuda, Etsuko; Yamada, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    To determine the long-term outcome of systemic artery aneurysms (SAAs) after Kawasaki disease (KD). We investigated the characteristics and the fate of SAAs in 20 patients using medical records and angiograms. The age of onset of KD ranged from 1 month to 20 months. The interval from the onset of KD to the latest angiogram ranged from 16 months to 24 years. The regression rate of peripheral artery aneurysm and the frequency of stenotic lesions were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method in 11 patients who had undergone initial angiography within 4 months. The mean duration of fever was 24 ± 12 days. All 20 patients had at least 1 symmetric pair of aneurysms in bilateral peripheral arteries, and 16 patients had multiple SAAs. The distributions of SAAs was as follows: brachial artery, 30; common iliac artery, 20; internal iliac artery, 21; abdominal aortic aneurysm, 7; and others, 29. The frequencies of regression of SAA and of the occurrence of stenotic lesions at 20 years after the onset of KD were 51% and 25%, respectively (n = 42). The diameter of all SAAs in the acute phase leading to stenotic lesions in the late period was >10 mm. SAAs occurred symmetrically and were multiple in younger infants and those with severe acute vasculitis. The fate of SAAs resembles that of coronary artery aneurysms, and depends on the diameter during the acute phase. Larger SAAs can lead to stenotic lesions in the late period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A model of blood flow in the mesenteric arterial system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Leo K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are some early clinical indicators of cardiac ischemia, most notably a change in a person's electrocardiogram. Less well understood, but potentially just as dangerous, is ischemia that develops in the gastrointestinal system. Such ischemia is difficult to diagnose without angiography (an invasive and time-consuming procedure mainly due to the highly unspecific nature of the disease. Understanding how perfusion is affected during ischemic conditions can be a useful clinical tool which can help clinicians during the diagnosis process. As a first step towards this final goal, a computational model of the gastrointestinal system has been developed and used to simulate realistic blood flow during normal conditions. Methods An anatomically and biophysically based model of the major mesenteric arteries has been developed to be used to simulate normal blood flows. The computational mesh used for the simulations has been generated using data from the Visible Human project. The 3D Navier-Stokes equations that govern flow within this mesh have been simplified to an efficient 1D scheme. This scheme, together with a constitutive pressure-radius relationship, has been solved numerically for pressure, vessel radius and velocity for the entire mesenteric arterial network. Results The computational model developed shows close agreement with physiologically realistic geometries other researchers have recorded in vivo. Using this model as a framework, results were analyzed for the four distinct phases of the cardiac cycle – diastole, isovolumic contraction, ejection and isovolumic relaxation. Profiles showing the temporally varying pressure and velocity for a periodic input varying between 10.2 kPa (77 mmHg and 14.6 kPa (110 mmHg at the abdominal aorta are presented. An analytical solution has been developed to model blood flow in tapering vessels and when compared with the numerical solution, showed excellent agreement. Conclusion An

  19. STUDY OF PROFUNDA FEMORIS ARTERY OF HUMAN CADAVERS IN RAJKOT CITY, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip R. Chauhan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profunda femoris artery is the major branch of the femoral artery. It is at critical place in relation to femoral artery for various interventions. Aim: To study the origin of profunda femoris artery. And to compare the cross sectional area of profunda femoris artery between right and left limbs. Material and methods: In this cross sectional study, 51 human femoral triangles from 26 (18 male and 08 female human cadavers in P.D.U. Government Medical College, Rajkot were dissected and studied during regular dissection classes. Site of origin of profunda femoris artery was noted in relation to femoral artery. The distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal point was measured and noted. Circumference of profunda femoris artery at the level of origin was measured. The cross sectional area was calculated. Collected data was analyzed by standard statistical formulas with the help of Microsoft excel 2007 and Epi info TM 7 software. Result: Most common (52.95% cases site of origin was posterolateral from femoral artery. The mean distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal ligament was 30.17 mm. There was no significant difference in cross sectional area of right and left profunda femoris artery (at 95% confidence interval Conclusion: Profunda femoris artery is used for angiography, ultrasonography and cardiac catheterization also. It is the major blood supply of the thigh. Its relations with femoral artery, femoral vein and femoral nerve makes it important structure for clinicians. Variations in origin of profunda femoris artery must be considered to avoid complication like aneurism and faulty passage of the catheter. High origin of profunda femoris artery is more prone to damage while accessing femoral artery.

  20. Passive cigarette smoking induces inflammatory injury in human arterial walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ni; HONG Jiang; DAI Qiu-yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that both active and passive cigarette smoking increase the risk of atherosclerosis. But very little is known about the biological processes induced by passive cigarette smoking that contribute to atheresclerosis. We observe the expression of a few of biological and inflammatory markers in human arterial walls in vitro which were treated with the second-hand smoke solution (sidestream whole, SSW), and discuss the possible mechanism of inflammatory injury induced by second-hand smoke.Methods The biological markers (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, PECAM-1; α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA; collagen Ⅳ, Col Ⅳ) and inflammatory markers (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1; interleukin-8, IL-8) of human aortal wall were tested by immunofluorescence staining. The levels of MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNA expression were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results No distinct difference was observed between SSW and the control group on the expression of biological markers as assessed by the light microscope. But the inflammatory markers VCAM-1, MCP-1 and IL-8 on the subendothelial layer and smooth muscle cell layers, which are near the endothelium of arterial wall, were strongly stained in the SSW group compared with the control group. Their fluorescence intensities in the 1:40 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.35±0.04, MCP-1: 0.34±0.05, IL-8: 0.37±0.05) and the 1:20 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.40±0.04, MCP-1: 0.52±0.09, IL-8: 0.51±0.07) were significantly stronger than the control group (VCAM-1: 0.12±0.04, MCP-1: 0.06±0.02, IL-8: 0.24±0.03) by semi-quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence (P <0.001 vs control). MCP-1 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.15±0.04) and the 1:20 SSW (0.19±0.06) group was significantly higher than in the control group (0.09±0.03) (P <0.05, P <0.01 vs control); IL-8 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.64±0.12) and 1

  1. Study of Posterior Cerebral Artery in Human Cadaveric Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gunnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Basilar artery (BA terminates in right and left posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs. Each PCA supplies respective occipital lobe of the cerebrum. The present study is designed to know the morphology, morphometry, branching pattern, and symmetry of PCA. Methods. The study included 340 PCAs dissected from 170 human cadaveric brains. Results. Morphological variations of P1 segment included, aplasia (2.35%, hypoplasia (5.29%, duplication (2.35%, fenestration (1.17%, and common trunk shared with SCA (1.76%. Morphological variations of origin of P2 segment included direct origin of it from BA (1.17% and ICA (2.35%. Unusually, two P2 segments, each arising separately from BA and ICA, were observed in 1.17%. Unilateral two P2 segments from CW were found in 0.58%. Morphological variations of course of P2 were duplication (0.58%, fenestration (0.58%, and aneurysm (1.76%. Unilateral P2 either adult or fetal was seen in 4.71%. The group II branching pattern was found to be most common. Asymmetry of P2 was 40%. Morphometry of P2 revealed mean length of 52 mm and mean diameter of 2.7 mm. Conclusion. The present study provides the complete anatomical description of PCA regarding morphology, morphometry, symmetry, and its branching pattern. Awareness of these variations is likely to be useful in cerebrovascular procedures.

  2. Histamine releases PGI2 from human pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, R R; Duff, M J; Foster, A; Paddon, H B

    1986-08-01

    Histamine caused a triphasic response of human pulmonary artery strips in vitro, consisting of a small initial contraction followed by pronounced relaxation preceding a second contractile response. These characteristics were not seen with other contractile stimuli including 5-hydroxytryptamine, leukotriene D4, and KCl. The relaxant component of this response was ablated by removal of endothelium from the vascular strips or by pretreatment of the tissue with 1 microM indomethacin. Measurement of the PGI2 degradation product 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in supernatants from histamine-challenged tissues confirmed the synthesis of PGI2. Supernatants from unstimulated or leukotriene-challenged tissues contained no detectable amounts of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The histamine H1 antagonist diphenydramine inhibited both the contractile and relaxant responses to histamine whereas the H2 antagonist cimetidine affected neither component. The released PGI2 significantly altered the dose-response curve to histamine without inhibiting the maximal contractile responses. We conclude that histamine induces PGI2 formation from pulmonary arterial endothelium via an H1 receptor.

  3. Robust pulse wave velocity estimation by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness and may permit continuous, non-invasive, and cuff-less monitoring of blood pressure. Here, robust PWV estimation was sought by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms. In this approach, the system that optimally couples the proximal waveform to the distal waveform is identified, and the time delay of this system is then used to calculate PWV. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, a standard identification technique was applied to non-invasive impedance cardiography and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from six humans subjected to progressive reductions in central blood volume induced by lower body negative pressure. This technique estimated diastolic pressure with an overall root-mean-squared-error of 5.2 mmHg. For comparison, the conventional detection method for estimating PWV yielded a corresponding error of 8.3 mmHg.

  4. Reasonable classical concepts in human lower limb anatomy from the viewpoint of the primitive persistent sciatic artery and twisting human lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of this review is (1) to introduce the two previous studies we published human lower limb anatomy based on the conventional macroscopic anatomical [corrected] criteria with hazardous recognition of this description, (2) to activate the discussion whether the limb homology exists, and (3) to contribute to future study filling the gap between the gross anatomy and embryology. One of the topics we discussed was the human persistent sciatic artery. To date, numerous human cases of persistent sciatic artery have been reported in which the anomalous artery was present in the posterior compartment of the thigh alongside the sciatic nerve. As one of the important criteria for assessing the human primitive sciatic artery, its ventral arterial position with respect to the sciatic nerve is reasonable based on the initial positional relationship between ventral arterial and dorsal nervous systems and comparative anatomical findings. We also discuss ways of considering the topography of muscles of the lower limb and their innervations compared to those of the upper limb. We propose a schema of the complex anatomical characteristics of the lower limb based on the vertebrate body plan. According to this reasonable schema, the twisted anatomy of the lower limb can be understood more easily. These two main ideas discussed in this paper will be useful for further understanding of the anatomy of the lower limb and as a first step for future. We hope that the future study in lower limb will be further developed by both viewpoints of the classical gross anatomy and recent embryology.

  5. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  6. Modern embalming, circulation of fluids, and the voyage through the human arterial system: Carl L. Barnes and the culture of immortality in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Irina

    2011-01-01

    By considering the work of American embalmer, lawyer, and physician Carl Lewis Barnes (1872-1927), this paper analyzes the emergence of modern embalming in America. Barnes experimented with and exhibited the techniques by which embalming fluids travelled into the most remote cavities of the human body. In this sense, modem embalmers based their skills and methods on experimental medicine, turning the anatomy of blood vessels, physiology of circulation, and composition of blood into a circuit that allowed embalming fluids to move throughout the corpse. Embalmers in the late 19th century took ownership of the laws of hydrodynamics and the physiology of blood circulation to market their fluids and equipment, thus playing the role of physiologists of death, performing and demonstrating physiological experiments with dead bodies.

  7. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  8. Impaired glucose-induced thermogenesis and arterial norepinephrine response persist after weight reduction in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Andersen, T; Christensen, N J;

    1990-01-01

    A reduced thermic response and an impaired activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been reported after oral glucose in human obesity. It is, however, not known whether the reduced SNS activity returns to normal along with weight reduction. The thermic effect of glucose was lower...... in eight obese patients than in matched control subjects (1.7% vs 9.2%, p less than 0.002). The increase in arterial norepinephrine after glucose was also blunted in the obese patients. After a 30-kg weight loss their glucose and lipid profiles were markedly improved but the thermic effect of glucose...... was still lower than that of the control subjects (4.2%, p less than 0.001). The glucose-induced arterial norepinephrine response remained diminished in the reduced obese patients whereas the changes in plasma epinephrine were similar in all three groups. The results suggest that a defective SNS may...

  9. A STUDY OF ARTERIAL SUPPLY OF VERMIFORM APPENDIX IN HUMANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosmani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The surgical procedures like appendicectomy, demands a precise knowledge of vascular anatomy of ileocolic region. The aim of th is study is to study the arterial supply of the appendix, findings of which may reveal more anatomica l facts about the arteries of appendix and their variations. Total 52 specimens of caecum a nd appendix with their arteries intact were collected, cleaned and dissected. The ileocolic art ery and its branches to the appendix were traced carefully and observations were recorded. Th e ileocolic artery arises independently from superior mesenteric artery in 96.88% of cases and en ds by dividing into superior and inferior division in 93.76% of cases. The appendicular artery arises from inferior division in 46.88%, ileal branch 28.13%, ileocolic artery 18.75% and fr om arterial arcade in 6.25% of cases. 21.87% of cases showed additional appendicular artery. KEYWORDS: Caecum, appendix, ileocolic artery, appendicular arter y.

  10. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The impact of disease related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared to frequen......The impact of disease related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared...

  11. Systemic arterial air embolism after percutaneous lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, S.S., E-mail: samanjit@btinternet.com [Ottawa Hospital, Ontario (Canada); Gupta, A.; Goncalves, A.T.C.; Souza, C.A.; Matzinger, F.; Seely, J.M. [Ottawa Hospital, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Systemic arterial air embolism is a rarely encountered but much feared complication of percutaneous lung biopsy. We present a comprehensive review of iatrogenic air embolism post-lung biopsy, a complication that is often suboptimally managed. This review was inspired by our own institutional experience and we use this to demonstrate that excellent outcomes from this complication can be seen with prompt treatment using hyperbaric oxygen chamber therapy, after initial patient stabilization has been achieved. Pathophysiology, clinical features, and risk factors are reviewed and misconceptions regards venous versus arterial air embolism are examined. An algorithm is provided for radiologists to ensure suspected patients are appropriately managed with more favourable outcomes.

  12. Clopidogrel in infants with systemic-to-pulmonary-artery shunts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, David L; Berger, Felix; Li, Jennifer S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease palliated with placement of a systemic-to-pulmonary-artery shunt are at risk for shunt thrombosis and death. We investigated whether the addition of clopidogrel to conventional therapy reduces mortality from any cause and morbidity relate...

  13. [General systems theory, analog models and essential arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indovina, I; Bonelli, M

    1991-02-15

    The application of the General System Theory to the fields of biology and particularly of medicine is fraught with many difficulties deriving from the mathematical complexities of application. The authors suggest that these difficulties can be overcome by applying analogical models, thus opening new prospects for the resolution of the manifold problems involved in connection with the study of arterial hypertension.

  14. Assembly of a Pulmonary Artery Pressure Sensor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Müntjes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implantable system for telemonitoring the intravascular pressure in the pulmonary artery. By implanting a catheter-bound pressure and temperature sensor into the pulmonary artery, it is possible to monitor the actual value and the time variations of the intravascular pressure with a frequency of 128 Hz. Thus hospitalization of patients suffering from heart insufficiency can be avoided by early changes in therapy.Preliminary in vivo experiments have been conducted to verify the fixation mechanism and the positioning of the sensor at the right place in the pulmonary artery. It was shown that the proposed fixation mechanism and the packaging of the sensor promise to be stable.

  15. Differential response of human fetal smooth muscle cells from arterial duct to retinoid acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hui WU; Shao-jun XU; Jian-ying TENG; Wei WU; Du-yun YE; Xing-zhong WU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:The aim of the present study was to understand the role of retinoic acid (RA) in the development of isolated patent ductus arteriosus and the features of arterial duct-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods:The VSMC were isolated, and the biological characteristics and the response to RA were investi-gated in the arterial duct, aorta, and pulmonary artery VSMC from 6 human embry-onic samples. Western blotting, immunostaining, and cell-based ELISA were em-ployed to analyze the proliferation regulation of VSMC. Results:The VSMC from the arterial duct expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at a signifi-cantly lower rate than those from the aorta and pulmonary artery, but expressed a higher level of Bax and Bcl-2. The expression level of PCNA or Bcl-2 was associ-ated with the embryonic age. The effects of RA on the VSMC from the arterial duct were quite different from those from the aorta and pulmonary artery. In arterial duct VSMC, RA stimulated PCNA expression, but such stimulation could be sup-pressed by CD2366, an antagonist of nuclear retinoid receptor activation. In aorta or pulmonary artery VSMC, the expression response of PCNA to RA was insignificant. The ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 decreased in arterial duct VSMC after RA treatment due to the significant inhibition of Bax expression. Conclusion:The VSMC from the arterial duct possessed distinct biological behaviors. RA might be important in the development of ductus arteriosus VSMC.

  16. Prediction of Carotid Artery Stenosis in Candidates of Coronary Artery Bypasses Surgery by A Scoring System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Shirani

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Up to 9% of coronary ar-tery bypass grafting (CABG patients suffer from stroke after the surgery. Although post CABG stroke has multiple etiologies, stenosis of cervical carotid arteries is an important factor. Many studies have evaluated carotid artery stenosis in CABG. Carotid stenosis and its related factors and a new scoring sys-tem for selection of CABG patients for Doppler study are introduced. Materials and methods: 1721 consecutive cases of non-urgent CABG were evaluated for presence of significant carotid stenosis (> 50% stenosis. The asso-ciation of age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, dislipidemia and left main coronary stenosis with ca-rotid stenosis was evaluated. For introducing a scor-ing method, absence of each related factor was scored by 1 and its presence by 2. The score range for each patient was from 5 (none of related factors up to 10 (all of related factors. Results: 7% of patients suffered from significant stenosis. Female gender, age more than 55 years old, hypertension, diabetes, and stenosis of left main coronary artery were the related risk factors in uni-variate analysis. A step type analysis revealed patients with score 5 have 98.3% negative predictive value (NPV for significant stenosis with 96.2% sensitivity and 13.9% specificity. Patients with score 10 have 93.9% NPV for significant stenosis with 99.9% speci-ficity. Conclusion: This scoring system may help for better selection of patients for Doppler study before CABG.

  17. Carotid arterial blood pressure waveform monitoring using a portable ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joohyun Seo; Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Hae-Seung Lee; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a non-invasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform monitoring technique using ultrasound. A portable ultrasound system to excite ultrasound transducers and acquire data is designed with off-the-shelf components. The insonation angles are identified using a vector Doppler technique based on the cosine dependency of the Doppler signals. The pulse pressure of an estimated waveform at the left common carotid artery is compared to the standard sphygmomanometer measurement in a clinical test. The estimated carotid ABP waveform shows excellent agreement to the finger ABP waveform with expected discrepancy of the systolic peak shape due to different measurement sites. The proposed method also tracks slow blood pressure fluctuations. This validation on human subjects shows potential for a noninvasive blood pressure waveform monitoring device at central arterial sites.

  18. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    of another limb. Static exercise increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, which were largest during one-leg knee extension. After exercise heart rate and mean arterial pressure returned to the resting level. No changes were recorded in arterial carbon dioxide tension, and the rate of perceived......In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  19. A Laser-Assisted Anastomotic Technique : Feasibility on Human Diseased Coronary Arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Vink, Aryan; Homoet-van der Kraak, Petra H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313984166; Helthuis, Jasper; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Buijsrogge, Marc P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/24420098X

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic disease might hamper the efficacy of the Excimer laser-assisted Trinity Clip anastomotic connector in coronary arteries. Therefore, its efficacy was evaluated on human diseased coronary arteries (study 1). In addition, the acute laser effects onto the coronary wall were as

  20. Improved pulse transit time estimation by system identification analysis of proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the system identification approach for potentially improved estimation of pulse transit time (PTT), a popular arterial stiffness marker. In this approach, proximal and distal arterial waveforms are measured and respectively regarded as the input and output of a system. Next, the system impulse response is identified from all samples of the measured input and output. Finally, the time delay of the impulse response is detected as the PTT estimate. Unlike conventional foot-to-foot detection techniques, this approach is designed to provide an artifact robust estimate of the true PTT in the absence of wave reflection. The approach is also applicable to arbitrary types of arterial waveforms. We specifically applied a parametric system identification technique to noninvasive impedance cardiography (ICG) and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from 15 humans subjected to lower-body negative pressure. We assessed the technique through the correlation coefficient (r) between its 1/PTT estimates and measured diastolic pressure (DP) per subject and the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the DP predicted from these estimates and measured DP. The technique achieved average r and RMSE values of 0.81 ± 0.16 and 4.3 ± 1.3 mmHg. For comparison, the corresponding values were 0.59 ± 0.37 (P system identification approach can indeed improve PTT estimation.

  1. Simulation of stent deployment in a realistic human coronary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Steen Anton FW

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of restenosis after a stenting procedure is related to local biomechanical environment. Arterial wall stresses caused by the interaction of the stent with the vascular wall and possibly stress induced stent strut fracture are two important parameters. The knowledge of these parameters after stent deployment in a patient derived 3D reconstruction of a diseased coronary artery might give insights in the understanding of the process of restenosis. Methods 3D reconstruction of a mildly stenosed coronary artery was carried out based on a combination of biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound. Finite element method computations were performed to simulate the deployment of a stent inside the reconstructed coronary artery model at inflation pressure of 1.0 MPa. Strut thickness of the stent was varied to investigate stresses in the stent and the vessel wall. Results Deformed configurations, pressure-lumen area relationship and stress distribution in the arterial wall and stent struts were studied. The simulations show how the stent pushes the arterial wall towards the outside allowing the expansion of the occluded artery. Higher stresses in the arterial wall are present behind the stent struts and in regions where the arterial wall was thin. Values of 200 MPa for the peak stresses in the stent strut were detected near the connecting parts between the stent struts, and they were only just below the fatigue stress. Decreasing strut thickness might reduce arterial damage without increasing stresses in the struts significantly. Conclusion The method presented in this paper can be used to predict stresses in the stent struts and the vessel wall, and thus evaluate whether a specific stent design is optimal for a specific patient.

  2. A quantitative method for studying human arterial baroreflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Goble, Ross L.

    1991-01-01

    A new system is described that delivers precise, stereotyped pressure changes to the human neck and elicits neurally-mediated heart rate changes. The centerpiece of this system is a Silastic chamber that is strapped to the anterior neck. This chamber is connected to a stepping-motor-controlled bellows assembly. A strain-gauge transducer measures the intensity of pressure changes. The entire system is controlled by microprocessors, and both stimuli and responses are displayed on a digital oscilloscope. The end-product of this system is a reproducible baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relation that can be recorded rapidly and safely in astronauts in space.

  3. Anatomic study of the dorsal arterial system of the hand Estudo anatômico do sistema arterial dorsal da mão

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende; Rames Mattar Júnior; Álvaro Baik Cho; Oswaldo Hideo Hasegawa; Samuel Ribak

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the dorsal arterial system of the hand received less attention than the palmar system. The studies concerning dorsal arterial anatomy present some controversies regarding the origin and presence of the dorsal metacarpal artery branches. Knowledge of the anatomy of dorsal metacarpal arteries is especially applied in the surgical planning for flaps taken from the dorsum of the hand. The purpose of this study is to analyze the arterial anatomy of the dorsum of the hand, compare our...

  4. Pharmacological characterization of VIP and PACAP receptors in the human meningeal and coronary artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kayi Y; Baun, Michael; de Vries, René;

    2011-01-01

    We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries....

  5. Artery Soft-Tissue Modelling for Stent Implant Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality technology can be utilised to provide new systematic training methods for surgical procedures. Our aim is to build a simulator that allows medical students to practice the coronary stent implant procedure and avoids exposing patients to risks. The designed simulation system consists of a virtual environment and a haptic interface, in order to provide both the visualization of the coronary arteries and the tactile and force feedback generated during the interactions of the surgical instruments in the virtual environment. Since the arteries are soft tissues, their shape may change during an operation; for this reason physical modelling of the organs is necessary to render their behaviour under the influence of surgeon's instruments. The idea is to define a model that computes the displacement of the tissue versus time; from the displacement it is possible to calculate the response of the tissue to the surgical tool external stimuli. Information about tools displacements and tissue responses are also used to graphically model the artery wall and virtual surgical instrument deformations generated as a consequence of their coming into contact. In order to obtain a realistic simulation, the Finite Element Method has been used to model the soft tissues of the artery, using linear elasticity to reduce computational time and speed up interaction rates.

  6. Human activated protein C variants in a rat model of arterial thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlbäck Björn

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C (APC inhibits coagulation by degrading activated factor V (FVa and factor VIII (FVIIIa, protein S (PS functioning as a cofactor to APC. Methods By mutagenesis of the vitamin K-dependent Gla domain of APC, we have recently created an APC variant having enhanced anticoagulant activity due to increased affinity for negatively charged phospholipid membranes. In the present study, the potential antithrombotic effects of this APC variant, and of a variant APC that is additionally mutated in the serine protease domain, have been evaluated in a blind randomized study in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. In this model, we have previously found the combination of bovine APC and PS to be highly antithrombotic. Four treatment groups each containing 10 rats were, in a blind random fashion, given intravenous bolus injections of wild-type or mutant variants of APC (0.8 mg/kg together with human PS (0.6 mg/kg or human PS (0.6 mg/kg alone. A control group with 20 animals where given vehicle only. Results A trend to increased patency rates was noted in a group receiving one of the APC variants, but it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion In conclusion, administration of human APC variants having enhanced anticoagulant efficacy together with human PS in a rat model of arterial thrombosis did not give an efficient antithrombotic effect. The lack of effect may be due to species-specific differences between the human protein C system and the rat hemostatic system.

  7. Pharmacological characterization of VIP and PACAP receptors in the human meningeal and coronary artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kayi Y; Baun, Michael; de Vries, René;

    2011-01-01

    We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries.......We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries....

  8. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  9. Ambulatory pulmonary arterial pressure in primary pulmonary hypertension: variability, relation to systemic arterial pressure, and plasma catecholamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, A. M.; Ikram, H; Crozier, I G; Nicholls,M.G.; Jans, S.

    1990-01-01

    The variability of pulmonary arterial pressure, the relation of pulmonary pressure to systemic pressure, pulmonary pressure responses to stimuli (exercise, hypoxia, smoking, free ambulation), and plasma catecholamine responses were assessed in five patients with primary pulmonary hypertension. Ambulatory monitoring techniques provided data for the computerised analysis of continuous, beat-to-beat, direct recordings of both pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures for 8 to 10 hours. The absol...

  10. HUMAN CORONARY ARTERIES- A STUDY BASED ON MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma Kunnath Narayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The coronary arteries are the biggest vasa vasora in the body since the heart is considered to be a modified blood vessel. The increased myocardial oxygen demand of the heart is met wholly by two coronary arteries. Hence, patients with coronary artery disease are prone to develop myocardial ischemia. The study is aimed at the structural changes of this vessels in the population of middle Kerala of various age groups from birth to seventy years. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimen for histological study were fixed in 10% formalin and subjected to tissue processing. The sections were taken at the thickness of 5 microns and stained by using Haematoxylin- Eosin method and Verhoeff’s method for elastic fibers. The thickness of arterial wall were measured using ocular micrometer. RESULTS Structural changes of the three layered vessel walls were observed. Intimal proliferation, splitting, fragmentation and reduplication of internal elastic lamina were the important histological observation in the arterial wall as age advances. It was observed that there was a sixty fold increase in the thickness of intima from foetal to sixth decade of life. Tunica media exhibit a six fold increase in thickness probably due to muscular hypertrophy. The tunica adventitia have a threefold increase in thickness which least compared with other tunics. CONCLUSION These changes may favour atherosclerosis resulting in myocardial ischemia. Ischemic heart disease is the major cause of death and disability among the age group of third to sixth decade of life.

  11. Quantitative Measurement of Dissection Resistance in Intimal and Medial Layers of Human Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Johnson, John A; Spinale, Francis G; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2014-04-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery is the most frequently involved vessel in coronary artery dissection, a cause of acute coronary syndrome or sudden cardiac death. The biomechanical mechanisms underlying arterial dissection are not well understood. This study investigated the dissection properties of LAD specimens harvested from explanted hearts at the time of cardiac transplantation, from patients with primary dilated cardiomyopathy (n=12). Using a previously validated approach uniquely modified for these human LAD specimens, we quantified the local energy release rate, G, within different arterial layers during experimental dissection events (tissue tearing). Results show that the mean values of G during arterial dissection within the intima and within the media in human LADs are 20.7±16.5 J/m(2) and 10.3±5.0 J/m(2), respectively. The difference in dissection resistance between tearing events occurring within the intima and within the media is statistically significant. Our data fall in the same order of magnitude as most previous measurements of adhesive strength in other human arteries, with the differences in measured values of G within the layers most likely due to histologically observed differences in the structure and composition of arterial layers.

  12. Development of Decellularized Human Umbilical Arteries as Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liqiong; Muto, Akihito; Chan, Stephen A.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Developing a tissue-engineered small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular graft for reconstructive surgery has remained a challenge for the past several decades. This study was conducted to develop a decellularized umbilical artery and to evaluate its composition, endothelial cell compatibility, mechanical properties, and in vivo stability for potential use as a small-diameter vascular graft. Methods and Results Human umbilical arteries were isolated and decellularized by incubation in CHAPS and sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers followed by incubation in endothelial growth media-2. Decellularized umbilical arteries were completely devoid of cellular and nuclear material while retaining the integrity of extracellular collagenous matrix. The mechanical strength of the decellularized umbilical artery as assessed by its burst pressure in vitro showed no significant change from its native form. Decellularized umbilical arteries supported endothelial adherence as indicated by the re-endotheliazation with a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, decellularized vessels that were implanted into nude rats as abdominal aorta interposition grafts remained mechanically intact and patent for up to 8 weeks. Conclusion Decellularized human umbilical arteries preserved the extracellular matrix, supported endothelialization, and retained function in vivo for up to 8 weeks. These properties suggest the potential use of decellularized umbilical arteries as small-diameter vascular grafts. PMID:19207043

  13. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  14. Simulation of stent deployment in a realistic human coronary artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank); F. Migliavacca (Francesco); S. Schievano (Silvia); L. Socci (Laura); L. Petrini (Lorenza); A. Thury (Attila); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G. Dubini (Gabriele)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The process of restenosis after a stenting procedure is related to local biomechanical environment. Arterial wall stresses caused by the interaction of the stent with the vascular wall and possibly stress induced stent strut fracture are two important parameters. The knowledg

  15. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been co

  16. Myocardial bridges of the coronary arteries in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgür; Cavdar, Safiye; Yalin, Aymelek; Yener, Nuran; Ozdogmus, Omer

    2010-09-01

    During the last century, many investigators reported on myocardial bridges in the adult human heart. In the present study, 39 human fetal hearts (the mean gestastional age was 30 weeks) were studied for myocardial bridging, and the results were correlated with adult data. Among the 39 (27 male and 12 female) fetal hearts studied, 26 bridges were observed on 18 fetal hearts (46.2%). Ten of the bridges had one myocardial bridge, whereas double myocardial bridges were observed in eight fetal hearts. The most frequent myocardial bridges were observed on the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which had 13 bridges (50%). Eight (30.7%) myocardial bridges were on the diagonal artery, and on the posterior descending artery there were five (19.3%). Myocardial bridges were not observed on the circumflex artery. The data presented in this study may provide potentially useful information for the preoperative evaluation of the newborn and may have a clinical implication for sudden fetal death.

  17. Triptans induce vasoconstriction of human arteries and veins from the thoracic wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Jarvius, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2005-01-01

    A common side effect of migraine treatment with triptans is chest symptoms. The origin of these symptoms is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the vasocontractile effect of triptans in human arteries and veins from the thoracic wall and in coronary artery bypass grafts. In vitro...... detected by real-time PCR in all blood vessels studied. In conclusion, triptans induce vasoconstriction in arteries and veins from the thoracic wall, most likely by activation of 5-HT1B receptors. This response could be observed in only 38% to 57% of the patients, which may provide an explanation for why...

  18. Arterial specification of endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic flow bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Le, Andrew V; Mendez, Julio J; Qyang, Yibing; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) exist in different microenvironments in vivo, including under different levels of shear stress in arteries versus veins. Standard stem cell differentiation protocols to derive ECs and EC-subtypes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generally use growth factors or other soluble factors in an effort to specify cell fate. In this study, a biomimetic flow bioreactor was used to subject hiPSC-derived ECs (hiPSC-ECs) to shear stress to determine the impacts on phenotype and upregulation of markers associated with an anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, arterial-like phenotype. The in vitro bioreactor system was able to efficiently mature hiPSC-ECs into arterial-like cells in 24 h, as demonstrated by qRT-PCR for arterial markers EphrinB2, CXCR4, Conexin40 and Notch1, as well protein-level expression of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD). Furthermore, the exogenous addition of soluble factors was not able to fully recapitulate this phenotype that was imparted by shear stress exposure. The induction of these phenotypic changes was biomechanically mediated in the shear stress bioreactor. This biomimetic flow bioreactor is an effective means for the differentiation of hiPSC-ECs toward an arterial-like phenotype, and is amenable to scale-up for culturing large quantities of cells for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  20. Matching models of left ventricle and systemic artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳兆荣; 吴驰

    1997-01-01

    To reveal how the matching models of the left ventricle and its afterload affect the pressure and flow in the aortic root, the differences between the measured pressure and flow waveforms and those determined by three kinds of matching model were compared. The results showed that, compared with the results by both matching models 1 and 2, the pressure and flow waveforms determined by matching model 3 established in this work were in the closest agreement with the corresponding experimental waveforms, therefore indicating that matching model 3 was a matching model that closely and rationally characterized the match between the left ventricle and the systemic artery.

  1. Off-pump sequential bilateral internal mammary artery grafting combined with selective arterialization of the coronary venous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yang; YAN Xiao-lei; WEI Hua; YANG Jun-feng; GU Cheng-xiong

    2011-01-01

    Background Off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) has been widely applied in recent years as a less invasive method of myocardial revascularization. This study evaluated the sequential bilateral internal mammary artery grafting combined with selective arterialization of the coronary venous system during OPCAB.Methods From April 2004 to August 2010, patients with diffuse right coronary lesions were studied retrospectively and divided into two groups. Group 1 included seventeen patients who underwent this surgery while group 2 included twenty-one patients without right coronary artery surgical therapy. All patients presented with symptoms of angina. Blood flow of bridged vessels was measured. The perioperative ventricular parameters including left ventricular ejection fraction and end diastolic diameter were compared. During follow-up, myocardial nuclide imaging and coronary angiography were carried out.Results Off-pump coronary artery bypass was performed with an average of 3.6 grafts per patient. Hospital mortality was zero. At the time of follow-up, the patients in group 1 recovered better than in group 2 (P<0.05). In both groups, the mean New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and ejection fraction increased significantly (P<0.001) and the mean left ventricular end-diastolic diameter decreased significantly (P <0.05). Myocardial blood supply of inferior wall in group 1 was obviously improved by myocardial nuclide imaging. Coronary angiography for eight patients in group 1 verified that there was blood flow to myocardium in the arterialized vein.Conclusions Sequential bilateral internal mammary artery grafting combined with selective arterialization of the coronary venous system can be performed during OPCAB. A postoperative improvement in the cardiac functions and the quality of life was documented, increasing our expectation for extensive application.

  2. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  3. Arterial supply in the human pectoralis minor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, A; Takafuji, T; Sato, Y

    1993-03-01

    In the following, we report our findings obtained as a result of injecting an acrylic pigment in the arteries supplying the pectoralis minor muscle in 50 lateral chests of 26 Japanese adults (15 males and 11 females). In the pectoralis minor muscle, the muscular bundle near the terminal is supplied by A. processus coracoideris (Pc, Sato-Takafuji, '85) or A. coracobrachialis (Cb, Sato, '80) of A. axillaris (Ax), while its middle upper and lower peripherals are supplied by A. thoracoacromialis (Ta) and A. partis abdominalis (Pab, Sato, '76), respectively. Further, the upper and lower peripherals at its origin are supplied by A. thoracica suprema (Ts) and A. thoracica lateralis (Tl), respectively. Pc, Cb, Pab and Ts may occasionally be absent. Arteries supplying this muscle are classified according to their origins and routes of distribution, as follows. Type I-a: Pc or Cb, Ta, Pab, Ts and Tl are present, 32%; Type II-a: Ts is absent from Type I-a, 14%; Type III-a: Pb and Pc are absent from Type I-a, 20%; Type IV-a: Cb, Pc and Ts are absent from Type I-a, 10%. Type b is Type a without Pab. The rates of appearance of Type I-b, II-b, III-b and IV-b were all 6%. The ratios of distribution in area a were as follows, in order of decreasing ratio: 37.6% for Pab (37 cases), 32.4% for Tl (49 cases), 30.2% for Ta (49 cases), 10.8% for Ts (32 cases), 7% for Cb (9 cases), and 6.37% for Pc. In the pectoralis minor muscle, the major supplying arteries are Pab, Tl and Ta, and where Pab was absent, this was compensated for by a branch of Ta. The total number of supplying arteries in this muscle was two to five, with the majority, or 36%, having four arteries. As for sex differences in the incidence of each type, Type I-a appeared more often in males (40%) than in females (20%). The rates according to the ribs of origin were 46%, 36%, 16%, and 2% for types 2.3.4.5, 3.4.5, 2.3.4, and 2.3.4.5.6, respectively. It was interesting that all Type II and Type IV cases without Ts corresponded

  4. Copper dependence of angioproliferation in pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaard, Harm J; Mizuno, Shiro; Guignabert, Christophe; Al Hussaini, Aysar A; Farkas, Daniela; Ruiter, Gerrina; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Fadel, Elie; Allegood, Jeremy C; Humbert, Marc; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Spiegel, Sarah; Farkas, Laszlo; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2012-05-01

    Obliteration of the vascular lumen by endothelial cell growth is a hallmark of many forms of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copper plays a significant role in the control of endothelial cell proliferation in cancer and wound-healing. We sought to determine whether angioproliferation in rats with experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in humans depend on the proangiogenic action of copper. A copper-depleted diet prevented, and copper chelation with tetrathiomolybdate reversed, the development of severe experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension. The copper chelation-induced reopening of obliterated vessels was caused by caspase-independent apoptosis, reduced vessel wall cell proliferation, and a normalization of vessel wall structure. No evidence was found for a role of super oxide-1 inhibition or lysyl-oxidase-1 inhibition in the reversal of angioproliferation. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibited the proliferation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from explanted lungs from control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. These data suggest that the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation by a copper-restricting strategy could be explored as a new therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It remains to be determined, however, whether potential toxicity to the right ventricle is offset by the beneficial pulmonary vascular effects of antiangiogenic treatment in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  5. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine Modulates Molecular Arterial Homeostasis of Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Geng-Fan; Zhu, Shao-Wei; Zhu, Shu-Gan; Li, Feng; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is widely expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human intracranial aneurysms (IAs), but the effect and underlying mechanism of SPARC on VSMCs during the formation and progression of IAs needs to be probed. Human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) were treated with a gradient concentrations of SPARC in vitro for different time. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis were used to investigate the effect of SPARC on HUASMCs. After exposure to 2 and 4 μg/ml SPARC, cell viability were 89.3 ± 2.00 %, and 87.57 ± 2.17 % (P IAs.

  6. Typology of the arteries in the human scalenus region, with special reference to the accessory ascending cervical artery.

    OpenAIRE

    Su WD; Ohtsuka A; Taguchi T; Murakami T.

    2000-01-01

    The accessory ascending cervical artery (Murakami et al., 1996), which arises from the subclavian artery and ascends between the scalenus anterior and medius muscles, was studied in 87 Japanese adult cadavers (174 sides), with special attention being given to its origin, distribution, and relationship to other arteries at the cervical or scalenus region. In 154 sides (88.5%), the accessory ascending cervical artery was found to originate from the subclavian artery behind the scalenus anterior...

  7. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm) of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC) and further evaluated the growth and apop...

  8. Vasodilator activity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in human mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materazzi, Serena; Zagli, Giovanni; Nassini, Romina; Bartolini, Ilenia; Romagnoli, Stefano; Chelazzi, Cosimo; Benemei, Silvia; Coratti, Andrea; De Gaudio, Angelo Raffaele; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The role of endogenous H2S has been highlighted as a gaseous transmitter. The vascular smooth muscle inhibitory effects of H2S have been characterized in isolated aorta and mesenteric arteries in rats and mice. Our study was aimed at investigating the vascular effects of H2S on human isolated mesenteric arteries and examining the underlying mechanisms involved. All experiments were performed on rings (4-8mm long) of human mesenteric arteries obtained from patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of the University of Florence (app. N. 2015/0024947). The effect of NaHS, an H2S donor, was determined using noradrenaline pre-contracted human isolated mesenteric rings. NaHS evoked a concentration-dependent relaxation (EC50 57μM). In contrast, homocysteine, an endogenous precursor of H2S, failed to affect human isolated mesenteric rings. Vasorelaxant response to NaHS was reduced by endothelium removal, application of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME and ODQ inhibitor of cyclic GMP. SQ 22536, an adenylate-cyclase inhibitor, failed to block NaHS-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of endogenous prostanoid production by indomethacin significantly reduced NaHS induced vasorelaxation. The role of potassium channels was also examined: blockers of the Ca(2+)-dependent potassium channel, charybdotoxin and apamin, failed to have any influence on the relaxant response to NaHS on this vascular tissue. In summary, H2S induced relaxation of isolated rings of human mesenteric arteries. Endothelium-dependent related mechanisms with the stimulation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels represents important cellular mechanisms for H2S effect on human mesenteric arteries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased levels of endothelin ETB receptor mRNA in human omental arteries after organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, S; Adner, M; Edvinsson, L

    1998-01-01

    1. Using competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in vitro pharmacology, smooth muscle endothelin ETB receptor expression was studied in segments of human omental artery, fresh and after organ culture for 1 and 5 days. 2. The competitive RT-PCR assay used in the pr...

  10. Pleiotropic effects of statins in distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butrous Ghazwan S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent clinical data suggest statins have transient but significant effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we explored the molecular effects of statins on distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and their relevance to proliferation and apoptosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary distal human PASMCs from patients and controls were treated with lipophilic (simvastatin, atorvastatin, mevastatin and fluvastatin, lipophobic (pravastatin and nitric-oxide releasing statins and studied in terms of their DNA synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and endothelin-1 release. Results Treatment of human PASMCs with selected statins inhibited DNA synthesis, proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Statins differed in their effectiveness, the rank order of anti-mitogenic potency being simvastatin > atorvastatin > > pravastatin. Nevertheless, a novel nitric oxide-releasing derivative of pravastatin (NCX 6550 was effective. Lipophilic statins, such as simvastatin, also enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of iloprost and sildenafil, promoted apoptosis and inhibited the release of the mitogen and survival factor endothelin-1. These effects were reversed by mevalonate and the isoprenoid intermediate geranylgeranylpyrophosphate and were mimicked by inhibitors of the Rho and Rho-kinase. Conclusions Lipophilic statins exert direct effects on distal human PASMCs and are likely to involve inhibition of Rho GTPase signalling. These findings compliment some of the recently documented effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  11. In vivo transfer of lipoprotein(a) into human atherosclerotic carotid arterial intima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bo; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Schroeder, T V;

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the atherogenic potential of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and LDL by measuring the intimal clearance of these two plasma lipoproteins in the atherosclerotic intima of the human carotid artery in vivo. Autologous 131I-Lp(a) and 125I-LDL were mixed and reinjected intr...

  12. Geometry-based pressure drop prediction in mildly diseased human coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.C. Schrauwen (Jelle); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPressure drop (△. p) estimations in human coronary arteries have several important applications, including determination of appropriate boundary conditions for CFD and estimation of fractional flow reserve (FFR). In this study a △. p prediction was made based on geometrical features deri

  13. In-depth characterization of CGRP receptors in human intracranial arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Jørgensen, Linda; Engel, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    in cerebral and middle meningeal arteries with and without endothelium as well as in microvessels and in the endothelial cells. Human and rat alpha- and beta-CGRP, amylin, adrenomedullin and [acetamidomethyl-Cys(2,7)]human CGRP induced strong concentration-dependent relaxation of human cerebral and middle...... meningeal arteries. Removal of the endothelium neither changed the maximum relaxant response nor the pIC(50) values for alpha- and beta-CGRP as compared to the responses in arteries with an intact endothelium. Human alpha-CGRP-(8-37) caused a shift of h alpha- and h beta-CGRP-induced relaxations in cerebral...... and middle meningeal arteries. Calculation of pK(B) values revealed that h alpha-CGRP-(8-37) could not significantly discriminate between relaxations induced by h alpha-CGRP (pK(B) around 6.8) and h beta-CGRP (pK(B) around 5.4). There was no significant difference in pK(B) value of h alpha-CGRP-(8-37) on h...

  14. X-ray micro computed tomography for the visualization of an atherosclerotic human coronary artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matviykiv, Sofiya; Buscema, Marzia; Deyhle, Hans; Pfohl, Thomas; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis refers to narrowing or blocking of blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain or stroke. Constricted segments of diseased arteries exhibit considerably increased wall shear stress, compared to the healthy ones. One of the possibilities to improve patient’s treatment is the application of nano-therapeutic approaches, based on shear stress sensitive nano-containers. In order to tailor the chemical composition and subsequent physical properties of such liposomes, one has to know precisely the morphology of critically stenosed arteries at micrometre resolution. It is often obtained by means of histology, which has the drawback of offering only two-dimensional information. Additionally, it requires the artery to be decalcified before sectioning, which might lead to deformations within the tissue. Micro computed tomography (μCT) enables the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of soft and hard tissues at micrometre level. μCT allows lumen segmentation that is crucial for subsequent flow simulation analysis. In this communication, tomographic images of a human coronary artery before and after decalcification are qualitatively and quantitatively compared. We analyse the cross section of the diseased human coronary artery before and after decalcification, and calculate the lumen area of both samples.

  15. Mechanisms of decompensation and organ failure in cirrhosis: From peripheral arterial vasodilation to systemic inflammation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro; Moreau, Richard; Angeli, Paolo; Schnabl, Bernd; Arroyo, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral arterial vasodilation hypothesis has been most influential in the field of cirrhosis and its complications. It has given rise to hundreds of pathophysiological studies in experimental and human cirrhosis and is the theoretical basis of life-saving treatments. It is undisputed that splanchnic arterial vasodilation contributes to portal hypertension and is the basis for manifestations such as ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, but the body of research generated by the hypothesis has revealed gaps in the original pathophysiological interpretation of these complications. The expansion of our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating vascular tone, inflammation and the host-microbiota interaction require a broader approach to advanced cirrhosis encompassing the whole spectrum of its manifestations. Indeed, multiorgan dysfunction and failure likely result from a complex interplay where the systemic spread of bacterial products represents the primary event. The consequent activation of the host innate immune response triggers endothelial molecular mechanisms responsible for arterial vasodilation, and also jeopardizes organ integrity with a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Thus, the picture of advanced cirrhosis could be seen as the result of an inflammatory syndrome in contradiction with a simple hemodynamic disturbance.

  16. Creatine kinase inhibition lowers systemic arterial blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, Fares A; Oudman, Inge; Haan, Yentl C; van Kuilenburg, Andre B P; Leen, Rene; Danser, Jan A H; Leijten, Frank P J; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; van Montfrans, Gert A; Clark, Joseph F; Brewster, Lizzy M

    2016-12-01

    Creatine kinase is reported to be a main predictor of blood pressure (BP) in the general population, with a strong correlation between resistance artery creatine kinase expression and clinical BP in humans. The enzyme rapidly regenerates ATP near cytoplasmic ATPases involved in pressor responses, including resistance artery contractility and renal sodium retention. Therefore, we assessed whether creatine kinase inhibition reduces BP. We implemented the 'Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments' guideline. In a 4-week randomized controlled trial, male 16-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (N = 16) were randomly assigned to the specific competitive creatine kinase inhibitor beta-guanidinopropionic acid (3%)-supplemented chow vs. standard chow. BP measured by the tail-cuff method was the main outcome. Other outcomes included vasodilation in isolated arteries and renal renin expression. Creatine kinase inhibition reduced BP safely and reversibly. Mean baseline BP of, respectively, 191.5 (standard error 4.3) mmHg SBP and 143.1 (4.1) mmHg DBP was reduced by, respectively, 42.7 (5.5) mmHg SBP and 35.6 (5.0) mmHg DBP (P creatine kinase inhibition. Our data indicate that modulation of the creatine kinase system is a potential novel treatment target for hypertension.

  17. The role of tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annayya R Aroor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies support the notion that arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events contributing significantly to systolic hypertension, impaired ventricular-arterial coupling and diastolic dysfunction, impairment in myocardial oxygen supply and demand, and progression of kidney disease. Although arterial stiffness is associated with aging, it is accelerated in the presence of obesity and diabetes. The prevalence of arterial stiffness parallels the increase of obesity that is occurring in epidemic proportions and is partly driven by a sedentary life style and consumption of a high fructose, high salt and high fat western diet. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of arterial stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. The local tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS in the vascular tissue and immune cells and perivascular adipose tissue is recognized as an important element involved in endothelial dysfunction which contributes significantly to arterial stiffness. Activation of vascular RAAS is seen in humans and animal models of obesity and diabetes, and associated with enhanced oxidative stress and inflammation in the vascular tissue. The cross talk between angiotensin and aldosterone underscores the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors in modulation of insulin resistance, decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness. In addition, both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this local tissue activation of RAAS. In this review we will attempt to present a unifying mechanism of how environmental and immunological factors are involved in this local tissue RAAS activation, and the role of this process in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness and targeting tissue RAAS activation.

  18. Placental growth factor is a potent vasodilator of rat and human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osol, George; Celia, Gerard; Gokina, Natalia; Barron, Carolyn; Chien, Edward; Mandala, Maurizio; Luksha, Leonid; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2008-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether placental growth factor (PlGF) exerts a vasodilatory effect on rat uterine vessels (arcuate arteries and veins) and to examine regional differences in reactivity by comparing these responses to those of comparably sized mesenteric vessels. We also sought to examine and compare its effects on human uterine and subcutaneous vessels. All vessels were studied in vitro, under pressurized (rat) or isometric wire-mounted (human) conditions, and exposed to a range of PlGF concentrations. Inhibitors of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis were included in an effort to understand the causal mechanism(s). In rat uterine arteries, the effects of receptor inhibition and activation using selective ligands for VEGFR-1 (PlGF) vs. VEGFR-2 (VEGF-E) were determined, and real-time RT-PCR was performed to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on relative abundance of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 message in the vascular wall. PlGF was a potent vasodilator of all vessels studied, with greatest sensitivity observed in rat uterine arteries. Pregnancy significantly augmented dilator sensitivity to PlGF, and this effect was associated with selective upregulation of VEGFR-1 message in the pregnant state. The contribution of nitric oxide was appreciable in rat and human uterine arteries, with lesser effects in rat uterine veins and mesenteric arteries, and with no observable effect in human subcutaneous vessels. Based on these results, we conclude that PlGF is a potent vasodilator of several vessel types in both humans and rats. Its potency and mechanism vary with physiological state and vessel location and are mediated solely by the VEGFR-1 receptor subtype. Gestational changes in the uterine circulation suggest that this factor may play a role in modulating uterine vascular remodeling and blood flow during the pregnant state.

  19. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR (PlGF) IS A POTENT VASODILATOR OF RAT AND HUMAN RESISTANCE ARTERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osol, George; Celia, Gerard; Gokina, Natalia; Barron, Carolyn; Chien, Edward; Mandala, Maurizio; Luksha, Leonid; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether PlGF exerts a vasodilatory effect on rat uterine vessels (arcuate arteries and veins) and to examine regional differences in reactivity by comparing these responses to those of comparably-sized mesenteric vessels. We also sought to examine and compare its effects on human uterine and subcutaneous vessels. All vessels were studied in vitro, under pressurized (rat) or isometric wire-mounted (human) conditions, and exposed to a range of PlGF concentrations. Inhibitors of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis were included in an effort to understand the causal mechanism(s). In rat uterine arteries, the effects of receptor inhibition and activation using selective ligands for VEGFR-1 (PlGF) vs. VEGFR-2 (VEGF-E) were determined, and real-time RT-PCR was performed to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on relative abundance of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 message in the vascular wall. PlGF was a potent vasodilator of all vessels studied, with greatest sensitivity observed in rat uterine arteries. Pregnancy significantly augmented dilator sensitivity to PlGF, and this effect was associated with selective upregulation of VEGFR-1 message in the pregnant state. The contribution of nitric oxide was appreciable in rat and human uterine arteries, with lesser effects in rat uterine veins and mesenteric arteries, and with no observable effect in human subcutaneous vessels. Based on these results, we conclude that PlGF is a potent vasodilator of several vessel types in both humans and rats. Its potency and mechanism varies with physiological state and vessel location, and is mediated solely by the VEGFR-1 receptor subtype. Gestational changes in the uterine circulation suggest that this factor may play a role in modulating uterine vascular remodeling and blood flow during the pregnant state. PMID:18192215

  20. Arterial diameter during central volume depletion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Madsen, P; Matzen, S;

    1995-01-01

    .3) to 2.2 (SEM 0.3) 1.min-1] and heart rate [HR, from 64 (SEM 3) to 100 (SEM 7) beats.min-1], mean arterial pressure (MAP, from 77 (SEM 4) to 89 (SEM 2) mmHg [10.3 (SEM 0.53 to 11.9 (SEM 0.27) kPa]) and total peripheral resistance (TPR, from 19 (SEM 2) to 34 (SEM 4) mmHg.min.1-1 [2.5 (SEM 0.27) to 4.......5 (SEM 0.53) kPa.min.1-1]) increased; but with the appearance of presyncopal symptoms, HR, MAP and TPR were reduced to 65 (SEM 8) beats.min-1, 46 (SEM 4) mmHg [6.1 (SEM 0.53) kPa] and 18 (SEM 3) mmHg.min.1-1 [2.4 (SEM 0.4) kPa.min-1.1-1], respectively (P

  1. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  2. Angiotensin II receptor mRNA expression and vasoconstriction in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Pantev, Emil; Emilson, Malin;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor that is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and atherosclerosis. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA expression levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and the vasocontractile responses...... to angiotensin II were characterised by in vitro pharmacology in endothelium-denuded human coronary arteries. Angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)) receptor mRNA expression levels were significantly down-regulated in arteries from patients with heart failure as compared to controls. The angiotensin II...

  3. Diagnosis of atherosclerosis in human carotid artery by FT-Raman spectroscopy: Principal Components Analysis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Grazielle V.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Martin, Airton A.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Pacheco, Marcos T.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Zampieri, Marcelo; Pasqualucci, Carlos A. G.

    2004-07-01

    FT- Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) could allow identification and evaluation of human atherosclerotic lesions. A Raman spectrum can provide biochemical information of arteries which can help identifying the disease status and evolution. In this study, it is shown the results of FT-Raman for identification of human carotid arteries in vitro. Fragments of human carotid arteries were analyzed using a FT-Raman spectrometer with a Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm operating at an excitation power of 300mW. Spectra were obtained with 250 scans and spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. Each collection time was approximately 8 min. A total of 75 carotid fragments were spectroscopically scanned and FT-Raman results were compared with histopathology. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to model an algorithm for tissue classification into three categories: normal, atherosclerotic plaque without calcification and atherosclerotic plaque with calcification. Non-atherosclerotic (normal) artery, atherosclerotic plaque and calcified plaque exhibit different spectral signatures related to biochemicals presented in each tissue type, such as, bands of collagen and elastin (proteins), cholesterol and its esters and calcium hydroxyapatite and carbonate apatite respectively. Results show that there is 96% match between classifications based on PCA algorithm and histopathology. The diagnostic applied over all 75 samples had sensitivity and specificity of about 89% and 100%, respectively, for atherosclerotic plaque and 100% and 98% for calcified plaque.

  4. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  5. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  6. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Concussion: Arterial Pulse Contour Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F La Fountaine

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The arterial pulse wave (APW has a distinct morphology whose contours reflect dynamics in cardiac function and peripheral vascular tone as a result of sympathetic nervous system (SNS control. With a transition from rest to increased metabolic demand, the expected augmentation of SNS outflow will not only affect arterial blood pressure and heart rate, it will also induce changes to the contours of the APW. Following a sports concussion, a transient state cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is present. How this state affects the APW, has yet to be described. A prospective, parallel-group study on cardiovascular autonomic control (i.e., digital electrocardiogram and continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure was performed in the seated upright position in ten athletes with concussion and 7 non-injured control athletes. Changes in APW were compared at rest and during the first 60 seconds (F60 of an isometric handgrip test (IHGT in concussed athletes and non-injured controls within 48 hours (48hr and 1 week (1wk of injury. The concussion group was further separated by the length of time until they were permitted to return to play (RTP>1wk; RTP≤1wk. SysSlope, an indirect measurement of stroke volume, was significantly lower in the concussion group at rest and during F60 at 48hr and 1wk; a paradoxical decline in SysSlope occurred at each visit during the transition from rest to IHGT F60. The RTP>1wk group had lower SysSlope (405±200; 420±88; 454±236 mmHg/s, respectively at rest 48hr compared to the RTP≤1wk and controls. Similarly at 48hr rest, several measurements of arterial stiffness were abnormal in RTP>1wk compared to RTP≤1wk and controls: Peak-to-Notch Latency (0.12±0.04; 0.16±0.02; 0.17±0.05, respectively, Notch Relative Amplitude (0.70±0.03; 0.71±0.04; 0.66±0.14, respectively and Stiffness Index (6.4±0.2; 5.7±0.4; 5.8±0.5, respectively. Use of APW revealed that concussed athletes have a transient increase in peripheral artery

  7. Endothelin-dependent vasoconstriction in human uterine artery: application to preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Dechanet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced uteroplacental perfusion, the initiating event in preeclampsia, is associated with enhanced endothelin-1 (ET-1 production which feeds the vasoconstriction of uterine artery. Whether the treatments of preeclampsia were effective on ET-1 induced contraction and could reverse placental ischemia is the question addressed in this study. We investigated the effect of antihypertensive drugs used in preeclampsia and of ET receptor antagonists on the contractile response to ET-1 on human uterine arteries. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experiments were performed, ex vivo, on human uterine artery samples obtained after hysterectomy. We studied variations in isometric tension of arterial rings in response to the vasoconstrictor ET-1 and evaluated the effects of various vasodilators and ET-receptor antagonists on this response. Among antihypertensive drugs, only dihydropyridines were effective in blocking and reversing the ET-1 contractile response. Their efficiency, independent of the concentration of ET-1, was only partial. Hydralazine, alpha-methyldopa and labetalol had no effect on ET-1 induced contraction which is mediated by both ET(A and ET(B receptors in uterine artery. ET receptors antagonists, BQ-123 and BQ-788, slightly reduced the amplitude of the response to ET-1. Combination of both antagonists was more efficient, but it was not possible to reverse the maximal ET-1-induced contraction with antagonists used alone or in combination. CONCLUSION: Pharmacological drugs currently used in the context of preeclampsia, do not reverse ET-1 induced contraction. Only dihydropyridines, which partially relax uterine artery previously contracted with ET-1, might offer interesting perspectives to improve placental perfusion.

  8. Effect of severe acidosis on vasoactive effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine in human distal mammary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Charles; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Devillier, Philippe; Naline, Emmanuel; Lansac, Emmanuel; Ménasché, Philippe; Faisy, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Acidosis is a very common pathologic process in perioperative management. However, how to correct severe acidosis to improve the efficacy of vasoconstrictors in hemodynamically unstable patients is still debated. The present study investigated whether severe extracellular acidosis influences the vasoactive properties of vasoconstrictors on human isolated arteries. Segments of intact distal internal mammary arteries were removed from 41 patients undergoing artery bypass grafting. The arterial rings were washed in Krebs-Henseleit solution and suspended in an organ bath. The rings were set at a pretension equivalent of 100 mm Hg, and the relaxation response to 10 μM acetylcholine was verified. Concentration-response curves for epinephrine, norepinephrine, methoxamine (α1A/D-adrenoceptor agonist), phenylephrine (equipotent agonist of α1A/B-adrenoceptors), and clonidine (α2-adrenoceptor agonist) were achieved under control conditions (pH 7.40) and under acidic conditions by substitution of the Krebs-Henseleit solution with a modified solution. Decreasing the pH from 7.40 to 7.20, 7.0, or 6.80 did not significantly alter the potency and efficacy of epinephrine and norepinephrine, although the standardized effect size was sometimes large. Severe acidosis (pH 6.80) did not significantly change the potency and efficacy of phenylephrine and clonidine, although it increased the efficacy and potency of methoxamine (P acidosis did not impair the vasoactive properties of epinephrine and norepinephrine in human medium-size arteries until pH 6.80. The results of the present study also suggest that acidosis might potentiate arterial responsiveness to vasoconstrictors, mostly by way of the α1D-adrenoceptor. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Digital analysis of the dynamics of the arterial supply to the human foetal kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczera, Małgorzata; Gajda, Grzegorz; Gielecki, Jerzy S

    2003-11-01

    Variations in the renal arteries in human individuals and foetuses have already been well studied. Contemporary trends in visualisation techniques focus on the evaluation of the dynamic parameters of blood flow in the vessels (speed, pulsatility, resistance). Most of these data have been obtained by the means of Doppler ultrasound (Fig. 1, 2). The authors have not found any anatomical database containing information about variability in the volume of the foetal renal arteries. The aim of the study is to design a database for variation in foetal renal artery volume in relation to foetal age and sex. The material consisted of digital images of the renal arteries filled with LBS-latex taken from 30 foetuses aged 12-19 Hbd. Digital analysis of the arteries was made with a unique form of software. The program is a 2D vector graphic editor using spliced functions of Bezier. Foetal age is estimated according to the last menstrual period and measurement of manual foot length and femur length (FL) as determined by ultrasound.

  10. Premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile smooth muscle cells in human umbilical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffino, S; Lamy, E; Foucault-Bertaud, A; Risso, F; Reboul, R; Tellier, E; Chareyre, C; Dignat-George, F; Simeoni, U; Charpiot, P

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) participate to the regulation of peripheral arterial resistance and blood pressure. To assume their function, SMCs differentiate throughout the normal vascular development from a synthetic phenotype towards a fully differentiated contractile phenotype by acquiring a repertoire of proteins involved in contraction. In human fetal muscular arteries and umbilical arteries (UAs), no data are available regarding the differentiation of SMCs during the last trimester of gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of SMCs during this gestation period in human UAs. We investigated the phenotype of SMCs in human UAs from very preterm (28-31 weeks of gestation), late preterm (32-35 weeks) and term (37-41 weeks) newborns using biochemical and immunohistochemical detection of α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smoothelin, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain. We found that the number of SMCs positive for smoothelin in UAs increased with gestational age. Western blot analysis revealed a higher content of smoothelin in term compared to very preterm UAs. These results show that SMCs in human UAs gradually acquire a fully differentiated contractile phenotype during the last trimester of gestation and thus that premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile SMCs in human UAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Internal carotid artery dissection following chiropractic treatment in a pregnant woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Adam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of internal carotid artery dissection in a pregnant woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE immediately following chiropractic treatment is presented. The literature regarding complications of neck manipulation during pregnancy, spontaneous dissection of craniocervical arteries in pregnancy and the postpartum period, and dissection of craniocervical arteries in SLE are reviewed. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first case of carotid artery dissection following chiropractic treatment in a pregnant woman published in the literature.

  12. a New System for Estimating Sclerosis of IN VIVO Common Carotid Artery by Ultrasound B-Mode Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogata, Fumio; Yokota, Yasunari; Kawamura, Yoko; Walsh, W. R.

    2009-08-01

    A new system has been developed for estimating sclerosis of in vivo common carotid artery by ultrasound B-mode (Brightness-mode) image analysis. The method is based on in vivo stiffness, Eth, calculated from the variation of carotid-duct-diameter with changing of systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In addition from the results of tensile and internal pressure burst test using in vitro human and animal arteries specimens, we found a correlation between in vitro Eths estimated from stress-strain curve of radial and tensile tests by subjecting step by step loads. Thus, using a correlation curve a technique for estimating in vivo Eth as well as tensile strength of carotid artery can be predicted. Then, to be a simple routine medical examination, a prototype software was developed, which is capable to measure the diameter changes by the image processing based on 30-image/s and one pixel size data (in case of the report, 0.0713 mm/pixel) of an ultrasound device. The total examination time for both sides of the common carotid arteries was within 300 seconds. To examine the validity of this technique, some clinical data is presented. The result indicated that the stiffness (Eth), strength, and critical burst pressure are useful symptom indices for arterial sclerosis, especially for finding the beginning sclerosis that would start early twenties.

  13. Pial artery and subarachnoid width response to apnoea in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Wolf, Jacek; Swierblewska, Ewa; Kunicka, Katarzyna; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Bieniaszewski, Leszek; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about intracranial pressure (ICP)-cerebral haemodynamic interplay during repetitive apnoea. A recently developed method based on near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) noninvasively measures changes in pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) as well as subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) in humans. We tested the complex response of the pial artery and subarachnoid width to apnoea using this method. The pial artery and subarachnoid width response to consecutive apnoeas lasting 30, 60 s and maximal breath-hold (91.1 ± 23.1 s) were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. The cc-TQ and sas-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), pulsatility index and resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate (HR) and beat-to-beat SBP and DBP blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) was measured using a medical gas analyser. Apnoea evoked a multiphasic response in blood pressure, pial artery compliance and ICP. First, SBP declined, which was accompanied by an increase in cc-TQ and sas-TQ. Directly after these changes, SBP exceeded baseline values, which was followed by a decline in cc-TQ and the return of sas-TQ to baseline. During these initial changes, CBFV remained stable. Towards the end of the apnoea, BP, cc-TQ and CBFV increased, whereas pulsatility index, resistive index and sas-TQ declined. Changes in sas-TQ were linked to changes in EtCO2, HR and SBP. Apnoea is associated with ICP swings, closely reflecting changes in EtCO2, HR and peripheral BP. The baroreflex influences the pial artery response.

  14. Screening for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-L. Vachiéry

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The onset and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc can be particularly aggressive; however, effective treatments are available. Therefore, early identification of patients with suspected PAH, confirmation of diagnosis, and intervention is essential. PAH may be challenging to diagnose in its earliest stages, particularly in populations that have multiple causes of breathlessness, and, therefore, screening is required. The optimal screening tools and methodology are, as yet, unknown, and this is confounded by a lack of consensus over which patients to screen. Current practice favours annual screening of all SSc patients using Doppler echocardiography to detect elevated right heart pressures. This will typically identify most patients with the various forms of pulmonary hypertension found in SSc. The optimum thresholds for Doppler echocardiography are still subject to investigation, especially for patients with mild pulmonary hypertension, and this technique may, therefore, yield a significant number of false-positives and a currently unknown number of false-negatives. Confirmatory right heart catheterisation remains necessary in all suspected cases. Further research is needed to identify the optimal tools and the screening approach with greatest specificity and selectivity.

  15. Comparison of the vasodilator responses of isolated human and rat middle meningeal arteries to migraine related compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grände, Gustaf; Labruijere, Sieneke; Haanes, Kristian Agmund

    2014-01-01

    , telcagepant) were applied to the isolated arteries, and both induced a significant decrease of the effect of exogenously administrated CGRP. In experiments on rat middle meningeal arteries, pre-contracted with PGF2α, similar tendencies were seen. When the pre-contraction was switched to K+ in a separate...... series of experiments, CGRP and sildenafil significantly relaxed the arteries. CONCLUSIONS: Still no definite answer can be given as to why pain is experienced during an attack of migraine. No clear correlation was found between the efficacy of a substance as a meningeal artery vasodilator in human...

  16. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  17. Oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江渝; 刘红; 彭家和; 叶治家; 何凤田; 董燕麟; 刘秉文

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein (HDL) induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods: HDL cocultured with SMCs at 37℃ in 48 h was subjected, and native HDL (N-HDL) served as control. Oxidative modification of HDL was identified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. Absorbances of conjugated diene (CD) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) were measured with ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 234 and 560 nm respectively, and fluorescence intensity of thiobarbuturic acid reaction substance (TBARS) with fluorescence spectrophotometry at 550 nm emission wavelength with excitation at 515 nm. Results: In comparison with N-HDL, the electrophoretic mobility of SMCs-cocultured HDL was increased, and the contents of CD, LOOH and TBARS HDL were very significantly higher than those of the control HDL (P<0.01). Conclusion: Oxidative modification of HDL can be induced by human arterial SMCs.

  18. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  19. Relationship between upper and lower limb conduit artery vasodilator function in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Rowley, N.; Padilla, J.; Simmons, G.H.; Laughlin, M.H.; Whyte, G.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a strong predictor of future cardiovascular disease and is believed to represent a "barometer" of systemic endothelial health. Although a recent study [Padilla et al. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 235: 1287-1291, 2010] in pigs confirmed a strong correlation b

  20. Relationship between upper and lower limb conduit artery vasodilator function in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Rowley, N.; Padilla, J.; Simmons, G.H.; Laughlin, M.H.; Whyte, G.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a strong predictor of future cardiovascular disease and is believed to represent a "barometer" of systemic endothelial health. Although a recent study [Padilla et al. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 235: 1287-1291, 2010] in pigs confirmed a strong correlation b

  1. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations.

  2. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    4.5m for the pulmonary vascular tree. According to Guyton & Hall (2000), about 5 L is considered normal for an adult human, and the area distribution...decreases further, and even falls below the equilibrium pressure. Guyton & Hall (2000) reports that normal mean pressures are 100 mmHg in the arteries, 20...the order of 100 times faster than realtime. Five liters is considered a normal volume for an adult human circulatory system ( Guyton & Hall, 2000

  3. In Vitro Vasoactive Effects of Levobupivacaine and Ropivacaine on the Isolated Human Umbilical Artery and Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Kılıçaslan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this in vitro study, we investigated the vasoactive effects of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine on vascular smooth muscle derived from human umbilical arteries and veins.Material and Methods: The strips were mounted in tissue baths at 37°C continuously gassed with 5% CO2 in oxygen for isometric recording of contractile activity on a polygraph. The endothelium of some tissues was mechanically removed to assess the influence of the endothelium on contractility. The strips were precontracted with serotonin (10-6 M 5-HT; n=7. After obtaining the maximal contraction, responses obtained by adding levobupivacaine and ropivacaine (10-9-10-4 M; n=7 cumulatively were recorded. Contractions were expressed as the (% of 5HT maximal response percentage of 5 HT’s maximal response.Results: Both levobupivacaine and ropivacaine induce a concentration-dependent contraction in the smooth muscle cells of umbilical arteries and veins. Maximum contractile response (Emax of levobupivacaine (79.2±2.5, 71.1±2.6 was higher than ropivacaine (68.4±2, 36.2±2.8 on both umbilical arteries and veins. There were no statistically significant differences between contraction responses of endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded tissues. Conclusion: The results suggest that, in high concentrations, levobupivacaine and ropivacaine may affect umbilical blood flow by contracting the umbilical artery and vein, thus reducing fetal blood flow.

  4. A novel human artery model to assess the magnetic accumulation of SPIONs under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janikowska, Agata; Matuszak, Jasmin; Lyer, Stefan; Schreiber, Eveline; Unterweger, Harald; Zaloga, Jan; Groll, Jürgen; Alexiou, Christoph; Cicha, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic targeting utilises the properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to accumulate particles in specified vasculature regions under an external magnetic field. As the behaviour of circulating particles varies depending on nanoparticle characteristics, magnetic field strength and flow dynamics, we established an improved ex vivo model in order to estimate the magnetic capture of SPIONs in physiological-like settings. We describe here a new, easy to handle ex vivo model of human umbilical artery. Using this model, the magnetic targeting of different types of SPIONs under various external magnetic field gradients and flow conditions was investigated by atomic emission spectroscopy and histology. Among tested particles, SPION-1 with lauric acid shell had the largest capacity to accumulate at the specific artery segment. SPION-2 (lauric acid/albumin-coated) were also successfully targeted, although the observed peak in the iron content under the tip of the magnet was smaller than for SPION-1. In contrast, we did not achieve magnetic accumulation of dextran-coated SPION-3. Taken together, the umbilical artery model constitutes a time- and cost-efficient, 3R-compliant tool to assess magnetic targeting of SPIONs under flow. Our results further imply the possibility of an efficient in vivo targeting of certain types of SPIONs to superficial arteries. PMID:28176885

  5. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  6. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Tadhg

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. Study Design Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. Results Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Conclusion Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  7. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. STUDY DESIGN: Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. RESULTS: Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSION: Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  8. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  9. Arterial dysfunction but maintained systemic blood pressure in cavin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Swärd

    Full Text Available Caveolae are omega-shaped plasma membrane micro-domains that are abundant in cells of the vascular system. Formation of caveolae depends on caveolin-1 and cavin-1 and lack of either protein leads to loss of caveolae. Mice with caveolin-1 deficiency have dysfunctional blood vessels, but whether absence of cavin-1 similarly leads to vascular dysfunction is not known. Here we addressed this hypothesis using small mesenteric arteries from cavin-1-deficient mice. Cavin-1-reporter staining was intense in mesenteric arteries, brain arterioles and elsewhere in the vascular system, with positive staining of both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Arterial expression of cavin-1, -2 and -3 was reduced in knockout (KO arteries as was expression of caveolin-1, -2 and -3. Caveolae were absent in the endothelial and smooth muscle layers of small mesenteric arteries as determined by electron microscopy. Arginase, a negative regulator of nitric oxide production, was elevated in cavin-1 deficient arteries as was contraction in response to the α1-adrenergic agonist cirazoline. Detailed assessment of vascular dimensions revealed increased media thickness and reduced distensibility, arguing that enhanced contraction was due to increased muscle mass. Contrasting with increased α1-adrenergic contraction, myogenic tone was essentially absent and this appeared to be due in part to increased nitric oxide production. Vasomotion was less frequent in the knock-out vessels. In keeping with the opposing influences on arterial resistance of increased agonist-induced contractility and reduced myogenic tone, arterial blood pressure was unchanged in vivo. We conclude that deficiency of cavin-1 affects the function of small arteries, but that opposing influences on arterial resistance balance each other such that systemic blood pressure in unstressed mice is well maintained.

  10. Venous and Arterial Thrombotic Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Vargas-Ruiz, Angel Gabriel; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos A; Cicero-Casarrubias, Alba; Ocampo-Torres, Mario C; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thrombosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is 25 to 50-fold higher than in the general population; we aimed to define the characteristics of venous thrombotic events (VTE) and arterial thrombotic events (ATE) to identify the patients at highest risk. The study included 219 patients with recent-onset SLE. At baseline, standardized medical history and laboratory tests were done. Followup visits occurred quarterly, and information about damage accrual, comorbidities, and cardiovascular risk factors was updated annually. Main outcome was development of TE after SLE diagnosis. Thirty-five patients (16%) developed TE (27 VTE, 8 ATE) during 5.21 years of followup; incidence rate 31/1000 patient-years. Most events (57%) developed within the first year of diagnosis, and 69% were not associated with lupus anticoagulant (LAC), determined with 1 method. VTE developed earlier than ATE (2.0 vs 57.5 mos, p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis, variables preceding VTE included cutaneous vasculitis, nephrotic syndrome, dose of prednisone, and LAC in combination with anti-RNP/Sm antibodies (p < 0.03). Patients with ATE were older (median age 44 vs 29 yrs, p = 0.04), smokers, and had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, at least 2 traditional risk factors, nephrotic syndrome, chronic damage, and a higher cumulative dose of prednisone (p < 0.05). LAC in combination with anti-RNP/Sm antibodies was associated with VTE and improved the accuracy for predicting it. Our study suggests that in SLE, VTE and ATE have different risk factors. Understanding these differences is helpful for identifying patients at highest risk. The use of LAC plus anti-RNP/Sm for predicting VTE deserves further study.

  11. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for...

  12. Ischemic heart disease down-regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease and controls. Furthermore......, the suitability of artery culture for studying angiotensin receptor changes was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. The angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA levels were down-regulated in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease as compared to controls (P

  13. Rabbit Model of Human Gliomas: Implications for Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huamin; Janowski, Miroslaw; Pearl, Monica S.; Malysz-Cymborska, Izabela; Li, Shen; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis for malignant brain tumors remains poor despite a combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This is partly due to the blood-brain barrier, a major obstacle that prevents therapeutic agents from effectively reaching the tumor. We have recently developed a method for precise and predictable opening of the blood-brain barrier via the intra-arterial administration of mannitol, a hyperosmolar agent, in a rabbit model, whose vascular anatomy facilitates the use of standard interventional neuroradiology techniques and devices. To date, however, no protocols are available that enable human glioma modeling in rabbits. In this article, we report on the xenotransplantation of a human glioblastoma (GBM-1) in adult New Zealand rabbits. We induced multi-drug immunosuppression (Mycophenolate Mofetil, Dexamethasone, Tacrolimus) and stereotactically implanted GBM-1 tumor cells into rabbit brains. The rabbits were followed for 42 days, monitored by MRI and body weight measurements, and underwent postmortem histopathological analysis. On MRI, brain tumors were identified on T2-weighted scans. On histopathology, tumors were detected with hematoxylin/eosin and their human origin was confirmed with immunohistochemistry against human-specific antigens. Our method for human glioma modeling in rabbits provides the foundation to test novel treatment strategies, including intra-arterial therapeutic agent delivery. PMID:28103265

  14. Resistance artery creatine kinase mRNA and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, Fares A; Oudman, Inge; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Afink, Gijs B; Keijser, Remco; Clark, Joseph F; van Montfrans, Gert A; Brewster, Lizzy M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains the main risk factor for cardiovascular death. Environmental and biological factors are known to contribute to the condition, and circulating creatine kinase was reported to be the main predictor of blood pressure in the general population. This was proposed to be because of high resistance artery creatine kinase-BB rapidly regenerating ATP for vascular contractility. Therefore, we assessed whether creatine kinase isoenzyme mRNA levels in human resistance arteries are associated with blood pressure. We isolated resistance-sized arteries from omental fat donated by consecutive women undergoing uterine fibroid surgery. Blood pressure was measured in the sitting position. Vessels of 13 women were included, 6 normotensive and 7 hypertensive, mean age 42.9 years (SE, 1.6) and mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure, 144.8 (8.0)/86.5 (4.3) mm Hg. Arteriolar creatine kinase isoenzyme mRNA was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Normalized creatine kinase B mRNA copy numbers, ranging from 5.2 to 24.4 (mean, 15.0; SE, 1.9), showed a near-perfect correlation with diastolic blood pressure (correlation coefficient, 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.0) and were well correlated with systolic blood pressure, with a 90% relative increase in resistance artery creatine kinase B mRNA in hypertensives compared with normotensives, normalized copy numbers were, respectively, 19.3 (SE, 2.0) versus 10.1 (SE, 2.1), P=0.0045. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence suggesting that resistance artery creatine kinase mRNA expression levels concur with blood pressure levels, almost doubling with hypertension. These findings add to the evidence that creatine kinase might be involved in the vasculature's pressor responses.

  15. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christopher P; Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼ 40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Radiological assessment of the inferior alveolar artery course in human corpse mandibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertl, Kristina [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Oral Surgery, Bernhard Gottlieb School of Dentistry, Vienna (Austria); Malmoe University, Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmoe (Sweden); Hirtler, Lena [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department of Systematic Anatomy, Vienna (Austria); Dobsak, Toni [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Oral Surgery, Bernhard Gottlieb School of Dentistry, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Karl Donath Laboratory for Hard Tissue and Biomaterial Research, Division of Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Heimel, Patrick [Medical University of Vienna, Karl Donath Laboratory for Hard Tissue and Biomaterial Research, Division of Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Vienna (Austria); Gahleitner, Andre [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Oral Surgery, Bernhard Gottlieb School of Dentistry, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Osteoradiology, General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Ulm, Christian [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Oral Surgery, Bernhard Gottlieb School of Dentistry, Vienna (Austria); Plenk, Hanns [Medical University of Vienna, Bone and Biomaterials Research, Institute for Histology and Embryology, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-04-01

    CT assessment of the entire course of the inferior alveolar artery (IAA) within the mandibular canal. After contrast medium injection (180 or 400 mg/ml iodine concentration) into the external carotid arteries of 15 fresh human cadaver heads, the main IAA's position in the canal (cranial, buccal, lingual or caudal) was assessed in dental CT images of partially edentulous mandibles. The course of the main IAA could be followed at both iodine concentrations. The higher concentration gave the expected better contrast, without creating artefacts, and improved visibility of smaller arteries, such as anastomotic sections, dental branches and the incisive branch. The main IAA changed its position in the canal more often than so far known (mean 4.3 times, SD 1.24, range 2-7), but with a similar bilateral course. A cranial position was most often detected (42 %), followed by lingual (36 %), caudal (16 %) and buccal (6 %). With this non-invasive radiologic method, the entire course of the main IAA in the mandibular canal could be followed simultaneously with other bone structures on both sides of human cadaver mandibles. This methodology allows one to amend existing anatomical and histological data, which are important for surgical interventions near the mandibular canal. (orig.)

  17. The Effect of Creatine Kinase Inhibition on Contractile Properties of Human Resistance Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, Zhila; Karamat, Fares A; Ankum, Willem M; Clark, Joseph F; van Montfrans, Gert A; van Bavel, Ed; Brewster, Lizzy M

    2016-02-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) is a main predictor of blood pressure, and this is thought to largely depend on high resistance artery contractility. We previously reported an association between vascular contractility and CK in normotensive pregnancy, but pregnancy is a strong CK inducer, and data on human hypertension are lacking. Therefore, we further explored CK-dependency of vascular contractility outside the context of pregnancy in normotensive and hypertensive women. Nineteen consecutive women, mean age 42 years (SE 1.3), mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure respectively 142.6 (SE 5.9)/85.6 (3.4) mm Hg (9 hypertensive), donated an omental fat sample during abdominal surgery. We compared vasodilation after the specific CK inhibitor 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene (DNFB; 10(-6) mol/l) to sodium nitroprusside (10(-6) mol/l) in isolated resistance arteries using a wire myograph. Additionally, we assessed predictors of vasoconstrictive force. DNFB reduced vascular contractility to 24.3% (SE 4.4), P resistance artery contractility across human normotension and primary hypertension outside the context of pregnancy. Further studies should explore the effect of CK inhibitors on clinical blood pressure. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension: links, risks, and management strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Tselios K; Gladman DD; Urowitz MB

    2016-01-01

    Konstantinos Tselios, Dafna D Gladman, Murray B Urowitz, University of Toronto Lupus Clinic, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by the second highest prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), after systemic sclerosis, among the connective tissue diseases. SLE-associated PAH is hemodynamically defined by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest (&...

  20. Phosphodiesterase type 4 expression and anti-proliferative effects in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Saliha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a proliferative vascular disease, characterized by aberrant regulation of smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis in distal pulmonary arteries. Prostacyclin (PGI2 analogues have anti-proliferative effects on distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs, which are dependent on intracellular cAMP stimulation. We therefore sought to investigate the involvement of the main cAMP-specific enzymes, phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4, responsible for cAMP hydrolysis. Methods Distal human PASMCs were derived from pulmonary arteries by explant culture (n = 14, passage 3–12. Responses to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (5–10 ng/ml, serum, PGI2 analogues (cicaprost, iloprost and PDE4 inhibitors (roflumilast, rolipram, cilomilast were determined by measuring cAMP phosphodiesterase activity, intracellular cAMP levels, DNA synthesis, apoptosis (as measured by DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2, MMP-9 production. Results Expression of all four PDE4A-D genes was detected in PASMC isolates. PDE4 contributed to the main proportion (35.9 ± 2.3%, n = 5 of cAMP-specific hydrolytic activity demonstrated in PASMCs, compared to PDE3 (21.5 ± 2.5%, PDE2 (15.8 ± 3.4% or PDE1 activity (14.5 ± 4.2%. Intracellular cAMP levels were increased by PGI2 analogues and further elevated in cells co-treated with roflumilast, rolipram and cilomilast. DNA synthesis was attenuated by 1 μM roflumilast (49 ± 6% inhibition, rolipram (37 ± 6% and cilomilast (30 ± 4% and, in the presence of 5 nM cicaprost, these compounds exhibited EC50 values of 4.4 (2.6–6.1 nM (Mean and 95% confidence interval, 59 (36–83 nM and 97 (66–130 nM respectively. Roflumilast attenuated cell proliferation and gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 production and promoted the anti-proliferative effects of PGI2 analogues. The cAMP activators iloprost and forskolin also induced apoptosis

  1. [The stimulation of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells by cigarette smoke extract contributed to cell senescence and induced human pulmonary artery smooth cell migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L; Zhu, P C; Wang, Y E; Gao, Y T; Ao, Q L

    2017-06-12

    Objective: To observe the senescent effect of human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAEC) stimulated by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and the effect of secretion of senescent cells on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscles cell (HPASMC) proliferation and migration. Methods: HPAEC was treated with different concentrations of CSE in vitro and cell proliferation was determined by CCK8, senescence cells analyzed by detecting the β-gal activity, and the senescent proteins of cells measured by Western blot. The concentration of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) was detected by ELISA and the expression of MCP-1 and TGF-β1 was measured by Real-time PCR. The number of the proliferated cells was measured by Transwell assay and immunoflurescence. Results: The HPAEC was aging with the stimulation concentration of CSE increasing and the stimulation time prolonging (Pcells increased as the exposure time prolonged. Compared with the control group, cell viability of 48 h group(1.8±0.1) and 72 h group (1.8±0.1) decreased significantly. The flow cytometry showed a significant difference between the CSE group(14.1±1.2) and the control group(28.5±1.8) in S phase(Pcell cycle arrest. The SASP was increasing as the CSE-exposure prolonged. Compared with the control group(177±39), the 48 h group(460±43) and the 72 h group(609±64) showed a marked increase in MCP-1(Pcells could secrete SASP which induced HPASMC proliferation. After different times of conditioned medium stimulation, HPASMC proliferated especially at 72 h(P<0.05) . The immnoflorescence and Transwell assay confirmed this finding. Conclusion: CSE could induce senescence of HPAEC and SASP production which improved HPASMC proliferation and migration.

  2. Nitinol Stent Fatigue in a Peripheral Human Artery Subjected to Pulsatile and Articulation Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sean Michael

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol self-expanding stents are used to treat peripheral occluded vessels such as the superficial femoral artery or the carotid. The complex vessel articulation requires a stent device that is flexible and kink resistant yet durable. The present study shows how the latest advances in commercially available engineering software tools permit engineering simulations of the many aspects of the Nitinol stent design and analysis. Two stent geometries are evaluated: a helical type stent design, and a more traditional straight strut, with multiple crowns design. The fatigue performance of the two stents is compared. The results show that advanced nonlinear finite element simulations and fatigue predictions of the Nitinol stent are possible today inside realistic simulated human arteries. The finite element analysis software used in this study is SimXpert, Marc, and Mentat (MSC Software, Santa Ana, CA).

  3. Application of a four-channel vibrometer system for detection of arterial stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Adriaan; Waz, Adam; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Dirckx, Joris; Abramski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CD) are the most important cause of death in the world and their prevalence is only rising. A significant aspect in the etiology of CD is the stiffening of the large arteries (arteriosclerosis) and plaque formation (atherosclerosis) in the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck. As shown by increasing evidence, both conditions can be detected by assessing pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the CCA, and several approaches allow local detection of PWV, including ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In previous studies, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) was introduced as an approach to assess arterial stiffness. In the present work, a new, compact four-channel LDV system is used for PWV detection in four phantom arteries mimicking real life CCA conditions. The high sensitivity of the LDV system allowed PWV to be assessed, and even local changes in phantom architecture could be detected. This method has potential for cardiovascular screening, as it allows arteriosclerosis assessment and plaque detection.

  4. Fractional-order viscoelasticity applied to describe uniaxial stress relaxation of human arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craiem, Damian; Armentano, Ricardo L [Facultad de IngenierIa, Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Favaloro University, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojo, Francisco J; Atienza, Jose Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo V [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: dcraiem@favaloro.edu.ar

    2008-09-07

    Viscoelastic models can be used to better understand arterial wall mechanics in physiological and pathological conditions. The arterial wall reveals very slow time-dependent decays in uniaxial stress-relaxation experiments, coherent with weak power-law functions. Quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory was successfully applied to modeling such responses, but an accurate estimation of the reduced relaxation function parameters can be very difficult. In this work, an alternative relaxation function based on fractional calculus theory is proposed to describe stress relaxation experiments in strips cut from healthy human aortas. Stress relaxation (1 h) was registered at three incremental stress levels. The novel relaxation function with three parameters was integrated into the QLV theory to fit experimental data. It was based in a modified Voigt model, including a fractional element of order {alpha}, called spring-pot. The stress-relaxation prediction was accurate and fast. Sensitivity plots for each parameter presented a minimum near their optimal values. Least-squares errors remained below 2%. Values of order {alpha} = 0.1-0.3 confirmed a predominant elastic behavior. The other two parameters of the model can be associated to elastic and viscous constants that explain the time course of the observed relaxation function. The fractional-order model integrated into the QLV theory proved to capture the essential features of the arterial wall mechanical response.

  5. A hemodynamics model to study the collective behavior of the ventricular-arterial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin Wang, Yuh-Ying; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2013-01-01

    Applying principles from complex systems to study the efficacy of integrative therapies has become a new interest in medical research. We aimed to construct a concise model for the ventricular-arterial (VA) system and to provide a systematic method for exploring its overall behavior. The transportation of blood from the heart to the peripheral arterioles via hydraulic pressure forces was described by a multi-rank model. Parts of the VA system that have strong mutual interactions were combined into a single sub system. Sub systems of four different ranks were characterized. We then applied the multi-rank model to analyze the aortic pressure wave generated by the periodic ventricular blood ejection, the renal pressure in response to the input from the VA system, and the blood flowing from the renal artery to its arterioles. Maintaining the pressure distribution along the main arteries and in all of the organs with the lowest possible ventricular input turned out to be the first principle for the operation of an efficient VA system. By this principle, we pointed out the benefit of some arterial structures in mammals, derived specific regulation rules and deduced some fundamental concepts for healing. The justification of the biomechanics in our model that differed greatly from those in the prevailing models was given. We concluded that the oscillatory motion and the pressure pulse of the arterial system can be analyzed as steady states with resonance behaviors and suggested utilizing this model to construct integrative therapies for diseases correlated with abnormality in blood circulation.

  6. Gene expression profiling in the human middle cerebral artery after cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, P; Edvinsson, L

    2006-01-01

    MCA samples distributing to the ischemic area, 7-10 days post-stroke. The gene expression was examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray, proteins were studied with immunohistochemistry. We investigated genes previously shown to be upregulated in animal models of cerebral...... with microarray and seven genes chosen for further investigation with real-time PCR; ELK3, LY64, Metallothionin IG, POU3F4, Actin alpha2, RhoA and smoothelin. Six of these were regulated the same way when confirming array expression with real-time PCR. Gene expression studies in the human MCA leading......We have investigated the gene expression in human middle cerebral artery (MCA) after ischemia. Ischemic stroke affects the perfusion in the affected area and experimental cerebral ischemia results in upregulation of vasopressor receptors in the MCA leading to the ischemic area. We obtained human...

  7. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors: current state-of-the-art on systemic arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Elisardo C; Gava, Agata L; Graceli, Jones B; Balarini, Camille M; Campagnaro, Bianca P; Pereira, Thiago Melo C; Meyrelles, Silvana S

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is well known, first for the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and more recently for pulmonary hypertension. The discovery that PDE5 is present in the systemic artery endothelium and smooth muscle cells led investigators to test the extra sexual effects of sildenafil, the first and most investigated PDE5 inhibitor, in diseases affecting the systemic arteries. Cumulative data from experimental and clinical studies have revealed beneficial effects of sildenafil on systemic arterial hypertension and its target organs, such as the heart, kidneys and vasculature. An important effect of sildenafil is reduction of hypertension and improvement of endothelial function in experimental models of hypertension and hypertensive subjects. Interestingly, in angiotensin-dependent hypertension, its beneficial effects on endothelial and kidney dysfunctions seem to at least in part be caused by its ability to decrease the levels of angiotensin II and increase angiotensin 1-7, in addition to improving nitric oxide bioavailability and diminishing reactive oxygen species. Another remarkable finding on the effects of sildenafil comes from studies in apolipoprotein E knockout mice, a model of atherosclerosis that closely resembles human atherosclerotic disease. In this review, we focus on the promising beneficial effects of sildenafil for treating systemic high blood pressure, especially resistant hypertension, and the endothelial dysfunction that is present in hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  8. Ex Vivo and in Silico Study of Human Common Carotid Arteries Pressure Response in Physiological and Inverted State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechna, A.; Cieślicki, K.; Lombarski, L.; Ciszek, B.

    2015-02-01

    Arterial walls are a multilayer structures with nonlinear material characteristics. Furthermore, residual stresses exist in unloaded state (zero-pressure condition) and they affect arterial behavior. To investigate these phenomena a number of theoretical and numerical studies were performed, however no experimental validation was proposed and realized yet. We cannot get rid of residual stresses without damaging the arterial segment. In this paper we propose a novel experiment to validate a numerical model of artery with residual stresses. The inspiration for our study originates from experiments made by Dobrin on dogs' arteries (1999). We applied the idea of turning the artery inside out. After such an operation the sequence of layer is reversed and the residual stresses are re-ordered. We performed several pressure-inflation tests on human Common Carotid Arteries (CCA) in normal and inverted configurations. The nonlinear responses of arterial behavior were obtained and compared to the numerical model. Computer simulations were carried out using the commercial software which applied the finite element method (FEM). Then, these results were discussed.

  9. Ischemic heart disease induces upregulation of endothelin receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    and controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). In addition, the suitability of organ culture as a model mimicking endothelin receptor changes in cardiovascular disease was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. Endothelin ETA and ETB receptor mRNA levels were......Endothelin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. The aims were to quantify endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptor mRNA levels in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure...

  10. Differential localization and characterization of functional calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human subcutaneous arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Ahnstedt, H; Larsen, R;

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor are widely distributed within the circulation and the mechanism behind its vasodilation not only differs from one animal species to another but is also dependent on the type and size of vessel. The present study examines the nature of CGRP......-induced vasodilation, characteristics of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant and localization of the key components calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) of the CGRP receptor in human subcutaneous arteries....

  11. Coronary artery abnormalities in children with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre-Utile, Alain; Galeotti, Caroline; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Still's disease (Systemic-onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: SoJIA) is characterised by high-spiking daily fevers, arthritis and evanescent rashes. Diagnosis of Still's disease is often challenging. Infectious diseases and other inflammatory conditions, especially in young children, Kawasaki disease may look similar. Clinicians often rely on echocardiographic evidence of coronary artery abnormalities to differentiate between Kawasaki disease and Still's disease. Coronary artery dilation would typically favour the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. We present four children with Still's disease and coronary artery abnormalities who were initially misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease. The first patient had pericarditis and an irregular wall of the left coronary artery, without dilation on echocardiography. The second patient had a left coronary artery dilatation and a pericarditis. The third patient had thickened left coronary artery walls, and the fourth patient had a hyperechogenicity of the left and right coronary arteries. They received IVIG without success. The diagnosis of Still's disease was made secondary with evidence of persistent arthritis. All but one patient finally needed biologic treatments. Coronary abnormalities may be observed during various febrile conditions and do not exclude the diagnosis of Still's disease. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of pressure-dependent segmental arterial compliance and postural changes on pulse wave transmission in an arterial model of the human upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P

    2011-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effect of postural changes on arterial blood pressure and vascular properties, it is important to understand effects of pressure-dependent arterial compliance. This study investigates effects of pressure-dependent compliance on pulse wave velocity (PWVar), pressure wave shape, and transmission characteristics in an arterial model of the human arm from heart to radial artery from supine to standing. Estimated central pressure waveform was used as the input for the model, calculated using a validated transfer function (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical) from recorded radial pulses in 10 healthy male subjects (53.8 ± 7.9 years) during 0, 30, 60 and 90 degree head-up tilt. A 5-segment linear model was optimized using estimated central and recorded radial arterial pulse; each segment represented by an equivalent inductance, resistance and capacitance (compliance (C)) Pressure-dependent compliance (C(P)=a · e(b · P) was added to develop a nonlinear model, and the radial pulse calculated. Comparison of the radial pulse calculated by the linear and nonlinear models showed no statistical difference in systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure in any position of tilt. However, waveform shape was increasingly divergent at higher angles of tilt (RMS error 2.3 ± 1.2 mmHg supine, 6.5 ± 3.0 mmHg standing) as was PWVar (0% increase from supine to standing in the linear model, 16.7% increase in nonlinear model). Fourier analysis demonstrated peak amplitude of transmission being at higher frequencies and phase delay being lower in the nonlinear model relative to the linear model. Pressure-dependent arterial compliance, whilst having no effect on peak values of pressure, has significant effects on waveform shape and transmission speed, especially with a more upright position.

  13. Measurement system for an in-vitro characterization of the biomechanics and hemodynamics of arterial bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Bagnasco, D.; Balay, G.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R. L.; Negreira, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    Arterial behaviour in-vivo is influenced, amongst other factors, by the interaction between blood flow and the arterial wall endothelium, and the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall. This interaction plays an important role in pathogenic mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. To quantify these interactions both from biomechanical and hemodynamical standpoints, a complete characterization and modelling of the arterial wall, blood flow, shear wall and circumferential wall stresses are needed. The development of a new multi-parameter measurement system (distances, pressures, flows, velocity profiles, temperature, viscosity) for an in-vitro characterization of the biomechanics and hemodynamics in arterial bifurcations (specially in carotid bifurcations) is described. This set-up represents an improvement relative to previous set-ups developed by the group FCIEN-FMED and is presently under development. Main subsystems interactions and environment-system interactions were identified and compensated to improve system's performance. Several interesting problems related with signal acquisition using a variety of sensors and some experimental results are shown and briefly discussed. Experimental data allow construction of meshes and parameter estimation of the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall, as well as boundary conditions, all suitable to be employed in CFD and FSI numerical simulation.

  14. Arterial flow regulator enables transplantation and growth of human fetal kidneys in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N K; Gu, J; Gu, S; Osorio, R W; Concepcion, W; Gu, E

    2015-06-01

    Here we introduce a novel method of transplanting human fetal kidneys into adult rats. To overcome the technical challenges of fetal-to-adult organ transplantation, we devised an arterial flow regulator (AFR), consisting of a volume adjustable saline-filled cuff, which enables low-pressure human fetal kidneys to be transplanted into high-pressure adult rat hosts. By incrementally withdrawing saline from the AFR over time, blood flow entering the human fetal kidney was gradually increased until full blood flow was restored 30 days after transplantation. Human fetal kidneys were shown to dramatically increase in size and function. Moreover, rats which had all native renal mass removed 30 days after successful transplantation of the human fetal kidney were shown to have a mean survival time of 122 days compared to 3 days for control rats that underwent bilateral nephrectomy without a prior human fetal kidney transplant. These in vivo human fetal kidney models may serve as powerful platforms for drug testing and discovery.

  15. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  16. Disorder in Complex Human System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  17. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  18. Anatomy and arterial vascularization of female genital system of margay (Leopardus weidii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Braga Soares Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The margay (Leopardus wiedii belongs to Carnivora order and present’s nocturnal habits. There are few studies using this specie, whereas it is between feline species vulnerable to extinction. Thus, we propose a descriptive study about female genital system and behavior of the arteries responsible for the blood supply to these organs in margay. It used one exemplary victim of poaching that to death. The animal was stored in freezer. Subsequent to defrost at room temperature, it proceeded with the solution injection Leoprene Latex ‘650’ colored in red for better identification of vessels before the adjacent strutures. The specimen was fixed using an aqueous 10% formaldehyde with subsequent immersion in the same fixative solution. The genital system were dissected and the organs and arterial branches were identified and photodocumented. The female genital system of margay consists of a pair of ovaries, uterus with a pair of uterine horns, vagina and vulva. The arterial distribution of female system have a common vessel to iliac artery which branches and leads to internal pudendal artery sends a branch along the pudendal nerve pathway, urogenital artery. This, we performed divided into two branches, cranial and caudal. The cranial branch irrigates laterally cervix and uterine horns and caudal branch, vagina and vulva. The ovarian arteries, peers, originate from abdominal aorta only vascularization the ovaries. The female genital system and vascularization of the genitals organs of margay resembles of domestic carnivores including cats and some wild felines like the ocelot and find differences with the same description held in other domestic and wild species.

  19. Successful pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit Michael

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Mortality in pregnant patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension related to connective tissue disease is as high as 56%. The authors report the first case of a successful maternal-fetal outcome in a pregnant patient with systemic lupus erythematosus-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with sildenafil and inhaled iloprost during pregnancy and until several weeks after caesarean section. Case presentation The case presented is of a 29-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and associated severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Vasodilator therapy with bosentan and sildenafil, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine and oral anticoagulation (phenprocoumon had normalized her right ventricular over right atrial pressure when she was diagnosed in her 5th week of pregnancy. The teratogenic drugs bosentan and phenprocoumon were stopped, the latter replaced by low molecular weight heparin. During the 35th week, a slight increase in pulmonary pressure was found. Therapy with inhaled iloprost was established. A caesarean section was performed in the 37th week and a healthy baby was delivered. The patient remained stable until 11 weeks after delivery, when an increase in right ventricular over right atrial pressure was noted. Bosentan was reintroduced and prednisone and azathioprine doses were increased. The patient has remained stable until the present time. Conclusion Pulmonary arterial hypertension has been considered a contraindication for pregnancy. Novel vasodilator therapy, combined with immunosuppressants in this patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, may "cure" pulmonary arterial hypertension and permit pregnancy with successful outcome. However, postpartum exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension have to be considered.

  20. 64-MDCT imaging of the coronary arteries and systemic arterial vascular tree in a single examination: optimisation of the scan protocol and contrast-agent administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, A; Anzidei, M; Francone, M; Cavallo Marincola, B; Carbone, I; Geiger, D; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P L; Zini, C; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a 64-row multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) acquisition protocol with biphasic administration of contrast medium for comprehensive assessment of the coronary and systemic arterial tree in a single examination. The scanning protocol comprised two acquisitions: an electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated scan at the level of the heart, followed by a total-body, low-dose scan of the systemic arterial circulation. Twenty patients were evaluated using two different strategies for contrast administration. In ten patients, the delay between the two acquisitions was set at 40 s, whereas in the remaining patients, it varied between 45 s and 65 s. For both strategies, the degree of systemic arterial opacification and the attenuation gradient between arterial and venous structures were quantitatively assessed at six extracoronary locations. Two observers evaluated in consensus the presence or absence of atherosclerosis and the degree of stenosis of arterial segments. Three hundred coronary segments were analysed. Arterial-wall changes were depicted in 155 (51%) segments, and in 35 (23%), the degree of stenosis was > 50%. Of the 640 extracoronary arterial segments, 250 (39%) presented atherosclerotic wall alterations, in 50 (20%), the degree of stenosis was > 50% and five were affected by aneurysmal dilatation. The magnitude of arterial opacification values and attenuation gradients between arterial and venous structures were significantly higher in patients scanned with the 40-s fixed-delay strategy. Whole-body CT angiography with biphasic administration of contrast agent and fixed scan delay has been shown to be a feasible and reproducible technique. Comprehensive data on the global atherosclerotic burden potentially offer important therapeutic options for subclinical, high-risk segments.

  1. A Preliminary Observation of Weight Loss Following Left Gastric Artery Embolization in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Gunn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. Embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA, which preferentially supplies the gastric fundus, has been shown to produce weight loss in animal models. However, weight loss after LGA embolization in humans has not been previously established. The aim of this study was to evaluate postprocedural weight loss in patients following LGA embolization. Subjects/Methods. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who underwent LGA embolization for upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding was performed. Postprocedural weight loss in this group was compared to a control group of patients who had undergone embolization of other arteries for upper GI bleeding. Results. The experimental group (N=19 lost an average of 7.3% of their initial body weight within three months of LGA embolization, which was significantly greater than the 2% weight loss observed in the control group (N=28 (P=0.006. No significant differences were seen between the groups in preprocedural body mass index (BMI, age, postprocedural care in the intensive care unit, history of malignancy, serum creatinine, or left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions. The current data suggest that body weight in humans may be modulated via LGA embolization. Continued research is warranted with prospective studies to further investigate this phenomenon.

  2. Investigation of CGRP receptors and peptide pharmacology in human coronary arteries. Characterization with a nonpeptide antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Saetrum Opgaard, Ole; Eskesen, Karen

    2003-01-01

    in human coronary arteries. Relaxant responses were studied on isolated segments of coronary arteries after precontraction with U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-11alpha,9alpha-epoxymethano-prostaglandin F(2alpha)). The human peptides alphaCGRP, AM, and amylin induced relaxation with mean pEC50 values of 8.6, 6.......8, and 6.3 M, respectively. Preincubation with alphaCGRP(8-37) (10(-7) -10(-5) M) and a novel nonpeptide CGRP antagonist "Compound 1" (WO98/11128) (10(-7)-10(-5) M) caused a dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for alphaCGRP with pA(2) values of 7.0 and 7.1, respectively....... Preincubation with alphaCGRP(8-37) (10(-6) M) and Compound 1 (10(-6) M) caused significant rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for AM and amylin as well with pK B values between 6.6 and 7.5. Preincubation with AM(22-52) had no antagonistic effect on the AM and amylin response, neither did...

  3. Anatomic study of the dorsal arterial system of the hand Estudo anatômico do sistema arterial dorsal da mão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the dorsal arterial system of the hand received less attention than the palmar system. The studies concerning dorsal arterial anatomy present some controversies regarding the origin and presence of the dorsal metacarpal artery branches. Knowledge of the anatomy of dorsal metacarpal arteries is especially applied in the surgical planning for flaps taken from the dorsum of the hand. The purpose of this study is to analyze the arterial anatomy of the dorsum of the hand, compare our observations with those of previous studies from the literature, and therefore to define parameters for surgical planning for flaps supplied by the dorsal metacarpal arteries. METHOD: Twenty-six dissections were performed at the dorsum of the right hand of 26 cadavers by making a distal-based U-shaped incision. After catheterization of the radial artery at the wrist level, a plastic dye solution with low viscosity and quick solidification was injected to allow adequate exposure of even small vessels. The radial artery and its branches, the dorsal arterial arch, the dorsal metacarpal arteries, the distal and proximal communicating branches of the palmar system, and the distal cutaneous branches were carefully dissected and identified. RESULTS: The distal cutaneous branches originating from the dorsal metacarpal arteries were observed in all cases; these were located an average of 1.2 cm proximal from the metacarpophalangeal joint. The first dorsal metacarpal artery presented in 3 different patterns regarding its course: fascial, subfascial, and mixed. The branching pattern of the radial artery at the first intermetacarpal space was its division into 3 branches. We observed the presence of the dorsal arterial arch arising from the radial artery in 100% of the cases. The distance between the dorsal arterial arch and the branching point of the radial artery was an average of 2 cm. The first and second dorsal metacarpal arteries were visualized in all cases. The

  4. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    areas produce life long disability Problem: The combination of jet fuel and high noise environment can exacerbate hearing loss Objective: Expose...Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training Systems Interfaces and Cognitive Processes Protection, Sustainment, and Warfighter...Infrastructure, & Information Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release 4 Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training System

  5. Human-System task integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Defence research programme Human-System Task Integration aims at acquiring knowledge for the optimal cooperation between human and computer, under the following constraints: freedom of choice in decisions to automate and multiple, dynamic task distributions. This paper describe

  6. Focal adhesion kinase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides inhibit human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and promote human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-long; ZHANG Zhen-xiang; XU Yong-jian; NI Wang; CHEN Shi-xin

    2005-01-01

    Background Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays an important role in pulmonary vessel structural remodelling. At present, the mechanisms related to proliferation of PASMCs are not clear. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase. Recent research indicates that FAK is implicated in signalling pathways which regulate cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, there are no reports about the role of FAK in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs). We investigated whether FAK takes part in the intracellular signalling pathway involved in HPASMCs proliferation and apoptosis, by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to selectively suppress the expression of FAK protein.Methods Cultured HPASMCs stimulated by fibronectin (40 μg/ml) were passively transfected with ODNs, sense FAK, mismatch sense and antisense-FAK respectively. Expression of FAK, Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK 2) and caspase-3 proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blots. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analysed by flow cytometry. In addition, cytoplasmic FAK expression was detected by immunocytochemical staining.Results When compared with mismatch sense group, the protein expressions of FAK, JNK and CDK 2 in HPASMCs decreased in antisense-FAK ODNs group and increased in sense-FAK ODNs group significantly. Caspase-3 expression upregulated in HPASMCs when treated with antisense ODNs and downregulated when treated with sense ODNs. When compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase decreased significantly in sense ODNs group, while the proportion of cells at S phase increased significantly. In contrast, compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase was increased significantly in antisense-FAK ODNs group. The level of cell apoptosis in antisense-FAK group

  7. Effect of volume expansion on systemic hemodynamics and central and arterial blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1995-01-01

    and in controls. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (12 patients with Child-Turcotte class A, 14 with class B, and 13 with class C) and 6 controls were studied. During hepatic vein catheterization, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central and arterial blood volume, noncentral blood volume...... in patients with either class B or class C. Conversely, the noncentral blood volume increased in patients with class B and C. In both patients and controls, the cardiac output increased and the systemic vascular resistance decreased, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure did not change significantly......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Systemic vasodilatation in cirrhosis may lead to hemodynamic alterations with reduced effective blood volume and decreased arterial blood pressure. This study investigates the response of acute volume expansion on hemodynamics and regional blood volumes in patients with cirrhosis...

  8. Acute lead exposure increases arterial pressure: role of the renin-angiotensin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylla Ronacher Simões

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic lead exposure causes hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of acute exposure to lead on arterial pressure and elucidate the early mechanisms involved in the development of lead-induced hypertension. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar rats were treated with lead acetate (i.v. bolus dose of 320 µg/Kg, and systolic arterial pressure, diastolic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured during 120 min. An increase in arterial pressure was found, and potential roles of the renin-angiotensin system, Na(+,K(+-ATPase and the autonomic reflexes in this change in the increase of arterial pressure found were evaluated. In anesthetized rats, lead exposure: 1 produced blood lead levels of 37±1.7 µg/dL, which is below the reference blood concentration (60 µg/dL; 2 increased systolic arterial pressure (Ct: 109±3 mmHg vs Pb: 120±4 mmHg; 3 increased ACE activity (27% compared to Ct and Na(+,K(+-ATPase activity (125% compared to Ct; and 4 did not change the protein expression of the α1-subunit of Na(+,K(+-ATPase, AT(1 and AT(2. Pre-treatment with an AT(1 receptor blocker (losartan, 10 mg/Kg or an ACE inhibitor (enalapril, 5 mg/Kg blocked the lead-induced increase of arterial pressure. However, a ganglionic blockade (hexamethonium, 20 mg/Kg did not prevent lead's hypertensive effect. CONCLUSION: Acute exposure to lead below the reference blood concentration increases systolic arterial pressure by increasing angiotensin II levels due to ACE activation. These findings offer further evidence that acute exposure to lead can trigger early mechanisms of hypertension development and might be an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  9. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  10. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-21

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic (94)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((94)Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K(1) for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K(1). For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from (94)Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The

  11. Doppler colour flow mapping of fetal intracerebral arteries in the presence of central nervous system anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); R. Heydanus (Rogier); P.A. Stewart (Patricia)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe adjunctive role of Doppler colour flow mapping in the evaluation of intracerebral morphology and arterial blood flow in the presence of normal and abnormal central nervous system morphology was determined. A total of 59 fetuses with suspected central nervous system pathology between

  12. Expression of ET(A) and ET(B) receptor mRNA in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, J; Szok, D; Edvinsson, L

    2002-01-01

    The vascular effects of endothelins (ET) are in mammals mediated via two receptor subtypes, endothelin A (ET(A), mainly constrictive) and endothelin B (ET(B), mainly dilating) receptors. We have examined the presence of ET(A) and ET(B) receptor mRNA using the reverse transcription polymerase chain...... reaction (RT-PCR) in both normal human cerebral arteries and cerebral arteries from patients with cerebrovascular disease. Two vessel preparations were studied: macroscopic arteries and microvessels, the latter obtained through a sensitive separation method. In endothelial cells both ET(A) and ET......(B) receptor mRNA was detected. In almost all samples from normal cerebral arteries only ET(A) receptor mRNA was detected, whereas in vessel samples from patients with cerebrovascular disease as well as cerebral neoplasms, additional ET(B) receptor mRNA was detected significantly more frequently...

  13. The transcriptome of human epicardial, mediastinal and subcutaneous adipose tissues in men with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Guauque-Olarte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The biological functions of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT remain largely unknown. However, the proximity of EAT to the coronary arteries suggests a role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD. The objectives of this study were to identify genes differentially regulated among three adipose tissues, namely EAT, mediastinal (MAT and subcutaneous (SAT and to study their possible relationships with the development of cardiovascular diseases. METHODS AND RESULTS: Samples were collected from subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgeries. Gene expression was evaluated in the three adipose depots of six men using the Illumina® HumanWG-6 v3.0 expression BeadChips. Twenty-three and 73 genes were differentially up-regulated in EAT compared to MAT and SAT, respectively. Ninety-four genes were down-regulated in EAT compared to SAT. However, none were significantly down-regulated in EAT compared to MAT. More specifically, the expression of the adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA1, involved in myocardial ischemia, was significantly up-regulated in EAT. Levels of the prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS gene, recently associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, were significantly different in the three pairwise comparisons (EAT>MAT>SAT. The results of ADORA1 and PTGDS were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR in 25 independent subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the transcriptional profiles of EAT and MAT were similar compared to the SAT. Despite this similarity, two genes involved in cardiovascular diseases, ADORA1 and PTGDS, were differentially up-regulated in EAT. These results provide insights about the biology of EAT and its potential implication in CAD.

  14. The Transcriptome of Human Epicardial, Mediastinal and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues in Men with Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Piché, Marie-Ève; Fournier, Dominique; Mauriège, Pascale; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Background The biological functions of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) remain largely unknown. However, the proximity of EAT to the coronary arteries suggests a role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The objectives of this study were to identify genes differentially regulated among three adipose tissues, namely EAT, mediastinal (MAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) and to study their possible relationships with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Methods and Results Samples were collected from subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgeries. Gene expression was evaluated in the three adipose depots of six men using the Illumina® HumanWG-6 v3.0 expression BeadChips. Twenty-three and 73 genes were differentially up-regulated in EAT compared to MAT and SAT, respectively. Ninety-four genes were down-regulated in EAT compared to SAT. However, none were significantly down-regulated in EAT compared to MAT. More specifically, the expression of the adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA1), involved in myocardial ischemia, was significantly up-regulated in EAT. Levels of the prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) gene, recently associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, were significantly different in the three pairwise comparisons (EAT>MAT>SAT). The results of ADORA1 and PTGDS were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR in 25 independent subjects. Conclusions Overall, the transcriptional profiles of EAT and MAT were similar compared to the SAT. Despite this similarity, two genes involved in cardiovascular diseases, ADORA1 and PTGDS, were differentially up-regulated in EAT. These results provide insights about the biology of EAT and its potential implication in CAD. PMID:21603615

  15. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...... stemming from human resources - such as insight, understanding, creativity, and action - are inherently important to all innovation processes. The chapter also suggests a tentative conceptual and analytical framework for studying human resources and their development within a system of innovation approach...

  16. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    the research questions which are studied in the thesis.      Chapter 2 reviews relevant literature on systems of innovation, human capital, and skill-biased technological and organisational change. It is stated in the chapter that this thesis primarily refers to a system of innovation approach as its......Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...

  17. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  18. Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bioactive Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newcomer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under normal physiological conditions, mature human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs exhibit a “contractile” phenotype marked by low rates of proliferation and protein synthesis, but these cells possess the remarkable ability to dedifferentiate into a “synthetic” phenotype when stimulated by conditions of pathologic stress. A variety of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMU films are shown here to exhibit bioactive properties that induce distinct responses from cultured hCASMCs. Surfaces terminated with Nafion or poly(styrenesulfonic acid (PSS induce changes in the expression and organization of intracellular proteins, while a hydrophilic, zwitterionic copolymer of acrylic acid and 3-[2-(acrylamido-ethyl dimethylammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-PAEDAPS is resistant to cell attachment and suppresses the formation of key cytoskeletal components. Differential expression of heat shock protein 90 and actin is observed, in terms of both their magnitude and cellular localization, and distinct cytoplasmic patterns of vimentin are seen. The ionophore A23187 induces contraction in confluent hCASMC cultures on Nafion-terminated surfaces. These results demonstrate that PEMU coatings exert direct effects on the cytoskeletal organization of attaching hCASMCs, impeding growth in some cases, inducing changes consistent with phenotypic modulation in others, and suggesting potential utility for PEMU surfaces as a coating for coronary artery stents and other implantable medical devices.

  19. Puerarin induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in hypoxic human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs. Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs, and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O₂ conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123 fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  1. Adaptable setups for magnetic drug targeting in human muscular arteries: Design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghajani, Amirhossein; Hashemi, Soheil; Abdolali, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting has been used to steer magnetic therapeutic agents and has received much attention for capillaries and human brain arteries. In this paper, we focus on noninvasive targeting of nanoparticles in muscular arteries, in where the vessel diameter and blood flow are much challengingly higher than brain capillaries. We aim to design a low intensity magnetic field which avoids potential side effects on blood cells while steers particles with high targeting rate. The setup design procedure is considerably flexible to be used in a wide variety of large vessels. Using particle tracing, a new method is proposed to connect the geometry of the vessel under the action of targeting to the required magnetic force. Specifications of the coil which is placed outside the body are derived based on this required force. Mutual effects of coil dimensions on the produced magnetic force are elaborated and summarized in a design flowchart to be used for arbitrary muscular vessel sizes. The performance of the optimized coil is validated by in vitro experiments and it is shown that particles are steered with the average efficiency of 80.2% for various conditions.

  2. Biodegradable Polymers Influence the Effect of Atorvastatin on Human Coronary Artery Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohbach, Anne; Begunk, Robert; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan B; Sternberg, Katrin; Busch, Raila

    2016-01-22

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have reduced in-stent-restenosis drastically. Yet, the stent surface material directly interacts with cascades of biological processes leading to an activation of cellular defense mechanisms. To prevent adverse clinical implications, to date almost every patient with a coronary artery disease is treated with statins. Besides their clinical benefit, statins exert a number of pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells (ECs). Since maintenance of EC function and reduction of uncontrolled smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation represents a challenge for new generation DES, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on human coronary artery cells grown on biodegradable polymers. Our results show a cell type-dependent effect of ATOR on ECs and SMCs. We observed polymer-dependent changes in IC50 values and an altered ATOR-uptake leading to an attenuation of statin-mediated effects on SMC growth. We conclude that the selected biodegradable polymers negatively influence the anti-proliferative effect of ATOR on SMCs. Hence, the process of developing new polymers for DES coating should involve the characterization of material-related changes in mechanisms of drug actions.

  3. Biodegradable Polymers Influence the Effect of Atorvastatin on Human Coronary Artery Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Strohbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-eluting stents (DES have reduced in-stent-restenosis drastically. Yet, the stent surface material directly interacts with cascades of biological processes leading to an activation of cellular defense mechanisms. To prevent adverse clinical implications, to date almost every patient with a coronary artery disease is treated with statins. Besides their clinical benefit, statins exert a number of pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells (ECs. Since maintenance of EC function and reduction of uncontrolled smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation represents a challenge for new generation DES, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR on human coronary artery cells grown on biodegradable polymers. Our results show a cell type-dependent effect of ATOR on ECs and SMCs. We observed polymer-dependent changes in IC50 values and an altered ATOR-uptake leading to an attenuation of statin-mediated effects on SMC growth. We conclude that the selected biodegradable polymers negatively influence the anti-proliferative effect of ATOR on SMCs. Hence, the process of developing new polymers for DES coating should involve the characterization of material-related changes in mechanisms of drug actions.

  4. AN ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CORONARY ARTERY DOMINANCE IN HUMAN CADAVERIC HEARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: With ever increasing incidence of coronary heart disease, a thorough study of the coronary arteries is the need of time. AIM: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the coronary dominance pattern which will help the cardiac physicians and surgeons for better diagnosis and management of coronary arte ry disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study undertaken in the Department of Anatomy, Assam Medical College included 75 perinatal and 15 adult cadaveric human hearts which were preserved in 10% formaldehyde solution after simple dissecting procedure and the dominance was noted. RESULTS: In the present study, out of total of 90 cases the right coronary dominance was found to be present in 58 cases (64.44%.This included 34(60.71% males and 24(70.59% females. Total cases of left coronary dominance were fo und to be 22(24.45%. Among these, 15(26.79% were males and 7(20.59% were females. Finally 10(11.11% co - dominant cases were found, of which 7 cases (12.50% were males and 3 cases (8.82% were females. CONCLUSION : Thus the study revealed that most of th e cases were having right coronary predominance. KEYWORDS : Coronary arteries, Dominance .

  5. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  6. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  7. Evidence for shear stress-mediated dilation of the internal carotid artery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Howard Henry; Atkinson, Ceri L; Heinonen, Ilkka H A

    2016-01-01

    Increases in arterial carbon dioxide tension (hypercapnia) elicit potent vasodilation of cerebral arterioles. Recent studies have also reported vasodilation of the internal carotid artery during hypercapnia, but the mechanism(s) mediating this extracranial vasoreactivity are unknown. Hypercapnia ...

  8. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods......Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very...... with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K...

  9. STAT6 mediates apoptosis of human coronary arterial endothelial cells by interleukin-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yuki; Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a cytokine produced by type 2 helper T cells that has pathophysiological roles in allergic inflammation and fibrosis formation. IL-13 shares many functional properties with IL-4, which promotes apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs). We here investigated the effects of IL-13 on apoptosis using human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Assessment by WST-1 assay demonstrated that IL-13 as well as IL-4 significantly inhibited cell growth. IL-13 significantly attenuated the cell viability and induced apoptosis of HCAECs as well. Expression of mRNA for vascular endothelial cell growth factor, which maintains survival of ECs, was significantly diminished by IL-13. The effects of IL-13 and IL-4 were abolished by depletion of STAT6 using RNA interference. These results suggest that IL-13 attenuates EC viability by inducing apoptosis, and that STAT6 plays pivotal roles on IL-13- and IL-4-induced apoptosis in ECs.

  10. Perturbation of human coronary artery endothelial cell redox state and NADPH generation by methylglyoxal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E Morgan

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with elevated plasma glucose, increased reactive aldehyde formation, oxidative damage, and glycation/glycoxidation of biomolecules. Cellular detoxification of, or protection against, such modifications commonly requires NADPH-dependent reducing equivalents (e.g. GSH. We hypothesised that reactive aldehydes may modulate cellular redox status via the inhibition of NADPH-generating enzymes, resulting in decreased thiol and NADPH levels. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC were incubated with high glucose (25 mM, 24 h, 37°C, or methylglyoxal (MGO, glyoxal, or glycolaldehyde (100-500 µM, 1 h, 37°C, before quantification of intracellular thiols and NADPH-generating enzyme activities. Exposure to MGO, but not the other species examined, significantly (P<0.05 decreased total thiols (∼35%, further experiments with MGO showed significant losses of GSH (∼40% and NADPH (∼10%; these changes did not result in an immediate loss of cell viability. Significantly decreased (∼10% NADPH-producing enzyme activity was observed for HCAEC when glucose-6-phosphate or 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate were used as substrates. Cell lysate experiments showed significant MGO-dose dependent inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate-dependent enzymes and isocitrate dehydrogenase, but not malic enzyme. Analysis of intact cell or lysate proteins showed that arginine-derived hydroimidazolones were the predominant advanced glycation end-product (AGE formed; lower levels of N(ε-(carboxyethyllysine (CEL and N(ε-(carboxymethyllysine (CML were also detected. These data support a novel mechanism by which MGO exposure results in changes in redox status in human coronary artery endothelial cells, via inhibition of NADPH-generating enzymes, with resultant changes in reduced protein thiol and GSH levels. These changes may contribute to the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in diabetes-associated atherosclerosis.

  11. Mechanisms of acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in systemic arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Catherine; Lekic, Mateja; Smith, Christina L; Pusec, Carolina M; Sweazea, Karen L

    2013-10-01

    For mammals, acetylcholine (ACh) promotes endothelium-dependent vasodilation primarily through nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-mediated pathways, with varying reliance on endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. Currently, no studies have been conducted on small systemic arteries from wild birds. We hypothesized that ACh-mediated vasodilation of isolated small arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) would likewise depend on endothelial-derived factors. Small resistance mesenteric and cranial tibial (c. tibial) arteries (80-150 μm, inner diameter) were cannulated and pre-constricted to 50 % of resting inner diameter with phenylephrine then exposed to increasing concentrations of ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) or the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10(-12)-10(-3) M). For mesenteric arteries, ACh-mediated vasodilation was significantly blunted with the potassium channel antagonist tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 10 mM); whereas responses were only moderately impaired with endothelial disruption or inhibition of prostaglandins (indomethacin, 10 μM). In contrast, endothelial disruption as well as exposure to TEA largely abolished vasodilatory responses to ACh in c. tibial arteries while no effect of prostaglandin inhibition was observed. For both vascular beds, responses to ACh were moderately dependent on the NO signaling pathway. Inhibition of NO synthase had no impact, despite complete reversal of phenylephrine-mediated tone with SNP, whereas inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) caused minor impairments. Endothelium-independent vasodilation also relied on potassium channels. In summary, ACh-mediated vasodilation of mesenteric and c. tibial arteries occurs through the activation of potassium channels to induce hyperpolarization with moderate reliance on sGC. Prostaglandins likewise play a small role in the vasodilatory response to ACh in mesenteric arteries.

  12. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  13. Examining human-system interactions: The HSYS (Human SYStem) methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Harbour, J.L.; Sullivan, C.; Hallbert, B.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    HSYS is a model-based methodology developed to examine the many factors which influence Human-SYStem interactions. HSYS is built around a linear model of human performance, called the Input-Action model, which describes five sequential steps: Input Detection, Input Understanding, Action Selection, Action Planning, and Action Execution. HSYS is structured in an hierarchical tree which presents a logical structure for examining potential areas where human performance, hardware or other system components are less than adequate. The HSYS tree consists of five major branches which correspond to the five major components of the Input-Action model. Initial validation was begun by studying accident reports via HSYS and identifying sources of error. The validation process has continued with accident investigations in operational settings. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Evidence-based detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis: the DETECT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coghlan, J.G.; Denton, C.P.; Grunig, E.; Bonderman, D.; Distler, O.; Khanna, D.; Muller-Ladner, U.; Pope, J.E.; Vonk, M.C.; Doelberg, M.; Chadha-Boreham, H.; Heinzl, H.; Rosenberg, D.M.; McLaughlin, V.V.; Seibold, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Earlier detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a leading cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), facilitates earlier treatment. The objective of this study was to develop the first evidence-based detection algorithm for PAH in SSc. METHODS: In this cross-sectional, intern

  15. Effect of volume expansion on systemic hemodynamics and central and arterial blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    and in controls. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (12 patients with Child-Turcotte class A, 14 with class B, and 13 with class C) and 6 controls were studied. During hepatic vein catheterization, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central and arterial blood volume, noncentral blood volume...

  16. Blood supply of the posterior cerebral artery by the carotid system on angiograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, JCF; Franke, CL; Soeterboek, AAJGM; Versteege, CWM; Ramos, LMP; van Gijn, J

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose Occipital lobe infarcts are traditionally attributed to vertebrobasilar disease. However, anatomical studies indicate that in some people the supply of the posterior cerebral artery is via the carotid system. We investigated how often such a developmental variant in the cerebr

  17. Evidence-based detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis: the DETECT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coghlan, J.G.; Denton, C.P.; Grunig, E.; Bonderman, D.; Distler, O.; Khanna, D.; Muller-Ladner, U.; Pope, J.E.; Vonk, M.C.; Doelberg, M.; Chadha-Boreham, H.; Heinzl, H.; Rosenberg, D.M.; McLaughlin, V.V.; Seibold, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Earlier detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a leading cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), facilitates earlier treatment. The objective of this study was to develop the first evidence-based detection algorithm for PAH in SSc. METHODS: In this cross-sectional,

  18. Bronchial artery and non-bronchial systemic artery embolization for the treatment in patients with hemoptysis: analysis of efficacy of gelfoam single use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seok Kyun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To investigate the efficacy of Gelfoam single use for the management of hemoptysis by analyzing patients with recurrence in embolized artery and other artery, respectively. Between 1992 and 2000, 131 patients (104 men and 27 women, mean age: 54.4 years) with hemoptysis underwent BAE using gelatin sponge only. After puncturing the femoral artery using the Seldinger method, angiographies of the thoracic aorta, the bronchial arteries, the intercostal arteries, and the systemic collaterals which were suspected of bleeding focus and embolization were performed. Gelfoam was used 1 x 3 mm and 2 x 3 mm or 2 x 5mm by the diameter of feeding arteries. The cumulative hemoptysis control rate and recurrence rate were analyzed from the previously embolized vessels. Hemoptysis were recurred among 34 of 131 patients. Twenty-two patients had a recurrence from the same vessels and 12 from the different ones. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, the cumulative hemoptysis control rate was obtained in the patients with a recurrence from the same vessels: 88.8% in 1 month, 79.9% in 1 year, and 77.3% in 2 year. The reasons for recurrences of the same lesions are as follows; due to the tortuosity of the vessel (n=3); partial embolization through the common trunk formation between bronchial and anterior spinal artery (n=3); by vessel spasms or autogenous thrombus (n=2); due to the contrast media hypersensitivity (n=1). These 9 patients were not treated successfully. In the remaining 13 cases, hemoptysis were recurred due to recanalization of embolized vessels. Among 161 procedure, complications consisted of fever (n=8), dyspnea (n=8), mild chest discomfort (n=7), lower back pain (n=1), and transient lower leg paralysis (n=1), which were improved within several days. There was no serious complication in this study. Bronchial artery embolization using Gelfoam alone maybe effective and safe to control hemoptysis.

  19. Proteomic analysis of the effect of iptakalim on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia YANG; Zhengxia LIU; Shu ZHANG; Yu JING; Shijiang ZHANG; Weiping XIE; Lei MA; Changliang ZHU; Hong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of iptakalim (Ipt),a newly selective KATP channel opener,in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) using proteomic analysis.Methods: Human PASMCs were incubated with ET-1 (10-8 mol/L) and ETA (10-8 mol/L) plus iptaklim (10-5 mol/L) for 24 h.Analysis via 2-DE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was employed to display the different protein profiles of whole-cell protein from cultures of control,ET-1 treatment alone,and treatment with ET-1 and iptaklim combined.Real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the proteomic analysis.Results: When iptakalim inhibited the proliferative effect of ET-1 in human PASMCs by opening the KATP channels,the expression of different groups of cellular proteins was changed,including cytoskeleton-associated proteins,plasma mem-brane proteins and receptors,chaperone proteins,ion transport-associated proteins,and glycolytic and metabolism-associ-ated proteins.We found that iptakalim could inhibit the proliferation of human PASMCs partly by affecting the expression of Hsp60,vimentin,nucleoporin P54 (NUP54) and Bcl-XL by opening the KATP channel.Conclusion: The data suggest that a wide range of signaling pathways may be involved in abolishing ET-1-induced prolif-eration of human PASMCs following iptakalim treatment.

  20. Dynamic Changes of Pulmonary Arterial Pressure and Ductus Arteriosus in Human Newborns From Birth to 72 Hours of Age

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Normal pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary hypertension assessment of newborns is rarely reported. The aim of the study is to explore dynamic changes of pulmonary arterial pressure and ductus arteriosus in human newborns from birth to 72 h of age with echocardiography. A total of 76 cases of normal newborns were prospectively detected by echocardiography after birth of 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, respectively. Ductus arteriosus diameter, blood shunt direction, blood flo...

  1. Anatomy of the Ophthalmic Artery: Embryological Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOMA, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    There are considerable variations in the anatomy of the human ophthalmic artery (OphA), such as anomalous origins of the OphA and anastomoses between the OphA and the adjacent arteries. These anatomical variations seem to attribute to complex embryology of the OphA. In human embryos and fetuses, primitive dorsal and ventral ophthalmic arteries (PDOphA and PVOphA) form the ocular branches, and the supraorbital division of the stapedial artery forms the orbital branches of the OphA, and then numerous anastomoses between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the external carotid artery (ECA) systems emerge in connection with the OphA. These developmental processes can produce anatomical variations of the OphA, and we should notice these variations for neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures. PMID:27298261

  2. The role of external Ca²⁺ in the action of Ca²⁺-channel agonists and antagonists on isolated human thoracic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaliene, V; Barsys, V; Giedraitis, S; Benetis, R; Krauze, A

    2014-02-01

    In systemic atherosclerosis develops the abnormal vascular tone which is associated with elevated calcium influx into smooth muscle cells and their calcification that may be proportional to the extent and severity of atherosclerotic disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the responses of isolated human arterial samples to Ca²⁺-channel agonists and antagonists by varying the external Ca²⁺ concentration. Two dihydropyridine type calcium-channel blockers, amlodipine and cerebrocrast, were used in this study. The benzodiazepine-type calcium-channel blocker diltiazem, the benzimidazole derivative 1-acetyl-5,6-dimethoxy-2-methylthiobenzimidazole and 3,4'-bipyridine derivative milrinone were also used. Experiments were carried out on isolated human thoracic artery samples obtained from 74 patients, aged 38-88 years, during conventional myocardial revascularisation operations. The contraction of artery samples was recorded using an iFOT10 force transducer. Cumulative concentration-contraction curves of the tested agents (10⁻⁷ to 10⁻⁴ M) were established by varying the external Ca²⁺ concentration from 0.9 mM to 2.7 mM. Cerebrocrast, regardless of the Ca²⁺ concentration significantly increased arterial contraction, particularly at the lower Ca²⁺ (≈77%). Diltiazem, the benzimidazole derivative and milrinone caused the artery samples to relax at 10⁻⁴ M concentrations by 55%, 55% and 44%, respectively, when the external Ca²⁺ corresponded to the physiological standard. Shifting to lower or higher Ca²⁺ concentrations significantly altered the response of vessel samples by increasing their contraction. In conclusion, the present study shows that the response of isolated human thoracic artery samples to both the slow calcium channel suppressant diltiazem and to agonists of that channel (milrinone and the benzimidazole derivative) is regulated by the amount of calcium present in the physiological solution. Treatment with a slow

  3. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  4. ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION IN SYSTEMIC VASCULITIS: CLINICAL FEATURES AND PRINCIPLES OF PATHOGENETIC THERAPY. PART II. POSSIBILITIES OF OPTIMIZING OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Praskurnichy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of arterial hypertension in systemic vasculitis. Data on the principles of antihypertensive treatment of systemic vasculitis are presented. The possibilities of pharmacotherapy and surgical treatment of these diseases are discussed separately.

  5. Ghrelin-related peptides do not modulate vasodilator nitric oxide production or superoxide levels in mouse systemic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Sleeman, Mark W; Sobey, Christopher G; Andrews, Zane B; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-04-01

    The ghrelin gene is expressed in the stomach where it ultimately encodes up to three peptides, namely, acylated ghrelin, des-acylated ghrelin and obestatin, which all have neuroendocrine roles. Recently, the authors' reported that these peptides have important physiological roles in positively regulating vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) production in the cerebral circulation, and may normally suppress superoxide production by the pro-oxidant enzyme, Nox2-NADPH oxidase. To date, the majority of studies using exogenous peptides infer that they may have similar roles in the systemic circulation. Therefore, this study examined whether exogenous and endogenous ghrelin-related peptides modulate NO production and superoxide levels in mouse mesenteric arteries and/or thoracic aorta. Using wire myography, it was found that application of exogenous acylated ghrelin, des-acylated ghrelin or obestatin to mouse thoracic aorta or mesenteric arteries failed to elicit a vasorelaxation response, whereas all three peptides elicited vasorelaxation responses of rat thoracic aorta. Also, none of the peptides modulated mouse aortic superoxide levels as measured by L-012-enhanced chemiluminescence. Next, it was found that NO bioactivity and superoxide levels were unaffected in the thoracic aorta from ghrelin-deficient mice when compared with wild-type mice. Lastly, using novel GHSR-eGFP reporter mice in combination with double-labelled immunofluorescence, no evidence was found for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) in the throracic aorta, which is the only functional ghrelin receptor identified to date. Collectively these findings demonstrate that, in contrast to systemic vessels of other species (e.g. rat and human) and mouse cerebral vessels, ghrelin-related peptides do not modulate vasodilator NO production or superoxide levels in mouse systemic arteries.

  6. Penetration of an artificial arterial thromboembolism in a live animal using an intravascular therapeutic microrobot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Semi; Choi, Hyunchul; Go, Gwangjun; Lee, Cheong; Lim, Kyung Seob; Sim, Doo Sun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-04-01

    The biomedical applications of wireless robots are an active area of study. In addition to moving to a target lesion, wireless locomotive robots can deliver a therapeutic drug for a specific disease. Thus, they hold great potential as therapeutic devices in blood vessel diseases, such as thrombi and occlusions, and in other diseases, such as cancer and inflammation. During a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), surgeons wear a heavy shielding cloth. However, they cannot escape severe radiation exposure owing to unstable shielding. They may also suffer from joint pains because of the weight of the shielding cloth. In addition, the catheters in PCIs are controlled by the surgeon's hand. Thus, they lack steering ability. A new intravascular therapeutic system is needed to address these problems in conventional PCIs. We developed an intravascular therapeutic microrobot system (ITMS) using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system with bi-plane X-ray devices that can remotely control a robot in blood vessels. Using this proposed ITMS, we demonstrated the locomotion of the robot in abdominal and iliac arteries of a live pig by the master-slave method. After producing an arterial thromboembolism in a live pig in a partial iliac artery, the robot moved to the target lesion and penetrated by specific motions (twisting and hammering) of the robot using the proposed ITMS. The results reveal that the proposed ITMS can realize stable locomotion (alignment and propulsion) of a robot in abdominal and iliac arteries of a live pig. This can be considered the first preclinical trial of the treatment of an artificial arterial thromboembolism by penetration of a blood clot.

  7. Factors influencing the diameter of human anterior and posterior intercostal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, David R; Khuder, Sadik A; Lane, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    At present, there have not been any detailed studies examining the size relationships of the intercostal arteries. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the vessel lumenal diameter of ipsilateral, paired anterior and posterior IC arteries, as well as with the length of the IC space supplied by each artery. Samples were collected from the second-sixth anterior and posterior IC arteries near their site of origin, and the lengths of the corresponding IC spaces were measured in 42 cadavers. Lumenal diameters of both the anterior and posterior IC arteries at consecutive IC space closely followed second degree polynomial regression models (R(2) = 0.9655, and R(2) = 0.9741, respectively), and reached maximum size at the fifth IC space, which was found to be the longest of the IC spaces. No direct relationship was observed between diameters of the paired anterior and posterior IC arteries, although there was a trend for the larger anterior IC arteries to be paired with the larger posterior IC arteries. The calculated rate of blood flow at each IC artery was approximately two-fold greater in males than in females. These results suggest that the length of the IC space, and hence the extent of the thoracic wall supplied, is a major factor in determining the diameter of both anterior and posterior IC arteries. Since COPD is such a prevalent disease, this study also examined its influence on the IC arteries, and found that the posterior IC arteries are significantly larger among afflicted subjects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Use of the Stingray Re-Entry System in Two Complex Cases of Occluded Superficial Femoral Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Galbraith, Erin M.; Marc Del Rosario; Khusrow Niazi

    2011-01-01

    Totally occluded infrainguinal arterial disease presents formidable challenges to endovascular revascularization. A variety of devices have been made available to make the crossing of these lesions more amenable to endovascular techniques. We discuss the novel use of a device that has been developed for crossing occluded coronary arteries, the Stingray Re-Entry System.

  9. Use of the Stingray Re-Entry System in Two Complex Cases of Occluded Superficial Femoral Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Galbraith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Totally occluded infrainguinal arterial disease presents formidable challenges to endovascular revascularization. A variety of devices have been made available to make the crossing of these lesions more amenable to endovascular techniques. We discuss the novel use of a device that has been developed for crossing occluded coronary arteries, the Stingray Re-Entry System.

  10. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  11. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  12. Physiological and pharmacological characterization of transmembrane acid extruders in cultured human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunng-Shinng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracellular pH (pH i is a pivotal factor for cellular functions and homeostasis. Apart from passive intracellular buffering capacity, active transmembrane transporters responsible for kinetic changes of pH i impacts. Acid extrusion transporters such as Na + /H + exchanger (NHE and Na + /HCO3− cotransporter (NBC have been found to be activated when cells are in an acidic condition in different cell types. However, such far, the pH i regulators have not been characterized in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs. Materials and Methods: We, therefore, investigated the mechanism of pH i recovery from intracellular acidosis, induced by NH 4 Cl-prepulse, using pH-sensitive fluorescence dye: 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxethyl-5(6-carboxy-fluorescein in HUASMCs. Cultured HUASMCs were derived from the segments of the human umbilical artery that were obtained from women undergoing children delivery. Results: The resting pH i is 7.23 ± 0.03 when cells in HEPES (nominally HCO 3− -free buffered solution. The resting pH i is higher as 7.27 ± 0.03 when cells in CO 2 /HCO3− -buffered solution. In HEPES-buffered solution, a pH i recovery following induced intracellular acidosis could be inhibited completely by 30 μM HOE 694 (a specific NHE inhibitor or by removing [Na +]o . In 5% CO2/HCO3− -buffered solution, 30 μM HOE 694 slowed the pH i recovery from the induced intracellular acidosis only. On the contrary, HOE 694 adding together with 0.2 mM 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (a specific NBC inhibitor or removal of [Na +]o entirely blocked the acid extrusion. By using Western blot technique, we demonstrated that four different isoforms of NBC, that is, SLC4A8 (NBCBE, SLC4A7 (NBCn1, SLC4A5 (NBCe2 and SLC4A4 (NBCe1, co-exist in the HUASMCs. Conclusions: We demonstrate, for the 1 st time, that apart from the housekeeping NHE1, another Na + couple HCO3− -transporter, that is, NBC, functionally coexists to

  13. Coexistence of at least three distinct beta-adrenoceptors in human internal mammary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, M; Omrani, G; Mahmoudian, M

    2000-01-01

    The internal mammary artery (IMA) is currently the preferred conduit for myocardial revascularization. However, perioperative vasospasm and a hypoperfusion state during maximal exercise may limit its use as a bypass graft. The mechanism of spasm has not been clearly defined. Since beta-adrenoceptor activation plays a major role in vasorelaxation, the present study was carried out to investigate the beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness of human IMA smooth muscle. Isoproterenol produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded IMA segments, precontracted with phenylephrine (maximal relaxation 46.33+/-5.45%). Atenolol (10(-6)M) and propranolol (2x10(-7)M) inhibited isoproterenol-induced relaxation. While atenolol produced partial inhibition, propranolol caused a complete inhibition in a majority of the segments and a partial inhibition in a minority. BRL 37344, a selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings of endothelium-denuded IMA (maximal relaxation 40.35+/-4.07%). Cyanopindolol, a beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist, produced a marked relaxation (58.65+/-6.2%) in endothelium-denuded IMA rings, precontracted with phenylephrine. Cyanopindolol-induced relaxation was resistant to blockade by propranolol (2x10(-7)M). Spontaneous contractions of IMA rings were also observed in some cases that were inhibited by isoproterenol and BRL 37344. This observation implies the important role of beta-adrenoceptor activation in prevention of human IMA spasm. The results obtained in present study indicate that human IMA smooth muscle possesses an atypical beta-adrenoceptor together with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors. Regarding the relaxation induced in IMA rings by adding BRL 37344, the possible identical entities of IMA atypical beta-adrenoceptors and beta 3-adrenoceptors are suggested.

  14. Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity under orthostatic stress in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi eIchinose

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained against the orthostatic stress caused by gravity’s effect on the fluid distribution within the body are important issues in physiology, especially in humans who usually adopt an upright posture. Peripheral vasoconstriction and increased heart rate are major cardiovascular adjustments to orthostatic stress and comprise part of the reflex response elicited via the carotid sinus and aortic baroreceptors (arterial baroreflex: ABR and cardiopulmonary stretch receptors (cardiopulmonary baroreflex. In a series of studies, we have been characterizing the ABR-mediated regulation of cardiovascular hemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA while applying orthostatic stress in humans. We have found that under orthostatic stress, dynamic carotid baroreflex responses are modulated as exemplified by the increases in the MSNA, blood pressure and heart rate responses elicited by carotid baroreflex unloading and the shorter period of MSNA suppression, comparable reduction and faster recovery of MAP and greater heart rate response to carotid baroreflex stimulation. Our results also show that ABR-mediated beat-to-beat control over burst incidence, burst strength and total MSNA is progressively modulated as orthostatic stress is increased until induction of syncope, and that the sensitivity of ABR control over the aforementioned MSNA variables is substantially reduced during the development of syncope. We suggest that in humans, the modulation of ABR function under orthostatic stress may be one of the mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained and orthostatic hypotension limited, and impairment of ABR control over sympathetic vasomotor activity leads to the severe hypotension associated with orthostatic syncope.

  15. Dysregulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system contributes to pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Man, Frances; Tu, Ly; Handoko, Louis; Rain, Silvia; Ruiter, Gerrina; François, Charlène; Schalij, Ingrid; Dorfmüller, Peter; Simonneau, Gérald; Fadel, Elie; Perros, Frederic; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Piet; Van Der Velden, Jolanda; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Humbert, Marc; Eddahibi, Saadia; Guignabert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH) often have a low cardiac output. To compensate, neurohormonal systems like renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system are upregulated but this may have long-term negative effects on the progression of iPAH. Objectives Assess systemic and pulmonary RAAS-activity in iPAH-patients and determine the efficacy of chronic RAAS-inhibition in experimental PAH. Measurements and Main Results We collected 79 blood samples from 58 iPAH-patients in the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam (between 2004–2010), to determine systemic RAAS-activity. We observed increased levels of renin, angiotensin (Ang) I and AngII, which was associated with disease progression (p<0.05) and mortality (p<0.05). To determine pulmonary RAAS-activity, lung specimens were obtained from iPAH-patients (during lung transplantation, n=13) and controls (during lobectomy or pneumonectomy for cancer, n=14). Local RAAS-activity in pulmonary arteries of iPAH-patients was increased, demonstrated by elevated ACE-activity in pulmonary endothelial cells and increased AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor expression and signaling. In addition, local RAAS- upregulation was associated with increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via enhanced AT1-receptor signaling in iPAH-patients compared to controls. Finally, to determine the therapeutic potential of RAAS-activity, we assessed the chronic effects of an AT1-receptor antagonist (losartan) in the monocrotaline PAH-rat model (60 mg/kg). Losartan delayed disease progression, decreased RV afterload and pulmonary vascular remodeling and restored right ventricular-arterial coupling in PAH-rats. Conclusions Systemic and pulmonary RAAS-activities are increased in iPAH-patients and associated with increased pulmonary vascular remodeling. Chronic inhibition of RAAS by losartan is beneficial in experimental PAH. PMID:22859525

  16. [Radionuclide evaluation of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesian, N M; Babaian, A S; Mikaelian, R S; Mnatsakanian, E L

    1986-08-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage I-IIA HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage IIB-III HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The transition of one hemodynamic type into another and its detection acquired a great importance. The definition of the types of hemodynamics at rest and of effort was very important in terms of adequate antihypertensive therapy and the prediction of a subsequent course of disease. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radio-angiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing.

  17. Optical coherence tomography evaluation of pulmonary arterial vasculopathy in Systemic Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Johannes P.; Loder, Christopher D.; Dobarro, David; Kaier, Thomas; Reddecliffe, Sally; Schreiber, Benjamin E.; Handler, Clive; Denton, Christopher P.; Coghlan, John G.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease is incomplete, since information about alterations of the pulmonary vasculature in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is primarily provided by autopsy or tissue specimens. The aim of this study was to compare the distal pulmonary vasculature of <2 mm in diameter in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients with (n = 17) and without (n = 5) associated PAH using Optical Coherence Tomography during Right Heart catheterization. SSc-PAH patients showed significant thickening of Intima Media Thickening Area compared to patients without PAH (27 +/− 5.8% vs. 21 +/− 1.4%, p = 0.024). A good haemodynamic response to previous targeted PAH treatment was associated with a significantly greater number of small pulmonary artery side branches <300 μm per cm vessel (3.8 +/− 1.1 vs. 1.8 +/− 1.1; p = 0.010) and not associated with Intima Media thickening Area (26 +/− 5.4% vs. 28 +/− 6.7%; p = 0.6). Unexpected evidence of pulmonary artery thrombus formation was found in 19% of SSc-PAH patients. This is the first in-vivo study demonstrating a direct link between a structural abnormality of pulmonary arteries and a response to targeted treatment in PAH. Intravascular imaging may identify subgroups that may benefit from anticoagulation. PMID:28233825

  18. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Silva Neto, Eulâmpio José; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. PMID:26811552

  19. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Aires Araujo Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS, as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5% and 2 (3.3% patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08. A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS.

  20. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Silva Neto, Eulampio Jose; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials And Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. (author)

  1. Adrenomedullin is a potent inhibitor of angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Kano, H; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Hanehira, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-06-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. In the current study, we examined the possible interaction of adrenomedullin, a novel vasorelaxant peptide, and angiotensin II (Ang II) on human coronary artery SMC migration using Boyden's chamber method. Ang II stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(6) and 10(8) mol/L. This stimulation was clearly blocked by the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the type 2 receptor antagonist PD 123319. The migration stimulatory effect of Ang II was chemotactic in nature for cultured human coronary artery SMCs but was not chemokinetic. Human adrenomedullin clearly inhibited Ang II-induced migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Human adrenomedullin stimulated cAMP formation in these cells. Inhibition by adrenomedullin of Ang II-induced SMC migration was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cAMP. 8-Bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibited the Ang II-induced SMC migration. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates SMC migration via type 1 receptors in human coronary artery and adrenomedullin inhibits Ang II-induced migration at least partly through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. Taken together with the finding that adrenomedullin is synthesized in and secreted from vascular endothelial cells, this peptide may play a role as a local antimigration factor in certain pathological conditions.

  2. Repeated increases in blood flow, independent of exercise, enhance conduit artery vasodilator function in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naylor, L.H.; Carter, H.; Fitzsimons, M.G.; Cable, N.T.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the importance of repeated increases in blood flow to conduit artery adaptation, using an exercise-independent repeated episodic stimulus. Recent studies suggest that exercise training improves vasodilator function of conduit arteries via shear stress-mediated

  3. An advanced computational bioheat transfer model for a human body with an embedded systemic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Boileau, Etienne; Parthimos, Dimitris; Nithiarasu, Perumal

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, an elaborate one-dimensional thermofluid model for a human body is presented. By contrast to the existing pure conduction-/perfusion-based models, the proposed methodology couples the arterial fluid dynamics of a human body with a multi-segmental bioheat model of surrounding solid tissues. In the present configuration, arterial flow is included through a network of elastic vessels. More than a dozen solid segments are employed to represent the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues, and each segment is constituted by a multilayered circular cylinder. Such multi-layers allow flexible delineation of the geometry and incorporation of properties of different tissue types. The coupling of solid tissue and fluid models requires subdivision of the arterial circulation into large and small arteries. The heat exchange between tissues and arterial wall occurs by convection in large vessels and by perfusion in small arteries. The core region, including the heart, provides the inlet conditions for the fluid equations. In the proposed model, shivering, sweating, and perfusion changes constitute the basis of the thermoregulatory system. The equations governing flow and heat transfer in the circulatory system are solved using a locally conservative Galerkin approach, and the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues is solved using a standard implicit backward Euler method. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed model, temperature field evolutions are monitored at different points of the arterial tree and in the surrounding tissue layers. To study the differences due to flow-induced convection effects on thermal balance, the results of the current model are compared against those of the widely used modelling methodologies. The results show that the convection significantly influences the temperature distribution of the solid tissues in the vicinity of the arteries. Thus, the inner convection has a more predominant role in the human body heat

  4. Human nervous system function emulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform.

  5. Anterior temporal artery tap to identify systemic interference using short-separation NIRS measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sood, Mehak; Jindal, Utkarsh; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate neural activity. Neural activity has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF) that supplies glucose via neurovascular coupling. Therefore, noninvasive and continuous monitoring...... identify systemic interference using this short-separation NIRS. Moreover, NIRS-EEG joint-imaging during anodal tDCS was used to measure changes in mean cerebral haemoglobin oxygen saturation (rSO2) along with changes in the log-transformed mean-power of EEG within 0.5 Hz-11.25 Hz. We found that percent...... change in the mean rSO2 better correlated with the corresponding percent change in log-transformed mean-power of EEG within 0.5 Hz-11.25 Hz frequency band after removing the systemic contamination using the temporal artery tap method. Based on our findings, we propose that anterior temporal artery tap...

  6. Effects of Dietary Decosahexaenoic Acid (Dha) on eNOS in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Charles L.; Stice, James P.; Hart, C. Michael; Mbai, Fiona N.; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in heart disease, and may reduce functional capacity via attenuations in peripheral blood flow. Dietary DHA may improve this dysfunction, but the mechanism is unknown. We determined if DHA enhances expression and activity of eNOS in cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). HCAEC from 4 donors were treated with 5 nM, 50 nM, or 1 μM DHA for 7 days to model chronic DHA exposure. A trend for increased expression of eNOS and phospho-eNOS was observed with 5 and 50 nM DHA. DHA also enhanced expression of two proteins instrumental in activation of eNOS; phospho-Akt (5 and 50 nM) and HSP90 (50 nM and 1 μM). VEGF-induced activation of Akt increased NOx in treated (50 nM DHA) vs. untreated HCAEC (9.2±1.0 vs. 3.3±1.1 μmols/μg protein/μl). Findings suggest that DHA enhances eNOS and Akt activity, augments HSP90 expression, and increases NO bioavailability in response to Akt kinase activation PMID:18682551

  7. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: study of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousada, Guillermo; Baloira, Adolfo; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Valverde, Diana

    2016-04-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and progressive disease that can be inherited as autosomal dominant form. The BMPR2, ACVRL1 and ENG genes are main genes involved in the pathology. PAH associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is another rare disease with a low incidence, prevalence and survival. The main objective of this analysis was to study the clinical and molecular characteristics of PAH associated to HIV patients. We present 4 cases of HIV patients who developed PAH and have been treated with ambrisentan. Pathogenic mutations have been identify in analyzed genes in 3 of the four analyzed patients. In addition, these patients present other changes classified as benign after a thorough in silico analysis. We identified some changes in genetic modifiers that predispose to these patients to more severe phenotype. The clinical analysis can help to define monitoring for these patients and the administration of appropriate treatment. These patients also have shown several pathogenic mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Human brain: reliability and reproducibility of pulsed arterial spin-labeling perfusion MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Geon-Ho; Song, Enmin; Zhu, Xiao-Ping; Matson, Gerald B; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2005-03-01

    The Committee of Human Research of the University of California San Francisco approved this study, and all volunteers provided written informed consent. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the global and regional reliability and reproducibility of noninvasive brain perfusion measurements obtained with different pulsed arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and to determine the extent to which within-subject variability and random noise limit reliability and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined twice within 2 hours. The pulsed ASL methods compared in this study differ mainly with regard to magnetization transfer and eddy current effects. There were two main results: (a) Pulsed ASL MR imaging consistently had high measurement reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.75) and reproducibility (coefficients of variation less than 8.5%), and (b) random noise rather than within-subject variability limited reliability and reproducibility. It was concluded that low signal-to-noise ratios substantially limit the reliability and reproducibility of perfusion measurements.

  9. Colocalization of Serum Amyloid A with Microtubules in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Lakota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA acts as a major acute phase protein and represents a sensitive and accurate marker of inflammation. Besides its hepatic origin, as the main source of serum SAA, this protein is also produced extrahepatically. The mRNA levels of SAA become significantly elevated following proinflammatory stimuli, as well as, are induced through their own positive feedback in human primary coronary artery endothelial cells. However, the intracellular functions of SAA are so far unknown. Colocalization of SAA with cytoskeletal filaments has previously been proposed, so we analyzed the colocalization of SAA with all three cytoskeletal elements: actin filaments, vimentin filaments, and microtubules. Immunofluorescent double-labeling analyses confirmed by PLA method revealed a strict colocalization of SAA with microtubules and a very infrequent attachment to vimentin while the distribution of actin filaments appeared clearly separated from SAA staining. Also, no significant colocalization was found between SAA and endomembranes labeled with the fluorescent lipid stain DiO6. However, SAA appears to be located also unbound in the cytosol, as well as inside the nucleus and within nanotubes extending from the cells or bridging neighboring cells. These different locations of SAA in endothelial cells strongly indicate multiple potential functions of this protein.

  10. Markers of inflammation collocate with increased wall stress in human coronary arterial plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallow, Karen Melissa; Taylor, W Robert; Rachev, Alexander; Vito, Raymond Peter

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that spatial relationships exist between the local mechanical environment and inflammatory marker expression in atherosclerotic plaques, and that these relationships are plaque-progression dependent. Histologic cross-sections were collected at regular intervals along the length of diseased human coronary arteries and classified as early, intermediate, advanced, or mature based on their morphological features. For each cross-section, the spatial distribution of stress was determined using a 2D heterogeneous finite element model, and the corresponding distribution of selected inflammatory markers (macrophages, matrix metalloproteinase-1 [MMP-1], and nuclear factor-kappa B [NF-κB]) were determined immunohistochemically. We found a monotonic spatial relationship between mechanical stress and activated NF-κB that was consistent in all stages of plaque progression. We also identified progression-dependent relationships between stress and both macrophage presence and MMP-1 expression. These findings add to our understanding of the role of mechanical stress in stimulating the inflammatory response, and help explain how mechanical factors may regulate complex biological changes in remodeling.

  11. [False arterial aneurysms of celiac trunk system in patients with chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriger, A G; Kokov, L S; Karmazanovskiĭ, G G; Kuntsevich, G I; Fedorov, V D; Barbin, P B; Tarbaeva, N V

    2008-01-01

    20 patients with chronic pancreatitis complicated by development of false aneurysms of arteries in celiac trunk system were observed. Diagnostics utilities included ultrasound study, contrasted computed tomography and angiography. Two types of aneurysms are distinguished: parencchymal and pseudocysts. Radioendovascular operation is the method of choice for aneurism treatment. Surgical treatment is carried out in case of aneurism rupture with voluminous bleeding or on necessity of elimination other complications of chronic pancreatitis (pseudocyst, pancreatic hypertension, wirsungolithiasis).

  12. [Systemic arterial hypertension in México. A consensus to mitigate its comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Given that systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is the most common illness presented by the adults who come to primary care in México, in this supplement a group of cardiologists, as well as other specialists, from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) offer a systematic review, a critical analysis, and a national consensus of guidelines as a frame of reference to the daily clinical practice in order to mitigate SAH in México.

  13. Effect of Nateglinide and Glibenclamide on Endothelial Cells and Smooth Muscle Cells from Human Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeger H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the effect of nateglinide and glibenclamide, two different substances used for therapy of diabetes mellitus type 2, were investigated on the synthesis of markers of endothelial function and on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in vitro. As cell models endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human coronary arteries were used. Both substances were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 mmol/l. As markers of endothelial function prostacyclin, endothelin and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 were tested. Nateglinide and glibenclamide were similarly able to inhibit endothelial endothelin and PAI-1 synthesis, but only at the highest concentration tested. Endothelial prostacyclin synthesis and proliferation of smooth muscle cells were not significantly changed by both substances. These results indicate that both nateglinide and glibenclamide may have potential in reducing negative long-term effects of diabetes such as atherogenesis. Kurzfassung: Effekt von Nateglinid und Glibenclamid auf Endothel- und Muskelzellen humaner Koronararterien. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Wirkung von Nateglinid und Glibenclamid, zweier unterschiedlicher Substanzen zur Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus Typ 2, auf die Synthese von Markern der Endothelfunktion und auf die Proliferation glatter Muskelzellen untersucht. Als Zellmodell dienten Endothelzellen und glatte Muskelzellen menschlicher Koronararterien. Beide Substanzen wurden in den Konzentrationen 0,1, 1 und 10 mmol/l getestet. Als Marker der Endothelfunktion dienten Prostazyklin, Endothelin und Plasminogen-Aktivator-Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Sowohl Nateglinid als auch Glibenclamid konnten die endotheliale Endothelin- und PAI-1-Produktion in ähnlichem Ausmaß senken, allerdings nur in der höchsten Konzentration. Die Prostazyklinsynthese und die Muskelzellproliferation wurden nicht signifikant beeinflußt. Diese Ergebnisse deuten daraufhin, daß sowohl Nateglinid als auch

  14. A Human Body Analysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girondel Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system for human body analysis (segmentation, tracking, face/hands localisation, posture recognition from a single view that is fast and completely automatic. The system first extracts low-level data and uses part of the data for high-level interpretation. It can detect and track several persons even if they merge or are completely occluded by another person from the camera's point of view. For the high-level interpretation step, static posture recognition is performed using a belief theory-based classifier. The belief theory is considered here as a new approach for performing posture recognition and classification using imprecise and/or conflicting data. Four different static postures are considered: standing, sitting, squatting, and lying. The aim of this paper is to give a global view and an evaluation of the performances of the entire system and to describe in detail each of its processing steps, whereas our previous publications focused on a single part of the system. The efficiency and the limits of the system have been highlighted on a database of more than fifty video sequences where a dozen different individuals appear. This system allows real-time processing and aims at monitoring elderly people in video surveillance applications or at the mixing of real and virtual worlds in ambient intelligence systems.

  15. Effects of lipopolysaccharide infusion on arterial levels and transcerebral exchange kinetics of glutamate and glycine in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Taudorf, Sarah; Bailey, Damian M

    2012-01-01

    . Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial to jugular venous concentration differences of glutamate and glycine were determined before and after a 4-h intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, total dose of 0.3 ng/kg) in 12 healthy volunteers. The global cerebral net exchange......, their transcerebral exchange kinetics were unaffected. Inflammation-induced alterations of the circulating levels of glutamate and glycine, do not affect the global transcerebral exchange kinetics of these amino acids in healthy humans....

  16. Localization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and its relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumi Uchida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL plays a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. However, its localization in human coronary arterial wall is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize deposition sites and patterns of native oxLDL and their relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery. METHODS: Evans blue dye (EB elicits a violet fluorescence by excitation at 345-nm and emission at 420-nm, and a reddish-brown fluorescence by excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm characteristic of oxLDL only. Therefore, native oxLDL in excised human coronary artery were investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM using EB as a biomarker. RESULTS: (1 By luminal surface scan with CFM, the % incidence of oxLDL in 38 normal segments, 41 white plaques and 32 yellow plaques that were classified by conventional angioscopy, was respectively 26, 44 and 94, indicating significantly (p<0.05 higher incidence in the latter than the former two groups. Distribution pattern was classified as patchy, diffuse and web-like. Web-like pattern was observed only in yellow plaques with necrotic core. (2 By transected surface scan, oxLDL deposited within superficial layer in normal segments and diffusely within both superficial and deep layers in white and yellow plaques. In yellow plaques with necrotic core, oxLDL deposited not only in the marginal zone of the necrotic core but also in the fibrous cap. CONCLUSION: Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results suggest that oxLDL begins to deposit in human coronary artery wall before plaque formation and increasingly deposits with plaque growth, exhibiting different deposition sites and patterns depending on morphological changes.

  17. PC02 Beta3-adrenoceptor agonist-induced relaxation of human placental arteries is reduced in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    0BARTHEZ; CROUGET; PGUERARD; MJLEROYZAMIA; MBREUILLER-FOUCHE; EJMORCILLO; TCRPCO; PSAGOT; MDUMAS; MBARDOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the functionality of β2- and 133-adrenoreceptors(β-ARs) in human placental arteries and to assess the influence of pregnancy-induced hypertension on β-ARs responsiveness.METHODS: We performed in vitro functional and biochemical studies as well as RT-PCR experiments. RESULTS: SR59119

  18. Doppler ultrasound study of penis in men with systemic sclerosis: a correlation with Doppler indices of renal and digital arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, E; Barbano, B; Gigante, A; Cianci, R; Molinaro, I; Quarta, S; Digiulio, M A; Messineo, D; Pisarri, S; Salsano, F

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) prevalence in male systemic sclerosis (SSc) is high and its pathogenesis is unclear. The aim of the study is to assess correlation between Doppler ultrasound indices of penis and kidneys or digital arteries in male systemic sclerosis. Fourteen men with systemic sclerosis were enrolled in this study. Erectile function was investigated by the International Index of Erectile Function-5. Peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, resistive index, pulsative index, and systolic/diastolic ratio were measured on the cavernous arteries at the peno-scrotal junction in the flaccid state, on the interlobar artery of both kidneys and all ten proper palmar digital arteries. Ten (71 percent) patients have an International Index of Erectile Function-5 less than 21. Reduction of penis peak systolic velocity was observed in all SSc subjects. Doppler indices of cavernous arteries correlate with the International Index of Erectile Function-5. The renal and digital arteries resistive index demonstrated a good correlation (p less than 0.0001) with International Index of Erectile Function-5. A positive correlation exists between penis and kidney arteries Doppler indices: end diastolic velocity (p less than 0.05, r=0.54), resistive index (p less than 0.0001, r=0.90), systolic/diastolic ratio (p less than 0.01, r=0.69). A positive correlation was observed between penis and digital arteries Doppler indices: peak systolic velocity (p less than 0.01, r=0.68), end diastolic velocity (p less than 0.01, r=0.75), resistive index (p less than 0.001, r=0.79), systolic/diastolic ratio (p less than 0.05, r=0.59). A correlation exists between arterial impairment of penis and renal or digital arteries.

  19. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  20. Plaque components affect wall stress in stented human carotid artery: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen-Min; Liu, Xiao; Du, Cheng-Fei; Sun, An-Qiang; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Zhan-Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Carotid artery stenting presents challenges of in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis, which are caused primarily by alterations in the mechanical environment of the artery after stent implantation. The present study constructed patient-specific carotid arterial bifurcation models with lipid pools and calcified components based on magnetic resonance imaging. We numerically analyzed the effects of multicomponent plaques on the distributions of von Mises stresses (VMSs) in the patient-specific models after stenting. The results showed that when a stent was deployed, the large soft lipid pool in atherosclerotic plaques cushioned the host artery and reduced the stress within the arterial wall; however, this resulted in a sharp increase of VMS in the fibrous cap. When compared with the lipid pool, the presence of the calcified components led to slightly increased stresses on the luminal surface. However, when a calcification was located close to the luminal surface of the host artery and the stenosis, the local VMS was elevated. Overall, compared with calcified components, large lipid pools severely damaged the host artery after stenting. Furthermore, damage due to the calcified component may depend on location.

  1. Plaque components affect wall stress in stented human carotid artery:A numerical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Fan; Xiao Liu; Cheng-Fei Du; An-Qiang Sun; Nan Zhang; Zhan-Ming Fan; Yu-Bo Fan; Xiao-Yan Deng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting presents challenges of in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis, which are caused primarily by alterations in the mechanical environment of the artery after stent implantation. The present study con-structed patient-specific carotid arterial bifurcation models with lipid pools and calcified components based on magnetic resonance imaging. We numerically analyzed the effects of multicomponent plaques on the distributions of von Mises stresses (VMSs) in the patient-specific models after stenting. The results showed that when a stent was deployed, the large soft lipid pool in atherosclerotic plaques cushioned the host artery and reduced the stress within the arterial wall;how-ever, this resulted in a sharp increase of VMS in the fibrous cap. When compared with the lipid pool, the presence of the calcified components led to slightly increased stresses on the luminal surface. However, when a calcification was located close to the luminal surface of the host artery and the stenosis, the local VMS was elevated. Overall, compared with calcified components, large lipid pools severely dam-aged the host artery after stenting. Furthermore, damage due to the calcified component may depend on location.

  2. Local effects of atherosclerotic plaque on arterial distensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, C; Failla, M; Emanuelli, G; Grappiolo, A; Boffi, L; Corsi, D; Mancia, G

    2001-11-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia are characterized by a reduction in arterial distensibility and by accelerated atherosclerosis. Whether arterial stiffening is an inherent feature of these conditions or just the consequence of the atherosclerotic clinical or subclinical lesions is not known, however. Our aim was to obtain information on this issue by directly measuring, in humans, arterial distensibility both at the site of an atherosclerotic lesion and at the proximal normal site. In 10 patients (8 men; mean+/-SEM age, 65.2+/-3.4 years) affected by monolateral hemodynamic significant internal carotid artery stenosis, we measured arterial distensibility (Wall Track System; PIE Medical) bilaterally, both at the internal carotid artery and at the common carotid artery level. In the common carotid artery, measurements were made 3 cm below the bifurcation. In the affected internal carotid artery, measurements were made at the plaque shoulder (wall thickness of 2 mm). Measurements were made in the contralateral internal carotid artery at a symmetrical level. Arterial wall thickness was measured in the same site of arterial distensibility. Arterial distensibility was less in the internal than in the common carotid artery, with a marked reduction at the plaque internal carotid artery level compared with the corresponding contralateral site (-45%, P<0.01). It was also less, however, in the common carotid artery branching into the atherosclerotic internal carotid artery than in the contralateral common carotid artery (-25%, P<0.05). Wall thickness was similar in the 2 common carotid arteries and obviously greater in the affected internal carotid artery than in the contralateral artery. Arterial distensibility was markedly less in the internal carotid artery where there was a plaque compared with the intact contralateral internal carotid artery; it was also less, however, in the common carotid artery of the affected side in comparison with the contralateral

  3. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with systemic arterial hypertension without respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabahi MF

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Fouad Rabahi,1,2 Sheila Alves Pereira,1 José Laerte Rodrigues Silva Júnior,1,2 Aline Pacheco de Rezende,1 Adeliane Castro da Costa,2 Krislainy de Sousa Corrêa,2,3 Marcus Barreto Conde4,5 1School of Medicine, Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil; 2Clínica do Aparelho Respiratório (CLARE, Goiania, Brazil; 3Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil; 4Faculdade de Medicina de Petrópolis/FASE, Petrópolis, Brazil; 5Instituto de Doenças do Tórax da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is often delayed until later stages of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD among adults on treatment for systemic arterial hypertension independently of the presence of respiratory symptoms. Methods: This cross-sectional study included adults aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and systemic arterial hypertension diagnosed at three Primary Health Care facilities in Goiania, Brazil. Patients were evaluated using a standardized respiratory questionnaire and spirometry. COPD prevalence was measured considering the value of forced vital capacity and/or forced expiratory volume in 1 second <0.70. Results: Of a total of 570 subjects, 316 (55% met inclusion criteria and were invited to participate. Two hundred and thirty-three (73.7% patients with arterial hypertension reported at least one respiratory symptom, while 83 (26.3% reported no respiratory symptoms; 41 (17.6% patients with arterial hypertension and at least one respiratory symptom, and 10 (12% patients with arterial hypertension but no respiratory symptoms were diagnosed with COPD (P=0.24. The prevalence of COPD in people with no previous COPD diagnosis was greater among those with no respiratory symptoms (100% than among those with respiratory symptoms (56.1% (P=0.01. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that

  4. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveform monitoring using two- element ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joohyun; Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Lee, Hae-Seung; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-04-01

    This work details noninvasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform estimation based on an arterial vessel cross-sectional area measurement combined with an elasticity measurement of the vessel, represented by pulse wave velocity (PWV), using a two-element ultrasound system. The overall ABP waveform estimation is validated in a custom-designed experimental setup mimicking the heart and an arterial vessel segment with two single element transducers, assuming a constant hemodynamic system. The estimation of local PWV using the flow-area method produces unbiased elasticity estimation of the tube in a pressure waveform comparison. The measured PWV using 16 cardiac cycles of data is 8.47 + 0.63 m/s with an associated scaling error of -1.56 + 14.0% in a direct pressure waveform comparison, showing negligible bias error on average. The distension waveform obtained from a complex cross-correlation model estimator (C3M) reliably traces small pressure changes reflected by the diameter change. The excellent agreement of an estimated pressure waveform to the reference pressure waveform suggests the promising potential of a readily available, inexpensive, and portable ABP waveform monitoring device.

  5. Dual-modality arterial pulse monitoring system for continuous blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Xuan Dai; Yuan-Ting Zhang; Jing Liu; Xiao-Rong Ding; Ni Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and ambulatory measurement of blood pressure (BP) is essential for efficient diagnosis, management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, traditional cuff-based BP measurement methods provide only intermittent BP readings and can cause discomfort with the occlusive cuff. Although pulse transit time (PTT) method is promising for cuffless and continuous BP measurement, its pervasive use is restricted by its limited accuracy and requirement of placing sensors on multiple body sites. To tackle these issues, we propose a novel dual-modality arterial pulse monitoring system for continuous blood pressure measurement, which simultaneously records the pressure and photoplethysmography (PPG) signals of radial artery. The obtained signals can be used to generate a pressure-volume curve, from which the elasticity index (EI) and viscosity index (VI) can be extracted. Experiments were carried out among 7 healthy subjects with their PPG, ECG, arterial pressure wave and reference BP collected to examine the effectiveness of the proposed indexes. The results of this study demonstrate that a linear regression model combining EI and VI has significantly higher BP tracking correlation coefficient as compared to the PTT method. This suggests that the proposed system and method can potentially be used for convenient and continuous blood pressure estimation with higher accuracy.

  6. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether or not highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in Henan Province, China. Method: Fifty human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with at least a 5-year history of highly active antiretroviral therapy use and 50 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients without a history of highly active antiretroviral therapy use were enrolled in this study. Carotid artery intima-media thickness and stiffness were determined by quantitative inter-media thickness and quantitative artery stiffness, respectively. Results: No statistically significant difference in carotid artery intima-media thickness and stiffness was observed between groups. A significant association between human immunodeficiency virus infection time and carotid artery stiffness was observed, but no significant association between human immunodeficiency virus infection time and intima-media thickness was found. No significant association between intima-media thickness, stiffness, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were observed. Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis system for coronary artery stenosis using a neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Horiba, Isao; Sugie, Noboru; Nanki, Michio

    2001-07-01

    We have developed a new computer-aided diagnosis system for coronary artery stenosis, which can learn medical doctors' clinical experiences and medical knowledge. In order to develop such a system, we have employed a multilayer neural network (NN). The NN has the capability to learn experts' experiences and knowledge. The proposed system consists of (a) automatic vessel tracking, (b) automatically extraction of the edges of the vessel, and (c) estimation of stenosis based on the NN. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed system, two experiments with the phantoms and clinical images were performed. The stenoses estimated by the proposed system agreed well with not only the stenoses based on the actual measurement of the phantoms but also those diagnosed by a medical specialist from coronary arteriograms. The experimental results have shown that the proposed system has the capability to learn medical doctors' clinical experiences and medical knowledge. The proposed system has been proved to be useful to aid to diagnose coronary artery stenosis.

  8. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li, Hai Wang, Bin Yang, Jichen Yang, Xiuyan Ruan, Yadong Yang, Edward K. Wakeland, Quanzhen Li, Xiangdong Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC and further evaluated the growth and apoptosis status of SMC and HuVEC. After SMC and HuVEC were exposed to CO for 7-day, the growth of SMC and HuVEC was significantly inhibited by CO in vitro on day 5 of CO exposure. And CO blocked cell cycle progress of SMC and HuVEC, more SMC and HuVEC stagnated at G0/G1 phase by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, CO treatment inhibited SMC and HuVEC apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide through decreasing caspase 3 and 9 activities. To confirm the molecular mechanism of CO effect on SMC and HuVEC growth, we compared the gene expression profile in SMC and CO-treated SMC, HuVEC and CO-treated HuVEC. By microarray analysis, we found the expression level of some genes which are related to cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and apoptosis were changed during CO exposure. We further identified that the down-regulated CDK2 contributed to arresting cell growth and the down-regulated Caspase 3 (CASP3 and Caspase 9 (CASP9 were associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, CO exerts a certain growth arrest on SMC and HuVEC by inhibiting cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase and has regulatory effect on cell apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated genes.

  9. Characterization of plaque components with intravascular ultrasound elastography in human femoral and coronary arteries in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. de Korte (Chris); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); H.A. Woutman; N. Bom (Klaas); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The composition of plaque is a major determinant of coronary-related clinical syndromes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography has proven to be a technique capable of reflecting the mechanical properties of phantom material and the femoral arterial

  10. Correlation between Systemic Arterial Hypertension and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Central Obese Non-Diabetic Men with Evidence of Coronary Artery Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Anna Lukito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have confirmed separately the relationship between obesity, insulin-resistance, hypertension and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 with coronary artery calcification, a parameter of subclinical atherosclerosis. It was also reported that BMPs may function as proinflammatory, prohypertensive and proatherogenic mediators. The study aimed to assess the correlation between systemic hypertension and BMP-2 plasma concentration in central-obese non-diabetic men with evidence of coronary artery calcification. METHODS: This was a cross sectional study on 60 central-obese non-diabetic men, of an average age of 55.2 years, with evidence of coronary calcification, who came for health check-up and met the inclusion criteria consecutively as defined by waist circumference >90 cm and fasting blood glucose <126 mg/dL. Coronary calcification was defined by coronary artery calcium (CAC score ≥10 Agatson-unit Dual Source 64 slice CT scan. RESULTS: There is positive correlation between hypertension and BMP-2 in central-obese non-diabetic men with evidence of coronary artery calcification. BMP-2 plasma concentration was higher in the hypertensive subjects. The correlation was stronger in younger (<55 years old subjects and subjects with insulin-resitance. KEYWORDS: hypertension, BMP-2, coronary calcification, central obesity, age, insulin resistance.

  11. Fundamental relations between short-term RR interval and arterial pressure oscillations in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the principal explanations for respiratory sinus arrhythmia is that it reflects arterial baroreflex buffering of respiration-induced arterial pressure fluctuations. If this explanation is correct, then elimination of RR interval fluctuations should increase respiratory arterial pressure fluctuations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured RR interval and arterial pressure fluctuations during normal sinus rhythm and fixed-rate atrial pacing at 17.2+/-1.8 (SEM) beats per minute greater than the sinus rate in 16 healthy men and 4 healthy women, 20 to 34 years of age. Measurements were made during controlled-frequency breathing (15 breaths per minute or 0.25 Hz) with subjects in the supine and 40 degree head-up tilt positions. We characterized RR interval and arterial pressure variabilities in low-frequency (0.05 to 0.15 Hz) and respiratory-frequency (0.20 to 0.30 Hz) ranges with fast Fourier transform power spectra and used cross-spectral analysis to determine the phase relation between the two signals. As expected, cardiac pacing eliminated beat-to-beat RR interval variability. Against expectations, however, cardiac pacing in the supine position significantly reduced arterial pressure oscillations in the respiratory frequency (systolic, 6.8+/-1.8 to 2.9 +/-0.6 mm Hg2/Hz, P=.017). In contrast, cardiac pacing in the 40 degree tilt position increased arterial pressure variability (systolic, 8.0+/-1.8 to 10.8 +/-2.6, P=.027). Cross-spectral analysis showed that 40 degree tilt shifted the phase relation between systolic pressure and RR interval at the respiratory frequency from positive to negative (9 +/-7 degrees versus -17+/-11 degrees, P=.04); that is, in the supine position, RR interval changes appeared to lead arterial pressure changes, and in the upright position, RR interval changes appeared to follow arterial pressure changes. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that respiratory sinus arrhythmia can actually contribute to respiratory arterial

  12. Lifelong physical activity prevents an age-related reduction in arterial and skeletal muscle nitric oxide bioavailability in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Blackwell, James R; Damsgaard, Ramsus;

    2012-01-01

    Ageing has been proposed to be associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that scavenge nitric oxide (NO). In eight young sedentary (23±1 years; Y), eight older lifelong sedentary (66±2 years; OS) and eight older lifelong physically active subjects (62±2 years; OA), we...... circulation and in the musculature of sedentary ageing humans due to increased oxidative stress. Lifelong physical activity opposes this effect within the trained musculature and in the arterial circulation. The lower blood flow response to leg exercise in ageing humans is not associated with a reduced...

  13. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream.

  14. Human pentraxin 3 (PTX3 as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Tamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although inflammation is an important feature of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, the usefulness of local inflammatory markers as biomarkers for PAH is unknown. In this study, we tested whether plasma concentrations of human pentraxin 3 (PTX3, a local inflammatory marker, would be a useful biomarker for detecting PAH. METHODS: Plasma PTX3 concentrations were evaluated in 50 PAH patients (27 with idiopathic PAH, 17 with PAH associated with connective tissue disease (CTD-PAH, and six with congenital heart disease, 100 age and sex-matched healthy controls, and 34 disease-matched CTD patients without PAH. Plasma concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP and C-reactive protein (CRP were also determined. RESULTS: Mean PTX3 levels were significantly higher in all PAH patients than in the healthy controls (4.40±0.37 vs. 1.94±0.09 ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001. Using a threshold level of 2.84 ng/mL, PTX3 yielded a sensitivity of 74.0% and a specificity of 84.0% for the detection of PAH. In CTD-PAH patients, mean PTX3 concentrations were significantly higher than in CTD patients without PAH (5.02±0.69 vs. 2.40±0.14 ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001. There was no significant correlation between plasma levels of PTX3 and BNP or CRP. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves for screening PAH in patients with CTD revealed that PTX3 (area under the ROC curve 0.866 is superior to BNP. Using a PTX3 threshold of 2.85 ng/mL maximized true-positive and false-negative results (sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 73.5%. CONCLUSION: Plasma concentrations of PTX3 may be a better biomarker of PAH than BNP, especially in patients with CTD.

  15. Spectral characteristics of normal and atherosclerotic human coronary artery intima and media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcos, N. C.; Levy, Guy C.; Rizoiu, Ioana-Mihaela; Tomita, M.

    1994-07-01

    Efficient use and specific targeting of laser energy to atherosclerotic lesions necessitate understanding of spectral characteristics of intima and media from normal and diseased segments. We report absorption, transmission, and reflectance spectra from 19 normal and 21 diseased coronary artery segments which were obtained at autopsy within 5 to 10 h post mortem and submerged in oxygenated Ringer's solution. Spectra were obtained from the luminal surface of 1 X 1 cm full thickness arteries or bluntly dissected intima and media segments in the range 250 to 2500 nm. Water peaks were subtracted. Absorption and transmission for full thickness artery, intima, and media from normal and atherosclerotic arteries shared main bands at 1150 and 1700 nm with variation in intensity. Significant differences in reflectance showed bands at 1080, 1340, 1600, 1739 nm in normal intima and media and atherosclerotic intima but absent in media from atherosclerotic arteries. Peaks at 1340, 1600, and 1739 nm in normal intima and media are equalized in atherosclerotic intima and absent in atherosclerotic media. In conclusion, absence of reflectance at 1080, 1340, 1600, and 1739 nm in atherosclerotic media may be selectively utilized to target laser energy and ablation at intimal plaque and spare media of atherosclerotic arteries.

  16. Translating the microRNA signature of microvesicles derived from human coronary artery smooth muscle cells in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Cenarro, Ana; Garlaschelli, Katia; Pellegatta, Fabio; Vilades, David; Nasarre, Laura; Camino-Lopez, Sandra; Crespo, Javier; Carreras, Francesc; Leta, Rubén; Catapano, Alberico Luigi; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Civeira, Fernando; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the impact of atherogenic lipoproteins on the miRNA signature of microvesicles derived from human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMC) and to translate these results to familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Conditioned media was collected after exposure of CASMC to atherogenic lipoproteins. Plasma samples were collected from two independent populations of diagnosed FH patients and matched normocholesterolemic controls (Study population 1, N=50; Study population 2, N=24) and a population of patients with suspected CAD (Study population 3, N=50). Extracellular vesicles were isolated and characterized using standard techniques. A panel of 30 miRNAs related to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) (patho-)physiology was analyzed using RT-qPCR. Atherogenic lipoproteins significantly reduced levels of miR-15b-5p, -24-3p, -29b-3p, -130a-3p, -143-3p, -146a-3p, -222-3p, -663a levels (Pmicrovesicles (0.1μm-1μm in diameter) released by CASMC. Two of these miRNAs, miR-24-3p and miR-130a-3p, were reduced in circulating microvesicles from FH patients compared with normocholesterolemic controls in a pilot study (Study population 1) and in different validation studies (Study populations 1 and 2) (Pmicrovesicles and these alterations are reflected in patients with FH. Circulating miR-130a-3p emerges as a potential biomarker for coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative anatomy of the arterial system of the foot in primates. 1. Macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S; Ikeda, A

    1990-01-01

    Using stereoscopic angiography, the entire arterial system of the foot of the macaque was analyzed. The arteria saphena, instead of the a. tibialis anterior, reaches the dorsum of the foot, and its branches supply most of the foot. The dorsal arteries are dominant as far as the metatarsal spaces of the lateral four toes. The a. metatarsea dorsalis II showed a tendency to be the single dominant artery and to give rise to even the a. digitalis communis plantaris IV through the catella plantaris distalis. This tendency was observed more clearly in other macaques species than the Japanese monkey. The perforating branch at the second proximal metatarsal space forms the arcus plantaris profundus, which is accompanied by the deep branch of the nervus plantaris lateralis. Beneath the arch, the catella plantaris proximalis is formed on the metatarsal bones among the perforating branches of the aa. metatarseae dorsales. The a. tibialis posterior forms the arcus plantaris superficialis, whose thin branches commonly enter the aa. digitales communes plantares.

  18. Integration of multi-modality imaging for accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoglou, George D.; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Sianos, George; Tsikaderis, Dimitrios; Matakos, Antonis; Koutkias, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos; Parcharidis, George E.; Louridas, George E.

    2006-12-01

    In conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human coronary arteries, IVUS images are arranged linearly generating a straight vessel volume. However, with this approach real vessel curvature is neglected. To overcome this limitation an imaging method was developed based on integration of IVUS and biplane coronary angiography (BCA). In 17 coronary arteries from nine patients, IVUS and BCA were performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected and in each frame the IVUS catheter was interactively detected for the extraction of 3D catheter path. Ultrasound data was obtained with a sheath-based catheter and recorded on S-VHS videotape. S-VHS data was digitized and lumen and media-adventitia contours were semi-automatically detected in end-diastolic IVUS images. Each pair of contours was aligned perpendicularly to the catheter path and rotated in space by implementing an algorithm based on Frenet-Serret rules. Lumen and media-adventitia contours were interpolated through generation of intermediate contours creating a real 3D lumen and vessel volume, respectively. The absolute orientation of the reconstructed lumen was determined by back-projecting it onto both angiographic planes and comparing the projected lumen with the actual angiographic lumen. In conclusion, our method is capable of performing rapid and accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo. This technique can be utilized for reliable plaque morphometric, geometrical and hemodynamic analyses.

  19. Nuclear IL-33 regulates soluble ST2 receptor and IL-6 expression in primary human arterial endothelial cells and is decreased in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongmin; Perros, Frédéric; Caramori, Gaetano; Meng, Chao; Dormuller, Peter; Chou, Pai-Chien; Church, Colin; Papi, Alberto; Casolari, Paolo; Welsh, David; Peacock, Andrew; Humbert, Marc; Adcock, Ian M; Wort, Stephen J

    2014-08-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is an incurable condition leading to right ventricular failure and death and inflammation is postulated to be associated with vascular remodelling. Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the "alarmin" family can either act on the membrane ST2 receptor or as a nuclear repressor, to regulate inflammation. We show, using immunohistochemistry, that IL-33 expression is nuclear in the vessels of healthy subjects whereas nuclear IL-33 is markedly diminished in the vessels of IPAH patients. This correlates with reduced IL-33 mRNA expression in their lung. In contrast, serum levels of IL-33 are unchanged in IPAH. However, the expression of the soluble form of ST2, sST2, is enhanced in the serum of IPAH patients. Knock-down of IL-33 in human endothelial cells (ECs) using siRNA is associated with selective modulation of inflammatory genes involved in vascular remodelling including IL-6. Additionally, IL-33 knock-down significantly increased sST2 release from ECs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that IL-33 bound multiple putative homeodomain protein binding motifs in the proximal and distal promoters of ST2 genes. IL-33 formed a complex with the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1, a transcriptional repressor. In conclusion, IL-33 regulates the expression of IL-6 and sST2, an endogenous IL-33 inhibitor, in primary human ECs and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PAH through recruitment of transcriptional repressor proteins.

  20. [State of the dopamine system activity, as one of factors for the development of arterial hypertension and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzogub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Bogdan, T V; Sobol', V O

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of 5 subtypes of dopamine receptors revealed their important role in development of arterial hypertension and obesity. Reduce of their functional activity or number with age conduces to the increase of tone of the sympathetic nervous system, dyspoiesis of leptin, hyperphagia, development of obesity and arterial hypertension. Prescription of dopamine agonists conduces to reduction of in, normalization of leptin, diminishing of appetite and body mass, decrease of blood pressure. Combination of arterial hypertension and obesity is recommended to determine dopamine excretion and to appoint dopamine agonists at level of < 600 nmol/24 hours.

  1. Activation of endothelial and epithelial KCa2.3 calcium-activated potassium channels by NS309 relaxes human small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Small (K(Ca) 2) and intermediate (K(Ca) 3.1) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca) ) may contribute to both epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxations, but this has not been established in human pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. Therefore, we...... investigated the expression of K(Ca) 2.3 and K(Ca) 3.1 channels, and hypothesized that activation of these channels would produce relaxation of human bronchioles and pulmonary arteries. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Channel expression and functional studies were conducted in human isolated small pulmonary arteries.......1 activator, NS309, induced concentration-dependent relaxations. NS309 was equally potent in relaxing pulmonary arteries, but less potent in bronchioles, than salbutamol. NS309 relaxations were blocked by the K(Ca) 2 channel blocker apamin, while the K(Ca) 3.1 channel blocker, charybdotoxin failed to reduce...

  2. Measurement of the ultrasonic properties of human coronary arteries in vitro with a 50-MHz acoustic microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic attenuation coefficient, wave propagation speed and integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC of human coronary arteries were measured in vitro over the -6 dB frequency bandwidth (36 to 67 MHz of a focused ultrasound transducer (50 MHz, focal distance 5.7 mm, f/number 1.7. Corrections were made for diffraction effects. Normal and diseased coronary artery sub-samples (N = 38 were obtained from 10 individuals at autopsy. The measured mean ± SD of the wave speed (average over the entire vessel wall thickness was 1581.04 ± 53.88 m/s. At 50 MHz, the average attenuation coefficient was 4.99 ± 1.33 dB/mm with a frequency dependence term of 1.55 ± 0.18 determined over the 36- to 67-MHz frequency range. The IBC values were: 17.42 ± 13.02 (sr.m-1 for thickened intima, 11.35 ± 6.54 (sr.m-1 for fibrotic intima, 39.93 ± 50.95 (sr.m-1 for plaque, 4.26 ± 2.34 (sr.m-1 for foam cells, 5.12 ± 5.85 (sr.m-1 for media and 21.26 ± 31.77 (sr.m-1 for adventitia layers. The IBC results indicate the possibility for ultrasound characterization of human coronary artery wall tissue layer, including the situations of diseased arteries with the presence of thickened intima, fibrotic intima and plaque. The mean IBC normalized with respect to the mean IBC of the media layer seems promising for use as a parameter to differentiate a plaque or a thickened intima from a fibrotic intima.

  3. Middle cerebral artery diameter changes during rhythmic handgrip exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbree, J; Bronzwaer, Agt; van Buchem, M A; Daemen, Mjap; van Lieshout, J J; van Osch, Mjp

    2017-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography is a frequently employed technique for quantifying cerebral blood flow by assuming a constant arterial diameter. Given that exercise increases arterial pressure by sympathetic activation, we hypothesized that exercise might induce a change in the diameter of large cerebral arteries. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) cross-sectional area was assessed in response to handgrip exercise by direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) observations. Twenty healthy subjects (11 female) performed three 5 min bouts of rhythmic handgrip exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction, alternated with 5 min of rest. High-resolution 7 T MRI scans were acquired perpendicular to the MCA. Two blinded observers manually determined the MCA cross-sectional area. Sufficient image quality was obtained in 101 MCA-scans of 19 subjects (age-range 20-59 years). Mixed effects modelling showed that the MCA cross-sectional area decreased by 2.1 ± 0.8% (p = 0.01) during handgrip, while the heart rate increased by 11 ± 2% (p exercise. This further strengthens the current concept of sympathetic control of large cerebral arteries, showing in vivo vasoconstriction during exercise-induced sympathetic activation. Moreover, care must be taken when interpreting TCD exercise studies as diameter constancy cannot be assumed.

  4. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  5. Radioimmunologic analysis of the state of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system in arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Yakovlev, A.A.; Gandzha, T.I.; Yugrinov, O.G. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev)

    1985-01-01

    In 110 patients suffering from various forms of arterial hypertension (hypertension, aldosteronoma, phaeochromocytoma, corticosteroma) the parameters of the system renin-angiotensin-aldosterone were measured. Basal values of aldosterone, renin activity in blood as well as their concentration in blood taken from the vena cava inferior, renal and adrenal veins during selective renography were determined. The 24-hours rhythm of the hormones in the blood, the reaction of the glomerular zone of the adrenal cortex and the juxtaglomerular renal system under acute Lasix (furosemide) stress was evaluated. It was found, that the system renin-angiotensin-aldosterone is disturbed in all patients with arterial hypertension. This is indicated by changes of aldosterone concentration, renin activity in peripheral blood and in the blood from the vena cava inferior, renal and adrenal veins, the 24-hours rhythm of their concentrations in serum and the reaction to acute Lasix stress. The radioimmunoassays of quantitative parameters of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are decisive for the differential diagnosis of hypertension and adrenal gland tumors connected with a hypertension syndrome. They facilitate a rational choice of the hypertension therapy and the daily distribution of the medications for patients with hypertension. The radioimmunoassays can be used for checking the efficiency of medications and surgery.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension: links, risks, and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tselios K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Konstantinos Tselios, Dafna D Gladman, Murray B Urowitz, University of Toronto Lupus Clinic, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the second highest prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, after systemic sclerosis, among the connective tissue diseases. SLE-associated PAH is hemodynamically defined by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest (≥25 mmHg with normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (≤15 mmHg and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Estimated prevalence ranges from 0.5% to 17.5% depending on the diagnostic method used and the threshold of right ventricular systolic pressure in studies using transthoracic echocardiogram. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial with vasoconstriction, due to imbalance of vasoactive mediators, leading to hypoxia and impaired vascular remodeling, collagen deposition, and thrombosis of the pulmonary circulation. Multiple predictive factors have been recognized, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, pleuritis, pericarditis, anti-ribonuclear protein, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Secure diagnosis is based on right heart catheterization, although transthoracic echocardiogram has been shown to be reliable for patient screening and follow-up. Data on treatment mostly come from uncontrolled observational studies and consist of immunosuppressive drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, as well as PAH-targeted approaches with endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, and vasodilators (epoprostenol. Prognosis is significantly affected, with 1- and 5-year survival estimated at 88% and 68%, respectively. Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus, pulmonary arterial hypertension, immunosuppressive, transthoracic echocardiogram, endothelin receptor antagonists

  7. A Combination of Constitutive Damage Model and Artificial Neural Networks to Characterize the Mechanical Properties of the Healthy and Atherosclerotic Human Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyed Mohammadali; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2017-02-02

    It has been indicated that the content and structure of the elastin and collagen of the arterial wall can subject to a significant alteration due to the atherosclerosis. Consequently, a high tissue stiffness, stress, and even damage/rupture are triggered in the arterial wall. Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the coronary arteries, none of them consider the role of collagen damage of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arterial walls. Recently, a fiber family-based constitutive equation was proposed to capture the anisotropic mechanical response of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries via both the histostructural and uniaxial data. In this study, experimental mechanical measurements along with histological data of the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls were employed to determine the constitutive damage parameters and remodeling of the collagen fibers. To do this, the preconditioned arterial tissues were excised from human cadavers within 5-h postmortem, and the mean angle of their collagen fibers was precisely determined. Thereafter, a group of quasistatic axial and circumferential loadings were applied to the arterial walls, and the constrained nonlinear minimization method was employed to identify the arterial parameters according to the axial and circumferential extension data. The remodeling of the collagen fibers during the tensile test was also predicted via Artificial Neural Networks algorithm. Regardless of loading direction, the results presented a noteworthy load-bearing capability and stiffness of the atherosclerotic arteries compared to the healthy ones (P < 0.005). Theoretical fiber angles were found to be consistent with the experimental histological data with less than 2 and 5° difference for the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls, respectively. The pseudoelastic damage model data were also compared with that of the experimental data, and

  8. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  9. Combined central retinal artery and vein occlusion secondary to systemic non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Dhananjay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of low-grade systemic B-cell non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL causing central retinal artery and vein occlusion, which was the only manifestation of disease recurrence. A young man with resolved systemic NHL underwent fluorescein angiography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to investigate a severe unilateral visual loss. A combined vascular occlusion was observed in the right eye. Neuroimaging detected optic nerve infiltration; but no systemic/ central nervous system involvement was observed. The patient was treated with high-doses of corticosteroids and optic nerve irradiation. The optic neuropathy and vascular occlusion were resistant to treatment. The subsequent neovascular glaucoma was treated by panretinal photocoagulation, which relieved the pain, but vision was not recovered. No further recurrence was observed over the following year.

  10. The quantum human central neural system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Rekkas, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we present Excess Entropy Production for human aging system as the sum of their respective subsystems and electrophysiological status. Additionally, we support the hypothesis of human brain and central neural system quantumness and we strongly suggest the theoretical and philosophical status of human brain as one of the unknown natural Dirac magnetic monopoles placed in the center of a Riemann sphere.

  11. The effect of pH and ion channel modulators on human placental arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyba Y Ali

    Full Text Available Chorionic plate arteries (CPA are located at the maternofetal interface where they are able to respond to local metabolic changes. Unlike many other types of vasculature, the placenta lacks nervous control and requires autoregulation for controlling blood flow. The placental circulation, which is of low-resistance, may become hypoxic easily leading to fetal acidosis and fetal distress however the role of the ion channels in these circumstances is not well-understood. Active potassium channel conductances that are subject to local physicochemical modulation may serve as pathways through which such signals are transduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulation of CPA by pH and the channels implicated in these responses using wire myography. CPA were isolated from healthy placentae and pre-contracted with U46619 before testing the effects of extracellular pH using 1 M lactic acid over the pH range 7.4-6.4 in the presence of a variety of ion channel modulators. A change from pH 7.4 to 7.2 produced a 29±3% (n = 9 relaxation of CPA which increased to 61±4% at the lowest pH of 6.4. In vessels isolated from placentae of women with pre-eclampsia (n = 6, pH responses were attenuated. L-methionine increased the relaxation to 67±7% (n = 6; p<0.001 at pH 6.4. Similarly the TASK 1/3 blocker zinc chloride (1 mM gave a maximum relaxation of 72±5% (n = 8; p<0.01 which compared with the relaxation produced by the TREK-1 opener riluzole (75±5%; n = 6. Several other modulators induced no significant changes in vascular responses. Our study confirmed expression of several ion channel subtypes in CPA with our results indicating that extracellular pH within the physiological range has an important role in controlling vasodilatation in the human term placenta.

  12. Diagnosis of systemic arterial diseases with whole-body 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jiang; CHEN Bin; WANG Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    Background With the development of magnetic resonance (MR) technologies, whole-body 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D CE MRA) has become possible. The purpose of this study was to introduce and evaluate this technique in demonstration of various systemic arterial diseases.Methods Thirty-seven patients underwent whole-body 3D CE MRA using a 1.5T MR imager. The patients included were with clinically documented or suspected peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD, n=19),Takayasu arteritis (n=8), polyarteritis nodosa (n=1), Type B dissection (n=4) and thoracic and/or abdominal aneurysm (n=5). Sixty-eight surface coil elements were employed to encompass the whole body. Four 3D CE MRA stations were acquired successively through automatic table moving. A total scan range of 188 cm,covering the arterial tree from carotid artery to trifurcation vessels, was acquired. Overall image quality of each arterial segment and venous overlay were assessed and rated. The depiction of various systemic arterial diseases was evaluated and compared with other imaging modalities if available, including digital subtraction angiography (DSA), CT angiography, dedicated mono-station MRA.Results Whole-body 3D CE MRA was well tolerated by all patients. It yielded a detailed display of the arterial system with a short examination time. The image quality was considered diagnostic in 99.3% of the arterial segments. The remaining 0.7% of the arterial segments were considered non-diagnostic. In 7 of 19 patients with PAOD, whole-body MRA showed additional vascular narrowing apart from peripheral arterial disease. In 9 patients with vasculitis, whole-body MRA depicted luminal irregularity, narrowing or occlusion, aneurysm and collateral circulation involving multiple vascular segments. Whole-body MRA also clearly revealed the severity and extent of dissection and aortic aneurysm. In 20 cases the vascular pathologies demonstrated on whole body MRA were confirmed by other imaging investigations

  13. Mechanisms of remodelling of small arteries, antihypertensive therapy and the immune system in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2015-12-04

    This review summarizes my lecture for the 2015 Distinguished Scientist Award from the Canadian Society of Clinical Investigation, and is based mainly on studies in my laboratory on the mechanisms of remodelling of small arteries in experimental animal and human hypertension and on treatments that lower blood pressure and improve structure and function of resistance vessels. Small resistance arteries undergo either inward eutrophic or hypertrophic remodelling, which raises blood pressure and impairs tissue perfusion. These vascular changes are corrected by some antihypertensive drugs, which may lead to improved outcomes. Vasoconstriction, growth, oxidative stress and inflammation are some of the mechanisms, within the vascular wall, that can be beneficially affected by antihypertensive agents. These antihypertensive-sensitive mechanisms are reviewed in this review, together with the inflammatory and immune mechanisms that may participate in hypertension and associated cardiovascular injury. Molecular studies, based on this research, will hopefully identify novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets, which will improve our ability to prevent and treat hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  14. Time-course of ventilation, arterial and pulmonary CO(2) tension during CO (2) increase in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Toru; Okada, Yasumasa; Hara, Yasushi; Sakamaki, Fumio; Kyotani, Shingo; Tomita, Takeshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi; Nakanishi, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    A change of ventilation (VE), PaCO( 2 ) (arterial CO( 2 ) tension) and PvCO( 2 ) (pulmonary arterial CO( 2 ) tension) with time was not evaluated precisely during exercise or CO( 2 ) rebreathing in humans. In this study, changes of these variables with time were fitted to exponential curves {y = Exp ( x/ T + A ) + k} and compared. When exercise pulmonary hemodynamics was examined in 15 cardiac patients to decide therapies, we asked the patients to undergo CO( 2 ) rebreathing using air with supplementation of consumed O( 2 ). Arterial and pulmonary blood was drawn every minute. During exercise, T was 28.2 ± 8.4 and 26.8 ± 12.4, and A was 0.80 ± 0.50 and 0.50 ± 0.90 in VE and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with no statistical differences. During CO( 2 ) rebreathing, T was 18.6 ± 5.8, 41.8 ± 38.0 and 21.6 ± 9.7 and A was 0.39 ± 0.67, 1.64 ± 1.35 and 0.17 ± 0.83 in VE, PaCO( 2 ) and PvCO( 2 ), respectively, with statistical difference of PaCO( 2 ) from other variables, suggesting that VE and PvCO( 2 ) showed same mode of change according to time but PaCO( 2 ) did not.

  15. Egr-1 identifies neointimal remodeling and relates to progression in human pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feen, Diederik E; Dickinson, Michael G; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Borgdorff, Marinus A J; Sietsma, Hannie; Lévy, Marilyne; Berger, Rolf M F

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is hallmarked by the development of neointimal lesions. The transcription factor Egr-1 seems to play a critical role in neointimal formation in experimental PAH and was identified as a putative target for intervention. In this study we investigated

  16. Egr-1 identifies neointimal remodeling and relates to progression in human pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feen, Diederik E; Dickinson, Michael G; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Borgdorff, Marinus A J; Sietsma, Hannie; Lévy, Marilyne; Berger, Rolf M F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is hallmarked by the development of neointimal lesions. The transcription factor Egr-1 seems to play a critical role in neointimal formation in experimental PAH and was identified as a putative target for intervention. In this study we investigated w

  17. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification.

  18. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  19. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Bouts, Y.M.; Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Scholten, R.R.; Spaanderman, M.E.; Pugh, C.J.; Sprung, V.S.; Schreuder, T.H.; Jones, H.; Cable, T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk fa

  20. System of matrix metalloproteinases and cytokine secretion in type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired carbohydrate tolerance associated with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kologrivova, I V; Suslova, T E; Koshel'skaya, O A; Vinnitskaya, I V; Trubacheva, O A

    2014-03-01

    The study included patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired carbohydrate tolerance associated with arterial hypertension, patients with arterial hypertension, and healthy volunteers. We evaluated the levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2, MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1), glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, and spontaneous and mitogen-activated cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in combination with arterial hypertension exhibited maximum TIMP-1 levels and TIMP-1/MMP-2, TIMP-1/ MMP-9 ratios as well as enhanced secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17 and reduced secretion of IL-10 in comparison with healthy individuals. The observed shifts are probably determined the development of systemic hyperinsulinemia in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus coupled with arterial hypertension.

  1. Fundamentals of systems ergonomics/human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Ergonomics/human factors is, above anything else, a systems discipline and profession, applying a systems philosophy and systems approaches. Many things are labelled as system in today's world, and this paper specifies just what attributes and notions define ergonomics/human factors in systems terms. These are obviously a systems focus, but also concern for context, acknowledgement of interactions and complexity, a holistic approach, recognition of emergence and embedding of the professional effort involved within organization system. These six notions are illustrated with examples from a large body of work on rail human factors.

  2. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  3. Integration of a capacitive pressure sensing system into the outer catheter wall for coronary artery FFR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Frank; Kuisma, Heikki; Gao, Feng; Saarilahti, Jaakko; Gomes Martins, David; Kärkkäinen, Anu; Marrinan, Brendan; Pintal, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The deadliest disease in the world is coronary artery disease (CAD), which is related to a narrowing (stenosis) of blood vessels due to fatty deposits, plaque, on the arterial walls. The level of stenosis in the coronary arteries can be assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) measurements. This involves determining the ratio between the maximum achievable blood flow in a diseased coronary artery and the theoretical maximum flow in a normal coronary artery. The blood flow is represented by a pressure drop, thus a pressure wire or pressure sensor integrated in a catheter can be used to calculate the ratio between the coronary pressure distal to the stenosis and the normal coronary pressure. A 2 Fr (0.67mm) outer diameter catheter was used, which required a high level of microelectronics miniaturisation to fit a pressure sensing system into the outer wall. The catheter has an eccentric guidewire lumen with a diameter of 0.43mm, which implies that the thickest catheter wall section provides less than 210 microns height for flex assembly integration consisting of two dies, a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor and an ASIC. In order to achieve this a very thin circuit flex was used, and the two chips were thinned down to 75 microns and flip chip mounted face down on the flex. Many challenges were involved in obtaining a flex layout that could wrap into a small tube without getting the dies damaged, while still maintaining enough flexibility for the catheter to navigate the arterial system.

  4. Nuclear IL-33 regulates soluble ST2 receptor and IL-6 expression in primary human arterial endothelial cells and is decreased in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Dongmin [Section of Vascular Biology, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Perros, Frédéric [Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris-Sud, Paris, Clamart (France); Caramori, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Sezione di Medicina Interna e Cardiorespiratoria, Centro Interdipartimentale per lo Studio delle Malattie Infiammatorie delle Vie Aeree e Patologie Fumo-Correlate, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Meng, Chao [Section of Vascular Biology, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Geriatrics, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Dormuller, Peter [Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris-Sud, Paris, Clamart (France); Chou, Pai-Chien [Airways Disease, National Heart and Lung Institute (United Kingdom); Church, Colin [Scottish Pulmonary Vascular Unit, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Papi, Alberto; Casolari, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Sezione di Medicina Interna e Cardiorespiratoria, Centro Interdipartimentale per lo Studio delle Malattie Infiammatorie delle Vie Aeree e Patologie Fumo-Correlate, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Welsh, David; Peacock, Andrew [Scottish Pulmonary Vascular Unit, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Humbert, Marc [Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris-Sud, Paris, Clamart (France); Adcock, Ian M. [Airways Disease, National Heart and Lung Institute (United Kingdom); Wort, Stephen J., E-mail: s.wort@imperial.ac.uk [Section of Vascular Biology, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear IL-33 expression is reduced in vascular endothelial cells from PAH patients. • Knockdown of IL-33 leads to increased IL-6 and sST2 mRNA expression. • IL-33 binds homeobox motifs in target gene promoters and recruits repressor proteins. - Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is an incurable condition leading to right ventricular failure and death and inflammation is postulated to be associated with vascular remodelling. Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the “alarmin” family can either act on the membrane ST2 receptor or as a nuclear repressor, to regulate inflammation. We show, using immunohistochemistry, that IL-33 expression is nuclear in the vessels of healthy subjects whereas nuclear IL-33 is markedly diminished in the vessels of IPAH patients. This correlates with reduced IL-33 mRNA expression in their lung. In contrast, serum levels of IL-33 are unchanged in IPAH. However, the expression of the soluble form of ST2, sST2, is enhanced in the serum of IPAH patients. Knock-down of IL-33 in human endothelial cells (ECs) using siRNA is associated with selective modulation of inflammatory genes involved in vascular remodelling including IL-6. Additionally, IL-33 knock-down significantly increased sST2 release from ECs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that IL-33 bound multiple putative homeodomain protein binding motifs in the proximal and distal promoters of ST2 genes. IL-33 formed a complex with the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1, a transcriptional repressor. In conclusion, IL-33 regulates the expression of IL-6 and sST2, an endogenous IL-33 inhibitor, in primary human ECs and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PAH through recruitment of transcriptional repressor proteins.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension: links, risks, and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Gladman, Dafna D; Urowitz, Murray B

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by the second highest prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), after systemic sclerosis, among the connective tissue diseases. SLE-associated PAH is hemodynamically defined by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest (≥25 mmHg) with normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (≤15 mmHg) and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Estimated prevalence ranges from 0.5% to 17.5% depending on the diagnostic method used and the threshold of right ventricular systolic pressure in studies using transthoracic echocardiogram. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial with vasoconstriction, due to imbalance of vasoactive mediators, leading to hypoxia and impaired vascular remodeling, collagen deposition, and thrombosis of the pulmonary circulation. Multiple predictive factors have been recognized, such as Raynaud's phenomenon, pleuritis, pericarditis, anti-ribonuclear protein, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Secure diagnosis is based on right heart catheterization, although transthoracic echocardiogram has been shown to be reliable for patient screening and follow-up. Data on treatment mostly come from uncontrolled observational studies and consist of immunosuppressive drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, as well as PAH-targeted approaches with endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil), and vasodilators (epoprostenol). Prognosis is significantly affected, with 1- and 5-year survival estimated at 88% and 68%, respectively.

  6. Central hemodynamics and arterial stiffness in idiopathic and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Klaas; Fliegen, Sabine; Koester, Jelena; Martin, Rafael Campos; Deuschl, Günther; Reppel, Michael; Mortensen, Kai; Schneider, Susanne A

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure is commonly abnormal in parkinsonian disorders, but central hemodynamics and arterial stiffness, well-established predictors of total cardiovascular risk, have rarely been studied in these disorders. 32 patients [27 with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD); 5 with multiple system atrophy (MSA)] and 15 controls matched for cardiac risk factors underwent 24 h-ambulatory blood pressure recordings using an I.E.M. device (Mobil-O-Graph™), measuring peripheral pressure and calculating central pressures and arterial stiffness. Mean augmentation indices corrected for heart rate (AIx@75) were significantly lower and pulse wave velocities were significantly elevated in patients compared to controls. Central systolic blood pressure, cardiac output and daytime total vascular resistance were significantly elevated in patients. Mean nocturnal systolic peripheral blood pressure and nocturnal heart rates were also significantly higher; 56.3% of patients had nocturnal hypertension (80% of the MSA group); 85.2% showed non-dipping. This supports previous findings of reduced vulnerability to systemic atherosclerosis and end-organ damage in treated PD. Yet, hemodynamic abnormalities were common and often remained asymptomatic.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension: links, risks, and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Gladman, Dafna D; Urowitz, Murray B

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by the second highest prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), after systemic sclerosis, among the connective tissue diseases. SLE-associated PAH is hemodynamically defined by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest (≥25 mmHg) with normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (≤15 mmHg) and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Estimated prevalence ranges from 0.5% to 17.5% depending on the diagnostic method used and the threshold of right ventricular systolic pressure in studies using transthoracic echocardiogram. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial with vasoconstriction, due to imbalance of vasoactive mediators, leading to hypoxia and impaired vascular remodeling, collagen deposition, and thrombosis of the pulmonary circulation. Multiple predictive factors have been recognized, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, pleuritis, pericarditis, anti-ribonuclear protein, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Secure diagnosis is based on right heart catheterization, although transthoracic echocardiogram has been shown to be reliable for patient screening and follow-up. Data on treatment mostly come from uncontrolled observational studies and consist of immunosuppressive drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, as well as PAH-targeted approaches with endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil), and vasodilators (epoprostenol). Prognosis is significantly affected, with 1- and 5-year survival estimated at 88% and 68%, respectively. PMID:28053559

  8. Low-profile stent system for treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: The GREAT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapoval, M.; Zahringer, M.; Pattynama, P.; Rabbia, C.; Vignali, C.; Maleux, G.; Boyer, L.; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M.; Jaschke, W.; Hafsahl, G.; Downes, M.; Beregi, J.P.; Veeger, N.; Talen, A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Palmaz Genesis Peripheral Stainless Steel Balloon Expandable Stent in Renal Artery Treatment (GREAT) Trial was designed to assess the safety and performance of a low-profile stent for the treatment of obstructive renal artery disease by looking at 6-month renal artery patency uniformly

  9. Low-profile stent system for treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis : The GREAT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapoval, M; Zahringer, M; Pattynama, P; Rabbia, C; Vignali, C; Maleux, G; Boyer, L; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M; Jaschke, W; Hafsahl, G; Downes, M; Beregi, JP; Veeger, N; Talen, A

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Palmaz Genesis Peripheral Stainless Steel Balloon Expandable Stent in Renal Artery Treatment (GREAT) Trial was designed to assess the safety and performance of a low-profile stent for the treatment of obstructive renal artery disease by looking at 6-month renal artery patency uniformly

  10. Fractals and fractal dimension of systems of blood vessels: An analogy between artery trees, river networks, and urban hierarchies

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    An analogy between the fractal nature of networks of arteries and that of systems of rivers has been drawn in the previous works. However, the deep structure of the hierarchy of blood vessels has not yet been revealed. This paper is devoted to researching the fractals, allometric scaling, and hierarchy of blood vessels. By analogy with Horton-Strahler's laws of river composition, three exponential laws have been put forward. These exponential laws can be reconstructed and transformed into three linear scaling laws, which can be named composition laws of blood vessels network. From these linear scaling laws it follows a set of power laws, including the three-parameter Zipf's law on the rank-size distribution of blood vessel length and the allometric scaling law on the length-diameter relationship of blood vessels in different orders. The models are applied to the observed data on human beings and animals early given by other researchers, and an interesting finding is that human bodies more conform to natural r...

  11. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Long-lasting physiological antagonism of calcitonin gene-related peptide towards endothelin-1 in rat mesenteric arteries and human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labruijere, Sieneke; Compeer, Matthijs G; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J;

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 causes long-lasting contraction via endothelin type A receptor (ETAR) in isolated rat mesenteric arteries (RMA) that cannot be readily terminated by removing the agonist, or by adding the ETAR antagonist BQ123 or the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. It could be terminated by adding cal......-lasting non-selective arterial smooth muscle relaxation that may add to the neuropeptide being a physiological antagonist of arterial effects of ET-1. Long-lasting, washout-resistant ET-1/ETAR interaction does not occur in HCMAs....

  13. Clinical arterial infusion of calcium gluconate: The preferred method for treating hydrofluoric acid burns of distal human limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhai Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of arterial infusions of calcium gluconate to treat hydrofluoric (HF acid burns of the distal human limbs. Materials and Methods: Eligible patients with HF burn limbs, collected from January 2008 to October 2011, were given the arterial infusion of calcium gluconate into the injured limbs. The measures of pain were conducted before the infusion, immediately after the infusion, 4 h after the infusion, and 2 days after the infusion by the visual analogy score (VAS. If the VAS score was higher than 4.0 at the time point 4 h after the first infusion, the infusion was repeated. The time of wound healing, and the number and ratio of the cases receiving the surgical operation were also evaluated. Results: A total of 118 patients, male (107 cases and female (11 cases, were collected, including 64 cases of outpatients and 54 cases of inpatients. The age of the subjects ranged from 16 to 60 years, with the mean age of 37.6. The burn sites were located in the lateral limbs (28 cases and in the unilateral limbs (90 cases. For 107 cases, the pain scores decreased quickly after the first infusion. The other 11 cases, with the VAS score higher than 4.0 at the time point 4 h after the first infusion, received the second infusion. The average time of wound healing and the ratio of the cases receiving the surgical operation were closely related to the interval from the injury to the reception of infusion. Conclusions: Arterial infusion of calcium gluconate, effectively relieving the pain, blocking wound progressive deepening, and causing no adverse effects, could be the preferential method to treat hydrofluoric acid burns of the distal human limbs.

  14. Oxidation modifies the structure and function of the extracellular matrix generated by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Christine Y; Degendorfer, Georg; Hammer, Astrid; Whitelock, John M; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    ECM (extracellular matrix) materials, such as laminin, perlecan, type IV collagen and fibronectin, play a key role in determining the structure of the arterial wall and the properties of cells that interact with the ECM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peroxynitrous acid, an oxidant generated by activated macrophages, on the structure and function of the ECM laid down by HCAECs (human coronary artery endothelial cells) in vitro and in vivo. We show that exposure of HCAEC-derived native matrix components to peroxynitrous acid (but not decomposed oxidant) at concentrations >1 μM results in a loss of antibody recognition of perlecan, collagen IV, and cell-binding sites on laminin and fibronectin. Loss of recognition was accompanied by decreased HCAEC adhesion. Real-time PCR showed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes, including MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase 7) and MMP13, as well as down-regulation of the laminin α2 chain, in HCAECs cultured on peroxynitrous acid-treated matrix compared with native matrix. Immunohistochemical studies provided evidence of co-localization of laminin with 3-nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrous acid damage, in type II-III/IV human atherosclerotic lesions, consistent with matrix damage occurring during disease development in vivo. The results of the present study suggest a mechanism through which peroxynitrous acid modifies endothelial cell-derived native ECM proteins of the arterial basement membrane in atherosclerotic lesions. These changes to ECM and particularly perlecan and laminin may be important in inducing cellular dysfunction and contribute to atherogenesis.

  15. Association Between Physician Teamwork and Health System Outcomes After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, John M; Funk, Russell J; Garrison, Spencer A; Owen-Smith, Jason; Kaufman, Samuel A; Pagani, Francis D; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K

    2016-11-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) must often see multiple providers dispersed across many care locations. To test whether teamwork (assessed with the bipartite clustering coefficient) among these physicians is a determinant of surgical outcomes, we examined national Medicare data from patients undergoing CABG. Among Medicare beneficiaries who underwent CABG between 2008 and 2011, we mapped relationships between all physicians who treated them during their surgical episodes, including both surgeons and nonsurgeons. After aggregating across CABG episodes in a year to construct the physician social networks serving each health system, we then assessed the level of physician teamwork in these networks with the bipartite clustering coefficient. Finally, we fit a series of multivariable regression models to evaluate associations between a health system's teamwork level and its 60-day surgical outcomes. We observed substantial variation in the level of teamwork between health systems performing CABG (SD for the bipartite clustering coefficient was 0.09). Although health systems with high and low teamwork levels treated beneficiaries with comparable comorbidity scores, these health systems differed over several sociocultural and healthcare capacity factors (eg, physician staff size and surgical caseload). After controlling for these differences, health systems with higher teamwork levels had significantly lower 60-day rates of emergency department visit, readmission, and mortality. Health systems with physicians who tend to work together in tightly-knit groups during CABG episodes realize better surgical outcomes. As such, delivery system reforms focused on building teamwork may have positive effects on surgical care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. [Pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. Alveolitis, fibrosis and pulmonar arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    Pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. Alveolitis, fibrosis and pulmonar arterial hypertension Lung disease is present in most of the patients with systemic sclerosis and is now the most important cause of mortality. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension are, so far, the main disorders found and both are difficult to detect at the earliest stages. However, diagnostic tools such as immunological test, lung function test, high resolution CT, bronchoalveolar lavage, echocardiography, right-side cardiac catheterization, or lung biopsy are necessary to accurately evaluate the clinical status and allow to improve the management organ-specific ad hoc. Progress in immunological and vascular therapies as well as other emergence drugs offer new expectations to scleroderma patients. Copyright © 2006 Elsevier España S.L. Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential bilateral central retinal artery occlusion as the primary manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xuan; ZHUANG Yan; DONG Fang-tian; ZHANG Fan; CHEN You-xin

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) has been rarely reported as the primary manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).The severe retinal vaso-occlusive diseases usually cause devastating and permanent damage to visual function in spite of vigorous treatment.A 42-year-old Chinese woman presented with abrupt bilateral vision loss.The diagnosis of bilateral CRAO was suggested by the ocular presentation and fluorescein angiography.Laboratory studies showed positive results of antinuclear antibody,anti-Ro/SSA anti-La/SSB; decreased levels of C3,C4 complement and normal levels of antiphospholipides antibodies (APAs).Her visual acuity deteriorated despite systemic steroid and immunosuppressant treatment.Severe vaso-occlusive retinopathy may be an earlier manifestation of SLE without elevated level of APAs.

  18. Renin system of the kidney in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseeva, L A; Dymshits, G M; Markel, A L; Jakobson, G S

    2009-02-01

    The renal renin system was studied in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension. The expression of genes for renin (Ren1) and cyclooxygenase (Cox-2) was evaluated in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats (normotensive control). Basal gene expression for Ren1 and Cox-2 in ISIAH rats was much lower than in WAG rats. Water deprivation for 11 h was followed by a 4-fold increase in Cox-2 gene expression in ISIAH rats. The increase in gene expression was insignificant in WAG rats (by 30%). Renin gene expression in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats remained practically unchanged after water deprivation. We conclude that a change in Cox-2 gene expression after short-term water deprivation serves as a reliable criterion for functional strain of the renal renin system in hypertensive ISIAH rats.

  19. Raynaud's phenomenon is correlated with elevated systolic pulmonary arterial pressure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, A; Floros, A; Gialafos, E; Kanakis, M; Tassiopoulos, S; Kafasi, N; Vaiopoulos, G

    2007-01-01

    In patients with Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Raynaud phenomenon (RP) is frequently present and associated with pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) is an indicator of PHT and can be estimated noninvasively. We attempt to explore the significance of RP in SLE and to correlate it with clinical and serological parameters of the disease. The study population consisted of 34 patients (age, sex and disease duration matched) who fulfilled the revised SLE criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, and were categorized into two groups: Group 1 had patients having SLE and RP (2 males/15 females, mean age 45 +/- 18 years) and group 2 had patients with SLE but without RP (3 males/14 females, mean age 40 +/- 14 years. Detailed cardiac ultrasound was performed including measurement of PASP, while clinical and serological features of both groups were collected and correlated. Significant differences were shown in the presence of arterial hypertension (P < 0.05), arthralgias (P < 0.005), arthritis (P < 0.05), myalgias (P < 0.05), alopecia (P < 0.05) and PASP (P < 0.0001). No difference was observed among the cardiac ultrasound indices and the ejection fraction between the two groups. PASP was significantly correlated with RP, while no correlation was observed regarding the disease duration. In patients with SLE, the presence of RP was associated with elevation in PASP. Further investigation is needed to clarify the significance of this relation.

  20. Nonbronchial systemic feeding arteries in patients with hemoptysis : predictive factors at radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull; Park, Kyung Joo; Chung, Kyung Il; Won, Je Hwan; Suh, Jung Ho [Ajou Univ. School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    To determine the radiographic findings which predict the presence of nonbronchial systemic feeding arteries (NBFAs) in patients undergoing embolotherapy to control hemoptysis. In 48 patients (39 men and 9 women ; mean age, 51 years) who underwent embolotherapeutic procedures for controlling hemoptysis, selective angiography was performed at the intercostal, subclavian and bronchial arteries in 65 hemithoraces (right 11, left 20, bilateral 17). Underlying diseases were tuberculosis (n=34, including three patients with aspergilloma), bronchiectasis )n=11), paragonimiasis (n=2) and metastatic cancer (n=1). The presence of NBFA at angiography was correlated with radiographic findings including pleural thickening, parenchymal distortion, and the location of lung lesions. NBFAs were found in 34 (77%) of 44 hemithoraces with pleural thickening, and in six (29%) of 21 without pleural thickening ; the sensitivity and specificity of prediction were 85% and 60%, respectively. NBFAs were observed with greater frequency as the thickness of the pleura increased, and the extent of pleural thickening correlated less with the presence of NBFA than did thickness. NBFAs were found in 35 (78%) of 45 hemithoraces with parenchymal distortion, and in five (25%) of 20 without distortion (p<0.001). In addition, the distribution of the underlying disease in the upper lung zone showed close correlation with the presence of NBFAs (p<0.05). In patients with hemoptysis, the pleural thickening revealed by radiography has a high sensitivity and a relatively low specificity for predicting the presence of NBFA, and patients with parenchymal distortion and upper lung lesions have a high incidence of NBFA.

  1. Oxygen tension and normalisation pressure modulate nifedipine-sensitive relaxation of human placental chorionic plate arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E J; Wareing, M; Greenwood, S L; Baker, P N

    2006-01-01

    Fetoplacental blood vessel constriction in response to reduced oxygenation has been demonstrated in placenta perfused in vitro. In pulmonary vessels, hypoxic vasoconstriction involves Ca2+ influx into smooth muscle through membrane ion channels including voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs). We hypothesised that VGCCs are involved in agonist-induced constriction of fetoplacental resistance vessels and that their contribution is modulated by oxygen. Chorionic plate small arteries were studied using wire myography. Arteries were normalised at high (0.9 of L(13.3 kPa)) or low (0.9 of L(5.1 kPa)) stretch and experiments performed at 156, 38 or 15 mmHg oxygen. At low stretch, U46619 (thromboxane-mimetic) or KCl (smooth muscle depolarisation) constriction was greater at 38 than 156 or 15 mmHg oxygen. An L-type VGCC blocker nifedipine, inhibited KCl constriction by >85% but was less effective in U46619 constrictions (43-67%). At high stretch, nifedipine inhibition of KCl- and U46619-induced constriction was less at 15 than 38 or 156 mmHg oxygen. Oxygen did not affect constriction to U46619 or nifedipine-induced relaxation when vessels were normalised at high stretch. In conclusion, oxygen modulates chorionic plate arterial constriction at low stretch but regulation is lost at high stretch. U46619 constriction is underlain by VGCCs and nifedipine-insensitive processes; their relative contribution is influenced by oxygen.

  2. Cardiovascular system identification: Simulation study using arterial and central venous pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamolegkos, Nikolaos; Vicario, Francesco; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a study of the identifiability of a lumped model of the cardiovascular system. The significance of this work from the existing literature is in the potential advantage of using both arterial and central venous (CVP) pressures, two signals that are frequently monitored in the critical care unit. The analysis is done on the system's state-space representation via control theory and system identification techniques. Non-parametric state-space identification is preferred over other identification techniques as it optimally assesses the order of a model, which best describes the input-output data, without any prior knowledge about the system. In particular, a recent system identification algorithm, namely Observer Kalman Filter Identification with Deterministic Projection, is used to identify a simplified version of an existing cardiopulmonary model. The outcome of the study highlights the following two facts. In the deterministic (noiseless) case, the theoretical indicators report that the model is fully identifiable, whereas the stochastic case reveals the difficulty in determining the complete system's dynamics. This suggests that even with the use of CVP as an additional pressure signal, the identification of a more detailed (high order) model of the circulatory system remains a challenging task.

  3. Emergency and elective implantation of covered stent systems in iatrogenic arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltz, J.P.; Kickuth, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Bastuerk, P.; Hoppe, H.; Triller, J. [Universitaetsspital Bern (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Diagnostische, Interventionelle und Paediatrische Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of covered stents for the management of iatrogenic arterial injury. Materials and Methods: Between 03/1998 and 12/2009, 31 patients underwent selective covered stent implantation after iatrogenic arterial injury. 12/31 of these patients (38.7 %) were hemodynamically unstable. Six different endovascular covered stent types were utilized. The primary endpoints of this study were technical and clinical success and rates of minor and major complications. Results: Initial angiograms demonstrated active extravasation in 19 (61.3 %) patients and pseudoaneurysms in 12 (38.7 %) patients. The following sites of bleeding origin were detected: axillary artery, subclavian artery, common iliac artery, external iliac artery, internal iliac artery, common femoral artery, superficial femoral artery, popliteal and fibular artery, femoro-popliteal and popliteo-crural bypasses, common hepatic artery, aberrant hepatic artery, cystic and gastroduodenal artery. In all patients bleeding was effectively controlled by covered stent implantation resulting in an immediate technical success of 100 %. Clinical success attributed to covered stent implantation was documented in 30 of the 31 patients (96.8 %). Major complications included death in four patients (11.1 %), acute thrombosis with arm ischemia in one patient (2.8 %) and stent fracture with associated pseudoaneurysm in another patient (2.8 %). In 2/31 patients (6.5 %) covered stent failure was detected and successfully treated by implantation of a second covered stent. Conclusion: Emergency and elective implantation of covered stents may be used for minimally invasive and effective management of iatrogenic arterial injury. (orig.)

  4. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are 'Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM' and 'Human-System Modelling (HSM', are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operators' skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory-motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human-mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  5. Ventricular mass index correlates with pulmonary artery pressure and predicts survival in suspected systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Dan; Condliffe, Robin; Woodhouse, Neil; Elliot, Charlie A; Armstrong, Iain J; Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine; Akil, Mohammed; Wild, Jim M; Kiely, David G

    2009-09-01

    The ventricular mass index (VMI) has been proposed as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension (PH). We hypothesized that in patients with SSc it may predict the presence or absence of PH. Details of all consecutive SSc patients undergoing MRI and right heart catheterization were collected prospectively. Subsequently, the VMI for all patients was calculated, and further baseline data were collected. Data for 40 patients, 28 of whom were diagnosed with PH at rest (PH(REST)), were analysed. VMI correlated strongly with mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP; r = 0.79). Using a VMI threshold of 0.56, positive predictive value (PPV) for PH(REST) was 88% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%. Using a threshold of 0.7, PPV was found to be 100% and NPV 53%. Echocardiographically obtained tricuspid gradient (TG) also demonstrated a strong correlation with mPAP. Two-year survival in patients with VMI or =0.7 was 91 and 43%, respectively (P VMI correlates well with mPAP in patients with SSc and may have a role in non-invasively excluding clinically significant PH in breathless SSc patients in whom echocardiographic screening has failed. Further study in larger groups of patients is justified.

  6. Induction by lysophosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid component of atherogenic lipoproteins, of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-07-28

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to determine whether lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), a prominent component of oxidatively modified LDL, induces migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and, if so, to clarify the mechanism, and (2) to investigate the possible interactions of lyso-PC and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, endothelin- (ET-1), adrenomedullin (AM), or vitamin E on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. Lyso-PC induced SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-5) mol/L. By contrast, phosphatidylcholine was without significant activity, and lysophosphatidylinositol and lysophosphatidylserine were much less effective than lyso-PC. Lyso-PC increased basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) production in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-5) mol/L in these cells. Furthermore, lyso-PC-induced SMC migration was inhibited by neutralizing antibody to bFGF but not by neutralizing antibody to transforming growth factor-beta1. Lyso-PC-induced migration was significantly enhanced by PDGF-BB or ET-1 but was clearly inhibited by human AM and vitamin E. These results indicate that (1) lyso-PC induces human coronary artery SMC migration at least in part through release of endogenous bFGF and (2) this lyso-PC-induced migration can be further induced by PDGF-BB and ET-1 and can be inhibited by human AM and vitamin E. Lyso-PC may recruit medial SMCs during the process of coronary atherosclerosis in part by releasing bFGF in concert with PDGF-BB or ET-1 in vascular tissues. This lyso-PC-induced SMC migration may be suppressed by AM and vitamin E under certain pathological conditions.

  7. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Green, Melissa; Boris, Jay; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    We describe a model for systems-level transport in the human circulatory system that is based on a set of equations for a one-dimensional unsteady elastic pipe flow circuit. The system is collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To drive the fluid, the contractions of a beating heart are modeled as periodic area changes of the elastic vessels. Two different models are compared, both including and neglecting fluid acceleration. Time-resolved distributions of pressure, velocity and area compare reasonably well with reference data. Increasing the rigidity of the vasculature is found to increase peak arterial pressures on the order of ten percent, and including a distributed vascular contraction to model distributed skeletal muscle contractions monotonically increases time-averaged blood flow in the veins, consistent with human physiological response. The circulatory system model presented here simulates the circulatory system on the order of one hundred times faster than real-time; that is, we can compute thousands of heartbeats per minute of CPU time.

  8. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  9. Prediction of new onset of resting pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voilliot, Damien; Magne, Julien; Dulgheru, Raluca; Kou, Seisyou; Henri, Christine; Caballero, Luis; De Sousa, Carla; Sprynger, Muriel; Andre, Béatrice; Pierard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is crucial in systemic scleroderma. However, predictors of new onset of resting PH during follow-up (FUPH) have been poorly explored. To determine whether nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) grade and exercise echocardiographic variables are predictors of FUPH. We prospectively enrolled 40 patients with systemic sclerosis (age 54±13 years; 68% women). All patients underwent graded semisupine exercise echocardiography and NVC. Baseline resting PH and FUPH were defined as systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP)>35 mmHg, and exercise-induced PH (EIPH) as exercise sPAP>50 mmHg. Seventeen patients developed EIPH (43%). During follow-up (FU) (25±15 months), 11 patients without baseline PH developed FUPH (28%), all from the EIPH group. Patients with FUPH were significantly older (60±14 vs 50±12 years; P=0.04), had higher resting and exercise sPAP (30±4 vs 22±5 and 60±12 vs 40±11 mmHg, respectively; P2 (90% vs 35%; P=0.0009). After adjustment for age, resting sPAP, exercise sPAP and NVC grade>2 were associated with maximal resting sPAP during follow-up and FUPH (P2 had a very high incidence of FUPH (82%), and both variables remained strongly associated with FUPH after adjustment for age (hazard ratio 11.6, 95% confidence interval 2.4-55.3; P=0.002). Exercise echocardiography and NVC can identify a subgroup of patients with systemic sclerosis who are at risk of developing FUPH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Systemic leukotriene B4 receptor antagonism lowers arterial blood pressure and improves autonomic function in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvar, Paul J; Hendy, Emma B; Cruise, Thomas D; Walas, Dawid; DeCicco, Danielle; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Schwaber, James S; Waki, Hidefumi; Murphy, David; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-10-15

    Evidence indicates an association between hypertension and chronic systemic inflammation in both human hypertension and experimental animal models. Previous studies in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) support a role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4 ), a potent chemoattractant involved in the inflammatory response, but its mode of action is poorly understood. In the SHR, we observed an increase in T cells and macrophages in the brainstem; in addition, gene expression profiling data showed that LTB4 production, degradation and downstream signalling in the brainstem of the SHR are dynamically regulated during hypertension. When LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) receptors were blocked with CP-105,696, arterial pressure was reduced in the SHR compared to the normotensive control and this reduction was associated with a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (BP) indicators. These data provide new evidence for the role of LTB4 as an important neuro-immune pathway in the development of hypertension and therefore may serve as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of neurogenic hypertension. Accumulating evidence indicates an association between hypertension and chronic systemic inflammation in both human hypertension and experimental animal models. Previous studies in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) support a role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4 ), a potent chemoattractant involved in the inflammatory response. However, the mechanism for LTB4 -mediated inflammation in hypertension is poorly understood. Here we report in the SHR, increased brainstem infiltration of T cells and macrophages plus gene expression profiling data showing that LTB4 production, degradation and downstream signalling in the brainstem of the SHR are dynamically regulated during hypertension. Chronic blockade of the LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor with CP-105,696, reduced arterial pressure in the SHR compared to the normotensive control and this reduction was associated with a significant

  11. 5-HT1D receptor agonists and human coronary artery reactivity in vitro: crossover comparisons of 5-HT and sumatriptan with rizatriptan and L-741,519.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, J; Boulanger, C M; Desta, B; Hill, R G; Schofield, W N; Taylor, A A

    1996-10-01

    1. Rizatriptan (MK-462, (N,N-dimethyl-2-[5-(1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)-1H-indol-3-yl] ethylamine)) and its structurally related analogue L-741,519 (N-methyl-4-[5-(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)-1H-indol-3-yl]piperidine) are novel 5-HT1D-receptor agonists. Rizatriptan has shown efficacy as an anti-migraine agent in clinical trials. Since angiographic studies in patients have shown that sumatriptan (an established 5-HT1D-receptor agonist) can cause coronary artery vasoconstriction, we compared the effects of rizatriptan and L-741,519 with those of 5-HT and sumatriptan on endothelium-denuded segments of human coronary artery in vitro. 2. Coronary arteries were obtained from explanted hearts from patients undergoing cardiac transplantation (n = 16 viable arteries from 13 males, 3 females, aged 38-68 years) and arterial segments (5-6 mm in length) were mounted in organ baths for isometric tension recording. Each segment was first exposed to 45mM KCl and then to 5-HT (1 nM-100 microM). Concentration-effect curves to rizatriptan and sumatriptan (Study 1, n = 6 or 7 arteries) or sumatriptan and L-741,519 (Study 2, n = 8 arteries) were then performed in a consecutive and random manner. The response to repeated application of 5-HT was obtained in separate segments. 3. One artery showed severe atheroma and was not included in the analysis. ANOVA showed that 5-HT responsiveness varied significantly between arteries from different patients; but not between arterial segments from the same patient. Desensitization was seen consistently across all agonists but did not significantly affect inter-agonist comparisons. 4. There was graded effectiveness in the ability of the agonists to cause contraction with the rank order of Emax values being 5-HT > sumatriptan > L-741,519 > rizatriptan. In terms of EC50 values, L-741,519 was significantly more potent than sumatriptan. 5. The present study (using a 'cross-over' experimental protocol) confirms our previous observation that rizatriptan is less

  12. Transcriptional profiling of human liver identifies sex-biased genes associated with polygenic dyslipidemia and coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijing Zhang

    Full Text Available Sex-differences in human liver gene expression were characterized on a genome-wide scale using a large liver sample collection, allowing for detection of small expression differences with high statistical power. 1,249 sex-biased genes were identified, 70% showing higher expression in females. Chromosomal bias was apparent, with female-biased genes enriched on chrX and male-biased genes enriched on chrY and chr19, where 11 male-biased zinc-finger KRAB-repressor domain genes are distributed in six clusters. Top biological functions and diseases significantly enriched in sex-biased genes include transcription, chromatin organization and modification, sexual reproduction, lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Notably, sex-biased genes are enriched at loci associated with polygenic dyslipidemia and coronary artery disease in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, of the 8 sex-biased genes at these loci, 4 have been directly linked to monogenic disorders of lipid metabolism and show an expression profile in females (elevated expression of ABCA1, APOA5 and LDLR; reduced expression of LIPC that is consistent with the lower female risk of coronary artery disease. Female-biased expression was also observed for CYP7A1, which is activated by drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia. Several sex-biased drug-metabolizing enzyme genes were identified, including members of the CYP, UGT, GPX and ALDH families. Half of 879 mouse orthologs, including many genes of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, show growth hormone-regulated sex-biased expression in mouse liver, suggesting growth hormone might play a similar regulatory role in human liver. Finally, the evolutionary rate of protein coding regions for human-mouse orthologs, revealed by dN/dS ratio, is significantly higher for genes showing the same sex-bias in both species than for non-sex-biased genes. These findings establish that human hepatic sex differences are widespread and affect diverse cell

  13. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of an Aneurysmal Aberrant Systemic Artery Supplying a Pulmonary Sequestrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Duus, Louise Aarup; Elle, Bo

    2015-10-01

    An aberrant systemic artery originating from the abdominal aorta supplying a pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. This causes a left-to-left shunt. Symptoms include recurrent pneumonias, hemoptysis, and, in the long term, heart failure. Aneurysm of the aberrant vessel is rarely seen. Traditionally, treatment of pulmonary sequestrations includes ligation of the feeding vessel and lobectomy. A new promising treatment is an endovascular approach. Only a few cases describe endovascular treatment of pulmonary sequestration. This is the first published case of a giant aneurysmal branch from the abdominal aorta to the normal basal segments of the lung, successfully occluded with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II, St.Jude Medical, MN, USA) alone.

  15. Infections Increase Risk of Arterial and Venous Thromboses in Danish Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baronaite Hansen, Renata; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Infections and thromboses are known complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated if infectious episodes in patients with SLE were followed by an increased risk of thrombotic events. METHODS: A cohort of 571 patients with prevalent or incident SLE was followed...... for a mean of 8.9 ± 7.6 years. All episodes of hospitalized infections or episodes of cutaneous herpes zoster as well as arterial and venous thrombotic events were identified by retrospective chart review and prospective updating of a clinical database. For time-dependent analyses adjusted for age, sex...... was increased [relative rate (RR) 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.6, and RR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.9, respectively]. Venous thromboses were in particular more prevalent after respiratory infections (RR 5.4, 95% CI 2.3-13). CONCLUSION: The temporal associations observed in this study indicate that infections could be risk factors...

  16. Endovascular Treatment of an Aneurysmal Aberrant Systemic Artery Supplying a Pulmonary Sequestrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz, E-mail: klk@dadlnet.dk [Odense University Hospital, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Duus, Louise Aarup, E-mail: louise.brodersen@gmail.com [Sygehus Lillebaelt Vejle, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Elle, Bo, E-mail: Bo.Elle@rsyd.dk [Odense University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Denmark)

    2015-10-15

    An aberrant systemic artery originating from the abdominal aorta supplying a pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. This causes a left-to-left shunt. Symptoms include recurrent pneumonias, hemoptysis, and, in the long term, heart failure. Aneurysm of the aberrant vessel is rarely seen. Traditionally, treatment of pulmonary sequestrations includes ligation of the feeding vessel and lobectomy. A new promising treatment is an endovascular approach. Only a few cases describe endovascular treatment of pulmonary sequestration. This is the first published case of a giant aneurysmal branch from the abdominal aorta to the normal basal segments of the lung, successfully occluded with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II, St.Jude Medical, MN, USA) alone.

  17. Hipertensão arterial sistêmica e anestesia Hipertensión arterial sistémica y anestesia Systemic hypertension and anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Nacur Lorentz

    2005-10-01

    evidencias de la literatura que puedan direccionar la práctica clínica. CONTENIDO: El artículo presenta incidencia y clasificación de la hipertensión arterial sistémica, además de relatar y comentar trabajos relevantes a respecto de la hipertensión arterial en el paciente quirúrgico. CONCLUSIONES: Aún no están establecidos sobre cuales niveles máximos de presión son compatibles con una cirugía electiva, siendo que, actualmente, los criterios para la suspensión de la cirugía en el paciente hipertenso mal controlado son mucho más apoyados en dados empíricos que en evidencias. Existe una inclinación en aplazar la cirugía cuando la PA es superior a 180/110 mmHg, solamente que cada caso debe ser analizado aisladamente, valorando más lesiones en órganos mira que en la presión arterial propiamente dicha.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Due to the high incidence of systemic hypertension and the lack of consensus on pressure levels to be accepted before inducing anesthesia for elective procedures, literature associated to hypertension and anesthesia was reviewed. Considering that canceling a surgery implies expenses making Medicine increasingly more expensive and that, on the other hand, anesthesia should be induced in the safest possible manner, this study aimed at evaluating literature evidences to orient clinical practice. CONTENTS: Incidence and classification of systemic hypertension in addition to reports and comments on relevant studies approaching hypertension in surgical patients are presented. CONCLUSIONS: Maximum pressure levels compatible with elective procedures are still not established and today criteria to cancel surgery of poorly controlled hypertensive patients are more based on empirical data than on evidences. There is a trend to cancel the procedure when BP is above 180/110 mmHg, but situations should be evaluated in a case-by-case basis, giving more importance to target-organs injury than to blood pressure itself.

  18. Relative contributions of PM2.5 chemical constituents to acute arterial vasoconstriction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urch, Bruce; Brook, Jeffrey R; Wasserstein, David; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Corey, Paul; Silverman, Frances

    2004-06-01

    Studies have shown associations between acute ambient particulate matter (PM) levels and increases in morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported in 24 healthy adults that exposure to concentrated ambient particles plus ozone (CAP + O(3)) caused a mean decrease of 0.09 mm in brachial artery diameter (BAD), which was significantly larger than a mean increase of 0.01 mm among the same individuals exposed to filtered air (FA). Our current objective is to examine the relationship between total and constituent PM(2.5) mass concentrations and the acute vascular response. We have analyzed both ambient and exposure filters from the brachial artery study for major chemical constituents, allowing us to compare the strength of the associations between each constituent and an individual's arterial response. We determined gravimetric PM(2.5) mass concentration and inorganic ion content from exposure filters. Twenty-three-hour ambient PM(2.5) filters collected from the same site and on the same day were used to estimate exposure concentrations of trace elements and organic and elemental carbon. We performed linear regression analyses on the levels of measured or estimated PM constituents using each subject's FA exposure as a control. We found, from our regression analyses, a significant negative association between both the organic and elemental carbon concentrations and the difference in the postexposure change in the BAD (Delta BAD) between and CAP + O(3) and FA exposure days. An understanding of the PM constituents most responsible for adverse health outcomes is critical for efforts to develop pollution abatement strategies that maximize benefits to public health.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  20. Atrial distension, arterial pulsation, and vasopressin release during negative pressure breathing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Damgaard, M; Gabrielsen, A

    2001-01-01

    in eight healthy males, we tested the hypothesis that with similar increases in LA diameter, suppression of AVP release is dependent on the degree of increase in PP. LA diameter increased similarly during the posture change and negative pressure breathing (-9 to -24 mmHg) from between 30 and 31 +/- 1 to 34......During an antiorthostatic posture change, left atrial (LA) diameter and arterial pulse pressure (PP) increase, and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) is suppressed. By comparing the effects of a 15-min posture change from seated to supine with those of 15-min seated negative pressure breathing...... +/- 1 mm (P breathing from 36 +/- 3 to 42 +/- 3 mmHg (P

  1. Atrial distension, arterial pulsation, and vasopressin release during negative pressure breathing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Damgaard, M; Gabrielsen, A;

    2001-01-01

    During an antiorthostatic posture change, left atrial (LA) diameter and arterial pulse pressure (PP) increase, and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) is suppressed. By comparing the effects of a 15-min posture change from seated to supine with those of 15-min seated negative pressure breathing...... in eight healthy males, we tested the hypothesis that with similar increases in LA diameter, suppression of AVP release is dependent on the degree of increase in PP. LA diameter increased similarly during the posture change and negative pressure breathing (-9 to -24 mmHg) from between 30 and 31 +/- 1 to 34...... +/- 1 mm (P breathing from 36 +/- 3 to 42 +/- 3 mmHg (P

  2. Left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses to ketamine and TEE in chronically instrumented monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S. C.; Ludwig, D. A.; Reister, C.; Fanton, J. W.; Ewert, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of prescribed doses of ketamine five minutes after application and influences of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses were investigated to test the hypothesis that ketamine and/or TEE probe insertion alter cardiovascular function. Seven rhesus monkeys were tested under each of four randomly selected experimental conditions: (1) intravenous bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 ml), (2) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min), (3) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min) with TEE, and (4) control (no ketamine or TEE). Monkeys were chronically instrumented with a high fidelity, dual-sensor micromanometer to measure left ventricular and aortic pressure and a transit-time ultrasound probe to measure aortic flow. These measures were used to calculate left ventricular function. A 4-element Windkessel lumped-parameter model was used to estimate total peripheral resistance and systemic arterial compliance. Baroreflex response was calculated as the change in R-R interval divided by the change in mean aortic pressure measured during administration of graded concentrations of nitroprusside. The results indicated that five minutes after ketamine application heart rate and left ventricular diastolic compliance decreased while TEE increased aortic systolic and diastolic pressure. We conclude that ketamine may be administered as either a bolus or continuous infusion without affecting cardiovascular function 5 minutes after application while the insertion of a TEE probe will increase aortic pressure. The results for both ketamine and TEE illustrate the classic "Hawthorne Effect," where the observed values are partly a function of the measurement process. Measures of aortic pressure, heart rate, and left ventricular diastolic pressure should be viewed as relative, as opposed to absolute, when organisms are sedated with ketamine or instrumented with a TEE probe.

  3. Wave speed in human coronary arteries is not influenced by microvascular vasodilation: implications for wave intensity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandi, M Cristina; De Silva, Kalpa; Lumley, Matthew; Lockie, Timothy P E; Clapp, Brian; Spaan, Jos A E; Perera, Divaka; Siebes, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Wave intensity analysis and wave separation are powerful tools for interrogating coronary, myocardial and microvascular physiology. Wave speed is integral to these calculations and is usually estimated by the single-point technique (SPc), a feasible but as yet unvalidated approach in coronary vessels. We aimed to directly measure wave speed in human coronary arteries and assess the impact of adenosine and nitrate administration. In 14 patients, the transit time Δt between two pressure signals was measured in angiographically normal coronary arteries using a microcatheter equipped with two high-fidelity pressure sensors located Δs = 5 cm apart. Simultaneously, intracoronary pressure and flow velocity were measured with a dual-sensor wire to derive SPc. Actual wave speed was calculated as DNc = Δs/Δt. Hemodynamic signals were recorded at baseline and during adenosine-induced hyperemia, before and after nitroglycerin administration. The energy of separated wave intensity components was assessed using SPc and DNc. At baseline, DNc equaled SPc (15.9 ± 1.8 vs. 16.6 ± 1.5 m/s). Adenosine-induced hyperemia lowered SPc by 40 % (p DNc remained unchanged, leading to marked differences in respective separated wave energies. Nitroglycerin did not affect DNc, whereas SPc transiently fell to 12.0 ± 1.2 m/s (p < 0.02). Human coronary wave speed is reliably estimated by SPc under resting conditions but not during adenosine-induced vasodilation. Since coronary wave speed is unaffected by microvascular dilation, the SPc estimate at rest can serve as surrogate for separating wave intensity signals obtained during hyperemia, thus greatly extending the scope of WIA to study coronary physiology in humans.

  4. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  5. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is released from capsaicin-sensitive nerve fibres and induces vasodilatation of human cerebral arteries concomitant with activation of adenylyl cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, I; Mortensen, A; Edvinsson, L

    1996-01-01

    strong and potent relaxation of precontracted circular vessel segments. The Imax (maximum relaxant effect) to human calcitonin was low and the pD2 (concentration for half maximum effect) 7.7 was much lower than that of CGRP. The CGRP-1, antagonist human alpha-CGRP8-37 blocked the response to human alpha......-CGRP but not to human beta-CGRP, while the putative antagonist [Tyr]CGRP28-37 did not. Capsaicin (10(-15)-10(-8)M) caused relaxation of the cerebral arteries by 22% of precontraction. Pre-treatment with 10(-6)M human alpha-CGRP8-37 inhibited this relaxation. Human alpha-CGRP increased the cyclic AMP content of human...... cerebral arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase in adenylyl cyclase activity was blocked by human alpha-CGRP8-37. The results suggest that CGRP-1 receptors coupled to adenylyl cyclase are present in human cerebral arteries....

  7. Development of the human aortic arch system captured in an interactive three-dimensional reference model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, M Sameer; Sizarov, Aleksander; Christoffels, Vincent M; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2014-06-01

    Variations and mutations in the human genome, such as 22q11.2 microdeletion, can increase the risk for congenital defects, including aortic arch malformations. Animal models are increasingly expanding our molecular and genetic insights into aortic arch development. However, in order to justify animal-to-human extrapolations, a human morphological, and molecular reference model would be of great value, but is currently lacking. Here, we present interactive three-dimensional reconstructions of the developing human aortic arch system, supplemented with the protein distribution of developmental markers for patterning and growth, including T-box transcription factor TBX1, a major candidate for the phenotypes found in patients with the 22q11.2 microdeletion. These reconstructions and expression data facilitate unbiased interpretations, and reveal previously unappreciated aspects of human aortic arch development. Based on our reconstructions and on reported congenital anomalies of the pulmonary trunk and tributaries, we postulate that the pulmonary arteries originate from the aortic sac, rather than from the sixth pharyngeal arch arteries. Similar to mouse, TBX1 is expressed in pharyngeal mesenchyme and epithelia. The endothelium of the pharyngeal arch arteries is largely negative for TBX1 and family member TBX2 but expresses neural crest marker AP2α, which gradually decreases with ongoing development of vascular smooth muscle. At early stages, the pharyngeal arch arteries, aortic sac, and the dorsal aortae in particular were largely negative for proliferation marker Ki67, potentially an important parameter during aortic arch system remodeling. Together, our data support current animal-to-human extrapolations and future genetic and molecular analyses using animal models of congenital heart disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Binding of human coronary artery endothelial cells to plasma-treated titanium dioxide nanotubes of different diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flašker, Ajda; Kulkarni, Mukta; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Junkar, Ita; Čučnik, Saša; Žigon, Polona; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Iglič, Aleš; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna

    2016-05-01

    Nanoscale topography in improving vascular response in vitro was established previously on various titanium surfaces. In the present study different surface nanotopographies that is different diameters of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanotubes (NTs) were fabricated by electrochemical anodization and conditioned with highly reactive gaseous oxygen plasma. The morphology of different diameter NTs was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while changes in chemical composition on the surface before and after plasma treatment were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Performance of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) on those conditioned surfaces was studied in regard to cell proliferation, released IL-6 protein and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM). We show that HCAEC function is dependent on the diameter of the TiO2 NTs, functioning far less optimally when bound to 100 nm TiO2 NTs as compared to Ti foil, 15 nm NTs or 50 nm NTs. There were improved, morphological cell shape changes, observed with IFM, between HCAEC growing on oxygen-rich plasma-treated versus nontreated 100 nm NTs. These endothelialized conditioned Ti nanosurfaces could elucidate optimization conditions necessary for vascular implants in coronary arteries.

  9. Effect of Australian propolis from stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria on pre-contracted human and porcine isolated arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia C Massaro

    Full Text Available Bee propolis is a mixture of plant resins and bee secretions. While bioactivity of honeybee propolis has been reported previously, information is limited on propolis from Australian stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria. The aim of this study was to investigate possible vasomodulatory effects of propolis in KCl-precontracted porcine coronary arteries using an ex vivo tissue bath assay. Polar extracts of propolis produced a dose-dependent relaxant response (EC50=44.7±7.0 μg/ml, which was unaffected by endothelial denudation, suggesting a direct effect on smooth muscle. Propolis markedly attenuated a contractile response to Ca(2+ in vessels that were depolarised with 60 mM KCl, in Ca(2+-free Krebs solution. Propolis (160 µg/ml reduced vascular tone in KCl pre-contracted vessels to near-baseline levels over 90 min, and this effect was partially reversible with 6 h washout. Some loss in membrane integrity, but no loss in mitochondrial function was detected after 90 min exposure of human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells to 160 µg/ml propolis. We conclude that Australian stingless bee (T. carbonaria propolis relaxes porcine coronary artery in an endothelial-independent manner that involves inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels. This effect is partially and slowly reversible upon washout. Further studies are required to determine the therapeutic potential of Australian stingless bee propolis for conditions in which vascular supply is compromised.

  10. Effect of Australian propolis from stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria) on pre-contracted human and porcine isolated arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Flavia C; Brooks, Peter R; Wallace, Helen M; Nsengiyumva, Vianne; Narokai, Lorraine; Russell, Fraser D

    2013-01-01

    Bee propolis is a mixture of plant resins and bee secretions. While bioactivity of honeybee propolis has been reported previously, information is limited on propolis from Australian stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria). The aim of this study was to investigate possible vasomodulatory effects of propolis in KCl-precontracted porcine coronary arteries using an ex vivo tissue bath assay. Polar extracts of propolis produced a dose-dependent relaxant response (EC50=44.7±7.0 μg/ml), which was unaffected by endothelial denudation, suggesting a direct effect on smooth muscle. Propolis markedly attenuated a contractile response to Ca(2+) in vessels that were depolarised with 60 mM KCl, in Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. Propolis (160 µg/ml) reduced vascular tone in KCl pre-contracted vessels to near-baseline levels over 90 min, and this effect was partially reversible with 6 h washout. Some loss in membrane integrity, but no loss in mitochondrial function was detected after 90 min exposure of human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells to 160 µg/ml propolis. We conclude that Australian stingless bee (T. carbonaria) propolis relaxes porcine coronary artery in an endothelial-independent manner that involves inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. This effect is partially and slowly reversible upon washout. Further studies are required to determine the therapeutic potential of Australian stingless bee propolis for conditions in which vascular supply is compromised.

  11. Pulsatility Index of Blood Echogenicity of the Human Radial and Common Carotid Arteries: Relation with Age and Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bok, Tae Hoon; Kong, Qi; Nam, Kweon Ho; Choi, Jay Chol; Paeng, Dong Guk [Department of Ocean System Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In the present paper, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both the human radial artery(RA) and common carotid artery(CCA), depending on the age, and the pulsatility index of blood echogenicity(PIBE) was analyzed. In addition, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both RA and CCA of both the stroke patients and the control group, and PIBE was compared. PIBE of RA for the young group was similar with that for the old group (0.13{+-}0.21 and 0.16{+-}0.03). PIBE of CCA for the young group, however, was larger than that for the old group (0.70{+-}0.21 and 0.32{+-}0.01), and was more variable depending on the subject. Similarly, the fibrinogen concentrations of the patients (336{+-}61 and 340{+-}126 mg/dl) were more than that of the control group (264{+-}38 and 43 mg/dl), for both RA and CCA. The results indicate the possibility of the ultrasonic test on the correlation between erythrocyte aggregation and stroke, and it is expected that the in-vivo EA measurement would be clinically useful.

  12. Effect of Australian Propolis from Stingless Bees (Tetragonula carbonaria) on Pre-Contracted Human and Porcine Isolated Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Flavia C.; Brooks, Peter R.; Wallace, Helen M.; Nsengiyumva, Vianne; Narokai, Lorraine; Russell, Fraser D.

    2013-01-01

    Bee propolis is a mixture of plant resins and bee secretions. While bioactivity of honeybee propolis has been reported previously, information is limited on propolis from Australian stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria). The aim of this study was to investigate possible vasomodulatory effects of propolis in KCl-precontracted porcine coronary arteries using an ex vivo tissue bath assay. Polar extracts of propolis produced a dose-dependent relaxant response (EC50=44.7±7.0 μg/ml), which was unaffected by endothelial denudation, suggesting a direct effect on smooth muscle. Propolis markedly attenuated a contractile response to Ca2+ in vessels that were depolarised with 60 mM KCl, in Ca2+-free Krebs solution. Propolis (160 µg/ml) reduced vascular tone in KCl pre-contracted vessels to near-baseline levels over 90 min, and this effect was partially reversible with 6h washout. Some loss in membrane integrity, but no loss in mitochondrial function was detected after 90 min exposure of human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells to 160 µg/ml propolis. We conclude that Australian stingless bee (T. carbonaria) propolis relaxes porcine coronary artery in an endothelial-independent manner that involves inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. This effect is partially and slowly reversible upon washout. Further studies are required to determine the therapeutic potential of Australian stingless bee propolis for conditions in which vascular supply is compromised. PMID:24260567

  13. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  14. Determinants of exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voilliot, Damien; Magne, Julien; Dulgheru, Raluca; Kou, Seisyou; Henri, Christine; Laaraibi, Saloua; Sprynger, Muriel; Andre, Béatrice; Pierard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-05-15

    Exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (EIPH) in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has already been observed but its determinants remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and the determinants of EIPH in SSc. We prospectively enrolled 63 patients with SSc (age 54±3years, 76% female) followed in CHU Sart-Tilman in Liège. All patients underwent graded semi-supine exercise echocardiography. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) was derived from the peak velocity of the tricuspid regurgitation jet and adding the estimation of right atrial pressure, both at rest and during exercise. Resting pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) was defined as sPAP > 35 mmHg and EIPH as sPAP > 50 mmHg during exercise. The following formulas were used: mean PAP (mPAP) = 0.61 × sPAP + 2, left atrial pressure (LAP)=1.9+1.24 × left ventricular (LV) E/e' and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)=(mPAP-LAP)/LV cardiac output (CO) and slope of mPAP-LVCO relationship=changes in mPAP/changes in LVCO. Resting PH was present in 3 patients (7%) and 21 patients developed EIPH (47%). Patients with EIPH had higher resting LAP (10.3 ± 2.2 versus 8.8 ± 2.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), resting PVR (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1 Woods units; p=0.004), exercise LAP (13.3 ± 2.3 vs. 9 ± 1.7 mmHg; p < 0.0001), exercise PVR (3.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.9 Woods units; p = 0.02) and slope of mPAP-LVCO (5.8 ± 2.4 vs. 2.9 ± 2.1 mmHg/L/min; p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and gender, exercise LAP (β=3.1 ± 0.8; p=0.001) and exercise PVR (β=7.9 ± 1.7; p=0.0001) were independent determinants of exercise sPAP. EIPH is frequent in SSc patients and is mainly related to both increased exercise LV filling pressure and exercise PVR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid Battery Ultracapacitor System For Human Robotic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop a hybrid battery-ultra capacitor storage system that powers human-robotic systems in space missions. Space missions...

  16. NASA Human System Risk Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA utilizes an evidence based system to perform risk assessments for the human system for spaceflight missions. The center of this process is the multi-disciplinary Human System Risk Board (HSRB). The HSRB is chartered from the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) at NASA Headquarters. The HSRB reviews all human system risks via an established comprehensive risk and configuration management plan based on a project management approach. The HSRB facilitates the integration of human research (terrestrial and spaceflight), medical operations, occupational surveillance, systems engineering and many other disciplines in a comprehensive review of human system risks. The HSRB considers all factors that influence human risk. These factors include pre-mission considerations such as screening criteria, training, age, sex, and physiological condition. In mission factors such as available countermeasures, mission duration and location and post mission factors such as time to return to baseline (reconditioning), post mission health screening, and available treatments. All of the factors influence the total risk assessment for each human risk. The HSRB performed a comprehensive review of all potential inflight medical conditions and events and over the course of several reviews consolidated the number of human system risks to 30, where the greatest emphasis is placed for investing program dollars for risk mitigation. The HSRB considers all available evidence from human research and, medical operations and occupational surveillance in assessing the risks for appropriate mitigation and future work. All applicable DRMs (low earth orbit for 6 and 12 months, deep space for 30 days and 1 year, a lunar mission for 1 year, and a planetary mission for 3 years) are considered as human system risks are modified by the hazards associated with space flight such as microgravity, exposure to radiation, distance from the earth, isolation and a closed environment. Each risk has a summary

  17. Reducing false positives of microcalcification detection systems by removal of breast arterial calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mordang, Jan-Jurre, E-mail: Jan-Jurre.Mordang@radboudumc.nl; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Karssemeijer, Nico [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard den [The National Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen 6503 GJ, The Netherlands and Department of Radiology, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DD (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In the past decades, computer-aided detection (CADe) systems have been developed to aid screening radiologists in the detection of malignant microcalcifications. These systems are useful to avoid perceptual oversights and can increase the radiologists’ detection rate. However, due to the high number of false positives marked by these CADe systems, they are not yet suitable as an independent reader. Breast arterial calcifications (BACs) are one of the most frequent false positives marked by CADe systems. In this study, a method is proposed for the elimination of BACs as positive findings. Removal of these false positives will increase the performance of the CADe system in finding malignant microcalcifications. Methods: A multistage method is proposed for the removal of BAC findings. The first stage consists of a microcalcification candidate selection, segmentation and grouping of the microcalcifications, and classification to remove obvious false positives. In the second stage, a case-based selection is applied where cases are selected which contain BACs. In the final stage, BACs are removed from the selected cases. The BACs removal stage consists of a GentleBoost classifier trained on microcalcification features describing their shape, topology, and texture. Additionally, novel features are introduced to discriminate BACs from other positive findings. Results: The CADe system was evaluated with and without BACs removal. Here, both systems were applied on a validation set containing 1088 cases of which 95 cases contained malignant microcalcifications. After bootstrapping, free-response receiver operating characteristics and receiver operating characteristics analyses were carried out. Performance between the two systems was compared at 0.98 and 0.95 specificity. At a specificity of 0.98, the sensitivity increased from 37% to 52% and the sensitivity increased from 62% up to 76% at a specificity of 0.95. Partial areas under the curve in the specificity

  18. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that infective agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), in particular Chlamydia pneumoniae and parvovirus B19. We investigated temporal arteries from patients with GCA for these infections as well as human herpes viruses...... conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8....... RESULTS: In all 30 biopsies, PCR was negative for DNAs of parvovirus B19, each of the eight human herpes viruses and C. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of DNA from parvovirus B19, human herpes virus or C. pneumoniae in any of the temporal arteries. These agents do not seem to play a unique...

  19. Study on Virtual Human Skeleton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭巧; 李亦

    2004-01-01

    A solution of virtual human skeleton system is proposed. Some issues on integration of anatomical geometry, biodynamics and computer animation are studied. The detailed skeleton system model that incorporates the biodynamic and geometric characteristics of a human skeleton system allows some performance studies in greater detail than that performed before. It may provide an effective and convenient way to analyze and evaluate the movement performance of a human body when the personalized anatomical data are used in the models. An example shows that the proposed solution is effective for the stated problems.

  20. The human cutaneous chemokine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eMoser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfil a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defence against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumours and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process.

  1. The NATO Unmanned Aircraft System Human Systems Integration Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    High level indicators of where human system interactions may occur • Textual descriptions of the overall human component of the system • Use cases...for specific team tasks  Type of interaction – i.e., collaborate, coordinate, supervise, etc.  Team cohesiveness indicators – i.e., trust

  2. Prostaglandin I2 and Prostaglandin E2 Modulate Human Intrarenal Artery Contractility Through Prostaglandin E2-EP4, Prostacyclin-IP, and Thromboxane A2-TP Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Morten P; Hansen, Pernille B L; Stubbe, Jane

    2014-01-01

    receptors. Intrarenal arteries were microdissected from human nephrectomy samples (n=53, median diameter ≈362 μm, 88% viable, 76% relaxed in response to acetylcholine). Rings were suspended in myographs to record force development. In vessels with K(+)-induced tension (EC70: -log [mol/L]=1.36±0.03), PGE2....../L elicited increased tension. This was abolished by thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist (S18886, 10(-6) mol/L). A TP agonist (U46619, n=6) evoked tension (EC50=8.1±0.2) that was inhibited by S18886. Polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting showed EP4, IP, and TP receptors in intrarenal arteries......Cyclooxygenase inhibitors decrease renal blood flow in settings with decreased effective circulating volume. The present study examined the hypothesis that prostaglandins, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (PGI2), induce relaxation of human intrarenal arteries through PGE2-EP and PGI2-IP...

  3. Unsteady Integrodifferential Equation of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Constricted Collapsible Tube Model of Diseased Human Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Velaski Tuema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady flow in a collapsible tube is analyzed to simulate a diseased human coronary artery. The novelty of the approach is that the set of equations governing the fluid-structure interaction is reduced to a single integrodifferential equation in the transient state. The equation is then solved using the finite difference method to obtain the flow characteristics and compliant wall behavior. Three control parameters are investigated, namely, Reynolds number, inlet transmural pressure, and the wall thickness. The predicted wall deflection is quite large at low Reynolds numbers, suggesting possible approach to breakdown in equilibrium. The transmural pressure increases with wall deflection and bulges appear at the ends of the membrane indicating critical stage of stability, consistent with previous studies. Increase in wall thickness reduces the wall deflection and ultimately results in its collapse which may indicate another breakdown in equilibrium. An increase in internal pressure is required to maintain membrane stability.

  4. CRESST Human Performance Knowledge Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    team processes and team outcomes. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 463-494. 0 Herl, H. E. (1995). Construct validation of an approach to modeling...system to measure content understanding. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 315-334. Johnson, R.F. (2001). Statistical measures of marksmanship (ARI...problem-solving. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 403-418. West, C. D., Pomeroy, J. R., Park, J. K., Gerstenberger, E. A., & Sandoval, J. (2000

  5. The CSF and arterial to internal jugular venous hormonal differences during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ott, Peter; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    the brain (a-v diff) of hormones that could influence its carbohydrate uptake (n= 9). In addition, neuroendocrine activity and a potential uptake of hormones via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assessed by lumbar puncture postexercise and at rest (n= 6). Exercise increased the arterial concentration...... protein (HSP72), insulin, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. The findings indicate that for maximal exercise, the concentration of noradrenaline is increased within the brain, whereas blood borne hormones and cytokines are seemingly unimportant. The results support the notion that the exercise......Strenuous exercise increases the cerebral uptake of carbohydrate out of proportion to that of oxygen, but it is unknown whether such enhanced carbohydrate uptake is influenced by the marked endocrine response to exercise. During exhaustive exercise this study evaluated the a-v differences across...

  6. Histology-validated x-ray tomography for imaging human coronary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscema, Marzia; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Khimchenko, Anna; Matviykiv, Sofiya; Holme, Margaret N.; Hipp, Alexander; Beckmann, Felix; Saxer, Till; Michaud, Katarzyna; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Heart disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. To improve therapy and patient outcome, the knowledge of anatomical changes in terms of lumen morphology and tissue composition of constricted arteries is crucial for designing a localized drug delivery to treat atherosclerosis disease. Traditional tissue characterization by histology is a pivotal tool, although it brings disadvantages such as vessel morphology modification during decalcification and slicing. X-ray tomography in absorption and phase contrast modes yields a deep understanding in blood vessel anatomy in healthy and diseased stages: measurements in absorption mode make visible highly absorbing tissue components including cholesterol plaques, whereas phase contrast tomography gains better contrast of the soft tissue components such as vessel walls. Established synchrotron radiation-based micro-CT techniques ensure high performance in terms of 3D visualization of highly absorbing and soft tissues.

  7. Modeling human operator involvement in robotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    A modeling approach is presented to describe complex manned robotic systems. The robotic system is modeled as a (highly) nonlinear, possibly time-varying dynamic system including any time delays in terms of optimal estimation, control and decision theory. The role of the human operator(s) is modeled

  8. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH.

  9. First-in-Human Experience With the Gore Balloon-Expandable Covered Endoprosthesis in Iliac Artery Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Buckley, Brendan; Connor, Brigid; Colgan, Frances; Hill, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    To report the first-in-human iliac artery experience of a new balloon-expandable covered endoprosthesis. A prospective, single-center pilot study recruited 30 symptomatic patients (mean age 64 years; 18 men) to evaluate the safety and early efficacy of the new Gore balloon-expandable covered endoprosthesis for the treatment of de novo or restenotic common and/or external iliac artery lesions. According to protocol, up to 2 discrete lesions could be treated with a maximum total treated length ≤110 mm. Follow-up included clinical evaluation with duplex ultrasound at 1, 6, and 12 months. Data are presented through 12-month follow-up. The primary safety endpoint was a composite of device- or procedure-related death, myocardial infarction, or amputation in the treated leg within 30 days of the index procedure. Multiple performance outcomes were also evaluated. The primary 30-day safety endpoint was 0%. Per-subject estimates of primary patency, freedom from target lesion revascularization, and freedom from target vessel revascularization were 100% at 1 and 6 months and 96.6% at 12 months. Estimates of assisted primary and secondary patency were both 100% at 12 months. Freedom from major adverse events at 12 months was 100%. Most patients experienced improvements in Rutherford category, ankle-brachial index, and functional status that were sustained to 12 months. This positive first-in-human experience with the Gore balloon-expandable covered endoprosthesis suggests this device will have an important role in the management of aortoiliac occlusive disease.

  10. Effect of natriuretic peptide family on the oxidized LDL-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Ueda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-10-01

    The migration of medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in atherosclerotic lesions. The present study examined the possible effect of a novel endothelium-derived relaxing peptide, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMCs by the Boyden's chamber method. The effect of CNP was compared with that of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively). Oxidized LDL stimulates SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 20 and 200 micrograms/mL. This stimulation was chemotactic in nature but was not chemokinetic. By contrast, native LDL was without significant activity. CNP-22 clearly inhibited SMC migration stimulated with 200 micrograms/mL oxidized LDL in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-9) and 10(-6) mol/L. ANP-(1-28) and BNP-32 also inhibited oxidized LDL-induced SMC migration at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L, but these effects were weaker than the effect of CNP-22. Such inhibition by these natriuretic peptides was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cGMP. Oxidized LDL-induced migration was significantly inhibited by a stable analogue of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, or an activator of the cytosolic guanylate cyclase, sodium nitroprusside. These natriuretic peptides did not suppress the cell adhesion either in the absence or presence of oxidized LDL. These data indicate that oxidized LDL stimulates migration of human coronary artery SMCs and that natriuretic peptides, especially CNP, inhibit this stimulated SMC migration, at least in part, through a cGMP-dependent process. Taken together with the finding that oxidized LDL is present in the intima, CNP may play a role as a local antimigration factor during the process of intimal thickening in hypercholesterolemia-induced coronary atherosclerosis.

  11. Clinical Observation of Recombinant Human Vascular Endostatin Durative Transfusion Combined with Window Period Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy in the Treatment of 
Advanced Lung Squamous Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan LV

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The aim of this study is to observe the efficacy and safety of recombinant human vascular endostatin (endostar durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced lung squamous carcinoma. Methods From February 2014 to January 2015, 10 cases of the cytological or histological pathology diagnosed stage IIIb - stage IV lung squamous carcinoma were treated with recombinant human vascular endostatin (30 mg/d durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy. Over the same period of 10 cases stage IIIb - stage IV lung squamous carcinoma patients for pure arterial perfusion chemotherapy were compared. Recombinant human vascular endostatin was durative transfused every 24 hours for 7 days in combination group, and in the 4th day of window period, the 10 patients were received artery infusion chemotherapy, using docetaxel combined with cisplatin. Pure treatment group received the same arterial perfusion chemotherapy regimen. 4 weeks was a cycle. 4 weeks after 2 cycles, to evaluate the short-term effects and the adverse drug reactions. Results 2 groups of patients were received 2 cycles treatments. The response rate (RR was 70.0%, and the disease control rate (DCR was 90.0% in the combination group; In the pure treatment group were 50.0%, 70.0% respectively, there were no statistically significant difference (P=0.650, 0.582. The adverse reactions of the treatment were mild, including level 1-2 of gastrointestinal reaction and blood toxicity, there were no statistically significant difference (P=0.999, P=0.628. In the combination group, 1 patient occurred level 1 of cardiac toxicity. Conclusion Recombinant human vascular endostatin durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced lung squamous carcinoma could take a

  12. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  13. Systems biology of human atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Sikkel, Markus B; Davies, Kerry J; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Want, Elizabeth J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology describes a holistic and integrative approach to understand physiology and pathology. The "omic" disciplines include genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolic profiling (metabonomics and metabolomics). By adopting a stance, which is opposing (yet complimentary) to conventional research techniques, systems biology offers an overview by assessing the "net" biological effect imposed by a disease or nondisease state. There are a number of different organizational levels to be understood, from DNA to protein, metabolites, cells, organs and organisms, even beyond this to an organism's context. Systems biology relies on the existence of "nodes" and "edges." Nodes are the constituent part of the system being studied (eg, proteins in the proteome), while the edges are the way these constituents interact. In future, it will be increasingly important to collaborate, collating data from multiple studies to improve data sets, making them freely available and undertaking integrative analyses.

  14. Human-Systems Integration Processes (HSIP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In FY12, this project removed the commercial-specific content from the Commercial Human-Systems Integration Design Processes (CHSIP), identified gaps in the...

  15. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Cost/Risk Drivers The numbers in the Activities boxes correspond to the numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements...Technology Development Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME References: ● DODI 5000.02 & DODD 5000.01 ● DAG ● CJCSI...Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Incorporate domain considerations into baseline

  16. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due to the adv......The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due...... in the system. Applying the CAG clustering method to data from the human gut microbiome, we identified dependency-associations between plasmids, phages and clone-specific gene sets to their bacterial host. Connections between CRISPR-elements and phages were also observed. Additionally, the persistence of some...... bacterial species in the human gut could be predicted based on absence or presence of specific genetic modules. Based on the same CAG clustering of the human gut microbiome data, the link between bile acid degradation of bacteria in the gut and obesity was investigated. There seemed to be a slight...

  17. CT and MRI findings of cerebral ischemic lesions in the cortical and perforating arterial system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Masakuni; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kodama, Mitsuo; Urushidani, Makoto; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Taku [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It is clinically useful to divide the location of infarction into the cortical and perforating arterial system. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now make the point of infarction a simple and useful task in daily practice. The diagnostic modality has also demonstrated that risk factors and clinical manifestations are different for infarction in the cortical as opposed to the perforating system. In this paper, we present various aspects of images of cerebral ischemia according to CT and/or MRI findings. With the advance of imaging mechanics, diagnostic capability of CT or/and MRI for cerebral infarction has markedly been improved. We must consider these points on evaluating the previously reported results. In addition, we always consider the pathological background of these image-findings for the precise interpretation of their clinical significance. In some instances, dynamic study such as PET or SPECT is needed for real interpretations of CT and/or MRI images. We paid special reference to lacunar stroke and striatocapsular infarct. In addition, `branch atheromatous disease (Caplan)` was considered, in particular, for their specific clinical significances. Large striatocapsular infarcts frequently show cortical signs and symptoms such as aphasia or agnosia in spite of their subcortical localization. These facts, although have previously been known, should be re-considered for their pathoanatomical mechanism. (author).

  18. An intelligent prognostic system for analyzing patients with paraquat poisoning using arterial blood gas indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Feiyan; Li, Huaizhong; Tong, Changfei; Pan, Zhifang; Li, Jun; Chen, Huiling

    The arterial blood gas (ABG) test is used to assess gas exchange in the lung, and the acid-base level in the blood. However, it is still unclear whether or not ABG test indexes correlate with paraquat (PQ) poisoning. This study investigates the predictive value of ABG tests in prognosing patients with PQ poisoning; it also identifies the most significant indexes of the ABG test. An intelligent machine learning-based system was established to effectively give prognostic analysis of patients with PQ poisoning based on ABG indexes. In the proposed system, an enhanced support vector machine combined with a feature selection strategy was developed to predict the risk status from a pool of 103 patients (56 males and 47 females); of these, 52 subjects were deceased and 51 patients were alive. The proposed method was rigorously evaluated against the real-life dataset in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Additionally, the feature selection was investigated to identify correlating factors for the risk status. The results demonstrated that there were significant differences in ABG indexes between deceased and alive subjects (p-value <0.01). According to the feature selection, we found that the most important correlated indexes were associated with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2). This study discovered the relationship between ABG test and poisoning degree to provide a new avenue for prognosing PQ poisoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are ʹHuman Adaptive Mechatronics (HAMʹ and ʹHuman‐System Modelling (HSMʹ, are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operatorsʹ skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory‐motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human‐mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  20. Differential effects of formoterol on thrombin- and PDGF-induced proliferation of human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharova Elena A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (PAVSM cell proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH. The long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR agonist formoterol, a racemate comprised of (R,R- and (S,S-enantiomers, is commonly used as a vasodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. PH, a common complication of COPD, increases patients’ morbidity and reduces survival. Recent studies demonstrate that formoterol has anti-proliferative effects on airway smooth muscle cells and bronchial fibroblasts. The effects of formoterol and its enantiomers on PAVSM cell proliferation are not determined. The goals of this study were to examine effects of racemic formoterol and its enantiomers on PAVSM cell proliferation as it relates to COPD-associated PH. Methods Basal, thrombin-, PDGF- and chronic hypoxia-induced proliferation of primary human PAVSM cells was examined by DNA synthesis analysis using BrdU incorporation assay. ERK1/2, mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation were determined by phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, ribosomal protein S6 and S473-Akt using immunoblot analysis. Results We found that (R,R and racemic formoterol inhibited basal, thrombin- and chronic hypoxia-induced proliferation of human PAVSM cells while (S,S formoterol had lesser inhibitory effect. The β2AR blocker propranolol abrogated the growth inhibitory effect of formoterol. (R,R, but not (S,S formoterol attenuated basal, thrombin- and chronic hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but had little effect on Akt and S6 phosphorylation levels. Formoterol and its enantiomers did not significantly affect PDGF-induced DNA synthesis and PDGF-dependent ERK1/2, S473-Akt and S6 phosphorylation in human PAVSM cells. Conclusions Formoterol inhibits basal, thrombin-, and chronic hypoxia-, but not PDGF-induced human PAVSM cell proliferation and ERK1/2, but has little effect on

  1. Bronchial artery embolization in hemoptysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hong-xiu; YANG Ding-cai; LIU Wei-hong; TANG He-qing; LIU Ke-yong; ZHAO Xiao-hua; TAN Yi-qing; WANG Jun

    2005-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis is one of the most dreaded of all respiratory emergencies and can have a variety of underlying causes. It is mostly caused by bleeding from bronchial circulation. Bronchial artery embolization is now considered to be the treatment of choice for acute massive hemoptysis. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is a safe and effective nonsurgical treatment for patients with massive hemoptysis. However, nonbronchial systemic arteries can be a significant source of massive hemoptysis and a cause of recurrence after successful BAE. So knowledge of the bronchial artery anatomy, together with an understanding of the pathophysiologic features of massive hemoptysis, are essential for planning and performing BAE in affected patients. In addition, interventional radiologists should be familiar with the techniques, results, efficacy, safety and possible complications of BAE and with the characteristics of the various embolic agents. Bronchial arterial catheterisation in human via a percutaneous approach has been practiced for 32 years (1973) in the world and 20 years (1986) in China, initially for direct chemotherapy treatment for bronchial malignancies and then for the embolization of patients with massive haemoptysis. A review of clinical experience to evaluate technique,embolic materials,outcome and complications of BAE is presented.

  2. A case for human systems neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J L

    2015-06-18

    Can the human brain itself serve as a model for a systems neuroscience approach to understanding the human brain? After all, how the brain is able to create the richness and complexity of human behavior is still largely mysterious. What better choice to study that complexity than to study it in humans? However, measurements of brain activity typically need to be made non-invasively which puts severe constraints on what can be learned about the internal workings of the brain. Our approach has been to use a combination of psychophysics in which we can use human behavioral flexibility to make quantitative measurements of behavior and link those through computational models to measurements of cortical activity through magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, we have tested various computational hypotheses about what neural mechanisms could account for behavioral enhancement with spatial attention (Pestilli et al., 2011). Resting both on quantitative measurements and considerations of what is known through animal models, we concluded that weighting of sensory signals by the magnitude of their response is a neural mechanism for efficient selection of sensory signals and consequent improvements in behavioral performance with attention. While animal models have many technical advantages over studying the brain in humans, we believe that human systems neuroscience should endeavor to validate, replicate and extend basic knowledge learned from animal model systems and thus form a bridge to understanding how the brain creates the complex and rich cognitive capacities of humans.

  3. DESIGN METHODS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav E. Elkin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the concept of "human development" and the schematic diagram of the organizational design of regional management systems in relation to human development. Management as an organizational process in the study is considered as part of all social subsystems, specifies regularities of development and formation of new structures and functions. In the study applied the following methods: allocation of levels of models, techniques of domination, the allocation phases of the operation, the construction of generalized indicators, etc. As a result of research design problems of systems management human development revealed that the primary means of successful adaptation of organizations to changing conditions is an effective mechanism for management of human capacity, which will provide the best in current economic terms the end results that allows you to apply the concept of "innovation potential" in relation to the process of human development.

  4. Association between human immunodeficiency virus infection and arterial stiffness in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilder, Justin S.; Idris, Nikmah S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.; Cheung, Michael M H; Burgner, David; Kurniati, Nia; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2017-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and adverse cardiovascular outcome in adults. Early recognition of changes in vascular properties might prove essential in cardiovascular prevention in HIV-infected patients. We investigated the

  5. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    ," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2......-2.5 min of muscle ischemia. MAP increased similarly during static [114 (102-133) mmHg] and heavy dynamic exercise [121 (104-136) mmHg] and increased during muscle ischemia after dynamic exercise. During heavy dynamic exercise, Vmean increased 24% (10-47%; P less than 0.01) over approximately 3 min despite...... constant arterial carbon dioxide tension. In contrast, static exercise with a higher rate of perceived exertion [18 (13-20) vs. 15 (12-18) units; P less than 0.01] was associated with no significant change in Vmean. Muscle ischemia after exercise was not associated with an elevation in Vmean, and it did...

  6. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure on human arterial pressure during the solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Levi, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We performed a study of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure (AtmP) and the horizontal geomagnetic field component (H). We worked with a sample of 304 healthy normotense volunteers, 152 men and 152 women, with ages between 18 and 84 years in Mexico City during the period 2008-2014, corresponding to the minimum, ascending and maximum phases of the solar cycle 24. The data was divided by gender, age and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: Correlations, bivariate and superposed epochs (within a window of three days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the SBP and DBP and the natural variables (AtmP and H). The correlation analysis indicated correlation between the SBP and DBP and AtmP and H, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analysis showed that the largest correlations are between the SBP and DBP and the AtmP. The superposed epoch analysis found that the largest number of significant SBP and DBP changes occurred for women. Finally, the blood pressure changes are larger during the solar minimum and ascending solar cycle phases than during the solar maximum; the storms of the minimum were more intense than those of the maximum and this could be the reason of behavior of the blood pressure changes along the solar cycle.

  7. Comparison between Adventitial and Intimal Inflammation of Ruptured and Nonruptured Atherosclerotic Plaques in Human Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higuchi Maria L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the possible role of adventitial inflammation in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability and coronary artery remodelling. METHODS: We compared the mean numbers of lymphocytes in the adventitia and in the plaque of ruptured thrombosed and stable equi-stenotic coronary segments of 34 patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. We also analysed adventitial microvessels, adventitial fibrosis and the external elastic membrane. RESULTS: In the adventitia, the numbers of lymphocytes and microvessels/mm² were 69.5±88.3 and 60.9± 32.1 in culprit lesions and 16.4 ± 21.1 and 44.3±16.1 in stable lesions (p<0.05; within the plaques, the mean number of lymphocytes was 24±40.8 in culprit lesions and 10.9±13.2 in stable ones (p=0.17. The mean percent area of adventitial fibrosis/cross-sectional area of the vessel was significantly lower in unstable plaques (p<0.001. The confocal images showed holes in the external elastic membrane. CONCLUSION: Unstable plaques exhibit chronic pan-arteritis, accompanied by enlargement, medial thinning, and less fibrosis than in stable lesions, which is compatible with vessel aneurysm. Adventitial inflammation may contribute significantly to atheroma instability.

  8. Human Internal Mammary Artery (IMA) Transplantation and Stenting: A Human Model to Study the Development of In-Stent Restenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoqin; Deuse, Tobias; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Haromy, Alois; Tsao, Phil S.; Maegdefessel, Lars; Erben, Reinhold G.; Bergow, Claudia; Behnisch, Boris B.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Robbins, Robert C.; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo research models to investigate pathobiological and pathophysiological processes in the development of intimal hyperplasia after vessel stenting are crucial for translational approaches1,2. The commonly used animal models include mice, rats, rabbits, and pigs3-5. However, the translation of these models into clinical settings remains difficult, since those biological processes are already studied in animal vessels but never performed before in human research models6,7. In this video we demonstrate a new humanized model to overcome this translational gap. The shown procedure is reproducible, easy, and fast to perform and is suitable to study the development of intimal hyperplasia and the applicability of diverse stents. This video shows how to perform the stent technique in human vessels followed by transplantation into immunodeficient rats, and identifies the origin of proliferating cells as human. PMID:22617624

  9. The effects of low dose chemotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma through percutaneously implanted intra-arterial port system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Won, Je Hwan; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Sung Won [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Won [Suwon Medical Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of low-dose FP (5-Fluorouracil[5FU]+Cispatin[CDDP]) therapy through a percutaneously implanted intra-arterial port system in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty-five patients with advanced HCCs and portal vein thrombosis, or large HCCs which were unresectable or for which transarterial chemoembolization was thought to be ineffective, underwent intra-arterial port implantation. The mean maxinal diameter of these tumors was 13.7 (range, 5-21.5) cm, and they were located at the right lobe (n=18), the left lobe(n=3), or throughout the liver (n=4). Tumor thrombosis was detected in the main (n=14), right (n=3) and left portal vein(n=1), the right portal vein and inferior vena cava(n=2), and the inferior vena cava(n=1). The four others patients had no portal vein thrombosis. All intra-arterial port implantations were performed percutaneously in the angiographic ward through the right or left common femoral artery. The port chamber was implanted in the inguinal area and fixed using histoacryl. For intra-arterial chemotherapy, 5-FU (250 mg/day) and CDDP (10 mg/day) were used for five days every four weeks. In order to observe changes in tumor size, follow-up CT scanning was performed every two months. Implantation of the port system was successful in all cases, and patients underwent between one and eleven (mena, 3.9) sessions of chemotherapy. Port-and catheter-related complications, namely dislodgement of the catheter(n=2), wound infection(n=2), migration of the coil(n=1) and catheter occlusion(n=1) occurred in six patients (24%), and chemotherapy-related complications, namely liver failure(n=3) and gastric ulcer bleeding(n=1), in four (16%). A complete response, i. e. the disappearance of tumor thrombosis of the portal vein, was achieved in one patient (4%), a partial response in three (12%), and a minor response in four (16%); the overall response rate was 32% and the mean survival period was 7.6 months. Low-dose FP

  10. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael Permin

    2011-01-01

    Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP...... is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous[ATP...

  11. Flow visualization and 1- and 3-D laser-Doppler-anemometer measurements in models of human carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D; Pflugbeil, G; Matsuo, T; Lesniak, B

    1998-04-01

    Pulsatile flow, wall distensibility, non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood in flow separation regions, and high/low blood pressure were studied in elastic silicon rubber models having a compliance similar to human vessels and the same surface structure as the biological intima models of (1) a healthy carotid artery model, (2) a 90% stenosis in the ICA, and (3) 80% stenosis in both the internal and external carotid arteries. Flow was visualized for steady flow and pulsatile studies to localize flow separation regions and reattachment points. Local velocity was measured with a 1-, 2-, or 3-D laser-Doppler-anemometer (LDA). Flow in the unstenosed model was Re = 250. In the stenosed models, the Re number decreased to Re = 180 and 213 under the same experimental conditions. High velocity fluctuations with vortices were found in the stenosed models. The jet flow in the stenosis increased up to 4 m/s. With an increasing bifurcation angle, the separation regions in the ECA and ICA increased. Increased flow (Re = 350) led to an increase in flow separation and high velocity shear gradients. The highest shear stresses were nearly 20 times higher than normal. The 90% stenosis created high velocity shear gradients and velocity fluctuations. Downstream of the stenoses, eddies were found over the whole cross-section. In the healthy model a slight flow separation region was observed in the ICA at the branching cross-section whereas in the stenosed models, the flow separation regions extended far into the ICA. We conclude that a detailed understanding of flow is necessary before vascular surgery is performed especially before artificial grafts or patches are implanted.

  12. Microscopic anatomy of the human vertebro-basilar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato P. Chopard

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Concerning the structure of connective-muscular components the authors studied the walls of the terminal segments of the vertebral arteries as well as the basilar artery, utilizing the following staining methods: Azan modified by Heideinheim, Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin, and Weigert modified by van Gieson. It was established that wall of the vertebro-basilar system exhibits a mixed structure, muscular and elastic, by means of which the vessels are adjusted to the specific blood circulation conditions. Thus, vertebral arteries show in the most external layer of tunica media an evident external elastic lamina. In contrast, in the basilar artery the elastic tissue is localized mainly in the tunica media, and is distributed heterogeneously. In its caudal segment the elastic fibers are situated in the most internal layer of tunica media, and in the cranial segment the elastic component is homogenously distributed in the whole of tunica media.

  13. Current Approaches to the Treatment of Systemic-Sclerosis-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (SSc-PAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanski, Vincent; Launay, David; Hachulla, Eric; Humbert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe condition causing significant morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Despite the use of specific treatments, SSc-PAH survival remains poorer than in idiopathic PAH (IPAH). Recent therapeutic advances in PAH show a lower magnitude of response in SSc-PAH and a higher risk of adverse events, as compared to IPAH. The multifaceted underlying mechanisms and the multisystem nature of SSc probably explain part of the worse outcomes in SSc-PAH compared to IPAH. This review describes the current management of SSc-PAH with an emphasis on the impact of the different organ involvements in the prognosis and treatment response. An earlier detection of PAH and a better characterization of the clinical phenotypes of SSc-PAH are warranted in clinical practice and future trials. Determinants of prognosis, surrogate markers of clinical improvement or worsening, and relevance of the common endpoints used in clinical trials should be evaluated in this specific population. A multidisciplinary approach in expert referral centers is mandatory for SSc-PAH management.

  14. A nanostructured genosensor for the early diagnosis of systemic arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, Thalita; Cancino, Juliana; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2015-02-01

    The rapid progress of nanomedicine, especially in areas related to medical imaging and diagnostics, has motivated the development of new nanomaterials that can be combined with biological materials for specific medical applications. One such area of research involves the detection of specific DNA sequences for the early diagnosis of genetic diseases, using nanoparticles-containing genosensors. Typical genosensors devices are based on the use of sensing electrodes - biorecognition platforms - containing immobilized capture DNA probes capable of hybridizing with specific target DNA sequences. In this paper we show that upon an appropriate design of the biorecognition platform, efficient sandwich-type genosensors based upon DNA-AuNPs nanocomplexes can be efficiently applied to the detection of a Systemic Arterial Hypertension (SAH) polymorphism located in intron 16 of the Angiotensin-converter enzyme (ACE) gene. Since SAH is intimately related to heart diseases, especially blood hypertension, its early detection is of great biomedical interest. The biorecognition platforms were assembled using mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMmix), which provided the immobilization of organized architectures with molecular control. Detection of the DNA target sequence at concentrations down to 1 nM was carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). We show that the use of EIS combined with specific nanobiocomplexes represents an efficient method for the unambiguous detection of complementary DNA hybridization for preventative nanomedicine applications.

  15. Use of lateral circumflex femoral artery system free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporro, Daniel; Fueyo, Angel; Martín, Clara; Carnero, Susana; Llorente, José L

    2011-05-01

    We present a 10-year retrospective study at a tertiary center designed to evaluate the advantages, complications, and comparative results using lateral circumflex femoral artery (LCFA) system free flaps for cranial base reconstruction. In this study, a cranial base defect refers to exposed intracranial contents to the skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx, or oral cavity. These defects resulted from resections of primary or recurrent neoplasms or from secondary problems after cranial base surgery. We performed 20 flaps in 20 patients. The selection of flap was as follows: 8 combinations of anterolateral/anteromedial thigh flaps with vastus lateralis muscle or tensor fascia lata flaps, 6 ALT fasciocutaneous flaps, and 6 muscle/myocutaneous flaps. The flap's success rate was 95% (19/20). Early major complications included 1 perioperative death, and there was 1 myocardial infarction. Minor complications included 1 partial (12%) flap loss, 2 temporal cerebrospinal fluid leak, 2 donor-site hematoma, 2 minor wound breakdown, 3 facial nerve weakness, and 4 donor-site numbness. Among 20 patients undergoing LCFA system flap reconstruction, 12 are alive and disease free. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient. She underwent ablative surgery and a new successful free flap (forearm flap); after 2 years, the patient is disease free. The LCFA system flaps in skull base reconstruction provide versatility in flap design and availability of adequate tissues to fill dead space, and it offers vascularized fascia to augment dural repairs. It also provides a very long pedicle and allows simultaneous flap harvest with low donor-site morbidity.

  16. Activation of group IVC phospholipase A2 by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induces apoptosis of human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sean M.; Elgayyar, Mona A.; Menn, Fu-Minn; Vulava, Vijay M.; McKay, Larry; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary; Tucker, Dawn E.; Leslie, Christina C.; Lu, Kim P.; Ramos, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal tar mixtures and tobacco sources, is considered a significant risk factor for the development of heart disease in humans. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of PAHs present at a Superfund site on human coronary artery endothelial cell (HCAEC) phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and apoptosis. Extremely high levels of 12 out of 15 EPA high-priority PAHs were present in both the streambed and floodplain sediments at a site where an urban creek and its adjacent floodplain were extensively contaminated by PAHs and other coal tar compounds. Nine of the 12 compounds and a coal tar mixture (SRM 1597A) activated group IVC PLA2 in HCAECs, and activation of this enzyme was associated with histone fragmentation and poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Genetic silencing of group IVC PLA2 inhibited both 3H-fatty acid release and histone fragmentation by PAHs and SRM 1597A, indicating that individual PAHs and a coal tar mixture induce apoptosis of HCAECs via a mechanism that involves group IVC PLA2. Western blot analysis of aortas isolated from feral mice (Peromyscus leucopus) inhabiting the Superfund site showed increased PARP and caspase-3 cleavage when compared to reference mice. These data suggest that PAHs induce apoptosis of HCAECs via activation of group IVC PLA2. PMID:21132278

  17. [Arterial pathology in migraine: endothelial dysfunction and structural changes in the brain and systemic vasculature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Ramón-Carbajo, César; Álvarez-Escudero, Rocío; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; García-Cabo, Carmen; Pascual, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Introduccion. La fisiopatologia subyacente a la asociacion entre migraña y otras enfermedades vasculares sistemicas no aterotromboticas no se conoce con certeza. La disfuncion endotelial se ha propuesto como nexo comun. A su vez, la disfuncion endotelial se considera como precursora de cambios estructurales en las paredes arteriales. Objetivo. Revisar el conocimiento actual acerca de las alteraciones funcionales (disfuncion endotelial) y estructurales (rigidez arterial y cambios ateroescleroticos) del lecho arterial asociadas a la migraña. Desarrollo. Estudios de marcadores biologicos de disfuncion endotelial en sangre periferica, vasorreactividad sistemica y cerebral, calculo de indices de rigidez arterial y visualizacion directa de cambios macroscopicos en la pared arterial han mostrado diferencias entre pacientes con y sin migraña, asi como entre los distintos subtipos de migraña. Conclusiones. La disfuncion endotelial, como precursora de cambios estructurales a nivel arterial, se postula como sustrato de la patologia vascular asociada a la migraña. La alteracion de marcadores biologicos es sugestiva de disfuncion endotelial en los pacientes con migraña; sin embargo, la correlacion con estudios de vasorreactividad no permite establecer conclusiones definitivas. Los datos disponibles no permiten concluir que la migraña se asocie con alteraciones macroscopicas fuera del lecho arterial cerebral.

  18. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/SP-2015-3709, Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide, also known as the "HSIPG," provides a tool for implementing HSI activities within the NASA systems engineering framework. The HSIPG is written to aid the HSI practitioner engaged in a program or project (P/P), and serves as a knowledge base to allow the practitioner to step into an HSI lead or team member role for NASA missions. Additionally, this HSIPG is written to address the role of HSI in the P/P management and systems engineering communities and aid their understanding of the value added by incorporating good HSI practices into their programs and projects. Through helping to build a community of knowledgeable HSI practitioners, this document also hopes to build advocacy across the Agency for establishing strong, consistent HSI policies and practices. Human Systems Integration (HSI) has been successfully adopted (and adapted) by several federal agencies-most notably the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-as a methodology for reducing system life cycle costs (LCCs). These cost savings manifest themselves due to reductions in required numbers of personnel, the practice of human-centered design, decreased reliance on specialized skills for operations, shortened training time, efficient logistics and maintenance, and fewer safety-related risks and mishaps due to unintended human/system interactions. The HSI process for NASA establishes how cost savings and mission success can be realized through systems engineering. Every program or project has unique attributes. This HSIPG is not intended to provide one-size-fits-all recommendations for HSI implementation. Rather, HSI processes should be tailored to the size, scope, and goals of individual situations. The instructions and processes identified here are best used as a starting point for implementing human-centered system concepts and designs across programs and projects of varying types, including

  19. High-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansis, Eberhard; Carroll, John D.; Schaefer, Dirk; Doessel, Olaf; Grass, Michael [Philips Technologie GmbH Forschungslaboratorien, Roentgenstrasse 24-26, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado 80262 (United States); Philips Technologie GmbH Forschungslaboratorien, Roentgenstrasse 24-26, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Philips Technologie GmbH Forschungslaboratorien, Roentgenstrasse 24-26, 22335 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the coronary arteries during a cardiac catheter-based intervention can be performed from a C-arm based rotational x-ray angiography sequence. It can support the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, treatment planning, and intervention guidance. 3-D reconstruction also enables quantitative vessel analysis, including vessel dynamics from a time-series of reconstructions. Methods: The strong angular undersampling and motion effects present in gated cardiac reconstruction necessitate the development of special reconstruction methods. This contribution presents a fully automatic method for creating high-quality coronary artery reconstructions. It employs a sparseness-prior based iterative reconstruction technique in combination with projection-based motion compensation. Results: The method is tested on a dynamic software phantom, assessing reconstruction accuracy with respect to vessel radii and attenuation coefficients. Reconstructions from clinical cases are presented, displaying high contrast, sharpness, and level of detail. Conclusions: The presented method enables high-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm system.

  20. Uterine Spiral Artery Remodeling: The Role of Uterine Natural Killer Cells and Extravillous Trophoblasts in Normal and High-Risk Human Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Daniel R; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Gruslin, Andrée

    2015-07-01

    The process of uterine spiral artery remodeling in the first trimester of human pregnancy is an essential part of establishing adequate blood perfusion of the placenta that will allow optimal nutrient/waste exchange to meet fetal demands during later development. Key regulators of spiral artery remodeling are the uterine natural killer cells and the invasive extravillous trophoblasts. The functions of these cells as well as regulation of their activation states and temporal regulation of their localization within the uterine tissue are beginning to be known. In this review, we discuss the roles of these two cell lineages in arterial remodeling events, their interaction/influence on one another and the outcomes of altered temporal, and spatial regulation of these cells in pregnancy complications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Development of Human System Integration at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; McGuire, Kerry; Thompson, Shelby; Vos, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Human Systems Integration seeks to design systems around the capabilities and limitations of the humans which use and interact with the system, ensuring greater efficiency of use, reduced error rates, and less rework in the design, manufacturing and operational deployment of hardware and software. One of the primary goals of HSI is to get the human factors practitioner involved early in the design process. In doing so, the aim is to reduce future budget costs and resources in redesign and training. By the preliminary design phase of a project nearly 80% of the total cost of the project is locked in. Potential design changes recommended by evaluations past this point will have little effect due to lack of funding or a huge cost in terms of resources to make changes. Three key concepts define an effective HSI program. First, systems are comprised of hardware, software, and the human, all of which operate within an environment. Too often, engineers and developers fail to consider the human capacity or requirements as part of the system. This leads to poor task allocation within the system. To promote ideal task allocation, it is critical that the human element be considered early in system development. Poor design, or designs that do not adequately consider the human component, could negatively affect physical or mental performance, as well as, social behavior. Second, successful HSI depends upon integration and collaboration of all the domains that represent acquisition efforts. Too often, these domains exist as independent disciplines due to the location of expertise within the service structure. Proper implementation of HSI through participation would help to integrate these domains and disciplines to leverage and apply their interdependencies to attain an optimal design. Via this process domain interests can be integrated to perform effective HSI through trade-offs and collaboration. This provides a common basis upon which to make knowledgeable decisions. Finally

  2. Sex differences in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanston, John E; Strother, Lars

    2017-01-02

    This Mini-Review summarizes a wide range of sex differences in the human visual system, with a primary focus on sex differences in visual perception and its neural basis. We highlight sex differences in both basic and high-level visual processing, with evidence from behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging studies. We argue that sex differences in human visual processing, no matter how small or subtle, support the view that females and males truly see the world differently. We acknowledge some of the controversy regarding sex differences in human vision and propose that such controversy should be interpreted as a source of motivation for continued efforts to assess the validity and reliability of published sex differences and for continued research on sex differences in human vision and the nervous system in general. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This brief abstract reviews the development of the current day approach to human system risk management for space flight and the development of the critical components of this process over the past few years. The human system risk management process now provides a comprehensive assessment of each human system risk by design reference mission (DRM) and is evaluated not only for mission success but also for long-term health impacts for the astronauts. The discipline of bioastronautics is the study of the biological and medical effects of space flight on humans. In 1997, the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) initiated the Bioastronautics Roadmap (Roadmap) as the "Critical Path Roadmap", and in 1998 participation in the roadmap was expanded to include the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) and the external community. A total of 55 risks and 250 questions were identified and prioritized and in 2000, the Roadmap was base-lined and put under configuration control. The Roadmap took into account several major advisory committee reviews including the Institute of Medicine (IOM) "Safe Passage: Astronaut care for Exploration Missions", 2001. Subsequently, three collaborating organizations at NASA HQ (Chief Health and Medical Officer, Office of Space Flight and Office of Biological & Physical Research), published the Bioastronautics Strategy in 2003, that identified the human as a "critical subsystem of space flight" and noted that "tolerance limits and safe operating bands must be established" to enable human space flight. These offices also requested a review by the IOM of the Roadmap and that review was published in October 2005 as "A Risk Reduction Strategy for Human Exploration of Space: A Review of NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap", that noted several strengths and weaknesses of the Roadmap and made several recommendations. In parallel with the development of the Roadmap, the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) began a process in

  4. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

    2008-10-01

    A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

  5. Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    user’s location and then per- forming the (cognitive) task of Mark A. Livingston Naval Research Laboratory Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality ...00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the basis for situation awareness or—in combina- tion with visual cues—a navigation task. Tactile tasks. Via haptic devices, we can apply vir- tual

  6. Human behavior in online social systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.

    2009-06-01

    We present and study data concerning human behavior in four online social systems: (i) an Internet community of friends of over 107 people, (ii) a music community website with over 106 users, (iii) a gamers’ community server with over 5 × 106 users and (iv) a booklovers’ website with over 2.5 × 105 users. The purpose of those systems is different; however, their properties are very similar. We have found that the distribution of human activity (e.g., the sum of books read or songs played) has the form of a power law. Moreover, the relationship between human activity and time has a power-law form, too. We present a simple interest-driven model of the evolution of such systems which explains the emergence of two scaling regimes.

  7. α1-Adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the impact of reducing extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Morgan, R Garrett; Gifford, Jayson R; Park, Song-Young; Symons, J David; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Graded exercise results not only in the modulation of adrenergic mediated smooth muscle tone and a preferential increase in blood flow to the active skeletal muscle termed 'functional sympatholysis', but is also paralleled by metabolically induced reductions in pH. We therefore sought to determine whether pH attenuates α(1)-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in human feed arteries. Feed arteries (560 ± 31 μm i.d.) were harvested from 24 humans (55 ± 4 years old) and studied using the isometric tension technique. Vessel function was assessed using KCl, phenylephrine (PE), ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-response curves to characterize non-receptor-mediated and receptor-mediated vasocontraction, as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. All concentration-response curves were obtained from (originally contiguous) vessel rings in separate baths with a pH of 7.4, 7.1, 6.8 or 6.5. Reduction of the pH, via HCl, reduced maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (pH 7.4 = 85 ± 19, pH 7.1 = 57 ± 16, pH 6.8 = 34 ± 15 and pH 6.5 = 16 ± 5% KCl(max)), which was partly due to reduced smooth muscle function, as assessed by KCl (pH 7.4 = 88 ± 13, pH 7.1 = 67 ± 8, pH 6.8 = 67 ± 9 and pH 6.5 = 58 ± 8% KCl(max)). Graded acidosis had no effect on maximal vasorelaxation. In summary, these data reveal that reductions in extracellular pH attenuate α(1)-mediated vasocontraction, which is partly explained by reduced smooth muscle function, although vasorelaxation in response to ACh and SNP remained intact. These findings support the concept that local acidosis is likely to contribute to functional sympatholysis and exercise hyperaemia by opposing sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction while not impacting vasodilatation.

  8. Role of Myoendothelial Gap Junctions in the Regulation of Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation by Laminar Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle cells may dedifferentiate into the synthetic phenotype and promote atherosclerosis. Here, we explored the role of myoendothelial gap junctions in phenotypic switching of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs co-cultured with human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs exposed to shear stress. Methods: HCASMCs and HCAECs were seeded on opposite sides of Transwell inserts, and HCAECs were exposed to laminar shear stress of 12 dyn/cm2 or 5 dyn/cm2. The myoendothelial gap junctions were evaluated by using a multi-photon microscope. Results: In co-culture with HCAECs, HCASMCs exhibited a contractile phenotype, and maintained the expression of differentiation markers MHC and H1-calponin. HCASMCs and HCAECs formed functional intercellular junctions, as evidenced by colocalization of connexin(Cx40 and Cx43 on cellular projections inside the Transwell membrane and biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs. Cx40 siRNA and 18-α-GA attenuated protein expression of MHC and H1-calponin in HCASMCs. Shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 increased Cx43 and decreased Cx40 expression in HCAECs, and partly inhibited biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs, which could be completely blocked by Cx43 siRNA or restored by Cx40 DNA transfected into HCAECs. The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 promoted HCASMC phenotypic switching, manifested by morphological changes, decrease in MHC and H1-calponin expression, and increase in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB release, which was partly rescued by Cx43 siRNA or Cx40 DNA or PDGF receptor signaling inhibitor. Conclusions: The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 caused the dysfunction of Cx40/Cx43 heterotypic myoendothelial gap junctions, which may be replaced by homotypic Cx43/Cx43 channels, and induced HCASMC transition to the synthetic phenotype associated with the activation of PDGF receptor signaling, which may contribute to shear stress

  9. Modelling the layer-specific three-dimensional residual stresses in arteries, with an application to the human aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Ogden, Ray W

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides the first analysis of the three-dimensional state of residual stress and stretch in an artery wall consisting of three layers (intima, media and adventitia), modelled as a circular cylindrical tube. The analysis is based on experimental results on human aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening documented in a recent paper by Holzapfel et al. (Holzapfel et al. 2007 Ann. Biomed. Eng. 35, 530-545 (doi:10.1007/s10439-006-9252-z)). The intima is included in the analysis because it has significant thickness and load-bearing capacity, unlike in a young, healthy human aorta. The mathematical model takes account of bending and stretching in both the circumferential and axial directions in each layer of the wall. Previous analysis of residual stress was essentially based on a simple application of the opening-angle method, which cannot accommodate the three-dimensional residual stretch and stress states observed in experiments. The geometry and nonlinear kinematics of the intima, media and adventitia are derived and the associated stress components determined explicitly using the nonlinear theory of elasticity. The theoretical results are then combined with the mean numerical values of the geometrical parameters and material constants from the experiments to illustrate the three-dimensional distributions of the stretches and stresses throughout the wall. The results highlight the compressive nature of the circumferential stress in the intima, which may be associated with buckling of the intima and its delamination from the media, and show that the qualitative features of the stretch and stress distributions in the media and adventitia are unaffected by the presence or absence of the intima. The circumferential residual stress in the intima increases significantly as the associated residual deformation in the intima increases while the corresponding stress in the media (which is compressive at its inner boundary and tensile at its outer boundary

  10. HCMV-infection in a human arterial organ culture model: effects on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rössler Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of infections with the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV for the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis is still unclear. Both a clear correlation and no correlation at all have been reported in clinical, mostly serological studies. In our study we employed a human non-injury ex vivo organ culture model to investigate the effect of an in vitro permissive HCMV-infection on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia for a period of 56 days. Results During routine-nephrectomies parts of renal arteries from 71 patients were obtained and prepared as human organ cultures. Cell free HCMV infection was performed with the fibroblast adapted HCMV strain AD169, the endotheliotropic strain TB40E, and a clinical isolate (AN 365. After 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 56 days in culture staining of HCMV-antigens was carried out and reactive cell proliferation and neointimal thickening were analysed. Successful HCMV-infection was accomplished with all three virus strains studied. During the first 21 days in organ culture no cell proliferation or neointimal hyperplasia was detected. At day 35 and day 56 moderate cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia was found both in HCMV-infected segments and mock infected controls. Neointimal hyperplasia in productively HCMV-infected segments was lower than in non infected at day 35 and day 56, but relatively higher after infection with the endotheliotropic TB40E in comparison with the two other strains. Conclusion The data do not support the hypothesis that HCMV-infection triggers restenosis via a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia in comparison to non infected controls. Interestingly however, even after lytic infection, a virus strain specific difference was observed.

  11. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  12. Transarterial embolization treatment for aberrant systemic arterial supply to the normal lung: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Ra; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Park, Byeong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Hospital, Dong A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    A 24-year-old man presented with dyspnea on exertion and intermittent blood-tinged sputum. He was diagnosed with aberrant systemic arterial supply to the normal lung (ASANL) based on the results of imaging studies. The patient was successfully treated with transarterial embolization using coils and a vascular plug and his symptoms disappeared during the follow-up. Herein, we reported the imaging findings of ASANL, differential diagnoses, and its treatment options. In addition, we reviewed the relevant literature.

  13. CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN NEEDS SYSTEM - PERSONALITY - HUMAN MOTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela MINICA

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the main attributes of an economic approach of needs and preferences, with detailed focus on the correlation between meta-needs and personality, by correlating the principle of hierarchy established by Maslow with the balance theory. Adopting an integrated system of human capital motivation, which takes into account the complex aspects involved in the knowledge society, represents a managerial requirement for any organisation.

  14. CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN NEEDS SYSTEM - PERSONALITY - HUMAN MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela MINICA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the main attributes of an economic approach of needs and preferences, with detailed focus on the correlation between meta-needs and personality, by correlating the principle of hierarchy established by Maslow with the balance theory. Adopting an integrated system of human capital motivation, which takes into account the complex aspects involved in the knowledge society, represents a managerial requirement for any organisation.

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance

  16. Scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac sympathetic nervous system in patients with single-vessel coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Nawada, Ryuzo; Obayashi, Kazuhiko; Tamekiyo, Hiromichi; Mochizuki, Mamoru [Shizuoka General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    In coronary artery disease, the cardiac sympathetic nervous system is closely associated with myocardial ischemia. I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging allows us to assess the cardiac sympathetic nervous system regionally. One-hundred and eleven patients with single-vessel disease underwent regional quantitative analysis of MIBG imaging before successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), and repeat angiography 6 months after PTCA. Based on the results of the follow-up left ventriculogram, patients were divided into 3 groups: 39 angina pectoris (AP), 48 prior myocardial infarction without asynergy (MI without asynergy) and 24 prior myocardial infarction with asynergy (Ml with asynergy). AP and MI without asynergy had significant correlations between uptake parameters and regional washout in the territory of diseased vessels, among which the severity score in AP was the most closely correlated with regional washout (r=0.79, p<0.0001). These correlations disappeared in MI with asynergy. To compare regional MIBG parameters in the territory of the diseased vessel as well as in the territories of the other major coronary arteries among the 3 groups, we examined MIBG parameters in 57 patients with left anterior descending artery (LAD) disease selected from among the study patients. Regional washout in the territory of the LAD was significantly higher in the MI without asynergy group than in the other two groups. The left circumflex artery (LCX) region showed significantly reduced MlBG uptake and an increased extent score in the MI with asynergy group compared with the AP group, although only a difference in the extent score existed between the MI with asynergy group and the AP group in the right coronary artery (RCA) region. In addition, the global ejection fraction before PTCA showed a significant negative correlation with each regional washout rate. In this way, regional quantitative analysis of MIBG imaging can detect the regional

  17. Systemic-pulmonary artery shunts in infants: modified Blalock-Taussig and central shunt procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Access is gained through a midline sternotomy, the thymus partially excised and the superior part of the pericardium is opened. The innominate vein is retracted and the innominate artery is mobilized up to the bifurcation. The aorta is retracted to the left, the superior vena cavae to the right and the right atrial appendage inferiorly. The adventitia around the right pulmonary artery (PA) is dissected, taking care to incise the bulky pericardial reflection between the superior vena cavae and the trachea. Heparin is administrated. An occlusive clamp is applied to the right PA to test for haemodynamic tolerance prior to proceeding with the interposition of a suitable size artificial vascular prosthesis, based on the weight of the patient, between the innominate artery, or proximal subclavian artery and the right PA. Alternatively, if a sufficient main PA is present and adequate flow from a patent ductus arteriosus an end-to-side interposition shunt may be constructed between the ascending aorta and the main PA, provided the patient is stable with the test occlusion of the main PA. The management of the patent arterial ductus depends on whether or not there is forward flow through the PA.

  18. [Clinical guidelines for detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of systemic arterial hypertension in Mexico (2008)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Martín; Pastelín, Gustavo; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Martínez-Reding, Jesús; Lomelí, Catalina; Mendoza-González, Celso; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Méndez, Arturo; Franco, Martha; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Verdejo, Juan; Sánchez, Noé; Ruiz, Rocío; Férez-Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The multidisciplinary Institutional Committee of experts in Systemic Arterial Hypertension from the National Institute of Cardiology "Ignacio Chávez" presents its update (2008) of "Guidelines and Recommendations" for the early detection, control, treatment and prevention of Hypertension. The boarding tries to be simple and realistic for all that physicians whom have to face the hypertensive population in their clinical practice. The information is based in the most recent scientific evidence. These guides are principally directed to hypertensive population of emergent countries like Mexico. It is emphasized preventive health measures, the importance of the no pharmacological actions, such as good nutrition, exercise and changes in life style, (which ideally it must begin from very early ages). "We suggest that the changes in the style of life must be vigorous, continuous and systematized, with a real reinforcing by part of all the organisms related to the health education for all population (federal and private social organisms). It is the most important way to confront and prevent this pandemic of chronic diseases". In this new edition the authors amplifies the information and importance on the matter. The preventive cardiology must contribute in multidisciplinary entailment. Based mainly on national data and the international scientific publications, we developed our own system of classification and risk stratification for the carrying people with hypertension, Called HTM (Arterial Hypertension in Mexico) index. Its principal of purpose this index is to keep in mind that the current approach of hypertension must be always multidisciplinary. The institutional committee of experts reviewed with rigorous methodology under the principles of the evidence-based medicine, both, national and international medical literature, with the purpose of adapting the concepts and guidelines for a better control and treatment of hypertension in Mexico. This work group recognizes

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zeling; Mathai, Stephen C; Hummers, Laura K; Shah, Ami A; Wigley, Fredrick M; Lechtzin, Noah; Hassoun, Paul M; Girgis, Reda E

    2016-12-01

    The fractional exhaled concentration of nitric oxide (FENO) has been shown to be reduced in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but has not been adequately studied in PAH associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We measured FENO at an expiratory flow rate of 50 mL/s in 21 treatment-naive patients with SSc-associated PAH (SSc-PAH), 94 subjects with SSc without pulmonary involvement, and 84 healthy volunteers. Measurements of FENO at additional flow rates of 100, 150, and 250 mL/s were obtained to derive the flow-independent nitric oxide exchange parameters of maximal airway flux (J'awNO) and steady-state alveolar concentration (CANO). FENO at 50 mL/s was similar (P = 0.22) in the SSc-PAH group (19 ± 12 parts per billion [ppb]) compared with the SSc group (17 ± 12 ppb) and healthy control group (21 ± 11 ppb). No change was observed after 4 months of targeted PAH therapy in 14 SSc-PAH group patients (P = 0.9). J'awNO was modestly reduced in SSc group subjects without lung disease (1.2 ± 0.5 nl/s) compared with healthy controls (1.64 ± 0.9; P group. CANO was elevated in individuals with SSc-PAH (4.8 ± 2.6 ppb) compared with controls with SSc (3.3 ± 1.4 ppb) and healthy subjects (2.6 ± 1.5 ppb; P < 0.001 for both). However, after adjustment for the diffusing capacity of CO, there was no significant difference in CANO between individuals with SSc-PAH and controls with SSc. We conclude that FENO is not useful for the diagnosis of PAH in SSc. Increased alveolar nitric oxide in SSc-PAH likely represents impaired diffusion into pulmonary capillary blood.

  20. The mechanical properties of the systemic and pulmonary arteries of Python regius correlate with blood pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soldt, Benjamin J; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Wang, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Pythons are unique amongst snakes in having different pressures in the aortas and pulmonary arteries because of intraventricular pressure separation. In this study, we investigate whether this correlates with different blood vessel strength in the ball python Python regius. We excised segments from the left, right, and dorsal aortas, and from the two pulmonary arteries. These were subjected to tensile testing. We show that the aortic vessel wall is significantly stronger than the pulmonary artery wall in P. regius. Gross morphological characteristics (vessel wall thickness and correlated absolute amount of collagen content) are likely the most influential factors. Collagen fiber thickness and orientation are likely to have an effect, though the effect of collagen fiber type and cross-links between fibers will need further study.

  1. The phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol dilates large cerebral arteries in humans without affecting regional cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Steffen; Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Petersen, Kenneth A;

    2004-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries (VMCA) was measured with transcranial Doppler, and the superficial temporal and radial arteries diameters were measured with ultrasonography. During the 4-hour observation period, there was no effect on systolic blood pressure (P = 0.28), but diastolic blood pressure decreased...

  2. OPPOSING EFFECTS OF SHEAR-MEDIATED DILATION AND MYOGENIC CONSTRICTION ON ARTERY DIAMETER IN RESPONSE TO HANDGRIP EXERCISE IN HUMANS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, C.L.; Carter, H.H.; Naylor, L.H.; Dawson, E.A.; Marusic, P.; Hering, D.; Schlaich, M.P.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Whilst the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30-minutes of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of ch

  3. Continuous stroke volume monitoring by modelling flow from non-invasive measurement of arterial pressure in humans under orthostatic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Pott, F.; Jenstrup, M.; Goudoever, J. van; Secher, N.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between aortic flow and pressure is described by a three-element model of the arterial input impedance, including continuous correction for variations in the diameter and the compliance of the aorta (Modelflow). We computed the aortic flow from arterial pressure by this model, and

  4. Effect of black tea consumption on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and ischaemia-reperfusion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Tim H A; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Greyling, Arno; Draijer, Richard; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-02-01

    Tea consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Previous studies found that tea flavonoids work through direct effects on the vasculature, leading to dose-dependent improvements in endothelial function. Cardioprotective effects of regular tea consumption may relate to the prevention of endothelial ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Therefore, we examined the effect of black tea consumption on endothelial function and the ability of tea to prevent IR injury. In a randomized, crossover study, 20 healthy subjects underwent 7 days of tea consumption (3 cups per day) or abstinence from tea. We examined brachial artery (BA) endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), using high resolution echo-Doppler, before and 90 min after tea or hot water consumption. Subsequently, we followed a 20-min ischaemia and 20-min reperfusion protocol of the BA after which we measured FMD to examine the potential of tea consumption to protect against IR injury. Tea consumption resulted in an immediate increase in FMD% (pre-consumption: 5.8 ± 2.5; post-consumption: 7.2 ± 3.2; p tea consumption (p tea ingestion improves BA FMD. However, the impact of the IR protocol on FMD was not influenced by tea consumption. Therefore, the cardioprotective association of tea ingestion relates to a direct effect of tea on the endothelium in humans in vivo.

  5. Group & Intergroup Relations in Living Human Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    investigations summarized in Table 2-1 include analyses of a broad range of system properties (cf. Adorno et al, 1950, MacKinnon, 1965; Beavers, 1977, Goffman...also characteristic of the authoritarian personality ( Adorno , et al., 1950). The balance of feeling within an underbounded system is typically less...groups being studied. 2 - 45 REFERENCES Adam R.N. and Preiss, J.J. (eds.) Human Organization Research. Homewood, Illinois: Dorsey, 1960. Adorno , T.W

  6. Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2017-01-01

    The study, discovery, and application of information about human abilities, human limitations, and other human characteristics to the design of tools, devices, machines, systems, job tasks and environments for effective human performance.

  7. Precontrol of the pulmonary artery during thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy and systemic lymph node dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Mei, Jiandong; Liu, Chengwu

    2016-01-01

    The main reasons of emergent conversion during thoracoscopic lobectomy included tumor invasion, hilar lymph node (LN) metastasis, and lymphoid tuberculosis. We presented a video which depicted a three-portal thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy with dissection of large LNs. Severe adhesions between a large LN and the first branch of the left pulmonary artery (PA) were found during surgery. For safety reasons, the left main pulmonary artery (LMPA) was clamped with an endoscopic bulldog clamp prior to lymph nodal dissection. The strategy of precontrolling the LMPA during thoracoscopic lobectomy is useful for these patients with complicated hilum, and may assure the safety of the operation. PMID:27162690

  8. Retrograde arterial leg blood flow during tilt-back from a head-up posture: importance of capacitive flows when arterial pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Don D; Nådland, Inger Helene; Toska, Karin

    2010-03-01

    The windkessel function of the arterial system converts the intermittent action of the heart into more continuous microcirculatory blood flow during diastole via the return of elastic energy stored in the walls of the arteries during systole. Might the same phenomenon occur regionally within the arterial system during tilting owing to regional differences in local arterial pressure imposed by gravity? We sought to test the hypothesis that during tilt-back from a head-up posture, the return of stored elastic energy in leg arteries would work to slow, or perhaps transiently reverse, the flow of blood in the femoral artery. Femoral artery blood flow and arterial pressure were recorded during tilt back from a 30 degrees head-up posture to supine (approximately 0.5 G) in young, healthy subjects (n = 7 males and 3 females) before and during clonidine infusion. During control (no drug) conditions femoral artery blood flow ceased for an entire heart beat during tilt-back. During clonidine infusion femoral artery blood flow reversed for at least one entire heart beat during tilt-back, i.e., blood flow in the retrograde direction in the femoral artery from the leg into the abdomen. Thus substantial capacitive effects of tilting on leg blood flow occur in humans during mild changes in posture.

  9. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  10. Complex Systems and Human Performance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    constitute a cognitive architecture or decomposing the work flows and resource constraints that characterize human-system interactions, the modeler...also explored the generation of so-called “ fractal ” series from simple task network models where task times are the calculated by way of a moving

  11. How to Bootstrap a Human Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Arbib, Michael; Garrod, Simon

    2013-01-01

    How might a human communication system be bootstrapped in the absence of conventional language? We argue that motivated signs play an important role (i.e., signs that are linked to meaning by structural resemblance or by natural association). An experimental study is then reported in which participants try to communicate a range of pre-specified…

  12. Systemic gemcitabine combined with intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Seven cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiminori Uka; Kazuaki Chayama; Hiroshi Aikata; Shintaro Takaki; Tomokazu Kawaoka; Hiromi Saneto; Daiki Mild; Shoichi Takahashi; Naoyuld Toyota; Katsuhide Ito

    2008-01-01

    The combination of intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is effective against advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Systemic gemcitabine chemotherapy seems effective in many cancers.We report the results of combination therapy with systemic gemcitabine, intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-FU (GEMFP).Seven patients with non-resectable advanced HCC were treated with GEMFP.One course of chemotherapy consisted of daily intra-arterial cisplatin (20 mg/body weight/hour on day z, 10 mg/body weight per 0.5 h on d 2-5 and 8-12), followed by 5-FU (250 mg/body weight per 5 h on d 1-5 and 8-12) via an injection port.Gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 was administered intravenously at 0.5 h on d 1 and 8.The objective response was 57%.The response to GEMFP was as follows: complete response (no patients), partial response (four patients), stable disease (three patients),and progressive disease (no patients).The median survival period was 8 mo (range, 5-55).With regard to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions, seven (100%),seven, six (86%) and one (14%) patients developed leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and anemia,respectively.GEMFP may potentially be effective for nonresectable advanced HCC, but it has severe hematologic toxicity.

  13. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents myocardial injury and arterial thrombogenesis in a novel animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Vasile I; Tan, Ying S; McClure, Erin E; La Bonte, Laura R; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-) [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride-induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications.

  14. Renal dynamic scintigraphy with captropil in systemic arterial hypertension diagnosis; Cintilografia renal dinamica com captopril no diagnostico da hipertensao arterial renovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervo, Marco Antonio Cadorna; Amarante Junior, Jose Luiz de Medeiros; Souza, Ricardo Alberto Manhaes; Evangelista, Maria Gardenia [Hospital Naval Marcilio Dias, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1995-12-31

    Forty one patients, 15 male and 16 female presenting systemic arterial hypertension were submitted to Basal RDC and after being simulated by Captopril; the radiotracer used was 99 mTc-DTPA (dietileno triamino pentacetic acid-99 Tc-technetium). From the 41 patients studied, 13 had the GFR (Glomerular filtration rate) Captopril when compared to Basal RDC radioactive, 11 of them were confirmed as having vascular renal disease by Renal Artiography and two of them were false (one case renal litiase and the other chronic pyelonephritis). Two more false negative cases have occurred in the RDC and three patients refused to be submitted to a Renal Arteriography. In the cases which the Total Glomerular Filtration Rate was reduced, there was an agreement of 89,5% between the RDC and the Renal Arteriography. No alterations have been observed in the Renal Arteriography on the remaining 23 patients and in the RDC after Captopril there was normal increase in the Glomerular Filtration Rate when compared to the Basal RDC. The method has showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 92%. We can conclude that the RDC with Captopril test is not an invasive method, it has good sensitivity and specificity and it can be indicated as a beginning test to select patients when you intend to detect vascular renal disease; nevertheless the RDC will never be used as a final test of vascular lesion. (author) 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Collagen-Binding Protein Cnm Is Required for Streptococcus mutans Adherence to and Intracellular Invasion of Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Miller, James H.; Martinez, Alaina R.; Simpson-Haidaris, Patricia J.; Burne, Robert A.; Lemos, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, a global health problem that affects 60 to 90% of the population, and a leading causative agent of infective endocarditis. It can be divided into four different serotypes (c, e, f, and k), with serotype c strains being the most common in the oral cavity. In this study, we demonstrate that in addition to OMZ175 and B14, three other strains (NCTC11060, LM7, and OM50E) of the less prevalent serotypes e and f are able to invade primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Invasive strains were also significantly more virulent than noninvasive strains in the Galleria mellonella (greater wax worm) model of systemic disease. Interestingly, the invasive strains carried an additional gene, cnm, which was previously shown to bind to collagen and laminin in vitro. Inactivation of cnm rendered the organisms unable to invade HCAEC and attenuated their virulence in G. mellonella. Notably, the cnm knockout strains did not adhere to HCAEC as efficiently as the parental strains did, indicating that the loss of the invasion phenotype observed for the mutants was linked to an adhesion defect. Comparisons of the invasive strains and their respective cnm mutants did not support a correlation between biofilm formation and invasion. Thus, Cnm is required for S. mutans invasion of endothelial cells and possibly represents an important virulence factor of S. mutans that may contribute to cardiovascular infections and pathologies. PMID:21422186

  16. The collagen-binding protein Cnm is required for Streptococcus mutans adherence to and intracellular invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Miller, James H; Martinez, Alaina R; Simpson-Haidaris, Patricia J; Burne, Robert A; Lemos, José A

    2011-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, a global health problem that affects 60 to 90% of the population, and a leading causative agent of infective endocarditis. It can be divided into four different serotypes (c, e, f, and k), with serotype c strains being the most common in the oral cavity. In this study, we demonstrate that in addition to OMZ175 and B14, three other strains (NCTC11060, LM7, and OM50E) of the less prevalent serotypes e and f are able to invade primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Invasive strains were also significantly more virulent than noninvasive strains in the Galleria mellonella (greater wax worm) model of systemic disease. Interestingly, the invasive strains carried an additional gene, cnm, which was previously shown to bind to collagen and laminin in vitro. Inactivation of cnm rendered the organisms unable to invade HCAEC and attenuated their virulence in G. mellonella. Notably, the cnm knockout strains did not adhere to HCAEC as efficiently as the parental strains did, indicating that the loss of the invasion phenotype observed for the mutants was linked to an adhesion defect. Comparisons of the invasive strains and their respective cnm mutants did not support a correlation between biofilm formation and invasion. Thus, Cnm is required for S. mutans invasion of endothelial cells and possibly represents an important virulence factor of S. mutans that may contribute to cardiovascular infections and pathologies.

  17. Scattering and Absorbing Characteristics of Human Arteries and Veins in Kubelka-Munk Model at He-Ne Laser in Vitro%Kubelka-Munk模型下人血管对He-Ne激光的散射与吸收特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏华江; 李晓原; 巫国勇; 刘小星; 魏冬季; 谭润初

    2001-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance and transmittance of human arteries and veins were studied with 632.8 nm of He-Ne laser. The measurements were performed with two standard integrating sphere systems. The absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and the changes of total optical intensities I(x), forward scattering flux i(x), backward scattering flux j(x) as a function of thickness of human arteries and veins were evaluated and analyzed from the experimented data by Kubelka-Munk model. The results of measurement showed significant difference of diffuse reflectance and transmittance between arteries and veins at 632.8 nm wavelength of He-Ne laser. Furthermore, the absorption coefficient and the scattering coefficient of arteries were obviously bigger than that of veins at He-Ne laser wavelength. The changes of I(x), i(x) and j(x) as a function of thickness of human arteries and veins were also significant difference.%测量了人动脉和静脉对He-Ne激光的反射和透射传输特性.实验采用两积分球系统及波长为632.8 nm的He-Ne激光器,并根据测量数据及采用Kubelka-Munk模型分析和计算了人动脉和静脉组织对该波长激光的吸收系数、散射系数及总的光强I(x)及前向散射通量i(x)和后向散射通量j(x)随厚度的变化情况.结果表明,人动脉和静脉的漫反射率和透射率有明显差别,而且,动脉对激光的吸收系数和散射系数明显较静脉的大,在动脉和静脉组织中I(x),i(x)和j(x)随厚度的变化情况也有明显的区别.

  18. Effects of oxidized low density lipoprotein on the growth of human artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gao-feng; SENG Jing-jing; ZHANG Hua; SHE Ming-peng

    2005-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) promotes the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis (AS), and that the proliferation, migration and phenotype alteration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) into foam cells are critical changes in AS. It is proposed that ox-LDL might play a novel role in the pathologic process of vSMCs. The present study was performed ex vivo to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on the growth of cultured human vSMCs.Methods Using NaBr density gradient centrifugation, LDL from human plasma was isolated and purified. ox-LDL was produced from LDL after being incubated with CuSO4. ox-LDL was then added to the culture medium at different concentrations (25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 75 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, 125 μg/ml, and 150 μg/ml) for 7 days. The influence of ox-LDL on vSMC growth was observed from several aspects as growth curve, mitosis index, lipid staining, and in situ determination of apoptosis. The digital results were analyzed with SPSS 10.0.Results The ox-LDL produced ex vivo had a good purity and optimal oxidative degree, which was similar to the intrinsic ox-LDL in atherosclerotic plaque. ox-LDL at a concentration of 25 μg/ml demonstrated the strongest proliferation. At the concentration of 125 μg/ml, ox-LDL suppressed the growth of vSMCs. At concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, ox-LDL presented powerful mitotic trigger. When the concentration of ox-LDL increased, the mitotic index of vSMCs decreased gradually. ox-LDL induced more foam cells from vSMCs with rich intracellular lipid accumulation at concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml. ox-LDL at higher concentrations induced more apoptotic vSMCs.Conclusions ox-LDL at lower concentrations may trigger proliferation and phenotype alteration into foam cells of vSMCs, and at higher concentrations it may induce apoptosis in vSMCs. ox-LDL plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis by its effect on v

  19. Customization of entropy estimation measures for human arterial hypertension records segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirugeda-Roldan, E M; Molina-Pico, A; Cuesta-Frau, D; Oltra-Crespo, S; Miro-Martinez, P; Vigil-Medina, L; Varela-Entrecanales, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new application of the recently developed Coefficient of Sample Entropy (CosEn) measure. This entropy estimator is specially suited for cases where the length of the time series is extremely short. CosEn has already been used successfully to characterize and detect atrial fibrillation, using as few as 12 heartbeats. We have customized the methodology employed for heartbeat interval series to blood pressure hypertensive (BPHT) human records. Little can be found about BPHT records and its nonlinear regularity analysis. The method described in this paper provides a good segmentation between control and pathologic groups, based on the corresponding labeled BPHT records. The experimental dataset was drawn from the available records at the Hypertension Unit of the University Hospital of Mostoles, in Spain. The hypertension related variables studied were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean blood pressure (MBP). The hypothesis test yielded the following results in each case: acceptance probability of 0 for SBP, 0.005 for DBP and 0 for MBP. The confidence intervals for the three variables were nonoverlapping.

  20. Magnetic characterization of human blood in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, B. [Institute of Environmental Engineering PAS, ul. SkLodowskiej-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Bucko, M.S., E-mail: michal.bucko@helsinki.f [Institute of Environmental Engineering PAS, ul. SkLodowskiej-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 64, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Chrobak, A. [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Wasilewski, J. [3rd Chair and Clinical Ward of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Silesian Centre of Heart Diseases, ul. Szpitalna 2, 41-800 Zabrze (Poland); Zych, M. [Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jagiellonska 4, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland)

    2011-03-15

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in biomagnetism-a field of biophysics concerned with the magnetic properties of living organisms. Biomagnetism focuses on the measurement of magnetic properties of biological samples in the clinical environment. Progress in this field can provide new data for the understanding of the pathomechanism of atherosclerosis and support the diagnostic options for the evaluation and treatment of atherothrombotic complications. Lyophilized human blood samples from patients with atherosclerotic lesions (calcium scoring (CS) CS>0) and without atherosclerotic lesions (CS=0) were magnetically investigated. Magnetic measurements (performed in room and low temperature) indicated significant magnetic differences between these two groups of patients. Atherosclerotic blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles (magnetite and/or maghemite) and significant changes in the superparamagnetic behaviour. This research presents that magnetometry, in combination with medical research can lead to a better understanding of iron physiology in the atherosclerotic process. - Research Highlights: {yields}Blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles. {yields}Atherosclerotic blood samples consist of larger superparamagnetic clusters. {yields}Superparamagnetic particles in pathological samples are considered to be magnetite. {yields}The formation of ferrimagnetic particles is favoured in the atherosclerotic patients. {yields}Magnetite may play a role in the progression of atherosclerosis.

  1. Kidney transplant artery stenosis. Interrelationship between blood pressure, kidney function, renin-aldosterone system and body sodium content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Fjeldborg, O

    1977-01-01

    Among 9 hypertensive recipients with kidney transplant artery stenosis (KTAS) evidence of increased activity of the renin system was present in 3. Surgical repair of KTAS in 4 recipients resulted in an increase in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate associated with a decrease in exchangeable sodium and blood pressure. Peripheral plasma renin and aldosterone values were normal before and after operation in all. It is suggested that sodium retention may counterbalance increased activity of the renin system in KTAS. Preoperative determinations of plasma renin do not predict the effect of surgical repair of KTAS on hypertension.

  2. Arterial waveform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  3. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    was associated with a 30-40% increase in blood flow rate and a highly significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (P less than 0.001 for all). Approximately 100 min after the subjects went to sleep an additional blood flow rate increment (mean 56%) and a simultaneous significant decrease......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...... were used for measurement of blood flow rates. An automatic portable blood pressure recorder and processor unit was used for measurement of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate every 15 min. The change from upright to supine position at the beginning of the night period...

  4. Involving human forecasters in numerical prediction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Homar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human forecasters routinely improve upon the output from numerical weather prediction models and often have keen insight to model biases and shortcomings. This wealth of knowledge about model performance is largely untapped, however, as it is used only at the end point in the forecast process to interpret the model-predicted fields. Yet there is no reason why human forecasters cannot intervene at other earlier times in the numerical weather prediction process, especially when an ensemble forecasting system is in use. Human intervention in ensemble creation may be particularly helpful for rare events, such as severe weather events, that are not predicted well by numerical models. The USA/NOAA SPC/NSSL Spring Program 2003 tested an ensemble generation method in which human forecasters were involved in the ensemble creation process. The forecaster highlighted structures of interest and, using an adjoint model, a set of perturbations were obtained and used to generate a 32-member ensemble. The results show that this experimental ensemble improves upon the operational numerical forecasts of severe weather. The human-generated ensemble is able to provide improved guidance on high-impact weather events, but lacks global dispersion and produces unreliable forecasts for non-hazardous weather events. Further results from an ensemble constructed by combining the operational ensemble perturbations with the human-generated perturbations shows promising skill for the forecast of severe weather while avoiding the problem of limited global dispersion. The value of human beings in the creation of ensembles designed to target specific high- impact weather events is potentially large. Further investigation of the value of forecasters being part of the ensemble creation process is strongly recommended. There remains a lot to learn about how to create ensembles for short-range forecasts of severe weather, and we need to make better use of the skill and experience of

  5. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  6. Interesting Basis of Vertebrobasilar Arterial Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebrobasilar arterial territory nourishes one-quarter of human brain. It constitutes some vital and strategic parts of the central nervous system.Methods: A number of keywords (vertebral, basilar, artery, and territory were searched in MEDLINE (Ovid and PubMed as well as Google, ProQuest, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and Science Direct online electronic search engines. Only articles containing all keywords were included. The final search was performed on October, 1, 2012. We also reviewed archives of libraries in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Iran for all anatomy, embryology, neurology, and neuroscience books and journals about vertebrobasilar arterial territories.Results: The vertebrobasilar arterial (VA system has a high incidence of variations, anomalies, and persistent fetal vessels. Two important anatomic facts explain why VA origin lesions seldom cause chronic hemodynamically significant low flow to the vertebrobasilar system. First, the VAs are paired vessels that unite to form a single basilar artery. Second, the extracranial VA gives off numerous muscular and other branches as it ascends in the neck. Thus, in the VA system, there is much more potential for development of adequate collateral circulation. Even when there is bilateral occlusion of the VAs at their origins, patients do not often develop posterior circulation infarcts.Conclusion: VA origin disease is more benign than ICA origin disease from hemodynamic aspect. This important point could make influence in therapeutic interventional decisions in asymptomatic VA origin stenosis

  7. The evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery system in neuro-Behçet and Behçet disease using magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Evren; Kamisli, Suat; Dogan, Metin; Tasolar, Sevgi; Kahraman, Ayşegül; Oztanir, Mustafa Namik; Sener, Serpil

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of the vertebrobasilar artery system in patients with Behçet's and Neuro-Behçet's disease. For this aim; 20 adults with clinically diagnosed Behcet's disease, 20 adults with Neuro-Behçet's disease, and 19 age- and gender-matched controls were examined by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). During MRA, diameters of left vertebral artery (LVA), right vertebral artery (RVA), basilar artery (BA), and proximal segment (P1) of posterior cerebral artery between origin and junction with the posterior communicating artery were measured. In all groups, LVA was dominant than RVA (P < 0.05). The diameters of BA and right P1 of Neuro-Behçet's disease were larger than the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the diameters of left P1 of Neuro-Behçet's disease were larger but not statistically significant. There is no difference between the groups in terms of gender. Behçet's disease can affect vascular structures; therefore vertebrobasilar artery system should be examined in patients with Behçet's and Neuro-Behçet's disease.

  8. Exhaled nitric oxide in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Stephen C.; Hummers, Laura K.; Shah, Ami A.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Lechtzin, Noah; Hassoun, Paul M.; Girgis, Reda E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fractional exhaled concentration of nitric oxide (FENO) has been shown to be reduced in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but has not been adequately studied in PAH associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We measured FENO at an expiratory flow rate of 50 mL/s in 21 treatment-naive patients with SSc-associated PAH (SSc-PAH), 94 subjects with SSc without pulmonary involvement, and 84 healthy volunteers. Measurements of FENO at additional flow rates of 100, 150, and 250 mL/s were obtained to derive the flow-independent nitric oxide exchange parameters of maximal airway flux (J′awNO) and steady-state alveolar concentration (CANO). FENO at 50 mL/s was similar (P = 0.22) in the SSc-PAH group (19 ± 12 parts per billion [ppb]) compared with the SSc group (17 ± 12 ppb) and healthy control group (21 ± 11 ppb). No change was observed after 4 months of targeted PAH therapy in 14 SSc-PAH group patients (P = 0.9). J′awNO was modestly reduced in SSc group subjects without lung disease (1.2 ± 0.5 nl/s) compared with healthy controls (1.64 ± 0.9; P < 0.05) but was similar to that in the SSc-PAH group. CANO was elevated in individuals with SSc-PAH (4.8 ± 2.6 ppb) compared with controls with SSc (3.3 ± 1.4 ppb) and healthy subjects (2.6 ± 1.5 ppb; P < 0.001 for both). However, after adjustment for the diffusing capacity of CO, there was no significant difference in CANO between individuals with SSc-PAH and controls with SSc. We conclude that FENO is not useful for the diagnosis of PAH in SSc. Increased alveolar nitric oxide in SSc-PAH likely represents impaired diffusion into pulmonary capillary blood. PMID:28090297

  9. An Integrated Model of the Human Cardiopulmonary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of the systemic and pulmonic circulations, baroreflex control of arterial pressure, airway and lung mechanics, as well as, gas transport at...study is based on the multi-compartment model of the canine circulation that contains descriptions of heart, systemic circulation and pulmonic ...systemic and pulmonic circulatory loop consists of a group of resistive and elastic vessel segments. (c) The nonlinear pressure- volume (P-V

  10. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  11. Integrating Spaceflight Human System Risk Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of human health and performance success during exploration missions as well as to maintain the subsequent long-term health of the crew. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. "Human System Risks" (Risks) have been identified, and approximately 30 are being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  12. Brain and skin do not contribute to the systemic rise in erythropoietin during acute hypoxia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Taudorf, Sarah;

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) preserves arterial oxygen content by controlling red blood cell and plasma volumes. Synthesis of EPO was long thought to relate inversely to renal oxygenation, but in knockout mice, brain and skin have been identified as essential for the acute hypoxic EPO response. Whether...... these findings apply to humans remains unknown. We exposed healthy young subjects to hypoxia (equivalent to 3800 m) and measured EPO in arterial and jugular venous plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid. To examine the role of the skin for EPO production during hypoxia, subjects were exposed to 8 h of hypobaric...... hypoxia with or without breathing oxygen-enriched air to ensure systemic normoxemia. With 9 h of hypoxia, arterial EPO increased (from 6.0±2.2 to 22.0±6.0 mU/ml, n=11, P...

  13. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDonald, Rob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  14. A Case of Isolated Coronary Artery Ectasia in the Setting of Chronic Inflamation From human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckle, Mark R; Askari, Raza; Morsy, Mohamed; Ibebuogu, Uzoma N

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia also known as dilated coronopathy is a relatively rare finding that is most commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Several alternative reasons including congenital malformations and chronic inflammation have been identified as a cause of CAE. In this case, we discuss a 61-year-old male with postoperative chest pain who was found to have localized CAE in the absence of significant atherosclerosis. We also elucidate the recently proposed markers of chronic inflammation that might be associated with coronary artery ectasia.

  15. Comparative reactivity of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid with human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Mitchell M; Grima, Michael A; Rayner, Benjamin S; Hadfield, Katrina A; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2013-12-01

    In the immune response, hypohalous acids are generated by activated leukocytes via the release of myeloperoxidase and the formation of H2O2. Although these oxidants have important bactericidal properties, they have also been implicated in causing tissue damage in inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) are the major oxidants formed by myeloperoxidase under physiological conditions, with the ratio of these oxidants dependent on diet and smoking status. HOCl is highly reactive and causes marked cellular damage, but few data are available on the effects of HOSCN on mammalian cells. In this study, we have compared the actions of HOCl and HOSCN on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). HOCl reacts rapidly with the cells, resulting in extensive cell death by both apoptosis and necrosis, with necrosis dominating at higher oxidant doses. In contrast, HOSCN is consumed more slowly, with cell death occurring only by apoptosis. Exposure of HCAEC to HOCl and HOSCN induces changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, which, in the case of HOSCN, is associated with mitochondrial release of proapoptotic factors, including cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and endonuclease G. With each oxidant, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent, with the inactivation of caspases 3/7 observed, and pretreatment of the cells with the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk having no effect on the extent of cell death. Loss of cellular thiols, depletion of glutathione, and the inactivation of thiol-dependent enzymes, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were seen with both oxidants, though to a much greater extent with HOCl. The ability of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants to induce endothelial cell apoptosis may contribute to the formation of unstable lesions in atherosclerosis. The results with HOSCN may be particularly significant for smokers, who have elevated plasma levels of SCN(-), the precursor

  16. Beta Blockers Suppress Dextrose-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Michael J; Kurban, William; Shah, Harshit; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D

    Beta blockers are known to have favorable effects on endothelial function partly because of their capacity to reduce oxidative stress. To determine whether beta blockers can also prevent dextrose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in addition to their antioxidative effects, human coronary artery endothelial cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells were treated with 27.5 mM dextrose for 24 hours in the presence of carvedilol (a lipophilic beta blockers with alpha blocking activity), propranolol (a lipophilic nonselective beta blockers), and atenolol (a water-soluble selective beta blockers), and ER stress, oxidative, stress and cell death were measured. ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase assay and Western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), phospho-JNK, eukaryotic initiating factor 2α (eIF2α), and phospho-eIF2α and measurement of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. Cell viability was measured by propidium iodide staining method. The ER stress, SO production, and cell death induced by 27.5 mM dextrose were inhibited by all 3 beta blockers tested. The antioxidative and ER stress reducing effects of beta blockers were also observed in HepG2 cells. The salutary effects of beta blockers on endothelial cells in reducing both ER stress and oxidative stress may contribute to the cardioprotective effects of these agents.

  17. Enhanced cellular responses and distinct gene profiles in human fetoplacental artery endothelial cells under chronic low oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Fetoplacental endothelial cells are exposed to oxygen levels ranging from 2% to 8% in vivo. However, little is known regarding endothelial function within this range of oxygen because most laboratories use ambient air (21% O2) as a standard culture condition (SCN). We asked whether human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAECs) that were steadily exposed to the physiological chronic normoxia (PCN, 3% O2) for ∼20-25 days differed in their proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as in their global gene expression compared with those in the SCN. We observed that PCN enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. In oxygen reversal experiments (i.e., when PCN cells were exposed to SCN for 24 h and vice versa), we found that preexposure to 21% O2 decreased the migratory ability, but not the proliferative ability, of the PCN-HUAECs in response to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with increased protein levels of HIF1A and NOS3, but not FGFR1, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2. Microarray analysis demonstrated that PCN up-regulated 74 genes and down-regulated 86, 14 of which were directly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors as evaluated using in silico analysis. Gene function analysis further indicated that the PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from our functional assays. Given that PCN significantly alters cellular responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as transcription in HUAECs, it is likely that we may need to reexamine the current cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling fetoplacental endothelial functions, which were largely derived from endothelial models established under ambient O2.

  18. Effects of three days of dry immersion on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, S; Sugiyama, Y; Miwa, C; Kamiya, A; Mano, T; Ohira, Y; Shenkman, B; Egorov, A I; Kozlovskaya, I B

    2000-03-15

    The present study was performed to determine how sympathetic function is altered by simulated microgravity, dry immersion for 3 days, and to elucidate the mechanism of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance in humans. Six healthy men aged 21-36 years old participated in the study. Before and after the dry immersion, subjects performed head-up tilt (HUT) test to 30 degrees and 60 degrees (5 min each) with recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), electrocardiogram, and arterial blood pressure (Finapres). Resting MSNA was increased after dry immersion from 23.7+/-3.2 to 40.9+/-3.0 bursts/min (p<0.005) without significant changes in resting heart rate (HR). MSNA responsiveness to orthostasis showed no significant difference but HR response was significantly augmented after dry immersion (p<0. 005). A significant diastolic blood pressure fall at 5th min of 60 degrees HUT was observed in five orthostatic tolerant subjects despite enough MSNA discharge after dry immersion. A subject suffered from presyncope at 2 min after 60 degrees HUT. He showed gradual blood pressure fall 10 s after 60 degrees HUT with initially well-maintained MSNA response and then with a gradually attenuated MSNA, followed by a sudden MSNA withdrawal and abrupt blood pressure drop. In conclusion, dry immersion increased MSNA without changing MSNA response to orthostasis, and resting HR, while increasing the HR response to orthostasis. Analyses of MSNA and blood pressure changes in orthostatic tolerant subjects and a subject with presyncope suggested that not only insufficient vasoconstriction to sympathetic stimuli, but also a central mechanism to induce a sympathetic withdrawal might play a role in the development of orthostatic intolerance after microgravity exposure.

  19. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  20. Transcatheter coil embolization of an intercostal artery to pulmonary artery fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Numan, Furuzan [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University (Turkey); Saltuk, Levent [Institute of Cardiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University (Turkey)

    2002-02-01

    An 18-year-old asymptomatic male was found to have a high-flow systemic arterial to pulmonary arterial fistula fed by dilated lower intercostal arteries draining via pulmonary artery toward the left main pulmonary trunk. Transcatheter Guglielmi Detachable Coil (GDC; Target Ther, Fremont, Calif.) embolization was performed. Transcatheter embolization is a reasonable and less invasive mode in the treatment of systemic artery to pulmonary artery fistula, and GDC offers more precise coil placement over other conventional coils. (orig.)

  1. [Immune system evolution. (From cells to humans)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belek, A S

    1992-01-01

    The great variety of cells and molecules observed in the mammalian immune system can be explained by stepwise acquisition of them during phylogeny. Self/nonself discrimination and cell-mediated immunity have been present since the early stages of evolution. Although some inducible antimicrobial molecules have been demonstrated in invertebrates, immunoglobulins appear in vertebrates. T and B cell diversity, development of the lymphoid organs, MHC molecules, complement and cytokines are the characteristics that appear through the evolution of vertebrates. Further knowledge that will be obtained from phylogenetic studies will improve our understanding of the immune system of human.

  2. Human mirror neuron system and its plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Tifei Yuan; Yin Wang; Jun Ding

    2008-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) was first discovered in non-human primates; these neurons fire when a monkey performs an action or observes another monkey (or even some people) performing that same action. Recent findings have suggested that neural rehabilitation might be achieved through the activation of the MNS in patients after stroke. We propose two major mechanisms (one involving adult neurogenesis and another involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor) that may underlie the activation, modulation and expe-rience-dependent plasticity in the MNS, for further study on promoting central nerve functional reconstruc-tion and rehabilitation of patients with central nervous system injury.

  3. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  4. Modelling the evolution of human trail systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Keltsch, Joachim; Molnár, Péter

    1997-07-01

    Many human social phenomena, such as cooperation, the growth of settlements, traffic dynamics and pedestrian movement, appear to be accessible to mathematical descriptions that invoke self-organization. Here we develop a model of pedestrian motion to explore the evolution of trails in urban green spaces such as parks. Our aim is to address such questions as what the topological structures of these trail systems are, and whether optimal path systems can be predicted for urban planning. We use an `active walker' model that takes into account pedestrian motion and orientation and the concomitant feedbacks with the surrounding environment. Such models have previously been applied to the study of complex structure formation in physical, chemical and biological systems. We find that our model is able to reproduce many of the observed large-scale spatial features of trail systems.

  5. New simple image overlay system using a tablet PC for pinpoint identification of the appropriate site for anastomosis in peripheral arterial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yasuaki; Hosaka, Akihiro; Kamiuchi, Hiroki; Nie, Jun Xiao; Masamune, Ken; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and utility of a new image overlay system using a tablet PC for patients undergoing peripheral arterial reconstruction. Eleven limbs treated with distal bypass surgery were studied. Three-dimensional images obtained by processing a preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan were superimposed onto the back-camera images of a tablet PC. We used this system to pinpoint a planned distal anastomotic site preoperatively and to make a precise incision directly above it during surgery. We used a branch artery near the distal anastomotic site as a reference point and the accuracy of the system was validated by comparing its results with the intraoperative findings. The precision of the system was also compared with that of a preoperative ultrasonographic examination. Both the image overlay system and ultrasonography (US) accurately identified the target branch artery in all except one limb. In that limb, which had a very small reference branch artery, preoperative US wrongly identified another branch, whereas the image overlay system located the target branch with an error of 10 mm. Our image overlay system was easy to use and allowed us to precisely identify a target artery preoperatively. Therefore, this system could be helpful for pinpointing the most accurate incision site during surgery.

  6. Healing after arterial dilatation with radiofrequency thermal and nonthermal balloon angioplasty systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Barry, K J; Connolly, R J; Nardella, P C; Hayes, L L; Lee, B I; Waller, B F; Becker, G J; Callow, A D

    1993-01-01

    Thermal balloon angioplasty has been proposed as a means of reducing acute and delayed reclosure of arteries after percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty. A radiofrequency (rf) balloon catheter was used to perform thermal balloon angioplasty on canine arteries in vivo. The histologic appearance of rf-treated sites was compared with that of control sites treated by conventional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Acutely, rf-treated sites showed a reduced medial cellularity with preservation of internal elastic lamina except at the transitional zone between thermal injury and normal artery, where localized internal elastic lamina disruption was found. Nonthermal sites showed generalized disruption of internal elastic lamina and normal medial cellularity. Both thermal and nonthermal sites displayed a return of intimal cover commencing at 1 to 2 weeks and completed by 4 weeks. Diffuse myointimal hyperplasia appeared by 2 weeks after injury at breaks in the internal elastic lamina along the nonthermal vessels but was localized to the transitional zone in thermal injury sites. In rf-treated vessels, repopulation of the acellular thermally modified media had commenced by 4 weeks, and by 8 weeks the media was diffusely repopulated by spindle-shaped cells resembling smooth muscle cells lying between and aligned with preserved connective tissue laminae. Overall, the distribution and extent of the proliferative response after rf thermal balloon angioplasty were less than those seen after nonthermal balloon angioplasty. Thermal sites, which underwent reintimalization before medial cells returned, were considerably less prone to the development of myointimal hyperplasia. These results suggest that this modality may have beneficial effects on arterial healing after angioplasty.

  7. A 3-D ultrasound imaging robotic system to detect and quantify lower limb arterial stenoses: in vivo feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Marie-Ange; Merouche, Samir; Allard, Louise; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The degree of stenosis is the most common criterion used to assess the severity of lower limb peripheral arterial disease. Two-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging is the first-line diagnostic method for investigating lesions, but it cannot render a 3-D map of the entire lower limb vascular tree required for therapy planning. We propose a prototype 3-D US imaging robotic system that can potentially reconstruct arteries from the iliac in the lower abdomen down to the popliteal behind the knee. A realistic multi-modal vascular phantom was first conceptualized to evaluate the system's performance. Geometric accuracies were assessed in surface reconstruction and cross-sectional area in comparison to computed tomography angiography (CTA). A mean surface map error of 0.55 mm was recorded for 3-D US vessel representations, and cross-sectional lumen areas were congruent with CTA geometry. In the phantom study, stenotic lesions were properly localized and severe stenoses up to 98.3% were evaluated with -3.6 to 11.8% errors. The feasibility of the in vivo system in reconstructing the normal femoral artery segment of a volunteer and detecting stenoses on a femoral segment of a patient was also investigated and compared with that of CTA. Together, these results encourage future developments to increase the robot's potential to adequately represent lower limb vessels and clinically evaluate stenotic lesions for therapy planning and recurrent non-invasive and non-ionizing follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vascular system of the human spinal cord in the prenatal period: a dye injection and corrosion casting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiliński, J; Litwin, J A; Nowogrodzka-Zagórska, M; Gorczyca, J; Miodoński, A J

    2001-07-01

    The vascularization of the spinal cord was investigated in 50 human fetuses aged from 10 to 28 gestational weeks using dye injection methods and corrosion casting accompanied by scanning electron microscopy. In the investigated period of fetal development, the general vascular architecture of the spinal cord, corresponding to that described postnatally, seemed to be already established. The observed changes included: (1) remodeling of the supplying (extrinsic) arterial branches, (2) transformation of the posterior anastomotic chain into two distinct posterior spinal arteries, and (3) development of the capillary networks in the gray and white matter. The remodeling of the radicular arteries supplying the spinal cord was accompanied by a decrease in their number and transition from regular to irregular distribution (appearance of intersegmental differences in their frequency). The anterior spinal artery and regular array of the central arteries were already present in the youngest fetuses examined, but the final remodeling of the posterior anastomotic chain into two posterior spinal arteries occurred between 15th and 20th week of fetal life indicating that the vascularization of the anterior region of the spinal cord in the investigated period of fetal life was more advanced as compared with that of the posterior region. The capillary network of the gray matter in the youngest fetuses had the form of discrete glomerular plexuses supplied by groups of central arteries and mainly vascularizing the anterior horns. Successively, the plexuses fused to form a continuous system along the anterior columns and the system expanded to fully vascularize the posterior horns. The white matter in the earlier fetal period seemed to be partially avascular, later the density of capillaries vascularizing those areas was still much lower than in the gray matter. The veins showed considerably greater variability than the arteries, as far as their topography and distribution was

  9. Arterial hypoxaemia in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Hillingsø, Jens; Christensen, E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although low arterial oxygen tension (Po2) has been claimed to occur in one to two thirds of patients with cirrhosis, hypoxaemia appears to be rare in clinical practice. AIMS: To assess the frequency of arterial hypoxaemia in cirrhosis in relation to clinical and haemodynamic......%, 96%, 96%, and 93% (NS). So2 was below the lower limit of 92% in 0%, 9%, 7%, and 24% (p arterial carbon dioxide tension, a low systemic vascular...... resistance, and a low indocyanine green clearance (p arterial hypoxaemia in cirrhosis is about 22% in patients without encephalopathy, but it varies from 10-40% depending on the degree of hepatic dysfunction. Arterial hypoxaemia in patients with cirrhosis of differing...

  10. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  11. [The inversion of concepts about biological role of system rennin-angiotensin II- aldosterone and functions of arterial tension as a metabolism regulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N

    2015-02-01

    The phylogenetic theory of general pathology postulates that in physiology and pathology the concepts of biological role of arterial tension had been subjected to inversion. The activation by nephron of synthesis of components rennin-angiotensin II and increasing of aldosterone secretion are directed not to increase arterial tension but to preserve volume of piece of third world ocean privatized by each entity as pool of intercellular medium where all cells continue to live as billions years before. In phylogenetic sense, early organs can't regulate effect of physical factor of regulation of metabolism the late one in phylogenesis of arterial tension. The cause of increasing of arterial tension is the vasomotor center but not the kidneys. The vasomotor center increases arterial tension in the proximal section and further hydrodynamic tension in the distal section of arterial stream and tends to resuscitate function of nephrons, biological function of endoecology and biological reaction of excretion. The arterial tension, besides the main role in biological function of locomotion, is a physical factor of compensation of disorders of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation. In phylogenesis, three levels of metabolism regulation has been developed The specific regulation of biochemical reactions occurs on autocrine level. In paracrin regulated cell cenosises, at distal section of arterial stream, metabolism is regulated by billions of local peristaltic pumps through compensation of biological reaction of endothelium-depended vasodilatation, micro-circulation, effect of humoral mediators and hormonal principles. In vivo, from the level of vasomotor center, metabolism non-specifically and systemic regulates physical factor-arterial tension through sympathetic activation of heart. The arterial tension in proximal section of arterial stream overcomes resistance and physically "forces through" arterioles with disordered micro

  12. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in the context of positive anticardiolipin antibodies and clinically undiagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, M K; Mya, T

    2011-11-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an extremely uncommon condition that can lead to fatal acute myocardial infarction. There have been very few case reports of SCAD in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and even fewer in association with antiphospholipid antibodies - mainly postpartum. This is the first reported case of SCAD in a patient who was confirmed to have SLE and tested positive for anticardiolipin antibody and lupus anticoagulant. This case demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the differential diagnoses of SCAD at presentation. It also highlights the need for further research to explore the link between SLE, antiphospholipid antibodies and SCAD.

  13. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2001-01-01

    ) of 17.8 mmHg, and responded to beta-blocker treatment with a significant reduction in the HVPG (-16%; P controls 1.01 ml/mmHg; P ... systemic vascular resistance increased substantially (1083 versus 1378 dyn x s x cm-5, +27%; P blood pressure (-6%; P blood flow (-22%; P ... with beta-blockers increases small vessel (arteriolar) vascular tone towards the normal level, but does not affect the elevated compliance of the larger arteries in patients with cirrhosis....

  14. A Novel System for Measuring Optical Properties in Arterial Blood of Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castañeda-Miranda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of man–machine communication has been increasing day by day because of the great number of approaches that help to make human life agile or comfortable. Health is one of the aspects that has generated more interest in recent years. The optical technologies are new technical tools that are being implemented for medical diagnosis and for describing various processes occurring within human blood. These techniques have the virtue of being nondestructive; in addition they have the advantage of remote direction by using an in situ technique, with sensitivity capable of studying the properties of the blood through electromagnetic excitation. A device to obtain the electromagnetic spectrum in the blood has being designed and is presented in this work. This device uses a quartz lamp, emitting electromagnetic radiation between 200 nm and 2200 nm. A model for measuring the light attenuation through the blood is used. By applying a control in the frequency domain, a circuit device is designed. This device uses a database in time domain for its subsequent analysis by Fast Fourier Transformation in order to obtain absorption spectra. The acquisition time is of the order of microseconds, and the system is controlled automatically through accessible software from a personal computer.

  15. Complex lower face reconstruction using a combined technique of Estlander flap and subscapular artery system free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamahata, Atsumori; Saitou, Takashi; Beppu, Takeshi; Shirakura, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Akio; Yamaki, Takashi; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    When advanced mandibular carcinoma is resected, the defect may include lip and oral commissure. Free flap insertion is commonly used to reconstruct the lip defect. Although improvements in the oral reconstructive method via free flap use have been reported, functional and aesthetic results of the oral sphincter remain limited. This case report describes two individuals presenting with massive lower face defects, including a lower lip defect and a mandibular bone defect. Reconstruction was accomplished using the Estlander flap and free subscapular system of flaps. In both cases, the free subscapular artery system flap was elevated from the mandibular bone defect and other mucosal defect. The lower lip and oral commissure defect was reconstructed via Estlander flap. Free flaps survived 100% and both cases healed without complication. Patients regained good oral sphincter function with no reports of drooling. Thus, in cases involving massive lower face resection, including that of the lower lip and mandibular bone, this method of reconstruction when combined with lip-switch flap and subscapular artery system flap can prove to be useful.

  16. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems.

  17. Integrating spaceflight human system risk research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2017-10-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of exploration mission success and to maintain crew health, both during exploration missions and long term after return to Earth. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. ;Human System Risks; (Risks) have been identified, and 32 are currently being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  18. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidney can often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury or trauma to ...

  19. A global multiscale mathematical model for the human circulation with emphasis on the venous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lucas O; Toro, Eleuterio F

    2014-07-01

    We present a global, closed-loop, multiscale mathematical model for the human circulation including the arterial system, the venous system, the heart, the pulmonary circulation and the microcirculation. A distinctive feature of our model is the detailed description of the venous system, particularly for intracranial and extracranial veins. Medium to large vessels are described by one-dimensional hyperbolic systems while the rest of the components are described by zero-dimensional models represented by differential-algebraic equations. Robust, high-order accurate numerical methodology is implemented for solving the hyperbolic equations, which are adopted from a recent reformulation that includes variable material properties. Because of the large intersubject variability of the venous system, we perform a patient-specific characterization of major veins of the head and neck using MRI data. Computational results are carefully validated using published data for the arterial system and most regions of the venous system. For head and neck veins, validation is carried out through a detailed comparison of simulation results against patient-specific phase-contrast MRI flow quantification data. A merit of our model is its global, closed-loop character; the imposition of highly artificial boundary conditions is avoided. Applications in mind include a vast range of medical conditions. Of particular interest is the study of some neurodegenerative diseases, whose venous haemodynamic connection has recently been identified by medical researchers.

  20. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gestrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling.

  1. The experience of the illness and of the treatment for the person with systemic arterial hypertension: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to interpret the meanings of the experience of the condition and of the treatment among people with arterial hypertension. METHOD: the authors adopted the frames of reference of interpretive and medical anthropology and of the ethnographic method. 22 people with arterial hypertension, and 10 Family Health Strategy health workers, all from Minas Gerais, participated. The authors used interviews, participant observation, focus groups, field diaries and analysis of medical records. Ethical precepts were respected. RESULTS: two nuclei of meaning emerged: "The condition as an expression of way of living", and "The perspective of the cure of the condition". Nervous problems represent the nosological and symptomatic categories, caused by the urban way of living. The participants are supported by the belief of the curing of the problem. The family, spirituality and religion constitute social support networks. The therapeutic routes interpenetrate for the cure of the problem. The 'folk' health subsystem constitutes an important route because it provides better well-being and remission of the symptoms. CONCLUSION: the gaps evidenced between the points of view of the health professionals and the interviewees allow one to re-think the praxis so as to provide comprehensive, contextualized and humanized care, which encourages the people's potential for living, for empowerment, and for self-care.

  2. Model of the Human Sleep Wake System

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A model and analysis of the human sleep/wake system is presented. The model is derived using the known neuronal groups, and their various projections, involved with sleep and wake. Inherent in the derivation is the existence of a slow time scale associated with homeostatic regulation, and a faster time scale associated with the dynamics within the sleep phase. A significant feature of the model is that it does not contain a periodic forcing term, common in other models, reflecting the fact that sleep/wake is not dependent upon a diurnal stimulus. Once derived, the model is analyzed using a linearized stability analysis. We then use experimental data from normal sleep-wake systems and orexin knockout systems to verify the physiological validity of the equations.

  3. Effect of systemic vein chemotherapy and internal iliac arterial embolization infusion chemotherapy on angiogenesis and malignant degree of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of systemic vein chemotherapy and internal iliac arterial chemoembolization on angiogenesis and malignant degree of cervical cancer.Methods: A total of 108 cases of patients with middle and advanced cervical cancer were included in the research, and the time range of the research was from February 2014 to December 2015. According to different means of chemotherapy, included patients were divided into observation group 54 cases and control group 54 cases, control group received systemic vein chemotherapy, observation group received internal iliac arterial infusion chemotherapy and embolization treatment, and then differences in the levels of angiogenesis-related indicators, blood flow parameters within tumor, serum illness-related indicators, cervical tumor tissue proliferation-related indicators,etc. were compared between two groups after treatment.Results:Serum VEGFR-2, HIF-1α, vWF and Lam values of observation group after chemotherapy were lower than those of control group; PI, VI, FI, VFI and Vmax values of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group while RI value was higher than that of control group; serum SCC-Ag, TK1, HE4, CYFRA21-1, IGF-Ⅱ and Gal-9 values of observation group after chemotherapy were lower than those of control group; miR-26b, SCD-1, Cyclin D1 and TLR4 protein expression levels in tumor tissue of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group while miR-99b protein expression level was higher than that of control group.Conclusions: Internal iliac arterial infusion chemotherapy and embolization can significantly decrease tumor angiogenesis and inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and it is a perfect means of interventional chemotherapy.

  4. Numerical Models of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity: Brain Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; David, Tim

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is presented to model the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Models required for CFD simulation relevant to major hemodynamic issues are introduced such as non-Newtonian flow models governed by red blood cells, a model for arterial wall motion due to fluid-wall interactions, a vascular bed model for outflow boundary conditions, and a model for auto-regulation mechanism. The three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with these models are solved iteratively using the pseudocompressibility method and dual time stepping. Moving wall boundary conditions from the first-order fluid-wall interaction model are used to study the influence of arterial wall distensibility on flow patterns and wall shear stresses during the heart pulse. A vascular bed modeling utilizing the analogy with electric circuits is coupled with an auto-regulation algorithm for multiple outflow boundaries. For the treatment of complex geometry, a chimera overset grid technique is adopted to obtain connectivity between arterial branches. For code validation, computed results are compared with experimental data for steady and unsteady non-Newtonian flows. Good agreement is obtained for both cases. In sin-type Gravity Benchmark Problems, gravity source terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effect of gravitational variation on the human circulatory system. This computational approach is then applied to localized blood flows through a realistic carotid bifurcation and two Circle of Willis models, one using an idealized geometry and the other model using an anatomical data set. A three- dimensional anatomical Circle of Willis configuration is reconstructed from human-specific magnetic resonance images using an image segmentation method. The blood flow through these Circle of Willis models is simulated to provide means for studying gravitational effects on the brain

  5. Research on Human-Robot Joint System for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The lunar exploration in China is in progress. In order to reduce human workload and costs, and conduct researches more effectively and efficiently, human-robot joint systems are necessary for lunar exploration. The concept of human-robot joint system for lunar exploration is studied in this paper. The possible collaborative ways between human and robots and the collaborative activities which can be conducted for lunar exploration are discussed. Moreover, the preliminary configuration of a human-robot joint system is presented.

  6. The possibility of a veno-arterial bypass system using the Abiomed BVS 5000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezai, Akira; Shiono, Motomi; Nakata, Kin-Ichi; Hata, Mitsumasa; Taoka, Makoto; Negishi, Nanao; Sezai, Yukiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Effect of Abiomed BVS 5000 (Cardiovascular Inc., Danvers, MA, U.S.A) has been reported for mechanical assist circulation in cardiogenic shock. However, this pump is generally used as a ventricular assist device, not as a device for veno-arterial bypass. Therefore, we evaluated its effectiveness through an experiment. The left anterior descending branch of pigs' heart was ligated to prepare a model of acute myocardial infarction, and after the onset of cardiogenic shock, circulation was initially supported for 30 min using the BVS 5000, followed by support for another 30 min using a Gyro pump (Gyro, Kyocera, Inc., Kyoto, Japan). Subsequently, circulation was additionally supported for 30 min using both a Gyro and an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) (Tokai Medical Inc., Aichi, Japan) (Gyro + IABP). Circulation was supported in each group at 30-min intervals in the reversed order of assisted circulation. Although the mean aortic pressure, pump flow, and total flow were not significantly different among the three setups, the pulse pressure was 48.2 +/- 3.3, 12.2 +/- 2.2, and 29.9 +/- 3.8 mm Hg in Abiomed, Gyro, and Gyro + IABP, respectively. Although neither coronary arterial nor myocardial blood flow showed significant differences among the three setups, the renal arterial blood flow was significantly larger in BVS 5000 compared to the other two setups. In this study, we selected an alpha-cube (Platium Cube NCVC 6000, Edwards Research Medical Inc., Salt Lake City, UT, U.S.A.), which is considered as an oxygenator that produces minimum pressure loss. Therefore, the pulsatile flow we obtained with the Abiomed was maintained even after we started using the oxygenator. The pulsatile flow had positive effects on renal circulation and peripheral circulation.

  7. Relaxing Responses to Hydrogen Peroxide and Nitric Oxide in Human Pericardial Resistance Arteries Stimulated with Endothelin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurgans, Thomas M; Bloksgaard, Maria; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon

    2017-01-01

    relaxing effects of NO and increases those of H2 O2 in resistance artery smooth muscle of patients with cardiovascular disease. Arterial segments, dissected from the parietal pericardium of 39 cardiothoracic surgery patients, were studied by myography during amplitude-matched contractions induced by K......(+) , the TXA2 analogue U46619 or ET-1. Effects of the NO-donor Na-nitroprusside (SNP) and of exogenous H2 O2 were recorded in absence and presence of inhibitors of cyclooxygenases, NO-synthases and small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. During contractions induced by either...... significant in presence of inhibitors of mechanisms of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. In resistance arteries from patients with cardiovascular disease, ET-1 does not selectively modify smooth muscle relaxing responses to NO or H2 O2 . Furthermore, the candidate endothelium-derived relaxing factor H2 O2...

  8. Dental orthopantomogram biometrics system for human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Bhargava, Darpan; Deshpande, Ashwini

    2013-07-01

    Fingerprinting is the most widely accepted method of identification of people. But in cases of disfigured, decomposed, burnt or fragmented bodies, it is of limited value. Teeth and dental restorations on the other hand are extremely resistant to destruction by fire. They retain a number of their original characteristics, which are often unique and hence offer a possibility of rather accurate and legally acceptable identification of such remains. This study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of orthopantomography for human identification and propose a coding system for orthopantomogram (OPG), which can be utilized as an identification tool in forensic sciences.

  9. Echocardiography may help detect pulmonary vasculopathy in the early stages of pulmonary artery hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Walter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH in patients with systemic sclerosis is associated with a poor prognosis, but this can be improved by early disease detection. Abnormal pulmonary and cardiac function can be detected early by means of echocardiography, whereas right heart catheterization is usually performed later. Objectives The purpose of this prospective study was to detect early the presence of pulmonary artery vasculopathy in patients with verified systemic sclerosis without significant pulmonary fibrosis, normal lung volumes and a mildly reduced lung diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO. Methods Nineteen consecutive female NYHA class I-II patients with scleroderma and a PAPs of 2. They all underwent complete Doppler echocardiography, CPET, a pulmonary ventilation test (carbon monoxide lung diffusion, DLCO, HRCT. To investigate PAH by means of complete resting Doppler echocardiography estimates of systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAPs derived from tr icuspid regurgitation, mean PAP derived from pulmonary regurgitation, pulmonary vessel resistance (PVR derived from the acceleration time of the pulmonary outflow tract (ACTpo, and right ventricular function derived from tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE. Right heart catheterisation was conducted only, if pulmonary hypertension was suggested by echocardiography and an abnormal ventilator test. The data are given as mean values ± SD, unless otherwise stated. The correlations between the variables were analysed using Pearson's r coefficient, and the predictive value of the variables was calculated using linear regression analysis. A p value of > 0.05 was considered significant. Results Right heart catheterization detected PAH in 15/19 patients; mean PAP was 30.5 mm/Hg and RVP 3.6 UW. Coronary angiography of the patients aged more than 55 years showed some evidence of significant coronary artery disease. Echocardiography showed high systolic PAP

  10. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  11. Intracellular Acid-extruding regulators and the effect of lipopolysaccharide in cultured human renal artery smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hurng Loh

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of the intracellular pH (pHi in mammalian cells plays a pivotal role in maintaining cell function. Thus far, the housekeeping Na(+-H(+ exchanger (NHE and the Na(+-HCO3(- co-transporter (NBC have been confirmed in many mammalian cells as major acid extruders. However, the role of acid-extruding regulators in human renal artery smooth muscle cells (HRASMCs remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced vascular occlusion is associated with the apoptosis, activating calpain and increased [Ca(2+]i that are related to NHE1 activity in endothelia cells. This study determines the acid-extruding mechanisms and the effect of LPS on the resting pHi and active acid extruders in cultured HRASMCs. The mechanism of pHi recovery from intracellular acidosis (induced by NH4Cl-prepulse is determined using BCECF-fluorescence in cultured HRASMCs. It is seen that (a the resting pHi is 7.19 ± 0.03 and 7.10 ± 0.02 for HEPES- and CO2/HCO3(-- buffered solution, respectively; (b apart from the housekeeping NHE1, another Na(+-coupled HCO3(- transporter i.e. NBC, functionally co-exists to achieve acid-equivalent extrusion; (c three different isoforms of NBC: NBCn1 (SLC4A7; electroneutral, NBCe1 (SLC4A4; electrogenic and NBCe2 (SLC4A5, are detected in protein/mRNA level; and (d pHi and NHE protein expression/activity are significantly increased by LPS, in both a dose- and time- dependent manner, but NBCs protein expression is not. In conclusion, it is demonstrated, for the first time, that four pHi acid-extruding regulators: NHE1, NBCn1, NBCe1 and NBCe2, co-exist in cultured HRASMCs. LPS also increases cellular growth, pHi and NHE in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  12. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic vascular resistance, high arterial compliance, increased cardiac output, secondary activation of counter-regulatory systems (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, release of...

  13. Construction and histological analysis of a 3D human arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum using a layer-by-layer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Fumiaki; Narita, Hirokazu; Hiura, Ayami; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-03-01

    There is considerable global demand for three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues which mimic our native organs and tissues for use as in vitro drug screening systems and in regenerative medicine. In particular, there has been an increasing number of patients who suffer from arterial diseases such as arteriosclerosis. As such, in vitro 3D arterial wall models that can evaluate the effects of novel medicines and a novel artificial graft for the treatment are required. In our previous study, we reported the rapid construction of 3D tissues by employing a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and revealed their potential applications in the pharmaceutical fields and tissue engineering. In this study, we successfully constructed a 3D arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum by employing a LbL technique for the first time. The cells were coated with extracellular matrix nanofilms and seeded into a culture insert using a cell accumulation method. This model had a three-layered hierarchical structure: a fibroblast layer, a smooth muscle layer, and an endothelial layer, which resembled the native arterial wall. Our method could introduce vasa vasorum into a fibroblast layer in vitro and the 3D arterial wall model showed barrier function which was evaluated by immunostaining and transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Furthermore, electron microscopy observations revealed that the vasa vasorum was composed of single-layered endothelial cells, and the endothelial tubes were surrounded by the basal lamina, which are known to promote maturation and stabilization in native blood capillaries. These models should be useful for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 814-823, 2017.

  14. Human biomonitoring system in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerná, Milena; Spĕvácková, Vĕra; Batáriová, Andrea; Smíd, Jirí; Cejchanová, Mája; Ocadlíková, Dana; Bavorová, Hana; Benes, Bohuslav; Kubínová, Růzena

    2007-05-01

    The human biomonitoring (HBM) is an integral part of Environmental Health Monitoring System in the Czech Republic since 1994. Selected biomarkers of the internal dose (heavy metals, PCBs) and cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes as a biomarker of the exposure/effect to/of environmental genotoxic factors are systematically followed up in the blood and urine of adults (blood donors), in children aged 8 to 10 years, and in the breast milk of nursing mothers. Selected outputs documented the declining trend of blood lead levels, with the recent reference value of 80 mg/l for men, and the rising trend of blood selenium levels in adults, but not in children. PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in human milk show a long-term downward trend, but still higher than in neighbouring countries. The frequency of aberrant cells revealed a downward trend, but the increase obtained in the last monitored period needs to be explained. Further HBM activities are required to demonstrate the corresponding trends and to reduce human exposure and health risks.

  15. Arterial reconstruction after mangled extremity: injury severity scoring systems are not predictive of limb salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharawy, Mohamed Amin

    2005-01-01

    The Vascular Unit at Suez Canal University Hospital in Egypt covers a wide area with high rates of severe injuries. This is a prospective study of mangled extremities to identify risk factors associated with limb loss in these patients. Between December 2000 and August 2003, a prospective study on all patients with arterial injuries in mangled extremities was undertaken. All patients were scored using the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and the Mangled Extremity Severity Index (MESI). During this period, arterial reconstruction was performed in 62 patients. Primary patency, secondary patency, and limb salvage rates were 81%, 85.5%, and 93.5%, respectively. The only factor affecting limb salvage (statistical trend) was the site of trauma (upper limb 100% vs lower limb 89%; p = .08%). There was no significant effect related to the mechanism of trauma (blunt 90% vs stab 100%; p = .125), MESS ( 7, 91%; p = .22), and MESI ( 20, 90.5%; p = .154). Upper limb injuries were the least likely to lead to amputation. We recommend that all injuries, whatever their score, should be surgically explored before treatment decisions are made.

  16. Gaming the System: Developing an Educational Game for Securing Principles of Arterial Blood Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Cory Ann; Warren, Jonah; Glendon, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development process for creating a digital educational mini game prototype designed to provide practice opportunities for learning fundamental principles of arterial blood gases. Mini games generally take less than an hour to play and focus on specific subject matter. An interdisciplinary team of faculty from two universities mentored student game developers to design a digital educational mini game prototype. Sixteen accelerated bachelor of science in nursing students collaborated with game development students and playtested the game prototype during the last semester of their senior year in nursing school. Playtesting is a form of feedback that supports an iterative design process that is critical to game development. A 10-question survey was coupled with group discussions addressing five broad themes of an archetypical digital educational mini game to yield feedback on game design, play, and content. Four rounds of playtesting and incorporating feedback supported the iterative process. Accelerated bachelor of science in nursing student playtester feedback suggests that the digital educational mini game prototype has potential for offering an engaging, playful game experience that will support securing the fundamental principles of arterial blood gases. Next steps are to test the digital educational mini game for teaching and learning effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Deep Phenotyping of Systemic Arterial Hemodynamics in HFpEF (Part 1): Physiologic and Technical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio A

    2017-06-01

    A better understanding of the pathophysiology of heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF) is important. Detailed phenotyping of pulsatile hemodynamics has provided important insights into the pathophysiology of left ventricular remodeling and fibrosis, diastolic dysfunction, microvascular disease, and impaired oxygen delivery to peripheral skeletal muscle, all of which contribute to exercise intolerance, the cardinal feature of HFpEF. Furthermore, arterial pulsatile hemodynamic mechanisms likely contribute to the frequent presence of comorbidities, such as renal failure and dementia, in this population. Our therapeutic approach to HFpEF can be enhanced by clinical phenotyping tools with the potential to "segment" this population into relevant pathophysiologic categories or to identify individuals exhibiting prominent specific abnormalities that can be targeted by pharmacologic interventions. This review describes relevant technical and physiologic aspects regarding the deep phenotyping of arterial hemodynamics in HFpEF. In an accompanying review, the potential of this approach to enhance our clinical and therapeutic approach to HFpEF is discussed.

  18. Association of cytokines with endothelium dependent flow mediated vasodilation (FMD of systemic arteries in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazak Ilkay

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study was to elucidate the relation between localised inflammatory heart disease and endothelial dysfunction in the peripheral circulation, considering circulating cytokines as a potential link. Methods In 38 patients with non-ischemic heart disease, myocardial biopsies were examined for myocardial inflammation (immunohistology and virus persistence (PCR. Cytokines (sIL-4, IFN-g, IFN-b, IFN-a, sIL-12p7, TNF-a were measured by ELISA in venous serum. Endothelial function of the radial artery was examined by ultrasound, measuring diameter changes in response to reactive hyperemia (FMD, compared to glyceroltrinitrate (GTN-MD. Patients with EF Results Age 44 ± 14 years, 19 male, 19 female, EF 63.5[16]%. FMD 4.38 [4.82]%. 30 patients had myocardial inflammation (8 not, 23 virus persistence (15 not. FMD correlated significantly with sIL-12p7 (p = 0.024, r = -0.365, but not with other cytokines. sIL-12p7 levels were significantly higher in patients with severely impaired FMD (n = 17, compared with normal FMD (n = 21: 10.70 [10.72] vs. 4.33 [7.81] pg/ml (p = 0.002. Endothelium independent vasodilation (GTN-MD 23.67 [8.21]% was not impaired. Conclusion Endothelial dysfunction of peripheral arteries in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy is associated with elevated serum concentrations of sIL-12p7, but not of other cytokines. Circulating sIL-12p7 may partly explain, that endothelial dysfunction is not restricted to the coronary circulation, but involves systemic arteries.

  19. Universal growth constraints of human systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Scale independence is a ubiquitous feature of complex systems which implies a highly skewed distribution of resources with no characteristic scale. Research has long focused on why systems as varied as protein networks, evolution and stock actions all feature scale independence. Assuming that they simply do, we focus here on describing exactly how this behavior emerges. We show that growing towards scale independence implies strict constraints: the first is the well-known preferential attachment principle and the second is a new form of temporal scaling. These constraints pave a precise evolution path, such that an instantaneous snapshot of a distribution is enough to reconstruct its past and to predict its future. We validate our approach on diverse spheres of human activities ranging from scientific and artistic productivity, to sexual relations and online traffic.

  20. Impact of Personal Characteristics and Technical Factors on Quantification of Sodium 18F-Fluoride Uptake in Human Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Thomassen, Anders; de Jong, Pim A

    2015-01-01

    Sodium (18)F-fluoride ((18)F-NaF) PET/CT imaging is a promising imaging technique for assessment of atherosclerosis, but is hampered by a lack of validated quantification protocols. Both personal characteristics and technical factors can affect quantification of arterial (18)F-NaF uptake. This st...

  1. BEHAVIORAL STATES AND DOPPLER VELOCIMETRY OF THE RENAL-ARTERY IN THE NEAR-TERM HUMAN FETUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANDER, M; AARNOUDSE, JG; Oosterhof, H.

    Transition of fetal behavioural state IF to 2F coincides with cardiovascular changes measured by Doppler velocimetry e.g. a decrease in pulsatility index (PI) in the internal carotid arteries and in the descending aorta, indicating redistribution of blood flow. Recently, we reported a considerable

  2. The deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is related to phenotypic differences in human arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, H; Pinto, YM; Rooks, G; Grandjean, JG; Schunkert, H; vanGilst, WH

    We hypothesized that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism may be related to arterial phenotypic differences that could explain the adverse effects of deletion polymorphism. Accordingly, contractile responses to angiotensin I and II (0.1 nmol.l(-1)-1 mu mol.l(-1)),

  3. A dynamic human health risk assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Umesh; Singh, Gurmit; Pant, A B

    2012-05-01

    An online human health risk assessment system (OHHRAS) has been designed and developed in the form of a prototype database-driven system and made available for the population of India through a website - www.healthriskindia.in. OHHRAS provide the three utilities, that is, health survey, health status, and bio-calculators. The first utility health survey is functional on the basis of database being developed dynamically and gives the desired output to the user on the basis of input criteria entered into the system; the second utility health status is providing the output on the basis of dynamic questionnaire and ticked (selected) answers and generates the health status reports based on multiple matches set as per advise of medical experts and the third utility bio-calculators are very useful for the scientists/researchers as online statistical analysis tool that gives more accuracy and save the time of user. The whole system and database-driven website has been designed and developed by using the software (mainly are PHP, My-SQL, Deamweaver, C++ etc.) and made available publically through a database-driven website (www.healthriskindia.in), which are very useful for researchers, academia, students, and general masses of all sect